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Sample records for analysis-hydride generation-gas phase

  1. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

    2003-03-01

    Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

  2. Advanced Combustion Systems for Next Generation Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Haynes; Jonathan Janssen; Craig Russell; Marcus Huffman

    2006-01-01

    Next generation turbine power plants will require high efficiency gas turbines with higher pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures than currently available. These increases in gas turbine cycle conditions will tend to increase NOx emissions. As the desire for higher efficiency drives pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures ever higher, gas turbines equipped with both lean premixed combustors and selective catalytic reduction after treatment eventually will be unable to meet the new emission goals of sub-3 ppm NOx. New gas turbine combustors are needed with lower emissions than the current state-of-the-art lean premixed combustors. In this program an advanced combustion system for the next generation of gas turbines is being developed with the goal of reducing combustor NOx emissions by 50% below the state-of-the-art. Dry Low NOx (DLN) technology is the current leader in NOx emission technology, guaranteeing 9 ppm NOx emissions for heavy duty F class gas turbines. This development program is directed at exploring advanced concepts which hold promise for meeting the low emissions targets. The trapped vortex combustor is an advanced concept in combustor design. It has been studied widely for aircraft engine applications because it has demonstrated the ability to maintain a stable flame over a wide range of fuel flow rates. Additionally, it has shown significantly lower NOx emission than a typical aircraft engine combustor and with low CO at the same time. The rapid CO burnout and low NOx production of this combustor made it a strong candidate for investigation. Incremental improvements to the DLN technology have not brought the dramatic improvements that are targeted in this program. A revolutionary combustor design is being explored because it captures many of the critical features needed to significantly reduce emissions. Experimental measurements of the combustor performance at atmospheric conditions were completed in the first phase of the program

  3. Construction of power-generating gas turbine units with the use of efficient thermal schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolenko, D. I.; Gusev, A. A.; Zhuravlev, Yu. I.; Lesnichenko, A. Ya.; Tsai, S. S.

    2008-08-01

    The design features of GTE-30 and GTE-50 power-generating gas turbines, the basic thermal circuit of a PGU-90 (150) combined-cycle plant, and a layout solution for a cogeneration station built around a gas-turbine unit are considered.

  4. Development of the Next Generation Gas Trap for the Space Station Internal Thermal Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Spelbring, Chris; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Design goals are to meet or exceed the current requirements to (1) include greater operating ranges and conditions, (2) eliminate reliance on the current hydrophilic tube fabrication process, and (3) increase operational life and tolerance to particulate and microbial growth fouling. In addition, the next generation gas trap will essentially be a 'dropin" design such that no modifications to the ITCS pump package assembly (PPA) will be required, and the implementation of the new design will not affect changes to the ITCS operational conditions, interfaces, or software. This paper will present the initial membrane module design and development work which has included (1) a trade study among several conceptual designs, (2) performance modeling of a hydrophobic-only design, and (3) small-scale development test data for the hydrophobic-only design. Testing has shown that the hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal.

  5. Effects of Surfactant Contamination on the Next Generation Gas Trap for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2004-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gas bubbles from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Previous testing has shown that a hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal in clean deionized water. This paper presents results of testing to evaluate the effects of surfactant contamination on the steady-state performance of the hydrophobic-only design.

  6. Phases and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In discussing phase transitions, the first thing that we have to do is to define a phase. This is a concept from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, where a phase is defined as a homogeneous system. As a simple example, let us consider instant coffee. This consists of coffee powder dissolved in water, and after stirring it we have a homogeneous mixture, i.e., a single phase. If we add to a cup of coffee a spoonful of sugar and stir it well, we still have a single phase -- sweet coffee. However, if we add ten spoonfuls of sugar, then the contents of the cup will no longer be homogeneous, but rather a mixture of two homogeneous systems or phases, sweet liquid coffee on top and coffee-flavored wet sugar at the bottom...

  7. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE (NGGT) SYSTEMS STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-05

    Building upon the 1999 AD Little Study, an expanded market analysis was performed by GE Power Systems in 2001 to quantify the potential demand for an NGGT product. This analysis concluded that improvements to the US energy situation might be best served in the near/mid term (2002-2009) by a ''Technology-Focused'' program rather than a specific ''Product-Focused'' program. Within this new program focus, GEPS performed a parametric screening study of options in the three broad candidate categories of gas turbines: aero-derivative, heavy duty, and a potential hybrid combining components of the other two categories. GEPS's goal was to determine the best candidate systems that could achieve the DOE PRDA expectations and GEPS's internal design criteria in the period specified for initial product introduction, circa 2005. Performance feasibility studies were conducted on candidate systems selected in the screening task, and critical technology areas were identified where further development would be required to meet the program goals. DOE PRDA operating parameters were found to be achievable by 2005 through evolutionary technology. As a result, the study was re-directed toward technology enhancements for interim product introductions and advanced/revolutionary technology for potential NGGT product configurations. Candidate technologies were identified, both evolutionary and revolutionary, with a potential for possible development products via growth step improvements. Benefits were analyzed from two perspectives: (1) What would be the attributes of the top candidate system assuming the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity in 2009/2010; and (2) What would be the expected level of public benefit, assuming relevant technologies were incorporated into existing new and current field products as they became available. Candidate systems incorporating these technologies were assessed as to how they could serve multiple applications, both in terms of incorporation of technology into current products, as well as to an NGGT product. In summary, potential program costs are shown for development of the candidate systems along with the importance of future DOE enabling participation. Three main conclusions have been established via this study: (1) Rapid recent changes within the power generation regulatory environment and the resulting ''bubble'' of gas turbine orders has altered the timing and relative significance associated with the conclusions of the ADL study upon which the original DOE NGGT solicitation was based. (2) Assuming that the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity circa 2010, the top candidate system that meets or exceeds the DOE PRDA requirements was determined to be a hybrid aero-derivative/heavy duty concept. (3) An investment by DOE of approximately $23MM/year to develop NGGT technologies near/mid term for validation and migration into a reasonable fraction of the installed base of GE F-class products could be leveraged into $1.2B Public Benefit, with greatest benefits resulting from RAM improvements. In addition to the monetary Public Benefit, there is also significant benefit in terms of reduced energy consumption, and reduced power plant land usage.

  8. Moon Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    When teaching Moon phases, the focus seems to be on the sequence of Moon phases and, in some grade levels, how Moon phases occur. Either focus can sometimes be a challenge, especially without the use of models and observations of the Moon. In this month's column, the author describes some of the lessons that he uses to teach the phases of the Moon…

  9. PHASE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1959-09-01

    A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

  10. Venus Phasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    1997-01-01

    Presents a science activity designed to introduce students to the geocentric and heliocentric models of the universe. Helps students discover why phase changes on Venus knocked Earth out of the center of the universe. (DKM)

  11. Phase Won.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocher, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Describes ten steps involved in successful renovation of a college recreation center. They are as follows: hire the right architect, be realistic about costs, devise a plan, do a mental walk through, approach the renovation in phases, communicate to users, expect lost revenue and displacement issues, continue to communicate with architects and…

  12. Transition of Bery Phase and Pancharatnam Phase and Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guolan; Pan, Hui; Wang, Zisheng

    2016-07-01

    Berry Phase and time-dependent Pancharatnam phase are investigated for nuclear spin polarization in a liquid by a rotation magnetic field, where two-state mixture effect is exactly included in the geometric phases. We find that when the system of nuclear spin polarization is in the unpolarized state, the transitive phenomena of both Berry phase and Pancharatnam phase are taken place. For the polarized system, in contrast, such a transition is not taken place. It is obvious that the transitions of geometric phase correspond to the phase change of physical system.

  13. Unfolding wrapped phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2015-11-01

    Phase unwrapping is the final step in phase extraction methods, which consists of recovering the correct phase from the wrapped phase by removing 2π discontinuities. The difference between the correct phase and the wrapped phase is the phase wrapping map. A new method for phase unwrapping is presented by identifying the phase wrapping map as a sequence of binary valued intermediate wrapping maps and iteratively removing them producing the correct phase by phase-wrapped unfolding. A path-following algorithm is presented to exemplify the phase wrapped unfolding method.

  14. Four-phase differential phase shift resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.; Wallingford, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Two systems have been developed to resolve phase uncertainty without transmitting reference signals. In both methods signal is impressed on carrier as differential, rather than absolute, phase shift. At the receiver four-phase demodulation and logic process unambiguously resolves differential phase shift of input carrier.

  15. Development of a gas phase source for perfluoroalkyl acids to examine atmospheric sampling methods.

    PubMed

    MacInnis, John J; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Young, Cora J

    2016-06-21

    An inability to produce environmentally relevant gaseous mixing ratios of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), ubiquitous global contaminants, limits the analytical reliability of atmospheric chemists to make accurate gas and particulate measurements that are demonstrably free of interferences due to sampling artefacts. A gas phase source for PFAAs based on the acid displacement mechanism using perfluoropropionate (PFPrA), perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) has been constructed. The displacement efficiency of gas phase perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) is inversely related to chain length. Decreasing displacement efficiencies for PFPrA, PFBA, PFHxA, and PFOA were 90% ± 20%, 40% ± 10%, 40% ± 10%, 9% ± 4%, respectively. Generating detectable amounts of gas phase perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) was not possible. It is likely that lower vapour pressure and much higher acidity play a role in this lack of emission. PFCA emission rates were not elevated by increasing relative humidity (25%-75%), nor flow rate of carrier gas from 33-111 sccm. Overall, reproducible gaseous production of PFCAs was within the error of the production of hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a displacing acid (±20%) and was accomplished using a dry nitrogen flow of 33 ± 2 sccm. A reproducible mass emission rate of 0.97 ± 0.10 ng min(-1) (n = 8) was observed for PFBA. This is equivalent to an atmospheric mixing ratio of 12 ppmv, which is easily diluted to environmentally relevant mixing ratios of PFBA. Conversely, generating gas phase perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) by sublimating the solid acid under the same conditions produced a mass emission rate of 2800 ng min(-1), which is equivalent to a mixing ratio of 18 ppthv and over a million times higher than suspected atmospheric levels. Thus, for analytical certification of atmospheric sampling methods, generating gas phase standards for PFCAs is best accomplished using acid displacement under dry conditions

  16. New-generation gas turbine helping brewery lighten energy costs

    SciTech Connect

    Brezonick, M.

    1994-10-01

    In nearly any manufacturing industry, the loss of electrical power can have a severe impact on the manufacturing process. The case of Labatt's Ontario Breweries in particular, the loss of electrical service puts a crimp in the brewmaster's art by forcing the company to dump large quantities of it's Labatt's Blue. To solve the problem, the company has installed a gas-turbine-drive cogeneration system to guard against brownout. The new 501-KB7 was developed from the well-established 501-KB5 turbine. It has improved power output over the 501-KB7 design, up from 4025 to 5225 kw, a higher 13.5:1 pressure ratio, and a 32% increased in airflow (20.4 kg/s). The Labatt's installation which became operational in 1993 reduced the Breweries energy cost because of 501-KB7 turbine's higher energy output. 3 figs.

  17. Phase Coexistence in a Dynamic Phase Diagram.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luigi; Coppola, Luigi; Balog, Sandor; Mortensen, Kell; Ranieri, Giuseppe A; Olsson, Ulf

    2015-08-01

    Metastability and phase coexistence are important concepts in colloidal science. Typically, the phase diagram of colloidal systems is considered at the equilibrium without the presence of an external field. However, several studies have reported phase transition under mechanical deformation. The reason behind phase coexistence under shear flow is not fully understood. Here, multilamellar vesicle (MLV)-to-sponge (L3 ) and MLV-to-Lα transitions upon increasing temperature are detected using flow small-angle neutron scattering techniques. Coexistence of Lα and MLV phases at 40 °C under shear flow is detected by using flow NMR spectroscopy. The unusual rheological behavior observed by studying the lamellar phase of a non-ionic surfactant is explained using (2) H NMR and diffusion flow NMR spectroscopy with the coexistence of planar lamellar-multilamellar vesicles. Moreover, a dynamic phase diagram over a wide range of temperatures is proposed. PMID:26083451

  18. Implications of Low Volatility SOA and Gas-Phase Fragmentation Reactions on SOA Loadings and their Spatial and Temporal Evolution in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Easter, Richard C.; Beranek, Josef; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2013-04-27

    Recent laboratory and field measurements by a number of groups show that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) evaporates orders of magnitude slower than traditional models assume. In addition, chemical transport models using volatility basis set (VBS) SOA schemes neglect gas-phase fragmentation reactions, which are known to be extremely important. In this work, we present modeling studies to investigate the implications of non-evaporating SOA and gas-phase fragmentation reactions. Using the 3-D chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, we show that previous parameterizations, which neglect fragmentation during multi-generational gas-phase chemistry of semi-volatile/inter-mediate volatility organics ("aging SIVOC"), significantly over-predict SOA as compared to aircraft measurements downwind of Mexico City. In sharp contrast, the revised models, which include gas-phase fragmentation, show much better agreement with measurements downwind of Mexico City. We also demonstrate complex differences in spatial SOA distributions when we transform SOA to non-volatile secondary organic aerosol (NVSOA) to account for experimental observations. Using a simple box model, we show that for same amount of SOA precursors, earlier models that do not employ multi-generation gas-phase chemistry of precursors ("non-aging SIVOC"), produce orders of magnitude lower SOA than "aging SIVOC" parameterizations both with and without fragmentation. In addition, traditional absorptive partitioning models predict almost complete SOA evaporation at farther downwind locations for both "non-aging SIVOC" and "aging SIVOC" with fragmentation. In contrast, in our revised approach, SOA transformed to NVSOA implies significantly higher background concentrations as it remains in particle phase even under highly dilute conditions. This work has significant implications on understanding the role of multi-generational chemistry and NVSOA formation on SOA evolution in the atmosphere.

  19. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    SciTech Connect

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-06-01

    The idea of attacking the phase problem by crowdsourcing is introduced. Using an interactive, multi-player, web-based system, participants work simultaneously to select phase sets that correspond to better electron-density maps in order to solve low-resolution phasing problems. The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of ‘individuals’, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it

  20. Non-equilibrium phases and phase diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Massalski, T.B.; Rizzo, H.F.

    1988-03-01

    In this paper we consider the degree of usefulness of the phase diagram and the related thermodynamics in predicting and understanding the formation of metastable phases during quenching, or during low-temperature solid-state interdiffusion, or during co-deposition. Recent research has demonstrated that many of such metastable phases are formed because the more stable intermediate phases that are favored thermodynamically are nevertheless bypassed kinetically. The kinetic elimination of intermediate phases provides conditions where a metastable equilibrium can be established at low temperatures between the supercooled liquid and the terminal solid solutions, leading to metastable partitioned two-phase regions. Alternatively, the range of the metastable phases may be governed by the T/sub 0/ principle related to the crossover of the respective free energy curves, or may be controlled mainly by kinetic considerations. Which particular thermodynamic conditions apply appears to depend on the initial form of the phase diagram and the specific technique used. The occurrence of massive transformations also is discussed. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Map-likelihood phasing

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2001-01-01

    The recently developed technique of maximum-likelihood density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ▶), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] allows a calculation of phase probabilities based on the likelihood of the electron-density map to be carried out separately from the calculation of any prior phase probabilities. Here, it is shown that phase-probability distributions calculated from the map-likelihood function alone can be highly accurate and that they show minimal bias towards the phases used to initiate the calculation. Map-likelihood phase probabilities depend upon expected characteristics of the electron-density map, such as a defined solvent region and expected electron-density distributions within the solvent region and the region occupied by a macromolecule. In the simplest case, map-likelihood phase-probability distributions are largely based on the flatness of the solvent region. Though map-likelihood phases can be calculated without prior phase information, they are greatly enhanced by high-quality starting phases. This leads to the technique of prime-and-switch phasing for removing model bias. In prime-and-switch phasing, biased phases such as those from a model are used to prime or initiate map-likelihood phasing, then final phases are obtained from map-likelihood phasing alone. Map-likelihood phasing can be applied in cases with solvent content as low as 30%. Potential applications of map-likelihood phasing include unbiased phase calculation from molecular-replacement models, iterative model building, unbiased electron-density maps for cases where 2Fo − Fc or σA-weighted maps would currently be used, structure validation and ab initio phase determination from solvent masks, non-crystallographic symmetry or other knowledge about expected electron density. PMID:11717488

  2. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem.

    PubMed

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R; Yeates, Todd O

    2014-06-01

    The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as `crowdsourcing'. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of `individuals', each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing. PMID:24914965

  3. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    PubMed Central

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-01-01

    The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of ‘individuals’, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing. PMID:24914965

  4. Propagating phase interface with intermediate interfacial phase: Phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Kasra; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-05-01

    An advanced three-phase phase field approach (PFA) is suggested for a nonequilibrium phase interface that contains an intermediate phase, in particular, a solid-solid interface with a nanometer-sized intermediate melt (IM). A thermodynamic potential in the polar order parameters is developed that satisfies all thermodynamic equilibrium and stability conditions. The special form of the gradient energy allowed us to include the interaction of two solid-melt interfaces via an intermediate melt and obtain a well-posed problem and mesh-independent solutions. It is proved that for stationary 1D solutions to two Ginzburg-Landau equations for three phases, the local energy at each point is equal to the gradient energy. Simulations are performed for β ↔δ phase transformations (PTs) via IM in an HMX energetic material. The obtained energy IM width dependence is described by generalized force-balance models for short- and long-range interaction forces between interfaces but not far from the melting temperature. A force-balance model is developed that describes phase field results even 100 K below the melting temperature. The effects of the ratios of width and energies of solid-solid and solid-melt interfaces, temperature, and the parameter characterizing interaction of two solid-melt interfaces, on the structure, width, energy of the IM and interface velocity are determined by finite element method. Depending on parameters, the IM may appear by continuous or discontinuous barrierless disordering or via critical nucleus due to thermal fluctuations. The IM may appear during heating and persist during cooling at temperatures well below than it follows from sharp-interface approach. On the other hand, for some parameters when IM is expected, it does not form, producing an IM-free gap. The developed PFA represents a quite general three-phase model and can be extended to other physical phenomena, such as martensitic PTs, surface-induced premelting and PTs, premelting

  5. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James A.; Johnson, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency of phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention.

  6. Simplified phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershey, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    Tanlick sine-wave phase detector gives dc output voltage nearly proportional to phase difference between oscillator signal and reference signal. Device may be used for systems in which signal-to-noise ratio is high.

  7. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1992-05-26

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency or phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention. 6 figs.

  8. Phase jitter in a differential phase experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanenbaum, B. S.; Connolly, D. J.; Austin, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Austin (1971) had concluded that, because of the 'phase jitter,' the differential phase experiment is useful over a more limited height range than the differential absorption experiment. Several observations are presented to show that this conclusion is premature. It is pointed out that the logical basis of the differential absorption experiment also requires that the O- and X-mode echoes, at a given time, come from the same irregularities. Austin's calculations are believed to contain a systematic error above 80 km.

  9. Perceptions about Moon Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rider, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Presents research on different techniques to determine the level of understanding among middle school students regarding the phases of the moon. Quotes student responses to provide some insight into students' level of understanding of general knowledge about the moon, moon phases, and modeling the phases. Presents implications for teachers. (KHR)

  10. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  11. Phase microscope imaging in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Mehta, Shalin B.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging in a bright field or phase contrast microscope is partially coherent. We have found that the image can be conveniently considered and modeled in terms of the Wigner distribution function (WDF) of the object transmission. The WDF of the object has a simple physical interpretation for the case of a slowly varying object. Basically, the image intensity is the spatial marginal of the spatial convolution of the object WDF with the phase space imager kernel (PSIkernel), a rotated version of the transmission cross-coefficient. The PSI-kernel can be regarded as a partially-coherent generalization of the point spread function. This approach can be extended to consider the partial coherence of the image itself. In particular, we can consider the mutual intensity, WDF or ambiguity function of the image. It is important to note that the spatial convolution of the object WDF with the PSI-kernel is not a WDF, and not the WDF of the image. The phase space representations of the image have relevance to phase reconstruction methods such as phase space tomography, or the transport of intensity equation approach, and to the three-dimensional image properties.

  12. Gymnastics in Phase Space

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander Wu; /SLAC

    2012-03-01

    As accelerator technology advances, the requirements on accelerator beam quality become increasingly demanding. Facing these new demands, the topic of phase space gymnastics is becoming a new focus of accelerator physics R&D. In a phase space gymnastics, the beam's phase space distribution is manipulated and precision tailored to meet the required beam qualities. On the other hand, all realization of such gymnastics will have to obey accelerator physics principles as well as technological limitations. Recent examples of phase space gymnastics include Emittance exchanges, Phase space exchanges, Emittance partitioning, Seeded FELs and Microbunched beams. The emittance related topics of this list are reviewed in this report. The accelerator physics basis, the optics design principles that provide these phase space manipulations, and the possible applications of these gymnastics, are discussed. This fascinating new field promises to be a powerful tool of the future.

  13. Noncommutative Anandan quantum phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passos, E.; Ribeiro, L. R.; Furtado, C.; Nascimento, J. R.

    2007-07-01

    In this work, we study the noncommutative nonrelativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle, which possesses permanent magnetic and electric dipole moments, in the presence of external electric and magnetic fields. We use the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation of the Dirac spinor with a nonminimal coupling to obtain the nonrelativistic limit. In this limit, we study the noncommutative quantum dynamics and obtain the noncommutative Anandan geometric phase. We analyze the situation where the magnetic dipole moment of the particle is zero, and we obtain the noncommutative version of the He-McKellar-Wilkens effect. We demonstrate that this phase in the noncommutative case is a geometric dispersive phase. We also investigate this geometric phase by considering the noncommutativity in the phase space, and the Anandan phase is obtained.

  14. PHASE DIFFERENTIAL INDICATING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Kirsten, F.A.

    1962-01-01

    An electronic circuit for totalizing the net phase difference between two alternating current signals is designed which responds to both increasing and decreasing phase changes. A phase comparator provldes an output pulse for each 360 deg of phase difference occurring, there being a negative pulse for phase shtft in one direction and a positive pulse for a phase shift in the opposite direction. A counting circuit utilizing glow discharge tubes receives the negative and positive pulses at a single input terminal and provides a running net total, pulses of one polarity dded and pulses of the opposite polarity being subtracted. The glow discharge tubes may be decaded to increase the total count capacity. (AEC)

  15. Crystal phase identification

    DOEpatents

    Michael, Joseph R.; Goehner, Raymond P.; Schlienger, Max E.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample. This invention provides a method and apparatus for unambiguously identifying and determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample by using an electron beam generator, such as a scanning electron microscope, to obtain a backscattered electron Kikuchi pattern of a sample, and extracting crystallographic and composition data that is matched to database information to provide a quick and automatic method to identify crystalline phases.

  16. Phase Holograms In PMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D.; Muller, Richard E.

    1994-01-01

    Complex, computer-generated phase holograms written in thin films of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by process of electron-beam exposure followed by chemical development. Spatial variations of phase delay in holograms quasi-continuous, as distinquished from stepwise as in binary phase holograms made by integrated-circuit fabrication. Holograms more precise than binary holograms. Greater continuity and precision results in decreased scattering loss and increased imaging efficiency.

  17. Holographic magnetic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2009-09-15

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4- and D8-branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  18. Phase detection of chaos.

    PubMed

    Follmann, Rosangela; Macau, Elbert E N; Rosa, Epaminondas

    2011-01-01

    A technique, first introduced in the context of pseudoperiodic sound waves, is here applied to the problem of detecting the phase of phase coherent and also phase noncoherent chaotic oscillators. The approach is based on finding sinusoidal fits to segments of the signal, therefore obtaining, for each segment, an appropriate frequency from which a phase can be derived. Central to the method is a judicious choice for the size of a sliding window and for the frequency range, as well as for the window advancing step. The approach is robust against moderate noise levels and three cases are presented for demonstrating the applicability of the method. PMID:21405762

  19. Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 31 NIST/ACerS Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database (PC database for purchase)   The Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database contains commentaries and more than 21,000 diagrams for non-organic systems, including those published in all 21 hard-copy volumes produced as part of the ACerS-NIST Phase Equilibria Diagrams Program (formerly titled Phase Diagrams for Ceramists): Volumes I through XIV (blue books); Annuals 91, 92, 93; High Tc Superconductors I & II; Zirconium & Zirconia Systems; and Electronic Ceramics I. Materials covered include oxides as well as non-oxide systems such as chalcogenides and pnictides, phosphates, salt systems, and mixed systems of these classes.

  20. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  1. Lunar Phases Planisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawl, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a lunar phases planisphere with which a user can answer questions about the rising and setting times of the Moon as well as questions about where the Moon will be at a given phase and time. The article contains figures that can be photocopied to make the planisphere. (Contains 2 figures.)

  2. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  3. UPVG phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Utility PhotoVoltaic Group (UPVG), supported by member dues and a grant from the US Department of Energy, has as its mission the acceleration of the use of cost-effective small-scale and emerging large-scale applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of electric utilities and their customers. Formed in October, 1992, with the support of the American Public Power Association, Edison Electric Institute, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the UPVG currently has 90 members from all sectors of the electric utility industry. The UPVG`s efforts as conceived were divided into four phases: Phase 0--program plan; Phase 1--organization and strategy development; Phase 2--creating market assurance; and Phase 3--higher volume purchases. The Phase 0 effort developed the program plan and was completed early in 1993. The Phase 1 goal was to develop the necessary background information and analysis to lead to a decision as to which strategies could be undertaken by utilities to promote greater understanding of PV markets and achieve increased volumes of PV purchases. This report provides the details of the UPVG`s Phase 2 efforts to initiate TEAM-UP, its multiyear, 50-MW hardware initiative.

  4. Demonstrating Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Presents two experiments that demonstrate phase changes. The first experiment explores phase changes of carbon dioxide using powdered dry ice sealed in a piece of clear plastic tubing. The second experiment demonstrates an equilibrium process in which a crystal grows in equilibrium with its saturated solution. (PVD)

  5. Simulation of phase structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.

    1995-04-20

    This memo outlines a procedure developed by the author to extract information from phase measurements and produce a simulated phase structure for use in modeling optical systems, including characteristic optics for the Beamlet and NIF laser systems. The report includes an IDL program listing.

  6. Templated blue phases.

    PubMed

    Ravnik, Miha; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2015-11-21

    Cholesteric blue phases of a chiral liquid crystal are interesting examples of self-organised three-dimensional nanostructures formed by soft matter. Recently it was demonstrated that a polymer matrix introduced by photopolymerization inside a bulk blue phase not only stabilises the host blue phase significantly, but also serves as a template for blue phase ordering. We show with numerical modelling that the transfer of the orientational order of the blue phase to the surfaces of the polymer matrix, together with the resulting surface anchoring, can account for the templating behaviour of the polymer matrix inducing the blue phase ordering of an achiral nematic liquid crystal. Furthermore, tailoring the anchoring conditions of the polymer matrix surfaces can bring about orientational ordering different from those of bulk blue phases, including an intertwined complex of the polymer matrix and topological line defects of orientational order. Optical Kerr response of templated blue phases is explored, finding large Kerr constants in the range of K = 2-10 × 10(-9) m V(-2) and notable dependence on the surface anchoring strength. More generally, the presented numerical approach is aimed to clarify the role and actions of templating polymer matrices in complex chiral nematic fluids, and further to help design novel template-based materials from chiral liquid crystals. PMID:26412643

  7. Low distortion automatic phase control circuit. [voltage controlled phase shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauge, G.; Pederson, C. W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A voltage controlled phase shifter is rendered substantially harmonic distortion free over a large dynamic input range by employing two oppositely poled, equally biased varactor diodes as the voltage controlled elements which adjust the phase shift. Control voltages which affect the bias of both diodes equally are used to adjust the phase shift without increasing distortion. A feedback stabilized phase shifter is rendered substantially frequency independent by employing a phase detector to control the phase shift of the voltage controlled phase shifter.

  8. Source Wavelet Phase Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghadeh, Diako Hariri; Morley, Christopher Keith

    2016-06-01

    Extraction of propagation wavelet phase from seismic data can be conducted using first, second, third and fourth-order statistics. Three new methods are introduced, which are: (1) Combination of different moments, (2) Windowed continuous wavelet transform and (3) Maximum correlation with cosine function. To compare different methods synthetic data with and without noise were chosen. Results show that first, second and third order statistics are not able to preserve wavelet phase. Kurtosis can preserve propagation wavelet phase but signal-to-noise ratio can affect the extracted phase using this method. So for data set with low signal-to-noise ratio, it will be unstable. Using a combination of different moments to extract the phase is more robust than applying kurtosis. The improvement occurs because zero phase wavelets with reverse polarities have equal maximum kurtosis values hence the correct wavelet polarity cannot be identified. Zero-phase wavelets with reverse polarities have minimum and maximum values for a combination of different-moments method. These properties enable the technique to handle a finite data segment and to choose the correct wavelet polarity. Also, the existence of different moments can decrease sensitivity to outliers. A windowed continuous wavelet transform is more sensitive to signal-to-noise ratio than the combination of different-moments method, also if the scale for the wavelet is incorrect it will encounter with more problems to extract phase. When the effects of frequency bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio and analyzing window length are considered, the results of extracting phase information from data without and with noise demonstrate that combination of different-moments is superior to the other methods introduced here.

  9. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  10. Conceptual plan: Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, S.M.

    1993-07-01

    The Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program was established to address concerns regarding two-phase flow properties and to provide WIPP-specific, geologically consistent experimental data to develop more appropriate correlations for Salado rock to replace those currently used in Performance Assessment models. Researchers in Sandia`s Fluid Flow and Transport Department originally identified and emphasized the need for laboratory measurements of Salado threshold pressure and relative permeability. The program expanded to include the measurement of capillary pressure, rock compressibility, porosity, and intrinsic permeability and the assessment of core damage. Sensitivity analyses identified the anhydrite interbed layers as the most likely path for the dissipation of waste-generated gas from waste-storage rooms because of their relatively high permeability. Due to this the program will initially focus on the anhydrite interbed material. The program may expand to include similar rock and flow measurements on other WIPP materials including impure halite, pure halite, and backfill and seal materials. This conceptual plan presents the scope, objectives, and historical documentation of the development of the Salado Two-Phase Flow Program through January 1993. Potential laboratory techniques for assessing core damage and measuring porosity, rock compressibility, capillary and threshold pressure, permeability as a function of stress, and relative permeability are discussed. Details of actual test designs, test procedures, and data analysis are not included in this report, but will be included in the Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program Test Plan pending the results of experimental and other scoping activities in FY93.

  11. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  12. FEL phased array configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellan, Jeffrey B.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of various phased array and shared aperture concepts for FEL configurations are discussed. Consideration is given to the characteristics of intra- and inter-micropulse phasing; intra-macropulse phasing; an internal coupled resonator configuration; and an injection locked oscillator array. The use of a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration with multiple or single master oscillators for FELs is examined. The venetian blind, rotating plate, single grating, and grating rhomb shared aperture concepts are analyzed. It is noted that the shared aperture approach using a grating rhomb and the MOPA concept with a single master oscillator and a coupled resonator are useful for FEL phased array configurations; and the MOPA concept is most applicable.

  13. Microfluidic binary phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Dan; Menetrier, Laure; Wong, Joyce; Tabeling, Patrick; Salamitou, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    We present a novel binary phase flow regime where the two phases differ substantially in both their wetting and viscous properties. Optical tracking particles are used in order to investigate the details of such multiphase flow inside capillary channels. We also describe microfluidic filters we have developed, capable of separating the two phases based on capillary pressure. The performance of the filters in separating oil-water emulsions is discussed. Binary phase flow has been previously used in microchannels in applications such as emulsion generation, enhancement of mixing and assembly of custom colloidal paticles. Such microfluidic systems are increasingly used in a number of applications spanning a diverse range of industries, such as biotech, pharmaceuticals and more recently the oil industry.

  14. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  15. ELECTRONIC PHASE CONTROL CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Salisbury, J.D.; Klein, W.W.; Hansen, C.F.

    1959-04-21

    An electronic circuit is described for controlling the phase of radio frequency energy applied to a multicavity linear accelerator. In one application of the circuit two cavities are excited from a single radio frequency source, with one cavity directly coupled to the source and the other cavity coupled through a delay line of special construction. A phase detector provides a bipolar d-c output signal proportional to the difference in phase between the voltage in the two cavities. This d-c signal controls a bias supply which provides a d-c output for varying the capacitnce of voltage sensitive capacitors in the delay line. The over-all operation of the circuit is completely electronic, overcoming the time response limitations of the electromechanical control systems, and the relative phase relationship of the radio frequency voltages in the two caviiies is continuously controlled to effect particle acceleration.

  16. Geometry and Moon Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Kenneth W.; Harrell, Marvin E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity, designed to comply with the National Science Education Standards, that integrates science and mathematics concepts. Mathematical modeling of the moon's phases is employed to show students the role of mathematics in describing scientific phenomena. (DKM)

  17. Digital Receiver Phase Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcin, Martin; Abramovici, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The software of a commercially available digital radio receiver has been modified to make the receiver function as a two-channel low-noise phase meter. This phase meter is a prototype in the continuing development of a phase meter for a system in which radiofrequency (RF) signals in the two channels would be outputs of a spaceborne heterodyne laser interferometer for detecting gravitational waves. The frequencies of the signals could include a common Doppler-shift component of as much as 15 MHz. The phase meter is required to measure the relative phases of the signals in the two channels at a sampling rate of 10 Hz at a root power spectral density <5 microcycle/(Hz)1/2 and to be capable of determining the power spectral density of the phase difference over the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 Hz. Such a phase meter could also be used on Earth to perform similar measurements in laser metrology of moving bodies. To illustrate part of the principle of operation of the phase meter, the figure includes a simplified block diagram of a basic singlechannel digital receiver. The input RF signal is first fed to the input terminal of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). To prevent aliasing errors in the ADC, the sampling rate must be at least twice the input signal frequency. The sampling rate of the ADC is governed by a sampling clock, which also drives a digital local oscillator (DLO), which is a direct digital frequency synthesizer. The DLO produces samples of sine and cosine signals at a programmed tuning frequency. The sine and cosine samples are mixed with (that is, multiplied by) the samples from the ADC, then low-pass filtered to obtain in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) signal components. A digital signal processor (DSP) computes the ratio between the Q and I components, computes the phase of the RF signal (relative to that of the DLO signal) as the arctangent of this ratio, and then averages successive such phase values over a time interval specified by the user.

  18. Efficient Bayesian Phase Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Nathan; Granade, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a new method called rejection filtering that we use to perform adaptive Bayesian phase estimation. Our approach has several advantages: it is classically efficient, easy to implement, achieves Heisenberg limited scaling, resists depolarizing noise, tracks time-dependent eigenstates, recovers from failures, and can be run on a field programmable gate array. It also outperforms existing iterative phase estimation algorithms such as Kitaev's method.

  19. Phased array antenna control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doland, G. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Several new and useful improvements in steering and control of phased array antennas having a small number of elements, typically on the order of 5 to 17 elements are provided. Among the improvements are increasing the number of beam steering positions, reducing the possibility of phase transients in signals received or transmitted with the antennas, and increasing control and testing capacity with respect to the antennas.

  20. Efficient Bayesian Phase Estimation.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Nathan; Granade, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a new method called rejection filtering that we use to perform adaptive Bayesian phase estimation. Our approach has several advantages: it is classically efficient, easy to implement, achieves Heisenberg limited scaling, resists depolarizing noise, tracks time-dependent eigenstates, recovers from failures, and can be run on a field programmable gate array. It also outperforms existing iterative phase estimation algorithms such as Kitaev's method. PMID:27419551

  1. Quantum phase of inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berera, Arjun; Rangarajan, Raghavan

    2013-02-01

    Inflation models can have an early phase of inflation where the evolution of the inflaton is driven by quantum fluctuations before entering the phase driven by the slope of the scalar field potential. For a Coleman-Weinberg potential this quantum phase lasts 107-8 e-foldings. A long period of fluctuation driven growth of the inflation field can possibly take the inflaton past ϕ*, the value of the field where our current horizon scale crosses the horizon; alternatively, even if the field does not cross ϕ*, the inflaton could have high kinetic energy at the end of this phase. Therefore, we study these issues in the context of different models of inflation. In scenarios where cosmological relevant scales leave during the quantum phase, we obtain large curvature perturbations of O(10). We also apply our results to quadratic curvaton models and to quintessence models. In curvaton models we find that inflation must last longer than required to solve the horizon problem, that the curvaton models are incompatible with small field inflation models, and that there may be too large non-Gaussianity. A new phase of thermal fluctuation driven inflation is proposed, in which during inflation the inflaton evolution is governed by fluctuations from a sustained thermal radiation bath rather than by a scalar field potential.

  2. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  3. Electron Holography: phases matter.

    PubMed

    Lichte, Hannes

    2013-06-01

    Essentially, all optics is wave optics, be it with light, X-rays, neutrons or electrons. The information transfer from the object to the image can only be understood in terms of waves given by amplitude and phase. However, phases are difficult to measure: for slowly oscillating waves such as sound or low-frequency electromagnetic waves, phases can be measured directly; for high frequencies this has to be done by heterodyne detection, i.e. superposition with a reference and averaging over time. In optics, this is called interferometry. Because interference is mostly very difficult to achieve, phases have often been considered 'hidden variables' seemingly pulling the strings from backstage, only visible by their action on the image intensity. This was almost the case in conventional Electron Microscopy with the phase differences introduced by an object. However, in the face of the urgent questions from solid state physics and materials science, these phases have to be determined precisely, because they encode the most dominant object properties, such as charge distributions and electromagnetic fields. After more than six decades of very patient advancement, electron interferometry and holography offer unprecedented analytical facilities down to an atomic scale. Akira Tonomura has prominently contributed to the present state. PMID:23620338

  4. Compressed sensing phase retrieval with phase diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shun; Hu, Xinqi; Qin, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    The compressed sensing (CS) theory shows that sparse signal can be reconstructed accurately with some randomly observed measurements that are much fewer than what traditional method requires. Since it takes structure of signals into consideration, it has many advantages in the structured signals process. With CS, measuring can be speeded up and the cost of hardware can be decreased significantly. However, it faces great challenge in the amplitude-only measurement. In this article, we study the magnitude-only compressed sensing phase retrieval (CSPR) problem, and propose a practical recovery algorithm. In our algorithm, we introduce the powerful Hybrid-Input-Output algorithm with phase diversity to make our algorithm robust and efficient. A relaxed ℓ0 norm constrain is also introduced to help PR find a sparse solution with fewer measurements, which is demonstrated to be essential and effective to CSPR. We finally successfully apply it into complex-valued object recovery in THz imaging. The numerical results show that the proposed algorithm can recover the object pretty well with fewer measurements than what PR traditionally requires.

  5. Phased array ghost elimination.

    PubMed

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2006-05-01

    Parallel imaging may be applied to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including distortions such as off-resonance or local flow, which are space variant. Phased array combining coefficients may be calculated that null ghost artifacts at known locations based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the nulling constraint. The resultant phased array ghost elimination (PAGE) technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The phased array method for ghost elimination may result in greater flexibility in designing acquisition strategies. For example, in multi-shot EPI applications ghosts are typically mitigated by the use of an interleaved phase encode acquisition order. An alternative strategy is to use a sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order and cancel the resultant ghosts using PAGE parallel imaging. Cancellation of ghosts by means of phased array processing makes sequential, non-interleaved phase encode acquisition order practical, and permits a reduction in repetition time, TR, by eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order has benefits of reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow and EPI delay misalignment. Furthermore, the use of EPI with PAGE has inherent fat-water separation and has been used to provide off-resonance correction using a technique referred to as lipid elimination with an echo-shifting N/2-ghost acquisition (LEENA), and may further generalized using the multi-point Dixon method. Other applications of PAGE include cancelling ghosts which arise due to amplitude or phase variation during the approach to steady state. Parallel imaging requires estimates of the complex coil sensitivities. In vivo estimates may be derived by temporally varying the phase encode ordering to obtain a full k-space dataset in a scheme

  6. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-11-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  7. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  8. On phase reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Min

    This thesis focuses on the mathematical analysis of the optical phase reconstruction problem. Phase information of light waves has played an important role in many optical applications. However, the phase function of a light wave cannot be measured directly. In 1983, Teague proposed the idea of an intensity senor for measuring phase functions of light waves. It uses an elliptic partial differential equation called the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE), which relates intensity to the phase function of a light wave. Teague's study was followed by Roddier and others. When intensity decreases to zero at the boundary, the equation has singularity since the diffusion coefficient vanishes. In 1996, Gureyev and Nugent claimed that no boundary conditions are needed for getting a unique solution of the TIE in this singular case. We present in this thesis the theoretical analysis of the necessity of boundary conditions for solving the TIE. A hybrid theoretical-numerical boundary condition is also derived for solving the TIE numerically in the case of vanishing intensity at the boundary. Numerical tests and optical simulations over discs verified the potency of this theoretical-numerical hybrid boundary condition and the algorithm. Another approach studied is the Weighted Least Action Principle (WLAP), which is proposed by Rubinstein and Wolansky in the year 2004. The WLAP states a variational principle for finding the light rays mapping between two planes using the intensity profiles on the planes, and it writes the problem of phase reconstruction in the functional form. Minimizing the associated functional, we obtain the ray mapping of the light wave in question. The phase function can be derived from the optimized ray mapping. A numerical algorithm was designed to carry out the process. Simulations and tests are reported to show the feasibility of the methods proposed.

  9. Digital phase-lock loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved digital phase lock loop incorporates several distinctive features that attain better performance at high loop gain and better phase accuracy. These features include: phase feedback to a number-controlled oscillator in addition to phase rate; analytical tracking of phase (both integer and fractional cycles); an amplitude-insensitive phase extractor; a more accurate method for extracting measured phase; a method for changing loop gain during a track without loss of lock; and a method for avoiding loss of sampled data during computation delay, while maintaining excellent tracking performance. The advantages of using phase and phase-rate feedback are demonstrated by comparing performance with that of rate-only feedback. Extraction of phase by the method of modeling provides accurate phase measurements even when the number-controlled oscillator phase is discontinuously updated.

  10. EUCLIDES: first phase completed!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benschop, Jos P.; Dinger, Udo; Ockwell, David C.

    2000-07-01

    The Extreme UV Concept Lithography Development System (EUCLIDES) program headed by ASM Lithography (ASML), partnered with Carl Zeiss and Oxford Instruments is evaluating EUV lithography for its viability at resolutions of 70 nm and below. From August 1998 through February 2000 the first phase was done. In this phase, the core technologies necessary to demonstrate the technical solutions for the list of possible EUV lithography 'showstoppers' have been developed. This includes: (1) Mirror substrates, (2) High reflectivity multi- layer coatings, (3) Resist outgassing reduction schemes, (4) Vacuum stages. A synchrotron source design was developed to compare synchrotron sources with plasma sources. The consortium also investigated the total system architecture to make sure the system concept meets the requirements of the semiconductor industry at an acceptable cost of ownership. In this paper, an overview of the program objectives is given, followed by an overview of highlights obtained by the various program partners and subcontractors throughout the first phase. Finally, the European partner's plan for the next phase is shown (working in close collaboration with other international consortia). This next phase will eventually lead to EUVL production tools.

  11. Two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program to characterize the spray from candidate nozzles for icing-cloud simulation is discussed. One canidate nozzle, which is currently used for icing research, has been characterized for flow and drop size. The median-volume diameter (MVD) from this air-assist nozzle is compared with correlations in the literature. The new experimental spray facility is discussed, and the drop-size instruments are discussed in detail. Since there is no absolute standard for drop-size measurements and there are other limitations, such as drop -size range and velocity range, several instruments are used and results are compared. A two-phase model was developed at Pennsylvania State University. The model uses the k-epsilon model of turbulence in the continous phase. Three methods for treating the discrete phase are used: (1) a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model, (2) a deterministic separated flow (DSF) model, and (3) a stochastic separated flow (SSF) model. In the LHF model both phases have the same velocity and temperature at each point. The DSF model provides interphase transport but ignores the effects of turbulent fluctuations. In the SSF model the drops interact with turbulent eddies whose properties are determined by the k-epsilon turbulence model. The two-phase flow model has been extended to include the effects of evaporation and combustion.

  12. Phasing rectangular apertures.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Homoelle, D; Utterback, E; Jones, S M

    2009-10-26

    Several techniques have been developed to phase apertures in the context of astronomical telescopes with segmented mirrors. Phasing multiple apertures, however, is important in a wide range of optical applications. The application of primary interest in this paper is the phasing of multiple short pulse laser beams for fast ignition fusion experiments. In this paper analytic expressions are derived for parameters such as the far-field distribution, a line-integrated form of the far-field distribution that could be fit to measured data, enclosed energy or energy-in-a-bucket and center-of-mass that can then be used to phase two rectangular apertures. Experimental data is taken with a MEMS device to simulate the two apertures and comparisons are made between the analytic parameters and those derived from the measurements. Two methods, fitting the measured far-field distribution to the theoretical distribution and measuring the ensquared energy in the far-field, produced overall phase variance between the 100 measurements of less than 0.005 rad(2) or an RMS displacement of less than 12 nm. PMID:19997175

  13. Single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinn-Chang; Wang, Yung-Shan; Jou, Hurng-Liahng; Lu, Wei-Tso

    2016-07-01

    This study proposes a single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface which converts the power from a single-phase utility to three-phase power for a three-phase load. The proposed single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface comprises a bridge-type switch set, a set of three-phase inductors, a transformer set and a set of three-phase capacitors. A current-mode control controls the switching of bridge-type switch set, to generate a set of nonzero-sequence (NZS) currents and a set of zero-sequence (ZS) currents. The transformer set is used to decouple the NZS currents and the ZS currents. The NZS currents are used to generate a high-quality three-phase voltage that supplies power to a three-phase load. The ZS currents flow to the single-phase utility so that the utility current is sinusoidal and in phase with the utility voltage. Accordingly, only a bridge-type switch set is used in the single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface to simply the power circuit. A prototype is developed and tested to verify the performance of the proposed single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface.

  14. Phase trombones with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    The phase shifting trombones considered up to now for SSC application consisted of sets of evenly spaced quadrupoles separated by drift spaces. One such trombone was placed between a dispersion suppressor and a crossing insertion, so that the trombone had zero dispersion. With such trombones, it is possible to change {beta}{sup *} at constant tune, or to change the tunes by several units without altering the cell phase advances in the arcs. An objection to the above type of phase trombone is that it adds to the circumference, since no bending is included. This objection may or may not be valid depending on the potential usefulness of the drift spaces in them. In this note the authors show an alternative trombone design in which dipoles are included between the quadrupoles as in the normal arc cells. Since these trombones have dispersion, they are placed at the ends of the arcs, to be followed in turn by the dispersion suppressors and crossing insertions.

  15. Controllable tomography phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Tomography phase microscopy (TPM) is a new microscopic method that can quantitatively yield the volumetric 3D distribution of a sample's refractive index (RI), which is significant for cell biology research. In this paper, a controllable TPM system is introduced. In this system a circulatory phase-shifting method and piezoelectric ceramic are used which enable the TPM system to record the 3D RI distribution at a more controllable speed, from 1 to 40 fps, than in the other TPM systems reported. The resolution of the RI distribution obtained by this controllable TPM is much better than that in images recorded by phase contrast microscopy and interference tomography microscopy. The realization of controllable TPM not only allows for the application of TPM to the measurement of kinds of RI sample, but also contributes to academic and technological support for the practical use of TPM.

  16. Phase insensitive acoustoelectric transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonic transducers transform acoustic waves into electrical signals preserving phase and amplitude information. When the acoustic wavelength is significantly smaller than the transducer diameter, severe phase modulation of the electrical signal can occur. This results in anomalous attenuation measurements, background noise in nondestructive evaluation, and in general complicates data interpretation. This article describes and evaluates a phase-insensitive transducer based on the acoustoelectric effect. Theory of operation of the acoustoelectric transducer (AET) is discussed, and some optimization procedures outlined for its use. Directivity data for the AET are contrasted with a conventional piezoelectric transducer. In addition, transmission scanning data of phantom flaws in metal plates are presented for both transducers and demonstrate a significant improvement in resolution with the AET.

  17. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  18. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  19. Electroweak Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gregory Wayne

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles, and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, _ {T}, is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially sensitive function of T. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase T so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal extensions of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field. Semi-classical reasoning suggests that, when a particle receives a contribution to its mass from the vacuum expectation value of a scalar, under certain conditions, the ground state of particle number one contains a 'dimple' or shallow scalar field condensate around the particle. We argue that this is not the case. A careful analysis, taking into account quantum mechanics, shows that the semi-classical approximation is a poor one. We find that there are no energetically favored one-particle dimple solutions for perturbative couplings.

  20. Compressive phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, F.; MacDowell, A.; Marchesini, S.; Padmore, H. A.; Parkinson, D. Y.; Pien, J.; Schirotzek, A.; Yang, C.

    2010-08-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  1. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  2. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  3. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-06-06

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line. 2 figs.

  4. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line.

  5. GAS PHASE EXPOSURE HISTORY DERIVED FROM MATERIAL PHASE CONCENTRATION PROFILES USING SOLID PHASE MICRO-EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: F8P31059
    Title: Gas Phase Exposure History Derived from Material Phase Concentration Profiles Using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): Jonathan Lewis McKinney
    Institution: University of Missouri - ...

  6. Phase interpolation circuits using frequency multiplication for phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, P. R.; Mailloux, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Antenna phasing circuit is described with the following advantages - 1/ increased number of phased elements, 2/ current repetition for each array element, 3/ circuit simplicity, and 4/ accurate phase interpolation. This circuit functions with Huggins Scan or with nearly any other phasing system.

  7. Suppressing phase errors from vibration in phase-shifting interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Deck, Leslie L.

    2009-07-10

    A general method for reducing the influence of vibrations in phase-shifting interferometry corrects the surface phase map through a spectral analysis of a ''phase-error pattern,'' a plot of the interference intensity versus the measured phase, for each phase-shifted image. The method is computationally fast, applicable to any phase-shifting algorithm and interferometer geometry, has few restrictions on surface shape, and unlike spatial Fourier methods, high density spatial carrier fringes are not required, although at least a fringe of phase departure is recommended. Over a 100x reduction in vibrationally induced surface distortion is achieved for small amplitude vibrations on real data.

  8. Fun with Phase Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis, David

    2006-01-01

    A lot of good elementary science involves studying solids, liquids, and gases, and some inquiry-based activities that are easy to set up and do. In this article, the author presents activities pertaining to simple phase change. Using water as the example, these activities introduce upper-grade students to the idea of the arrangement of molecules…

  9. Temperature stabilized phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The construction, tests, and performance of a temperature stabilized phase detector are discussed. It has a frequency stability of 5 parts in 10 to the 16th power at 100 MHz, with a temperature step of 20 C (15 to 35 C).

  10. Apodized Phase Mask Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Among the optical instruments proposed to detect and characterize exoplanets, phase masks coronagraphs offer very small inner working angles. Designed for off-axis telescopes, their performance is greatly reduced when used with centrally obstructed apertures such as those of the Palomar telescope, the very large telescope, or the James Webb space telescope. However, a clear circular aperture is not the only pupil shape for which a phase mask coronagraph can work properly. In fact, for a given centrally obstructed aperture, we show that it is possible to compute optimal apodizers that help achieve stellar extinction levels similar to those obtained in the ideal case of an off-axis telescope. Trade-offs exist between these levels, the transmission of the apodizer, and the area covered by the Lyot stop. We detail the Fourier optics formalism that makes these optimizations possible, as well as a few examples of shaped pupils. Some are designed for a four-quadrants phase mask, and some others for a vortex phase mask. We also offer a comparison with a coronagraph solely composed of a shaped pupil.

  11. SSIP Phase I Roadmap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinh, Megan; Lucas, Anne; Taylor, Cornelia; Kelley, Grace; Kasprzak, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This roadmap provides a description of the activities involved in the development of the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP) (SPP/APR Indicators C11 and B17) due to the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) on April 1, 2015. The roadmap is intended to support states with completing Phase I of the SSIP process. This document provides…

  12. Soviet phase conjugation research

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.A.; Boyd, R.W.; Klein, M.B.; Kurnit, N.A.; Milonni, P.W.; Rockwell, D.A.; Yeh, P.

    1990-09-01

    Optical phase conjugation is a Soviet-discovered technique that applies nonlinear optical effects to automatically manipulate laser beams while automatically correcting for arbitrary distortions. Optical phase conjugation can aid in providing improved configurations for average-power and high-peak-power laser systems; it can provide nearly automatic pointing and tracking laser systems; and it can provide many other practical applications (both military and nonmilitary). Here it is important to note that 100- to 1000-watt systems are also of significant importance, not just ultra-high-energy or high-power lasers designed to do significant structural damage at significant distances. One class of phase conjugation techniques, namely, stimulated Brillouin scattering, along with its four-wave mixing counterpart, Brillioun-enhanced four-wave mixing, has been the hallmark of the Soviet effort -- with nearly all contributions (both theoretical and experimental) arising from the Soviet Union. Both stimulated Brillouin scattering and Brillouin-enhanced four-wave mixing arise from the same electrostrictive nonlinearity, where the presence of a gradient in the optical intensity produces a force on the fluid. Scientists in the United States started studying optical phase conjugation approximately five years after Soviet scientists, and initially concentrated on areas quite different from those of Soviet emphasis.

  13. Phase change compositions

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, straight chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  14. Phase change compositions

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, long chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  15. Low gravity phase separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Pope, W. L.; Smith, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for phase separating a gas-liquid mixture as might exist in a subcritical cryogenic helium vessel for cooling a superconducting magnet at low gravity such as in planetary orbit, permitting conservation of the liquid and extended service life of the superconducting magnet.

  16. Semiconductor Laser Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.

    1985-01-01

    Oscillations synchronized and modulated individually for beam steering. Phased array of GaAs infrared lasers put out powerful electronically-steerable coherent beam. Fabricated as integrated circuit on GaAs chip, new device particularly suited to optical communications, optical data processing and optical detection and ranging systems.

  17. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  18. Advanced Virgo phase cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schaaf, L.; Agatsuma, K.; van Beuzekom, M.; Gebyehu, M.; van den Brand, J.

    2016-05-01

    A century after the prediction of gravitational waves, detectors have reached the sensitivity needed to proof their existence. One of them, the Virgo interferometer in Pisa, is presently being upgraded to Advanced Virgo (AdV) and will come into operation in 2016. The power stored in the interferometer arms raises from 20 to 700 kW. This increase is expected to introduce higher order modes in the beam, which could reduce the circulating power in the interferometer, limiting the sensitivity of the instrument. To suppress these higher-order modes, the core optics of Advanced Virgo is equipped with a thermal compensation system. Phase cameras, monitoring the real-time status of the beam constitute a critical component of this compensation system. These cameras measure the phases and amplitudes of the laser-light fields at the frequencies selected to control the interferometer. The measurement combines heterodyne detection with a scan of the wave front over a photodetector with pin-hole aperture. Three cameras observe the phase front of these laser sidebands. Two of them monitor the in-and output of the interferometer arms and the third one is used in the control of the aberrations introduced by the power recycling cavity. In this paper the working principle of the phase cameras is explained and some characteristic parameters are described.

  19. Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basinger, Scott A.; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa; Cohen, David; Green, Joseph J.; Lou, John; Ohara, Catherine; Redding, David; Shi, Fang

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval software uses the Modified Gerchberg-Saxton (MGS) algorithm, an image-based sensing method that can turn any focal plane science instrument into a wavefront sensor, avoiding the need to use external metrology equipment. Knowledge of the wavefront enables intelligent control of active optical systems.

  20. String mediated phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Haws, D.; Rivers, R.; Holbraad, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated from first principles how the existence of string-like structures can cause a system to undergo a phase transition. In particular, the role of topologically stable cosmic string in the restoration of spontaneously broken symmetries is emphasized. How the thermodynamic properties of strings alter when stiffness and nearest neighbor string-string interactions are included is discussed.

  1. Mentoring Phases and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Georgia T.

    1997-01-01

    Data from 178 proteges supported Kram's model of mentoring phases: initiation, cultivation, separation, and redefinition. Data from 82 current and 69 former proteges were compared to those from 93 who were never mentored. Mentees had better career outcomes, organizational socialization, and job satisfaction; those not mentored had slightly higher…

  2. Introduction to phasing

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Garry L.

    2010-01-01

    When collecting X-ray diffraction data from a crystal, we measure the intensities of the diffracted waves scattered from a series of planes that we can imagine slicing through the crystal in all directions. From these intensities we derive the amplitudes of the scattered waves, but in the experiment we lose the phase information; that is, how we offset these waves when we add them together to reconstruct an image of our molecule. This is generally known as the ‘phase problem’. We can only derive the phases from some knowledge of the molecular structure. In small-molecule crystallography, some basic assumptions about atomicity give rise to relationships between the amplitudes from which phase information can be extracted. In protein crystallography, these ab initio methods can only be used in the rare cases in which there are data to at least 1.2 Å resolution. For the majority of cases in protein crystallography phases are derived either by using the atomic coordinates of a structurally similar protein (molecular replacement) or by finding the positions of heavy atoms that are intrinsic to the protein or that have been added (methods such as MIR, MIRAS, SIR, SIRAS, MAD, SAD or com­binations of these). The pioneering work of Perutz, Kendrew, Blow, Crick and others developed the methods of isomorphous replacement: adding electron-dense atoms to the protein without disturbing the protein structure. Nowadays, methods from small-molecule crystallography can be used to find the heavy-atom substructure and the phases for the whole protein can be bootstrapped from this prior knowledge. More recently, improved X-ray sources, detectors and software have led to the routine use of anomalous scattering to obtain phase information from either incorporated selenium or intrinsic sulfurs. In the best cases, only a single set of X-ray data (SAD) is required to provide the positions of the anomalous scatters, which together with density-modification procedures can reveal

  3. Phase Operator and Phase State in Thermo Field Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hong-Yi; Jiang, Nian-Quan

    We extend the Susskind-Glogower phase operator and phase state in quantum optics to thermo field dynamics (TFD). Based on the thermo entangled state representation, we introduce thermo excitation and de-excitation operators with which the phase operator and phase state in TFD can be constructed. The phase state treated as a limiting case of a new SU(1, 1) coherent states is also exhibited.

  4. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  5. Multicomponent three-phase equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.K.

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents the relations that describe thermodynamic equilibrium in a three-phase system. Multiple components, including air, water, and oil components, are considered in three phases: (1) aqueous, (2) oil, and (3) gas. Primary variables are specified for each of seven possible phase combinations. These primary variables are then used to determine the necessary secondary variables to completely describe the system. Criteria are also developed to check the stability of each phase configuration and determine possible transitions from one phase configuration to another phase configuration via phase appearances and disappearances.

  6. Noisy quantum phase communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklu, Berihu; Trapani, Jacopo; Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2015-06-01

    We address quantum phase channels, i.e communication schemes where information is encoded in the phase-shift imposed to a given signal, and analyze their performances in the presence of phase diffusion. We evaluate mutual information for coherent and phase-coherent signals, and for both ideal and realistic phase receivers. We show that coherent signals offer better performances than phase-coherent ones, and that realistic phase channels are effective ones in the relevant regime of low energy and large alphabets.

  7. Phase-field modeling of multi-phase solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, Britta; Wheeler, Adam A.

    2002-08-01

    A phase-field model for a general class of multi-phase metallic alloys is now proposed which describes both multi-phase solidification phenomena as well as polycrystalline grain structures. The model serves as a computational method to simulate the motion and kinetics of multiple phase boundaries and enables the visualization of the diffusion processes and of the phase transitions in multi-phase systems. Numerical simulations are presented which illustrate the capability of the phase-field model to recover a variety of complex experimental growth structures. In particular, the phase-field model can be used to simulate microstructure evolutions in eutectic, peritectic and monotectic alloys. In addition, polycrystalline grain structures with effects such as wetting, grain growth, symmetry properties of adjacent triple junctions in thin film samples and stability criteria at multiple junctions are described by phase-field simulations.

  8. Spatial Phase Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Frequently, scientists grow crystals by dissolving a protein in a specific liquid solution, and then allowing that solution to evaporate. The methods used next have been, variously, invasive (adding a dye that is absorbed by the protein), destructive (crushing protein/salt-crystal mixtures and observing differences between the crushing of salt and protein), or costly and time-consuming (X-ray crystallography). In contrast to these methods, a new technology for monitoring protein growth, developed in part through NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding from Marshall Space Flight Center, is noninvasive, nondestructive, rapid, and more cost effective than X-ray analysis. The partner for this SBIR, Photon-X, Inc., of Huntsville, Alabama, developed spatial phase imaging technology that can monitor crystal growth in real time and in an automated mode. Spatial phase imaging scans for flaws quickly and produces a 3-D structured image of a crystal, showing volumetric growth analysis for future automated growth.

  9. High power phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, B.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Makarov, A.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    One of the approaches to power distribution system of a superconducting proton linac under discussion at FNAL requires development of a fast-action, megawatt-range phase shifter. Using a couple of this kind of devices with a waveguide hybrid junction can allow independent control of phase and amplitude of RF power at the input of each superconducting cavity, which will result in significant saving in number of klystrons and modulators required for the accelerator. A prototype of a waveguide version of the shifter that uses Yttrium-Iron Garnet (YIG) blocks was developed and tested. This report presents design concept of the device, and main results of simulation and proof-of-principle tests.

  10. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  11. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1999-08-03

    An interferometer is disclosed which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 11 figs.

  12. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  13. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  14. Optically interconnected phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Kunath, Richard R.

    1988-01-01

    Phased-array antennas are required for many future NASA missions. They will provide agile electronic beam forming for communications and tracking in the range of 1 to 100 GHz. Such phased arrays are expected to use several hundred GaAs monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) as transmitting and receiving elements. However, the interconnections of these elements by conventional coaxial cables and waveguides add weight, reduce flexibility, and increase electrical interference. Alternative interconnections based on optical fibers, optical processing, and holography are under evaluation as possible solutions. In this paper, the current status of these techniques is described. Since high-frequency optical components such as photodetectors, lasers, and modulators are key elements in these interconnections, their performance and limitations are discussed.

  15. Phase calibration generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    A phase calibration system was developed for the Deep Space Stations to generate reference microwave comb tones which are mixed in with signals received by the antenna. These reference tones are used to remove drifts of the station's receiving system from the detected data. This phase calibration system includes a cable stabilizer which transfers a 20 MHz reference signal from the control room to the antenna cone. The cable stabilizer compensates for delay changes in the long cable which connects its control room subassembly to its antenna cone subassembly in such a way that the 20 MHz is transferred to the cone with no significant degradation of the hydrogen maser atomic clock stability. The 20 MHz reference is used by the comb generator and is also available for use as a reference for receiver LO's in the cone.

  16. Phase-Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    System developed and used at Langley Research Center measures phase between two signals of same frequency or between two signals, one of which is harmonic multiple of other. Simple and inexpensive device combines digital and analog components to give accurate phase measurements. One signal at frequency f fed to pulse shaper, produces negative pulse at time t4. Pulse applied to control input of sample-and-hold module 1. Second signal, at frequency nf, fed to zero-crossover amplifier, producing square wave at time t. Signal drives first one-shot producing narrow negative pulse at t1. Signal then drives second one-shot producing narrow positive pulse at time t2. This pulse used to turn on solid-state switch and reset integrator circuit to zero.

  17. Measurement by phase severance

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1987-03-01

    It is claimed that the measurement process is more accurately described by ''quasi-local phase severance'' than by ''wave function collapse''. The approach starts from the observation that the usual route to quantum mechanics starting from the Hamilton-Jacobi equations throws away half the degrees of freedom, namely, the classical initial state parameters. To overcome this difficulty, the full set of Hamilton-Jacobi equations is interpreted as operator equations acting on a state vector. The measurement theory presented is based on the conventional S-matrix boundary condition of N/sub A/ free particles in the distant past and N/sub B/ free particles in the distant future and taking the usual free particle wave functions, multiplied by phase factors.

  18. Emergence and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikkema, Arnold

    2006-05-01

    Phase transitions are well defined in physics through concepts such as spontaneous symmetry breaking, order parameter, entropy, and critical exponents. But emergence --- also exhibiting whole-part relations (such as top-down influence), unpredictability, and insensitivity to microscopic detail --- is a loosely-defined concept being used in many disciplines, particularly in psychology, biology, philosophy, as well as in physics[1,2]. I will review the concepts of emergence as used in the various fields and consider the extent to which the methods of phase transitions can clarify the usefulness of the concept of emergence both within the discipline of physics and beyond.1. Robert B. Laughlin, A Different Universe: Reinventing Physics from the Bottom Down (New York: Basic Books, 2005). 2. George F.R. Ellis, ``Physics and the Real World'', Physics Today, vol. 58, no. 7 (July 2005) pp. 49-54.

  19. Phase space quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaszak, Maciej; Domański, Ziemowit

    2012-02-01

    This paper develops an alternative formulation of quantum mechanics known as the phase space quantum mechanics or deformation quantization. It is shown that the quantization naturally arises as an appropriate deformation of the classical Hamiltonian mechanics. More precisely, the deformation of the point-wise product of observables to an appropriate noncommutative ⋆-product and the deformation of the Poisson bracket to an appropriate Lie bracket are the key elements in introducing the quantization of classical Hamiltonian systems. The formalism of the phase space quantum mechanics is presented in a very systematic way for the case of any smooth Hamiltonian function and for a very wide class of deformations. The considered class of deformations and the corresponding ⋆-products contains as a special case all deformations which can be found in the literature devoted to the subject of the phase space quantum mechanics. Fundamental properties of ⋆-products of observables, associated with the considered deformations are presented as well. Moreover, a space of states containing all admissible states is introduced, where the admissible states are appropriate pseudo-probability distributions defined on the phase space. It is proved that the space of states is endowed with a structure of a Hilbert algebra with respect to the ⋆-multiplication. The most important result of the paper shows that developed formalism is more fundamental than the axiomatic ordinary quantum mechanics which appears in the presented approach as the intrinsic element of the general formalism. The equivalence of two formulations of quantum mechanics is proved by observing that the Wigner-Moyal transform has all properties of the tensor product. This observation allows writing many previous results found in the literature in a transparent way, from which the equivalence of the two formulations of quantum mechanics follows naturally. In addition, examples of a free particle and a simple harmonic

  20. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  1. Solid phase extraction membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Kurt C; Langer, Roger L

    2002-11-05

    A wet-laid, porous solid phase extraction sheet material that contains both active particles and binder and that possesses excellent wet strength is described. The binder is present in a relatively small amount while the particles are present in a relatively large amount. The sheet material is sufficiently strong and flexible so as to be pleatable so that, for example, it can be used in a cartridge device.

  2. Photoinduced phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, K H

    2011-02-23

    Optically induced ultrafast electronic excitations with sufficiently long lifetimes may cause strong effects on phase transitions like structural and nonmetal→metal ones and on supercooling, supersaturation, etc. Examples are the transitions diamond→graphite, graphite→graphene, non-metal→metal, solid→liquid and vapor→liquid, solid. Photoinduced formation of graphene and water condensation of saturated or supersaturated vapor due to increased bonding amongst water molecules are of particular interest. These nonequilibrium transitions are an ultrafast response, on a few hundred fs time scale, to the fast low to large energy electronic excitations. The energy of the photons is converted into electronic energy via electronic excitations changing the cohesive energy. This changes the chemical potential controlling the phase transition. In view of the advances in laser optics photon induced transitions are expected to become an active area in nonequilibrium physics and phase transition dynamics. Conservation laws like energy or angular momentum conservation control the time during which the transitions occur. Since the photon induced effects result from weakening or strengthening of the bonding between the atoms or molecules transitions like solid/liquid, etc can be shifted in both directions. Photoinduced transitions will be discussed from a unified point of view. PMID:21411879

  3. Compactification on phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelady, Benjamin; Wheeler, James

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge for string theory is to understand the dimensional reduction required for comparison with the standard model. We propose reducing the dimension of the compactification by interpreting some of the extra dimensions as the energy-momentum portion of a phase-space. Such models naturally arise as generalized quotients of the conformal group called biconformal spaces. By combining the standard Kaluza-Klein approach with such a conformal gauge theory, we may start from the conformal group of an n-dimensional Euclidean space to form a 2n-dimensional quotient manifold with symplectic structure. A pair of involutions leads naturally to two n-dimensional Lorentzian manifolds. For n = 5, this leaves only two extra dimensions, with a countable family of possible compactifications and an SO(5) Yang-Mills field on the fibers. Starting with n=6 leads to 4-dimensional compactification of the phase space. In the latter case, if the two dimensions each from spacetime and momentum space are compactified onto spheres, then there is an SU(2)xSU(2) (left-right symmetric electroweak) field between phase and configuration space and an SO(6) field on the fibers. Such a theory, with minor additional symmetry breaking, could contain all parts of the standard model.

  4. Phases, phase equilibria, and phase rules in low-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, T.; Mishin, Y.

    2015-07-28

    We present a unified approach to thermodynamic description of one, two, and three dimensional phases and phase transformations among them. The approach is based on a rigorous definition of a phase applicable to thermodynamic systems of any dimensionality. Within this approach, the same thermodynamic formalism can be applied for the description of phase transformations in bulk systems, interfaces, and line defects separating interface phases. For both lines and interfaces, we rigorously derive an adsorption equation, the phase coexistence equations, and other thermodynamic relations expressed in terms of generalized line and interface excess quantities. As a generalization of the Gibbs phase rule for bulk phases, we derive phase rules for lines and interfaces and predict the maximum number of phases than may coexist in systems of the respective dimensionality.

  5. Phases, phase equilibria, and phase rules in low-dimensional systems.

    PubMed

    Frolov, T; Mishin, Y

    2015-07-28

    We present a unified approach to thermodynamic description of one, two, and three dimensional phases and phase transformations among them. The approach is based on a rigorous definition of a phase applicable to thermodynamic systems of any dimensionality. Within this approach, the same thermodynamic formalism can be applied for the description of phase transformations in bulk systems, interfaces, and line defects separating interface phases. For both lines and interfaces, we rigorously derive an adsorption equation, the phase coexistence equations, and other thermodynamic relations expressed in terms of generalized line and interface excess quantities. As a generalization of the Gibbs phase rule for bulk phases, we derive phase rules for lines and interfaces and predict the maximum number of phases than may coexist in systems of the respective dimensionality. PMID:26233156

  6. Digital phase-locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An digital phase-locked loop is provided for deriving a loop output signal from an accumulator output terminal. A phase detecting exclusive OR gate is fed by the loop digital input and output signals. The output of the phase detector is a bi-level digital signal having a duty cycle indicative of the relative phase of the input and output signals. The accumulator is incremented at a first rate in response to a first output level of the phase detector and at a second rate in response to a second output level of the phase detector.

  7. Monoclinic phases arising across thermal inter-ferroelectric phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yijia; Xue, Fei; Lei, Shiming; Lummen, Tom T. A.; Wang, Jianjun; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Chen, Long-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Thermotropic phase boundaries (TPBs), as thermal analogs of morphotropic phase boundaries (MPBs), are associated with the thermal inter-ferroelectric phase transitions. Similar to an MPB, a TPB exhibits a characteristically flattened energy profile which favors polarization rotation, thus giving rise to a structurally bridging low-symmetry phase. We report on the kinetic process of thermal inter-ferroelectric phase transitions in BaTiO3 and KNbO3 using the phase-field method. The domain structures are found to play key roles in stabilizing the monoclinic phase. In simple domain structures, the monoclinic phase is a transient phase and cannot be stabilized into its neighboring phase regimes. However, by introducing structural inhomogeneity (orthogonal in-plane domain twins), we found that the monoclinic phase can be stabilized over a range of over 100 K across the transition. As a result, the piezoelectric properties are enhanced due to the stabilized monoclinic phase. In addition to the emergence of new piezoelectric components with monoclinic symmetry, most of the original components present in the tetragonal symmetry also show substantial enhancement with the rotation of polarization.

  8. VRA Modeling, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindt, Louis M.; Mullins, Michael E.; Hand, David W.; Kline, Andrew A.

    1995-01-01

    The destruction of organic contaminants in waste water for closed systems, such as that of Space Station, is crucial due to the need for recycling the waste water. A co-current upflow bubble column using oxygen as the gas phase oxidant and packed with catalyst particles consisting of a noble metal on an alumina substrate is being developed for this process. The objective of this study is to develop a plug-flow model that will predict the performance of this three phase reactor system in destroying a multicomponent mixture of organic contaminants in water. Mass balances on a series of contaminants and oxygen in both the liquid and gas phases are used to develop this model. These mass balances incorporate the gas-to-liquid and liquid-to-particle mass transfer coefficients, the catalyst effectiveness factor, and intrinsic reaction rate. To validate this model, a bench scale reactor has been tested at Michigan Technological University at elevated pressures (50-83 psig,) and a temperature range of 200 to 290 F. Feeds consisting of five dilute solutions of ethanol (approx. 10 ppm), chlorobenzene (approx. 20 ppb), formaldehyde (approx. 100 ppb), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO approx. 300 ppb), and urea (approx. 20 ppm) in water were tested individually with an oxygen mass flow rate of 0.009 lb/h. The results from these individual tests were used to develop the kinetic parameter inputs necessary for the computer model. The computer simulated results are compared to the experimental data obtained for all 5 components run in a mixture on the differential test column for a range of reactor contact times.

  9. Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estlin, Tara A.; Chien, Steve A.; Castano, Rebecca; Gaines, Daniel M.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Schoolcraft, Josua B.; Oyake, Amalaye; Vaughs, Ashton G.; Torgerson, Jordan L.

    2011-01-01

    The Palomar Adaptive Optics System actively corrects for changing aberrations in light due to atmospheric turbulence. However, the underlying internal static error is unknown and uncorrected by this process. The dedicated wavefront sensor device necessarily lies along a different path than the science camera, and, therefore, doesn't measure the true errors along the path leading to the final detected imagery. This is a standard problem in adaptive optics (AO) called "non-common path error." The Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration (APRC) software suite performs automated sensing and correction iterations to calibrate the Palomar AO system to levels that were previously unreachable.

  10. Quantum phase magnification.

    PubMed

    Hosten, O; Krishnakumar, R; Engelsen, N J; Kasevich, M A

    2016-06-24

    Quantum metrology exploits entangled states of particles to improve sensing precision beyond the limit achievable with uncorrelated particles. All previous methods required detection noise levels below this standard quantum limit to realize the benefits of the intrinsic sensitivity provided by these states. We experimentally demonstrate a widely applicable method for entanglement-enhanced measurements without low-noise detection. The method involves an intermediate quantum phase magnification step that eases implementation complexity. We used it to perform squeezed-state metrology 8 decibels below the standard quantum limit with a detection system that has a noise floor 10 decibels above the standard quantum limit. PMID:27339982

  11. Quantum phase magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosten, O.; Krishnakumar, R.; Engelsen, N. J.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum metrology exploits entangled states of particles to improve sensing precision beyond the limit achievable with uncorrelated particles. All previous methods required detection noise levels below this standard quantum limit to realize the benefits of the intrinsic sensitivity provided by these states. We experimentally demonstrate a widely applicable method for entanglement-enhanced measurements without low-noise detection. The method involves an intermediate quantum phase magnification step that eases implementation complexity. We used it to perform squeezed-state metrology 8 decibels below the standard quantum limit with a detection system that has a noise floor 10 decibels above the standard quantum limit.

  12. FNAS phase partitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanalstine, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Project NAS8-36955 D.O. #100 initially involved the following tasks: (1) evaluation of various coatings' ability to control wall wetting and surface zeta potential expression; (2) testing various methods to mix and control the demixing of phase systems; and (3) videomicroscopic investigation of cell partition. Three complementary areas were identified for modification and extension of the original contract. They were: (1) identification of new supports for column cell partition; (2) electrokinetic detection of protein adsorption; and (3) emulsion studies related to bioseparations.

  13. Athena: Assessment Phase Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, David; Ayre, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The Athena mission concept has been proposed by the community in response to science themes of the Hot and Energetic Universe. Unlike other, competitive, mission selection exercises this "Large" class observatory mission has essentially been pre-selected. Nevertheless it has to be demonstrated that Athena meets the programmatic constraints of 1Bn euro cost cap, and a readiness level appropriate for formal mission adoption by the end 2019. This should be confirmed through a Phase A study conducted with two parallel industry activities. We describe the technical and programmatic content of these and latest progress in space and ground segment definition.

  14. Ion Phase Space Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Daniel Peter

    1987-09-01

    Experimental measurements are presented of ion phase space evolution in a collisionless magnetoplasma utilizing nonperturbing laser induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics. Ion configuration space and velocity space transport, and ion thermodynamic information were derived from the phase space diagrams for the following beam-plasma and obstacle-plasma systems:(UNFORMATTED TABLE OR EQUATION FOLLOWS) OBSTACLE & PLASMA SPECIES qquad disc & quad Ba ^+/e^ qquad disc & quad Ba^+/SF _6^-/e^ BEAM SPECIES & PLASMA SPECIES} qquad Ba^+ & quad Cs^+/e^ qquad Cs^+ & quad Ba^+/e^ qquad Ba^+ & quad Cs^+/SF_6 ^-/e^ qquad e^- & quad Ba^+ /e^ TABLE/EQUATION ENDS The ions were roughly mass symmetric. Plasma systems were reconstructed from multiple discrete Ba(II) ion velocity distributions with spatial, temporal, and velocity resolution of 1 mm^3, 2 musec, and 3 times 1010 cm ^3/sec^3 respectively. Phase space reconstructions indicated resonant ion response to the current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (EICW) in the case of an electron beam and to the ion cyclotron-cyclotron wave in the case of ion beams. Ion energization was observed in both systems. Local particle kinetic energy densities increase far above thermal levels in the presence of the EICW and ICCW. Time-resolved measurements of the EICW identified phase space particle bunching. The nonlinear evolution of f_{rm i}(x,v,t) was investigated for both beam systems. The near wake of conducting electrically floating disc obstacle was studied. Anomalous cross field diffusion (D_bot > 10 ^4 cm^2/sec) and ion energization were correlated with strong, low-frequency turbulence generated by the obstacle. Ion perpendicular kinetic energy densities doubled over thermal levels in the near wake. Upstream of the obstacle, l ~ 50 lambda_ {rm D}, a collisionless shock was indicated; far downstream, an ion flux peak was observed. Three negative ion plasma (NIP) sources were developed and characterized in the course of research: two

  15. Vapor phase pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    The vapor phase pyrolysis process is designed exclusively for the lunar production of oxygen. In this concept, granulated raw material (soil) that consists almost entirely of metal oxides is vaporized and the vapor is raised to a temperature where it dissociates into suboxides and free oxygen. Rapid cooling of the dissociated vapor to a discrete temperature causes condensation of the suboxides, while the oxygen remains essentially intact and can be collected downstream. The gas flow path and flow rate are maintained at an optimum level by control of the pressure differential between the vaporization region and the oxygen collection system with the aid of the environmental vacuum.

  16. Frequency discriminator/phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Circuit provides dual function of frequency discriminator/phase detector which reduces frequency acquisition time without adding to circuit complexity. Both frequency discriminators, in evaluated frequency discriminator/phase detector circuits, are effective two decades above and below center frequency.

  17. Microcellular foams via phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    A study of wide variety of processes for making plastic foams shows that phase separation processes for polymers from solutions offers the most viable methods for obtaining rigid plastic foams which met the physical requirements for fusion target designs. Four general phase separation methods have been shown to give polymer foams with densities less than 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ and cell sizes of 30..mu..m or less. These methods involve the utilization of non-solvent, chemical or thermal cooling processes to achieve a controlled phase separation wherein either two distinct phases are obtained where the polymer phase is a continuous phase or two bicontinuous phases are obtained where both the polymer and solvent are interpenetrating, continuous, labyrinthine phases. Subsequent removal of the solvent gives the final foam structure.

  18. Stationary phase analysis of generalized cubic phase mask wavefront coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Hui, Mei; Jia, Wei

    2013-07-01

    The modified generalized cubic phase mask (GCPM) has recently been applied in wavefront coding systems including infrared imaging and microscopy. In this paper, the stationary phase method is employed to analyze the GCPM characteristics. The SPA of the modulation transfer function (MTF) under misfocus aberration is derived for a wavefront coding system with a GCPM. The approximation corresponds with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach. On the basis of this approximation, we compare the characteristics of GCPM and cubic phase masks (CPM). A GCPM design approach based on stationary phase approximation is presented which helps to determine the initial parameter of phase mask, significantly decreasing the computational time required for numerical simulation.

  19. N-Consecutive-Phase Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Lee, Ho-Kyoung; Weber, Charles

    1995-01-01

    N-consecutive-phase encoder (NCPE) is conceptual encoder for generating alphabet of N consecutive full-response continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) signals. Enables use of binary preencoder of higher rate than used with simple continuous-phase encoder (CPE). NCPE makes possible to achieve power efficiencies and bandwidth efficiencies greater than conventional trellis coders with continuous-phase frequency-shift keying (CPFSK).

  20. A cosmic superfluid phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1991-01-01

    The universe may have undergone a superfluid-like phase during its evolution, resulting from the injection of nontopological charge into the spontaneously broken vacuum. In the presence of vortices this charge is identified with angular momentum. This leads to turbulent domains on the scale of the correlation length. By restoring the symmetry at low temperatures, the vortices dissociate and push the charges to the boundaries of these domains. The model can be scaled (phenomenologically) to very low energies, it can be incorporated in a late time phase transition and form large scale structure in the boundary layers of the correlation volumes. The novel feature of the model lies in the fact that the dark matter is endowed with coherent motion. The possibilities of identifying this flow around superfluid vortices with the observed large scale bulk motion is discussed. If this identification is possible, then the definite prediction can be made that a more extended map of peculiar velocities would have to reveal large scale circulations in the flow pattern.

  1. Process for phase separation

    DOEpatents

    Comolli, Alfred G.

    1979-01-01

    This invention provides a continuous process for separating a gaseous phase from a hydrocarbon liquid containing carbonaceous particulates and gases. The liquid is fed to a cylindrical separator, with the gaseous phase being removed therefrom as an overhead product, whereas the hydrocarbon liquid and the particulates are withdrawn as a bottoms product. By feeding the liquid tangentially to the separator and maintaining a particulate-liquid slurry downward velocity of from about 0.01 to about 0.25 fps in the separator, a total solids weight percent in the slurry of from about 0.1 to about 30%, a slurry temperature of from about 550.degree. to about 900.degree. F., a slurry residence time in the separator of from about 30 to about 360 seconds, and a length/diameter ratio for the separator of from about 20/1 to about 50/1, so that the characterization factor, .alpha., defined as ##STR1## DOES NOT EXCEED ABOUT 48 (.degree.R sec.sup.2)/ft, the deposit of carbonaceous materials on the interior surface of the separator may be substantially eliminated.

  2. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  3. Phase calibration target for quantitative phase imaging with ptychography.

    PubMed

    Godden, T M; Muñiz-Piniella, A; Claverley, J D; Yacoot, A; Humphry, M J

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) utilizes refractive index and thickness variations that lead to optical phase shifts. This gives contrast to images of transparent objects. In quantitative biology, phase images are used to accurately segment cells and calculate properties such as dry mass, volume and proliferation rate. The fidelity of the measured phase shifts is of critical importance in this field. However to date, there has been no standardized method for characterizing the performance of phase imaging systems. Consequently, there is an increasing need for protocols to test the performance of phase imaging systems using well-defined phase calibration and resolution targets. In this work, we present a candidate for a standardized phase resolution target, and measurement protocol for the determination of the transfer of spatial frequencies, and sensitivity of a phase imaging system. The target has been carefully designed to contain well-defined depth variations over a broadband range of spatial frequencies. In order to demonstrate the utility of the target, we measure quantitative phase images on a ptychographic microscope, and compare the measured optical phase shifts with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) topography maps and surface profile measurements from coherence scanning interferometry. The results show that ptychography has fully quantitative nanometer sensitivity in optical path differences over a broadband range of spatial frequencies for feature sizes ranging from micrometers to hundreds of micrometers. PMID:27137054

  4. Phase Detector For Rectangular Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dischert, Robert A.; Walter, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Phase detector for use with phase-locked-loops, servocontrol, and other electronic circuits designed to avoid disadvantages of other phase detectors. Used with both intermittent and continuous input signals. Circuit offers several advantages; reference signals continuous, burst of few pulses, or single pulse. Circuit "coasts" in absence of reference signal. Generates no steady-state output waveform at lock which makes filtering easier.

  5. Phase-change materials handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, D. V.; Hoover, M. J.; Oneill, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Handbook describes relationship between phase-change materials and more conventional thermal control techniques and discusses materials' space and terrestrial applications. Material properties of most promising phase-change materials and purposes and uses of metallic filler materials in phase-change material composites are provided.

  6. Phase detector for three-phase power factor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A phase detector for the three phase power factor controller (PFC) is described. The phase detector for each phase includes an operational amplifier which senses the current phase angle for that phase by sensing the voltage across the phase thyristor. Common mode rejection is achieved by providing positive feedback between the input and output of the voltage sensing operational amplifier. this feedback preferably comprises a resistor connected between the output and input of the operational amplifier. The novelty of the invention resides in providing positive feedback such that switching of the operational amplifier is synchronized with switching of the voltage across the thyristor. The invention provides a solution to problems associated with high common mode voltage and enables use of lower cost components than would be required by other approaches.

  7. Phase chaos in coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Popovych, Oleksandr V; Maistrenko, Yuri L; Tass, Peter A

    2005-06-01

    A complex high-dimensional chaotic behavior, phase chaos, is found in the finite-dimensional Kuramoto model of coupled phase oscillators. This type of chaos is characterized by half of the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents being positive and the Lyapunov dimension equaling almost the total system dimension. Intriguingly, the strongest phase chaos occurs for intermediate-size ensembles. Phase chaos is a common property of networks of oscillators of very different natures, such as phase oscillators, limit-cycle oscillators, and chaotic oscillators, e.g., Rössler systems. PMID:16089804

  8. Phase chaos in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Maistrenko, Yuri L.; Tass, Peter A.

    2005-06-01

    A complex high-dimensional chaotic behavior, phase chaos, is found in the finite-dimensional Kuramoto model of coupled phase oscillators. This type of chaos is characterized by half of the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents being positive and the Lyapunov dimension equaling almost the total system dimension. Intriguingly, the strongest phase chaos occurs for intermediate-size ensembles. Phase chaos is a common property of networks of oscillators of very different natures, such as phase oscillators, limit-cycle oscillators, and chaotic oscillators, e.g., Rössler systems.

  9. Geometric phase shifting digital holography.

    PubMed

    Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Narayanamurthy, C S; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2016-06-01

    A new phase shifting digital holographic technique using a purely geometric phase in Michelson interferometric geometry is proposed. The geometric phase in the system does not depend upon either optical path length or wavelength, unlike dynamic phase. The amount of geometric phase generated is controllable through a rotating wave plate. The new approach has unique features and major advantages in holographic measurement of transparent and reflecting three-dimensional (3D) objects. Experimental results on surface shape measurement and imaging of 3D objects are presented using the proposed method. PMID:27244436

  10. Phase coexistence far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of simple far-from-equilibrium systems exhibiting phase separation leads to the conclusion that phase coexistence is not well defined in this context. This is because the properties of the coexisting nonequilibrium systems depend on how they are placed in contact, as verified in the driven lattice gas with attractive interactions, and in the two-temperature lattice gas, under (a) weak global exchange between uniform systems, and (b) phase-separated (nonuniform) systems. Thus, far from equilibrium, the notions of universality of phase coexistence (i.e., independence of how systems exchange particles and/or energy), and of phases with intrinsic properties (independent of their environment) are lost.

  11. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  12. Phasing a segmented telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykin, Irina; Yacobi, Lee; Adler, Joan; Ribak, Erez N.

    2015-02-01

    A crucial part of segmented or multiple-aperture systems is control of the optical path difference between the segments or subapertures. In order to achieve optimal performance we have to phase subapertures to within a fraction of the wavelength, and this requires high accuracy of positioning for each subaperture. We present simulations and hardware realization of a simulated annealing algorithm in an active optical system with sparse segments. In order to align the optical system we applied the optimization algorithm to the image itself. The main advantage of this method over traditional correction methods is that wave-front-sensing hardware and software are no longer required, making the optical and mechanical system much simpler. The results of simulations and laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of this optimization algorithm to correct both piston and tip-tilt errors.

  13. Infrared metamaterial phase holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larouche, Stéphane; Tsai, Yu-Ju; Tyler, Talmage; Jokerst, Nan M.; Smith, David R.

    2012-05-01

    As a result of advances in nanotechnology and the burgeoning capabilities for fabricating materials with controlled nanoscale geometries, the traditional notion of what constitutes an optical device continues to evolve. The fusion of maturing low-cost lithographic techniques with newer optical design strategies has enabled the introduction of artificially structured metamaterials in place of conventional materials for improving optical components as well as realizing new optical functionality. Here we demonstrate multilayer, lithographically patterned, subwavelength, metal elements, whose distribution forms a computer-generated phase hologram in the infrared region (10.6 μm). Metal inclusions exhibit extremely large scattering and can be implemented in metamaterials that exhibit a wide range of effective medium response, including anomalously large or negative refractive index; optical magnetism; and controlled anisotropy. This large palette of metamaterial responses can be leveraged to achieve greater control over the propagation of light, leading to more compact, efficient and versatile optical components.

  14. Phasing a segmented telescope.

    PubMed

    Paykin, Irina; Yacobi, Lee; Adler, Joan; Ribak, Erez N

    2015-02-01

    A crucial part of segmented or multiple-aperture systems is control of the optical path difference between the segments or subapertures. In order to achieve optimal performance we have to phase subapertures to within a fraction of the wavelength, and this requires high accuracy of positioning for each subaperture. We present simulations and hardware realization of a simulated annealing algorithm in an active optical system with sparse segments. In order to align the optical system we applied the optimization algorithm to the image itself. The main advantage of this method over traditional correction methods is that wave-front-sensing hardware and software are no longer required, making the optical and mechanical system much simpler. The results of simulations and laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of this optimization algorithm to correct both piston and tip-tilt errors. PMID:25768631

  15. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  16. Time domain phase measuring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The phase and/or period stability of a device is determined by connecting the device in one orthogonal arm of a phase detector having a mixer. In the other arm is an adjustable, variable phase shift device. The output of the mixer is fed through an active low pass filter to derive a DC voltage indicative of the phase shift. The variable phase device is adjusted so that the DC voltage will nullify the phase shift of the tested device under normal conditions. The DC voltage level is converted into a time interval indicative of the phase change of the tested device by determining when the level equals the amplitude of a low frequency ramp voltage. The interval between adjacent equality points can be measured or the period between a reference point on the ramp voltage and the quality be measured.

  17. Phase Coarsening in Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. G.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2015-08-01

    Phase coarsening (Ostwald ripening) phenomena are ubiquitous in materials growth processes such as thin film formation. The classical theory explaining late-stage phase coarsening phenomena was developed by Lifshitz and Slyozov, and by Wagner in the 1960s. Their theory is valid only for a vanishing volume fraction of the second phase in three dimensions. However, phase coarsening in two-dimensional systems is qualitatively different from that in three dimensions. In this paper, the many-body concept of screening length is reviewed, from which we derive the growth law for a `screened' phase island, and develop diffusion screening theory for phase coarsening in thin films. The coarsening rate constant, maximum size of phase islands in films, and their size distribution function will be derived from diffusion screening theory. A critical comparison will be provided of prior coarsening concepts and improvements derived from screening approaches.

  18. Simulation of Mission Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlstrom, Nicholas Mercury

    2016-01-01

    This position with the Simulation and Graphics Branch (ER7) at Johnson Space Center (JSC) provided an introduction to vehicle hardware, mission planning, and simulation design. ER7 supports engineering analysis and flight crew training by providing high-fidelity, real-time graphical simulations in the Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) lab. The primary project assigned by NASA mentor and SES lab manager, Meghan Daley, was to develop a graphical simulation of the rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) phases of flight. The simulation is to include a generic crew/cargo transportation vehicle and a target object in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Various capsule, winged, and lifting body vehicles as well as historical RPOD methods were evaluated during the project analysis phase. JSC core mission to support the International Space Station (ISS), Commercial Crew Program (CCP), and Human Space Flight (HSF) influenced the project specifications. The simulation is characterized as a 30 meter +V Bar and/or -R Bar approach to the target object's docking station. The ISS was selected as the target object and the international Low Impact Docking System (iLIDS) was selected as the docking mechanism. The location of the target object's docking station corresponds with the RPOD methods identified. The simulation design focuses on Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) system architecture models with station keeping and telemetry data processing capabilities. The optical and inertial sensors, reaction control system thrusters, and the docking mechanism selected were based on CCP vehicle manufacturer's current and proposed technologies. A significant amount of independent study and tutorial completion was required for this project. Multiple primary source materials were accessed using the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS) and reference textbooks were borrowed from the JSC Main Library and International Space Station Library. The Trick Simulation Environment and User

  19. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer phase grating designs

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Diffraction phase gratings are employed in phase-shifting point diffraction interferometers to improve the interferometric fringe contrast. The diffraction phase grating diffracts a zeroth-order diffraction of light at a first power level to the test-beam window of a mask that is positioned at the image plane and a first-order diffraction at a second power to the reference-beam pinhole. The diffraction phase grating is preferably selected to yield a desired ratio of the first power level to second power level.

  20. Phased Array Feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. Richard; Bradley, Richard F.; Brisken, Walter F.; Cotton, William D.; Emerson, Darrel T.; Kerr, Anthony R.; Lacasse, Richard J.; Morgan, Matthew A.; Napier, Peter J.; Norrod, Roger D.; Payne, John M.; Pospieszalski, Marian W.; Symmes, Arthur; Thompson, A. Richard; Webber, John C.

    This white paper offers cautionary observations about the planning and development of new, large radio astronomy instruments. Complexity is a strong cost driver so every effort should be made to assign differing science requirements to different instruments and probably different sites. The appeal of shared resources is generally not realized in practice and can often be counterproductive. Instrument optimization is much more difficult with longer lists of requirements, and the development process is longer and less efficient. More complex instruments are necessarily further behind the technology state of the art because of longer development times. Including technology R&D in the construction phase of projects is a growing trend that leads to higher risks, cost overruns, schedule delays, and project de-scoping. There are no technology breakthroughs just over the horizon that will suddenly bring down the cost of collecting area. Advances come largely through careful attention to detail in the adoption of new technology provided by industry and the commercial market. Radio astronomy instrumentation has a very bright future, but a vigorous long-term R&D program not tied directly to specific projects needs to be restored, fostered, and preserved.

  1. Optimal Phase Oscillatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follmann, Rosangela

    2013-03-01

    Important topics as preventive detection of epidemics, collective self-organization, information flow and systemic robustness in clusters are typical examples of processes that can be studied in the context of the theory of complex networks. It is an emerging theory in a field, which has recently attracted much interest, involving the synchronization of dynamical systems associated to nodes, or vertices, of the network. Studies have shown that synchronization in oscillatory networks depends not only on the individual dynamics of each element, but also on the combination of the topology of the connections as well as on the properties of the interactions of these elements. Moreover, the response of the network to small damages, caused at strategic points, can enhance the global performance of the whole network. In this presentation we explore an optimal phase oscillatory network altered by an additional term in the coupling function. The application to associative-memory network shows improvement on the correct information retrieval as well as increase of the storage capacity. The inclusion of some small deviations on the nodes, when solutions are attracted to a false state, results in additional enhancement of the performance of the associative-memory network. Supported by FAPESP - Sao Paulo Research Foundation, grant number 2012/12555-4

  2. Phase change materials handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, D. V.; Hoover, M. J.; Oneill, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide theory and data needed by the thermal design engineer to bridge the gap between research achievements and actual flight systems, within the limits of the current state of the art of phase change materials (PCM) technology. The relationship between PCM and more conventional thermal control techniques is described and numerous space and terrestrial applications of PCM are discussed. Material properties of the most promising PCMs are provided; the purposes and use of metallic filler materials in PCM composites are presented; and material compatibility considerations relevant to PCM design are included. The engineering considerations of PCM design are described, especially those pertaining to the thermodynamic and heat transfer phenomena peculiar to PCM design. Methods of obtaining data not currently available are presented. The special problems encountered in the space environment are described. Computational tools useful to the designer are discussed. In summary, each aspect of the PCM problem important to the design engineer is covered to the extent allowed by the scope of this effort and the state of the art.

  3. Impulsive phase transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Bely-Dubau, Francoise; Brown, John C.; Dulk, George A.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Enome, Shinzo; Gabriel, Alan H.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Melrose, Donald; Neidig, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    The transport of nonthermal electrons is explored. The thick-target electron beam model, in which electrons are presumed to be accelerated in the corona and typically thermalized primarily in the chromosphere and photosphere, is supported by observations throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. At the highest energies, the anisotropy of gamma-ray emission above 10 MeV clearly indicates that these photons are emitted by anisotropically-directed particles. The timing of this high-energy gamma-radiation with respect to lower-energy hard X-radiation implies that the energetic particles have short life-times. For collisional energy loss, this means that they are stopped in the chromosphere or below. Stereoscopic (two-spacecraft) observations at hard X-ray energies (up to 350 keV) imply that these lower-energy (but certainly nonthermal) electrons are also stopped deep in the chromosphere. Hard X-ray images show that, in spatially resolved flares whose radiation consists of impulsive bursts, the impulsive phase starts with X-radiation that comes mostly from the foot-points of coronal loops whose coronal component is outlined by microwaves.

  4. Phase-Oriented Gear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Phase-oriented gear systems are differential planetary transmissions in which each planet gear has two sets of unequal numbers of teeth indexed at prescribed relative angles (phases). The figure illustrates an application of the phase-oriented gearing concept to a relatively simple speed-reducing differential planetary transmission that includes a sun gear, an idler gear, three identical planet gears, a ground internal ring gear, and an output internal ring gear. Typically, the ground internal ring gear and output internal ring gear have different numbers of teeth, giving rise to a progressive and periodic phase shift between the corresponding pairs of teeth engaged by each successive planet gear. To accommodate this phase shift, it is necessary to introduce a compensating phase shift between the ground-gear-engaging and output-gearengaging sections of each planet gear. This is done by individually orienting each planet gear

  5. Distributed phased array architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Variations in amplifiers and phase shifters can cause degraded antenna performance, depending also on the environmental conditions and antenna array architecture. The implementation of distributed phased array hardware was studied with the aid of the DISTAR computer program as a simulation tool. This simulation provides guidance in hardware simulation. Both hard and soft failures of the amplifiers in the T/R modules are modeled. Hard failures are catastrophic: no power is transmitted to the antenna elements. Noncatastrophic or soft failures are modeled as a modified Gaussian distribution. The resulting amplitude characteristics then determine the array excitation coefficients. The phase characteristics take on a uniform distribution. Pattern characteristics such as antenna gain, half power beamwidth, mainbeam phase errors, sidelobe levels, and beam pointing errors were studied as functions of amplifier and phase shifter variations. General specifications for amplifier and phase shifter tolerances in various architecture configurations for C band and S band were determined.

  6. Oscillatory phase shapes syllable perception.

    PubMed

    Ten Oever, Sanne; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-12-29

    The role of oscillatory phase for perceptual and cognitive processes is being increasingly acknowledged. To date, little is known about the direct role of phase in categorical perception. Here we show in two separate experiments that the identification of ambiguous syllables that can either be perceived as /da/ or /ga/ is biased by the underlying oscillatory phase as measured with EEG and sensory entrainment to rhythmic stimuli. The measured phase difference in which perception is biased toward /da/ or /ga/ exactly matched the different temporal onset delays in natural audiovisual speech between mouth movements and speech sounds, which last 80 ms longer for /ga/ than for /da/. These results indicate the functional relationship between prestimulus phase and syllable identification, and signify that the origin of this phase relationship could lie in exposure and subsequent learning of unique audiovisual temporal onset differences. PMID:26668393

  7. Theory of antiferroelectric phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolédano, Pierre; Guennou, Mael

    2016-07-01

    At variance with structural ferroic phase transitions which give rise to macroscopic tensors coupled to macroscopic fields, criteria defining antiferroelectric (AFE) phase transitions are still under discussion due to the absence of specific symmetry properties characterizing their existence. They are recognized by the proximity of a ferroelectric (FE) phase induced under applied electric field, with a double hysteresis loop relating the induced polarization to the electric field and a typical anomaly of the dielectric permittivity. Here, we show that there exist indeed symmetry criteria defining AFE transitions. They relate the local symmetry of the polar crystallographic sites emerging at an AFE phase transition with the macroscopic symmetry of the AFE phase. The dielectric properties of AFE transitions are deduced from a Landau theoretical model in which ferroelectric and ferrielectric phases are shown to stabilize as the result of specific symmetry-allowed couplings of the AFE order parameter with the field-induced polarization.

  8. Phase contrast without phase plates and phase rings--optical solutions for improved imaging of phase structures.

    PubMed

    Piper, Timm; Piper, Jörg

    2013-10-01

    Using the optical methods described, phase specimens can be observed with a modified light microscope in enhanced clarity, purified from typical artifacts which are apparent in standard phase contrast illumination. In particular, haloing and shade-off are absent, lateral and vertical resolution are maximized and the image quality remains constant even in problematic preparations which cannot be well examined in normal phase contrast, such as specimens beyond a critical thickness or covered by obliquely situated cover slips. The background brightness and thus the range of contrast can be continuously modulated and specimens can be illuminated in concentric-peripheral, axial or paraxial light. Additional contrast effects can be achieved by spectral color separation. Normal glass or mirror lenses can be used; they do not need to be fitted with a phase plate or a phase ring. The methods described should be of general interest for all disciplines using phase microscopy. PMID:23913620

  9. Berry phase in neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiaogang; McKellar, Bruce H.J.; Zhang Yue

    2005-09-01

    We study the Berry phase in neutrino oscillations for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. In order to have a Berry phase, the neutrino oscillations must occur in a varying medium, the neutrino-background interactions must depend on at least two independent densities, and also there must be CP violation. If the neutrino interactions with matter are mediated only by the standard model W and Z boson exchanges, these conditions imply that there must be at least three generations of neutrinos. The CP violating Majorana phases do not play a role in generating a Berry phase. We show that a natural way to satisfy the conditions for the generation of a Berry phase is to have sterile neutrinos with active-sterile neutrino mixing, in which case at least two active and one sterile neutrinos are required. If there are additional new CP violating flavor changing interactions, it is also possible to have a nonzero Berry phase with just two generations.

  10. Digitally controlled distributed phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vawter, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    A digitally controlled distributed phase shifter is comprised of N phase shifters. Digital control is achieved by using N binary length-weighted electrodes located on the top surface of a waveguide. A control terminal is attached to each electrode thereby allowing the application of a control signal. The control signal is either one of two discrete bias voltages. The application of the discrete bias voltages change the modal index of a portion of the waveguide that corresponds to a length of the electrode to which the bias voltage is applied, thereby causing the phase to change through the underlying portion of the waveguide. The digitally controlled distributed phase shift network has a total phase shift comprised of the sum of the individual phase shifters.

  11. Phase characteristics of electromagnetic stirring

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisaki, Keisuke; Ueyama, Takatsugu; Takahashi, Keiichi; Satoh, Shouji

    1997-09-01

    Electromagnetic stirring is used at billet molds as well as at slab mold, to get high quality steel at continuous casting in steel making plant. In order to get the same electromagnetic force in each billet mold and thus the same quality, phase characteristics of electromagnetic stirring is investigated. From the calculation result, it is found that the relative phase at which the difference of the electromagnetic torque in each mold becomes the smallest is 0 or 240 deg. To apply the phase characteristics of the EMS to the quality control, the authors propose the dynamic phase control system by two inverters to get the high quality in the surface crack.

  12. Quantum phase transition in space

    SciTech Connect

    Damski, Bogdan; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    A quantum phase transition between the symmetric (polar) phase and the phase with broken symmetry can be induced in a ferromagnetic spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate in space (rather than in time). We consider such a phase transition and show that the transition region in the vicinity of the critical point exhibits scalings that reflect a compromise between the rate at which the transition is imposed (i.e., the gradient of the control parameter) and the scaling of the divergent healing length in the critical region. Our results suggest a method for the direct measurement of the scaling exponent {nu}.

  13. Going through a quantum phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    1992-01-01

    Phase measurements on a single-mode radiation field are examined from a system-theoretic viewpoint. Quantum estimation theory is used to establish the primacy of the Susskind-Glogower (SG) phase operator; its phase eigenkets generate the probability operator measure (POM) for maximum likelihood phase estimation. A commuting observables description for the SG-POM on a signal x apparatus state space is derived. It is analogous to the signal-band x image-band formulation for optical heterodyne detection. Because heterodyning realizes the annihilation operator POM, this analogy may help realize the SG-POM. The wave function representation associated with the SG POM is then used to prove the duality between the phase measurement and the number operator measurement, from which a number-phase uncertainty principle is obtained, via Fourier theory, without recourse to linearization. Fourier theory is also employed to establish the principle of number-ket causality, leading to a Paley-Wiener condition that must be satisfied by the phase-measurement probability density function (PDF) for a single-mode field in an arbitrary quantum state. Finally, a two-mode phase measurement is shown to afford phase-conjugate quantum communication at zero error probability with finite average photon number. Application of this construct to interferometric precision measurements is briefly discussed.

  14. Topological phases of eternal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Sekino, Yasuhiro; Shenker, Stephen; Susskind, Leonard

    2010-06-15

    ''Eternal inflation'' is a term that describes a number of different phenomena that have been classified by Winitzki. According to Winitzki's classification, these phases can be characterized by the topology of the percolating structures in the inflating, 'white', region. In this paper we discuss these phases, the transitions between them, and the way they are seen by a 'Census Taker', a hypothetical observer inside the noninflating, 'black', region. We discuss three phases that we call 'black island', 'tubular', and 'white island'. The black island phase is familiar, composed of rare Coleman De Luccia bubble nucleation events. The Census Taker sees an essentially spherical boundary, described by the conformal field theory of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker/conformal field theory (FRW/CFT) correspondence. In the tubular phase the Census Taker sees a complicated infinite genus structure composed of arbitrarily long tubes. The white island phase is even more mysterious from the black side. Surprisingly, when viewed from the noninflating region this phase resembles a closed, positively curved universe that eventually collapses to a singularity. Nevertheless, pockets of eternal inflation continue forever. In addition, there is an 'aborted' phase in which no eternal inflation takes place. Rigorous results of Chayes, Chayes, Grannan, and Swindle establish the existence of all of these phases, separated by first order transitions, in Mandelbrot percolation, a simple model of eternal inflation.

  15. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Boehm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-15

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E-fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  16. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Böhm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-01

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E -fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  17. Fluctuation driven electroweak phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  18. Emittance and Phase Space Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Alternative chicane-type beam lines are proposed for exact emittance exchange between horizontal phase space (x; x{prime}) and longitudinal phase space (z; {delta}). Methods to achieve exact phase space exchanges, i.e. mapping x to z, x{prime} to {delta}, z to x and {delta} to x{prime} are suggested. Methods to mitigate the thick-lens effect of the transverse cavity on emittance exchange are discussed. Some applications of the phase space exchanger and the feasibility of an emittance exchange experiment with the proposed chicane-type beam line at SLAC are discussed.

  19. Method for aqueous phase reactions

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for converting liquid organic material in a mixture into a product utilizing a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase without substantially affecting the catalytic activity, thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst.

  20. Logistics planning for phased programs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    It is pointed out that the proper and early integration of logistics planning into the phased program planning process will drastically reduce these logistics costs. Phased project planning is a phased approach to the planning, approval, and conduct of major research and development activity. A progressive build-up of knowledge of all aspects of the program is provided. Elements of logistics are discussed together with aspects of integrated logistics support, logistics program planning, and logistics activities for phased programs. Continuing logistics support can only be assured if there is a comprehensive sequential listing of all logistics activities tied to the program schedule and a real-time inventory of assets.

  1. Invalid phase values removal method for absolute phase recovery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Mo, Rong; Sun, Huibin; Chang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaxia

    2016-01-10

    A novel approach is presented for more effectively removing invalid phase values in absolute phase recovery. The approach is based on a detailed study involving the types and cases of invalid phase values. Meanwhile, some commonalities of the existing removal algorithms also are thoroughly analyzed. It is well known that rough absolute phase and fringe order maps can very easily be obtained by temporal phase unwrapping techniques. After carefully analyzing the components and fringe order distribution of the rough fringe order map, the proposed method chiefly adopts an entirely new strategy to refine a pure fringe order map. The strategy consists of three parts: (1) the square of an image gradient, (2) subregion areas of the binary image, and (3) image decomposition and composition. In combination with the pure fringe order map and a removal criterion, the invalid phase values can be identified and filtered out from the rough absolute phase map. This new strategy not only gets rid of the limitations of traditional removal methods but also has a two-fold function. The paper also offers different metrics from the experiment to evaluate the quality of the final absolute phase. In contrast with other removal methods, experimental results have verified the feasibility, effectiveness, and superiority of the proposed method. PMID:26835776

  2. Quantitative Phase Microscopy: how to make phase data meaningful.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Goldie; Creath, Katherine

    2014-03-12

    The continued development of hardware and associated image processing techniques for quantitative phase microscopy has allowed superior phase data to be acquired that readily shows dynamic optical volume changes and enables particle tracking. Recent efforts have focused on tying phase data and associated metrics to cell morphology. One challenge in measuring biological objects using interferometrically obtained phase information is achieving consistent phase unwrapping and -dimensions and correct for temporal discrepanices using a temporal unwrapping procedure. The residual background shape due to mean value fluctuations and residual tilts can be removed automatically using a simple object characterization algorithm. Once the phase data are processed consistently, it is then possible to characterize biological samples such as myocytes and myoblasts in terms of their size, texture and optical volume and track those features dynamically. By observing optical volume dynamically it is possible to determine the presence of objects such as vesicles within myoblasts even when they are co-located with other objects. Quantitative phase microscopy provides a label-free mechanism to characterize living cells and their morphology in dynamic environments, however it is critical to connect the measured phase to important biological function for this measurement modality to prove useful to a broader scientific community. In order to do so, results must be highly consistent and require little to no user manipulation to achieve high quality nynerical results that can be combined with other imaging modalities. PMID:25309099

  3. PHASE CHANGE LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

    2006-03-01

    Work is being performed to develop a new shipping system for frozen environmental samples (or other materials) that uses an optimal phase change liquid (PCL) formulation and an insulated shipping container with an on-board digital temperature data logger to provide a history of the temperature profile within the container during shipment. In previous work, several PCL formulations with temperatures of fusion ranging from approximately -14 to -20 C were prepared and evaluated. Both temperature of fusion and heat of fusion of the formulations were measured, and an optimal PCL formulation was selected. The PCL was frozen in plastic bags and tested for its temperature profile in a cooler using a digital temperature data logger. This testing showed that the PCL formulation can maintain freezer temperatures (< -7 to -20 C) for an extended period, such as the time for shipping samples by overnight courier. The results of the experiments described in this report provide significant information for use in developing an integrated freezer system that uses a PCL formulation to maintain freezer temperatures in coolers for shipping environmental samples to the laboratory. Experimental results show the importance of the type of cooler used in the system and that use of an insulating material within the cooler improves the performance of the freezer system. A new optimal PCL formulation for use in the system has been determined. The new formulation has been shown to maintain temperatures at < -7 to -20 C for 47 hours in an insulated cooler system containing soil samples. These results are very promising for developing the new technology.

  4. Adaptive Phase Delay Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    There are several experimental setups involving rotating machinery that require some form of synchronization. The adaptive phase delay generator (APDG) the Bencic-1000 is a flexible instrument that allows the user to generate pulses synchronized to the rising edge of a tachometer signal from any piece of rotating machinery. These synchronized pulses can vary by the delay angle, pulse width, number of pulses per period, number of skipped pulses, and total number of pulses. Due to the design of the pulse generator, any and all of these parameters can be changed independently, yielding an unparalleled level of versatility. There are two user interfaces to the APDG. The first is a LabVIEW program that has the advantage of displaying all of the pulse parameters and input signal data within one neatly organized window on the PC monitor. Furthermore, the LabVIEW interface plots the rpm of the two input signal channels in real time. The second user interface is a handheld portable device that goes anywhere a computer is not accessible. It consists of a liquid-crystal display and keypad, which enable the user to control the unit by scrolling through a host of command menus and parameter listings. The APDG combines all of the desired synchronization control into one unit. The experimenter can adjust the delay, pulse width, pulse count, number of skipped pulses, and produce a specified number of pulses per revolution. Each of these parameters can be changed independently, providing an unparalleled level of versatility when synchronizing hardware to a host of rotating machinery. The APDG allows experimenters to set up quickly and generate a host of synchronizing configurations using a simple user interface, which hopefully leads to faster results.

  5. Topology in Ordered Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanda, Satoshi; Matsuyama, Toyoki; Oda, Migaku; Asano, Yasuhiro; Yakubo, Kousuke

    2006-08-01

    .]. Nanofibers of hydrogen storage alloy / I. Saita ... [et al.]. Synthesis of stable icosahedral quasicrystals in Zn-Sc based alloys and their magnetic properties / S. Kashimoto and T. Ishimasa. One-armed spiral wave excited by eam pressure in accretion disks in Be/X-Ray binaries / K. Hayasaki and A. T. Okazaki -- IV. Topological defects and excitations. Topological excitations in the ground state of charge density wave systems / P. Monceau. Soliton transport in nanoscale charge-density-wave systems / K. Inagaki, T. Toshima and S. Tanda. Topological defects in triplet superconductors UPt3, Sr[symbol]RuO[symbol], etc. / K. Maki ... [et al.]. Microscopic structure of vortices in type II superconductors / K. Machida ... [et al.]. Microscopic neutron investigation of the Abrikosov state of high-temperature superconductors / J. Mesot. Energy dissipation at nano-scale topological defects of high-Tc superconductors: microwave study / A. Maeda. Pressure induced topological phase transition in the heavy Fermion compound CeAl[symbol] / H. Miyagawa ... [et al.]. Explanation for the unusual orientation of LSCO square vortex lattice in terms of nodal superconductivity / M. Oda. Local electronic states in Bi[symbol]Sr[symbol]CaCu[symbol]O[symbol] / A. Hashimoto ... [et al.] -- V. Topology in quantum phenomena. Topological vortex formation in a Bose-Einstein condensate of alkali-metal atoms / M. Nakahara. Quantum phase transition of [symbol]He confined in nano-porous media / K. Shirahama, K. Yamamoto and Y. Shibayama. A new mean-field theory for Bose-Einstein condensates / T. Kita. Spin current in topological cristals / Y. Asano. Antiferromagnetic defects in non-magnetic hidden order of the heavy-electron system URu[symbol]Si[symbol] / H. Amitsuka, K. Tenya and M. Yokoyama. Magnetic-field dependences of thermodynamic quantities in the vortex state of Type-II superconductors / K. Watanabe, T. Kita and M. Arai. Three-magnon-mediated nuclear spin relaxation in quantum ferrimagnets of topological

  6. Phase-locked loop with controlled phase slippage

    DOEpatents

    Mestha, L.K.

    1994-03-29

    A system for synchronizing a first subsystem controlled by a changing frequency sweeping from a first frequency to a second frequency, with a second subsystem operating at a steady state second frequency is described. Trip plan parameters are calculated in advance to determine the phase relationship between the frequencies of the first subsystem and second subsystem in order to obtain synchronism at the end of the frequency sweep of the first subsystem. During the time in which the frequency of the first subsystem is sweeping from the first frequency to the second frequency, the phase locked system compares the actual phase difference with the trip plan phase difference and incrementally changes the sweep frequency in a manner so that phase lock is achieved when the first subsystem reaches a frequency substantially identical to that of the second subsystem. 10 figures.

  7. Phase-locked loop with controlled phase slippage

    SciTech Connect

    Mestha, Lingappa K.

    1994-01-01

    A system for synchronizing a first subsystem controlled by a changing frequency sweeping from a first frequency to a second frequency, with a second subsystem operating at a steady state second frequency. Trip plan parameters are calculated in advance to determine the phase relationship between the frequencies of the first subsystem and second subsystem in order to obtain synchronism at the end of the frequency sweep of the first subsystem. During the time in which the frequency of the first subsystem is sweeping from the first frequency to the second frequency, the phase locked system compares the actual phase difference with the trip plan phase difference and incrementally changes the sweep frequency in a manner so that phase lock is achieved when the first subsystem reaches a frequency substantially identical to that of the second subsystem.

  8. Phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Chen, Zhengyu; Xu, Zhiguo; Gao, Yingjie

    2015-10-01

    Microwave photonic links (MPLs) can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial and waveguide solutions due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth, superior stability and immunity to external interference. It has been considered in various applications such as: the transmission of radio frequency (RF) signal over optical carriers, video television transmission, radar and communication systems. Stability of phase of the microwave photonic links is a critical issue in several realistic applications. The delay line technique for phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links is measured for the first time. Using this approach, the input signal noise and power supply noise can be effectively cancelled, and it does not require phase locking. The phase noise of a microwave photonic links with a 10 GHz sinusoidal signal is experimentally demonstrated.

  9. Microgravity Passive Phase Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paragano, Matthew; Indoe, William; Darmetko, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    A new invention disclosure discusses a structure and process for separating gas from liquids in microgravity. The Microgravity Passive Phase Separator consists of two concentric, pleated, woven stainless- steel screens (25-micrometer nominal pore) with an axial inlet, and an annular outlet between both screens (see figure). Water enters at one end of the center screen at high velocity, eventually passing through the inner screen and out through the annular exit. As gas is introduced into the flow stream, the drag force exerted on the bubble pushes it downstream until flow stagnation or until it reaches an equilibrium point between the surface tension holding bubble to the screen and the drag force. Gas bubbles of a given size will form a front that is moved further down the length of the inner screen with increasing velocity. As more bubbles are added, the front location will remain fixed, but additional bubbles will move to the end of the unit, eventually coming to rest in the large cavity between the unit housing and the outer screen (storage area). Owing to the small size of the pores and the hydrophilic nature of the screen material, gas does not pass through the screen and is retained within the unit for emptying during ground processing. If debris is picked up on the screen, the area closest to the inlet will become clogged, so high-velocity flow will persist farther down the length of the center screen, pushing the bubble front further from the inlet of the inner screen. It is desired to keep the velocity high enough so that, for any bubble size, an area of clean screen exists between the bubbles and the debris. The primary benefits of this innovation are the lack of any need for additional power, strip gas, or location for venting the separated gas. As the unit contains no membrane, the transport fluid will not be lost due to evaporation in the process of gas separation. Separation is performed with relatively low pressure drop based on the large surface

  10. USArray Regional Phase Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, J. S.; Shearer, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The regional Pn and Sn phases, which are typically described as headwaves that propagate in the uppermost mantle, are sensitive to heterogeneities in the mantle lid and complement other seismic studies with poorer vertical resolution at this depth. We have experimented with a variety of approaches to image the velocity structure and anisotropy in the western U.S., starting with separate Pn and Sn time-term tomographies, but also localized cross-correlation and stacking approaches that benefit from the regular USArray station arrangement. Later we combined the data sets for joint Pn-Sn inversions and the resulting Vp/Vs maps provide further insight into the nature of the seismic anomalies. Now that USArray has reached the east coast, we are updating our models to include the cumulative station footprint. The sparser source distribution in the eastern U.S., and the resulting longer ray paths, provide new challenges and justify the inclusion of additional parameters that account for the velocity gradient in the mantle lid. Our results show generally higher Pn velocities in the eastern U.S., but we observe patches of lower velocities around the New Madrid seismic zone and below the eastern Appalachians. We find that the Pn fast axes generally do not agree with SKS splitting orientations, suggesting significant vertical changes in anisotropy in the upper mantle. For example, the circular pattern of the fast polarization direction of SKS in the western U.S. is much less pronounced in the Pn results, and in the eastern U.S. the dominant Pn fast direction is approximately north-south, whereas the SKS fast polarizations are oriented roughly parallel to the absolute plate motion direction. Since Pn and Sn travel through the crust, they can provide additional information on crustal thickness. In several regions our results and estimates from receiver function studies are inconsistent. For example, beneath the Colorado Plateau our crustal thickness estimates are about 35-40 km

  11. Four-quadrant phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manus, E. A.; Wiley, H. P.

    1977-01-01

    Phase detection circuit functions over full 360 degrees covering all four quadrants, and gives linear output that is proportional to phase difference. In addition, its output has single polarity; thus it is compatible with logic circuitry without need for additional processing.

  12. Phase Transitions for Suspension Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iommi, Godofredo; Jordan, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    This paper is devoted to studying the thermodynamic formalism for suspension flows defined over countable alphabets. We are mostly interested in the regularity properties of the pressure function. We establish conditions for the pressure function to be real analytic or to exhibit a phase transition. We also construct an example of a potential for which the pressure has countably many phase transitions.

  13. Phase unwrapping via graph cuts.

    PubMed

    Bioucas-Dias, José M; Valadão, Gonçalo

    2007-03-01

    Phase unwrapping is the inference of absolute phase from modulo-2pi phase. This paper introduces a new energy minimization framework for phase unwrapping. The considered objective functions are first-order Markov random fields. We provide an exact energy minimization algorithm, whenever the corresponding clique potentials are convex, namely for the phase unwrapping classical Lp norm, with p > or = 1. Its complexity is KT (n, 3n), where K is the length of the absolute phase domain measured in 2pi units and T (n, m) is the complexity of a max-flow computation in a graph with n nodes and m edges. For nonconvex clique potentials, often used owing to their discontinuity preserving ability, we face an NP-hard problem for which we devise an approximate solution. Both algorithms solve integer optimization problems by computing a sequence of binary optimizations, each one solved by graph cut techniques. Accordingly, we name the two algorithms PUMA, for phase unwrappping max-flow/min-cut. A set of experimental results illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed approach and its competitiveness in comparison with state-of-the-art phase unwrapping algorithms. PMID:17357730

  14. Three phase downhole separator process

    DOEpatents

    Cognata, Louis John

    2008-06-24

    Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

  15. 78 FR 33911 - Phased Retirement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ...The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is proposing to implement phased retirement, a new human resources tool that allows full-time employees to work a part-time schedule while beginning to draw retirement benefits. Section 100121 of the ``Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act,'' or ``MAP-21,'' authorizes phased retirement under the Civil Service Retirement System and the......

  16. Phased Retirement: The European Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swank, Constance

    This report provides United States corporate and union policymakers with practical information on one alternative work pattern for older employees--phased retirement--from European colleagues who already have implemented or negotiated specific phasing programs. An introduction provides details on the collection of information from companies in…

  17. Phase-sensitive flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Steinkamp, J.A.

    1993-12-14

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer (FCM) provides additional FCM capability to use the fluorescence lifetime of one or more fluorochromes bound to single cells to provide additional information regarding the cells. The resulting fluorescence emission can be resolved into individual fluorescence signals if two fluorochromes are present or can be converted directly to a decay lifetime from a single fluorochrome. The excitation light for the fluorochromes is modulated to produce an amplitude modulated fluorescence pulse as the fluorochrome is excited in the FCM. The modulation signal also forms a reference signal that is phase-shifted a selected amount for subsequent mixing with the output modulated fluorescence intensity signal in phase-sensitive detection circuitry. The output from the phase-sensitive circuitry is then an individual resolved fluorochrome signal or a single fluorochrome decay lifetime, depending on the applied phase shifts. 15 figures.

  18. Phase Contrast Imaging in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Kai; Ernst, Thomas; Buchthal, Steve; Speck, Oliver; Anderson, Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance phase images can yield superior gray and white matter contrast compared to conventional magnitude images. However, the underlying contrast mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Previous studies have been limited to high field acquisitions in adult volunteers and patients. In this study, phase imaging in the neonatal brain is demonstrated for the first time. Compared to adults, phase differences between gray and white matter are significantly reduced but not inverted in neonates with little myelination and iron deposits in their brains. The remaining phase difference between the neonatal and adult brains may be due to different macromolecule concentration in the unmyelinated brain of the neonates and thus different frequency due to water macromolecule exchange. Additionally, the susceptibility contrast from brain myelination can be separately studied in neonates during brain development. Therefore, magnetic resonance phase imaging is suggested as a novel tool to study neonatal brain development and pathologies in neonates. PMID:21232619

  19. Phase width reduction project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.; Xie, Z.Q.; McMahan, M. A.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of the phase width reduction project, 1993--96, was to reduce the phase width of the 88-Inch Cyclotron beam on target from 5--10 ns to 1--2 ns for certain experiments, such as Gammasphere, which use time-of-flight identification. Since reducing the phase width also reduces beam intensity, tuning should be done to also optimize the transmission. The Multi-turn Collimator slits in the cyclotron center region were used to collimate the early turns radially, thus reducing the phase width from about 5 ns to 1--2 ns FWHM for a Gammasphere beam. The effect of the slits on phase width was verified with a Fast Faraday Cup and with particle and gamma-ray detectors in the external beamline.

  20. Phase-sensitive flow cytometer

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    This report describes phase-sensitive flow cytometer (FCM) which provides additional FCM capability to use the fluorescence lifetime of one or more fluorochromes bound to single cells to provide additional information regarding the cells. The resulting fluorescence emission can be resolved into individual fluorescence signals if two fluorochromes are present or can be converted directly to a decay lifetime from a single fluorochrome. The excitation light for the fluorochromes is modulated to produce an amplitude modulated fluorescence pulse as the fluorochrome is excited in the FCM. The modulation signal also forms a reference signal that is phase-shifted a selected amount for subsequent mixing with the output modulated fluorescence intensity signal in phase-sensitive detection circuitry. The output from the phase-sensitive circuitry is then an individual resolved fluorochrome signal or a single fluorochrome decay lifetime, depending on the applied phase shifts.

  1. Phase comparator apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Coffield, Frederick E.

    1987-01-01

    The phase change to be measured is multiply measured at artificially incred and decreased values and then averaged to result in greater accuracy. Delayed versions of the reference and input signals are compared in dual channels to the undelayed input signal and the undelayed reference signal, respectively. Resulting time-lengthened and time-shortened phase measurement signals from the dual comparator channels are algebraically combined to provide an analog output signal having an average magnitude accurately proportional to the true phase difference between the undelayed reference and the undelayed input signals. Increased linearity/reproducibility results where relatively high frequency signals (e.g., up to 70 MHz or more) are to be phase compared. An optional voltage clamp on the comparator channel outputs further improves linearity/reproducibility where very small phase differences are being measured.

  2. Two-phase nickel aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khadkikar, P. S.; Vedula, K.; Shabel, B. S.

    1987-01-01

    The as-extruded microstructures of two alloys in the two phase field consisting of Ni3Al and NiAl in the Ni-Al phase diagram exhibit fibrous morphology and consist of Ll(2) Ni3Al and B2 NiAl. These as-extruded microstructures can be modified dramatically by suitable heat treatments. Martensite plus NiAl or martensite plus Ni3Al microstructures are obtained upon quenching from 1523 K. Aging of martensite at 873 K results in the recently identified phase Ni5Al, whereas aging at 1123 K reverts the microstructures to Ni3Al plus NiAl. The microstructures with predominantly martensite of Ni5Al3 phases are brittle in tension at room temperature. The latter microstructure does not deform plastically even in compression at room temperature. However, some promise of room temperature tensile ductility is indicated by the Ni3Al plus NiAl phase mixtures.

  3. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  4. Phase-sensitive flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Steinkamp, John A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer (FCM) provides additional FCM capability to use the fluorescence lifetime of one or more fluorochromes bound to single cells to provide additional information regarding the cells. The resulting fluorescence emission can be resolved into individual fluorescence signals if two fluorochromes are present or can be converted directly to a decay lifetime from a single fluorochrome. The excitation light for the fluorochromes is modulated to produce an amplitude modulated fluorescence pulse as the fluorochrome is excited in the FCM. The modulation signal also forms a reference signal that is phase-shifted a selected amount for subsequent mixing with the output modulated fluorescence intensity signal in phase-sensitive detection circuitry. The output from the phase-sensitive circuitry is then an individual resolved fluorochrome signal or a single fluorochrome decay lifetime, depending on the applied phase shifts.

  5. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  6. Differentiation method for phase recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Meriç

    2015-03-01

    Here we consider a derivative based method for phase recovery and demonstrate a numerical method that can be described as differentiate and cross multiply operation to obtain the phase gradient. This method uses quadrature phase data that is in sine and cosine form, which is a natural outcome many interferometric measurements including that of digital holographic reconstruction. Since the differentiation is performed on trigonometric functions which are discrete, it is shown that the method of differentiation and the sampling rate are important considerations especially for the noise corrupt signals. The method is initially developed for 1D phase signals, and then later extended to 2D. Noise performance of the method is also investigated, and it is shown that for extremely noisy signals the method can be adapted to an iteration routine which recovers the phase successfully. We present simulations and the experimental results which show the validity of the approach.

  7. Planar infrared binary phase reflectarray.

    PubMed

    Ginn, James; Lail, Brian; Alda, Javier; Boreman, Glenn

    2008-04-15

    A reflective, binary phase reflectarray is demonstrated in the infrared, at a wavelength of 10.6 microm. The unique aspect of this work, at this frequency band, is that the specific desired phase shift is achieved using an array of subwavelength metallic patches on top of a ground-plane-backed dielectric stand-off layer. This is an alternative to the usual method of constructing a reflective Fresnel zone plate by means of a given thickness of dielectric. This initial demonstration of the reflectarray approach at infrared is significant in that there is inherent flexibility to create a range of phase shifts by varying the dimensions of the patches. This will allow for a multilevel phase distribution, or even a continuous variation of phase, across an optical surface with only two-dimensional lithography, avoiding the need for dielectric height variations. PMID:18414530

  8. Quantitative phase imaging using grating-based quadrature phase interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jigang; Yaqoob, Zahid; Heng, Xin; Cui, Xiquan; Yang, Changhuei

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we report the use of holographic gratings, which act as the free-space equivalent of the 3x3 fiber-optic coupler, to perform full field phase imaging. By recording two harmonically-related gratings in the same holographic plate, we are able to obtain nontrivial phase shift between different output ports of the gratings-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The phase difference can be adjusted by changing the relative phase of the recording beams when recording the hologram. We have built a Mach-Zehnder interferometer using harmonically-related holographic gratings with 600 and 1200 lines/mm spacing. Two CCD cameras at the output ports of the gratings-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer are used to record the full-field quadrature interferograms, which are subsequently processed to reconstruct the phase image. The imaging system has ~12X magnification with ~420μmx315μm field-of-view. To demonstrate the capability of our system, we have successfully performed phase imaging of a pure phase object and a paramecium caudatum.

  9. {sup 129}I Interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Caffee, M W; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-30

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for {sup 129}I was organized and conducted. Nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic ''standard type'' materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios of the samples varied from 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}14}. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the samples. In Phase I, the {sup 129}I AMS measurements for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in {sup 129}I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I {sup 129}I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the {sup 129}I intercomparison, three separate laboratories prepared AgI from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves). Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then re-distributed to the participating {sup 129}I AMS facilities and {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  10. Octahedral tilting, monoclinic phase and the phase diagram of PZT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, F.; Trequattrini, F.; Craciun, F.; Galassi, C.

    2011-10-01

    Anelastic and dielectric spectroscopy measurements on PbZr1-xTixO3 (PZT) close to the morphotropic (MPB) and antiferroelectric boundaries provide new insight into some controversial aspects of its phase diagram. No evidence is found of a border separating monoclinic (M) from rhombohedral (R) phases, in agreement with recent structural studies supporting a coexistence of the two phases over a broad composition range x < 0.5, with the fraction of M increasing toward the MPB. It is also discussed why the observed maximum of elastic compliance appears to be due to a rotational instability of the polarization linearly coupled to shear strain. Therefore it cannot be explained by extrinsic softening from finely twinned R phase alone, but indicates the presence also of M phase, not necessarily homogeneous. A new diffuse transition is found within the ferroelectric phase near x ˜ 0.1, at a temperature TIT higher than the well established boundary TT to the phase with tilted octahedra. It is proposed that around TIT the octahedra start rotating in a disordered manner and finally become ordered below TT. In this interpretation, the onset temperature for octahedral tilting monotonically increases up to the antiferroelectric transition of PbZrO3, and the depression of TT(x) below x = 0.18 would be a consequence of the partial relief of the mismatch between the average cation radii with the initial stage of tilting below TIT.

  11. Double random phase encoding using phase reservation and compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, various studies have been conducted to illustrate the vulnerability of double random phase encoding (DRPE). In this paper, we propose a novel method via phase reservation and compression to enhance DRPE security. Only a compressed phase distribution is available in the CCD plane, and the amplitude component is not available or requested for optical decryption. Since only noise-like distributions can be obtained by using the correct security keys during optical decryption, a nonlinear correlation algorithm is further applied for authenticating the decrypted image. It is demonstrated that valid conditions for attack algorithms are broken and high security can be achieved for the DRPE system.

  12. Inhomogeneous phase shifting: an algorithm for nonconstant phase displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Tellez-Quinones, Alejandro; Malacara-Doblado, Daniel

    2010-11-10

    In this work, we have developed a different algorithm than the classical one on phase-shifting interferometry. These algorithms typically use constant or homogeneous phase displacements and they can be quite accurate and insensitive to detuning, taking appropriate weight factors in the formula to recover the wrapped phase. However, these algorithms have not been considered with variable or inhomogeneous displacements. We have generalized these formulas and obtained some expressions for an implementation with variable displacements and ways to get partially insensitive algorithms with respect to these arbitrary error shifts.

  13. Numerical Studies of Topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraedts, Scott

    The topological phases of matter have been a major part of condensed matter physics research since the discovery of the quantum Hall effect in the 1980s. Recently, much of this research has focused on the study of systems of free fermions, such as the integer quantum Hall effect, quantum spin Hall effect, and topological insulator. Though these free fermion systems can play host to a variety of interesting phenomena, the physics of interacting topological phases is even richer. Unfortunately, there is a shortage of theoretical tools that can be used to approach interacting problems. In this thesis I will discuss progress in using two different numerical techniques to study topological phases. Recently much research in topological phases has focused on phases made up of bosons. Unlike fermions, free bosons form a condensate and so interactions are vital if the bosons are to realize a topological phase. Since these phases are difficult to study, much of our understanding comes from exactly solvable models, such as Kitaev's toric code, as well as Levin-Wen and Walker-Wang models. We may want to study systems for which such exactly solvable models are not available. In this thesis I present a series of models which are not solvable exactly, but which can be studied in sign-free Monte Carlo simulations. The models work by binding charges to point topological defects. They can be used to realize bosonic interacting versions of the quantum Hall effect in 2D and topological insulator in 3D. Effective field theories of ''integer'' (non-fractionalized) versions of these phases were available in the literature, but our models also allow for the construction of fractional phases. We can measure a number of properties of the bulk and surface of these phases. Few interacting topological phases have been realized experimentally, but there is one very important exception: the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE). Though the fractional quantum Hall effect we discovered over 30

  14. Supercooling and phase coexistence in cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Megevand, Ariel; Sanchez, Alejandro D.

    2008-03-15

    Cosmological phase transitions are predicted by particle physics models, and have a variety of important cosmological consequences, which depend strongly on the dynamics of the transition. In this work we investigate in detail the general features of the development of a first-order phase transition. We find thermodynamical constraints on some quantities that determine the dynamics, namely, the latent heat, the radiation energy density, and the false-vacuum energy density. Using a simple model with a Higgs field, we study numerically the amount and duration of supercooling and the subsequent reheating and phase coexistence. We analyze the dependence of the dynamics on the different parameters of the model, namely, the energy scale, the number of degrees of freedom, and the couplings of the scalar field with bosons and fermions. We also inspect the implications for the cosmological outcomes of the phase transition.

  15. Phase shift estimation in interferograms with unknown phase step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmau, Oscar; Rivera, Mariano; Gonzalez, Adonai

    2016-08-01

    We first present two closed formulas for computing the phase shift in interferograms with unknown phase step. These formulas obtain theoretically the exact phase step in fringe pattern without noise and only require the information in two pixels of the image. The previous formulas allows us to define a functional that yields an estimate of the phase step in interferograms corrupted by noise. In the experiment we use the standard Least Square formulation which also yields a closed formula, although the general formulation admits a robust potential. We provide two possible implementations of our approach, one in which the sites can be randomly selected and the other in which we can scan the whole image. The experiments show that the proposed algorithm presents the best results compared with state of the art algorithms.

  16. Phase unwrapping using discontinuity optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, T.J.

    1998-03-01

    In SAR interferometry, the periodicity of the phase must be removed using two-dimensional phase unwrapping. The goal of the procedure is to find a smooth surface in which large spatial phase differences, called discontinuities, are restricted to places where their presence is reasonable. The pioneering work of Goldstein et al. identified points of local unwrap inconsistency called residues, which must be connected by discontinuities. This paper presents an overview of recent work that treats phase unwrapping as a discrete optimization problem with the constraint that residues must be connected. Several algorithms use heuristic methods to reduce the total number of discontinuities. Constantini has introduced the weighted sum of discontinuity magnitudes as a criterion of unwrap error and shown how algorithms from optimization theory are used to minimize it. Pixels of low quality are given low weight to guide discontinuities away from smooth, high-quality regions. This method is generally robust, but if noise is severe it underestimates the steepness of slopes and the heights of peaks. This problem is mitigated by subtracting (modulo 2{pi}) a smooth estimate of the unwrapped phase from the data, then unwrapping the resulting residual phase. The unwrapped residual is added to the smooth estimate to produce the final unwrapped phase. The estimate can be computed by lowpass filtering of an existing unwrapped phase; this makes possible an iterative algorithm in which the result of each iteration provides the estimate for the next. An example illustrates the results of optimal discontinuity placement and the improvement from unwrapping of the residual phase.

  17. Phase transitions in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrahsheh, Fawaz Y.

    Disorder can have a wide variety of consequences for the physics of phase transitions. Some transitions remain unchanged in the presence of disorder while others are completely destroyed. In this thesis we study the effects of disorder on several classical and quantum phase transitions in condensed matter systems. After a brief introduction, we study the ferromagnetic phase transition in a randomly layered Heisenberg magnet using large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results provide numerical evidence for the exotic infinite-randomness scenario. We study classical and quantum smeared phase transitions in substitutional alloys A1-xBx. Our results show that the disorder completely destroys the phase transition with a pronounced tail of the ordered phase developing for all compositions x < 1. In addition, we find that short-ranged disorder correlations can have a dramatic effect on the transition. Moreover, we show an experimental realization of the composition-tuned ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic quantum phase transition in Sr1-xCa xRuO3. We investigate the effects of disorder on first-order quantum phase transitions on the example of the N-color quantum Ashkin-Teller model. By means of a strong disorder renormalization group, we demonstrate that disorder rounds the first-order transition to a continuous one for both weak and strong coupling between the colors. Finally, we investigate the superfluid-insulator quantum phase transition of one-dimensional bosons with off-diagonal disorder by means of large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations. Beyond a critical disorder strength, we find nonuniversal, disorder dependent critical behavior.

  18. Two-phase/two-phase heat exchanger analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Rhyn H.

    1992-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop (CPL) system with a condenser linked to a double two-phase heat exchanger is analyzed numerically to simulate the performance of the system from different starting conditions to a steady state condition based on a simplified model. Results of the investigation are compared with those of similar apparatus available in the Space Station applications of the CPL system with a double two-phase heat exchanger.

  19. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. Jr. ); Cochran, H.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Arsenic normally is not considered to be a contaminant. However, because arsenic was found in many cylinders of UF{sub 6}, including in corrosion products, a study was performed of the distribution of the two arsenic fluorides, AsF{sub 3} and AsF{sub 5}, between liquid and vapor phases. The results of the study pertain to condensation or vaporization of liquid UF{sub 6}. This study includes use of various experimental data plus many extrapolations necessitated by the meagerness of the experimental data. The results of this study provide additional support for the vapor-liquid equilibrium model of J.M. Prausnitz and his coworkers as a means of describing the distribution of various impurities between vapor and liquid phases of UF{sub 6}. Thus, it is concluded that AsF{sub 3} will tend to concentrate in the liquid phase but that the concentration of AsF{sub 5} in the vapor phase will exceed its liquid-phase concentration by a factor of about 7.5, which is in agreement with experimental data. Because the weight of the liquid phase in a condensation operation may be in the range of thousands of times that of the vapor phase, most of any AsF{sub 5} will be in the liquid phase in spite of this separation factor of 7.5. It may also be concluded that any arsenic fluorides fed into a uranium isotope separation plant will either travel with other low-molecular-weight gases or react with materials present in the plant. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Fibroid Ablation: Phase II and Phase III Results

    PubMed Central

    Pemueller, Rodolfo Robles; Garza Leal, José Gerardo; Abbott, Karen R.; Falls, Janice L.; Macer, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To review phase II and phase III treatments of symptomatic uterine fibroids (myomas) using laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA). Methods: We performed a retrospective, multicenter clinical analysis of 206 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic RFVTA of symptomatic myomas conducted on an outpatient basis under two phase II studies at 2 sites (n = 69) and one phase III study at 11 sites (n = 137). Descriptive and exploratory, general trend, and matched-pair analyses were applied. Results: From baseline to 12 months in the phase II study, the mean transformed symptom severity scores improved from 53.9 to 8.8 (P < .001) (n = 57), health-related quality-of-life scores improved from 48.5 to 92.0 (P < .001) (n = 57), and mean uterine volume decreased from 204.4 cm3 to 151.4 cm3 (P = .008) (n = 58). Patients missed a median of 4 days of work (range, 2–10 days). The rate of possible device-related adverse events was 1.4% (1 of 69). In the phase III study, approximately 98% of patients were assessed at 12 months, and their transformed symptom severity scores, health-related quality-of-life scores, mean decrease in uterine volume, and mean menstrual bleeding reduction were also significant. Patients in phase III missed a median of 5 days of work (range, 1–29 days). The rate of periprocedural device-related adverse events was 3.5% (5 of 137). Despite the enrollment requirement for patients in both phases to have completed childbearing, 4 pregnancies occurred within the first year after treatment. Conclusions: RFVTA does not require any uterine incisions and provides a uterine-sparing procedure with rapid recovery, significant reduction in uterine size, significant reduction or elimination of myoma symptoms, and significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24960480

  1. Machine learning phases of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasquilla, Juan; Stoudenmire, Miles; Melko, Roger

    We show how the technology that allows automatic teller machines read hand-written digits in cheques can be used to encode and recognize phases of matter and phase transitions in many-body systems. In particular, we analyze the (quasi-)order-disorder transitions in the classical Ising and XY models. Furthermore, we successfully use machine learning to study classical Z2 gauge theories that have important technological application in the coming wave of quantum information technologies and whose phase transitions have no conventional order parameter.

  2. Phase-locked laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botez, Dan (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A phase-locked laser array comprises a body of semiconductor material having means for defining a plurality of substantially parallel lasing zones which are spaced an effective distance apart so that the modes of the adjacent lasing zones are phase-locked to one another. One of the array electrodes comprises a plurality of electrical contacts to the body between the lasing zones. These contacts provide an enhanced current density profile and thus an increase in the gain in the regions between the lasing zones so that zero degree phase-shift operation between adjacent lasing zones is achievable.

  3. Dynamic phase-shifting photoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Asundi, A; Tong, L; Boay, C G

    2001-08-01

    The application of phase-shifting photoelasticity to a real-time dynamic event involves simultaneous recording of the four phase-shifted images. Here an instrument, believed to be novel, is developed and described for this purpose. Use of a Multispec Imager is introduced into digital photoelasticity for the first time to our knowledge. This device enables splitting the optical energy of an object into four identical paths, thus permitting recording of the required four phase-shifted images. Experimental demonstration is provided for validation. PMID:18360395

  4. Berry's phase in rotating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shi-Min; Xu, Hong-Hua

    1991-09-01

    It is shown that, in addition to the Aharonov-Bohm-like phase studied previously [M. V. Berry, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 392, 45 (1984); Y. Aharakov and J. Anandan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1593 (1987); C. H. Tsai and D. Neilson, Phys. Rev. A 37, 619 (1988)], Berry's topological phase also appears for purely mechanical reasons in systems rotating at slowly-time-varying angular velocity about a fixed center. A possible experiment to probe this manifestation of Berry's phase is discussed.

  5. SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Grunewald, Elliot D

    2013-11-12

    Technologies applicable to SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling are disclosed, including SNMR acquisition apparatus and methods, SNMR processing apparatus and methods, and combinations thereof. SNMR acquisition may include transmitting two or more SNMR pulse sequences and applying a phase shift to a pulse in at least one of the pulse sequences, according to any of a variety cycling techniques. SNMR processing may include combining SNMR from a plurality of pulse sequences comprising pulses of different phases, so that desired signals are preserved and indesired signals are canceled.

  6. Multichannel Phase and Power Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Samuel; Lux, James; McMaster, Robert; Boas, Amy

    2006-01-01

    An electronic signal-processing system determines the phases of input signals arriving in multiple channels, relative to the phase of a reference signal with which the input signals are known to be coherent in both phase and frequency. The system also gives an estimate of the power levels of the input signals. A prototype of the system has four input channels that handle signals at a frequency of 9.5 MHz, but the basic principles of design and operation are extensible to other signal frequencies and greater numbers of channels. The prototype system consists mostly of three parts: An analog-to-digital-converter (ADC) board, which coherently digitizes the input signals in synchronism with the reference signal and performs some simple processing; A digital signal processor (DSP) in the form of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) board, which performs most of the phase- and power-measurement computations on the digital samples generated by the ADC board; and A carrier board, which allows a personal computer to retrieve the phase and power data. The DSP contains four independent phase-only tracking loops, each of which tracks the phase of one of the preprocessed input signals relative to that of the reference signal (see figure). The phase values computed by these loops are averaged over intervals, the length of which is chosen to obtain output from the DSP at a desired rate. In addition, a simple sum of squares is computed for each channel as an estimate of the power of the signal in that channel. The relative phases and the power level estimates computed by the DSP could be used for diverse purposes in different settings. For example, if the input signals come from different elements of a phased-array antenna, the phases could be used as indications of the direction of arrival of a received signal and/or as feedback for electronic or mechanical beam steering. The power levels could be used as feedback for automatic gain control in preprocessing of incoming signals

  7. Berry phase in nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Fu, L. B.

    2010-05-15

    The Berry phase acquired by an eigenstate that experienced a nonlinear adiabatic evolution is investigated thoroughly. The circuit integral of the Berry connection of the instantaneous eigenstate cannot account for the adiabatic geometric phase, while the Bogoliubov excitations around the eigenstates are found to be accumulated during the nonlinear adiabatic evolution and contribute a finite phase of geometric nature. A two-mode model is used to illustrate our theory. Our theory is applicable to Bose-Einstein condensate, nonlinear light propagation, and Ginzburg-Landau equations for complex order parameters in condensed-matter physics.

  8. Phase space quantum mechanics - Direct

    SciTech Connect

    Nasiri, S.; Sobouti, Y.; Taati, F.

    2006-09-15

    Conventional approach to quantum mechanics in phase space (q,p), is to take the operator based quantum mechanics of Schroedinger, or an equivalent, and assign a c-number function in phase space to it. We propose to begin with a higher level of abstraction, in which the independence and the symmetric role of q and p is maintained throughout, and at once arrive at phase space state functions. Upon reduction to the q- or p-space the proposed formalism gives the conventional quantum mechanics, however, with a definite rule for ordering of factors of noncommuting observables. Further conceptual and practical merits of the formalism are demonstrated throughout the text.

  9. Geometrical Phases in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Joy Julius

    In quantum mechanics, the path-dependent geometrical phase associated with a physical system, over and above the familiar dynamical phase, was initially discovered in the context of adiabatically changing environments. Subsequently, Aharonov and Anandan liberated this phase from the original formulation of Berry, which used Hamiltonians, dependent on curves in a classical parameter space, to represent the cyclic variations of the environments. Their purely quantum mechanical treatment, independent of Hamiltonians, instead used the non-trivial topological structure of the projective space of one-dimensional subspaces of an appropriate Hilbert space. The geometrical phase, in their treatment, results from a parallel transport of the time-dependent pure quantum states along a curve in this space, which is endowed with an abelian connection. Unlike Berry, they were able to achieve this without resort to an adiabatic approximation or to a time-independent eigenvalue equation. Prima facie, these two approaches are conceptually quite different. After a review of both approaches, an exposition bridging this apparent conceptual gap is given; by rigorously analyzing a model composite system, it is shown that, in an appropriate correspondence limit, the Berry phase can be recovered as a special case from the Aharonov-Anandan phase. Moreover, the model composite system is used to show that Berry's correction to the traditional Born-Oppenheimer energy spectra indeed brings the spectra closer to the exact results. Then, an experimental arrangement to measure geometrical phases associated with cyclic and non-cyclic variations of quantum states of an entangled composite system is proposed, utilizing the fundamental ideas of the recently opened field of two-particle interferometry. This arrangement not only resolves the controversy regarding the true nature of the phases associated with photon states, but also unequivocally predicts experimentally accessible geometrical phases in a

  10. 129I interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II results

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.I.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, I.D.

    1997-07-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129I was organized and conducted. A total of nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic `standard type` materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129I/127I ratios of the samples varied from 10`-8 to 10`-14. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the environmental samples. The 129I AMS measurements obtained at different laboratories for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the comparison, AgI was prepared from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves) by three separate laboratories. Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then redistributed to the participating 129I AMS facilities and 129I/127I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  11. Experimental study of phase separation in dividing two phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yong; Yang Zhilin; Xu Jijun

    1996-12-31

    Experimental study of phase separation of air-water two phase bubbly, slug flow in the horizontal T-junction is carried out. The influences of the inlet mass quality X1, mass extraction rate G3/G1, and fraction of extracted liquid QL3/QL1 on phase separation characteristics are analyzed. For the first time, the authors have found and defined pulsating run effect by the visual experiments, which show that under certain conditions, the down stream flow of the T-junction has strangely affected the phase redistribution of the junction, and firstly point out that the downstream geometric condition is very important to the study of phase separation phenomenon of two-phase flow in a T-junction. This kind of phenomenon has many applications in the field of energy, power, petroleum and chemical industries, such as the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) caused by a small break in a horizontal coolant pipe in nuclear reactor, and the flip-flop effect in the natural gas transportation pipeline system, etc.

  12. In situ phase transformation of Laves phase from Chi-phase in Mo-containing Fe–Cr–Ni alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, L.; Yang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    For an in situ phase transformation of the Chi (χ) phase to the Laves phase we observed in a Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo model alloy. The morphology, composition, and crystal structure of the χ and Laves phases, and their orientation relationship with the matrix austenite phase were investigated. The resulted Laves phase has larger lattice mismatch with the matrix phase than the χ phase, leading to the increase of local strain fields and the formation of dislocations. Moreover, this finding is helpful to understand the precipitation behavior of the intermetallic phases in the Mo-containing austenitic stainless steels.

  13. Trends in phased array development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schell, A. C.

    1986-03-01

    In the past 15 years, several outstanding phased arrays have been taken into service for functions involving defense applications. It is pointed out, however, that the impact of phased array technology on radar and communications antennas has been minor in comparison to the impact of solid-state technology on the other major subsystem, the signal processor. This situation is mainly related to cost considerations, and the scale of the commercial market involved. Attention is given to details regarding the economics of phased arrays, a possible key to improved solutions to phased array construction and operation, the employment of the techniques of photolithography in the fabrication of a transversely-developed array, the need for manufacturing techniques to incorporate magnetic or electroacoustic control devices into the array, problems of heat generation, small mm-wave arrays, questions of reliability, and integrated antennas.

  14. Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Game Changing Development is taking on a technologydevelopment and demonstration effort to design, build, and test the next generation of Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers (PCM HXs) on ...

  15. Phase-Controlled Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.; Novak, G.; Moseley, S. H.; Pisano, G.; Krejny, M.; U-Yen, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report technology development of millimeter/submillimeter polarization modulators that operate by introducing a a variable, controlled phase delay between two orthogonal polarization states. The variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) operates via the introduction of a variable phase delay between two linear orthogonal polarization states, resulting in a variable mapping of a single linear polarization into a combination of that Stokes parameter and circular (Stokes V) polarization. Characterization of a prototype VPM is presented at 350 and 3000 microns. We also describe a modulator in which a variable phase delay is introduced between right- and left- circular polarization states. In this architecture, linear polarization is fully modulated. Each of these devices consists of a polarization diplexer parallel to and in front of a movable mirror. Modulation involves sub-wavelength translations of the mirror that change the magnitude of the phase delay.

  16. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  17. Hadron-Quark Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnoli, Rafael; Menezes, Debora P.; Providencia, Constanca

    2009-06-03

    In the present work we study the hadron-quarkphase transition with boson condensation by investigating the binodal surface and extending it to finite temperature in order to mimic the QCD phase diagram.

  18. Berry phase in Heisenberg representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. A.; Klimov, Andrei B.; Lerner, Peter B.

    1994-01-01

    We define the Berry phase for the Heisenberg operators. This definition is motivated by the calculation of the phase shifts by different techniques. These techniques are: the solution of the Heisenberg equations of motion, the solution of the Schrodinger equation in coherent-state representation, and the direct computation of the evolution operator. Our definition of the Berry phase in the Heisenberg representation is consistent with the underlying supersymmetry of the model in the following sense. The structural blocks of the Hamiltonians of supersymmetrical quantum mechanics ('superpairs') are connected by transformations which conserve the similarity in structure of the energy levels of superpairs. These transformations include transformation of phase of the creation-annihilation operators, which are generated by adiabatic cyclic evolution of the parameters of the system.

  19. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) is a federal interagency research effort coordinated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Research and Development (ORD). The objective of the NHEXAS Phase I Arizona study was to determine the distribution...

  20. Phase nucleation in curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo; García, Nicolás; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lorenzana, José; Daniel, Vega

    Nucleation and growth is the dominant relaxation mechanism driving first-order phase transitions. In two-dimensional flat systems, nucleation has been applied to a wide range of problems in physics, chemistry and biology. Here we study nucleation and growth of two-dimensional phases lying on curved surfaces and show that curvature modifies both critical sizes of nuclei and paths towards the equilibrium phase. In curved space, nucleation and growth becomes inherently inhomogeneous and critical nuclei form faster on regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Substrates of varying shape display complex energy landscapes with several geometry-induced local minima, where initially propagating nuclei become stabilized and trapped by the underlying curvature (Gómez, L. R. et al. Phase nucleation in curved space. Nat. Commun. 6:6856 doi: 10.1038/ncomms7856 (2015).).

  1. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    PubMed

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli. PMID:27336733

  2. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency

    PubMed Central

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A.; Hardie, Roger C.; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli. PMID:27336733

  3. Precision digital pulse phase generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-10-08

    A timing generator comprises a crystal oscillator connected to provide an output reference pulse. A resistor-capacitor combination is connected to provide a variable-delay output pulse from an input connected to the crystal oscillator. A phase monitor is connected to provide duty-cycle representations of the reference and variable-delay output pulse phase. An operational amplifier drives a control voltage to the resistor-capacitor combination according to currents integrated from the phase monitor and injected into summing junctions. A digital-to-analog converter injects a control current into the summing junctions according to an input digital control code. A servo equilibrium results that provides a phase delay of the variable-delay output pulse to the output reference pulse that linearly depends on the input digital control code. 2 figs.

  4. Precision digital pulse phase generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A timing generator comprises a crystal oscillator connected to provide an output reference pulse. A resistor-capacitor combination is connected to provide a variable-delay output pulse from an input connected to the crystal oscillator. A phase monitor is connected to provide duty-cycle representations of the reference and variable-delay output pulse phase. An operational amplifier drives a control voltage to the resistor-capacitor combination according to currents integrated from the phase monitor and injected into summing junctions. A digital-to-analog converter injects a control current into the summing junctions according to an input digital control code. A servo equilibrium results that provides a phase delay of the variable-delay output pulse to the output reference pulse that linearly depends on the input digital control code.

  5. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) is a federal interagency research effort coordinated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Research and Development (ORD). Phase I consists of demonstration/scoping studies using probability-based sampling ...

  6. Phase modulating the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrington, L. J., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation of a switched phase modulation system for the Urbana Radar System are discussed. The system is implemented and demonstrated using a simple procedure. The radar system and circuits are described and analyzed.

  7. Safety performance of traffic phases and phase transitions in three phase traffic theory.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengcheng; Liu, Pan; Wang, Wei; Li, Zhibin

    2015-12-01

    Crash risk prediction models were developed to link safety to various phases and phase transitions defined by the three phase traffic theory. Results of the Bayesian conditional logit analysis showed that different traffic states differed distinctly with respect to safety performance. The random-parameter logit approach was utilized to account for the heterogeneity caused by unobserved factors. The Bayesian inference approach based on the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method was used for the estimation of the random-parameter logit model. The proposed approach increased the prediction performance of the crash risk models as compared with the conventional logit model. The three phase traffic theory can help us better understand the mechanism of crash occurrences in various traffic states. The contributing factors to crash likelihood can be well explained by the mechanism of phase transitions. We further discovered that the free flow state can be divided into two sub-phases on the basis of safety performance, including a true free flow state in which the interactions between vehicles are minor, and a platooned traffic state in which bunched vehicles travel in successions. The results of this study suggest that a safety perspective can be added to the three phase traffic theory. The results also suggest that the heterogeneity between different traffic states should be considered when estimating the risks of crash occurrences on freeways. PMID:26367463

  8. Phase relationship in three-phase composites which include a void phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. L.; Nelson, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    The paper shows the relationship among polymer, particles, and voids in a three-phase composite and how some of the properties of a composite may be changed by changing the proportions of the phases. The three-phase composite is an aggregate of microspheres bonded together with a small amount of polymer which may not form a continuous matrix. The void space (third phase) is obtained by limiting the amount of polymer which is mixed with the microspheres. A ternary phase diagram is used to show the proportional relationship among the three phases, with each apex representing a volume fraction of unity for a constituent while the side opposite the apex represents a volume fraction of zero for that constituent. The vertical dimension represents some composite property such as density or strength. The effect of composition on composite properties is shown by plotting them on a binary phase diagram which represents a perpendicular plane coincident with the 0.60 volume fraction microsphere line.

  9. Phase transitions in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1984-11-01

    The rather general circumstances under which a phase transition in hadronic matter at finite temperature to an abnormal phase in which baryon effective masses become small and in which copious baryon-antibaryon pairs appear is emphasized. A preview is also given of a soliton model of dense matter, in which at a density of about seven times nuclear density, matter ceases to be a color insulator and becomes increasingly color conducting. 22 references.

  10. Phased arrays 1985 symposium: Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyskal, H. P.

    1985-08-01

    The Phased Arrays '85 Symposium, sponsored by the Rome Air Development Center, the MITRE Corporation, and the University of Massachusetts, was held at the MITRE Corporation 15 to 18 October and reviewed the state-of-the-art of phased array antenna systems and of the technology for next generation systems. This report contains the full papers which were presented with clearance for unlimited distribution.