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Sample records for analytical optimization study

  1. Reliability-based structural optimization: A proposed analytical-experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. Jefferson; Nikolaidis, Efstratios

    1993-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study for assessing the potential of reliability-based structural optimization is proposed and described. In the study, competing designs obtained by deterministic and reliability-based optimization are compared. The experimental portion of the study is practical because the structure selected is a modular, actively and passively controlled truss that consists of many identical members, and because the competing designs are compared in terms of their dynamic performance and are not destroyed if failure occurs. The analytical portion of this study is illustrated on a 10-bar truss example. In the illustrative example, it is shown that reliability-based optimization can yield a design that is superior to an alternative design obtained by deterministic optimization. These analytical results provide motivation for the proposed study, which is underway.

  2. Analytical study of ride smoothing benefits of control system configurations optimized for pilot handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to evaluate the relative improvements in aircraft ride qualities that resulted from utilizing several control law configurations that were optimized for pilot handling qualities only. The airplane configuration used was an executive jet transport in the approach configuration. The control law configurations included the basic system, a rate feedback system, three command augmentation systems (rate command, attitude command, and rate command/attitude hold), and a control wheel steering system. Both the longitudinal and lateral directional axes were evaluated. A representative example of each control law configuration was optimized for pilot handling qualities on a fixed base simulator. The root mean square airplane responses to turbulence were calculated, and predictions of ride quality ratings were computed by using three models available in the literature.

  3. An analytical model for studying the structural effects and optimization of a capacitive tactile sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guanhao; Wang, Yancheng; Mei, Deqing; Xi, Kailun; Chen, Zichen

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to study the structural effects of a capacitive tactile sensor array on its capacitance changes and sensitivities. The tactile sensor array has 8  ×  8 sensor units, and each unit utilizes the truncated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pyramid array structure as the dielectric layer to enhance the sensing performance. To predict the capacitance changes of the sensor unit, it is simplified into a two-layered structure: upper polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film and bottom truncated PDMS pyramid array. The upper PET is modeled by a displacement field function, while each of the truncated pyramids is analyzed to obtain its stress-strain relation. Using the Ritz method, the displacement field functions are solved. The deformation of the upper electrodes and the capacitance changes of the sensor unit can then be calculated. Using the developed model, the structural effects of the truncated PDMS pyramid array and the PDMS bump on the capacitance changes and sensitivities are studied. To achieve the largest capacitance changes, the dimensions have been optimized for the sensor unit. To verify the developed model, we have fabricated the sensor array, and the average sensitivities of the sensor unit to the x-, y-, and z-axes force are 0.49, 0.50, and 0.32% mN-1, respectively, while the model predicted values are 0.54, 0.54, and 0.35% mN-1. Results demonstrate that the developed model can accurately predict the sensing performance of the sensor array and could be utilized for structural optimization.

  4. An analytic study of near terminal area optimal sequencing and flow control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, S. K.; Straeter, T. A.; Hogge, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Optimal flow control and sequencing of air traffic operations in the near terminal area are discussed. The near terminal area model is based on the assumptions that the aircraft enter the terminal area along precisely controlled approach paths and that the aircraft are segregated according to their near terminal area performance. Mathematical models are developed to support the optimal path generation, sequencing, and conflict resolution problems.

  5. Analytical and Computational Aspects of Collaborative Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia M.; Lewis, Robert Michael

    2000-01-01

    Bilevel problem formulations have received considerable attention as an approach to multidisciplinary optimization in engineering. We examine the analytical and computational properties of one such approach, collaborative optimization. The resulting system-level optimization problems suffer from inherent computational difficulties due to the bilevel nature of the method. Most notably, it is impossible to characterize and hence identify solutions of the system-level problems because the standard first-order conditions for solutions of constrained optimization problems do not hold. The analytical features of the system-level problem make it difficult to apply conventional nonlinear programming algorithms. Simple examples illustrate the analysis and the algorithmic consequences for optimization methods. We conclude with additional observations on the practical implications of the analytical and computational properties of collaborative optimization.

  6. Extended Analytic Device Optimization Employing Asymptotic Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynsys, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Analytic optimization of a thermoelectric junction often introduces several simplifying assumptionsincluding constant material properties, fixed known hot and cold shoe temperatures, and thermallyinsulated leg sides. In fact all of these simplifications will have an effect on device performance,ranging from negligible to significant depending on conditions. Numerical methods, such as FiniteElement Analysis or iterative techniques, are often used to perform more detailed analysis andaccount for these simplifications. While numerical methods may stand as a suitable solution scheme,they are weak in gaining physical understanding and only serve to optimize through iterativesearching techniques. Analytic and asymptotic expansion techniques can be used to solve thegoverning system of thermoelectric differential equations with fewer or less severe assumptionsthan the classic case. Analytic methods can provide meaningful closed form solutions and generatebetter physical understanding of the conditions for when simplifying assumptions may be valid.In obtaining the analytic solutions a set of dimensionless parameters, which characterize allthermoelectric couples, is formulated and provide the limiting cases for validating assumptions.Presentation includes optimization of both classic rectangular couples as well as practically andtheoretically interesting cylindrical couples using optimization parameters physically meaningful toa cylindrical couple. Solutions incorporate the physical behavior for i) thermal resistance of hot andcold shoes, ii) variable material properties with temperature, and iii) lateral heat transfer through legsides.

  7. Optimism and Physical Health: A Meta-analytic Review

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Heather N.; Greenhouse, Joel B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Prior research links optimism to physical health, but the strength of the association has not been systematically evaluated. Purpose The purpose of this study is to conduct a meta-analytic review to determine the strength of the association between optimism and physical health. Methods The findings from 83 studies, with 108 effect sizes (ESs), were included in the analyses, using random-effects models. Results Overall, the mean ES characterizing the relationship between optimism and physical health outcomes was 0.17, p<.001. ESs were larger for studies using subjective (versus objective) measures of physical health. Subsidiary analyses were also conducted grouping studies into those that focused solely on mortality, survival, cardiovascular outcomes, physiological markers (including immune function), immune function only, cancer outcomes, outcomes related to pregnancy, physical symptoms, or pain. In each case, optimism was a significant predictor of health outcomes or markers, all p<.001. Conclusions Optimism is a significant predictor of positive physical health outcomes. PMID:19711142

  8. Gradient Optimization for Analytic conTrols - GOAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assémat, Elie; Machnes, Shai; Tannor, David; Wilhelm-Mauch, Frank

    Quantum optimal control becomes a necessary step in a number of studies in the quantum realm. Recent experimental advances showed that superconducting qubits can be controlled with an impressive accuracy. However, most of the standard optimal control algorithms are not designed to manage such high accuracy. To tackle this issue, a novel quantum optimal control algorithm have been introduced: the Gradient Optimization for Analytic conTrols (GOAT). It avoids the piecewise constant approximation of the control pulse used by standard algorithms. This allows an efficient implementation of very high accuracy optimization. It also includes a novel method to compute the gradient that provides many advantages, e.g. the absence of backpropagation or the natural route to optimize the robustness of the control pulses. This talk will present the GOAT algorithm and a few applications to transmons systems.

  9. Analytical and finite-element study of optimal strain distribution in various beam shapes for energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, B. L.; Gilbert, J. M.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2016-05-01

    Owing to the increasing demand for harvesting energy from environmental vibration for use in self-powered electronic applications, cantilever-based vibration energy harvesting has attracted considerable interest from various parties and has become one of the most common approaches to converting redundant mechanical energy into electrical energy. As the output voltage produced from a piezoelectric material depends largely on the geometric shape and the size of the beam, there is a need to model and compare the performance of cantilever beams of differing geometries. This paper presents the study of strain distribution in various shapes of cantilever beams, including a convex and concave edge profile elliptical beam that have not yet been discussed in any prior literature. Both analytical and finite-element models are derived and the resultant strain distributions in the beam are computed based on a MATLAB solver and ANSYS finite-element analysis tools. An optimum geometry for a vibration-based energy harvesting system is verified. Finally, experimental results comparing the power density for triangular and rectangular piezoelectric beams are also presented to validate the findings of the study, and the claim, as suggested in the literature, is verified.

  10. Analytical and finite-element study of optimal strain distribution in various beam shapes for energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, B. L.; Gilbert, J. M.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2016-08-01

    Owing to the increasing demand for harvesting energy from environmental vibration for use in self-powered electronic applications, cantilever-based vibration energy harvesting has attracted considerable interest from various parties and has become one of the most common approaches to converting redundant mechanical energy into electrical energy. As the output voltage produced from a piezoelectric material depends largely on the geometric shape and the size of the beam, there is a need to model and compare the performance of cantilever beams of differing geometries. This paper presents the study of strain distribution in various shapes of cantilever beams, including a convex and concave edge profile elliptical beam that have not yet been discussed in any prior literature. Both analytical and finite-element models are derived and the resultant strain distributions in the beam are computed based on a MATLAB solver and ANSYS finite-element analysis tools. An optimum geometry for a vibration-based energy harvesting system is verified. Finally, experimental results comparing the power density for triangular and rectangular piezoelectric beams are also presented to validate the findings of the study, and the claim, as suggested in the literature, is verified.

  11. Using perioperative analytics to optimize OR performance.

    PubMed

    Rempfer, Doug

    2015-06-01

    In the past, the data hospitals gleaned from operating rooms (ORs) tended to be static and lacking in actionable information. Hospitals can improve OR performance by applying OR analytics, such as evaluation of turnover times and expenses, which provide useful intelligence. Having the information is important, but success depends on aligning staff behavior to effectively achieve improvement strategies identified using the analytics. PMID:26665339

  12. Optimization of Analytical Potentials for Coarse-Grained Biopolymer Models.

    PubMed

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Maccari, Giuseppe; Spampinato, Giulia Lia Beatrice; Tozzini, Valentina

    2016-08-25

    The increasing trend in the recent literature on coarse grained (CG) models testifies their impact in the study of complex systems. However, the CG model landscape is variegated: even considering a given resolution level, the force fields are very heterogeneous and optimized with very different parametrization procedures. Along the road for standardization of CG models for biopolymers, here we describe a strategy to aid building and optimization of statistics based analytical force fields and its implementation in the software package AsParaGS (Assisted Parameterization platform for coarse Grained modelS). Our method is based on the use and optimization of analytical potentials, optimized by targeting internal variables statistical distributions by means of the combination of different algorithms (i.e., relative entropy driven stochastic exploration of the parameter space and iterative Boltzmann inversion). This allows designing a custom model that endows the force field terms with a physically sound meaning. Furthermore, the level of transferability and accuracy can be tuned through the choice of statistical data set composition. The method-illustrated by means of applications to helical polypeptides-also involves the analysis of two and three variable distributions, and allows handling issues related to the FF term correlations. AsParaGS is interfaced with general-purpose molecular dynamics codes and currently implements the "minimalist" subclass of CG models (i.e., one bead per amino acid, Cα based). Extensions to nucleic acids and different levels of coarse graining are in the course. PMID:27150459

  13. Optimization of reversed-phase chromatography methods for peptide analytics.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Rushd; Baur, Daniel; Pfister, David

    2015-12-18

    The analytical description and quantification of peptide solutions is an essential part in the quality control of peptide production processes and in peptide mapping techniques. Traditionally, an important tool is analytical reversed phase liquid chromatography. In this work, we develop a model-based tool to find optimal analytical conditions in a clear, efficient and robust manner. The model, based on the Van't Hoff equation, the linear solvent strength correlation, and an analytical solution of the mass balance on a chromatographic column describing peptide retention in gradient conditions is used to optimize the analytical scale separation between components in a peptide mixture. The proposed tool is then applied in the design of analytical reversed phase liquid chromatography methods of five different peptide mixtures. PMID:26620597

  14. Analytical and simulator study of advanced transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Rickard, W. W.

    1982-01-01

    An analytic methodology, based on the optimal-control pilot model, was demonstrated for assessing longitidunal-axis handling qualities of transport aircraft in final approach. Calibration of the methodology is largely in terms of closed-loop performance requirements, rather than specific vehicle response characteristics, and is based on a combination of published criteria, pilot preferences, physical limitations, and engineering judgment. Six longitudinal-axis approach configurations were studied covering a range of handling qualities problems, including the presence of flexible aircraft modes. The analytical procedure was used to obtain predictions of Cooper-Harper ratings, a solar quadratic performance index, and rms excursions of important system variables.

  15. An analytical optimization of electric propulsion orbit transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the electric propulsion's inherent propellant mass savings over chemical propulsion, electric propulsion orbit transfer vehicles (EPOTV's) are highly efficient mode of orbit transfer. When selecting an electric propulsion device (ion, MPD, or arcjet) and propellant for a particular mission, it is preferable to use quick, analytical system optimization methods instead of time intensive numerical integration methods. It is also of interest to determine each thruster's optimal operating characteristics for a specific mission. Analytical expressions are derived which determine the optimal specific impulse (Isp) for each type of electric thruster to maximize payload fraction for a desired thrusting time. These expressions take into account the variation of thruster efficiency with specific impulse. Verification of the method is made with representative electric propulsion values on a LEO-to-GEO mission. Application of the method to specific missions is discussed.

  16. Analytical Inverse Optimization in Two-Hand Prehensile Tasks.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Behnoosh; Ambike, Satyajit; Terekhov, Alexander; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    The authors explored application of analytical inverse optimization (ANIO) method to the normal finger forces in unimanual and bimanual prehensile tasks with discrete and continuously changing constraints. The subjects held an instrumented handle vertically with one or two hands. The external torque and grip force changed across trials or within a trial continuously. Principal component analysis showed similar percentages of variance accounted for by the first two principal components across tasks and conditions. Compared to unimanual tasks, bimanual tasks showed significantly more frequent inability to find a cost function leading to a stable solution. In cases of stable solutions, similar second-order polynomials were computed as cost functions across tasks and condition. The bimanual tasks, however, showed significantly worse goodness-of-fit index values. The authors show that ANIO can be used in tasks with slowly changing constraints making it an attractive tool to study optimality of performance in special populations. They also show that ANIO can fail in multifinger tasks, likely due to irreproducible behavior across trials, more likely to happen in bimanual tasks compared to unimanual tasks. PMID:27254391

  17. Analytic studies in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzochero, Pierre

    Five studies are presented in nuclear astrophysics, which deal with different stages of stellar evolution and which use analytic techniques as opposed to numerical ones. Two problems are described in neutrino astrophysics: the solar-neutrino puzzle is analyzed in the framework of the MSW mechanism for the enhancement of neutrino oscillations in matter; and the cooling of neutron stars is studied by calculating the neutrino emissivity from strangeness condensation. Radiative transfer is then examined as applied to SN1987A: its early spectrum and bolometric corrections are calculated by developing an analytic model which can describe both the extended nature of the envelope and the non-LTE state of the radiation field in the scattering-dominated early atmosphere; and a model-independent relation is derived between mass and kinetic energy for the hydrogen envelope of SN1987A, using only direct observations of its luminosity and photospheric velocity. Finally, an analytic approach is presented to relate the softness of the EOS of dense nuclear matter in the core of a supernova, the hydrostatic structure of such core and the initial strength of the shock wave.

  18. Analytical solutions to optimal underactuated spacecraft formation reconfiguration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Yan, Ye; Zhou, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Underactuated systems can generally be defined as systems with fewer number of control inputs than that of the degrees of freedom to be controlled. In this paper, analytical solutions to optimal underactuated spacecraft formation reconfiguration without either the radial or the in-track control are derived. By using a linear dynamical model of underactuated spacecraft formation in circular orbits, controllability analysis is conducted for either underactuated case. Indirect optimization methods based on the minimum principle are then introduced to generate analytical solutions to optimal open-loop underactuated reconfiguration problems. Both fixed and free final conditions constraints are considered for either underactuated case and comparisons between these two final conditions indicate that the optimal control strategies with free final conditions require less control efforts than those with the fixed ones. Meanwhile, closed-loop adaptive sliding mode controllers for both underactuated cases are designed to guarantee optimal trajectory tracking in the presence of unmatched external perturbations, linearization errors, and system uncertainties. The adaptation laws are designed via a Lyapunov-based method to ensure the overall stability of the closed-loop system. The explicit expressions of the terminal convergent regions of each system states have also been obtained. Numerical simulations demonstrate the validity and feasibility of the proposed open-loop and closed-loop control schemes for optimal underactuated spacecraft formation reconfiguration in circular orbits.

  19. Statistical and optimal learning with applications in business analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bin

    Statistical learning is widely used in business analytics to discover structure or exploit patterns from historical data, and build models that capture relationships between an outcome of interest and a set of variables. Optimal learning on the other hand, solves the operational side of the problem, by iterating between decision making and data acquisition/learning. All too often the two problems go hand-in-hand, which exhibit a feedback loop between statistics and optimization. We apply this statistical/optimal learning concept on a context of fundraising marketing campaign problem arising in many non-profit organizations. Many such organizations use direct-mail marketing to cultivate one-time donors and convert them into recurring contributors. Cultivated donors generate much more revenue than new donors, but also lapse with time, making it important to steadily draw in new cultivations. The direct-mail budget is limited, but better-designed mailings can improve success rates without increasing costs. We first apply statistical learning to analyze the effectiveness of several design approaches used in practice, based on a massive dataset covering 8.6 million direct-mail communications with donors to the American Red Cross during 2009-2011. We find evidence that mailed appeals are more effective when they emphasize disaster preparedness and training efforts over post-disaster cleanup. Including small cards that affirm donors' identity as Red Cross supporters is an effective strategy, while including gift items such as address labels is not. Finally, very recent acquisitions are more likely to respond to appeals that ask them to contribute an amount similar to their most recent donation, but this approach has an adverse effect on donors with a longer history. We show via simulation that a simple design strategy based on these insights has potential to improve success rates from 5.4% to 8.1%. Given these findings, when new scenario arises, however, new data need to

  20. Analytical investigations in aircraft and spacecraft trajectory optimization and optimal guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markopoulos, Nikos; Calise, Anthony J.

    1995-01-01

    A collection of analytical studies is presented related to unconstrained and constrained aircraft (a/c) energy-state modeling and to spacecraft (s/c) motion under continuous thrust. With regard to a/c unconstrained energy-state modeling, the physical origin of the singular perturbation parameter that accounts for the observed 2-time-scale behavior of a/c during energy climbs is identified and explained. With regard to the constrained energy-state modeling, optimal control problems are studied involving active state-variable inequality constraints. Departing from the practical deficiencies of the control programs for such problems that result from the traditional formulations, a complete reformulation is proposed for these problems which, in contrast to the old formulation, will presumably lead to practically useful controllers that can track an inequality constraint boundary asymptotically, and even in the presence of 2-sided perturbations about it. Finally, with regard to s/c motion under continuous thrust, a thrust program is proposed for which the equations of 2-dimensional motion of a space vehicle in orbit, viewed as a point mass, afford an exact analytic solution. The thrust program arises under the assumption of tangential thrust from the costate system corresponding to minimum-fuel, power-limited, coplanar transfers between two arbitrary conics. The thrust program can be used not only with power-limited propulsion systems, but also with any propulsion system capable of generating continuous thrust of controllable magnitude, and, for propulsion types and classes of transfers for which it is sufficiently optimal the results of this report suggest a method of maneuvering during planetocentric or heliocentric orbital operations, requiring a minimum amount of computation; thus uniquely suitable for real-time feedback guidance implementations.

  1. The analytical representation of viscoelastic material properties using optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a technique to model viscoelastic material properties with a function of the form of the Prony series. Generally, the method employed to determine the function constants requires assuming values for the exponential constants of the function and then resolving the remaining constants through linear least-squares techniques. The technique presented here allows all the constants to be analytically determined through optimization techniques. This technique is employed in a computer program named PRONY and makes use of commercially available optimization tool developed by VMA Engineering, Inc. The PRONY program was utilized to compare the technique against previously determined models for solid rocket motor TP-H1148 propellant and V747-75 Viton fluoroelastomer. In both cases, the optimization technique generated functions that modeled the test data with at least an order of magnitude better correlation. This technique has demonstrated the capability to use small or large data sets and to use data sets that have uniformly or nonuniformly spaced data pairs. The reduction of experimental data to accurate mathematical models is a vital part of most scientific and engineering research. This technique of regression through optimization can be applied to other mathematical models that are difficult to fit to experimental data through traditional regression techniques.

  2. Optimization of the analytical extraction of polyamines from milk.

    PubMed

    Rigueira, Juliana Cristina Sampaio; Rodrigues, Maria Isabel; Gloria, Maria Beatriz Abreu

    2011-10-30

    Polyamines play an important role as growth promoters, in the maturation of the intestinal tract of infants and in the modulation of the immune response; consequently, the importance of polyamines in the diet of infants and adults is well established. However, information on the occurrence and levels of polyamines in cow's milk and milk from other species (including human milk) is contradictory. Furthermore, the methods used for the extraction of amines from these samples vary widely. Therefore, a method for the accurate analysis of amines in milk from different species and in milk products is needed. A sequential strategy of experimental designs was used to optimize the analytical extraction of polyamines from milk. The dependent variables that significantly affected the recoveries were screened through a Plackett-Burman design. Sulfosalicylic acid (SSA) provided better recoveries compared to trichloroacetic acid. Centrifugation time and speed during extraction were independent variables. The Central Composite Rotational Design used to optimize the dependent variables indicated that the optimal conditions for the extraction of polyamines were 40s vortexing, four successive extractions, and an SSA concentration of 1.5%. These conditions provided recoveries ≥ 92.8% and CV ≤ 5.8%. The experiments confirmed the predicted results, indicating that the optimized conditions and models used were effective in the determination of amines from milk. Samples of raw milk and milk beverages were observed to be poor sources of spermine and spermidine, whereas human milk contained both amines. PMID:22063530

  3. Optimizing an Immersion ESL Curriculum Using Analytic Hierarchy Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Hui-Wen Vivian

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to fill a substantial knowledge gap regarding reaching a uniform group decision in English curriculum design and planning. A comprehensive content-based course criterion model extracted from existing literature and expert opinions was developed. Analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was used to identify the relative…

  4. Optimized flow cytometric assay for the measurement of platelet microparticles in plasma: pre-analytic and analytic considerations.

    PubMed

    Kim, H K; Song, K S; Lee, E S; Lee, Y J; Park, Y S; Lee, K R; Lee, S N

    2002-07-01

    Platelet microparticles (PMP) are submicroscopic membrane vesicles released by platelets during activation. Flow cytometry is the most widely used method for quantifying PMP, but the optimization of the technical method has not yet been fully evaluated. This study was designed to assess the pre-analytical variables including blood sampling conditions, and to evaluate the analytical variations including effect of the platelet-specific antibodies and quantitative beads, precision, linearity and accuracy in comparison with beta-thromboglobulin, which is one of the platelet activation markers. Numbers of PMP collected into citrate-theophylline-adenosine-dipyridamole (CTAD) tubes were increased with time, but to a lesser extent than when collected into sodium citrate tubes. The precision of the PMP assay was relatively high. Excellent linear correlation was observed for dilution linearity. Regarding the platelet-specific antibodies used, anti-CD41a-labeled samples resulted in higher PMP levels than those labeled with anti-CD61 and anti-CD42a. There was no significant difference of PMP counts according to the quantitative beads. The PMP assay is well correlated with beta-thromboglobulin levels. Our findings suggest that blood samples for the PMP assay should be collected in a CTAD tube and delayed measurement is not allowed to avoid artefactual platelet activation. The PMP assay can be used successfully as a useful marker of the detection of in vivo platelet activation, provided that pre-analytical and technical points are optimally taken into consideration. PMID:12138366

  5. Analytical insights into optimality and resonance in fish swimming

    PubMed Central

    Kohannim, Saba; Iwasaki, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides analytical insights into the hypothesis that fish exploit resonance to reduce the mechanical cost of swimming. A simple body–fluid fish model, representing carangiform locomotion, is developed. Steady swimming at various speeds is analysed using optimal gait theory by minimizing bending moment over tail movements and stiffness, and the results are shown to match with data from observed swimming. Our analysis indicates the following: thrust–drag balance leads to the Strouhal number being predetermined based on the drag coefficient and the ratio of wetted body area to cross-sectional area of accelerated fluid. Muscle tension is reduced when undulation frequency matches resonance frequency, which maximizes the ratio of tail-tip velocity to bending moment. Finally, hydrodynamic resonance determines tail-beat frequency, whereas muscle stiffness is actively adjusted, so that overall body–fluid resonance is exploited. PMID:24430125

  6. Analytic study of orbiter landing profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    A broad survey of possible orbiter landing configurations was made with specific goals of defining boundaries for the landing task. The results suggest that the center of the corridors between marginal and routine represents a more or less optimal preflare condition for regular operations. Various constraints used to define the boundaries are based largely on qualitative judgements from earlier flight experience with the X-15 and lifting body research aircraft. The results should serve as useful background for expanding and validating landing simulation programs. The analytic approach offers a particular advantage in identifying trends due to the systematic variation of factors such as vehicle weight, load factor, approach speed, and aim point. Limitations such as a constant load factor during the flare and using a fixed gear deployment time interval, can be removed by increasing the flexibility of the computer program. This analytic definition of landing profiles of the orbiter may suggest additional studies, includin more configurations or more comparisons of landing profiles within and beyond the corridor boundaries.

  7. Analytical Dimensional Reduction of a Fuel Optimal Powered Descent Subproblem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, Jeremy R.; Bishop, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Current renewed interest in exploration of the moon, Mars, and other planetary objects is driving technology development in many fields of space system design. In particular, there is a desire to land both robotic and human missions on the moon and elsewhere. The landing guidance system must be able to deliver the vehicle to a desired soft landing while meeting several constraints necessary for the safety of the vehicle. Due to performance limitations of current launch vehicles, it is desired to minimize the amount of fuel used. In addition, the landing site may change in real-time in order to avoid previously undetected hazards which become apparent during the landing maneuver. This complicated maneuver can be broken into simpler subproblems that bound the full problem. One such subproblem is to find a minimum-fuel landing solution that meets constraints on the initial state, final state, and bounded thrust acceleration magnitude. With the assumptions of constant gravity and negligible atmosphere, the form of the optimal steering law is known, and the equations of motion can be integrated analytically, resulting in a system of five equations in five unknowns. It is shown that this system of equations can be reduced analytically to two equations in two unknowns. With an additional assumption of constant thrust acceleration magnitude, this system can be reduced further to one equation in one unknown. It is shown that these unknowns can be bounded analytically. An algorithm is developed to quickly and reliably solve the resulting one-dimensional bounded search, and it is used as a real-time guidance applied to a lunar landing test case.

  8. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    A. S. Hofler; P. Evtushenko; M. Krasilnikov

    2007-08-01

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. RF and SRF gun design is further complicated because the bunches are space charge dominated and require additional emittance compensation. A genetic algorithm has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs for Cornell* and Jefferson Lab**, and we propose studying how the genetic algorithm techniques can be applied to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize gun designs that have been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  9. Depth Optimization Study

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kawase, Mitsuhiro

    2009-11-22

    The zipped file contains a directory of data and routines used in the NNMREC turbine depth optimization study (Kawase et al., 2011), and calculation results thereof. For further info, please contact Mitsuhiro Kawase at kawase@uw.edu. Reference: Mitsuhiro Kawase, Patricia Beba, and Brian Fabien (2011), Finding an Optimal Placement Depth for a Tidal In-Stream Conversion Device in an Energetic, Baroclinic Tidal Channel, NNMREC Technical Report.

  10. Pump-and-treat optimization using analytic element method flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matott, L. Shawn; Rabideau, Alan J.; Craig, James R.

    2006-05-01

    Plume containment using pump-and-treat (PAT) technology continues to be a popular remediation technique for sites with extensive groundwater contamination. As such, optimization of PAT systems, where cost is minimized subject to various remediation constraints, is the focus of an important and growing body of research. While previous pump-and-treat optimization (PATO) studies have used discretized (finite element or finite difference) flow models, the present study examines the use of analytic element method (AEM) flow models. In a series of numerical experiments, two PATO problems adapted from the literature are optimized using a multi-algorithmic optimization software package coupled with an AEM flow model. The experiments apply several different optimization algorithms and explore the use of various pump-and-treat cost and constraint formulations. The results demonstrate that AEM models can be used to optimize the number, locations and pumping rates of wells in a pump-and-treat containment system. Furthermore, the results illustrate that a total outflux constraint placed along the plume boundary can be used to enforce plume containment. Such constraints are shown to be efficient and reliable alternatives to conventional particle tracking and gradient control techniques. Finally, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique is identified as an effective algorithm for solving pump-and-treat optimization problems. A parallel version of the PSO algorithm is shown to have linear speedup, suggesting that the algorithm is suitable for application to problems that are computationally demanding and involve large numbers of wells.

  11. Determination of total iodine in serum and urine samples by ion chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection - studies on analyte loss, optimization of sample preparation procedures, and validation of analytical method.

    PubMed

    Błażewicz, Anna; Klatka, Maria; Dolliver, Wojciech; Kocjan, Ryszard

    2014-07-01

    A fast, accurate and precise ion chromatography method with pulsed amperometric detection was applied to evaluate a variety of parameters affecting the determination of total iodine in serum and urine of 81 subjects, including 56 obese and 25 healthy Polish children. The sample pretreatment methods were carried out in a closed system and with the assistance of microwaves. Both alkaline and acidic digestion procedures were developed and optimized to find the simplest combination of reagents and the appropriate parameters for digestion that would allow for the fastest, least time consuming and most cost-effective way of analysis. A good correlation between the certified and the measured concentrations was achieved. The best recoveries (96.8% for urine and 98.8% for serum samples) were achieved using 1ml of 25% tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution within 6min for 0.1ml of serum/urine samples. Using 0.5ml of 65% nitric acid solution the best recovery (95.3%) was obtained when 7min of effective digestion time was used. Freeze-thaw stability and long-term stability were checked. After 24 weeks 14.7% loss of iodine in urine, and 10.9% in serum samples occurred. For urine samples, better correlation (R(2)=0.9891) of various sample preparation procedures (alkaline digestion and application of OnGuard RP cartidges) was obtained. Significantly lower iodide content was found in samples taken from obese children. Serum iodine content in obese children was markedly variable in comparison with the healthy group, whereas the difference was less evident when urine samples were analyzed. The mean content in serum was 59.12±8.86μg/L, and in urine 98.26±25.93 for obese children when samples were prepared by the use of optimized alkaline digestion reinforced by microwaves. In healthy children the mean content in serum was 82.58±6.01μg/L, and in urine 145.76±31.44μg/L. PMID:24911549

  12. Analytical study of comet nucleus samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical procedures for studying and handling frozen (130 K) core samples of comet nuclei are discussed. These methods include neutron activation analysis, x ray fluorescent analysis and high resolution mass spectroscopy.

  13. Laser: a Tool for Optimization and Enhancement of Analytical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Preisler, Jan

    1997-01-01

    In this work, we use lasers to enhance possibilities of laser desorption methods and to optimize coating procedure for capillary electrophoresis (CE). We use several different instrumental arrangements to characterize matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum. In imaging mode, 488-nm argon-ion laser beam is deflected by two acousto-optic deflectors to scan plumes desorbed at atmospheric pressure via absorption. All absorbing species, including neutral molecules, are monitored. Interesting features, e.g. differences between the initial plume and subsequent plumes desorbed from the same spot, or the formation of two plumes from one laser shot are observed. Total plume absorbance can be correlated with the acoustic signal generated by the desorption event. A model equation for the plume velocity as a function of time is proposed. Alternatively, the use of a static laser beam for observation enables reliable determination of plume velocities even when they are very high. Static scattering detection reveals negative influence of particle spallation on MS signal. Ion formation during MALD was monitored using 193-nm light to photodissociate a portion of insulin ion plume. These results define the optimal conditions for desorbing analytes from matrices, as opposed to achieving a compromise between efficient desorption and efficient ionization as is practiced in mass spectrometry. In CE experiment, we examined changes in a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) coating by continuously monitoring the electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a fused-silica capillary during electrophoresis. An imaging CCD camera was used to follow the motion of a fluorescent neutral marker zone along the length of the capillary excited by 488-nm Ar-ion laser. The PEO coating was shown to reduce the velocity of EOF by more than an order of magnitude compared to a bare capillary at pH 7.0. The coating protocol was important, especially at an intermediate pH of 7.7. The increase of p

  14. Optimal symmetric flight studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weston, A. R.; Menon, P. K. A.; Bilimoria, K. D.; Cliff, E. M.; Kelley, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    Several topics in optimal symmetric flight of airbreathing vehicles are examined. In one study, an approximation scheme designed for onboard real-time energy management of climb-dash is developed and calculations for a high-performance aircraft presented. In another, a vehicle model intermediate in complexity between energy and point-mass models is explored and some quirks in optimal flight characteristics peculiar to the model uncovered. In yet another study, energy-modelling procedures are re-examined with a view to stretching the range of validity of zeroth-order approximation by special choice of state variables. In a final study, time-fuel tradeoffs in cruise-dash are examined for the consequences of nonconvexities appearing in the classical steady cruise-dash model. Two appendices provide retrospective looks at two early publications on energy modelling and related optimal control theory.

  15. Conical quadreflex antenna analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, P. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A method for evaluating the performance of a four-reflection or quadreflex antenna is reported. Geometrical optics was used initially to determine the ideal feed pattern required to produce uniform illumination on the aperture of the conical reflector and the reverse problem of quickly finding the aperture illumination given an arbitrary feed pattern. The knowledge of the aperture illumination makes it possible to compute the antenna efficiency, which is useful for comparing antenna performance during tradeoff studies. Scattering calculations, using physical optics techniques, were then used to more accurately determine the performance of a specific design.

  16. Analytical development and optimization of a graphene-solution interface capacitance model.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hediyeh; Rahmani, Rasoul; Mashayekhi, Reza; Ranjbari, Leyla; Shirdel, Amir H; Haghighian, Niloofar; Movahedi, Parisa; Hadiyan, Moein; Ismail, Razali

    2014-01-01

    Graphene, which as a new carbon material shows great potential for a range of applications because of its exceptional electronic and mechanical properties, becomes a matter of attention in these years. The use of graphene in nanoscale devices plays an important role in achieving more accurate and faster devices. Although there are lots of experimental studies in this area, there is a lack of analytical models. Quantum capacitance as one of the important properties of field effect transistors (FETs) is in our focus. The quantum capacitance of electrolyte-gated transistors (EGFETs) along with a relevant equivalent circuit is suggested in terms of Fermi velocity, carrier density, and fundamental physical quantities. The analytical model is compared with the experimental data and the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) is calculated to be 11.82. In order to decrease the error, a new function of E composed of α and β parameters is suggested. In another attempt, the ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm is implemented for optimization and development of an analytical model to obtain a more accurate capacitance model. To further confirm this viewpoint, based on the given results, the accuracy of the optimized model is more than 97% which is in an acceptable range of accuracy. PMID:24991496

  17. Analytical development and optimization of a graphene–solution interface capacitance model

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Hediyeh; Rahmani, Rasoul; Mashayekhi, Reza; Ranjbari, Leyla; Shirdel, Amir H; Haghighian, Niloofar; Movahedi, Parisa; Hadiyan, Moein

    2014-01-01

    Summary Graphene, which as a new carbon material shows great potential for a range of applications because of its exceptional electronic and mechanical properties, becomes a matter of attention in these years. The use of graphene in nanoscale devices plays an important role in achieving more accurate and faster devices. Although there are lots of experimental studies in this area, there is a lack of analytical models. Quantum capacitance as one of the important properties of field effect transistors (FETs) is in our focus. The quantum capacitance of electrolyte-gated transistors (EGFETs) along with a relevant equivalent circuit is suggested in terms of Fermi velocity, carrier density, and fundamental physical quantities. The analytical model is compared with the experimental data and the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) is calculated to be 11.82. In order to decrease the error, a new function of E composed of α and β parameters is suggested. In another attempt, the ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm is implemented for optimization and development of an analytical model to obtain a more accurate capacitance model. To further confirm this viewpoint, based on the given results, the accuracy of the optimized model is more than 97% which is in an acceptable range of accuracy. PMID:24991496

  18. Analytic characterization of linear accelerator radiosurgery dose distributions for fast optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Sanford L.; Bova, Frank J.; Buatti, John M.; Friedman, William A.; Eyster, Brian; Kendrick, Lance A.

    1999-11-01

    Linear accelerator (linac) radiosurgery utilizes non-coplanar arc therapy delivered through circular collimators. Generally, spherically symmetric arc sets are used, resulting in nominally spherical dose distributions. Various treatment planning parameters may be manipulated to provide dose conformation to irregular lesions. Iterative manipulation of these variables can be a difficult and time-consuming task, because (a) understanding the effect of these parameters is complicated and (b) three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations are computationally expensive. This manipulation can be simplified, however, because the prescription isodose surface for all single isocentre distributions can be approximated by conic sections. In this study, the effects of treatment planning parameter manipulation on the dimensions of the treatment isodose surface were determined empirically. These dimensions were then fitted to analytic functions, assuming that the dose distributions were characterized as conic sections. These analytic functions allowed real-time approximation of the 3D isodose surface. Iterative plan optimization, either manual or automated, is achieved more efficiently using this real time approximation of the dose matrix. Subsequent to iterative plan optimization, the analytic function is related back to the appropriate plan parameters, and the dose distribution is determined using conventional dosimetry calculations. This provides a pseudo-inverse approach to radiosurgery optimization, based solely on geometric considerations.

  19. Optimal analytic method for the nonlinear Hasegawa-Mima equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Mathew; Van Gorder, Robert A.; Vajravelu, Kuppalapalle

    2014-05-01

    The Hasegawa-Mima equation is a nonlinear partial differential equation that describes the electric potential due to a drift wave in a plasma. In the present paper, we apply the method of homotopy analysis to a slightly more general Hasegawa-Mima equation, which accounts for hyper-viscous damping or viscous dissipation. First, we outline the method for the general initial/boundary value problem over a compact rectangular spatial domain. We use a two-stage method, where both the convergence control parameter and the auxiliary linear operator are optimally selected to minimize the residual error due to the approximation. To do the latter, we consider a family of operators parameterized by a constant which gives the decay rate of the solutions. After outlining the general method, we consider a number of concrete examples in order to demonstrate the utility of this approach. The results enable us to study properties of the initial/boundary value problem for the generalized Hasegawa-Mima equation. In several cases considered, we are able to obtain solutions with extremely small residual errors after relatively few iterations are computed (residual errors on the order of 10-15 are found in multiple cases after only three iterations). The results demonstrate that selecting a parameterized auxiliary linear operator can be extremely useful for minimizing residual errors when used concurrently with the optimal homotopy analysis method, suggesting that this approach can prove useful for a number of nonlinear partial differential equations arising in physics and nonlinear mechanics.

  20. Analytical studies of coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2009-05-04

    Under certain assumptions and simplifications, we studied a few physics processes of Coherent Electron Cooling using analytical approach. In the modulation process, the effect due to merging the ion beam with the electron beam is studied under single kick approximation. In the free electron laser (FEL) amplifier, we studied the amplification of the electron density modulation using 1D analytical approach. Both the electron charge density and the phase space density are derived in the frequency domain. The solutions are then transformed into the space domain through Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT).

  1. Discrete optimization of isolator locations for vibration isolation systems: An analytical and experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Ponslet, E.R.; Eldred, M.S.

    1996-05-17

    An analytical and experimental study is conducted to investigate the effect of isolator locations on the effectiveness of vibration isolation systems. The study uses isolators with fixed properties and evaluates potential improvements to the isolation system that can be achieved by optimizing isolator locations. Because the available locations for the isolators are discrete in this application, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used as the optimization method. The system is modeled in MATLAB{trademark} and coupled with the GA available in the DAKOTA optimization toolkit under development at Sandia National Laboratories. Design constraints dictated by hardware and experimental limitations are implemented through penalty function techniques. A series of GA runs reveal difficulties in the search on this heavily constrained, multimodal, discrete problem. However, the GA runs provide a variety of optimized designs with predicted performance from 30 to 70 times better than a baseline configuration. An alternate approach is also tested on this problem: it uses continuous optimization, followed by rounding of the solution to neighboring discrete configurations. Results show that this approach leads to either infeasible or poor designs. Finally, a number of optimized designs obtained from the GA searches are tested in the laboratory and compared to the baseline design. These experimental results show a 7 to 46 times improvement in vibration isolation from the baseline configuration.

  2. Heliostat cost optimization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Reeken, Finn; Weinrebe, Gerhard; Keck, Thomas; Balz, Markus

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology for a heliostat cost optimization study. First different variants of small, medium sized and large heliostats are designed. Then the respective costs, tracking and optical quality are determined. For the calculation of optical quality a structural model of the heliostat is programmed and analyzed using finite element software. The costs are determined based on inquiries and from experience with similar structures. Eventually the levelised electricity costs for a reference power tower plant are calculated. Before each annual simulation run the heliostat field is optimized. Calculated LCOEs are then used to identify the most suitable option(s). Finally, the conclusions and findings of this extensive cost study are used to define the concept of a new cost-efficient heliostat called `Stellio'.

  3. Recent Studies in Functional Analytic Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Rafael Ferro

    2008-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP), based on the principles of radical behaviorism, emphasizes the impact of eventualities that occur during therapeutic sessions, the therapist-client interaction context, functional equivalence between environments, natural reinforcement and shaping by the therapist. This paper reviews recent studies of FAP…

  4. Query optimization for graph analytics on linked data using SPARQL

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokyong; Lee, Sangkeun; Lim, Seung -Hwan; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju

    2015-07-01

    Triplestores that support query languages such as SPARQL are emerging as the preferred and scalable solution to represent data and meta-data as massive heterogeneous graphs using Semantic Web standards. With increasing adoption, the desire to conduct graph-theoretic mining and exploratory analysis has also increased. Addressing that desire, this paper presents a solution that is the marriage of Graph Theory and the Semantic Web. We present software that can analyze Linked Data using graph operations such as counting triangles, finding eccentricity, testing connectedness, and computing PageRank directly on triple stores via the SPARQL interface. We describe the process of optimizing performance of the SPARQL-based implementation of such popular graph algorithms by reducing the space-overhead, simplifying iterative complexity and removing redundant computations by understanding query plans. Our optimized approach shows significant performance gains on triplestores hosted on stand-alone workstations as well as hardware-optimized scalable supercomputers such as the Cray XMT.

  5. Determination of proline in honey: comparison between official methods, optimization and validation of the analytical methodology.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Cristina; Annibaldi, Anna; Illuminati, Silvia; Finale, Carolina; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The study compares official spectrophotometric methods for the determination of proline content in honey - those of the International Honey Commission (IHC) and the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) - with the original Ough method. Results show that the extra time-consuming treatment stages added by the IHC method with respect to the Ough method are pointless. We demonstrate that the AOACs method proves to be the best in terms of accuracy and time saving. The optimized waiting time for the absorbance recording is set at 35min from the removal of reaction tubes from the boiling bath used in the sample treatment. The optimized method was validated in the matrix: linearity up to 1800mgL(-1), limit of detection 20mgL(-1), limit of quantification 61mgL(-1). The method was applied to 43 unifloral honey samples from the Marche region, Italy. PMID:24360478

  6. Analytical models integrated with satellite images for optimized pest management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global field protection (GFP) was developed to protect and optimize pest management resources integrating satellite images for precise field demarcation with physical models of controlled release devices of pesticides to protect large fields. The GFP was implemented using a graphical user interf...

  7. Conceptual design optimization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollowell, S. J.; Beeman, E. R., II; Hiyama, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of applying multilevel functional decomposition and optimization techniques to conceptual design of advanced fighter aircraft was investigated. Applying the functional decomposition techniques to the conceptual design phase appears to be feasible. The initial implementation of the modified design process will optimize wing design variables. A hybrid approach, combining functional decomposition techniques for generation of aerodynamic and mass properties linear sensitivity derivatives with existing techniques for sizing mission performance and optimization, is proposed.

  8. Analytical Similarity Assessment in Biosimilar Studies.

    PubMed

    Chow, Shein-Chung; Song, Fuyu; Bai, He

    2016-05-01

    For assessment of biosimilarity, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends a stepwise approach for obtaining the totality-of-the-evidence for demonstrating biosimilarity between a proposed biosimilar product and an innovative (reference) biological product. The stepwise approach starts with analytical studies for functional and structural characterization at various stages of manufacturing process of the proposed biosimilar product. Analytical similarity assessment involves identification of critical quality attributes (CQAs) that are relevant to clinical outcomes. FDA proposes first classifying the identified CQAs into three tiers according to their criticality or risking ranking relevant to clinical outcomes and then performing equivalence test (for CQAs in Tier 1), quality range approach (for CQAs in Tier 2), and raw data or graphical presentation (for CQAs in Tier 3) for obtaining totality-of-the-evidence for demonstrating biosimilarity between the proposed biosimilar product with the reference product. In practice, some debatable issues are evitably raised due to this complicated process of analytical similarity assessment. In this article, these debatable are described and discussed. PMID:26873509

  9. An Analytical Planning Model to Estimate the Optimal Density of Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yongjun; Yeo, Hwasoo

    2015-01-01

    The charging infrastructure location problem is becoming more significant due to the extensive adoption of electric vehicles. Efficient charging station planning can solve deeply rooted problems, such as driving-range anxiety and the stagnation of new electric vehicle consumers. In the initial stage of introducing electric vehicles, the allocation of charging stations is difficult to determine due to the uncertainty of candidate sites and unidentified charging demands, which are determined by diverse variables. This paper introduces the Estimating the Required Density of EV Charging (ERDEC) stations model, which is an analytical approach to estimating the optimal density of charging stations for certain urban areas, which are subsequently aggregated to city level planning. The optimal charging station’s density is derived to minimize the total cost. A numerical study is conducted to obtain the correlations among the various parameters in the proposed model, such as regional parameters, technological parameters and coefficient factors. To investigate the effect of technological advances, the corresponding changes in the optimal density and total cost are also examined by various combinations of technological parameters. Daejeon city in South Korea is selected for the case study to examine the applicability of the model to real-world problems. With real taxi trajectory data, the optimal density map of charging stations is generated. These results can provide the optimal number of chargers for driving without driving-range anxiety. In the initial planning phase of installing charging infrastructure, the proposed model can be applied to a relatively extensive area to encourage the usage of electric vehicles, especially areas that lack information, such as exact candidate sites for charging stations and other data related with electric vehicles. The methods and results of this paper can serve as a planning guideline to facilitate the extensive adoption of electric

  10. An Analytical Planning Model to Estimate the Optimal Density of Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yongjun; Yeo, Hwasoo

    2015-01-01

    The charging infrastructure location problem is becoming more significant due to the extensive adoption of electric vehicles. Efficient charging station planning can solve deeply rooted problems, such as driving-range anxiety and the stagnation of new electric vehicle consumers. In the initial stage of introducing electric vehicles, the allocation of charging stations is difficult to determine due to the uncertainty of candidate sites and unidentified charging demands, which are determined by diverse variables. This paper introduces the Estimating the Required Density of EV Charging (ERDEC) stations model, which is an analytical approach to estimating the optimal density of charging stations for certain urban areas, which are subsequently aggregated to city level planning. The optimal charging station's density is derived to minimize the total cost. A numerical study is conducted to obtain the correlations among the various parameters in the proposed model, such as regional parameters, technological parameters and coefficient factors. To investigate the effect of technological advances, the corresponding changes in the optimal density and total cost are also examined by various combinations of technological parameters. Daejeon city in South Korea is selected for the case study to examine the applicability of the model to real-world problems. With real taxi trajectory data, the optimal density map of charging stations is generated. These results can provide the optimal number of chargers for driving without driving-range anxiety. In the initial planning phase of installing charging infrastructure, the proposed model can be applied to a relatively extensive area to encourage the usage of electric vehicles, especially areas that lack information, such as exact candidate sites for charging stations and other data related with electric vehicles. The methods and results of this paper can serve as a planning guideline to facilitate the extensive adoption of electric

  11. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  12. Analytical study of diffusive relativistic shock acceleration.

    PubMed

    Keshet, Uri

    2006-12-01

    Particle acceleration in relativistic shocks is studied analytically in the test-particle, small-angle scattering limit, for an arbitrary velocity-angle diffusion function D. The particle spectral index s is found to be sensitive to D, particularly downstream and at certain angles. The analysis, confirmed numerically, justifies and generalizes previous results for isotropic diffusion. It can be used to test collisionless shock models and to observationally constrain D. For example, strongly forward- or backward-enhanced diffusion downstream is ruled out by gamma-ray burst afterglow observations. PMID:17155790

  13. New analytical strategies in studying drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Staack, Roland F; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2007-08-01

    Identification and elucidation of the structures of metabolites play major roles in drug discovery and in the development of pharmaceutical compounds. These studies are also important in toxicology or doping control with either pharmaceuticals or illicit drugs. This review focuses on: new analytical strategies used to identify potential metabolites in biological matrices with and without radiolabeled drugs; use of software for metabolite profiling; interpretation of product spectra; profiling of reactive metabolites; development of new approaches for generation of metabolites; and detection of metabolites with increased sensitivity and simplicity. Most of the new strategies involve mass spectrometry (MS) combined with liquid chromatography (LC). PMID:17583803

  14. [Critical reading of analytical observational studies].

    PubMed

    García Villar, C; Marín León, I

    2015-11-01

    Analytical observational studies provide very important information about real-life clinical practice and the natural history of diseases and can suggest causality. Furthermore, they are very common in scientific journals. The aim of this article is to review the main concepts necessary for the critical reading of articles about radiological studies with observational designs. It reviews the characteristics that case-control and cohort studies must have to ensure high quality. It explains a method of critical reading that involves checking the attributes that should be evaluated in each type of article using a structured list of specific questions. It underlines the main characteristics that confer credibility and confidence on the article evaluated. Readers are provided with tools for the critical analysis of the observational studies published in scientific journals. PMID:26123855

  15. Experimental design and multiple response optimization. Using the desirability function in analytical methods development.

    PubMed

    Candioti, Luciana Vera; De Zan, María M; Cámara, María S; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2014-06-01

    A review about the application of response surface methodology (RSM) when several responses have to be simultaneously optimized in the field of analytical methods development is presented. Several critical issues like response transformation, multiple response optimization and modeling with least squares and artificial neural networks are discussed. Most recent analytical applications are presented in the context of analytLaboratorio de Control de Calidad de Medicamentos (LCCM), Facultad de Bioquímica y Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, C.C. 242, S3000ZAA Santa Fe, ArgentinaLaboratorio de Control de Calidad de Medicamentos (LCCM), Facultad de Bioquímica y Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, C.C. 242, S3000ZAA Santa Fe, Argentinaical methods development, especially in multiple response optimization procedures using the desirability function. PMID:24767454

  16. Optimal control of quantum dissipative dynamics: Analytic solution for cooling the three-level Λ system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklarz, Shlomo E.; Tannor, David J.; Khaneja, Navin

    2004-05-01

    We study the problem of optimal control of dissipative quantum dynamics. Although under most circumstances dissipation leads to an increase in entropy (or a decrease in purity) of the system, there is an important class of problems for which dissipation with external control can decrease the entropy (or increase the purity) of the system. An important example is laser cooling. In such systems, there is an interplay of the Hamiltonian part of the dynamics, which is controllable, and the dissipative part of the dynamics, which is uncontrollable. The strategy is to control the Hamiltonian portion of the evolution in such a way that the dissipation causes the purity of the system to increase rather than decrease. The goal of this paper is to find the strategy that leads to maximal purity at the final time. Under the assumption that Hamiltonian control is complete and arbitrarily fast, we provide a general framework by which to calculate optimal cooling strategies. These assumptions lead to a great simplification, in which the control problem can be reformulated in terms of the spectrum of eigenvalues of ρ , rather than ρ itself. By combining this formulation with the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman theorem we are able to obtain an equation for the globally optimal cooling strategy in terms of the spectrum of the density matrix. For the three-level Λ system, we provide a complete analytic solution for the optimal cooling strategy. For this system it is found that the optimal strategy does not exploit system coherences and is a “greedy” strategy, in which the purity is increased maximally at each instant.

  17. Optimal control of quantum dissipative dynamics: Analytic solution for cooling the three-level {lambda} system

    SciTech Connect

    Sklarz, Shlomo E.; Tannor, David J.; Khaneja, Navin

    2004-05-01

    We study the problem of optimal control of dissipative quantum dynamics. Although under most circumstances dissipation leads to an increase in entropy (or a decrease in purity) of the system, there is an important class of problems for which dissipation with external control can decrease the entropy (or increase the purity) of the system. An important example is laser cooling. In such systems, there is an interplay of the Hamiltonian part of the dynamics, which is controllable, and the dissipative part of the dynamics, which is uncontrollable. The strategy is to control the Hamiltonian portion of the evolution in such a way that the dissipation causes the purity of the system to increase rather than decrease. The goal of this paper is to find the strategy that leads to maximal purity at the final time. Under the assumption that Hamiltonian control is complete and arbitrarily fast, we provide a general framework by which to calculate optimal cooling strategies. These assumptions lead to a great simplification, in which the control problem can be reformulated in terms of the spectrum of eigenvalues of {rho}, rather than {rho} itself. By combining this formulation with the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman theorem we are able to obtain an equation for the globally optimal cooling strategy in terms of the spectrum of the density matrix. For the three-level {lambda} system, we provide a complete analytic solution for the optimal cooling strategy. For this system it is found that the optimal strategy does not exploit system coherences and is a 'greedy' strategy, in which the purity is increased maximally at each instant.

  18. Analytical and experimental performance of optimal controller designs for a supersonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J. R.; Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L. C.; Batterton, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    The techniques of modern optimal control theory were applied to the design of a control system for a supersonic inlet. The inlet control problem was approached as a linear stochastic optimal control problem using as the performance index the expected frequency of unstarts. The details of the formulation of the stochastic inlet control problem are presented. The computational procedures required to obtain optimal controller designs are discussed, and the analytically predicted performance of controllers designed for several different inlet conditions is tabulated. The experimental implementation of the optimal control laws is described, and the experimental results obtained in a supersonic wind tunnel are presented. The control laws were implemented with analog and digital computers. Comparisons are made between the experimental and analytically predicted performance results. Comparisons are also made between the results obtained with continuous analog computer controllers and discrete digital computer versions.

  19. Approximate Analytical Solutions of the Regularized Long Wave Equation Using the Optimal Homotopy Perturbation Method

    PubMed Central

    Căruntu, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the optimal homotopy perturbation method, which is a new method to find approximate analytical solutions for nonlinear partial differential equations. Based on the well-known homotopy perturbation method, the optimal homotopy perturbation method presents an accelerated convergence compared to the regular homotopy perturbation method. The applications presented emphasize the high accuracy of the method by means of a comparison with previous results. PMID:25003150

  20. Asymptotic Linearity of Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law with Analytical Stability Margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal control modification has been developed to improve robustness to model-reference adaptive control. For systems with linear matched uncertainty, optimal control modification adaptive law can be shown by a singular perturbation argument to possess an outer solution that exhibits a linear asymptotic property. Analytical expressions of phase and time delay margins for the outer solution can be obtained. Using the gradient projection operator, a free design parameter of the adaptive law can be selected to satisfy stability margins.

  1. Development of an analytical solution of modified Biot's equations for the optimization of lightweight acoustic protection.

    PubMed

    Kanfoud, Jamil; Ali Hamdi, Mohamed; Becot, François-Xavier; Jaouen, Luc

    2009-02-01

    During lift-off, space launchers are submitted to high-level of acoustic loads, which may damage sensitive equipments. A special acoustic absorber has been previously integrated inside the fairing of space launchers to protect the payload. A new research project has been launched to develop a low cost fairing acoustic protection system using optimized layers of porous materials covered by a thin layer of fabric. An analytical model is used for the analysis of acoustic wave propagation within the multilayer porous media. Results have been validated by impedance tube measurements. A parametric study has been conducted to determine optimal mechanical and acoustical properties of the acoustic protection under dimensional thickness constraints. The effect of the mounting conditions has been studied. Results reveal the importance of the lateral constraints on the absorption coefficient particularly in the low frequency range. A transmission study has been carried out, where the fairing structure has been simulated by a limp mass layer. The transmission loss and noise reduction factors have been computed using Biot's theory and the local acoustic impedance approximation to represent the porous layer effect. Comparisons between the two models show the frequency domains for which the local impedance model is valid. PMID:19206863

  2. An analytical approach for gain optimization in multimode fiber Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junhe

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, an analytical approach is proposed to minimize the mode dependent gain as well as the wavelength dependent gain for the multimode fiber Raman amplifiers (MFRAs). It is shown that the optimal power integrals at the corresponding modes and wavelengths can be obtained by the non-negative least square method (NNLSM). The corresponding input pump powers can be calculated afterwards using the shooting method. It is demonstrated that if the power overlap integrals are not wavelength dependent, the optimization can be further simplified by decomposing the optimization problem into two sub optimization problems, i.e. the optimization of the gain ripple with respect to the modes, and with respect to the wavelengths. The optimization results closely match the ones in recent publications. PMID:25321517

  3. Dynamic optimization case studies in DYNOPT tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozana, Stepan; Pies, Martin; Docekal, Tomas

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic programming is typically applied to optimization problems. As the analytical solutions are generally very difficult, chosen software tools are used widely. These software packages are often third-party products bound for standard simulation software tools on the market. As typical examples of such tools, TOMLAB and DYNOPT could be effectively applied for solution of problems of dynamic programming. DYNOPT will be presented in this paper due to its licensing policy (free product under GPL) and simplicity of use. DYNOPT is a set of MATLAB functions for determination of optimal control trajectory by given description of the process, the cost to be minimized, subject to equality and inequality constraints, using orthogonal collocation on finite elements method. The actual optimal control problem is solved by complete parameterization both the control and the state profile vector. It is assumed, that the optimized dynamic model may be described by a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) or differential-algebraic equations (DAEs). This collection of functions extends the capability of the MATLAB Optimization Tool-box. The paper will introduce use of DYNOPT in the field of dynamic optimization problems by means of case studies regarding chosen laboratory physical educational models.

  4. Analytical strategies for studying stem cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, James M.; Choi, William T.; Sreekumar, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Owing to their capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency, stem cells possess untold potential for revolutionizing the field of regenerative medicine through the development of novel therapeutic strategies for treating cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Central to developing these strategies is improving our understanding of biological mechanisms responsible for governing stem cell fate and self-renewal. Increasing attention is being given to the significance of metabolism, through the production of energy and generation of small molecules, as a critical regulator of stem cell functioning. Rapid advances in the field of metabolomics now allow for in-depth profiling of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo, providing a systems perspective on key metabolic and molecular pathways which influence stem cell biology. Understanding the analytical platforms and techniques that are currently used to study stem cell metabolomics, as well as how new insights can be derived from this knowledge, will accelerate new research in the field and improve future efforts to expand our understanding of the interplay between metabolism and stem cell biology. PMID:26213533

  5. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.; ZINSLI, L. C.; CUSACK, L. J.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  6. Spatiotemporal and geometric optimization of sensor arrays for detecting analytes in fluids

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Nathan S.; Freund, Michael S.; Briglin, Shawn S.; Tokumaru, Phillip; Martin, Charles R.; Mitchell, David

    2009-09-29

    Sensor arrays and sensor array systems for detecting analytes in fluids. Sensors configured to generate a response upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more analytes can be located on one or more surfaces relative to one or more fluid channels in an array. Fluid channels can take the form of pores or holes in a substrate material. Fluid channels can be formed between one or more substrate plates. Sensor can be fabricated with substantially optimized sensor volumes to generate a response having a substantially maximized signal to noise ratio upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more target analytes. Methods of fabricating and using such sensor arrays and systems are also disclosed.

  7. Spatiotemporal and geometric optimization of sensor arrays for detecting analytes fluids

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Nathan S.; Freund, Michael S.; Briglin, Shawn M.; Tokumaru, Phil; Martin, Charles R.; Mitchell, David T.

    2006-10-17

    Sensor arrays and sensor array systems for detecting analytes in fluids. Sensors configured to generate a response upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more analytes can be located on one or more surfaces relative to one or more fluid channels in an array. Fluid channels can take the form of pores or holes in a substrate material. Fluid channels can be formed between one or more substrate plates. Sensor can be fabricated with substantially optimized sensor volumes to generate a response having a substantially maximized signal to noise ratio upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more target analytes. Methods of fabricating and using such sensor arrays and systems are also disclosed.

  8. Variable-Field Analytical Ultracentrifugation: I. Time-Optimized Sedimentation Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia; Metrick, Michael; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2015-08-18

    Sedimentation equilibrium (SE) analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a gold standard for the rigorous determination of macromolecular buoyant molar masses and the thermodynamic study of reversible interactions in solution. A significant experimental drawback is the long time required to attain SE, which is usually on the order of days. We have developed a method for time-optimized SE (toSE) with defined time-varying centrifugal fields that allow SE to be attained in a significantly (up to 10-fold) shorter time than is usually required. To achieve this, numerical Lamm equation solutions for sedimentation in time-varying fields are computed based on initial estimates of macromolecular transport properties. A parameterized rotor-speed schedule is optimized with the goal of achieving a minimal time to equilibrium while limiting transient sample preconcentration at the base of the solution column. The resulting rotor-speed schedule may include multiple over- and underspeeding phases, balancing the formation of gradients from strong sedimentation fluxes with periods of high diffusional transport. The computation is carried out in a new software program called TOSE, which also facilitates convenient experimental implementation. Further, we extend AUC data analysis to sedimentation processes in such time-varying centrifugal fields. Due to the initially high centrifugal fields in toSE and the resulting strong migration, it is possible to extract sedimentation coefficient distributions from the early data. This can provide better estimates of the size of macromolecular complexes and report on sample homogeneity early on, which may be used to further refine the prediction of the rotor-speed schedule. In this manner, the toSE experiment can be adapted in real time to the system under study, maximizing both the information content and the time efficiency of SE experiments. PMID:26287634

  9. A decision-analytic approach to the optimal allocation of resources for endangered species consultation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Converse, Sarah J.; Shelley, Kevin J.; Morey, Steve; Chan, Jeffrey; LaTier, Andrea; Scafidi, Carolyn; Crouse, Deborah T.; Runge, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    The resources available to support conservation work, whether time or money, are limited. Decision makers need methods to help them identify the optimal allocation of limited resources to meet conservation goals, and decision analysis is uniquely suited to assist with the development of such methods. In recent years, a number of case studies have been described that examine optimal conservation decisions under fiscal constraints; here we develop methods to look at other types of constraints, including limited staff and regulatory deadlines. In the US, Section Seven consultation, an important component of protection under the federal Endangered Species Act, requires that federal agencies overseeing projects consult with federal biologists to avoid jeopardizing species. A benefit of consultation is negotiation of project modifications that lessen impacts on species, so staff time allocated to consultation supports conservation. However, some offices have experienced declining staff, potentially reducing the efficacy of consultation. This is true of the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Washington Fish and Wildlife Office (WFWO) and its consultation work on federally-threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). To improve effectiveness, WFWO managers needed a tool to help allocate this work to maximize conservation benefits. We used a decision-analytic approach to score projects based on the value of staff time investment, and then identified an optimal decision rule for how scored projects would be allocated across bins, where projects in different bins received different time investments. We found that, given current staff, the optimal decision rule placed 80% of informal consultations (those where expected effects are beneficial, insignificant, or discountable) in a short bin where they would be completed without negotiating changes. The remaining 20% would be placed in a long bin, warranting an investment of seven days, including time for negotiation. For formal

  10. Many-objective optimization and visual analytics reveal key trade-offs for London's water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Evgenii S.; Huskova, Ivana; Kasprzyk, Joseph R.; Harou, Julien J.; Lambert, Chris; Reed, Patrick M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we link a water resource management simulator to multi-objective search to reveal the key trade-offs inherent in planning a real-world water resource system. We consider new supplies and demand management (conservation) options while seeking to elucidate the trade-offs between the best portfolios of schemes to satisfy projected water demands. Alternative system designs are evaluated using performance measures that minimize capital and operating costs and energy use while maximizing resilience, engineering and environmental metrics, subject to supply reliability constraints. Our analysis shows many-objective evolutionary optimization coupled with state-of-the art visual analytics can help planners discover more diverse water supply system designs and better understand their inherent trade-offs. The approach is used to explore future water supply options for the Thames water resource system (including London's water supply). New supply options include a new reservoir, water transfers, artificial recharge, wastewater reuse and brackish groundwater desalination. Demand management options include leakage reduction, compulsory metering and seasonal tariffs. The Thames system's Pareto approximate portfolios cluster into distinct groups of water supply options; for example implementing a pipe refurbishment program leads to higher capital costs but greater reliability. This study highlights that traditional least-cost reliability constrained design of water supply systems masks asset combinations whose benefits only become apparent when more planning objectives are considered.

  11. Optimal evaluation of infectious medical waste disposal companies using the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chao Chung

    2011-07-15

    Ever since Taiwan's National Health Insurance implemented the diagnosis-related groups payment system in January 2010, hospital income has declined. Therefore, to meet their medical waste disposal needs, hospitals seek suppliers that provide high-quality services at a low cost. The enactment of the Waste Disposal Act in 1974 had facilitated some improvement in the management of waste disposal. However, since the implementation of the National Health Insurance program, the amount of medical waste from disposable medical products has been increasing. Further, of all the hazardous waste types, the amount of infectious medical waste has increased at the fastest rate. This is because of the increase in the number of items considered as infectious waste by the Environmental Protection Administration. The present study used two important findings from previous studies to determine the critical evaluation criteria for selecting infectious medical waste disposal firms. It employed the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process to set the objective weights of the evaluation criteria and select the optimal infectious medical waste disposal firm through calculation and sorting. The aim was to propose a method of evaluation with which medical and health care institutions could objectively and systematically choose appropriate infectious medical waste disposal firms.

  12. An Analytical Study of the Mode Propagation along the Plasmaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeremley, Daniel; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Eremin, Denis; Theoretical Electrical Engineering Team

    2014-10-01

    The market shows in recent years a growing demand for bottles made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Therefore, fast and efficient sterilization processes as well as barrier coatings to decrease gas permeation are required. A specialized microwave plasma source - referred to as the plasmaline - has been developed to allow for treatment of the inner surface of such PET bottles The plasmaline is a coaxial waveguide combined with a gas-inlet which is inserted into the empty bottle and initiates a reactive plasma. To optimize and control the different surface processes, it is essential to fully understand the microwave power coupling to the plasma inside the bottle and thus the electromagnetic wave propagation along the plasmaline. In this contribution, we present a detailed dispersion analysis based on an analytical approach. We study how modes of guided waves are propagating under different conditions (if at all). The analytical results are supported by a series of self-consistent numerical simulations of the plasmaline and the plasma. The authors acknowledge funding by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within the frame of SFB-TR 87.

  13. Analytical study of shimmy of airplane wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourcier De Carbon, Christian

    1952-01-01

    The problem of shimmy of a castering wheel, such as the nose wheel of a tricycle gear airplane, is treated analytically. The flexibility of the tire is considered to be the primary cause of shimmy. The rather simple theory developed agrees rather well with previous experimental results. The author suggests that shimmy may be eliminated through a suitable choice of landing gear dimensions in lieu of a damper.

  14. Analytical optimization of demand management strategies across all urban water use sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Kenneth; Heaney, James P.; Morales, Miguel; Palenchar, John

    2014-07-01

    An effective urban water demand management program can greatly influence both peak and average demand and therefore long-term water supply and infrastructure planning. Although a theoretical framework for evaluating residential indoor demand management has been well established, little has been done to evaluate other water use sectors such as residential irrigation in a compatible manner for integrating these results into an overall solution. This paper presents a systematic procedure to evaluate the optimal blend of single family residential irrigation demand management strategies to achieve a specified goal based on performance functions derived from parcel level tax assessor's data linked to customer level monthly water billing data. This framework is then generalized to apply to any urban water sector, as exponential functions can be fit to all resulting cumulative water savings functions. Two alternative formulations are presented: maximize net benefits, or minimize total costs subject to satisfying a target water savings. Explicit analytical solutions are presented for both formulations based on appropriate exponential best fits of performance functions. A direct result of this solution is the dual variable which represents the marginal cost of water saved at a specified target water savings goal. A case study of 16,303 single family irrigators in Gainesville Regional Utilities utilizing high quality tax assessor and monthly billing data along with parcel level GIS data provide an illustrative example of these techniques. Spatial clustering of targeted homes can be easily performed in GIS to identify priority demand management areas.

  15. Three-dimensional magnetic optimization of accelerator magnets using an analytic strip model

    SciTech Connect

    Rochepault, Etienne Aubert, Guy; Vedrine, Pierre

    2014-07-14

    The end design is a critical step in the design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, the strain energy of the conductors must be minimized, which can be achieved using differential geometry. The end design also requires an optimization of the magnetic field homogeneity. A mechanical and magnetic model for the conductors, using developable strips, is described in this paper. This model can be applied to superconducting Rutherford cables, and it is particularly suitable for High Temperature Superconducting tapes. The great advantage of this approach is analytic simplifications in the field computation, allowing for very fast and accurate computations, which save a considerable computational time during the optimization process. Some 3D designs for dipoles are finally proposed, and it is shown that the harmonic integrals can be easily optimized using this model.

  16. Three-dimensional magnetic optimization of accelerator magnets using an analytic strip model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochepault, Etienne; Aubert, Guy; Vedrine, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    The end design is a critical step in the design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, the strain energy of the conductors must be minimized, which can be achieved using differential geometry. The end design also requires an optimization of the magnetic field homogeneity. A mechanical and magnetic model for the conductors, using developable strips, is described in this paper. This model can be applied to superconducting Rutherford cables, and it is particularly suitable for High Temperature Superconducting tapes. The great advantage of this approach is analytic simplifications in the field computation, allowing for very fast and accurate computations, which save a considerable computational time during the optimization process. Some 3D designs for dipoles are finally proposed, and it is shown that the harmonic integrals can be easily optimized using this model.

  17. Analytic study on the effects of the number of MLC segments and the least segment area on step-and-shoot head-and-neck IMRT planning using direct machine parameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Lee, MeYeon; Kim, Haeyoung; Bae, Hoonsik; Park, SoAh; Hwang, Taejin; Kim, KyoungJu; Han, Taejin

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we present the concurrent effects of the number of segments (NS) and the least segment area (LSA) for step-and-shoot head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning using the direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO), on which basis we suggest the optimal NS and LSA ranges. We selected three head-and-neck patients who had received IMRT via the simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique and classified them as easy, intermediate, and difficult cases. We formulated a benchmark plan and made 11 additional plans by re-optimizing the benchmark by varying the NS and the LSA for each case. Clinical and physical plan-quality evaluation parameters were considered separately: the conformality index (CI), the homogeneity index (HI) and the maximum or mean doses for the organs-at-risk were the clinical factors, and these were summarized as plan-quality parameter, Q. The modulation index (MI), the total monitor units (MUs), and the final composite cost function F were employed as parameters in the evaluation of the physical aspects. A 2-way analysis of variance (2-way ANOVA) was used to determine the effects of the NS and the LSA concurrently. Pearson's correlations among the total MU, MI, F, and Q were examined as well. Overall plan-efficiency factor ɛ was defined to estimate the optimal NS and LSA by considering the plan's quality and the beam delivery efficiency together. Plans with simple targets or a small number of beams (NB) were affected by the LSA whereas plans with complex targets or large NB were affected by the NS. Moreover, smaller NS and smaller LSA were advantageous for simple plans whereas larger NS and smaller LSA were beneficial for complex plans. When we consider the plan's quality and the beam delivery efficiency, {NS = 60-80, LSA = 8-12 cm2} are the proper ranges for head-and-neck IMRT planning with DMPO; however, the combination may differ based on the complexity of a given plan.

  18. Analytical study of magnetohydrodynamic propulsion stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahzadeh Jamalabadi, M. Y.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper an analytical solution for the stability of the fully developed flow drive in a magneto-hydro-dynamic pump with pulsating transverse Eletro-magnetic fields is presented. To do this, a theoretical model of the flow is developed and the analytical results are obtained for both the cylindrical and Cartesian configurations that are proper to use in the propulsion of marine vessels. The governing parabolic momentum PDEs are transformed into an ordinary differential equation using approximate velocity distribution. The numerical results are obtained and asymptotic analyses are built to discover the mathematical behavior of the solutions. The maximum velocity in a magneto-hydro-dynamic pump versus time for various values of the Stuart number, electro-magnetic interaction number, Reynolds number, aspect ratio, as well as the magnetic and electrical angular frequency and the shift of the phase angle is presented. Results show that for a high Stuart number there is a frequency limit for stability of the fluid flow in a certain direction of the flow. This stability frequency is dependent on the geometric parameters of a channel.

  19. Analytical methods used in a study of coke oven effluent.

    PubMed

    Schulte, K A; Larsen, D J; Hornung, R W; Crable, J V

    1975-02-01

    In a coke oven study conducted by NIOSH, selected chemical analyses of airborne particulates, vapors, and metals in the emissions from five coke ovens were done. Eight sampling procedures and seven analytical techniques were used to analyze samples collected for the study. Six of the analytical methods used are discussed. PMID:1146677

  20. Analytic study of disoriented chiral condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.

    1996-09-01

    By introducing a quark source in the nonlinear {sigma} model, we obtain an analytic boost-invariant solution as a candidate for the disoriented chiral condensate (DCC) in 3+1 dimensions. In order to trigger formation of the DCC, a strong transfer of axial isospin charge must occur between the expanding source and the interior in the baked Alaska scenario. An explicit chiral symmetry breaking is incorporated in the solution by connecting the decay period to the formation period. Quantitative estimates are presented with our simple solution. At least in this class of solutions, the explicit symmetry breaking masks almost completely the disorientation which would be reached asymptotically in the symmetric limit. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Analytical Model and Optimized Design of Power Transmitting Coil for Inductively Coupled Endoscope Robot.

    PubMed

    Ke, Quan; Luo, Weijie; Yan, Guozheng; Yang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    A wireless power transfer system based on the weakly inductive coupling makes it possible to provide the endoscope microrobot (EMR) with infinite power. To facilitate the patients' inspection with the EMR system, the diameter of the transmitting coil is enlarged to 69 cm. Due to the large transmitting range, a high quality factor of the Litz-wire transmitting coil is a necessity to ensure the intensity of magnetic field generated efficiently. Thus, this paper builds an analytical model of the transmitting coil, and then, optimizes the parameters of the coil by enlarging the quality factor. The lumped model of the transmitting coil includes three parameters: ac resistance, self-inductance, and stray capacitance. Based on the exact two-dimension solution, the accurate analytical expression of ac resistance is derived. Several transmitting coils of different specifications are utilized to verify this analytical expression, being in good agreements with the measured results except the coils with a large number of strands. Then, the quality factor of transmitting coils can be well predicted with the available analytical expressions of self- inductance and stray capacitance. Owing to the exact estimation of quality factor, the appropriate coil turns of the transmitting coil is set to 18-40 within the restrictions of transmitting circuit and human tissue issues. To supply enough energy for the next generation of the EMR equipped with a Ø9.5×10.1 mm receiving coil, the coil turns of the transmitting coil is optimally set to 28, which can transfer a maximum power of 750 mW with the remarkable delivering efficiency of 3.55%. PMID:26292335

  2. Holistic versus Analytic Evaluation of EFL Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghalib, Thikra K.; Al-Hattami, Abdulghani A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of holistic and analytic scoring rubrics in the context of EFL writing. Specifically, the paper compares EFL students' scores on a writing task using holistic and analytic scoring rubrics. The data for the study was collected from 30 participants attending an English undergraduate program in a Yemeni…

  3. Verifiable Adaptive Control with Analytical Stability Margins by Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a verifiable model-reference adaptive control method based on an optimal control formulation for linear uncertain systems. A predictor model is formulated to enable a parameter estimation of the system parametric uncertainty. The adaptation is based on both the tracking error and predictor error. Using a singular perturbation argument, it can be shown that the closed-loop system tends to a linear time invariant model asymptotically under an assumption of fast adaptation. A stability margin analysis is given to estimate a lower bound of the time delay margin using a matrix measure method. Using this analytical method, the free design parameter n of the optimal control modification adaptive law can be determined to meet a specification of stability margin for verification purposes.

  4. Parameter Estimation of Computationally Expensive Watershed Models Through Efficient Multi-objective Optimization and Interactive Decision Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Taimoor; Shoemaker, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Watershed model calibration is inherently a multi-criteria problem. Conflicting trade-offs exist between different quantifiable calibration criterions indicating the non-existence of a single optimal parameterization. Hence, many experts prefer a manual approach to calibration where the inherent multi-objective nature of the calibration problem is addressed through an interactive, subjective, time-intensive and complex decision making process. Multi-objective optimization can be used to efficiently identify multiple plausible calibration alternatives and assist calibration experts during the parameter estimation process. However, there are key challenges to the use of multi objective optimization in the parameter estimation process which include: 1) multi-objective optimization usually requires many model simulations, which is difficult for complex simulation models that are computationally expensive; and 2) selection of one from numerous calibration alternatives provided by multi-objective optimization is non-trivial. This study proposes a "Hybrid Automatic Manual Strategy" (HAMS) for watershed model calibration to specifically address the above-mentioned challenges. HAMS employs a 3-stage framework for parameter estimation. Stage 1 incorporates the use of an efficient surrogate multi-objective algorithm, GOMORS, for identification of numerous calibration alternatives within a limited simulation evaluation budget. The novelty of HAMS is embedded in Stages 2 and 3 where an interactive visual and metric based analytics framework is available as a decision support tool to choose a single calibration from the numerous alternatives identified in Stage 1. Stage 2 of HAMS provides a goodness-of-fit measure / metric based interactive framework for identification of a small subset (typically less than 10) of meaningful and diverse set of calibration alternatives from the numerous alternatives obtained in Stage 1. Stage 3 incorporates the use of an interactive visual

  5. Communication: Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms: Controlling the photoisomerization yield of retinal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, R. D.; Arango, C. A.; Reyes, A.

    2016-07-01

    We recently proposed a Quantum Optimal Control (QOC) method constrained to build pulses from analytical pulse shapes [R. D. Guerrero et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143(12), 124108 (2015)]. This approach was applied to control the dissociation channel yields of the diatomic molecule KH, considering three potential energy curves and one degree of freedom. In this work, we utilized this methodology to study the strong field control of the cis-trans photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal. This more complex system was modeled with a Hamiltonian comprising two potential energy surfaces and two degrees of freedom. The resulting optimal pulse, made of 6 linearly chirped pulses, was capable of controlling the population of the trans isomer on the ground electronic surface for nearly 200 fs. The simplicity of the pulse generated with our QOC approach offers two clear advantages: a direct analysis of the sequence of events occurring during the driven dynamics, and its reproducibility in the laboratory with current laser technologies.

  6. Analytical studies of hypersonic viscous dissociated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inger, George R.

    1995-01-01

    causes problems in CFD predictions. A preliminary theory for prediction that says the heating at the corner is X percent of the heating N boundary-layer thicknesses inboard was developed. This will prove useful to analytically evaluate the possible benefits of rounding the edges of these configurations and defining how much rounding is sufficient.

  7. Calibration of Semi-analytic Models of Galaxy Formation Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Andrés N.; Cora, Sofía A.; Padilla, Nelson D.; Domínguez, Mariano J.; Vega-Martínez, Cristian A.; Tecce, Tomás E.; Orsi, Álvaro; Yaryura, Yamila; García Lambas, Diego; Gargiulo, Ignacio D.; Muñoz Arancibia, Alejandra M.

    2015-03-01

    We present a fast and accurate method to select an optimal set of parameters in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation and evolution (SAMs). Our approach compares the results of a model against a set of observables applying a stochastic technique called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), a self-learning algorithm for localizing regions of maximum likelihood in multidimensional spaces that outperforms traditional sampling methods in terms of computational cost. We apply the PSO technique to the SAG semi-analytic model combined with merger trees extracted from a standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter N-body simulation. The calibration is performed using a combination of observed galaxy properties as constraints, including the local stellar mass function and the black hole to bulge mass relation. We test the ability of the PSO algorithm to find the best set of free parameters of the model by comparing the results with those obtained using a MCMC exploration. Both methods find the same maximum likelihood region, however, the PSO method requires one order of magnitude fewer evaluations. This new approach allows a fast estimation of the best-fitting parameter set in multidimensional spaces, providing a practical tool to test the consequences of including other astrophysical processes in SAMs.

  8. Interplanetary Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (IPOST). Volume 2: Analytic manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, P. E.; Kent, P. D.; Olson, D. W.; Vallado, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Interplanetary Program to Optimize Space Trajectories (IPOST) is intended to support many analysis phases, from early interplanetary feasibility studies through spacecraft development and operations. The IPOST output provides information for sizing and understanding mission impacts related to propulsion, guidance, communications, sensor/actuators, payload, and other dynamic and geometric environments. IPOST models three degree of freedom trajectory events, such as launch/ascent, orbital coast, propulsive maneuvering (impulsive and finite burn), gravity assist, and atmospheric entry. Trajectory propagation is performed using a choice of Cowell, Encke, Multiconic, Onestep, or Conic methods. The user identifies a desired sequence of trajectory events, and selects which parameters are independent (controls) and dependent (targets), as well as other constraints and the cost function. Targeting and optimization is performed using the Stanford NPSOL algorithm. IPOST structure allows subproblems within a master optimization problem to aid in the general constrained parameter optimization solution. An alternate optimization method uses implicit simulation and collocation techniques.

  9. Comparison of optimization methods for the hyperspectral semi-analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, KePing; Xi, Ying; Sun, LiRan; Zhang, Xuegang

    2009-01-01

    During recent years, more and more efforts have been focused on developing new models based on ocean optics theory to retrieve water's bio-geo-chemical parameters or inherent optical properties (IOPs) from either ocean color imagery or in situ measurements. Basically, these models are sophisticated, and hard to invert directly, look up table (LUT) technique or optimization methods are employed to retrieve the unknown parameters, e.g., chlorophyll concentration, CDOM absorption, etc. Many researches prefer to use time-consuming global optimization methods, e.g., genetic or evolutionary algorithm, etc. In this study, different optimization methods, smooth nonlinear optimization (NLP), global optimization (GO), nonsmooth optimization (NSP), are compared based on the sophisticated hyper-spectral semianalytical (SA) algorithm developed by Lee et al., retrieval accuracy and performance are evaluated. It is found that retrieval accuracy don't have much difference, the performance difference, however, is much larger, NLP works very well for the SA model. For a given model, it is better to analyze the model is linear, nonlinear or nonsmooth category problem, sometimes, convex also need to be determined, or linearize some nonsmooth problem caused by if decision, then select the corresponding category optimization methods. Initial values selection is a big issue for optimization, the simple statistical models (e.g., OC2 or OC4) are used to retrieve the unknowns as initial values.

  10. Analytical optimal controls for the state constrained addition and removal of cryoprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Chicone, Carmen C.; Critser, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Cryobiology is a field with enormous scientific, financial and even cultural impact. Successful cryopreservation of cells and tissues depends on the equilibration of these materials with high concentrations of permeating chemicals (CPAs) such as glycerol or 1,2 propylene glycol. Because cells and tissues are exposed to highly anisosmotic conditions, the resulting gradients cause large volume fluctuations that have been shown to damage cells and tissues. On the other hand, there is evidence that toxicity to these high levels of chemicals is time dependent, and therefore it is ideal to minimize exposure time as well. Because solute and solvent flux is governed by a system of ordinary differential equations, CPA addition and removal from cells is an ideal context for the application of optimal control theory. Recently, we presented a mathematical synthesis of the optimal controls for the ODE system commonly used in cryobiology in the absence of state constraints and showed that controls defined by this synthesis were optimal. Here we define the appropriate model, analytically extend the previous theory to one encompassing state constraints, and as an example apply this to the critical and clinically important cell type of human oocytes, where current methodologies are either difficult to implement or have very limited success rates. We show that an enormous increase in equilibration efficiency can be achieved under the new protocols when compared to classic protocols, potentially allowing a greatly increased survival rate for human oocytes, and pointing to a direction for the cryopreservation of many other cell types. PMID:22527943

  11. Studying Human Dynamics Through Web Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasco, Jose; Goncalves, Bruno

    2008-03-01

    When Tim Berners Lee, a physicist at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) first conceived the World Wide Web (WWW) in 1990 as a way to facilitate the sharing of scientific information and results among the centers different researchers and groups, even the most ingenious of science fiction writers could not have imagined the role it would come to play in the following decades. The increasing ubiquitousness of Internet access and the frequency with which people interact with it raise the possibility of using it to better observe, understand, and even monitor several aspects of human social behavior. Websites with large numbers of frequently returning users, such as search engines, company or university websites, are ideal for this task. The properly anonymized logs detailing the access history to Emory University's website is studied. We find that a small number of users is responsible for a finite fraction of the total activity. A saturation phenomenon is observed where, certain connections age, becoming less attractive to new activity over time. Finally, by measuring the average activity as a function of the day of the week, we find that productivity seems to be higher on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, with Sundays being the least active day.

  12. Analytical and phenomenological studies of rotating turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalov, Alex; Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    A framework, which combines mathematical analysis, closure theory, and phenomenological treatment, is developed to study the spectral transfer process and reduction of dimensionality in turbulent flows that are subject to rotation. First, we outline a mathematical procedure that is particularly appropriate for problems with two disparate time scales. The approach which is based on the Green's method leads to the Poincare velocity variables and the Poincare transformation when applied to rotating turbulence. The effects of the rotation are now reflected in the modifications to the convolution of a nonlinear term. The Poincare transformed equations are used to obtain a time-dependent analog of the Taylor-Proudman theorem valid in the asymptotic limit when the non-dimensional parameter mu is identical to Omega(t) approaches infinity (Omega is the rotation rate and t is the time). The 'split' of the energy transfer in both direct and inverse directions is established. Secondly, we apply the Eddy-Damped-Quasinormal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure to the Poincare transformed Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. This closure leads to expressions for the spectral energy transfer. In particular, an unique triple velocity decorrelation time is derived with an explicit dependence on the rotation rate. This provides an important input for applying the phenomenological treatment of Zhou. In order to characterize the relative strength of rotation, another non-dimensional number, a spectral Rossby number, which is defined as the ratio of rotation and turbulence time scales, is introduced. Finally, the energy spectrum and the spectral eddy viscosity are deduced.

  13. Cost optimization of DNAPL source and plume remediation under uncertainty using a semi-analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiff, Michael; Liu, Xiaoyi; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Parker, Jack; Kim, Ungtae

    2010-04-01

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) spills represent a potential long-term source of aquifer contamination, and successful low-cost remediation may require a combination of both plume management and source treatment. In addition, substantial uncertainty exists in many of the parameters that control field-scale behavior of DNAPL sources and plumes. For these reasons, cost optimization of DNAPL cleanup needs to consider multiple treatment options and their associated costs while also gauging the influence of prediction uncertainty on expected costs. In this paper, we present a management methodology for field-scale DNAPL source and plume management under uncertainty. Using probabilistic methods, historical data and prior information are combined to produce a set of equally likely realizations of true field conditions (i.e., parameter sets). These parameter sets are then used in a simulation-optimization framework to produce DNAPL cleanup solutions that have the lowest possible expected net present value (ENPV) cost and that are suitably cautious in the presence of high uncertainty. For simulation, we utilize a fast-running semi-analytic field-scale model of DNAPL source and plume evolution that also approximates the effects of remedial actions. The degree of model prediction uncertainty is gauged using a restricted maximum likelihood method, which helps to produce suitably cautious remediation strategies. We test our methodology on a synthetic field-scale problem with multiple source architectures, for which source zone thermal treatment and electron donor injection are considered as remedial actions. The lowest cost solution found utilizes a combination of source and plume remediation methods, and is able to successfully meet remediation constraints for a majority of possible scenarios. Comparisons with deterministic optimization results show that not taking into account uncertainty can result in optimization strategies that are not aggressive enough and result

  14. Analytical modeling and sensor monitoring for optimal processing of polymeric composite material systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loos, Alfred C.; Weideman, Mark H.; Kranbuehl, David E.; Long, Edward R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Process simulation models and cure monitoring sensors are discussed for use in optimal processing of fiber-reinforced composites. Analytical models relate the specified temperature and pressure cure cycle to the thermal, chemical, and physical processes occurring in the composite during consolidation and cure. Frequency-dependent electromagnetic sensing (FDEMS) is described as an in situ sensor for monitoring the composite curing process and for verification of process simulation models. A model for resin transfer molding of textile composites is used to illustrate the predictive capabilities of a process simulation model. The model is used to calculate the resin infiltration time, fiber volume fraction, resin viscosity, and resin degree of cure. Results of the model are compared with in situ FDEMS measurements.

  15. Analytical Prediction and Optimization of Far-Field Pyroshock Test Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacher, Alexander; Jungel, Nikolas; von Wagner, Utz; Bager, Annette

    2012-07-01

    The simulation of far-field pyroshocks is mainly performed by the use of mechanical or mechatronic devices such as hammer pendulums, shakers and piezoactors. Latter show limitations concerning frequency and acceleration ranges which does not hold for hammer pendulums or bolt guns. Their controllability, however, is rather unsatisfactory and there still exists a general lack of computational prediction tools for usually time consuming and costly far-field pyroshock tests. Mechanical minimal models of existing hammer test devices are presented and investigated by the use of the finite element and analytical methods. The tedious mechanical impact problem is reduced by introducing a nonlinear compressive spring connecting striking partners. Computational test results are verified by experiments and optimized by an evolution strategy allowing for determination of optimum test parameters. The algorithms developed are the basis for fast and efficient predictions of pyroshock tests.

  16. Aeroelastic Optimization Study Based on the X-56A Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley W.; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2014-01-01

    One way to increase the aircraft fuel efficiency is to reduce structural weight while maintaining adequate structural airworthiness, both statically and aeroelastically. A design process which incorporates the object-oriented multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool and the aeroelastic effects of high fidelity finite element models to characterize the design space was successfully developed and established. This paper presents two multidisciplinary design optimization studies using an object-oriented MDAO tool developed at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. The first study demonstrates the use of aeroelastic tailoring concepts to minimize the structural weight while meeting the design requirements including strength, buckling, and flutter. Such an approach exploits the anisotropic capabilities of the fiber composite materials chosen for this analytical exercise with ply stacking sequence. A hybrid and discretization optimization approach improves accuracy and computational efficiency of a global optimization algorithm. The second study presents a flutter mass balancing optimization study for the fabricated flexible wing of the X-56A model since a desired flutter speed band is required for the active flutter suppression demonstration during flight testing. The results of the second study provide guidance to modify the wing design and move the design flutter speeds back into the flight envelope so that the original objective of X-56A flight test can be accomplished successfully. The second case also demonstrates that the object-oriented MDAO tool can handle multiple analytical configurations in a single optimization run.

  17. Analytic Shielding Optimization to Reduce Crew Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Inside Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaza, Razvan; Cooper, Tim P.; Hanzo, Arthur; Hussein, Hesham; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Kimble, Ryan; Lee, Kerry T.; Patel, Chirag; Reddell, Brandon D.; Stoffle, Nicholas; Zapp, E. Neal; Shelfer, Tad D.

    2009-01-01

    A sustainable lunar architecture provides capabilities for leveraging out-of-service components for alternate uses. Discarded architecture elements may be used to provide ionizing radiation shielding to the crew habitat in case of a Solar Particle Event. The specific location relative to the vehicle where the additional shielding mass is placed, as corroborated with particularities of the vehicle design, has a large influence on protection gain. This effect is caused by the exponential- like decrease of radiation exposure with shielding mass thickness, which in turn determines that the most benefit from a given amount of shielding mass is obtained by placing it so that it preferentially augments protection in under-shielded areas of the vehicle exposed to the radiation environment. A novel analytic technique to derive an optimal shielding configuration was developed by Lockheed Martin during Design Analysis Cycle 3 (DAC-3) of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). [1] Based on a detailed Computer Aided Design (CAD) model of the vehicle including a specific crew positioning scenario, a set of under-shielded vehicle regions can be identified as candidates for placement of additional shielding. Analytic tools are available to allow capturing an idealized supplemental shielding distribution in the CAD environment, which in turn is used as a reference for deriving a realistic shielding configuration from available vehicle components. While the analysis referenced in this communication applies particularly to the Orion vehicle, the general method can be applied to a large range of space exploration vehicles, including but not limited to lunar and Mars architecture components. In addition, the method can be immediately applied for optimization of radiation shielding provided to sensitive electronic components.

  18. Integration of fuzzy analytic hierarchy process and probabilistic dynamic programming in formulating an optimal fleet management model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, Lay Eng; Khoo, Hooi Ling

    2013-09-01

    This study deals with two major aspects of airlines, i.e. supply and demand management. The aspect of supply focuses on the mathematical formulation of an optimal fleet management model to maximize operational profit of the airlines while the aspect of demand focuses on the incorporation of mode choice modeling as parts of the developed model. The proposed methodology is outlined in two-stage, i.e. Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process is first adopted to capture mode choice modeling in order to quantify the probability of probable phenomena (for aircraft acquisition/leasing decision). Then, an optimization model is developed as a probabilistic dynamic programming model to determine the optimal number and types of aircraft to be acquired and/or leased in order to meet stochastic demand during the planning horizon. The findings of an illustrative case study show that the proposed methodology is viable. The results demonstrate that the incorporation of mode choice modeling could affect the operational profit and fleet management decision of the airlines at varying degrees.

  19. Explicit solutions to analytical models of cross-layer protocol optimization in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2009-05-01

    The work is based on the interactions among the nodes of a wireless sensor network (WSN) to cooperatively process data from multiple sensors. Quality-of-service (QoS) metrics are associated with the quality of fused information: throughput, delay, packet error rate, etc. A multivariate point process (MVPP) model of discrete random events in WSNs establishes stochastic characteristics of optimal cross-layer protocols. In previous work by the author, discreteevent, cross-layer interactions in the MANET protocol are modeled in very general analytical terms with a set of concatenated design parameters and associated resource levels by multivariate point processes (MVPPs). Characterization of the "best" cross-layer designs for the MANET is formulated by applying the general theory of martingale representations to controlled MVPPs. Performance is described in terms of concatenated protocol parameters and controlled through conditional rates of the MVPPs. Assumptions on WSN characteristics simplify the dynamic programming conditions to yield mathematically tractable descriptions for the optimal routing protocols. Modeling limitations on the determination of closed-form solutions versus iterative explicit solutions for ad hoc WSN controls are presented.

  20. Study on aerodynamic design optimization of turbomachinery blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Naixing; Zhang, Hongwu; Huang, Weiguang; Xu, Yanji

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes the study on aerodynamics design optimization of turbomachinery blading developed by the authors at the Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, during the recent few years. The present paper describes the aspects mainly on how to use a rapid approach of profiling a 3D blading and of grid generation for computation, a fast and accurate viscous computation method and an appropriate optimization methodology including a blade parameterization algorithm to optimize turbomachinery blading aerodynamically. Any blade configuration can be expressed by three curves, they are the camber lines, the thickness distributions and the radial stacking line, and then the blade geometry can be easily parameterized by a number of parameters with three polynomials. A gradient-based parameterization analytical method and a response surface method were applied herein for blade optimization. It was found that the optimization process provides reliable design for turbomachinery with reasonable computing time.

  1. Behavior Analytic Contributions to the Study of Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubina, Richard M., Jr.; Morrison, Rebecca S.; Lee, David L.

    2006-01-01

    As researchers continue to study creativity, a behavior analytic perspective may provide new vistas by offering an additional perspective. Contemporary behavior analysis began with B. F. Skinner and offers a selectionist approach to the scientific investigation of creativity. Behavior analysis contributes to the study of creativity by…

  2. Analytical Study on Multi-stream Heat Exchanger Include Longitudinal Heat Conduction and Parasitic Heat Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weiping; Xie, Xiujuan; Yang, Huihui; Li, Laifeng; Gong, Linghui

    High performance heat exchangers are critical component in many cryogenic systems and its performance is typically very sensitive to longitudinal heat conduction, parasitic heat loads and property variations. This paper gives an analytical study on 1-D model for multi-stream parallel-plate fin heat exchanger by using the method of decoupling transformations. The results obtained in the present paper are valuable for the reference on optimization for heat exchanger design.

  3. Algorithms for optimized maximum entropy and diagnostic tools for analytic continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Dominic; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2016-08-01

    Analytic continuation of numerical data obtained in imaginary time or frequency has become an essential part of many branches of quantum computational physics. It is, however, an ill-conditioned procedure and thus a hard numerical problem. The maximum-entropy approach, based on Bayesian inference, is the most widely used method to tackle that problem. Although the approach is well established and among the most reliable and efficient ones, useful developments of the method and of its implementation are still possible. In addition, while a few free software implementations are available, a well-documented, optimized, general purpose, and user-friendly software dedicated to that specific task is still lacking. Here we analyze all aspects of the implementation that are critical for accuracy and speed and present a highly optimized approach to maximum entropy. Original algorithmic and conceptual contributions include (1) numerical approximations that yield a computational complexity that is almost independent of temperature and spectrum shape (including sharp Drude peaks in broad background, for example) while ensuring quantitative accuracy of the result whenever precision of the data is sufficient, (2) a robust method of choosing the entropy weight α that follows from a simple consistency condition of the approach and the observation that information- and noise-fitting regimes can be identified clearly from the behavior of χ2 with respect to α , and (3) several diagnostics to assess the reliability of the result. Benchmarks with test spectral functions of different complexity and an example with an actual physical simulation are presented. Our implementation, which covers most typical cases for fermions, bosons, and response functions, is available as an open source, user-friendly software.

  4. Dimensions of Early Speech Sound Disorders: A Factor Analytic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Barbara A.; Freebairn, Lisa A.; Hansen, Amy J.; Stein, Catherine M.; Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Taylor, H. Gerry

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to classify children with speech sound disorders (SSD) empirically, using factor analytic techniques. Participants were 3-7-year olds enrolled in speech/language therapy (N=185). Factor analysis of an extensive battery of speech and language measures provided support for two distinct factors, representing the skill…

  5. The Information Needs of the Developing Countries: Analytical Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salman, Lamia

    1981-01-01

    Presents the generalized conclusions from analytical case studies undertaken by UNESCO and the United Nations Interim Fund for Science and Technology for Development (IFSTD) on the needs and options for access to scientific and technical information in eight developing countries. (Author/JL)

  6. Analytical approach to cross-layer protocol optimization in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2008-04-01

    In the distributed operations of route discovery and maintenance, strong interaction occurs across mobile ad hoc network (MANET) protocol layers. Quality of service (QoS) requirements of multimedia service classes must be satisfied by the cross-layer protocol, along with minimization of the distributed power consumption at nodes and along routes to battery-limited energy constraints. In previous work by the author, cross-layer interactions in the MANET protocol are modeled in terms of a set of concatenated design parameters and associated resource levels by multivariate point processes (MVPPs). Determination of the "best" cross-layer design is carried out using the optimal control of martingale representations of the MVPPs. In contrast to the competitive interaction among nodes in a MANET for multimedia services using limited resources, the interaction among the nodes of a wireless sensor network (WSN) is distributed and collaborative, based on the processing of data from a variety of sensors at nodes to satisfy common mission objectives. Sensor data originates at the nodes at the periphery of the WSN, is successively transported to other nodes for aggregation based on information-theoretic measures of correlation and ultimately sent as information to one or more destination (decision) nodes. The "multimedia services" in the MANET model are replaced by multiple types of sensors, e.g., audio, seismic, imaging, thermal, etc., at the nodes; the QoS metrics associated with MANETs become those associated with the quality of fused information flow, i.e., throughput, delay, packet error rate, data correlation, etc. Significantly, the essential analytical approach to MANET cross-layer optimization, now based on the MVPPs for discrete random events occurring in the WSN, can be applied to develop the stochastic characteristics and optimality conditions for cross-layer designs of sensor network protocols. Functional dependencies of WSN performance metrics are described in

  7. Analytical modeling and optimization of DEAP-based multilayer stack-transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffstadt, Thorben; Maas, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Transducers based on dielectric electroactive polymers (DEAP) use electrostatic pressure to convert electrical into mechanical energy or vice versa. To scale up the actuation or the energy gain, multilayer transducers like DEAP stack transducers are appropriate. Within this contribution, a model of such a stack transducer is derived and experimentally validated. The model is based on a multi-domain approach to describe the mechanical dynamics and the electrical behavior of the DEAP. Since these two domains influence each other they are coupled afterwards by a novel approach using interchanging power flows. To parametrize this model, tensile and compression tests for different polymer materials were performed under static and transient considerations. The results of these experiments show that the parameters obtained from the tensile test sufficiently describe the compression mode and can therefore be used for the model. Based on this transducer model the overall energy and the different parts of the multi-domain are analytically determined for arbitrary operating points. These expressions for the energies are finally used to optimize well-defined coupling coefficients, by which a maximum part of the electrical input energy is converted to mechanical energy, especially mechanical work.

  8. Communication: Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms: Controlling the photoisomerization yield of retinal.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, R D; Arango, C A; Reyes, A

    2016-07-21

    We recently proposed a Quantum Optimal Control (QOC) method constrained to build pulses from analytical pulse shapes [R. D. Guerrero et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143(12), 124108 (2015)]. This approach was applied to control the dissociation channel yields of the diatomic molecule KH, considering three potential energy curves and one degree of freedom. In this work, we utilized this methodology to study the strong field control of the cis-trans photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal. This more complex system was modeled with a Hamiltonian comprising two potential energy surfaces and two degrees of freedom. The resulting optimal pulse, made of 6 linearly chirped pulses, was capable of controlling the population of the trans isomer on the ground electronic surface for nearly 200 fs. The simplicity of the pulse generated with our QOC approach offers two clear advantages: a direct analysis of the sequence of events occurring during the driven dynamics, and its reproducibility in the laboratory with current laser technologies. PMID:27448862

  9. Experimental/analytical approaches to modeling, calibrating and optimizing shaking table dynamics for structural dynamic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetti, Tomaso

    This thesis presents an Experimental/Analytical approach to modeling and calibrating shaking tables for structural dynamic applications. This approach was successfully applied to the shaking table recently built in the structural laboratory of the Civil Engineering Department at Rice University. This shaking table is capable of reproducing model earthquake ground motions with a peak acceleration of 6 g's, a peak velocity of 40 inches per second, and a peak displacement of 3 inches, for a maximum payload of 1500 pounds. It has a frequency bandwidth of approximately 70 Hz and is designed to test structural specimens up to 1/5 scale. The rail/table system is mounted on a reaction mass of about 70,000 pounds consisting of three 12 ft x 12 ft x 1 ft reinforced concrete slabs, post-tensioned together and connected to the strong laboratory floor. The slip table is driven by a hydraulic actuator governed by a 407 MTS controller which employs a proportional-integral-derivative-feedforward-differential pressure algorithm to control the actuator displacement. Feedback signals are provided by two LVDT's (monitoring the slip table relative displacement and the servovalve main stage spool position) and by one differential pressure transducer (monitoring the actuator force). The dynamic actuator-foundation-specimen system is modeled and analyzed by combining linear control theory and linear structural dynamics. The analytical model developed accounts for the effects of actuator oil compressibility, oil leakage in the actuator, time delay in the response of the servovalve spool to a given electrical signal, foundation flexibility, and dynamic characteristics of multi-degree-of-freedom specimens. In order to study the actual dynamic behavior of the shaking table, the transfer function between target and actual table accelerations were identified using experimental results and spectral estimation techniques. The power spectral density of the system input and the cross power spectral

  10. Analytical source term optimization for radioactive releases with approximate knowledge of nuclide ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofman, Radek; Seibert, Petra; Kovalets, Ivan; Andronopoulos, Spyros

    2015-04-01

    We are concerned with source term retrieval in the case of an accident in a nuclear power with off-site consequences. The goal is to optimize atmospheric dispersion model inputs using inverse modeling of gamma dose rate measurements (instantaneous or time-integrated). These are the most abundant type of measurements provided by various radiation monitoring networks across Europe and available continuously in near-real time. Usually, a source term of an accidental release comprises of a mixture of nuclides. Unfortunately, gamma dose rate measurements do not provide a direct information on the source term composition; however, physical properties of respective nuclides (deposition properties, decay half-life) can yield some insight. In the method presented, we assume that nuclide ratios are known at least approximately, e.g. from nuclide specific observations or reactor inventory and assumptions on the accident type. The source term can be in multiple phases, each being characterized by constant nuclide ratios. The method is an extension of a well-established source term inversion approach based on the optimization of an objective function (minimization of a cost function). This function has two quadratic terms: mismatch between model and measurements weighted by an observation error covariance matrix and the deviation of the solution from a first guess weighted by the first-guess error covariance matrix. For simplicity, both error covariance matrices are approximated as diagonal. Analytical minimization of the cost function leads to a liner system of equations. Possible negative parts of the solution are iteratively removed by the means of first guess error variance reduction. Nuclide ratios enter the problem in the form of additional linear equations, where the deviations from prescribed ratios are weighted by factors; the corresponding error variance allows us to control how strongly we want to impose the prescribed ratios. This introduces some freedom into the

  11. An analytical study of double bend achromat lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar Kant, Pradeep; Singh, Gurnam; Ghodke, A. D.

    2015-03-15

    In a double bend achromat, Chasman-Green (CG) lattice represents the basic structure for low emittance synchrotron radiation sources. In the basic structure of CG lattice single focussing quadrupole (QF) magnet is used to form an achromat. In this paper, this CG lattice is discussed and an analytical relation is presented, showing the limitation of basic CG lattice to provide the theoretical minimum beam emittance in achromatic condition. To satisfy theoretical minimum beam emittance parameters, achromat having two, three, and four quadrupole structures is presented. In this structure, different arrangements of QF and defocusing quadruple (QD) are used. An analytical approach assuming quadrupoles as thin lenses has been followed for studying these structures. A study of Indus-2 lattice in which QF-QD-QF configuration in the achromat part has been adopted is also presented.

  12. An analytical study of double bend achromat lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar; Kant, Pradeep; Singh, Gurnam; Ghodke, A. D.

    2015-03-01

    In a double bend achromat, Chasman-Green (CG) lattice represents the basic structure for low emittance synchrotron radiation sources. In the basic structure of CG lattice single focussing quadrupole (QF) magnet is used to form an achromat. In this paper, this CG lattice is discussed and an analytical relation is presented, showing the limitation of basic CG lattice to provide the theoretical minimum beam emittance in achromatic condition. To satisfy theoretical minimum beam emittance parameters, achromat having two, three, and four quadrupole structures is presented. In this structure, different arrangements of QF and defocusing quadruple (QD) are used. An analytical approach assuming quadrupoles as thin lenses has been followed for studying these structures. A study of Indus-2 lattice in which QF-QD-QF configuration in the achromat part has been adopted is also presented.

  13. An analytical study of double bend achromat lattice.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar; Kant, Pradeep; Singh, Gurnam; Ghodke, A D

    2015-03-01

    In a double bend achromat, Chasman-Green (CG) lattice represents the basic structure for low emittance synchrotron radiation sources. In the basic structure of CG lattice single focussing quadrupole (QF) magnet is used to form an achromat. In this paper, this CG lattice is discussed and an analytical relation is presented, showing the limitation of basic CG lattice to provide the theoretical minimum beam emittance in achromatic condition. To satisfy theoretical minimum beam emittance parameters, achromat having two, three, and four quadrupole structures is presented. In this structure, different arrangements of QF and defocusing quadruple (QD) are used. An analytical approach assuming quadrupoles as thin lenses has been followed for studying these structures. A study of Indus-2 lattice in which QF-QD-QF configuration in the achromat part has been adopted is also presented. PMID:25832220

  14. Microwave magnetoelectric fields: An analytical study of topological characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, R.; Shavit, R.; Kamenetskii, E. O.

    2015-10-01

    The near fields originated from a small quasi-two-dimensional ferrite disk with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillations are the fields with broken dual (electric-magnetic) symmetry. Numerical studies show that such fields - called the magnetoelectric (ME) fields - are distinguished by the power-flow vortices and helicity parameters (E.O. Kamenetskii, R. Joffe, R. Shavit, Phys. Rev. E 87 (2013) 023201). These numerical studies can well explain recent experimental results with MDM ferrite disks. In the present paper, we obtain analytically topological characteristics of the ME-field modes. For this purpose, we used a method of successive approximations. In the second approximation we take into account the influence of the edge regions of an open ferrite disk, which are excluded in the first-approximation solving of the magnetostatic (MS) spectral problem. Based on the analytical method, we obtain a "pure" structure of the electric and magnetic fields outside the MDM ferrite disk. The analytical studies can display some fundamental features that are non-observable in the numerical results. While in numerical investigations, one cannot separate the ME fields from the external electromagnetic (EM) radiation, the present theoretical analysis allows clearly distinguish the eigen topological structure of the ME fields. Importantly, this ME-field structure gives evidence for certain phenomena that can be related to the Tellegen and bianisotropic coupling effects. We discuss the question whether the MDM ferrite disk can exhibit properties of the cross magnetoelectric polarizabilities.

  15. Perturbative study on the analytic continuation for generalized gravitational entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudenziati, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    We study the analytic continuation used by Lewkowycz and Maldacena to prove the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for entanglement entropy, which is the holographic dual of the trace of the β -power of the Euclidean time evolution operator when β ∈R . This will be done perturbatively using a weakly time dependent Hamiltonian, corresponding to a small shift of the dual static background. The perturbation will be set to either satisfy the Lewkowycz-Maldacena proposal or a different analytic continuation, depending on its periodicity conditions. The two choices will be tested by computing the associated entropies and compared to the Ryu-Takayanagi formula. To our surprise we discover that, at first order, they both correctly reproduce the associated entanglement entropy. Furthermore in both cases we find unexpected divergent contributions that we have to discard in order to fit the minimal area computation, and an additional requirement on the β dependence on the metric.

  16. A Web-based Geovisual Analytical System for Climate Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, M.; Li, J.; Yang, C.; Schmidt, G. A.; Bambacus, M.; Cahalan, R.; Huang, Q.; Xu, C.; Noble, E.

    2012-12-01

    Climate studies involve petabytes of spatiotemporal datasets that are produced and archived at distributed computing resources. Scientists need an intuitive and convenient tool to explore the distributed spatiotemporal data. Geovisual analytical tools have the potential to provide such an intuitive and convenient method for scientists to access climate data, discover the relationships between various climate parameters, and communicate the results across different research communities. However, implementing a geovisual analytical tool for complex climate data in a distributed environment poses several challenges. This paper reports our efforts in developing a web-based geovisual analytical system to support the analysis of climate data generated by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) models. Using the ModelE developed by NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) as an example, we demonstrate that the system is able to 1) manage large volume datasets over the Internet, 2) visualize 3D/4D spatiotemporal data, 3) broker various spatiotemporal statistical analyses for climate research, and 4) support interactive data analysis and knowledge discovery. This research also provides an example of how to manage, disseminate, and analyze Big Data in the 21st century.

  17. Analytical electron microscopy study of radioactive ceramic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    O'Holleran, T. P.; Sinkler, W.; Moschetti, T. L.; Johnson, S. G.; Goff, K. M.

    1999-11-11

    A ceramic waste form has been developed to immobilize the halide high-level waste stream from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. Analytical electron microscopy studies, using both scanning and transmission instruments, have been performed to characterize the microstructure of this material. The microstructure consists primarily of sodalite granules (containing the bulk of the halides) bonded together with glass. The results of these studies are discussed in detail. Insight into the waste form fabrication process developed as a result of these studies is also discussed.

  18. Analytical and experimental studies of an optimum multisegment phased liner noise suppression concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawdy, D. T.; Beckemeyer, R. J.; Patterson, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented from detailed analytical studies made to define methods for obtaining improved multisegment lining performance by taking advantage of relative placement of each lining segment. Properly phased liner segments reflect and spatially redistribute the incident acoustic energy and thus provide additional attenuation. A mathematical model was developed for rectangular ducts with uniform mean flow. Segmented acoustic fields were represented by duct eigenfunction expansions, and mode-matching was used to ensure continuity of the total field. Parametric studies were performed to identify attenuation mechanisms and define preliminary liner configurations. An optimization procedure was used to determine optimum liner impedance values for a given total lining length, Mach number, and incident modal distribution. Optimal segmented liners are presented and it is shown that, provided the sound source is well-defined and flow environment is known, conventional infinite duct optimum attenuation rates can be improved. To confirm these results, an experimental program was conducted in a laboratory test facility. The measured data are presented in the form of analytical-experimental correlations. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment verifies and substantiates the analytical prediction techniques. The results indicate that phased liners may be of immediate benefit in the development of improved aircraft exhaust duct noise suppressors.

  19. Use of Analytical Solutions to Optimize Simulation of Multicomponent Three-Phase Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforce, Tara

    2010-05-01

    The conservation law for oil/water/gas flow in porous media can be highly sensitive to numerical dispersive effects, particularly in systems with substantial partitioning of components between the gas and oil phases. As a consequence, it is not typically possible to perform field-scale simulations with a sufficiently fine-grid to accurately model compositional displacements such as CO2 injection into oil fields for storage or enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The purpose of this study is to use analytical results to demonstrate the numerical errors in water and gas injection simulations in one dimension (1D) and to discuss the applicability of simplified models in obtaining an accurate simulated solution. Recently analytical solutions have become available for simultaneous water and gas (sWAG) flooding for three-phase multicomponent compositional systems (LaForce and Orr, 2009). This work showed the surprising result that excessive water injection can interfere with the development of multicontact miscibility (MCM) between the oil and gas phases. Multicontact miscibility occurs when a combination of thermodynamics and flow through porous media cause the formation of a single hydrocarbon phase. When MCM occurs hydrocarbons are displaced from the reservoir much more efficiently than in an immiscible gas or water flood. This presentation will compare and contrast the predicted displacements to a variety of models for sWAG flooding, including injection of water and a first-contact miscible (FCM) gas, three-phase compositional systems with developed miscibility and inert water (the aqueous phase contains only water, and water exists in only the aqueous phase) and compositional systems with developed miscibility in which all of the hydrocarbon components partition between all of the phases, but the water remains in the aqueous phase. Simulated solutions for each of the models are compared with the analytical solutions for various injection mixtures. This analysis can be used

  20. Analytical studies on the instabilities of heterogeneous intelligent traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngoduy, D.

    2013-10-01

    It has been widely reported in literature that a small perturbation in traffic flow such as a sudden deceleration of a vehicle could lead to the formation of traffic jams without a clear bottleneck. These traffic jams are usually related to instabilities in traffic flow. The applications of intelligent traffic systems are a potential solution to reduce the amplitude or to eliminate the formation of such traffic instabilities. A lot of research has been conducted to theoretically study the effect of intelligent vehicles, for example adaptive cruise control vehicles, using either computer simulation or analytical method. However, most current analytical research has only applied to single class traffic flow. To this end, the main topic of this paper is to perform a linear stability analysis to find the stability threshold of heterogeneous traffic flow using microscopic models, particularly the effect of intelligent vehicles on heterogeneous (or multi-class) traffic flow instabilities. The analytical results will show how intelligent vehicle percentages affect the stability of multi-class traffic flow.

  1. Analytical Study of Stress State in HTS Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, E.; Terzini, E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    A main challenge for high field solenoids made of in High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) is the large stress developed in the conductor. This is especially constraining for BSCCO, a brittle and strain sensitive ceramic material. To find parametric correlations useful in magnet design, analytical models can be used. A simple model is herein proposed to obtain the radial, azimuthal and axial stresses in a solenoid as a function of size, i.e. self-field, and of the engineering current density for a number of different constraint hypotheses. The analytical model was verified against finite element modeling (FEM) using the same hypotheses of infinite rigidity of the constraints and room temperature properties. FEM was used to separately evaluate the effect of thermal contractions at 4.2 K for BSCCO and YBCO coils. Even though the analytical model allows for a finite stiffness of the constraints, it was run using infinite stiffness. For this reason, FEM was again used to determine how much stresses change when considering an outer stainless steel skin with finite rigidity for both BSCCO and YBCO coils. For a better understanding of the actual loads that high field solenoids made of HTS will be subject to, we have started some analytical studies of stress state in solenoids for a number of constraint hypotheses. This will hopefully show what can be achieved with the present conductor in terms of self-field. The magnetic field (B) exerts a force F = B x J per unit volume. In superconducting magnets, where the field and current density (J) are both high, this force can be very large, and it is therefore important to calculate the stresses in the coil.

  2. Study of monopropellants for electrothermal thrusters: Analytical task summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuenzly, J. D.; Grabbi, R.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of operating small thrust level electrothermal thrusters is determined with monopropellants other than MIL-grade hydrazine. The work scope includes analytical study, design and fabrication of demonstration thrusters, and an evaluation test program where monopropellants with freezing points lower than MIL-grade hydrazine are evaluated and characterized to determine their applicability to electrothermal thrusters for spacecraft attitude control. Results of propellant chemistry studies and performance analyses indicated that the most promising candidate monopropellants to be investigated are monomethylhydrazine, Aerozine-50, 77% hydrazine-23% hydrazine azide blend, and TRW formulated mixed hydrazine monopropellant (MHM) consisting of 35% hydrazine-50% monomethylhydrazine-15% ammonia.

  3. Analytic expansions of luni-solar gravity perturbations along rotating axes for trajectory optimization: Part 1: The dynamic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kéchichian, Jean A.

    2011-06-01

    An analytic form of the accelerations due to the luni-solar perturbations resolved along the rotating Euler-Hill frame is devised by using the expansion method. The addition of higher order terms to the main gravity gradient term linear in the spacecraft radial distance, carried out to the third order, provides a very high level of accuracy in accounting for the gravity perturbations experienced by a vehicle in orbit due to the sun and the moon. The nodal precession as well as the perigee advance of the lunar orbit is taken into account analytically by using the analytic lunar theory of de Pontécoulant. The analytic description of the apparent solar orbit and the motion of the moon remove the need to call an epherneris generator at each integration step during the numerical integration of the spacecraft trajectory, leading to the self-contained software for rapid and efficient optimal trajectory generation through iterations. Equinoctial elements are used to describe the spacecraft state and the luni-solar accelerations are given in terms of the apparent solar and lunar longitudes as well as Eulerian angles of the spacecraft orbit with respect to the inertial ecliptic system. The analysis is useful in optimal low-thrust orbit transfers complementing previous analyses carried out by this author, in which thrust and Earth zonal perturbations such as J2, J3 and J4 in terms of the nonsingular equinoctial elements are included.

  4. Aerodynamic optimization studies on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1995-01-01

    The approach to carrying out multi-discipline aerospace design studies in the future, especially in massively parallel computing environments, comprises of choosing (1) suitable solvers to compute solutions to equations characterizing a discipline, and (2) efficient optimization methods. In addition, for aerodynamic optimization problems, (3) smart methodologies must be selected to modify the surface shape. In this research effort, a 'direct' optimization method is implemented on the Cray C-90 to improve aerodynamic design. It is coupled with an existing implicit Navier-Stokes solver, OVERFLOW, to compute flow solutions. The optimization method is chosen such that it can accomodate multi-discipline optimization in future computations. In the work , however, only single discipline aerodynamic optimization will be included.

  5. STOL aircraft transient ground effects. Part 1: Fundamental analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhammer, M. I.; Crowder, J. P.; Smyth, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    The first phases of a fundamental analytical study of STOL ground effects were presented. Ground effects were studied in two dimensions to establish the importance of nonlinear effects, to examine transient aspects of ascent and descent near the ground, and to study the modelling of the jet impingement on the ground. Powered lift system effects were treated using the jet-flap analogy. The status of a three-dimensional jet-wing ground effect method was presented. It was shown, for two-dimensional unblown airfoils, that the transient effects are small and are primarily due to airfoil/freestream/ground orientation rather than to unsteady effects. The three-dimensional study showed phenomena similar to the two-dimensional results. For unblown wings, the wing/freestream/ground orientation effects were shown to be of the same order of magnitude as for unblown airfoils. This may be used to study the nonplanar, nonlinear, jet-wing ground effect.

  6. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 2: Analytical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerlaugh, H. E.; Hall, E. W.; Brown, D. H.; Priestley, R. R.; Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The use of various advanced energy conversion systems were compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. The ground rules established by NASA and assumptions made by the General Electric Company in performing this cogeneration technology alternatives study are presented. The analytical methodology employed is described in detail and is illustrated with numerical examples together with a description of the computer program used in calculating over 7000 energy conversion system-industrial process applications. For Vol. 1, see 80N24797.

  7. Dispersion of helically corrugated waveguides: analytical, numerical, and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Burt, G; Samsonov, S V; Ronald, K; Denisov, G G; Young, A R; Bratman, V L; Phelps, A D R; Cross, A W; Konoplev, I V; He, W; Thomson, J; Whyte, C G

    2004-10-01

    Helically corrugated waveguides have recently been studied for use in various applications such as interaction regions in gyrotron traveling-wave tubes and gyrotron backward-wave oscillators and as a dispersive medium for passive microwave pulse compression. The paper presents a summary of various methods that can be used for analysis of the wave dispersion of such waveguides. The results obtained from an analytical approach, simulations with the three-dimensional numerical code MAGIC, and cold microwave measurements are analyzed and compared. PMID:15600525

  8. Vehicle systems design optimization study

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, J. L.

    1980-04-01

    The optimization of an electric vehicle layout requires a weight distribution in the range of 53/47 to 62/38 in order to assure dynamic handling characteristics comparable to current production internal combustion engine vehicles. It is possible to achieve this goal and also provide passenger and cargo space comparable to a selected current production sub-compact car either in a unique new design or by utilizing the production vehicle as a base. Necessary modification of the base vehicle can be accomplished without major modification of the structure or running gear. As long as batteries are as heavy and require as much space as they currently do, they must be divided into two packages - one at front under the hood and a second at the rear under the cargo area - in order to achieve the desired weight distribution. The weight distribution criteria requires the placement of batteries at the front of the vehicle even when the central tunnel is used for the location of some batteries. The optimum layout has a front motor and front wheel drive. This configuration provides the optimum vehicle dynamic handling characteristics and the maximum passsenger and cargo space for a given size vehicle.

  9. Vehicle systems design optimization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmour, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The optimum vehicle configuration and component locations are determined for an electric drive vehicle based on using the basic structure of a current production subcompact vehicle. The optimization of an electric vehicle layout requires a weight distribution in the range of 53/47 to 62/38 in order to assure dynamic handling characteristics comparable to current internal combustion engine vehicles. Necessary modification of the base vehicle can be accomplished without major modification of the structure or running gear. As long as batteries are as heavy and require as much space as they currently do, they must be divided into two packages, one at front under the hood and a second at the rear under the cargo area, in order to achieve the desired weight distribution. The weight distribution criteria requires the placement of batteries at the front of the vehicle even when the central tunnel is used for the location of some batteries. The optimum layout has a front motor and front wheel drive. This configuration provides the optimum vehicle dynamic handling characteristics and the maximum passenger and cargo space for a given size vehicle.

  10. Optimization by means of an analytical heat transfer model of a thermal insulation for CSP applications based on radiative shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetano, A.; Roncolato, J.; Montorfano, D.; Barbato, M. C.; Ambrosetti, G.; Pedretti, A.

    2016-05-01

    The employment of new gaseous heat transfer fluids as air or CO2, which are cheaper and environmentally friendly, is drawing more and more attention within the field of Concentrated Solar Power applications. However, despite the advantages, their use requires receivers with a larger heat transfer area and flow cross section with a consequent greater volume of thermal insulation. Solid thermal insulations currently used present high thermal inertia which is energetically penalizing during the daily transient phases faced by the main plant components (e.g. receivers). With the aim of overcoming this drawback a thermal insulation based on radiative shields is presented in this study. Starting from an initial layout comprising a solid thermal insulation layer, the geometry was optimized avoiding the use of the solid insulation keeping performance and fulfilling the geometrical constraints. An analytical Matlab model was implemented to assess the system thermal behavior in terms of heat loss taking into account conductive, convective and radiative contributions. Accurate 2D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were run to validate the Matlab model which was then used to select the most promising among three new different designs.

  11. Noble gas encapsulation into carbon nanotubes: Predictions from analytical model and DFT studies

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramani, Sree Ganesh; Singh, Devendra; Swathi, R. S.

    2014-11-14

    The energetics for the interaction of the noble gas atoms with the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated using an analytical model and density functional theory calculations. Encapsulation of the noble gas atoms, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe into CNTs of various chiralities is studied in detail using an analytical model, developed earlier by Hill and co-workers. The constrained motion of the noble gas atoms along the axes of the CNTs as well as the off-axis motion are discussed. Analyses of the forces, interaction energies, acceptance and suction energies for the encapsulation enable us to predict the optimal CNTs that can encapsulate each of the noble gas atoms. We find that CNTs of radii 2.98 − 4.20 Å (chiral indices, (5,4), (6,4), (9,1), (6,6), and (9,3)) can efficiently encapsulate the He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms, respectively. Endohedral adsorption of all the noble gas atoms is preferred over exohedral adsorption on various CNTs. The results obtained using the analytical model are subsequently compared with the calculations performed with the dispersion-including density functional theory at the M06 − 2X level using a triple-zeta basis set and good qualitative agreement is found. The analytical model is however found to be computationally cheap as the equations can be numerically programmed and the results obtained in comparatively very less time.

  12. Noble gas encapsulation into carbon nanotubes: Predictions from analytical model and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramani, Sree Ganesh; Singh, Devendra; Swathi, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    The energetics for the interaction of the noble gas atoms with the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated using an analytical model and density functional theory calculations. Encapsulation of the noble gas atoms, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe into CNTs of various chiralities is studied in detail using an analytical model, developed earlier by Hill and co-workers. The constrained motion of the noble gas atoms along the axes of the CNTs as well as the off-axis motion are discussed. Analyses of the forces, interaction energies, acceptance and suction energies for the encapsulation enable us to predict the optimal CNTs that can encapsulate each of the noble gas atoms. We find that CNTs of radii 2.98 - 4.20 Å (chiral indices, (5,4), (6,4), (9,1), (6,6), and (9,3)) can efficiently encapsulate the He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms, respectively. Endohedral adsorption of all the noble gas atoms is preferred over exohedral adsorption on various CNTs. The results obtained using the analytical model are subsequently compared with the calculations performed with the dispersion-including density functional theory at the M06 - 2X level using a triple-zeta basis set and good qualitative agreement is found. The analytical model is however found to be computationally cheap as the equations can be numerically programmed and the results obtained in comparatively very less time.

  13. Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Rubén D.; Arango, Carlos A.; Reyes, Andrés

    2015-09-01

    We propose a methodology to design optimal pulses for achieving quantum optimal control on molecular systems. Our approach constrains pulse shapes to linear combinations of a fixed number of experimentally relevant pulse functions. Quantum optimal control is obtained by maximizing a multi-target fitness function using genetic algorithms. As a first application of the methodology, we generated an optimal pulse that successfully maximized the yield on a selected dissociation channel of a diatomic molecule. Our pulse is obtained as a linear combination of linearly chirped pulse functions. Data recorded along the evolution of the genetic algorithm contained important information regarding the interplay between radiative and diabatic processes. We performed a principal component analysis on these data to retrieve the most relevant processes along the optimal path. Our proposed methodology could be useful for performing quantum optimal control on more complex systems by employing a wider variety of pulse shape functions.

  14. Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Rubén D.; Arango, Carlos A.; Reyes, Andrés

    2015-09-28

    We propose a methodology to design optimal pulses for achieving quantum optimal control on molecular systems. Our approach constrains pulse shapes to linear combinations of a fixed number of experimentally relevant pulse functions. Quantum optimal control is obtained by maximizing a multi-target fitness function using genetic algorithms. As a first application of the methodology, we generated an optimal pulse that successfully maximized the yield on a selected dissociation channel of a diatomic molecule. Our pulse is obtained as a linear combination of linearly chirped pulse functions. Data recorded along the evolution of the genetic algorithm contained important information regarding the interplay between radiative and diabatic processes. We performed a principal component analysis on these data to retrieve the most relevant processes along the optimal path. Our proposed methodology could be useful for performing quantum optimal control on more complex systems by employing a wider variety of pulse shape functions.

  15. Approach to analytically minimize the LCD moiré by image-based particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Lin; Tien, Chung-Hao

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed a methodology to optimize the parametric window of a liquid crystal display (LCD) system, whose visual performance was deteriorated by the pixel moiré arising in between multiple periodic structures. Conventional analysis and minimization of moiré patterns are limited by few parameters. With the proposed image-based particle swarm optimization (PSO), we enable a multivariable optimization at the same time. A series of experiments was conducted to validate the methodology. Due to its versatility, the proposed technique will certainly have a promising impact on the fast optimization in LCD design with more complex configuration. PMID:26479663

  16. Setting the optimal erythrocyte protoporphyrin screening decision threshold for lead poisoning: a decision analytic approach

    SciTech Connect

    DeBaun, M.R.; Sox, H.C. Jr. )

    1991-07-01

    Erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) was introduced in the 1970s as an inexpensive screening test for lead poisoning. As greater knowledge of lead poisoning has accumulated, the recommended EP level at which further evaluation for lead poisoning should be initiated has been lowered from greater than or equal to 50 micrograms/dL to greater than or equal to 35 micrograms/dL. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of this EP threshold. A receiver operator characteristic curve was constructed to assess the relationship between the true-positive rate and false-positive rate of EP at various decision thresholds. The receiver operator characteristic curve was constructed with data from the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1976 to 1980, which included 2673 children 6 years of age or younger who had both blood lead and EP level determinations. Decision analysis was then used to determine the optimal EP decision threshold for detecting a blood lead level greater than or equal to 25 micrograms/dL. The receiver operator characteristic curve demonstrated that EP is a poor predictor of a blood lead level greater than or equal to 25 micrograms/dL. At the currently recommended EP decision threshold of 35 micrograms/dL, the true-positive rates and false-positive rates of EP are 0.23 and 0.04, respectively. As a result of the inadequate performance of EP screening for lead poisoning, when the prevalence of lead poisoning is greater than 8%, there is no EP decision threshold that optimizes the relationship between the cost of screening normal children and the benefit of detecting lead-poisoned children. Erythrocyte protoporphyrin measurement is not sufficiently sensitive to be recommended uniformly as a screening test for lead poisoning.

  17. Design optimization studies using COSMIC NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitrof, Stephen M.; Bharatram, G.; Venkayya, Vipperla B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to create, test and document a procedure to integrate mathematical optimization algorithms with COSMIC NASTRAN. This procedure is very important to structural design engineers who wish to capitalize on optimization methods to ensure that their design is optimized for its intended application. The OPTNAST computer program was created to link NASTRAN and design optimization codes into one package. This implementation was tested using two truss structure models and optimizing their designs for minimum weight, subject to multiple loading conditions and displacement and stress constraints. However, the process is generalized so that an engineer could design other types of elements by adding to or modifying some parts of the code.

  18. Scalar top study: Detector optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Sopczak, A.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-09-01

    A vertex detector concept of the Linear Collider Flavor Identification (LCFI) collaboration, which studies pixel detectors for heavy quark flavor identification, has been implemented in simulations for c-quark tagging in scalar top studies. The production and decay of scalar top quarks (stops) is particularly interesting for the development of the vertex detector as only two c-quarks and missing energy (from undetected neutralinos) are produced for light stops. Previous studies investigated the vertex detector design in scenarios with large mass differences between stop and neutralino, corresponding to large visible energy in the detector. In this study we investigate the tagging performance dependence on the vertex detector design in a scenario with small visible energy for the International Linear Collider (ILC).

  19. Optimization of extractants, purifying packings, and eluents for analytical extraction of organochlorine pesticides in Hydragric Acrisols.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenhua; Xia, Liling; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Xin; Gao, Yanzheng

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we screened for an economic, rapid, and efficient hypotoxic pretreatment method for organochlorine pesticides in soil samples for gas chromatography (GC) analysis. The analytical extraction efficiencies of 11 different extractants, nine types of solid-phase purification (SPP) cartridge packings, and three types of eluents for 13 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in spiked and natural Chinese red soil (Hydragric Acrisols) were evaluated using an ultrasonic extraction and solid-phase purification method. High percent recoveries (85-106%) were obtained for the 13 organochlorine pesticides in soil when petroleum ether/acetone/water (10:5:2, v/v) was used an extractant. They were purified using celite SPP cartridge packing and eluted with 9 mL of dichloromethane/petroleum ether (1:9, v/v). The OCPs purification pretreatment of Hydragric Acrisols, using the above method, meets the GC analysis requirements. Compared with other traditional pretreatment methods for OCPs in soil samples, this method has several advantages, such as a short extraction time, reducing the amount of solvent, having no emulsion phenomenon, and hypotoxicity to the laboratory technicians. The concentrations of 1,1,1,-trichloro-2(p-chlorophenyl)-2-(o-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDTs; 3.42-8.08 ng g(-1)) in field soils were higher than the hexachlorocyclohexane concentration (2.94-6.12 ng g(-1)). The 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p'-DDE) + 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethane (p,p'-DDD)/p,p'-DDT ratio in this field soil was approximately 2.7, suggesting that no new DDT pollution source was introduced into the sampling site. PMID:21947976

  20. Analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Arun; Jat, K. L.

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma has been reported. In the present analytical investigation, the lattice displacement, acousto-optical polarization, susceptibility, acousto-optical gain constant arising due to the induced nonlinear current density and acousto-optical process are deduced in an acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma using the hydrodynamical model of plasma and coupled mode scheme. The influence of wave number and magnetic field has been explored. The analysis has been applied to centrosymmetric crystal. Numerical estimates are made for n-type InSb crystal duly irradiated by a frequency doubled 10.6 µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is found that lattice displacement, susceptibility and acousto-optical gain increase linearly with incident wave number and applied dc magnetic field, while decrease with scattering angle. The gain also increases with electric amplitude of incident laser beam. Results are found to be well in agreement with available literature.

  1. Analytical evaluation of laboratories wishing to perform environmental characterization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lauenstein, G.G.; Cantillo, A.Y.

    1997-07-01

    Laboratories competing to analyze bivalve mollusks under contract to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s Mussel Watch Project were required to undergo analytical tests of their ability to quantify environmental contaminants as part of the contract evaluation process. During the 1989 selection process laboratories that appeared to qualify on the basis of their written proposals were provided a gravimetrically prepared solution with unknown quantities of an undefined number of organic contaminants that are regularly quantified for the Mussel Watch Project. In 1994, competing laboratories were once again tested but this time using matrix materials for the quantification of both trace elements and organic contaminants. Three laboratory groups participated in the exercises. For the 1989 gravimetrically prepared solutions, all participating laboratories were able to identify the contaminants present and in all but two cases were able to report values to within {+-}25% of the known values. In 1994, all laboratories were within the acceptance criteria for the quantification of trace elements in the homogenate sample. Analytical laboratory testing is an important first step to ensure that environmental characterization studies are successful.

  2. Analytical optimization of nanocomposite surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/scattering detection in microfluidic separation devices.

    PubMed

    Connatser, R Maggie; Cochran, Malcolm; Harrison, Robert J; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Adding vibrational spectroscopies to the arsenal of detection modes for microfluidics (mufluidics) offers benefits afforded by structurally descriptive identification of separated electrophoretic bands. We have previously applied surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection with nanocomposite metal-elastomer substrates as a detection mode in mufluidic channels. To create these mufluidic-SERS devices, silver-PDMS substrate regions are integrated into the architecture of a separation chip fabricated from PDMS or glass. Herein, we investigate analytical figures of merit for integrated mufluidic-SERS devices by implementing improvements in fluidic and SERS substrate fabrication as well as data collection strategies. Improvements are achieved by chemical modification of the PDMS channel, increasing effective detection efficiency by minimizing analyte partitioning into nonsensing walls rendering more analyte available to the metallized cover slide of channels and also by uniquely fabricating deep channels that have larger volume to SERS surface area ratios than conventional channels. A method is developed to exploit the inherent concentration profile of analyte material within an electrophoretic band in order to extend the linear dynamic range of detection on the SERS nanostructured surface. This is accomplished by spatially interrogating the Gaussian concentration profile of said bands. The subtleties of this technique give insight into the analytical utility of SERS detection in general. Finally, SERS substrates uniquely created via electron beam lithography with controllable morphologies are integrated into mufluidic-SERS devices to prove feasibility of such a coupling for future work. A separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals in a hybrid SERS nanocomposite-glass device is the capstone of this work. PMID:18386301

  3. Optimization of poly(methyl styrene-co-bis(p-vinylbenzyl)dimethylsilane)-based capillary monoliths for separation of low, medium, and high molecular-weight analytes.

    PubMed

    Lubbad, Said H

    2016-04-22

    Poly(methyl styrene-co-bis(p-vinylbenzyl)dimethylsilane)-based monolithic capillary columns were optimized for separation of low, medium, and high molecular-weight analytes. The morphology and consequently the chromatographic performance of these monoliths were tuned by changes in the volume-ratio of monomer to macroporogen, establishing good monolithic flow-through and retention pores. Two monoliths were prepared and analyzed by reversed-phase chromatographic separation of low molecular-weight analytes such as alkyl benzenes and β-blockers, as well as medium and high molecular-weight analytes such as peptides and proteins, respectively. The microstructure was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and by inverse-size exclusion chromatography (ISEC). Monolith 1 demonstrated a high retention of alkyl benzenes, which coeluted from the column at the washing step of absolute acetonitrile; yet this monolith established a baseline separation of 9-peptide and 8-protein mixtures. Monolith 2 demonstrated efficient separation of the three analyte groups of different molecular weights. Six alkyl benzenes and five β-blockers were base-line separated in less than 5 and 2min, respectively, with good resolution and very small values of peak width at half height. Moreover, a comparable performance of efficient separation of the 9-peptide mixture and a fast separation of 5- and 8-protein mixtures were achieved. Both monoliths were characterized by high mechanical strength, high permeability, and excellent reproducibility. PMID:27016117

  4. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR KINETIC STUDIES OF BIOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Bi, Cong; Li, Zhao; Podariu, Maria; Hage, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information concerning the mechanism and behavior of these processes in living systems. This review discusses several analytical methods that can be used to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. These techniques include common or traditional methods such as stopped-flow analysis and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, as well as alternative methods based on affinity chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The general principles and theory behind these approaches are examined, and it is shown how each technique can be utilized to provide information on the kinetics of biological interactions. Examples of applications are also given for each method. In addition, a discussion is provided on the relative advantages or potential limitations of each technique regarding its use in kinetic studies. PMID:25700721

  5. An analytical study of electric vehicle handling dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, J. E.; Segal, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Hypothetical electric vehicle configurations were studied by applying available analytical methods. Elementary linearized models were used in addition to a highly sophisticated vehicle dynamics computer simulation technique. Physical properties of specific EV's were defined for various battery and powertrain packaging approaches applied to a range of weight distribution and inertial properties which characterize a generic class of EV's. Computer simulations of structured maneuvers were performed for predicting handling qualities in the normal driving range and during various extreme conditions related to accident avoidance. Results indicate that an EV with forward weight bias will possess handling qualities superior to a comparable EV that is rear-heavy or equally balanced. The importance of properly matching tires, suspension systems, and brake system front/rear torque proportioning to a given EV configuration during the design stage is demonstrated.

  6. Thermal analytical study of polyamide copolymer/Surlyn Ionomers Blends

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, C.; Ding, Y.P.

    1993-12-31

    Thermal analytical technique was used as a screening method to study polyamide(Nylon)/ethylene-co-methacrylic acid copolymer-based ionomer(Surlyn)blends. The retardation of crystallization process from molten state of Nylon-12 by the existence of the ionomer was observed, but the crystallization of Nylon-12 can not be thwarted even at high concentration of ionomers. Zinc ionomers shows stronger effect than sodium ionomers. A Nylon copolymer, polyamide-6,6-co-polyamide-6,10, was used to blend with different ionomers and the crystallization process from molten state of Nylon copolymer could be thwarted at high concentration of zinc ionomer even at very cooling rate. Interesting cold crystallization behavior of polyamide copolymer was observed during second DSC heating cycle in the temperature range of the melting process of ionomer.

  7. Analytical methods for kinetic studies of biological interactions: A review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Bi, Cong; Li, Zhao; Podariu, Maria; Hage, David S

    2015-09-10

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information concerning the mechanism and behavior of these processes in living systems. This review discusses several analytical methods that can be used to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. These techniques include common or traditional methods such as stopped-flow analysis and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, as well as alternative methods based on affinity chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The general principles and theory behind these approaches are examined, and it is shown how each technique can be utilized to provide information on the kinetics of biological interactions. Examples of applications are also given for each method. In addition, a discussion is provided on the relative advantages or potential limitations of each technique regarding its use in kinetic studies. PMID:25700721

  8. Petermann I and II spot size: Accurate semi analytical description involving Nelder-Mead method of nonlinear unconstrained optimization and three parameter fundamental modal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Choudhury, Raja; Roy Choudhury, Arundhati; Kanti Ghose, Mrinal

    2013-01-01

    A semi-analytical model with three optimizing parameters and a novel non-Gaussian function as the fundamental modal field solution has been proposed to arrive at an accurate solution to predict various propagation parameters of graded-index fibers with less computational burden than numerical methods. In our semi analytical formulation the optimization of core parameter U which is usually uncertain, noisy or even discontinuous, is being calculated by Nelder-Mead method of nonlinear unconstrained minimizations as it is an efficient and compact direct search method and does not need any derivative information. Three optimizing parameters are included in the formulation of fundamental modal field of an optical fiber to make it more flexible and accurate than other available approximations. Employing variational technique, Petermann I and II spot sizes have been evaluated for triangular and trapezoidal-index fibers with the proposed fundamental modal field. It has been demonstrated that, the results of the proposed solution identically match with the numerical results over a wide range of normalized frequencies. This approximation can also be used in the study of doped and nonlinear fiber amplifier.

  9. Analytical study of ultrasound influence on the molten metals atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonnikova, A.; Arkhipov, V.; Boiko, V.; Basalaev, S.; Konovalenko, A.; Zolotorev, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the study of influence of ultrasound on liquid atomization using ejection nozzles. Two principles of influence of ultrasound on the atomization process such as a change of conditions on gas-liquid boundary during the generation of ultrasound oscillation in the gas and liquid jet (film) disintegration under the action of capillary forces in cases of generation of ultrasound oscillation in the liquid are considered. The optimal values of the ultrasound oscillation frequencies are calculated. Two constructions of the nozzles patented are proposed.

  10. Optimization of a coaxial electron cyclotron resonance plasma thruster with an analytical model

    SciTech Connect

    Cannat, F. E-mail: felix.cannat@gmail.com; Lafleur, T.; Jarrige, J.; Elias, P.-Q.; Packan, D.; Chabert, P.

    2015-05-15

    A new cathodeless plasma thruster currently under development at Onera is presented and characterized experimentally and analytically. The coaxial thruster consists of a microwave antenna immersed in a magnetic field, which allows electron heating via cyclotron resonance. The magnetic field diverges at the thruster exit and forms a nozzle that accelerates the quasi-neutral plasma to generate a thrust. Different thruster configurations are tested, and in particular, the influence of the source diameter on the thruster performance is investigated. At microwave powers of about 30 W and a xenon flow rate of 0.1 mg/s (1 SCCM), a mass utilization of 60% and a thrust of 1 mN are estimated based on angular electrostatic probe measurements performed downstream of the thruster in the exhaust plume. Results are found to be in fair agreement with a recent analytical helicon thruster model that has been adapted for the coaxial geometry used here.

  11. Optimization of a coaxial electron cyclotron resonance plasma thruster with an analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannat, F.; Lafleur, T.; Jarrige, J.; Chabert, P.; Elias, P.-Q.; Packan, D.

    2015-05-01

    A new cathodeless plasma thruster currently under development at Onera is presented and characterized experimentally and analytically. The coaxial thruster consists of a microwave antenna immersed in a magnetic field, which allows electron heating via cyclotron resonance. The magnetic field diverges at the thruster exit and forms a nozzle that accelerates the quasi-neutral plasma to generate a thrust. Different thruster configurations are tested, and in particular, the influence of the source diameter on the thruster performance is investigated. At microwave powers of about 30 W and a xenon flow rate of 0.1 mg/s (1 SCCM), a mass utilization of 60% and a thrust of 1 mN are estimated based on angular electrostatic probe measurements performed downstream of the thruster in the exhaust plume. Results are found to be in fair agreement with a recent analytical helicon thruster model that has been adapted for the coaxial geometry used here.

  12. STRengthening Analytical Thinking for Observational Studies: the STRATOS initiative

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, Willi; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Altman, Douglas G; le Cessie, Saskia; Carpenter, James

    2014-01-01

    The validity and practical utility of observational medical research depends critically on good study design, excellent data quality, appropriate statistical methods and accurate interpretation of results. Statistical methodology has seen substantial development in recent times. Unfortunately, many of these methodological developments are ignored in practice. Consequently, design and analysis of observational studies often exhibit serious weaknesses. The lack of guidance on vital practical issues discourages many applied researchers from using more sophisticated and possibly more appropriate methods when analyzing observational studies. Furthermore, many analyses are conducted by researchers with a relatively weak statistical background and limited experience in using statistical methodology and software. Consequently, even ‘standard’ analyses reported in the medical literature are often flawed, casting doubt on their results and conclusions. An efficient way to help researchers to keep up with recent methodological developments is to develop guidance documents that are spread to the research community at large. These observations led to the initiation of the strengthening analytical thinking for observational studies (STRATOS) initiative, a large collaboration of experts in many different areas of biostatistical research. The objective of STRATOS is to provide accessible and accurate guidance in the design and analysis of observational studies. The guidance is intended for applied statisticians and other data analysts with varying levels of statistical education, experience and interests. In this article, we introduce the STRATOS initiative and its main aims, present the need for guidance documents and outline the planned approach and progress so far. We encourage other biostatisticians to become involved. PMID:25074480

  13. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Coherent Field Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Hans-Reinhard

    Motivated by the goal of investigating the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe, a study of dynamical aspects of nonlinear field-theoretical systems is performed. Symmetric and asymmetric double-well potentials in the φ4 theory are used as a model for these systems. In the first part, it is shown that in this model, a class of localized, time-dependent, spherically-symmetric objects dubbed oscillons exists. The most distinctive feature of these objects is that they are extremely long-lived. The properties of oscillons are studied by numerical and analytical means. In the second part of the study, the matching between (1+1)-dimensional nonlinear field theories coupled to an external stochastic environment and their lattice simulations is investigated. In particular, a method is developed to obtain numerical results which are lattice-spacing independent, and to extract the correct effective potential which emerges from the simulations. As an application, the thermal production of kinks is studied, obtaining the lattice-spacing independent number density of kinks and the effective barrier for kink production, i.e., the effective kink mass. Within its range of validity, the approach can be used to match numerical simulations to continuum studies of the emergence of coherent field structures in cosmology and condensed matter physics.

  14. Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces to parameters of the optimization-based human leg model revealed by analytical and numerical analyses.

    PubMed

    Raikova, R T; Prilutsky, B I

    2001-10-01

    There are different opinions in the literature on whether the cost functions: the sum of muscle stresses squared and the sum of muscle stresses cubed, can reasonably predict muscle forces in humans. One potential reason for the discrepancy in the results could be that different authors use different sets of model parameters which could substantially affect forces predicted by optimization-based models. In this study, the sensitivity of the optimal solution obtained by minimizing the above cost functions for a planar three degrees-of-freedom (DOF) model of the leg with nine muscles was investigated analytically for the quadratic function and numerically for the cubic function. Analytical results revealed that, generally, the non-zero optimal force of each muscle depends in a very complex non-linear way on moments at all three joints and moment arms and physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs) of all muscles. Deviations of the model parameters (moment arms and PCSAs) from their nominal values within a physiologically feasible range affected not only the magnitude of the forces predicted by both criteria, but also the number of non-zero forces in the optimal solution and the combination of muscles with non-zero predicted forces. Muscle force magnitudes calculated by both criteria were similar. They could change several times as model parameters changed, whereas patterns of muscle forces were typically not as sensitive. It is concluded that different opinions in the literature about the behavior of optimization-based models can be potentially explained by differences in employed model parameters. PMID:11522304

  15. Analytical and numerical analysis of inverse optimization problems: conditions of uniqueness and computational methods

    PubMed Central

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the key problems of motor control is the redundancy problem, in particular how the central nervous system (CNS) chooses an action out of infinitely many possible. A promising way to address this question is to assume that the choice is made based on optimization of a certain cost function. A number of cost functions have been proposed in the literature to explain performance in different motor tasks: from force sharing in grasping to path planning in walking. However, the problem of uniqueness of the cost function(s) was not addressed until recently. In this article, we analyze two methods of finding additive cost functions in inverse optimization problems with linear constraints, so-called linear-additive inverse optimization problems. These methods are based on the Uniqueness Theorem for inverse optimization problems that we proved recently (Terekhov et al., J Math Biol 61(3):423–453, 2010). Using synthetic data, we show that both methods allow for determining the cost function. We analyze the influence of noise on the both methods. Finally, we show how a violation of the conditions of the Uniqueness Theorem may lead to incorrect solutions of the inverse optimization problem. PMID:21311907

  16. Analytical and numerical analysis of inverse optimization problems: conditions of uniqueness and computational methods.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Alexander V; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2011-02-01

    One of the key problems of motor control is the redundancy problem, in particular how the central nervous system (CNS) chooses an action out of infinitely many possible. A promising way to address this question is to assume that the choice is made based on optimization of a certain cost function. A number of cost functions have been proposed in the literature to explain performance in different motor tasks: from force sharing in grasping to path planning in walking. However, the problem of uniqueness of the cost function(s) was not addressed until recently. In this article, we analyze two methods of finding additive cost functions in inverse optimization problems with linear constraints, so-called linear-additive inverse optimization problems. These methods are based on the Uniqueness Theorem for inverse optimization problems that we proved recently (Terekhov et al., J Math Biol 61(3):423-453, 2010). Using synthetic data, we show that both methods allow for determining the cost function. We analyze the influence of noise on the both methods. Finally, we show how a violation of the conditions of the Uniqueness Theorem may lead to incorrect solutions of the inverse optimization problem. PMID:21311907

  17. Analytical computation of the derivative of PSF for the optimization of phase mask in wavefront coding system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinhua; Zhou, Jiankang; Shen, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    Wavefront coding system can realize defocus invariance of PSF/OTF with a phase mask inserting in the pupil plane. Ideally, the derivative of the PSF/OTF with respect to defocus error should be close to zero as much as possible over the extended depth of field/focus for the wavefront coding system. In this paper, we propose an analytical expression for the computation of the derivative of PSF. With this expression, the derivative of PSF based merit function can be used in the optimization of the wavefront coding system with any type of phase mask and aberrations. Computation of the derivative of PSF using the proposed expression and FFT respectively are compared and discussed. We also demonstrate the optimization of a generic polynomial phase mask in wavefront coding system as an example. PMID:27607710

  18. Insight and Action Analytics: Three Case Studies to Consider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliron, Mark David; Malcolm, Laura; Kil, David

    2014-01-01

    Civitas Learning was conceived as a community of practice, bringing together forward-thinking leaders from diverse higher education institutions to leverage insight and action analytics in their ongoing efforts to help students learn well and finish strong. We define insight and action analytics as drawing, federating, and analyzing data from…

  19. ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--PESTICIDES IN REPLICATES ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Replicates/Pesticides database contains the analytical results of Pesticides concentrations in replicate samples. The samples were analyzed as part of the QA/QC protocols of the NHEXAS project. The class of analytes consist of five primary species that include benzene (CAS#...

  20. Performance Optimization of Self-Piercing Rivets through Analytical Rivet Strength Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents the authors' work on strength optimization and failure mode prediction of self-piercing rivets (SPR) for automotive applications. The limit load-based strength estimator is used to estimate the static strength of an SPR under cross tension loading configuration. Failure modes associated with the estimated failure strength are also predicted. Experimental strength and failure mode observations are used to validate the model. It is shown that the strength of an SPR joint depends on the material and gage combinations, rivet design, die design and riveting direction. The rivet strength estimator is then used to optimize the rivet strength by comparing the measured rivet strength and failure mode with the predicted ones. Two illustrative examples are used in which rivet strength is optimized by changing rivet design and riveting direction from the original manufacturing parameters.

  1. Micro-resonator loss computation using conformal transformation and active-lasing FDTD approach and applications to tangential/radial output waveguide optimization I: Analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangyu; Ou, Fang; Huang, Yingyan; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the physics of the loss mechanism of optical microresonators is important for one to know how to use them optimally for various applications. In these three-paper series, we utilized both analytical method (Conformal Transformation Approach) and numerical method (Active-Lasing Finite-Difference Time-Domain method) to study the resonator loss and cavity quality "Q" factor and apply them to optimize the radial/tangential waveguide coupling design. Both approaches demonstrate good agreement in their common region of applicability. In Part I, we review and expand on the conformal transformation method to show how exact solution of radiation loss for the case of cylindrical micro-resonator under both TE and TM polarizations can be obtained. We show how the method can be extended to apply to microdisk case.

  2. On biomolecules and semiconductors: Analytical studies of interface dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, John William Joseph

    The studies discussed here were undertaken to examine the use of III-V semiconducting materials as templates for biomolecules, to be applied in such technologies as Field-Effect Transistor (FET) and Light-emitting Diode (LED) biosensors. Materials application requires an informed analysis of interactions between chemical environments. Specific to surfaces, this means investigating the molecular interactions between the substrate and the bonding moieties. The analytical tools used to probe these interactions, and the changes that such communication causes on specific substrates are specifically discussed. Surface analysis tools included in this review are Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Nanoindentation, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman Microscopy. The interaction of biomolecules - deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), proteins adhered to nanoparticles, and amino acids - on semiconductor surfaces is also examined. Proper investigation follows, as well, the methods of applying these biomolecular structures to the specified surfaces, through procedures such as solution phase transfer, as well as Dip-pen Nanolithography (DPN). The stretching and enzymatic cleavage of DNA, on silicon oxide surfaces, was studied to determine the recognition properties of dual-enzymatic systems on surfaces. Fundamental questions such as the interaction of functional groups with InAs(100) surfaces, the mechanical properties of protein modified systems, and the DPN application of biologically relevant linker molecules to InAs(100) surfaces were explored. These studies provide information applicable to the development of novel sensing platforms in the future.

  3. Optimal sample preparation to characterize corrosion in historical photographs with analytical TEM.

    PubMed

    Grieten, Eva; Caen, Joost; Schryvers, Dominique

    2014-10-01

    An alternative focused ion beam preparation method is used for sampling historical photographs containing metallic nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. We use the preparation steps of classical ultra-microtomy with an alternative final sectioning with a focused ion beam. Transmission electron microscopy techniques show that the lamella has a uniform thickness, which is an important factor for analytical transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the method maintains the spatial distribution of nanoparticles in the soft matrix. The results are compared with traditional preparation techniques such as ultra-microtomy and classical focused ion beam milling. PMID:25256650

  4. Optimization of solar assisted heat pump systems via a simple analytic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J W

    1980-01-01

    An analytic method for calculating the optimum operating temperature of the collector/storage subsystem in a solar assisted heat pump is presented. A tradeoff exists between rising heat pump coefficient of performance and falling collector efficiency as this temperature is increased, resulting in an optimum temperature whose value increases with increasing efficiency of the auxiliary energy source. Electric resistance is shown to be a poor backup to such systems. A number of options for thermally coupling the system to the ground are analyzed and compared.

  5. Systematic analytical and numerical studies of highly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shan-Wen

    Strong electron correlations in condensed matter systems give rise to a wide range of striking physical properties, producing phenomena as varied as high temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator transitions and the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects. Quantum critical systems also exhibit strong correlations between a large number of degrees of freedom. In this thesis we study these complicated systems using a combination of analytical and numerical approaches. We perform systematic investigations, which adds to the robustness of our results. We develop a new method, based on the density-matrix renormalization-group (DMRG) algorithm combined with finite-size scaling analysis, to study critical behavior in quantum spin chains and extract critical exponents. Accurate results are obtained for spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic chains and the spin-1 chain at the critical point separating the Haldane and the dimerized phases. Disorder in a system can change its properties drastically. Plateau transitions in the integer quantum Hall effect provide the clearest example of quantum critical behavior in a disordered system. We provide analytical proof that the Chalker-Coddington model, which is used to describe the plateau transitions, is quantum critical. Starting from a field theory based on this model, equivalent to a non-Hermitian supersymmetric spin chain, we prove quantum criticality by a Lieb-Schultz-Mattis type theorem. This approach was motivated by numerical results obtained using the DMRG/finite-size scaling method. Our generalized LSM theorem also applies to the spin quantum Hall effect, which can appear in disordered d-wave superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry. The last part of the thesis is a renormalization-group study of two dimensional interacting electron systems. We obtain results relevant to high-temperature superconductors and also to the family of kappa - (BEDT - TTF)2X organic superconductors. At half filling, the fully nested

  6. Analytical study of Saint Gregory Nazianzen Icon, Old Cairo, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Yousry M.; Abdel-Maksoud, Gomaa; Magdy, Mina

    2015-11-01

    The study aims to evaluate the state of icon through characterization of the icon layers (ground, paint and varnish layers) and to provide tools for assessment the impact of aging and environmental conditions in order to produce some solutions for conservation of the icon. Analytical techniques used in this study were attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy (FESEM-EDX) and amino acid analyzer (AAA). The results obtained revealed that gypsum and lead white were used for ground layer. The identified pigments were lamp carbon black, brown ochre, Prussian blue, yellow ochre and gold leaf. Egg yolk was the binder used with most of pigments and animal glue was used with gold color. The varnish used was shellac resin. It was concluded that stable pigments gave permanent colors and environmental conditions had an influence on promotion of oxidation process. Auto-oxidation of binder and varnish materials occurred by the action of pigment components and light result in cracking of the paint film and fading of the varnish glaze.

  7. a Multidisciplinary Analytical Framework for Studying Active Mobility Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, D.; Hermida, C.; Osorio, P.

    2016-06-01

    Intermediate cities are urged to change and adapt their mobility systems from a high energy-demanding motorized model to a sustainable low-motorized model. In order to accomplish such a model, city administrations need to better understand active mobility patterns and their links to socio-demographic and cultural aspects of the population. During the last decade, researchers have demonstrated the potential of geo-location technologies and mobile devices to gather massive amounts of data for mobility studies. However, the analysis and interpretation of this data has been carried out by specialized research groups with relatively narrow approaches from different disciplines. Consequently, broader questions remain less explored, mainly those relating to spatial behaviour of individuals and populations with their geographic environment and the motivations and perceptions shaping such behaviour. Understanding sustainable mobility and exploring new research paths require an interdisciplinary approach given the complex nature of mobility systems and their social, economic and environmental impacts. Here, we introduce the elements for a multidisciplinary analytical framework for studying active mobility patterns comprised of three components: a) Methodological, b) Behavioural, and c) Perceptual. We demonstrate the applicability of the framework by analysing mobility patterns of cyclists and pedestrians in an intermediate city integrating a range of techniques, including: GPS tracking, spatial analysis, auto-ethnography, and perceptual mapping. The results demonstrated the existence of non-evident spatial behaviours and how perceptual features affect mobility. This knowledge is useful for developing policies and practices for sustainable mobility planning.

  8. An analytical study of various telecomminication networks using markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, M.; Jayamani, E.; Ezhumalai, P.

    2015-04-01

    The main aim of this paper is to examine issues relating to the performance of various Telecommunication networks, and applied queuing theory for better design and improved efficiency. Firstly, giving an analytical study of queues deals with quantifying the phenomenon of waiting lines using representative measures of performances, such as average queue length (on average number of customers in the queue), average waiting time in queue (on average time to wait) and average facility utilization (proportion of time the service facility is in use). In the second, using Matlab simulator, summarizes the finding of the investigations, from which and where we obtain results and describing methodology for a) compare the waiting time and average number of messages in the queue in M/M/1 and M/M/2 queues b) Compare the performance of M/M/1 and M/D/1 queues and study the effect of increasing the number of servers on the blocking probability M/M/k/k queue model.

  9. An experimental/analytical study of strains in encapsulated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guess, T. R.; Burchett, S. N.

    1991-12-01

    A combined experimental and analytical study of strains that develop in encapsulated assemblies during casting, curing and thermal excursions is described. The experimental setup, designed to measure in situ strains, consisted of thin, closed-end, metal tubes that were instrumented with strain gages and thermocouples before being over-potted with an encapsulant. Three epoxy-based materials were studied. After cure of the encapsulant, tube strains were measured over the temperature range of minus 55 C to 90 C. The thermal excursion experiments were then numerically modeled using finite element analyses and the results were compared to the experimental results. The predicted strains are overestimated (conservative) when a linear, elastic, temperature-dependent material model was assumed for the encapsulant and the stress free temperature was assumed to correspond to the cure temperature of the encapsulant. Very good agreement was obtained with the linear elastic calculations provided that the stress free temperature corresponds to the onset of the glassy-to-rubbery transition range of the encapsulant. Finally, very good agreement was obtained when a viscoelastic material model was utilized and a stress free temperature corresponding to the cure temperature was assumed.

  10. Stability of rotating stratified shear flow: an analytical study.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Cambon, C

    2010-02-01

    We study the stability problem of unbounded shear flow, with velocity U(i)=Sx(3)delta(i1), subjected to a uniform vertical density stratification, with Brunt-Väisälä frequency N, and system rotation of rate Omega about an axis aligned with the spanwise (x(2)) direction. The evolution of plane-wave disturbances in this shear flow is governed by a nonhomogeneous second-order differential equation with time-dependent coefficients. An analytical solution is found to be described by Legendre functions in terms of the nondimensional parameter sigma(phi)(2)=R(R+1)sin(2) phi+R(i), where R=(2Omega/S) is the rotation number, phi is the angle between the horizontal wave vector and the streamwise axis, and R(i)=N(2)/S(2) is the Richardson number. The long-time behavior of the solution is analyzed using the asymptotic representations of the Legendre functions. On the one hand, linear stability is analyzed in terms of exponential growth, as in a normal-mode analysis: the rotating stratified shear flow is stable if R(i)>1/4, or if 00, or if R(R+1)<0analytically in this streamwise direction. PMID:20365646

  11. 21 CFR 320.29 - Analytical methods for an in vivo bioavailability or bioequivalence study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Analytical methods for an in vivo bioavailability... Analytical methods for an in vivo bioavailability or bioequivalence study. (a) The analytical method used in... ingredient or therapeutic moiety, or its active metabolite(s), achieved in the body. (b) When the...

  12. CCS Site Optimization by Applying a Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm to Semi-Analytical Leakage Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, B. M.; Gonzalez-Nicolas, A.; Bau, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been proposed as a method of reducing global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Although CCS has the potential to greatly retard greenhouse gas loading to the atmosphere while cleaner, more sustainable energy solutions are developed, there is a possibility that sequestered CO2 may leak and intrude into and adversely affect groundwater resources. It has been reported [1] that, while CO2 intrusion typically does not directly threaten underground drinking water resources, it may cause secondary effects, such as the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in aquifer minerals and changes in pH values. These risks must be fully understood and minimized before CCS project implementation. Combined management of project resources and leakage risk is crucial for the implementation of CCS. In this work, we present a method of: (a) minimizing the total CCS cost, the summation of major project costs with the cost associated with CO2 leakage; and (b) maximizing the mass of injected CO2, for a given proposed sequestration site. Optimization decision variables include the number of CO2 injection wells, injection rates, and injection well locations. The capital and operational costs of injection wells are directly related to injection well depth, location, injection flow rate, and injection duration. The cost of leakage is directly related to the mass of CO2 leaked through weak areas, such as abandoned oil wells, in the cap rock layers overlying the injected formation. Additional constraints on fluid overpressure caused by CO2 injection are imposed to maintain predefined effective stress levels that prevent cap rock fracturing. Here, both mass leakage and fluid overpressure are estimated using two semi-analytical models based upon work by [2,3]. A multi-objective evolutionary algorithm coupled with these semi-analytical leakage flow models is used to determine Pareto-optimal trade-off sets giving minimum total cost vs. maximum mass

  13. Assessment of a fast generated analytical matrix for rotating slat collimation iterative reconstruction: a possible method to optimize the collimation profile.

    PubMed

    Boisson, F; Bekaert, V; Reilhac, A; Wurtz, J; Brasse, D

    2015-03-21

    In SPECT imaging, improvement or deterioration of performance is mostly due to collimator design. Classical SPECT systems mainly use parallel hole or pinhole collimators. Rotating slat collimators (RSC) can be an interesting alternative to optimize the tradeoff between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The present study was conducted using a RSC system for small animal imaging called CLiR. The CLiR system was used in planar mode only. In a previous study, planar 2D projections were reconstructed using the well-known filtered backprojection algorithm (FBP). In this paper, we investigated the use of the statistical reconstruction algorithm maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) to reconstruct 2D images with the CLiR system using a probability matrix calculated using an analytic approach. The primary objective was to propose a method to quickly generate a light system matrix, which facilitates its handling and storage, while providing accurate and reliable performance. Two other matrices were calculated using GATE Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the performance obtained using the matrix calculated analytically. The first matrix calculated using GATE took all the physics processes into account, where the second did not consider for the scattering, as the analytical matrix did not take this physics process into account either. 2D images were reconstructed using FBP and MLEM with the three different probability matrices. Both simulated and experimental data were used. A comparative study of these images was conducted using different metrics: the modulation transfert function, the signal-to-noise ratio and quantification measurement. All the results demonstrated the suitability of using a probability matrix calculated analytically. It provided similar results in terms of spatial resolution (about 0.6 mm with differences <5%), signal-to-noise ratio (differences <10%), or quality of image. PMID:25716556

  14. Assessment of a fast generated analytical matrix for rotating slat collimation iterative reconstruction: a possible method to optimize the collimation profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisson, F.; Bekaert, V.; Reilhac, A.; Wurtz, J.; Brasse, D.

    2015-03-01

    In SPECT imaging, improvement or deterioration of performance is mostly due to collimator design. Classical SPECT systems mainly use parallel hole or pinhole collimators. Rotating slat collimators (RSC) can be an interesting alternative to optimize the tradeoff between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The present study was conducted using a RSC system for small animal imaging called CLiR. The CLiR system was used in planar mode only. In a previous study, planar 2D projections were reconstructed using the well-known filtered backprojection algorithm (FBP). In this paper, we investigated the use of the statistical reconstruction algorithm maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) to reconstruct 2D images with the CLiR system using a probability matrix calculated using an analytic approach. The primary objective was to propose a method to quickly generate a light system matrix, which facilitates its handling and storage, while providing accurate and reliable performance. Two other matrices were calculated using GATE Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the performance obtained using the matrix calculated analytically. The first matrix calculated using GATE took all the physics processes into account, where the second did not consider for the scattering, as the analytical matrix did not take this physics process into account either. 2D images were reconstructed using FBP and MLEM with the three different probability matrices. Both simulated and experimental data were used. A comparative study of these images was conducted using different metrics: the modulation transfert function, the signal-to-noise ratio and quantification measurement. All the results demonstrated the suitability of using a probability matrix calculated analytically. It provided similar results in terms of spatial resolution (about 0.6 mm with differences <5%), signal-to-noise ratio (differences <10%), or quality of image.

  15. Systematic analytical characterization of new psychoactive substances: A case study.

    PubMed

    Lobo Vicente, Joana; Chassaigne, Hubert; Holland, Margaret V; Reniero, Fabiano; Kolář, Kamil; Tirendi, Salvatore; Vandecasteele, Ine; Vinckier, Inge; Guillou, Claude

    2016-08-01

    New psychoactive substances (NPS) are synthesized compounds that are not usually covered by European and/or international laws. With a slight alteration in the chemical structure of existing illegal substances registered in the European Union (EU), these NPS circumvent existing controls and are thus referred to as "legal highs". They are becoming increasingly available and can easily be purchased through both the internet and other means (smart shops). Thus, it is essential that the identification of NPS keeps up with this rapidly evolving market. In this case study, the Belgian Customs authorities apprehended a parcel, originating from China, containing two samples, declared as being "white pigments". For routine identification, the Belgian Customs Laboratory first analysed both samples by gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry and Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The information obtained by these techniques is essential and can give an indication of the chemical structure of an unknown substance but not the complete identification of its structure. To bridge this gap, scientific and technical support is ensured by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) to the European Commission Directorate General for Taxation and Customs Unions (DG TAXUD) and the Customs Laboratory European Network (CLEN) through an Administrative Arrangement for fast recognition of NPS and identification of unknown chemicals. The samples were sent to the JRC for a complete characterization using advanced techniques and chemoinformatic tools. The aim of this study was also to encourage the development of a science-based policy driven approach on NPS. These samples were fully characterized and identified as 5F-AMB and PX-3 using (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high-resolution tandem mass-spectrometry (HR-MS/MS) and Raman spectroscopy. A chemoinformatic platform was used to manage, unify analytical data from multiple techniques and instruments, and combine it with chemical and

  16. Development and optimization of an analytical system for volatile organic compound analysis coming from the heating of interstellar/cometary ice analogues.

    PubMed

    Abou Mrad, Ninette; Duvernay, Fabrice; Theulé, Patrice; Chiavassa, Thierry; Danger, Grégoire

    2014-08-19

    This contribution presents an original analytical system for studying volatile organic compounds (VOC) coming from the heating and/or irradiation of interstellar/cometary ice analogues (VAHIIA system) through laboratory experiments. The VAHIIA system brings solutions to three analytical constraints regarding chromatography analysis: the low desorption kinetics of VOC (many hours) in the vacuum chamber during laboratory experiments, the low pressure under which they sublime (10(-9) mbar), and the presence of water in ice analogues. The VAHIIA system which we developed, calibrated, and optimized is composed of two units. The first is a preconcentration unit providing the VOC recovery. This unit is based on a cryogenic trapping which allows VOC preconcentration and provides an adequate pressure allowing their subsequent transfer to an injection unit. The latter is a gaseous injection unit allowing the direct injection into the GC-MS of the VOC previously transferred from the preconcentration unit. The feasibility of the online transfer through this interface is demonstrated. Nanomoles of VOC can be detected with the VAHIIA system, and the variability in replicate measurements is lower than 13%. The advantages of the GC-MS in comparison to infrared spectroscopy are pointed out, the GC-MS allowing an unambiguous identification of compounds coming from complex mixtures. Beyond the application to astrophysical subjects, these analytical developments can be used for all systems requiring vacuum/cryogenic environments. PMID:25025518

  17. Study and optimization of the spatial resolution for detectors with binary readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonamine, R.; Maerschalk, T.; Lentdecker, G. De

    2016-09-01

    Using simulations and analytical approaches, we have studied single hit resolutions obtained with a binary readout, which is often proposed for high granularity detectors to reduce the generated data volume. Our simulations considering several parameters (e.g. strip pitch) show that the detector geometry and an electronics parameter of the binary readout chips could be optimized for binary readout to offer an equivalent spatial resolution to the one with an analog readout. To understand the behavior as a function of simulation parameters, we developed analytical models that reproduce simulation results with a few parameters. The models can be used to optimize detector designs and operation conditions with regard to the spatial resolution.

  18. Keplerian periodogram for Doppler exoplanet detection: optimized computation and analytic significance thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the so-called Keplerian periodogram, in which the putative detectable signal is modelled by a highly non-linear Keplerian radial velocity function, appearing in Doppler exoplanetary surveys. We demonstrate that for planets on high-eccentricity orbits the Keplerian periodogram is far more efficient than the classic Lomb-Scargle periodogram and even the multiharmonic periodograms, in which the periodic signal is approximated by a truncated Fourier series. We provide a new numerical algorithm for computation of the Keplerian periodogram. This algorithm adaptively increases the parametric resolution where necessary, in order to uniformly cover all local optima of the Keplerian fit. Thanks to this improvement, the algorithm provides more smooth and reliable results with minimized computing demands. We also derive a fast analytic approximation to the false alarm probability levels of the Keplerian periodogram. This approximation has the form (Pz3/2 + Qz)Wexp ( - z), where z is the observed periodogram maximum, W is proportional to the settled frequency range, and the coefficients P and Q depend on the maximum eccentricity to scan.

  19. Beamforming and holography image formation methods: an analytic study.

    PubMed

    Solimene, Raffaele; Cuccaro, Antonio; Ruvio, Giuseppe; Tapia, Daniel Flores; O'Halloran, Martin

    2016-04-18

    Beamforming and holographic imaging procedures are widely used in many applications such as radar sensing, sonar, and in the area of microwave medical imaging. Nevertheless, an analytical comparison of the methods has not been done. In this paper, the Point Spread Functions pertaining to the two methods are analytically determined. This allows a formal comparison of the two techniques, and to easily highlight how the performance depends on the configuration parameters, including frequency range, number of scatterers, and data discretization. It is demonstrated that the beamforming and holography basically achieve the same resolution but beamforming requires a cheaper (less sensors) configuration.. PMID:27137336

  20. Analytical and experimental study of vibrations in a gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Ruan, Y. F.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.; Coy, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical simulation of the dynamics of a gear transmission system is presented and compared to experimental results from a gear noise test rig at NASA Lewis. The analytical procedure developed couples the dynamic behaviors of the rotor-bearing-gear system with the response of the gearbox structure. Transient and steady-state vibrations of the gearbox system are presented in the time and frequency domains. The vibration characteristics of a simple single-mesh-gear noise test rig are modeled. The numerical simulations are compared to experimental data measured under typical operating conditions. The system natural frequencies, peak vibration amplitudes, and gear mesh frequencies are generally in good agreement.

  1. Thermoelectric power generation system optimization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karri, Madhav A.

    A significant amount of energy we consume each year is rejected as waste heat to the ambient. Conservative estimates place the quantity of energy wasted at about 70%. Converting the waste heat into electrical power would be convenient and effective for a number of primary and secondary applications. A viable solution for converting waste heat into electrical energy is to use thermoelectric power conversion. Thermoelectric power generation is based on solid state technology with no moving parts and works on the principle of Seebeck effect. In this work a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system simulator was developed to perform various parametric and system optimization studies. Optimization studies were performed to determine the effect of system size, exhaust and coolant ow conditions, and thermoelectric material on the net gains produced by the TEG system and on the optimum TEG system design. A sports utility vehicle was used as a case study for the application of TEG in mobile systems.

  2. Analytical method for optimal source reduction with monitored natural attenuation in contaminated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Widdowson, M.A.; Chapelle, F.H.; Brauner, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    A method is developed for optimizing monitored natural attenuation (MNA) and the reduction in the aqueous source zone concentration (??C) required to meet a site-specific regulatory target concentration. The mathematical model consists of two one-dimensional equations of mass balance for the aqueous phase contaminant, to coincide with up to two distinct zones of transformation, and appropriate boundary and intermediate conditions. The solution is written in terms of zone-dependent Peclet and Damko??hler numbers. The model is illustrated at a chlorinated solvent site where MNA was implemented following source treatment using in-situ chemical oxidation. The results demonstrate that by not taking into account a variable natural attenuation capacity (NAC), a lower target ??C is predicted, resulting in unnecessary source concentration reduction and cost with little benefit to achieving site-specific remediation goals.

  3. A fast, angle-dependent, analytical model of CsI detector response for optimization of 3D x-ray breast imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Melanie; Park, Subok; Badano, Aldo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate models of detector blur are crucial for performing meaningful optimizations of three-dimensional (3D) x-ray breast imaging systems as well as for developing reconstruction algorithms that faithfully reproduce the imaged object anatomy. So far, x-ray detector blur has either been ignored or modeled as a shift-invariant symmetric function for these applications. The recent development of a Monte Carlo simulation package called MANTIS has allowed detailed modeling of these detector blur functions and demonstrated the magnitude of the anisotropy for both tomosynthesis and breast CT imaging systems. Despite the detailed results that MANTIS produces, the long simulation times required make inclusion of these results impractical in rigorous optimization and reconstruction algorithms. As a result, there is a need for detector blur models that can be rapidly generated. Methods: In this study, the authors have derived an analytical model for deterministic detector blur functions, referred to here as point response functions (PRFs), of columnar CsI phosphor screens. The analytical model is x-ray energy and incidence angle dependent and draws on results from MANTIS to indirectly include complicated interactions that are not explicitly included in the mathematical model. Once the mathematical expression is derived, values of the coefficients are determined by a two-dimensional (2D) fit to MANTIS-generated results based on a figure-of-merit (FOM) that measures the normalized differences between the MANTIS and analytical model results averaged over a region of interest. A smaller FOM indicates a better fit. This analysis was performed for a monochromatic x-ray energy of 25 keV, a CsI scintillator thickness of 150 μm, and four incidence angles (0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°). Results: The FOMs comparing the analytical model to MANTIS for these parameters were 0.1951±0.0011, 0.1915±0.0014, 0.2266±0.0021, and 0.2416±0.0074 for 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45

  4. Application of X-ray fluorescence analytical techniques in phytoremediation and plant biology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nečemer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Ščančar, Janez; Jaćimović, Radojko; Simčič, Jurij; Pelicon, Primož; Budnar, Miloš; Jeran, Zvonka; Pongrac, Paula; Regvar, Marjana; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina

    2008-11-01

    Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that employs the use of higher plants for the clean-up of contaminated environments. Progress in the field is however handicapped by limited knowledge of the biological processes involved in plant metal uptake, translocation, tolerance and plant-microbe-soil interactions; therefore a better understanding of the basic biological mechanisms involved in plant/microbe/soil/contaminant interactions would allow further optimization of phytoremediation technologies. In view of the needs of global environmental protection, it is important that in phytoremediation and plant biology studies the analytical procedures for elemental determination in plant tissues and soil should be fast and cheap, with simple sample preparation, and of adequate accuracy and reproducibility. The aim of this study was therefore to present the main characteristics, sample preparation protocols and applications of X-ray fluorescence-based analytical techniques (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry—EDXRF, total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry—TXRF and micro-proton induced X-ray emission—micro-PIXE). Element concentrations in plant leaves from metal polluted and non-polluted sites, as well as standard reference materials, were analyzed by the mentioned techniques, and additionally by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The results were compared and critically evaluated in order to assess the performance and capability of X-ray fluorescence-based techniques in phytoremediation and plant biology studies. It is the EDXRF, which is recommended as suitable to be used in the analyses of a large number of samples, because it is multi-elemental, requires only simple preparation of sample material, and it is analytically comparable to the most frequently used instrumental chemical techniques. The TXRF is compatible to FAAS in sample preparation, but relative to AAS it is fast

  5. Analytical GIAO and hybrid-basis integral derivatives: application to geometry optimization of molecules in strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Tellgren, Erik I; Reine, Simen S; Helgaker, Trygve

    2012-07-14

    Analytical integral evaluation is a central task of modern quantum chemistry. Here we present a general method for evaluating differentiated integrals over standard Gaussian and mixed Gaussian/plane-wave hybrid orbitals. The main idea is to have a representation of basis sets that is flexible enough to enable differentiated integrals to be reinterpreted as standard integrals over modified basis functions. As an illustration of the method, we report a very simple implementation of Hartree-Fock level geometrical derivatives in finite magnetic fields for gauge-origin independent atomic orbitals, within the London program. As a quantum-chemical application, we optimize the structure of helium clusters and some well-known covalently bound molecules (water, ammonia and benzene) subject to strong magnetic fields. PMID:22653039

  6. A Cluster Analytic Study of Osteoprotective Behavior in Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Katherine; Thombs, Dennis L.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To derive an empirical taxonomy of osteoprotective stages using the Precaution Adoption Process Model (PAPM) and to identify the predisposing factors associated with each stage. Methods: An anonymous survey was completed by 504 undergraduates at a Midwestern public university. Results: Cluster analytic findings indicate that only 2…

  7. Expanding Students' Analytical Frameworks through the Study of Graphic Novels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    When teachers work with students to construct a metalanguage that they can draw on to describe and analyze graphic novels, and then invite students to apply that metalanguage in the service of composing multimodal texts of their own, teachers broaden students' analytical frameworks. In the process of doing so, teachers empower students. In this…

  8. Bending energy of a vesicle to which a small spherical particle adhere: An analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Si-Qin; Wei, Guang-Hong; Chen, Jeff Z. Y.

    2015-09-01

    On the basis of Helfrich’s bending energy model, we show that the adsorption process of a small spherical particle to a closed vesicle can be analytically studied by retaining the leading terms in an expansion of the shape equation. Our general derivation predicts the optimal binding sites on a vesicle, where the local membrane shape of the binding site could be non-axisymmetric before the continuous adhesion transition takes place. Our derivation avoids directly solving the shape equation and depends on an integration of the contact-line condition. The results are verified by several examples of independent numerical solutions. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11074047 and 11274075), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. RFDP-20100071110006), and the Natural Science and Science Engineering Council of Canada.

  9. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Several Fluid Mechanical Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. L.

    2014-03-01

    In this thesis, three parts, each with several chapters, are respectively devoted to hydrostatic, viscous, and inertial fluids theories and applications. Involved topics include planetary, biological fluid systems, and high performance computing technology. In the hydrostatics part, the classical Maclaurin spheroids theory is generalized, for the first time, to a more realistic multi-layer model, establishing geometries of both the outer surface and the interfaces. For one of its astrophysical applications, the theory explicitly predicts physical shapes of surface and core-mantle-boundary for layered terrestrial planets, which enables the studies of some gravity problems, and the direct numerical simulations of dynamo flows in rotating planetary cores. As another application of the figure theory, the zonal flow in the deep atmosphere of Jupiter is investigated for a better understanding of the Jovian gravity field. An upper bound of gravity field distortions, especially in higher-order zonal gravitational coefficients, induced by deep zonal winds is estimated firstly. The oblate spheroidal shape of an undistorted Jupiter resulting from its fast solid body rotation is fully taken into account, which marks the most significant improvement from previous approximation based Jovian wind theories. High viscosity flows, for example Stokes flows, occur in a lot of processes involving low-speed motions in fluids. Microorganism swimming is such a typical case. A fully three dimensional analytic solution of incompressible Stokes equation is derived in the exterior domain of an arbitrarily translating and rotating prolate spheroid, which models a large family of microorganisms such as cocci bacteria. The solution is then applied to the magnetotactic bacteria swimming problem, and good consistency has been found between theoretical predictions and laboratory observations of the moving patterns of such bacteria under magnetic fields. In the analysis of dynamics of planetary

  10. Incipient interturn fault diagnosis in induction machines using an analytic wavelet-based optimized Bayesian inference.

    PubMed

    Seshadrinath, Jeevanand; Singh, Bhim; Panigrahi, Bijaya Ketan

    2014-05-01

    Interturn fault diagnosis of induction machines has been discussed using various neural network-based techniques. The main challenge in such methods is the computational complexity due to the huge size of the network, and in pruning a large number of parameters. In this paper, a nearly shift insensitive complex wavelet-based probabilistic neural network (PNN) model, which has only a single parameter to be optimized, is proposed for interturn fault detection. The algorithm constitutes two parts and runs in an iterative way. In the first part, the PNN structure determination has been discussed, which finds out the optimum size of the network using an orthogonal least squares regression algorithm, thereby reducing its size. In the second part, a Bayesian classifier fusion has been recommended as an effective solution for deciding the machine condition. The testing accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity values are highest for the product rule-based fusion scheme, which is obtained under load, supply, and frequency variations. The point of overfitting of PNN is determined, which reduces the size, without compromising the performance. Moreover, a comparative evaluation with traditional discrete wavelet transform-based method is demonstrated for performance evaluation and to appreciate the obtained results. PMID:24808044

  11. Thermal boundary conductance enhancement using experimentally achievable nanostructured interfaces - analytical study combined with molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eungkyu; Zhang, Teng; Hu, Ming; Luo, Tengfei

    2016-06-22

    Interfacial thermal resistance presents great challenges to the thermal management of modern electronics. In this work, we perform an analytical study to enhance the thermal boundary conductance (TBC) of nanostructured interfaces with square-shape pillar arrays, extendable to the characteristic lengths that can be fabricated in practice. As a representative system, we investigate a SiC substrate with the square-shape pillar array combined with epitaxial GaN as the nanostructured interface. By applying a first-order ray tracing method and molecular dynamics simulations to analyze phonon incidence and transmission at the nanostructured interface, we systematically study the impact of the characteristic dimensions of the pillar array on the TBC. Based on the multi-scale analysis we provide a general guideline to optimize the nanostructured interfaces to achieve higher TBC, demonstrating that the optimized TBC value of the nanostructured SiC/GaN interfaces can be 42% higher than that of the planar SiC/GaN interfaces without nanostructures. The model used and results obtained in this study will guide the further experimental realization of nanostructured interfaces for better thermal management in microelectronics. PMID:27275647

  12. Analytical and experimental study on complex compressed air pipe network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Yushou; Cai, Maolin; Shi, Yan

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the working characteristics of complex compressed air networks, numerical methods are widely used which are based on finite element technology or intelligent algorithms. However, the effectiveness of the numerical methods is limited. In this paper, to provide a new method to optimize the design and the air supply strategy of the complex compressed air pipe network, firstly, a novel method to analyze the topology structure of the compressed air flow in the pipe network is initially proposed. A matrix is used to describe the topology structure of the compressed air flow. Moreover, based on the analysis of the pressure loss of the pipe network, the relationship between the pressure and the flow of the compressed air is derived, and a prediction method of pressure fluctuation and air flow in a segment in a complex pipe network is proposed. Finally, to inspect the effectiveness of the method, an experiment with a complex network is designed. The pressure and the flow of airflow in the network are measured and studied. The results of the study show that, the predicted results with the proposed method have a good consistency with the experimental results, and that verifies the air flow prediction method of the complex pipe network. This research proposes a new method to analyze the compressed air network and a prediction method of pressure fluctuation and air flow in a segment, which can predicate the fluctuation of the pressure according to the flow of compressed air, and predicate the fluctuation of the flow according to the pressure in a segment of a complex pipe network.

  13. Review of Factor Analytic Studies Examining Symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuster, Jill; Perry, Adrienne; Bebko, James; Toplak, Maggie E.

    2014-01-01

    Factor analytic studies have been conducted to examine the inter-relationships and degree of overlap among symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This paper reviewed 36 factor analytic studies that have examined ASD symptoms, using 13 different instruments. Studies were grouped into three categories: Studies with all DSM-IV symptoms, studies…

  14. An Optimization Study of Hot Stamping Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoo, Bonyoung; Umezu, Yasuyoshi; Watanabe, Yuko; Ma, Ninshu; Averill, Ron

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, 3-dimensional finite element analyses for hot-stamping processes of Audi B-pillar product are conducted using JSTAMP/NV and HEEDS. Special attention is paid to the optimization of simulation technology coupling with thermal-mechanical formulations. Numerical simulation based on FEM technology and optimization design using the hybrid adaptive SHERPA algorithm are applied to hot stamping operation to improve productivity. The robustness of the SHERPA algorithm is found through the results of the benchmark example. The SHERPA algorithm is shown to be far superior to the GA (Genetic Algorithm) in terms of efficiency, whose calculation time is about 7 times faster than that of the GA. The SHERPA algorithm could show high performance in a large scale problem having complicated design space and long calculation time.

  15. Orbital-optimized MP2.5 and its analytic gradients: Approaching CCSD(T) quality for noncovalent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bozkaya, Uğur; Sherrill, C. David

    2014-11-28

    Orbital-optimized MP2.5 [or simply “optimized MP2.5,” OMP2.5, for short] and its analytic energy gradients are presented. The cost of the presented method is as much as that of coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) [O(N{sup 6}) scaling] for energy computations. However, for analytic gradient computations the OMP2.5 method is only half as expensive as CCSD because there is no need to solve λ{sub 2}-amplitude equations for OMP2.5. The performance of the OMP2.5 method is compared with that of the standard second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), MP2.5, CCSD, and coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) methods for equilibrium geometries, hydrogen transfer reactions between radicals, and noncovalent interactions. For bond lengths of both closed and open-shell molecules, the OMP2.5 method improves upon MP2.5 and CCSD by 38%–43% and 31%–28%, respectively, with Dunning's cc-pCVQZ basis set. For complete basis set (CBS) predictions of hydrogen transfer reaction energies, the OMP2.5 method exhibits a substantially better performance than MP2.5, providing a mean absolute error of 1.1 kcal mol{sup −1}, which is more than 10 times lower than that of MP2.5 (11.8 kcal mol{sup −1}), and comparing to MP2 (14.6 kcal mol{sup −1}) there is a more than 12-fold reduction in errors. For noncovalent interaction energies (at CBS limits), the OMP2.5 method maintains the very good performance of MP2.5 for closed-shell systems, and for open-shell systems it significantly outperforms MP2.5 and CCSD, and approaches CCSD(T) quality. The MP2.5 errors decrease by a factor of 5 when the optimized orbitals are used for open-shell noncovalent interactions, and comparing to CCSD there is a more than 3-fold reduction in errors. Overall, the present application results indicate that the OMP2.5 method is very promising for open-shell noncovalent interactions and other chemical systems with difficult electronic structures.

  16. Analytical Studies of Boundary Layer Generated Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.; Shah, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis is made of the "interior noise" produced by high, subsonic turbulent flow over a thin elastic plate partitioned into "panels" by straight edges transverse to the mean flow direction. This configuration models a section of an aircraft fuselage that may be regarded as locally flat. The analytical problem can be solved in closed form to represent the acoustic radiation in terms of prescribed turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations. Two cases are considered: (i) the production of sound at an isolated panel edge (i.e., in the approximation in which the correlation between sound and vibrations generated at neighboring edges is neglected), and (ii) the sound generated by a periodic arrangement of identical panels. The latter problem is amenable to exact analytical treatment provided the panel edge conditions are the same for all panels. Detailed predictions of the interior noise depend on a knowledge of the turbulent boundary layer wall pressure spectrum, and are given here in terms of an empirical spectrum proposed by Laganelli and Wolfe. It is expected that these analytical representations of the sound generated by simplified models of fluid-structure interactions can used to validate more general numerical schemes.

  17. Analytical structural optimization and experimental verifications for traveling wave generation in self-assembling swimming smart boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani-Hani, M. A.; Karami, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents vibration analysis and structural optimization of a swimming-morphing structure. The swimming of the structure is achieved by utilization of piezoelectric patches to generate traveling waves. The third mode shape of the structure in the longitudinal direction resembles the body waveform of a swimming eel. After swimming to its destination, the morphing structure changes shape from an open box to a cube using shape memory alloys (SMAs). The SMAs used for the configuration change of the box robot cannot be used for swimming since they fail to operate at high frequencies. Piezoelectric patches are actuated at the third natural frequency of the structure. We optimize the thickness of the panels and the stiffness of the springs at the joints to generate swimming waveforms that most closely resemble the body waveform of an eel. The traveling wave is generated using two piezoelectric sets of patches bonded to the first and last segments of the beams in the longitudinal direction. Excitation of the piezoelectric results in coupled system dynamics equations that can be translated into the generation of waves. Theoretical analysis based on the distributed parameter model is conducted in this paper. A scalar measure of the traveling to standing wave ratio is introduced using a 2-dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FFT) of the body deformation waveform. An optimization algorithm based on tuning the flexural transverse wave is established to obtain a higher traveling to standing wave ratio. The results are then compared to common methods in the literature for assessment of standing to traveling wave ratios. The analytical models are verified by the close agreement between the traveling waves predicted by the model and those measured in the experiments.

  18. Optimal redesign study of the harm wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, S. C., Jr.; Weynand, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the use of optimization techniques to improve the flutter margins of the HARM AGM-88A wing. The missile has four cruciform wings, located near mid-fuselage, that are actuated in pairs symmetrically and antisymmetrically to provide pitch, yaw, and roll control. The wings have a solid stainless steel forward section and a stainless steel crushed-honeycomb aft section. The wing restraint stiffness is dependent upon wing pitch amplitude and varies from a low value near neutral pitch attitude to a much higher value at off-neutral pitch attitudes, where aerodynamic loads lock out any free play in the control system. The most critical condition for flutter is the low-stiffness condition in which the wings are moved symmetrically. Although a tendency toward limit-cycle flutter is controlled in the current design by controller logic, wing redesign to improve this situation is attractive because it can be accomplished as a retrofit. In view of the exploratory nature of the study, it was decided to apply the optimization to a wing-only model, validated by comparison with results obtained by Texas Instruments (TI). Any wing designs that looked promising were to be evaluated at TI with more complicated models, including body modes. The optimization work was performed by McIntosh Structural Dynamics, Inc. (MSD) under a contract from TI.

  19. Parameterizing Phrase Based Statistical Machine Translation Models: An Analytic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cer, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to determine the best way to train a statistical machine translation system. I first develop a state-of-the-art machine translation system called Phrasal and then use it to examine a wide variety of potential learning algorithms and optimization criteria and arrive at two very surprising results. First, despite the…

  20. Helicopter mission optimization study. [portable computer technology for flight optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of using low-cost, portable computer technology to help a helicopter pilot optimize flight parameters to minimize fuel consumption and takeoff and landing noise was demonstrated. Eight separate computer programs were developed for use in the helicopter cockpit using a hand-held computer. The programs provide the helicopter pilot with the ability to calculate power required, minimum fuel consumption for both range and endurance, maximum speed and a minimum noise profile for both takeoff and landing. Each program is defined by a maximum of two magnetic cards. The helicopter pilot is required to key in the proper input parameter such as gross weight, outside air temperature or pressure altitude.

  1. Analytic and numerical studies of the modified betatron. [Kiloamp beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.P.; Campbell, M.M.; Godfrey, B.B.

    1983-08-01

    The modified betatron concept has been proposed as a means of accelerating high current (kiloamp) electron beams to high energy. This device employs a toroidal magnetic field to overcome the space-charge limit on the current in a conventional betatron at low energy. In this paper, the authors look at the injection, equilibrium and stability of the modified betatron. The main emphasis is on stability. An analytic dispersion relation is derived using a cold-fluid model of the beam. The results are compared to three-dimensional simulations performed with the electromagnetic PIC code IVORY. The nonlinear development of the negative mass instability is followed in the simulations.

  2. Analytical study of the twin-jet shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the analytical model of twin-jet shielding is summarized. The models consist of a point noise source impinging on a cylinder of heated flow in which the temperature and flow velocity are uniform cross the cross section. In the formulation of the model, the wave equations are written for the regions outside the flow and within the flow cylinder. The solutions to the wave equations are matched at the jet boundary under the conditions of continuity of pressure and continuity of the vortex sheet. The solution reduces to an indefinite integral involving Bessel functions. The integral is solved approximately using a saddle point method.

  3. Coordinated Optimization of Visual Cortical Maps (II) Numerical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Reichl, Lars; Heide, Dominik; Löwel, Siegrid; Crowley, Justin C.; Kaschube, Matthias; Wolf, Fred

    2012-01-01

    In the juvenile brain, the synaptic architecture of the visual cortex remains in a state of flux for months after the natural onset of vision and the initial emergence of feature selectivity in visual cortical neurons. It is an attractive hypothesis that visual cortical architecture is shaped during this extended period of juvenile plasticity by the coordinated optimization of multiple visual cortical maps such as orientation preference (OP), ocular dominance (OD), spatial frequency, or direction preference. In part (I) of this study we introduced a class of analytically tractable coordinated optimization models and solved representative examples, in which a spatially complex organization of the OP map is induced by interactions between the maps. We found that these solutions near symmetry breaking threshold predict a highly ordered map layout. Here we examine the time course of the convergence towards attractor states and optima of these models. In particular, we determine the timescales on which map optimization takes place and how these timescales can be compared to those of visual cortical development and plasticity. We also assess whether our models exhibit biologically more realistic, spatially irregular solutions at a finite distance from threshold, when the spatial periodicities of the two maps are detuned and when considering more than 2 feature dimensions. We show that, although maps typically undergo substantial rearrangement, no other solutions than pinwheel crystals and stripes dominate in the emerging layouts. Pinwheel crystallization takes place on a rather short timescale and can also occur for detuned wavelengths of different maps. Our numerical results thus support the view that neither minimal energy states nor intermediate transient states of our coordinated optimization models successfully explain the architecture of the visual cortex. We discuss several alternative scenarios that may improve the agreement between model solutions and biological

  4. Multivariate optimization of an analytical method for the analysis of dog and cat foods by ICP OES.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Silvânio Silvério Lopes; Pereira, Ana Cristina Lima; Passos, Elisangela Andrade; Alves, José do Patrocínio Hora; Garcia, Carlos Alexandre Borges; Araujo, Rennan Geovanny Oliveira

    2013-04-15

    Experimental design methodology was used to optimize an analytical method for determination of the mineral element composition (Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ba, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P, S, Sr and Zn) of dog and cat foods. Two-level full factorial design was applied to define the optimal proportions of the reagents used for microwave-assisted sample digestion (2.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 and 6% m/v H2O2). A three-level factorial design for two variables was used to optimize the operational conditions of the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer, employed for analysis of the extracts. A radiofrequency power of 1.2 kW and a nebulizer argon flow of 1.0 L min(-1) were selected. The limits of quantification (LOQ) were between 0.03 μg g(-1) (Cr, 267.716 nm) and 87 μg g(-1) (Ca, 373.690 nm). The trueness of the optimized method was evaluated by analysis of five certified reference materials (CRMs): wheat flour (NIST 1567a), bovine liver (NIST 1577), peach leaves (NIST 1547), oyster tissue (NIST 1566b), and fish protein (DORM-3). The recovery values obtained for the CRMs were between 80 ± 4% (Cr) and 117 ± 5% (Cd), with relative standard deviations (RSDs) better than 5%, demonstrating that the proposed method offered good trueness and precision. Ten samples of pet food (five each of cat and dog food) were acquired at supermarkets in Aracaju city (Sergipe State, Brazil). Concentrations in the dog food ranged between 7.1 mg kg(-1) (Ba) and 2.7 g kg(-1) (Ca), while for cat food the values were between 3.7 mg kg(-1) (Ba) and 3.0 g kg(-1) (Ca). The concentrations of Ca, K, Mg, P, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in the food were compared with the guidelines of the United States' Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) and the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Food Supply (Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento-MAPA). PMID:23601884

  5. Analytical and experimental study of vibrations in a gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Ruan, Y. F.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, Fred B.; Coy, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical simulation of the dynamics of a gear transmission system is presented and compared to experimental results from a gear noise test rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The analytical procedure developed couples the dynamic behaviors of the rotor-bearing-gear system with the response of the gearbox structure. The modal synthesis method is used in solving the overall dynamics of the system. Locally each rotor-gear stage is modeled as an individual rotor-bearing system using the matrix transfer technique. The dynamics of each individual rotor are coupled with other rotor stages through the nonlinear gear mesh forces and with the gearbox structure through bearing support systems. The modal characteristics of the gearbox structure are evaluated using the finite element procedure. A variable time steping integration routine is used to calculate the overall time transient behavior of the system in modal coordinates. The global dynamic behavior of the system is expressed in a generalized coordinate system. Transient and steady state vibrations of the gearbox system are presented in the time and frequency domains. The vibration characteristics of a simple single mesh gear noise test rig is modeled. The numerical simulations are compared to experimental data measured under typical operating conditions. The comparison of system natural frequencies, peak vibration amplitudes, and gear mesh frequencies are generally in good agreement.

  6. Mechanics of Flapping Flight: Analytical Formulations of Unsteady Aerodynamics, Kinematic Optimization, Flight Dynamics, and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneja, Jayant Kumar

    Electricity is an indispensable commodity to modern society, yet it is delivered via a grid architecture that remains largely unchanged over the past century. A host of factors are conspiring to topple this dated yet venerated design: developments in renewable electricity generation technology, policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and advances in information technology for managing energy systems. Modern electric grids are emerging as complex distributed systems in which a portfolio of power generation resources, often incorporating fluctuating renewable resources such as wind and solar, must be managed dynamically to meet uncontrolled, time-varying demand. Uncertainty in both supply and demand makes control of modern electric grids fundamentally more challenging, and growing portfolios of renewables exacerbate the challenge. We study three electricity grids: the state of California, the province of Ontario, and the country of Germany. To understand the effects of increasing renewables, we develop a methodology to scale renewables penetration. Analyzing these grids yields key insights about rigid limits to renewables penetration and their implications in meeting long-term emissions targets. We argue that to achieve deep penetration of renewables, the operational model of the grid must be inverted, changing the paradigm from load-following supplies to supply-following loads. To alleviate the challenge of supply-demand matching on deeply renewable grids, we first examine well-known techniques, including altering management of existing supply resources, employing utility-scale energy storage, targeting energy efficiency improvements, and exercising basic demand-side management. Then, we create several instantiations of supply-following loads -- including refrigerators, heating and cooling systems, and laptop computers -- by employing a combination of sensor networks, advanced control techniques, and enhanced energy storage. We examine the capacity of each load

  7. Advanced Cogeneration Technology Economic Optimization Study (ACTEOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanda, P.; Ansu, Y.; Manuel, E. H., Jr.; Price, W. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The advanced cogeneration technology economic optimization study (ACTEOS) was undertaken to extend the results of the cogeneration technology alternatives study (CTAS). Cost comparisons were made between designs involving advanced cogeneration technologies and designs involving either conventional cogeneration technologies or not involving cogeneration. For the specific equipment cost and fuel price assumptions made, it was found that: (1) coal based cogeneration systems offered appreciable cost savings over the no cogeneration case, while systems using coal derived liquids offered no costs savings; and (2) the advanced cogeneration systems provided somewhat larger cost savings than the conventional systems. Among the issues considered in the study included: (1) temporal variations in steam and electric demands; (2) requirements for reliability/standby capacity; (3) availability of discrete equipment sizes; (4) regional variations in fuel and electricity prices; (5) off design system performance; and (6) separate demand and energy charges for purchased electricity.

  8. Analytical study on mesocarbon microbeads derived from coal tar pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Murata, S.; Nomura, M.

    1999-07-01

    Pitches have been recognized as excellent precursors for carbon materials and their properties are considered to be influential on the properties and function of carbon material. For this reason, their detailed characterization is being required. Successful pitch characterization must satisfy the following points: (1) very complicated pitches can be clearly distinguished; (2) the performance of the final carbon product can be predicted by characterizing the precursor pitch at its molecular level; and (3) a satisfactory explanation can be provided for chemical and physical behavior of pitches for a given utilization process based on their structural differences. Successful pitch characterization is quite difficult to be attained because pitches are very complex mixtures containing several hundred compounds with different functionalities. Thus, the methods for their characterization are limited to the measurements of average structural parameters, such as softening point (SP), H/C atomic ratio, quinoline- and toluene-insoluble (QI and TI) fractions, aromaticity, carbon yield, etc.. Although these parameters can give a fairly good evaluation about pitch quality, they can not always explain why pitches with similar characteristics on traditional characterization techniques display a significantly different behavior. This fact provides a challenging subject in the field of pitch characterization. At the same time, there is a possibility that in a given case satisfactory important factors remain undetected due to the limitation of analytical techniques, thus leading to serious problems in the pitch utilization. Therefore, it seems to be essential to know, for a given utilization of pitches, which of the pitch properties normally measured is important and how this affects the behavior of pitch. Another serious difficulty in pitch characterization is the fact that pitches are normally not completely soluble in solvents. There is no single analytical technique which can

  9. Optimization of the scheme for natural ecology planning of urban rivers based on ANP (analytic network process) model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichuan; Wang, Jiangping

    2015-07-01

    Rivers serve as a highly valued component in ecosystem and urban infrastructures. River planning should follow basic principles of maintaining or reconstructing the natural landscape and ecological functions of rivers. Optimization of planning scheme is a prerequisite for successful construction of urban rivers. Therefore, relevant studies on optimization of scheme for natural ecology planning of rivers is crucial. In the present study, four planning schemes for Zhaodingpal River in Xinxiang City, Henan Province were included as the objects for optimization. Fourteen factors that influenced the natural ecology planning of urban rivers were selected from five aspects so as to establish the ANP model. The data processing was done using Super Decisions software. The results showed that important degree of scheme 3 was highest. A scientific, reasonable and accurate evaluation of schemes could be made by ANP method on natural ecology planning of urban rivers. This method could be used to provide references for sustainable development and construction of urban rivers. ANP method is also suitable for optimization of schemes for urban green space planning and design. PMID:26387349

  10. Analytical study of diffraction effects in extremely large segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Yaitskova, Natalia; Dohlen, Kjetil; Dierickx, Philippe

    2003-08-01

    We present an analysis of the diffraction effects from a segmented aperture with a very large number of segments-prototype of the next generation of extremely large telescopes. This analysis is based on the point-spread-function analytical calculation for Keck-type hexagonal segmentation geometry. We concentrate on the effects that lead to the appearance of speckles and/or a regular pattern of diffraction peaks. These effects are related to random piston and tip-tilt errors on each segment, gaps between segments, and segment edge distortion. We deliver formulas and the typical numerical values for the Strehl ratio, the relative intensity of higher-order diffraction peaks, and the averaged intensity of speckles associated with each particular case of segmentation error. PMID:12938912

  11. Optimal Medical Equipment Maintenance Service Proposal Decision Support System combining Activity Based Costing (ABC) and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP).

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Leticia; Sloane, Elliot; M Bassani, Jose

    2005-01-01

    This study describes a framework to support the choice of the maintenance service (in-house or third party contract) for each category of medical equipment based on: a) the real medical equipment maintenance management system currently used by the biomedical engineering group of the public health system of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas located in Brazil to control the medical equipment maintenance service, b) the Activity Based Costing (ABC) method, and c) the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method. Results show the cost and performance related to each type of maintenance service. Decision-makers can use these results to evaluate possible strategies for the categories of equipment. PMID:17281912

  12. [Recommendation for studies of optimizing therapy protocols].

    PubMed

    Creutzig, U; Winkler, K

    1994-01-01

    Guidelines to establish the principles for the standard of Good Clinical Practice (GCP) for trials on medicinal products in human beings were coming into operation in the European Community in 1991. These recommendations are more extensive than those of the German drug regulatory act (AMG). Included are outlines for the protection of the patient, the responsibilities of the investigator, for biometrics and the quality assurance. Although most of the studies in pediatric oncology optimizing treatment schedules do not belong to the studies as defined by the AMG, certain rules and regulations are strictly adhered to, e.g. the Declaration of Helsinki for the protection of human rights, medical justification of involved risks, adequate and freely obtained informed consent of the patient and the parents. Furthermore, the approval of Ethics Committees must be requested. PMID:7967415

  13. A Comparative Theoretical and Computational Study on Robust Counterpart Optimization: I. Robust Linear Optimization and Robust Mixed Integer Linear Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zukui; Ding, Ran; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2011-01-01

    Robust counterpart optimization techniques for linear optimization and mixed integer linear optimization problems are studied in this paper. Different uncertainty sets, including those studied in literature (i.e., interval set; combined interval and ellipsoidal set; combined interval and polyhedral set) and new ones (i.e., adjustable box; pure ellipsoidal; pure polyhedral; combined interval, ellipsoidal, and polyhedral set) are studied in this work and their geometric relationship is discussed. For uncertainty in the left hand side, right hand side, and objective function of the optimization problems, robust counterpart optimization formulations induced by those different uncertainty sets are derived. Numerical studies are performed to compare the solutions of the robust counterpart optimization models and applications in refinery production planning and batch process scheduling problem are presented. PMID:21935263

  14. Analytical considerations for linear and nonlinear optimization of the theoretical minimum emittance cells: Application to the Compact Linear Collider predamping rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniou, F.; Papaphilippou, Y.

    2014-06-01

    The theoretical minimum emittance cells are the optimal configurations for achieving the absolute minimum emittance, if specific optics constraints are satisfied at the middle of the cell's dipole. Linear lattice design options based on an analytical approach for the theoretical minimum emittance cells are presented in this paper. In particular the parametrization of the quadrupole strengths and optics functions with respect to the emittance and drift lengths is derived. A multiparametric space can be then created with all the cell parameters, from which one can choose any of them to be optimized. An application of this approach is finally presented for the linear and nonlinear optimization of the Compact Linear Collider predamping rings.

  15. Experience of suicidal thoughts: a discourse analytic study.

    PubMed

    Galasiński, Dariusz; Ziółkowska, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the relationship between current psychiatric thinking on suicide and service users' accounts of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. The data comes from recordings of psychiatric interviews collected in three psychiatric hospitals in Poland. Assuming a constructionist view of discourse we argue that the literature on suicide ignores and simplifies the experience of those who think about suicide and attempt to commit it, and constructs their experiences as a homogeneous group of 'thoughts' with only limited content. We also offer a preliminary insight into the complexity of 'suicide thoughts', as narrated by those reporting them. We demonstrate that they are marginalized and made relatively irrelevant in the accounts of attempted suicide. Additionally, we demonstrate that while women construct suicide attempts (whether actually attempted in the end or not) as at least potentially beyond their control, men's narratives show them in control of the attempt, as if choosing an available option. We conclude by exploring possibilities of further qualitative discourse analytic research which builds on the findings we present here. PMID:24851507

  16. Experimental and analytical studies of advanced air cushion landing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, E. G. S.; Boghani, A. B.; Captain, K. M.; Rutishauser, H. J.; Farley, H. L.; Fish, R. B.; Jeffcoat, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Several concepts are developed for air cushion landing systems (ACLS) which have the potential for improving performance characteristics (roll stiffness, heave damping, and trunk flutter), and reducing fabrication cost and complexity. After an initial screening, the following five concepts were evaluated in detail: damped trunk, filled trunk, compartmented trunk, segmented trunk, and roll feedback control. The evaluation was based on tests performed on scale models. An ACLS dynamic simulation developed earlier is updated so that it can be used to predict the performance of full-scale ACLS incorporating these refinements. The simulation was validated through scale-model tests. A full-scale ACLS based on the segmented trunk concept was fabricated and installed on the NASA ACLS test vehicle, where it is used to support advanced system development. A geometrically-scaled model (one third full scale) of the NASA test vehicle was fabricated and tested. This model, evaluated by means of a series of static and dynamic tests, is used to investigate scaling relationships between reduced and full-scale models. The analytical model developed earlier is applied to simulate both the one third scale and the full scale response.

  17. Analytical TEM study of annealed nanocrystalline cobalt-phosphorous electrodeposits.

    PubMed

    da Silva, M; Klement, U

    2007-12-01

    Investigation of thermal stability of two nanocrystalline Co-P alloys shows that P atoms segregate to the grain boundaries upon annealing until precipitation of Co(2)P and CoP precipitates takes place. The P-rich precipitates formed have been investigated by analytical transmission electron microscopy to obtain statistical results of precipitate size, volume fraction and spatial distribution. Electron spectroscopic imaging maps show that the P-rich precipitates are 33 +/- 9 nm in Co-1.1at.%P and 33 +/- 12 nm in Co-3.2at.%P. The main differences between the alloys are the precipitate size distribution (Co-3.2at.%P having broader distribution) and precipitate volume number density (Co-3.2at.%P has 1.8 times more precipitates than Co-1.1at.%P). The volume fraction of precipitates is 3.0% in Co-1.1at.%P and 4.4% in Co-1.1at.%P. Most of the precipitates are of nearly spherical or slightly elongated shape, and only a few have a platelet-like shape as expected from previous tomographic atom probe measurements. Due to the truncation and projection effects, the composition of the precipitates could not be determined. PMID:18045328

  18. Applications of nuclear analytical techniques to environmental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, M. C.; Pacheco, A. M. G.; Marques, A. P.; Barros, L. I. C.; Reis, M. A.

    2001-07-01

    A few examples of application of nuclear-analytical techniques to biological monitors—natives and transplants—are given herein. Parmelia sulcata Taylor transplants were set up in a heavily industrialized area of Portugal—the Setúbal peninsula, about 50 km south of Lisbon—where indigenous lichens are rare. The whole area was 10×15 km around an oil-fired power station, and a 2.5×2.5 km grid was used. In north-western Portugal, native thalli of the same epiphytes (Parmelia spp., mostly Parmelia sulcata Taylor) and bark from olive trees (Olea europaea) were sampled across an area of 50×50 km, using a 10×10 km grid. This area is densely populated and features a blend of rural, urban-industrial and coastal environments, together with the country's second-largest metro area (Porto). All biomonitors have been analyzed by INAA and PIXE. Results were put through nonparametric tests and factor analysis for trend significance and emission sources, respectively.

  19. Space nuclear reactor shielding optimization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Richard D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    The Institute for Space Nuclear Reactor Studies is investigating optimal techniques for shielding spacecraft (payload) electronics from the combined radiation effects of the SP-100 system nuclear reactor core and the natural space environment. The academic challenge of this research includes the investigation of the combined influences of radiation from the space environment and the radiations from the reactor power source. The technical application includes a series of shielding mass penalty tradeoffs for the SP-100 Program concept between the reactor core shield and the additional shielding of the spacecraft enclosure. These mass penalty tradeoffs are being conducted for several space flight orbits of future interest to the space military and civilian communities. It was shown that several potential mission orbits may pose environmental radiation dosages which are more severe than the SP-100 specification of core escape neutron and gamma ray particle fluences incident on the spacecraft.

  20. Analytical model study of dendrimer/DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Qamhieh, Khawla; Nylander, Tommy; Ainalem, Marie-Louise

    2009-07-13

    The interaction between positively charged poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers of generation 4 and DNA has been investigated for two DNA lengths; 2000 basepairs (bp; L = 680 nm) and 4331 bp (L = 1472.5 nm) using a theoretical model by Schiessel for a semiflexible polyelectrolyte and hard spheres. The model was modified to take into account that the dendrimers are to be regarded as soft spheres, that is, the radius is not constant when the DNA interact with the dendrimer. For the shorter and longer DNA, the estimated optimal wrapping length, l(opt) is ≈15.69 and ≈12.25 nm, respectively, for dendrimers that retain their original size (R(o) = 2.25 nm) upon DNA interaction. However, the values of l(opt) for the dendrimers that were considered to have a radius of (R = 0.4R(o)) 0.9 nm were 9.3 and 9.4 nm for the short and long DNA, respectively, and the effect due to the DNA length is no longer observed. For l(opt) = 10.88 nm, which is the length needed to neutralize the 64 positive charges of the G4 dendrimer, the maximum number of dendrimers per DNA (N(max)) was ≈76 for the shorter DNA, which is larger than the corresponding experimental value of 35 for 2000 bp DNA. For the longer DNA, N(max) ≈ 160, which is close to the experimental value of 140 for the 4331 bp DNA. Charge inversion of the dendrimer is only observed when they retain their size or only slightly contract upon DNA interaction. PMID:19438230

  1. Optimality study of a gust alleviation system for light wing-loading STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komoda, M.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical study was made of an optimal gust alleviation system that employs a vertical gust sensor mounted forward of an aircraft's center of gravity. Frequency domain optimization techniques were employed to synthesize the optimal filters that process the corrective signals to the flaps and elevator actuators. Special attention was given to evaluating the effectiveness of lead time, that is, the time by which relative wind sensor information should lead the actual encounter of the gust. The resulting filter is expressed as an implicit function of the prescribed control cost. A numerical example for a light wing loading STOL aircraft is included in which the optimal trade-off between performance and control cost is systematically studied.

  2. A Spectrophotometric Study of the Permanganate-Oxalate Reaction: An Analytical Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalbus, Gene E.; Lieu, Van T.; Kalbus, Lee H.

    2004-01-01

    The spectrophotometric method assists in the study of potassium permanganate-oxalate reaction. Basic analytical techniques and rules are implemented in the experiment, which can also include the examination of other compounds oxidized by permanganate.

  3. Analytical study of spacecraft deposition contamination by internal reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.

    1972-01-01

    Infrared absorption spectra of ten individual contaminant materials and four binary mixtures of these have been studied using the internal reflection spectroscopy technique. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on these contaminants has also been studied. It has been observed that all siloxanes, silanes, and esters are drastically affected by ultraviolet irradiation. In most cases polymerization and tar formation results.

  4. A Factor Analytic Study of the Internet Usage Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monetti, David M.; Whatley, Mark A.; Hinkle, Kerry T.; Cunningham, Kerry T.; Breneiser, Jennifer E.; Kisling, Rhea

    2011-01-01

    This study developed an Internet Usage Scale (IUS) for use with adolescent populations. The IUS is a 26-item scale that measures participants' beliefs about how their Internet usage impacts their behavior. The sample for this study consisted of 947 middle school students. An exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation was conducted on the…

  5. A Factor Analytic Study of the Teaching Events Stress Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Livingston; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine if definitive factors emerge from the responses of teachers to the Teaching Events Stress Inventory (TESI). In a series of three studies during the years 1980 to 1982, data were collected to assess the levels and sources of stress experienced by 660 teachers in central and western Kentucky. The subjects…

  6. Analytical Study on Thermal and Mechanical Design of Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Su-Jong Yoon; Piyush Sabharwall; Eung-Soo Kim

    2013-09-01

    The analytical methodologies for the thermal design, mechanical design and cost estimation of printed circuit heat exchanger are presented in this study. In this study, three flow arrangements of parallel flow, countercurrent flow and crossflow are taken into account. For each flow arrangement, the analytical solution of temperature profile of heat exchanger is introduced. The size and cost of printed circuit heat exchangers for advanced small modular reactors, which employ various coolants such as sodium, molten salts, helium, and water, are also presented.

  7. An analytic modeling and system identification study of rotor/fuselage dynamics at hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Steven W.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of analytic modeling and system identification methods have been used to develop an improved dynamic model describing the response of articulated rotor helicopters to control inputs. A high-order linearized model of coupled rotor/body dynamics including flap and lag degrees of freedom and inflow dynamics with literal coefficients is compared to flight test data from single rotor helicopters in the near hover trim condition. The identification problem was formulated using the maximum likelihood function in the time domain. The dynamic model with literal coefficients was used to generate the model states, and the model was parametrized in terms of physical constants of the aircraft rather than the stability derivatives, resulting in a significant reduction in the number of quantities to be identified. The likelihood function was optimized using the genetic algorithm approach. This method proved highly effective in producing an estimated model from flight test data which included coupled fuselage/rotor dynamics. Using this approach it has been shown that blade flexibility is a significant contributing factor to the discrepancies between theory and experiment shown in previous studies. Addition of flexible modes, properly incorporating the constraint due to the lag dampers, results in excellent agreement between flight test and theory, especially in the high frequency range.

  8. An analytic modeling and system identification study of rotor/fuselage dynamics at hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Steven W.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of analytic modeling and system identification methods have been used to develop an improved dynamic model describing the response of articulated rotor helicopters to control inputs. A high-order linearized model of coupled rotor/body dynamics including flap and lag degrees of freedom and inflow dynamics with literal coefficients is compared to flight test data from single rotor helicopters in the near hover trim condition. The identification problem was formulated using the maximum likelihood function in the time domain. The dynamic model with literal coefficients was used to generate the model states, and the model was parametrized in terms of physical constants of the aircraft rather than the stability derivatives resulting in a significant reduction in the number of quantities to be identified. The likelihood function was optimized using the genetic algorithm approach. This method proved highly effective in producing an estimated model from flight test data which included coupled fuselage/rotor dynamics. Using this approach it has been shown that blade flexibility is a significant contributing factor to the discrepancies between theory and experiment shown in previous studies. Addition of flexible modes, properly incorporating the constraint due to the lag dampers, results in excellent agreement between flight test and theory, especially in the high frequency range.

  9. Experimental and Analytical Studies of Solar System Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, Donald S.

    2003-01-01

    The cosmochemistry research funded by this grant resulted in the publications given in the attached Publication List. The research focused in three areas: (1) Experimental studies of trace element partitioning. (2) Studies of the minor element chemistry and O isotopic compositions of MgAlO4 spinels from Ca-Al-Rich Inclusions in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and (3) The abundances and chemical fractionations of Th and U in chondritic meteorites.

  10. Study on bending behaviour of nickel–titanium rotary endodontic instruments by analytical and numerical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, C C; Liou, J U; Wen, P H; Peng, C C; Liu, T S

    2013-01-01

    Aim To develop analytical models and analyse the stress distribution and flexibility of nickel–titanium (NiTi) instruments subject to bending forces. Methodology The analytical method was used to analyse the behaviours of NiTi instruments under bending forces. Two NiTi instruments (RaCe and Mani NRT) with different cross-sections and geometries were considered. Analytical results were derived using Euler–Bernoulli nonlinear differential equations that took into account the screw pitch variation of these NiTi instruments. In addition, the nonlinear deformation analysis based on the analytical model and the finite element nonlinear analysis was carried out. Numerical results are obtained by carrying out a finite element method. Results According to analytical results, the maximum curvature of the instrument occurs near the instrument tip. Results of the finite element analysis revealed that the position of maximum von Mises stress was near the instrument tip. Therefore, the proposed analytical model can be used to predict the position of maximum curvature in the instrument where fracture may occur. Finally, results of analytical and numerical models were compatible. Conclusion The proposed analytical model was validated by numerical results in analysing bending deformation of NiTi instruments. The analytical model is useful in the design and analysis of instruments. The proposed theoretical model is effective in studying the flexibility of NiTi instruments. Compared with the finite element method, the analytical model can deal conveniently and effectively with the subject of bending behaviour of rotary NiTi endodontic instruments. PMID:23173762

  11. Asynchronous telehealth: a scoping review of analytic studies

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Amol; Khoja, Shariq; Lorca, Julio; McKibbon, Ann; Rizo, Carlos; Husereau, Donald; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2009-01-01

    Background Asynchronous telehealth captures clinically important digital samples (e.g., still images, video, audio, text files) and relevant data in one location and subsequently transmits these files for interpretation at a remote site by health professionals without requiring the simultaneous presence of the patient involved and his or her health care provider. Its utility in the health care system, however, still remains poorly defined. We conducted this scoping review to determine the impact of asynchronous telehealth on health outcomes, process of care, access to health services, and health resources. Methods A search was performed up to December 2006 of MEDLINE, CINAHL, HealthSTAR, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, and The Cochrane Library. Studies were included if they contained original data on the use of asynchronous telehealth and were published in English in a peer-reviewed journal. Two independent reviewers screened all articles and extracted data, reaching consensus on the articles and data identified. Data were extracted on general study characteristics, clinical domain, technology, setting, category of outcome, and results. Study quality (internal validity) was assessed using the Jadad scale for randomized controlled trials and the Downs and Black index for non-randomized studies. Summary data were categorized by medical specialty and presented qualitatively. Results The scoping review included 52 original studies from 238 citations identified; of these 52, almost half focused on the use of telehealth in dermatology. Included studies were characterized by diverse designs, interventions, and outcomes. Only 16 studies were judged to be of high quality. Most studies showed beneficial effects in terms of diagnostic accuracy, wait times, referral management, and satisfaction with services. Evidence on the impact of asynchronous telehealth on resource use in dermatology suggests a reduction in the number of, or avoidance of, in

  12. Analytical study of nozzle performance for nuclear thermal rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A parametric study has been conducted by the NASA-Lewis Rocket Engine Design Expert System for the convergent-divergent nozzle of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket system, which uses a nuclear reactor to heat hydrogen to high temperature and then expands it through the nozzle. It is established by the study that finite-rate chemical reactions lower performance levels from theoretical levels. Major parametric roles are played by chamber temperature and chamber pressure. A maximum performance of 930 sec is projected at 2700 K, and of 1030 at 3100 K.

  13. A Study of Online Exams Procrastination Using Data Analytics Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Yair; Ramim, Michelle M.

    2012-01-01

    Procrastination appears to be an inevitable part of daily life, especially for activities that are bounded by deadlines. It has implications for performance and is known to be linked to poor personal time management. Although research related to procrastination as a general behavior has been well established, studies assessing procrastination in…

  14. QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN: LOVE CANAL STUDY. APPENDIX B. ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The four volumes in this set comprise the working guideline documents for the Love Canal Study. The documents were developed to direct both the prime contractor and subcontractors while performing for the Environmental Protection Agency. Detailed procedures for each analysis type...

  15. A Factor Analytic Study of Children's Picture Interpretation Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Leslie C.

    1978-01-01

    This study focused on the psychological process involved in drawing inferences from pictures. Nineteen reference tests and two tests of picture interpretation behavior were administered to a random sample of 95 children aged 10-12: the Production of Inference Tests (PIT) and the Discovery of Similarities Test (DST). (JEG)

  16. Assessing Vocal Performances Using Analytical Assessment: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gynnild, Vidar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated ways to improve the appraisal of vocal performances within a national academy of music. Since a criterion-based assessment framework had already been adopted, the conceptual foundation of an assessment rubric was used as a guide in an action research project. The group of teachers involved wanted to explore thinking…

  17. Well-Being and Time: A Factor Analytic Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehrke, Milton F.; And Others

    While scales assessing psychological well-being have been used both as criterion measures and as variables of interest in their own right, there has been little attempt to deal with the issue of the time-boundedness of perceived well-being. A study was undertaken to examine the combined factor structure of two measures of well-being, the…

  18. Analytical studies of new airfoils for wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Calhoun, J. T.

    1981-01-01

    Computer studies were conducted to analyze the potential gains associated with utilizing new airfoils for large wind turbine rotor blades. Attempts to include 3-dimensional stalling effects were inconclusive. It is recommended that blade pressure measurements be made to clarify the nature of blade stalling. It is also recommended that new laminar flow airfoils be used as rotor blade sections.

  19. Children's Content Interest--A Factor Analytic Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Joan T.

    Recognizing that interest is essential to motivation, this study was designed both to identify and describe the content interest patterns and media preferences (print and television) of middle-grade children and to determine any relationship between these interests and sex, race, or socioeconomic status (SES). An inventory was administered to 250…

  20. Error sources in deferred heterodyne moire deflectometry - An analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stricker, Josef

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the aperture size and shape of the photodetector and of the structure of the grating lines on the performance of deferred electronic heterodyne moire deflectometry are studied. It is shown that scanning of a moire fringe pattern parallel to an unshifted fringe yields periodical variations in the heterodyne phase and amplitude, which cause severe errors in the measurements.

  1. Analytical and micromagnetic study of a Néel domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivkin, K.; Romanov, K.; Abanov, Ar.; Adamov, Y.; Saslow, W. M.

    2008-06-01

    For ferromagnets with exchange, dipolar interaction, and uniaxial anisotropy, by both analytic methods and micromagnetic simulations we study Néel domain walls in thin ferromagnetic strips of finite width. Comparison of the numerical results with the analytics yields parameter values that had been unspecified by the analytics, and determines the modifications needed to describe the magnetization both near the strip center and near the boundaries. With no uniaxial anisotropy, the domain wall center can be described by the same hyperbolic secant form as with uniaxial anisotropy, but the effective anisotropy constant must now be thought of as increasing with increasing film thickness and decreasing with increasing film width.

  2. Analytical, Experimental, and Modelling Studies of Lunar and Terrestrial Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of our research has been to understand the paths and the processes of planetary evolution that produced planetary surface materials as we find them. Most of our work has been on lunar materials and processes. We have done studies that obtain geological knowledge from detailed examination of regolith materials and we have reported implications for future sample-collecting and on-surface robotic sensing missions. Our approach has been to study a suite of materials that we have chosen in order to answer specific geologic questions. We continue this work under NAG5-4172. The foundation of our work has been the study of materials with precise chemical and petrographic analyses, emphasizing analysis for trace chemical elements. We have used quantitative models as tests to account for the chemical compositions and mineralogical properties of the materials in terms of regolith processes and igneous processes. We have done experiments as needed to provide values for geochemical parameters used in the models. Our models take explicitly into account the physical as well as the chemical processes that produced or modified the materials. Our approach to planetary geoscience owes much to our experience in terrestrial geoscience, where samples can be collected in field context and sampling sites revisited if necessary. Through studies of terrestrial analog materials, we have tested our ideas about the origins of lunar materials. We have been mainly concerned with the materials of the lunar highland regolith, their properties, their modes of origin, their provenance, and how to extrapolate from their characteristics to learn about the origin and evolution of the Moon's early igneous crust. From this work a modified model for the Moon's structure and evolution is emerging, one of globally asymmetric differentiation of the crust and mantle to produce a crust consisting mainly of ferroan and magnesian igneous rocks containing on average 70-80% plagioclase, with a large

  3. Experimental and Analytic Studies of an RF Load Resistor

    SciTech Connect

    Borovina, D.L.; Humphries, S.; Gahl, J.M.; Rees, D.

    1999-03-29

    The pulsed output of an 850-MHz klystron was directed into a load assembly containing a water-cooled, 50-ohm resistor. The load was systematically subjected to high peak-power pulses from the klystron. Several thin-film resistors were tested and exhibited various damage patterns for different combinations of peak microwave power (33 kW - 500 kW) and heat input. In order to better understand the phenomena observed, the electromagnetic field distribution inside the resistor housing was studied with WaveSim, a two-dimensional, finite-element scattering code. The conformal mesh of the program allowed accurate representations of the complex assembly geometry.

  4. Experimental and Analytical Studies for a Computational Materials Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.

    1999-01-01

    The studies supported by Grant NAG1-1780 were directed at providing physical data on polymer behavior that would form the basis for computationally modeling these types of materials. Because of ongoing work in polymer characterization this grant supported part of a larger picture in this regard. Efforts went into two combined areas of their time dependent mechanical response characteristics: Creep properties on the one hand, subject to different volumetric changes (nonlinearly viscoelastic behavior) and time or frequency dependence of dilatational material behavior. The details of these endeavors are outlined sufficiently in the two appended publications, so that no further description of the effort is necessary.

  5. Data Analytics Under Deployed Conditions: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Mark D; Bonica, Mark J; Mapes, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Like their colleagues in fixed facilities, healthcare planners operating in a combat environment face the problem of transforming data into actionable information. Not all data is useful for decision-making and not all data comes neatly packaged. In this case study, the authors present an effort to collect and analyze data about forward surgical team utilization. The article shares the variety of data collected and the process of analysis, and concludes with a recommended process for data analysis in the field. PMID:26606410

  6. Noise characteristics of upper surface blown configurations: Analytical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, N. N.; Tibbetts, J. G.; Pennock, A. P.; Tam, C. K. W.

    1978-01-01

    Noise and flow results of upper surface blown configurations were analyzed. The dominant noise source mechanisms were identified from experimental data. From far-field noise data for various geometric and operational parameters, an empirical noise prediction program was developed and evaluated by comparing predicted results with experimental data from other tests. USB aircraft compatibility studies were conducted using the described noise prediction and a cruise performance data base. A final design aircraft was selected and theory was developed for the noise from the trailing edge wake assuming it as a highly sheared layer.

  7. An analytical study for the design of advanced rotor airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical study has been conducted to design and evaluate two airfoils for helicopter rotors. The best basic shape, designed with a transonic hodograph design method, was modified to meet subsonic criteria. One airfoil had an additional constraint for low pitching-moment at the transonic design point. Airfoil characteristics were predicted. Results of a comparative analysis of helicopter performance indicate that the new airfoils will produce reduced rotor power requirements compared to the NACA 0012. The hodograph design method, written in CDC Algol, is listed and described.

  8. Analytical studies of the Alexandrovo Thracian tomb wall paintings.

    PubMed

    Glavcheva, Z; Yancheva, D; Velcheva, E; Stamboliyska, B; Petrova, N; Petkova, V; Lalev, G; Todorov, V

    2016-01-01

    A profound study of samples obtained from Thracian tomb wall paintings at Alexandrovo, Bulgaria (dating back to the fourth century BC) were carried out by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FTIR), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The current work provides a glimpse of the ingenious construction and painting techniques used in Thracian tomb at Alexandrovo. The results suggest that beeswax was used as a paint binder and also revealed presence of various nano-materials. PMID:25701135

  9. Discourse analytic study of counseling sessions in stroke physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Talvitie, Ulla; Pyöriä, Outi

    2006-01-01

    Studies on the interaction between physiotherapists and patients during treatment sessions have found low levels of communicative participation by patients and lack of direct influence by patients on the content of their treatment. This article reports the results of 7 counseling sessions in which physiotherapists and patients with stroke and their caregivers discussed the patients' postural control and balance, which had been tested and videotaped at different stages of the rehabilitation process. The physiotherapists' discourses relating to the videotaped test performances were either brief comments on the patient's performance or critical appraisals with references to difficulties encountered during performance. Performances of the easier tasks were treated by the physiotherapists with rhetorical questions. The second type of discourse consisted of the physiotherapists directing the patients' attention to their problems, and of the patients' and caregivers' initiatives leading to conversation about the patients' problems. The patients understood the significance of the test performance for their life at home in varying ways. The results of this study showed that successful counseling calls for physiotherapists to develop dialogic communication skills to help patients in coconstructing their home exercise together with their social network. PMID:16965256

  10. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  11. Analytical study of pressure balancing in gas film seals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1973-01-01

    Proper pressure balancing of gas film seals requires knowledge of the pressure profile load factor (load factor) values for a given set of design conditions. In this study, the load factor is investigated for subsonic and choked flow conditions, laminar and turbulent flows, and various seal entrance conditions. Both parallel sealing surfaces and surfaces with small linear deformation were investigated. The load factor for subsonic flow depends strongly on pressure ratio; under choked flow conditions, however, the load factor is found to depend more strongly on film thickness and flow entrance conditions rather than pressure ratio. The importance of generating hydrodynamic forces to keep the seal balanced under severe and multipoint operation is also discussed.

  12. Photocatalytic degradation of rosuvastatin: analytical studies and toxicity evaluations.

    PubMed

    Machado, Tiele Caprioli; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara; Arenzon, Alexandre; Segalin, Jeferson; Lansarin, Marla Azário

    2015-01-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of rosuvastatin, which is a drug that has been used to reduce blood cholesterol levels, was studied in this work employing ZnO as catalyst. The experiments were carried out in a temperature-controlled batch reactor that was irradiated with UV light. Preliminary the effects of the photocatalyst loading, the initial pH and the initial rosuvastatin concentration were evaluated. The experimental results showed that rosuvastatin degradation is primarily a photocatalytic process, with pseudo-first order kinetics. The byproducts that were generated during the oxidative process were identified using nano-ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nano-UPLC-MS/MS) and acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna were done to evaluate the toxicity of the untreated rosuvastatin solution and the reactor effluent. PMID:25300021

  13. An analytical and numerical study of axisymmetric flow around spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chien-Cheng; Liou, Biing-Horng; Chern, Ruey-Ling

    1992-01-01

    Axisymmetric viscous flow around ellipsoids of circular section is examined in detail using a matched asymptotic analysis and a deterministic hybrid vortex method. The hybrid vortex method solves the viscous vorticity equation by combining a finite-difference method for diffusion and a vortex-in-cell method for convection and stretching. The numerical study was carried out for an ellipsoid of axis ratio 2:1 and the limiting case of a sphere at Reynolds numbers between 100 and 3000. Particular attention is given to evaluation of the drag coefficient using three different approaches. Numerical and asymptotic results at small times are found to be in good agreement. Separation angles, wake lengths, and stationary drag coefficients for the sphere are also in good agreement with previous results obtained by a finite-difference method and with the standard drag curve.

  14. Analytical and physicochemical studies of non-electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, C.J.

    1982-08-01

    High-precision gas-liquid chromatographic studies of N,N-dibutyl-2-ethylhexylamide (DBEHA), n-hexadecyl iodide, and 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (PCB) were carried out on the neat form and dissolved in n-hexadecane, n-octadecane, and tetra-n-butyltin. The microscopic partition hypothesis did not describe the behavior of these solvent mixtures. Conventional solutions theories failed to describe the experimental data derived from the DBEHA (haloalkane solutes) and nematic-phase PCB solvent systems. Complexation studies of N,N-dialkylamides (N,N-dimethyl formamide, N,N-dimethyl acetamide, and N,N-dimethyl thioformamide) by NMR showed that mixtures of these species with C/sub 6/H/sub 6/ or CCl/sub 4/ could not be described by simple equations. The window diagram strategy was successful for several solvents with packed columns of mixed-bed stationary phases. For intimate mixtures of phases (packed columns and glass-capillary columns), highly-ordered liquid crystals (nematic as well as isotropic regions) gave relative retentions for inert solutes (e.g., alkanes) different from highly-polarizable solutes (e.g., aromatics). Relative retentions with mixtures of solvents other than liquid crystals, in contrast, are expected to be predictable for purposes of application of the window diagram strategy. Replication of solute retentions with mixed-bed packed columns as well as with a capillary column containing an in-situ polymerized stationary phase were found to conform nearly exactly to one equation and its variants. 44 figures, 84 tables.

  15. Synthesis of feedback control law for stabilization of chaotic system oscillations by means of analytic programming - Preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkerik, Roman; Oplatkova, Zuzana; Zelinka, Ivan; Davendra, Donald; Jasek, Roman

    2012-11-01

    This research deals with a synthesis of control law for selected discrete chaotic system - logistic equation by means of analytic programming. The novelty of the approach is that a tool for symbolic regression - analytic programming - is used for the purpose of stabilization of higher periodic orbits - oscillations between several values of chaotic system. The paper consists of the descriptions of analytic programming as well as used chaotic system and detailed proposal of cost function used in optimization process. For experimentation, Self-Organizing Migrating Algorithm (SOMA) with analytic programming and Differential evolution (DE) as second algorithm for meta-evolution were used.

  16. Computational and analytical studies of magnetization switching in iron nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Sam Hill

    In this dissertation we study the behavior of several computational models of a magnetic nanopillar. We first compare the effect that coarse-graining the computational lattice has on the magnetization switching for three degrees of discretization. Bimodal switching-time distributions are found for all three models, however the underlying mechanism is different for each one. In the lowest-resolution, single-spin model, a bimodal distribution is the result of spin precession which sometimes crosses the threshold defining a switching event early or in the next precession period, depending on thermal fluctuations. For the medium-resolution, stack-of-spins model, the presence of either one or two propagating domain walls during the switching event determines the total switching time, leading to the observed bimodal distribution. The most realistic model, which employs a high-resolution computational lattice, permits multiple switching paths, some of which are characterized by their visitation to a metastable free-energy well and consequently longer lifetimes. It is also notable that the medium-resolution model exhibits reentrant behavior for reversal fields that are applied close to the easy axis. The highest-resolution model is studied in detail, due to its complexity, which precludes a simple description of the mechanism resulting in bimodal switching-time behavior. Phase-space portraits of components of the total energy indicate that the metastable free-energy basin is circumvented for short-lived trials. Sufficient statistics are gathered to allow Markov matrices describing the average behavior of each mode to be investigated. Eigenvectors of these matrices provide estimates of the probability distribution of the largest transient for each mode in the energy space, while the projective dynamics technique identifies the location of the free-energy saddle point. The hypothesis that the visitation of the metastable well underlies the bimodal behavior is further

  17. [Analytical study and physiological consequences of a model of respiration].

    PubMed

    Guillez, A

    1979-01-01

    The author, starting from the pattern established by Brocas and Cherruault (1973), develops new equations by considering the dynamics of breathing. He distinguishes space without exhanges, called 'blower' and space with exchanges, called 'exchanger'. The equations are studied and explicit solutions are found by an original method. The necessity for a neutral gas is proved. The author develops periodic functions for ventilation, for gas pressures in the air and in the blood and control functions such as differences of pressure between aerial- and blood-dissolved gas at the bottom of the alveola, consumption of O2 and excretion of CO2 and remaining CO2 in blood. The control functions oscillate around zero for the differences and around constants for the others. Examining the effects of frequency of breathing, blood flow, variations of transerval diffusivities, atmospheric pressure, variation of the dimensions connected with fever, infections, altitude and depth, sclerosis and even emotions, he again determines the pathologies, their auscultation symptoms and other aspects. PMID:478687

  18. Analytical study of nozzle performance for nuclear thermal rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear propulsion has been identified as one of the key technologies needed for human exploration of the Moon and Mars. The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) uses a nuclear reactor to heat hydrogen to a high temperature followed by expansion through a conventional convergent-divergent nozzle. A parametric study of NTR nozzles was performed using the Rocket Engine Design Expert System (REDES) at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The REDES used the JANNAF standard rigorous methodology to determine nozzle performance over a range of chamber temperatures, chamber pressures, thrust levels, and different nozzle configurations. A design condition was set by fixing the propulsion system exit radius at five meters and throat radius was varied to achieve a target thrust level. An adiabatic wall was assumed for the nozzle, and its length was assumed to be 80 percent of a 15 degree cone. The results conclude that although the performance of the NTR, based on infinite reaction rates, looks promising at low chamber pressures, finite rate chemical reactions will cause the actual performance to be considerably lower. Parameters which have a major influence on the delivered specific impulse value include the chamber temperature and the chamber pressures in the high thrust domain. Other parameters, such as 2-D and boundary layer effects, kinetic rates, and number of nozzles, affect the deliverable performance of an NTR nozzle to a lesser degree. For a single nozzle, maximum performance of 930 seconds and 1030 seconds occur at chamber temperatures of 2700 and 3100 K, respectively.

  19. [Survey of voluntary tattooing (analytic study of 43 Navy recruits].

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, M; Penaud, F

    1975-05-01

    We report a new inquiry on 43 tattooed naval recrutees. Mean age: 19. Mean age at the time of the first tattooing: 16 1/2. Social and familial history shows frequent conflictual, divorced, separated parents; the father is often ill, old or missing. Most family have many children. Low socio-cultural and economical level is common. Forensic and pyschological history is already heavily rich. However tattooing and delinquency cannot be assimilated. As found in many other studies, most of the tattooed did not undergone this type of inquiry. Only particular tattooed are probably investigated, and comparative samples of non-tattooed are lacking most of the time. Tattooing indicate more social and psychological misery of the milieu during childhood of this adolescents than their own pathological problems. It is more sociopathy than psychopathy. The analysis of the tattooed drawings is provided. They are stereotyped and commonplace, and very similar to graffiti. Circumstances at the times of tattooing are described as their present attitude to their tattooing, specially the wish to remove their tattooed figures. Recent literature is reviewed. PMID:1233897

  20. Experimental and analytical studies of a true airspeed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G. L.; Shen, J. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A true airspeed sensor based on the precession of a vortex whistle for sensing airspeeds up to 321.9 km/hr (200 mph). In an attempt to model the complicated fluid mechanics of the vortex precession, three dimensional, inviscid, unsteady, incompressible fluid flow was studied by using the hydrodynamical linearized stability theory. The temporal stability approach was used to derive the relationship between the true airspeed and frequency response. The results show that the frequency response is linearly proportional to the airspeed. A computer program was developed to obtain the numerical solution. Computational results for various parameters were obtained. The designed sensor basically consisted of a vortex tube, a swirler, and a transducer system. A microphone converted the audible tone to an electronic frequency signal. Measurements for both the closed conduit tests and wind tunnel tests were recorded. For a specific flow rate or airspeed, larger exit swirler angles produced higher frequencies. For a smaller cross sectional area in the precessional flow region, the frequency was higher. It was observed that as the airspeed was increased the Strouhal number remained constant.

  1. An Analytical Study for Subsonic Oblique Wing Transport Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, E. S.; Honrath, J.; Tomlin, K. H.; Swift, G.; Shumpert, P.; Warnock, W.

    1976-01-01

    The oblique wing concept has been investigated for subsonic transport application for a cruise Mach number of 0.95. Three different mission applications were considered and the concept analyzed against the selected mission requirements. Configuration studies determined the best area of applicability to be a commercial passenger transport mission. The critical parameter for the oblique wing concept was found to be aspect ratio which was limited to a value of 6.0 due to aeroelastic divergence. Comparison of the concept final configuration was made with fixed winged configurations designed to cruise at Mach 0.85 and 0.95. The crossover Mach number for the oblique wing concept was found to be Mach 0.91 for takeoff gross weight and direct operating cost. Benefits include reduced takeoff distance, installed thrust and mission block fuel and improved community noise characteristics. The variable geometry feature enables the final configuration to increase range by 10% at Mach 0.712 and to increase endurance by as much as 44%.

  2. An Analytical Study of Mammalian Bite Wounds Requiring Inpatient Management

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Geun; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammalian bite injuries create a public health problem because of their frequency, potential severity, and increasing number. Some researchers have performed fragmentary analyses of bite wounds caused by certain mammalian species. However, little practical information is available concerning serious mammalian bite wounds that require hospitalization and intensive wound management. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to perform a general review of serious mammalian bite wounds. Methods We performed a retrospective review of the medical charts of 68 patients who were referred to our plastic surgery department for the treatment of bite wounds between January 2003 and October 2012. The cases were analyzed according to the species, patient demographics, environmental factors, injury characteristics, and clinical course. Results Among the 68 cases of mammalian bite injury, 58 (85%) were caused by dogs, 8 by humans, and 2 by cats. Most of those bitten by a human and both of those bitten by cats were male. Only one-third of all the patients were children or adolescents. The most frequent site of injury was the face, with 40 cases, followed by the hand, with 16 cases. Of the 68 patients, 7 were treated with secondary intention healing. Sixty-one patients underwent delayed procedures, including delayed direct closure, skin graft, composite graft, and local flap. Conclusions Based on overall findings from our review of the 68 cases of mammalian bites, we suggest practical guidelines for the management of mammalian bite injuries, which could be useful in the treatment of serious mammalian bite wounds. PMID:24286042

  3. An analytical study of reduced-gravity flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, R. D.; Kramer, J. L.; Zich, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Addition of surface tension forces to a marker-and-cell code and the performance of four incompressible fluid simulations in reduced gravity, were studied. This marker-and-cell code has a variable grid capability with arbitrary curved boundaries and time dependent acceleration fields. The surface tension logic includes a spline fit of surface marker particles as well as contact angle logic for straight and curved wall boundaries. Three types of flow motion were simulated with the improved code: impulsive settling in a model Centaur LH2 tank, continuous settling in a model and full scale Centaur LO2 tank and mixing in a Centaur LH2 tank. The impulsive settling case confirmed a drop tower analysis which indicated more orderly fluid collection flow patterns with this method providing a potential savings in settling propellants. In the LO2 tank, fluid collection and flow simulation into the thrust barrel were achieved. The mixing simulation produced good results indicating both the development of the flow field and fluid interface behavior.

  4. Study on the fast optimal direction determination for missile-borne star sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Kong, Long-tao; Xiong, Kai

    2013-12-01

    To ensure the accuracy and effectiveness of missile-borne star sensor for attitude determination, its optical axis direction must be adjusted in real time to avoid the stray light effectively and obtain star image with high-quality. In this paper, a fast optimal direction determination method that can be applied online in engineering is studied. Take the range of missile maneuver into consider, the proposed method solves the optimal direction of optical axis which can make star sensor obtain the best star image for star identification within the visible sky that avoids stray light. In the optical axis optimization model established, for a star sensor with given specification, the optimization indexes include the stars number and their mean magnitude of a star image obtained at a given direction, the control cost to reach the optimal direction from current status. The constraints include invisible sky, stray light etc. For such a complex nonlinear optimization problem without analytical solutions, the combination of enumeration method and table look-up method is employed to obtain solution rapidly for engineering applications. The stray light model is validated by comparing the simulation results with Satellite Tool Kit (STK). Simulation results show that the optimal direction determined by the proposed method can significantly improve the star image's quality and the optimization speed is fast enough to meet the requirement of online applications.

  5. Are empty methadone bottles empty? An analytic study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance treatment is the most widely prescribed treatment for opiate dependence with proven benefits for patients. In naïve users or in case of recreational misuse, methadone can be a source of potentially lethal intoxications, resulting in fatal overdoses. A few cases of infantile intoxications have been described in the literature, some of which resulted in death. Nowadays, more than 50,000 bottles are used every day in France, most of which are thrown away in the bin. Relatives at home, especially children, can have access to these empty bottles. This study aims to determine whether the residual quantity of methadone in the bottles is associated with a risk of intoxication for someone who has a low tolerance to opiates, such as a child. Methods The methadone dosage left in a sample of 175 bottles recapped after use by the patients taking their maintenance treatment in an addiction treatment program centre was analysed during a 2-week period in March 2013. Results The mean residual quantity of methadone left in each bottle after use is 1.9 ± 1.8 mg and 3.3 ± 2.4 mg in the sample of 60 mg bottles. Conclusions There is a potential danger of accidental overdose with empty bottles of methadone syrup, especially for children. To take into account this hazard, several harm reduction strategies can be proposed, such as favouring the taking of the treatment within the delivery centres rather than the ‘take home’ doses, asking methadone users to bring back their used bottles, and raising patients’ awareness of the intoxication risks and the necessary everyday precautions. For stable patients with take home methadone, the use of capsules could be considered. PMID:24990630

  6. A factor analytic study of midwives' attitudes to research.

    PubMed

    Hicks, C

    1995-03-01

    Midwives are increasingly being encouraged to undertake research activities at various levels, as a routine part of their job. However, despite topdown directives to this end, there is some evidence that relatively little research is published and reasons, such as lack of time, confidence and skill have been put forward to explain the short-fall. While these reasons may be valid obstacles, it is also conceivable that they are manifestations of a set of underlying attitudes to research in midwifery. If attitudes are assumed to be predictors of behaviour, then it may be relevant to study midwives' attitudes to research more closely in order to identify whether these are responsible in some measure for the short-fall in research output. To this end, a national survey of 397 midwives was undertaken to establish their attitudes to research. The results were subjected to factor analysis, using an orthogonal solution, in order to establish whether any coherent source components existed in the sample's attitude responses. The factor analysis yielded four coherent factors, which were (i) other health care professionals' views of the value of midwifery research; (ii) the value of research for midwifery practice; (iii) the research role of the midwife; (iv) midwives' competence to carry out research. On further analysis the first two factors were also found to be significantly related to midwives' likelihood of undertaking research and publishing research findings. These factors could form the basis for future attitude change and staff development and training programmes as a means by which midwifery research output could be increased. PMID:7731371

  7. Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Felix

    This study is concerned with direct conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy by subjecting pyroelectric materials to the Olsen cycle. The Olsen cycle consists of two isoelectric field and two isothermal process on the electric displacement versus electric field diagram. The energy and power generation capabilities of copolymer poly(vinylidene fluoridetrifluorethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] films and lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics were evaluated by executing the Olsen cycle via so-called "stamping experiments" and "dipping experiments". The stamping experiments consisted of alternatively pressing a pyroelectric material in thermal contact with hot and cold aluminum blocks under specified electric fields. It was performed to assess the pyroelectric energy conversion performance using heat conduction. The largest energy density generated in the stamping experiments was 155 J/L/cycle with 60/40 P(VDF-TrFE) thin film at 0.066 Hz between 25 and 110°C and electric fields cycled between 20 and 35 MV/m. This energy density exceeded the 130 J/L/cycle achieved by our previous prototypical device using oscillatory laminar convective heat transfer. However, the performance was limited by poor thermal contact between the aluminum blocks and pyroelectric material and also by excessive leakage current inherent to P(VDF-TrFE) at high temperatures and/or large electric fields. On the other hand, dipping experiments consisted of successively immersing a pyroelectric material into isothermal hot and cold thermal reservoirs at different temperatures while simultaneously cycling the electric fields. It was performed on relaxor ferroelectric x/65/35 PLZT ceramics with x between 5 and 10 mol.%. The operating temperature, applied electric field, sample thickness, cycle frequency, and electrode material were systematically varied to explore their respective effects on the energy and power densities produced. A maximum energy density

  8. Optimizing Classroom Acoustics Using Computer Model Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Rebecca; Bradley, John

    1998-01-01

    Investigates conditions relating to the maximum useful-to-detrimental sound ratios present in classrooms and determining the optimum conditions for speech intelligibility. Reveals that speech intelligibility is more strongly influenced by ambient noise levels and that the optimal location for sound absorbing material is on a classroom's upper…

  9. Nationwide Multicenter Reference Interval Study for 28 Common Biochemical Analytes in China

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Liangyu; Chen, Ming; Liu, Min; Tao, Zhihua; Li, Shijun; Wang, Liang; Cheng, Xinqi; Qin, Xuzhen; Han, Jianhua; Li, Pengchang; Hou, Li’an; Yu, Songlin; Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Qiu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A nationwide multicenter study was conducted in the China to explore sources of variation of reference values and establish reference intervals for 28 common biochemical analytes, as a part of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Committee on Reference Intervals and Decision Limits (IFCC/C-RIDL) global study on reference values. A total of 3148 apparently healthy volunteers were recruited in 6 cities covering a wide area in China. Blood samples were tested in 2 central laboratories using Beckman Coulter AU5800 chemistry analyzers. Certified reference materials and value-assigned serum panel were used for standardization of test results. Multiple regression analysis was performed to explore sources of variation. Need for partition of reference intervals was evaluated based on 3-level nested ANOVA. After secondary exclusion using the latent abnormal values exclusion method, reference intervals were derived by a parametric method using the modified Box–Cox formula. Test results of 20 analytes were made traceable to reference measurement procedures. By the ANOVA, significant sex-related and age-related differences were observed in 12 and 12 analytes, respectively. A small regional difference was observed in the results for albumin, glucose, and sodium. Multiple regression analysis revealed BMI-related changes in results of 9 analytes for man and 6 for woman. Reference intervals of 28 analytes were computed with 17 analytes partitioned by sex and/or age. In conclusion, reference intervals of 28 common chemistry analytes applicable to Chinese Han population were established by use of the latest methodology. Reference intervals of 20 analytes traceable to reference measurement procedures can be used as common reference intervals, whereas others can be used as the assay system-specific reference intervals in China. PMID:26945390

  10. Analytical study of the inside-out Gimbal dynamics. Volume 1: Analytical study of inside-out/coincident Gimbal dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybak, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    The performance capabilities and limitations of the instrument pointing system (IPS) are described. Suggestions of design modifications that result in overall improved IPS performance are included. Since the design and configuration of the IPS was modified a portion of the study was performed with the inside-out Gimbal configuration which was updated to the present coincident Gimbal system configuration. Due to the similarity of the two systems, the results obtained for the inside-out Gimbal also apply to the coincident Gimbal system.

  11. Chemometric study of the influence of instrumental parameters on ESI-MS analyte response using full factorial design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raji, M. A.; Schug, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Full factorial experimental design technique was used to study the main effects and the interaction effects between instrumental parameters in two mass spectrometers equipped with conventional electrospray ion sources (Thermo LCQ Deca XP and Shimadzu LCMS 2010). Four major parameters (spray voltage, ion transfer capillary temperature, ion transfer capillary voltage, and tube lens voltage) were investigated in both instruments for their contribution to analyte response, leading to a total of 16 experiments performed for each instrument. Significant parameters were identified by plotting the cumulative probability of each treatment against the estimated effects in normal plots. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to evaluate the statistical significance of the effects of the parameters on ESI-MS analyte response. The results reveal a number of important interactions in addition to the main effects for each instrument. In all the experiments performed, the tube lens voltage (or Q-array dc voltage in LCMS 2010) was found to have significant effects on analyte response in both instruments. The tube lens voltage was also found to interact with the capillary temperature in the case of the LCQ Deca XP and with the spray voltage in the case of the LCMS 2010. The results of these experiments provide important considerations in the instrumental optimization of ionization response for ESI-MS analysis.

  12. Perspectives on Using Video Recordings in Conversation Analytical Studies on Learning in Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusk, Fredrik; Pörn, Michaela; Sahlström, Fritjof; Slotte-Lüttge, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Video is currently used in many studies to document the interaction in conversation analytical (CA) studies on learning. The discussion on the method used in these studies has primarily focused on the analysis or the data construction, whereas the relation between data construction and analysis is rarely brought to attention. The aim of this…

  13. Publication Bias in Studies of an Applied Behavior-Analytic Intervention: An Initial Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sham, Elyssa; Smith, Tristram

    2014-01-01

    Publication bias arises when studies with favorable results are more likely to be reported than are studies with null findings. If this bias occurs in studies with single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) on applied behavior-analytic (ABA) interventions, it could lead to exaggerated estimates of intervention effects. Therefore, we conducted an…

  14. Optical microscopy as a comparative analytical technique for single-particle dissolution studies.

    PubMed

    Svanbäck, Sami; Ehlers, Henrik; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2014-07-20

    Novel, simple and cost effective methods are needed to replace advanced chemical analytical techniques, in small-scale dissolution studies. Optical microscopy of individual particles could provide such a method. The aim of the present work was to investigate and verify the applicability of optical microscopy as an analytical technique for drug dissolution studies. The evaluation was performed by comparing image and chemical analysis data of individual dissolving particles. It was shown that the data obtained by image analysis and UV-spectrophotometry produced practically identical dissolution curves, with average similarity and difference factors above 82 and below 4, respectively. The relative standard deviation for image analysis data, of the studied particle size range, varied between 1.9% and 3.8%. Consequently, it is proposed that image analysis can be used, on its own, as a viable analytical technique in single-particle dissolution studies. The possibility for significant reductions in sample preparation, operational cost, time and substance consumption gives optical detection a clear advantage over chemical analytical methods. Thus, image analysis could be an ideal and universal analytical technique for rapid small-scale dissolution studies. PMID:24751345

  15. Design and analysis of multilevel analytic studies with applications to a study of air pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Navidi, W; Thomas, D; Stram, D; Peters, J

    1994-01-01

    We discuss a hybrid epidemiologic design that aims to combine two approaches to studying exposure-disease associations. The analytic approach is based on comparisons between individuals, e.g., case-control and cohort studies, and the ecologic approach is based on comparisons between groups. The analytic approach generally provides a stronger basis for inference, in part because of freedom from between-group confounding and better quality data, but the ecologic approach is less susceptible to attenuation bias from measurement error and may provide greater variability in exposure. The design we propose entails selection of a number of groups and enrollment of individuals within each group. Exposures, outcomes, confounders, and modifiers would be assessed on each individual; but additional exposure data might be available on the groups. The analysis would then combine the individual-level and the group-level comparisons, with appropriate adjustments for exposure measurement errors, and would test for compatibility between the two levels of analysis, e.g., to determine whether the associations at the individual level can account for the differences in disease rates between groups. Trade-offs between numbers of groups, numbers of individuals, and the extent of the individual and group measurement protocols are discussed in terms of design efficiency. These issues are illustrated in the context of an on-going study of the health effects of air pollution in southern California, in which 12 communities with different levels and types of pollution have been selected and 3500 school children are being enrolled in a ten-year cohort study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7851327

  16. An object-oriented toolbox for studying optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, H. Lydia; Gouveia, Wences; Scales, John

    The CWP Object-Oriented Optimization Library (COOOL) is a collection of C++ classes for studying and solving optimization problems. It was developed using the freely available GNU compiler gcc. The library contains the basic building blocks for the efficient design of numerical linear algebra and optimization software; it also comes with a variety of unconstrained optimization algorithms and test objective functions drawn from our own research. The only requirement for using one of the optimization methods is that a simple model of communication be followed. This allows us to use exactly the same code to optimize functions tailored for a variety of hardware, no matter what programming language is used. Further, since we have provided class libraries containing building blocks for general purpose optimization and numerical linear algebra software, the development of new algorithms should be greatly aided. COOOL is now freely available via anonymous ftp at

  17. An analytical and experimental study of crack extension in center-notched composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, Jack L., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    The normal stress ratio theory for crack extension in anisotropic materials is studied analytically and experimentally. The theory is applied within a microscopic-level analysis of a single center notch of arbitrary orientation in a unidirectional composite material. The bulk of the analytical work of this study applies an elasticity solution for an infinite plate with a center line to obtain critical stress and crack growth direction predictions. An elasticity solution for an infinite plate with a center elliptical flaw is also used to obtain qualitative predictions of the location of crack initiation on the border of a rounded notch tip. The analytical portion of the study includes the formulation of a new crack growth theory that includes local shear stress. Normal stress ratio theory predictions are obtained for notched unidirectional tensile coupons and unidirectional Iosipescu shear specimens. These predictions are subsequently compared to experimental results.

  18. Analytic design method for optimal imaging: coupling three ray sets using two free-form lens profiles.

    PubMed

    Duerr, Fabian; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C; Meuret, Youri; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-02-27

    In this work, a new two-dimensional optics design method is proposed that enables the coupling of three ray sets with two lens surfaces. The method is especially important for optical systems designed for wide field of view and with clearly separated optical surfaces. Fermat's principle is used to deduce a set of functional differential equations fully describing the entire optical system. The presented general analytic solution makes it possible to calculate the lens profiles. Ray tracing results for calculated 15th order Taylor polynomials describing the lens profiles demonstrate excellent imaging performance and the versatility of this new analytic design method. PMID:22418364

  19. Analytical performance of a low-gas-flow torch optimized for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montaser, A.; Huse, G.R.; Wax, R.A.; Chan, S.-K.; Golightly, D.W.; Kane, J.S.; Dorrzapf, A.F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An inductively coupled Ar plasma (ICP), generated in a lowflow torch, was investigated by the simplex optimization technique for simultaneous, multielement, atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The variables studied included forward power, observation height, gas flow (outer, intermediate, and nebulizer carrier) and sample uptake rate. When the ICP was operated at 720-W forward power with a total gas flow of 5 L/min, the signal-to-background ratios (S/B) of spectral lines from 20 elements were either comparable or inferior, by a factor ranging from 1.5 to 2, to the results obtained from a conventional Ar ICP. Matrix effect studies on the Ca-PO4 system revealed that the plasma generated in the low-flow torch was as free of vaporizatton-atomizatton interferences as the conventional ICP, but easily ionizable elements produced a greater level of suppression or enhancement effects which could be reduced at higher forward powers. Electron number densities, as determined via the series until line merging technique, were tower ht the plasma sustained in the low-flow torch as compared with the conventional ICP. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  20. A Monte-Carlo Study of Confirmatory Factor Analytic Tests of Measurement Equivalence/Invariance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Adam W.; Lautenschlager, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) techniques have become the most common method of testing for measurement equivalence/invariance (ME/I). However, no study has simulated data with known differences to determine how well these CFA techniques perform. This study utilizes data with a variety of known simulated differences in factor…

  1. The Effect of Brain Based Learning on Academic Achievement: A Meta-Analytical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gozuyesil, Eda; Dikici, Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    This study's aim is to measure the effect sizes of the quantitative studies that examined the effectiveness of brain-based learning on students' academic achievement and to examine with the meta-analytical method if there is a significant difference in effect in terms of the factors of education level, subject matter, sampling size, and…

  2. Analytical Study of High Concentration PCB Paint at the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, N.J.

    1998-10-21

    This report provides results of an analytical study of high concentration PCB paint in a shutdown nuclear test reactor located at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The study was designed to obtain data relevant for an evaluation of potential hazards associated with the use of and exposure to such paints.

  3. A Factor Analytic Study of the Quay-Peterson Scale with Mentally Retarded Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A factor analytic study of the Behavior Problem Checklist was conducted on 259 mildly and moderately retarded (MR) adolescents and 306 non-handicapped adolescents. Results were generally in line with previous studies of normal learners. For MR Ss, factors included conduct problems, attention deficit disorders, socialized delinquency, personality…

  4. Laser scribe optimization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wannamaker, A.L.

    1996-09-01

    The laser scribe characterization/optimization project was initiated to better understand what factors influence response variables of the laser marking process. The laser marking system is utilized to indelibly identify weapon system components. Many components have limited field life, and traceability to production origin is critical. In many cases, the reliability of the weapon system and the safety of the users can be attributed to individual and subassembly component fabrication processes. Laser beam penetration of the substrate material may affect product function. The design agency for the DOE had requested that Federal Manufacturing and Technologies characterize the laser marking process and implement controls on critical process parameters.

  5. Aeroelastic Optimization Study Based on X-56A Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2014-01-01

    A design process which incorporates the object-oriented multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool and the aeroelastic effects of high fidelity finite element models to characterize the design space was successfully developed and established. Two multidisciplinary design optimization studies using an object-oriented MDAO tool developed at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center were presented. The first study demonstrates the use of aeroelastic tailoring concepts to minimize the structural weight while meeting the design requirements including strength, buckling, and flutter. A hybrid and discretization optimization approach was implemented to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of a global optimization algorithm. The second study presents a flutter mass balancing optimization study. The results provide guidance to modify the fabricated flexible wing design and move the design flutter speeds back into the flight envelope so that the original objective of X-56A flight test can be accomplished.

  6. A KBE-enabled design framework for cost/weight optimization study of aircraft composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; La Rocca, G.; van Tooren, M. J. L.

    2014-10-01

    Traditionally, minimum weight is the objective when optimizing airframe structures. This optimization, however, does not consider the manufacturing cost which actually determines the profit of the airframe manufacturer. To this purpose, a design framework has been developed able to perform cost/weight multi-objective optimization of an aircraft component, including large topology variations of the structural configuration. The key element of the proposed framework is a dedicated knowledge based engineering (KBE) application, called multi-model generator, which enables modelling very different product configurations and variants and extract all data required to feed the weight and cost estimation modules, in a fully automated fashion. The weight estimation method developed in this research work uses Finite Element Analysis to calculate the internal stresses of the structural elements and an analytical composite plate sizing method to determine their minimum required thicknesses. The manufacturing cost estimation module was developed on the basis of a cost model available in literature. The capability of the framework was successfully demonstrated by designing and optimizing the composite structure of a business jet rudder. The study case indicates the design framework is able to find the Pareto optimal set for minimum structural weight and manufacturing costin a very quick way. Based on the Pareto set, the rudder manufacturer is in conditions to conduct both internal trade-off studies between minimum weight and minimum cost solutions, as well as to offer the OEM a full set of optimized options to choose, rather than one feasible design.

  7. Micro-focused ultrasonic solid-liquid extraction (muFUSLE) combined with HPLC and fluorescence detection for PAHs determination in sediments: optimization and linking with the analytical minimalism concept.

    PubMed

    Capelo, J L; Galesio, M M; Felisberto, G M; Vaz, C; Pessoa, J Costa

    2005-06-15

    Analytical minimalism is a concept that deals with the optimization of all stages of an analytical procedure so that it becomes less time, cost, sample, reagent and energy consuming. The guide-lines provided in the USEPA extraction method 3550B recommend the use of focused ultrasound (FU), i.e., probe sonication, for the solid-liquid extraction of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, PAHs, but ignore the principle of analytical minimalism. The problems related with the dead sonication zones, often present when high volumes are sonicated with probe, are also not addressed. In this work, we demonstrate that successful extraction and quantification of PAHs from sediments can be done with low sample mass (0.125g), low reagent volume (4ml), short sonication time (3min) and low sonication amplitude (40%). Two variables are here particularly taken into account for total extraction: (i) the design of the extraction vessel and (ii) the solvent used to carry out the extraction. Results showed PAHs recoveries (EPA priority list) ranged between 77 and 101%, accounting for more than 95% for most of the PAHs here studied, as compared with the values obtained after soxhlet extraction. Taking into account the results reported in this work we recommend a revision of the EPA guidelines for PAHs extraction from solid matrices with focused ultrasound, so that these match the analytical minimalism concept. PMID:18970118

  8. Tomographic images of breast tissues obtained by Compton scattering: An analytical computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M. E.; Brunetti, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we studied by analytical simulation the potential of a Compton scatter technique for breast imaging application. A Compton scattering tomography system was computationally simulated in order to provide the projection data (scattering signal) for the image reconstructions. The simulated projections generated by the analytical proposed method were validated through comparison with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. Electron density images were obtained from the scattering signal using a reconstruction algorithm implemented for the system geometry. Finally, the quality of the reconstructed images was evaluated for different sample sizes, beam energies, and tissue compositions (glandularities).

  9. Accurate semi analytical model of an optical fiber having Kerr nonlinearity using a robust nonlinear unconstrained optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RoyChoudhury, Raja; RoyChoudhury, Arundhati

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a semi analytical formulation of modal properties of a non linear optical fiber having Kerr non linearity with a three parameter approximation of fundamental modal field. The minimization of core parameter ( U) which involves Kerr nonlinearity through the non-stationary expression of propagation constant, is carried out by Nelder-Mead Simplex method of non linear unconstrained minimization, suitable for problems with non-smooth functions as the method does not require any derivative information. Use of three parameters in modal approximation and implementation of Simplex methods enables our semi analytical description to be an alternative way having less computational burden for calculation of modal parameters than full numerical methods.

  10. An Analytical Approach to Study Educational Inequalities: 10 Hypothesis Tests in PIRLS 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caro, Daniel H.; Lenkeit, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    The paper draws on the work of Willms [2006. "Learning divides: Ten policy questions about the performance and equity of schools and schooling systems." Montreal: UNESCO Institute for Statistics] to present an analytical approach to the study of academic achievement disparities related to family socioeconomic status. The approach is illustrated by…

  11. Do Premarital Education Programs Really Work? A Meta-Analytic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawcett, Elizabeth B.; Hawkins, Alan J.; Blanchard, Victoria L.; Carroll, Jason S.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies (J. S. Carroll & W. J. Doherty, 2003) have asserted that premarital education programs have a positive effect on program participants. Using meta-analytic methods of current best practices to look across the entire body of published and unpublished evaluation research on premarital education, we found a more complex pattern of…

  12. A Factor Analytic Study of the Demographic Characteristics of Incarcerated Male and Female Juvenile Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckel, Robert V.; Mandell, Elizabeth

    1981-01-01

    A factor analytic study of the behavioral and demographic variables that describe male and female juvenile offenders in a southern correctional facility identified 10 factors for females and six for males. Items clustered much as anticipated for both groups, with family conflicts and individual neurotic traits forming clusters. (Author)

  13. The Effects of Incentives on Workplace Performance: A Meta-Analytic Review of Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condly, Steven J.; Clark, Richard E.; Stolovitch, Harold D.

    2003-01-01

    A meta-analytic review of all adequately designed field and laboratory research on the use of incentives to motivate performance is reported. Of approximately 600 studies, 45 qualified. The overall average effect of all incentive programs in all work settings and on all work tasks was a 22% gain in performance. Team-directed incentives had a…

  14. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--PESTICIDES IN DERMAL WIPES ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Dermal Wipes data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 3 pesticides in 177 dermal wipe samples over 177 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household during Stage III of the NHEXAS study. The Derma...

  15. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--METALS IN DERMAL WIPES ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Dermal Wipes data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 metals in 179 dermal wipe samples over 179 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household during Stage III of the NHEXAS study. The sampling per...

  16. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN FOOD ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 1,250 food samples. Dietary samples were collected by study participants who agreed to collect these on four consecutive days using a duplicate diet methodology. This method involves preparing or obtaining du...

  17. Experimental and analytical studies for the NASA carbon fiber risk assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Various experimental and analytical studies performed for the NASA carbon fiber risk assessment program are described with emphasis on carbon fiber characteristics, sensitivity of electrical equipment and components to shorting or arcing by carbon fibers, attenuation effect of carbon fibers on aircraft landing aids, impact of carbon fibers on industrial facilities. A simple method of estimating damage from airborne carbon fibers is presented.

  18. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--METALS IN URINE ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Urine data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 6 metals in 176 urine samples over 176 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household during Stage III of the NHEXAS study. The sample consists of the fir...

  19. Developing a Model and Applications for Probabilities of Student Success: A Case Study of Predictive Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Carol Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This case study relates to distance learning students on open access courses. It demonstrates the use of predictive analytics to generate a model of the probabilities of success and retention at different points, or milestones, in a student journey. A core set of explanatory variables has been established and their varying relative importance at…

  20. Pre-analytical errors management in the clinical laboratory: a five-year study

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Marín, Angeles; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Pérez-Hidalgo, Maria del Mar; Molina-Mendoza, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study describes quality indicators for the pre-analytical process, grouping errors according to patient risk as critical or major, and assesses their evaluation over a five-year period. Materials and methods: A descriptive study was made of the temporal evolution of quality indicators, with a study population of 751,441 analytical requests made during the period 2007–2011. The Runs Test for randomness was calculated to assess changes in the trend of the series, and the degree of control over the process was estimated by the Six Sigma scale. Results: The overall rate of critical pre-analytical errors was 0.047%, with a Six Sigma value of 4.9. The total rate of sampling errors in the study period was 13.54% (P = 0.003). The highest rates were found for the indicators “haemolysed sample” (8.76%), “urine sample not submitted” (1.66%) and “clotted sample” (1.41%), with Six Sigma values of 3.7, 3.7 and 2.9, respectively. Conclusions: The magnitude of pre-analytical errors was accurately valued. While processes that triggered critical errors are well controlled, the results obtained for those regarding specimen collection are borderline unacceptable; this is particularly so for the indicator “haemolysed sample”. PMID:24969918

  1. Negotiating Story Entry: A Micro-Analytic Study of Storytelling Projection in English and Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasui, Eiko

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation offers a micro-analytic study of the use of language and body during storytelling in American English and Japanese conversations. Specifically, I focus on its beginning and explore how a story is "projected." A beginning of an action or activity is where an incipient speaker negotiates the floor with co-participants; they…

  2. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--PESTICIDE METABOLITES IN URINE ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticide Metabolites in Urine data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 4 pesticide metabolites in 176 urine samples over 176 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household during Stage III of the NHEXAS study. ...

  3. Analytical Studies of Selected Educational Data. Supplement: Consultant Interpretation of Findings. Volume II of II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plantec, Peter M.; And Others

    Three papers by experts in the field of education for gifted children present interpretive comments on one of three research efforts (a School Staffing Survey) whose data were analytically studied in a companion volume (EC 040 763). The School Staffing Survey, which included a representative sample of elementary and secondary schools, gathered…

  4. Pragmatic Meta-Analytic Studies: Learning the Lessons from Naturalistic Evaluations of Multiple Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Paul; McNaught, Carmel; Cheng, Kin-Fai

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the concept of pragmatic meta-analytic studies in eLearning. Much educational technology literature focuses on developers and teachers describing and reflecting on their experiences. Few connections are made between these experiential "stories". The data set is fragmented and offers few generalisable lessons. The field needs…

  5. Adequacy of surface analytical tools for studying the tribology of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    Surface analytical tools are very beneficial in tribological studies of ceramics. Traditional methods of optical microscopy, XRD, XRF, and SEM should be combined with newer surface sensitive techniques especially AES and XPS. ISS and SIMS can also be useful in providing additional compositon details. Tunneling microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy are less known techniques that may also prove useful.

  6. A Factor Analytic Study of Selected Tests of Specific Components of Academic Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Nancy

    A factor analytic study was designed to examine the factor structure of a battery of 17 tests administered to 100 students at the primary, intermediate, and advanced (grades 7-10) levels and to determine differences in factor structures for the three groups. The tests, measures of academic achievement, included the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for…

  7. Attitudes Toward English and Its Functions in Finland: A Discourse-Analytic Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyrkstedt, Irene; Kalaja, Paula

    1998-01-01

    Argues for a redefinition of terms and reconsideration of methodology in research on language attitudes, suggesting that mentalistic definitions of attitudes be replaced with social ones and experimentation using the matched-guise technique be replaced by discourse-analytic research. A qualitative study on Finnish college student attitudes toward…

  8. A semi-analytical study on helical springs made of shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghani, M.; Naghdabadi, R.; Arghavani, J.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, the responses of shape memory polymer (SMP) helical springs under axial force are studied both analytically and numerically. In the analytical solution, we first derive the response of a cylindrical tube under torsional loadings. This solution can be used for helical springs in which both the curvature and pitch effects are negligible. This is the case for helical springs with large ratios of the mean coil radius to the cross sectional radius (spring index) and also small pitch angles. Making use of this solution simplifies the analysis of the helical springs to that of the torsion of a straight bar with circular cross section. The 3D phenomenological constitutive model recently proposed for SMPs is also reduced to the 1D shear case. Thus, an analytical solution for the torsional response of SMP tubes in a full cycle of stress-free strain recovery is derived. In addition, the curvature effect is added to the formulation and the SMP helical spring is analyzed using the exact solution presented for torsion of curved SMP tubes. In this modified solution, the effect of the direct shear force is also considered. In the numerical analysis, the 3D constitutive equations are implemented in a finite element program and a full cycle of stress-free strain recovery of an SMP (extension or compression) helical spring is simulated. Analytical and numerical results are compared and it is shown that the analytical solution gives accurate stress distributions in the cross section of the helical SMP spring besides the global load-deflection response. Some case studies are presented to show the validity of the presented analytical method.

  9. Analytical stability and simulation response study for a coupled two-body system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, K. M.; Roberts, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical stability study and a digital simulation response study of two connected rigid bodies are documented. Relative rotation of the bodies at the connection is allowed, thereby providing a model suitable for studying system stability and response during a soft-dock regime. Provisions are made of a docking port axes alignment torque and a despin torque capability for encountering spinning payloads. Although the stability analysis is based on linearized equations, the digital simulation is based on nonlinear models.

  10. PHOTOBIOREACTORS FOR PHYCOLOGY: DESIGN AND FUNCTION OF A COMPUTER-CONTROLLED, CULTURING APPARATUS OPTIMIZED FOR ANALYTICAL INVESTIGATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of photobioreactor research has been directed at optimizing biomass yields. However, the potential for exploiting these highly controlled culturing environments for most physiological research has yet to be realized. The main reason for this is that photobioreactor technology has tend...

  11. Effects of pre-analytical processes on blood samples used in metabolomics studies.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peiyuan; Lehmann, Rainer; Xu, Guowang

    2015-07-01

    Every day, analytical and bio-analytical chemists make sustained efforts to improve the sensitivity, specificity, robustness, and reproducibility of their methods. Especially in targeted and non-targeted profiling approaches, including metabolomics analysis, these objectives are not easy to achieve; however, robust and reproducible measurements and low coefficients of variation (CV) are crucial for successful metabolomics approaches. Nevertheless, all efforts from the analysts are in vain if the sample quality is poor, i.e. if preanalytical errors are made by the partner during sample collection. Preanalytical risks and errors are more common than expected, even when standard operating procedures (SOP) are used. This risk is particularly high in clinical studies, and poor sample quality may heavily bias the CV of the final analytical results, leading to disappointing outcomes of the study and consequently, although unjustified, to critical questions about the analytical performance of the approach from the partner who provided the samples. This review focuses on the preanalytical phase of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-driven metabolomics analysis of body fluids. Several important preanalytical factors that may seriously affect the profile of the investigated metabolome in body fluids, including factors before sample collection, blood drawing, subsequent handling of the whole blood (transportation), processing of plasma and serum, and inadequate conditions for sample storage, will be discussed. In addition, a detailed description of latent effects on the stability of the blood metabolome and a suggestion for a practical procedure to circumvent risks in the preanalytical phase will be given. PMID:25736245

  12. Optimal Trend Tests for Genetic Association Studies of Heterogeneous Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    The Cochran-Armitage trend test is a standard procedure in genetic association studies. It is a directed test with high power to detect genetic effects that follow the gene-dosage model. In this paper, the author proposes optimal trend tests for genetic association studies of heterogeneous diseases. Monte-Carlo simulations show that the power gain of the optimal trend tests over the conventional Cochran-Armitage trend test is striking when the genetic effects are heterogeneous. The easy-to-use R 3.1.2 software (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria) code is provided. The optimal trend tests are recommended for routine use. PMID:27278756

  13. Optimization and development of analytical methods for the determination of new brominated flame retardants and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediments and suspended particulate matter.

    PubMed

    López, P; Brandsma, S A; Leonards, P E G; de Boer, J

    2011-05-01

    With more stringent legislation on brominated flame retardants, it is expected that increasing amounts of substitutes would replace polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs). Therefore, the development and optimization of analytical methodologies that allow their identification and quantification are of paramount relevance. This work describes the optimization of an analytical procedure to determine pentabromochlorocyclohexane, tetrabromo-o-chlorotoluene, 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-p-xylene, tetrabromophthalic anhydride, 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromotoluene, tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate, decabromodiphenylethane and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane together with PBDEs in sediments and in suspended particulate matter. This method comprises a pressurized liquid extraction followed by three cleanup steps (gel permeation chromatography and solid phase extraction on Oasis™ HLB and on silica cartridges). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, using electron capture negative chemical ionization, is used for the final analysis. The proposed method provides recoveries >85%. The method was applied to sediment and suspended particulate matter samples from different locations in the Western Scheldt estuary (the Netherlands). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the occurrence of the additive flame retardants 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-p-xylene, 3,4,5,6-tetrabromo-o-chlorotoluene and 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromochlorocyclohexane is reported in the literature. The concentrations of these new flame retardants ranged from 0.05 to 0.30 μg/kg dry weight. PMID:21369755

  14. Collisional evolution - an analytical study for the non steady-state mass distribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira Martins, R.

    1999-05-01

    To study the collisional evolution of asteroidal groups one can use an analytical solution for the self-similar collision cascades. This solution is suitable to study the steady-state mass distribution of the collisional fragmentation. However, out of the steady-state conditions, this solution is not satisfactory for some values of the collisional parameters. In fact, for some values for the exponent of the mass distribution power law of an asteroidal group and its relation to the exponent of the function which describes "how rocks break" the author arrives at singular points for the equation which describes the collisional evolution. These singularities appear since some approximations are usually made in the laborious evaluation of many integrals that appear in the analytical calculations. They concern the cutoff for the smallest and the largest bodies. These singularities set some restrictions to the study of the analytical solution for the collisional equation. To overcome these singularities the author performed an algebraic computation considering the smallest and the largest bodies and he obtained the analytical expressions for the integrals that describe the collisional evolution without restriction on the parameters. However, the new distribution is more sensitive to the values of the collisional parameters. In particular the steady-state solution for the differential mass distribution has exponents slightly different from 11/6 for the usual parameters in the asteroid belt. The sensitivity of this distribution with respect to the parameters is analyzed for the usual values in the asteroidal groups. With an expression for the mass distribution without singularities, one can evaluate also its time evolution. The author arrives at an analytical expression given by a power series of terms constituted by a small parameter multiplied by the mass to an exponent, which depends on the initial power law distribution. This expression is a formal solution for the

  15. Memory and Study Strategies for Optimal Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamachek, Alice L.

    Study strategies are those specific reading skills that increase understanding, memory storage, and retrieval. Memory techniques are crucial to effective studying, and to subsequent performance in class and on written examinations. A major function of memory is to process information. Stimuli are picked up by sensory receptors and transferred to…

  16. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  17. Do dental students use optimal study strategies?

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Maureen; Kamboj, Rajit S; Pierre, Gaëlle C

    2015-01-01

    Research on human learning has shown that repeated retrieval practice or self-testing maximizes learning. However, recent studies have found undergraduate students to be largely unaware of the benefits of self-testing. The aim of this study was to examine dental students' study strategies and utilization of retrieval techniques for learning. All second-year dental students at New York University College of Dentistry were invited to participate. Of the total 360 students, 66 completed the two-question survey, for a response rate of 18.3%. The first question asked students to choose from a list of twelve study strategies the ones they used and to rank their top five in order of personal preference. Repeated reading was the most frequently used strategy with 83.3% of students reporting that they used it and 43.9% naming it as their top strategy. Of these students, 45.5% indicated that they self-tested while studying, but none indicated it was their number one strategy. The second question asked students how they would study after reading a textbook chapter for the first time. They were asked to choose one option from three possibilities: going back and restudying, self-testing (with the possibility of restudying afterward), or some other strategy. On this question, 25.8% chose restudying, 45.5% chose self-testing, and 28.8% indicated they would use another study strategy. Thus, 54.6% of the students reported they would not test themselves after reading a textbook chapter. Of those who chose self-testing, only seven students indicated they would do so to improve learning. The results of this study suggest that the students lacked sufficient awareness of the superiority of self-testing for learning. PMID:25576550

  18. A study of commuter airplane design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Wyatt, R. D.; Griswold, D. A.; Hammer, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Problems of commuter airplane configuration design were studied to affect a minimization of direct operating costs. Factors considered were the minimization of fuselage drag, methods of wing design, and the estimated drag of an airplane submerged in a propellor slipstream; all design criteria were studied under a set of fixed performance, mission, and stability constraints. Configuration design data were assembled for application by a computerized design methodology program similar to the NASA-Ames General Aviation Synthesis Program.

  19. Analytical study on emittance growth caused by roughness of a metallic photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2015-05-01

    The roughness of a photocathode could lead to an additional uncorrelated divergence of the emitted electrons and therefore to an increased thermal emittance. To calculate the emittance growth due to the cathode roughness, people usually choose a simple 2D sinusoidal surface model to avoid mathematical complexity. In this paper, we demonstrate an analytical method, which is inspired by the point spread function that has been widely used in radiation imaging field, to accurately evaluate the emittance growth due to the random roughness of a real-life cathode. Both analytical and numerical studies are performed. Our analytical formulas clearly reveal the relationship between the surface roughness and the emittance growth. Both analytical and numerical results surprisingly show that in the typical 3D random surface case, the influence of the surface roughness on the emittance growth is much smaller than the 2D sinusoidal case with typical roughness properties, however with roughness properties which are matched to the 3D case, the emittance growth conditions in these two cases are very similar. Even with applied electric field strength up to 120 MV /m , the total emittance growth is still below 10%. It implies that the large emittance growth (50%-100%) observed on metallic cathodes in some experiments, which is generally believed to be the result of the electric field on the rough surface, might be due to some other reasons.

  20. Analytic Drag Controller guidance gains evaluation. Mission planning, mission analysis and software formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treybig, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a study to optimize the guidance gains for the analytical drag control entry guidance system are presented. The guidance gains were optimized for study points chosen in all phases of entry.

  1. An analytical approach to the problem of inverse optimization with additive objective functions: an application to human prehension

    PubMed Central

    Pesin, Yakov B.; Niu, Xun; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of what is being optimized in human actions with respect to various aspects of human movements and different motor tasks. From the mathematical point of view this problem consists of finding an unknown objective function given the values at which it reaches its minimum. This problem is called the inverse optimization problem. Until now the main approach to this problems has been the cut-and-try method, which consists of introducing an objective function and checking how it reflects the experimental data. Using this approach, different objective functions have been proposed for the same motor action. In the current paper we focus on inverse optimization problems with additive objective functions and linear constraints. Such problems are typical in human movement science. The problem of muscle (or finger) force sharing is an example. For such problems we obtain sufficient conditions for uniqueness and propose a method for determining the objective functions. To illustrate our method we analyze the problem of force sharing among the fingers in a grasping task. We estimate the objective function from the experimental data and show that it can predict the force-sharing pattern for a vast range of external forces and torques applied to the grasped object. The resulting objective function is quadratic with essentially non-zero linear terms. PMID:19902213

  2. Reasoning about anomalies: a study of the analytical process of detecting and identifying anomalous behavior in maritime traffic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, Maria; Falkman, Göran; Ziemke, Tom; Kronhamn, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    The goal of visual analytical tools is to support the analytical reasoning process, maximizing human perceptual, understanding and reasoning capabilities in complex and dynamic situations. Visual analytics software must be built upon an understanding of the reasoning process, since it must provide appropriate interactions that allow a true discourse with the information. In order to deepen our understanding of the human analytical process and guide developers in the creation of more efficient anomaly detection systems, this paper investigates how is the human analytical process of detecting and identifying anomalous behavior in maritime traffic data. The main focus of this work is to capture the entire analysis process that an analyst goes through, from the raw data to the detection and identification of anomalous behavior. Three different sources are used in this study: a literature survey of the science of analytical reasoning, requirements specified by experts from organizations with interest in port security and user field studies conducted in different marine surveillance control centers. Furthermore, this study elaborates on how to support the human analytical process using data mining, visualization and interaction methods. The contribution of this paper is twofold: (1) within visual analytics, contribute to the science of analytical reasoning with practical understanding of users tasks in order to develop a taxonomy of interactions that support the analytical reasoning process and (2) within anomaly detection, facilitate the design of future anomaly detector systems when fully automatic approaches are not viable and human participation is needed.

  3. Optimization study of third harmonic generation in quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Mojibpour, Ali; Pourfath, Mahdi; Kosina, Hans

    2014-08-25

    A systematic optimization study of quantum cascade lasers with integrated nonlinearity for third-harmonic generation is performed. To model current transport the Pauli master equation is solved using a Monte Carlo approach. A multi-objective particle swarm optimization algorithm is applied to obtain the Pareto front. Our theoretical analysis indicates an optimized structure with five orders of magnitude increase in the generated third-harmonic power with respect to the reference design. This striking performance comes with a low threshold current density of about 1.6 kA/cm2 and is attributed to double resonant phonon scattering assisted extraction and injection scheme of the laser. PMID:25321265

  4. Optimization study of the efficient spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. D.; Chun, D. H.; Kang, M. S.; Kim, H. D.

    2008-09-01

    In the field of yarn dyeing, the most generally employed method is a type of package dyeing which uses a package of cheese stacked on a spindle made of a perforated tube. Spindles up to now, have been designed without considering the characteristics of dyeing liquid, focusing only on the geometric configuration which cause many problems such as lack of level dyeing. To improve the level dyeing and find the appropriate spindle configuration for the most effective dyeing process, this study examines the spindle flow-field in detail, using a computational method. Flow characteristics inside the spindle have been investigated with varying in porosity, porous diameter and the velocity of the flow. The results show that the total pressure of the flow through the spindle is used to overcome body force. The characteristics of the flow from the porous spindle could also be observed. Based on the results from this study, an effective spindle configuration for level-dyeing has been proposed.

  5. Analytical and numerical study of Gauss-Bonnet holographic superconductors with Power-Maxwell field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykhi, Ahmad; Salahi, Hamid Reza; Montakhab, Afshin

    2016-04-01

    We provide an analytical as well as a numerical study of the holographic s-wave superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with Power-Maxwell electrodynamics. We limit our study to the case where scalar and gauge fields do not have an effect on the background metric. We use a variational method, based on Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem for our analytical study, as well as a numerical shooting method in order to compare with our analytical results. Interestingly enough, we observe that unlike Born-Infeld-like nonlinear electrodynamics which decrease the critical temperature compared to the linear Maxwell field, the Power-Maxwell electrodynamics is able to increase the critical temperature of the holographic superconductors in the sublinear regime. We find that requiring the finite value for the gauge field on the asymptotic boundary r → ∞, restricts the power parameter, q, of the Power-Maxwell field to be in the range 1 /2 < q < ( d - 1) /2. Our study indicates that it is quite possible to make condensation easier as q decreases in its allowed range. We also find that for all values of q, the condensation can be affected by the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient α. However, the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term makes the transition slightly harder. Finally, we obtain an analytic expression for the order parameter and thus obtain the associated critical exponent near the phase transition. We find that the critical exponent has its universal value of β = 1 /2 regardless of the parameters q, α as well as dimension d, consistent with mean-field values obtained in previous studies.

  6. An analytical study on the carrier-phase linear combinations for triple-frequency GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinlong; Yang, Yuanxi; He, Haibo; Guo, Hairong

    2016-08-01

    The linear combinations of multi-frequency carrier-phase measurements for Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) are greatly beneficial to improving the performance of ambiguity resolution (AR), cycle slip correction as well as precise positioning. In this contribution, the existing definitions of the carrier-phase linear combination are reviewed and the integer property of the resulting ambiguity of the phase linear combinations is examined. The general analytical method for solving the optimal integer linear combinations for all triple-frequency GNSS is presented. Three refined triple-frequency integer combinations solely determined by the frequency values are introduced, which are the ionosphere-free (IF) combination that the Sum of its integer coefficients equal to 0 (IFS0), the geometry-free (GF) combination that the Sum of its integer coefficients equal to 0 (GFS0) and the geometry-free and ionosphere-free (GFIF) combination. Besides, the optimal GF, IF, extra-wide lane and ionosphere-reduced integer combinations for GPS and BDS are solved exhaustively by the presented method. Their potential applications in cycle slip detection, AR as well as precise positioning are discussed. At last, a more straightforward GF and IF AR scheme than the existing method is presented based on the GFIF integer combination.

  7. Evaluation of Lauha bhasma on classical analytical parameters - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar; Choudhary, A K; Prajapati, P K

    2008-01-01

    Lauha Bhasma is the most widely used bhasma preparation in therapeutics, but till date the temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma in electric muffle furnace is not fixed. So in this pilot study an attempt has been made to confirm the appropriate temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma. And emphasis has been given to evaluate this prepared Lauha Bhasma on classical analytical parameter, which reflects the physical and chemical properties of the Bhasma. PMID:22557274

  8. Evaluation of Lauha bhasma on classical analytical parameters – A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar; Choudhary, A. K.; Prajapati, P. K.

    2008-01-01

    Lauha Bhasma is the most widely used bhasma preparation in therapeutics, but till date the temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma in electric muffle furnace is not fixed. So in this pilot study an attempt has been made to confirm the appropriate temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma. And emphasis has been given to evaluate this prepared Lauha Bhasma on classical analytical parameter, which reflects the physical and chemical properties of the Bhasma. PMID:22557274

  9. Analytical study of the external field for non-circular tokamak with multipole moment expansion approach

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, O.; DeLucia, J.; Okabayashi, M.

    1980-10-01

    An analytical study is made of the external field required to produce non-circular toroidal MHD equilibria. Here the external magnetic flux pattern is formulated with a series of multipole moments expanded around the magnetic axis. The present approach provides a common description of the external field characteristics of various devices rather than specifying location of poloidal coils. Furthermore, the preconceptual design of noncircular devices can be simplified since the arrangement of poloidal coil location is decoupled from the physics requirement.

  10. Spectroellipsometric and ion beam analytical studies on a glazed ceramic object with metallic lustre decoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohner, T.; Agócs, E.; Petrik, P.; Zolnai, Z.; Szilágyi, E.; Kovács, I.; Szőkefalvi-Nagy, Z.; Tóth, L.; Tóth, A. L.; Illés, L.; Bársony, I.

    2014-11-01

    In this work recently produced and commercially available glazed ceramic object with metallic lustre decoration was studied by using a spectroscopic ellipsometer with rotating compensator. The thickness and metal content of the surface lustre layers are determined by ion beam analytical techniques, i.e., Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and external beam particle-induced X-ray emission and the results were utilized in the construction of multilayer optical models for the evaluation and interpretation of the spectroellipsometric measurements.

  11. Analytical study of the performance of a gust alleviation system for a STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehman, W. I.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical study has shown that a gust alleviation system for a STOL airplane in a cruise condition could reduce the root mean square of the normal acceleration of the airplane flying in random turbulence by as much as 50 percent. This alleviation is obtained by driving the flaps in response to normal acceleration and by moving the elevator in proportion to the commanded flap deflection angle and to a pitch-rate signal.

  12. Damage states in laminated composite three-point bend specimens: An experimental-analytical correlation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starbuck, J. Michael; Guerdal, Zafer; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Poe, Clarence C.

    1990-01-01

    Damage states in laminated composites were studied by considering the model problem of a laminated beam subjected to three-point bending. A combination of experimental and theoretical research techniques was used to correlate the experimental results with the analytical stress distributions. The analytical solution procedure was based on the stress formulation approach of the mathematical theory of elasticity. The solution procedure is capable of calculating the ply-level stresses and beam displacements for any laminated beam of finite length using the generalized plane deformation or plane stress state assumption. Prior to conducting the experimental phase, the results from preliminary analyses were examined. Significant effects in the ply-level stress distributions were seen depending on the fiber orientation, aspect ratio, and whether or not a grouped or interspersed stacking sequence was used. The experimental investigation was conducted to determine the different damage modes in laminated three-point bend specimens. The test matrix consisted of three-point bend specimens of 0 deg unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic stacking sequences. The dependence of the damage initiation loads and ultimate failure loads were studied, and their relation to damage susceptibility and damage tolerance of the mean configuration was discussed. Damage modes were identified by visual inspection of the damaged specimens using an optical microscope. The four fundamental damage mechanisms identified were delaminations, matrix cracking, fiber breakage, and crushing. The correlation study between the experimental results and the analytical results were performed for the midspan deflection, indentation, damage modes, and damage susceptibility.

  13. Analytical bunch compression studies for a linac-based electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, M.; Wesolowski, P.

    2015-10-01

    The current paper deals with analytical bunch compression studies for FLUTE whose results are compared to simulations. FLUTE is a linac-based electron accelerator with a design energy of approximately 40 MeV currently being constructed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. One of the goals of FLUTE is to generate electron bunches with their length lying in the femtosecond regime. In the first phase this will be accomplished using a magnetic bunch compressor. This compressor forms the subject of the studies presented. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part deals with pure geometric investigations of the bunch compressor where space charge effects and the backreaction of bunches with coherent synchrotron radiation are neglected. The second part is dedicated to the treatment of space charge effects. The upshot is that the analytical results in the two parts agree quite well with what is obtained from simulations. This paper shall form the basis for future analytical studies of the FLUTE bunch compressor and of bunch compression, in general.

  14. Analytical study of the liquid phase transient behavior of a high temperature heat pipe. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roche, Gregory Lawrence

    1988-01-01

    The transient operation of the liquid phase of a high temperature heat pipe is studied. The study was conducted in support of advanced heat pipe applications that require reliable transport of high temperature drops and significant distances under a broad spectrum of operating conditions. The heat pipe configuration studied consists of a sealed cylindrical enclosure containing a capillary wick structure and sodium working fluid. The wick is an annular flow channel configuration formed between the enclosure interior wall and a concentric cylindrical tube of fine pore screen. The study approach is analytical through the solution of the governing equations. The energy equation is solved over the pipe wall and liquid region using the finite difference Peaceman-Rachford alternating direction implicit numerical method. The continuity and momentum equations are solved over the liquid region by the integral method. The energy equation and liquid dynamics equation are tightly coupled due to the phase change process at the liquid-vapor interface. A kinetic theory model is used to define the phase change process in terms of the temperature jump between the liquid-vapor surface and the bulk vapor. Extensive auxiliary relations, including sodium properties as functions of temperature, are used to close the analytical system. The solution procedure is implemented in a FORTRAN algorithm with some optimization features to take advantage of the IBM System/370 Model 3090 vectorization facility. The code was intended for coupling to a vapor phase algorithm so that the entire heat pipe problem could be solved. As a test of code capabilities, the vapor phase was approximated in a simple manner.

  15. Molecular motion in cell membranes: Analytic study of fence-hindered random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkre, V. M.; Giuggioli, L.; Kalay, Z.

    2008-05-01

    A theoretical calculation is presented to describe the confined motion of transmembrane molecules in cell membranes. The study is analytic, based on Master equations for the probability of the molecules moving as random walkers, and leads to explicit usable solutions including expressions for the molecular mean square displacement and effective diffusion constants. One outcome is a detailed understanding of the dependence of the time variation of the mean square displacement on the initial placement of the molecule within the confined region. How to use the calculations is illustrated by extracting (confinement) compartment sizes from experimentally reported published observations from single particle tracking experiments on the diffusion of gold-tagged G -protein coupled μ -opioid receptors in the normal rat kidney cell membrane, and by further comparing the analytical results to observations on the diffusion of phospholipids, also in normal rat kidney cells.

  16. Analytical studies of fronts, colonies, and patterns: Combination of the Allee effect and nonlocal competition interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, M. G.; Escaff, D.; Kenkre, V. M.

    2010-09-01

    We present an analytic study of traveling fronts, localized colonies, and extended patterns arising from a reaction-diffusion equation which incorporates simultaneously two features: the well-known Allee effect and spatially nonlocal competition interactions. The former is an essential ingredient of most systems in population dynamics and involves extinction at low densities, growth at higher densities, and saturation at still higher densities. The latter feature is also highly relevant, particularly to biological systems, and goes beyond the unrealistic assumption of zero-range interactions. We show via exact analytic methods that the combination of the two features yields a rich diversity of phenomena and permits an understanding of a variety of issues including spontaneous appearance of colonies.

  17. Analytical study on holographic superfluid in AdS soliton background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chuyu; Pan, Qiyuan; Jing, Jiliang; Wang, Yongjiu

    2016-06-01

    We analytically study the holographic superfluid phase transition in the AdS soliton background by using the variational method for the Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem. By investigating the holographic s-wave and p-wave superfluid models in the probe limit, we observe that the spatial component of the gauge field will hinder the phase transition. Moreover, we note that, different from the AdS black hole spacetime, in the AdS soliton background the holographic superfluid phase transition always belongs to the second order and the critical exponent of the system takes the mean-field value in both s-wave and p-wave models. Our analytical results are found to be in good agreement with the numerical findings.

  18. A parametric sensitivity and optimization study for the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model flutter characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1991-01-01

    In this paper an effort is made to improve the analytical open-loop flutter predictions for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model using a sensitivity based optimization approach. The sensitivity derivatives of the flutter frequency and dynamic pressure of the model with respect to the lag terms appearing in the Roger's unsteady aerodynamics approximations are evaluated both analytical and by finite differences. Then, the Levenberg-Marquardt method is used to find the optimum values for these lag-terms. The results obtained here agree much better with the experimental (wind tunnel) results than those found in the previous studies.

  19. A semi-analytical study of positive corona discharge in wire-plane electrode configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanallah, K.; Pontiga, F.; Chen, J. H.

    2013-08-01

    Wire-to-plane positive corona discharge in air has been studied using an analytical model of two species (electrons and positive ions). The spatial distributions of electric field and charged species are obtained by integrating Gauss's law and the continuity equations of species along the Laplacian field lines. The experimental values of corona current intensity and applied voltage, together with Warburg's law, have been used to formulate the boundary condition for the electron density on the corona wire. To test the accuracy of the model, the approximate electric field distribution has been compared with the exact numerical solution obtained from a finite element analysis. A parametrical study of wire-to-plane corona discharge has then been undertaken using the approximate semi-analytical solutions. Thus, the spatial distributions of electric field and charged particles have been computed for different values of the gas pressure, wire radius and electrode separation. Also, the two dimensional distribution of ozone density has been obtained using a simplified plasma chemistry model. The approximate semi-analytical solutions can be evaluated in a negligible computational time, yet provide precise estimates of corona discharge variables.

  20. Analytic and Nearly Optimal Self-Testing Bounds for the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt and Mermin Inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniewski, Jedrzej

    2016-08-01

    Self-testing refers to the phenomenon that certain extremal quantum correlations (almost) uniquely identify the quantum system under consideration. For instance, observing the maximal violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality certifies that the two parties share a singlet. While self-testing results are known for several classes of states, in many cases they are only applicable if the observed statistics are almost perfect, which makes them unsuitable for practical applications. Practically relevant self-testing bounds are much less common and moreover they all result from a single numerical method (with one exception which we discuss in detail). In this work we present a new technique for proving analytic self-testing bounds of practically relevant robustness. We obtain improved bounds for the case of self-testing the singlet using the CHSH inequality (in particular we show that nontrivial fidelity with the singlet can be achieved as long as the violation exceeds β*=(16 +14 √{2 })/17 ≈2.11 ). In the case of self-testing the tripartite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state using the Mermin inequality, we derive a bound which not only improves on previously known results but turns out to be tight. We discuss other scenarios to which our technique can be immediately applied.

  1. An assessment of separable fluid connector system parameters to perform a connector system design optimization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasthofer, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    The key to optimization of design where there are a large number of variables, all of which may not be known precisely, lies in the mathematical tool of dynamic programming developed by Bellman. This methodology can lead to optimized solutions to the design of critical systems in a minimum amount of time, even when there are a great number of acceptable configurations to be considered. To demonstrate the usefulness of dynamic programming, an analytical method is developed for evaluating the relationship among existing numerous connector designs to find the optimum configuration. The data utilized in the study were generated from 900 flanges designed for six subsystems of the S-1B stage of the Saturn 1B space carrier vehicle.

  2. Analytical Models of Cross-Layer Protocol Optimization in Real-Time Wireless Sensor Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    The real-time interactions among the nodes of a wireless sensor network (WSN) to cooperatively process data from multiple sensors are modeled. Quality-of-service (QoS) metrics are associated with the quality of fused information: throughput, delay, packet error rate, etc. Multivariate point process (MVPP) models of discrete random events in WSNs establish stochastic characteristics of optimal cross-layer protocols. Discrete-event, cross-layer interactions in mobile ad hoc network (MANET) protocols have been modeled using a set of concatenated design parameters and associated resource levels by the MVPPs. Characterization of the "best" cross-layer designs for a MANET is formulated by applying the general theory of martingale representations to controlled MVPPs. Performance is described in terms of concatenated protocol parameters and controlled through conditional rates of the MVPPs. Modeling limitations to determination of closed-form solutions versus explicit iterative solutions for ad hoc WSN controls are examined.

  3. Measures for optimizing pulsed EC-QC laser spectroscopy of liquids and application to multi-analyte blood analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstetter, M.; Koch, C.; Genner, A.; Lendl, B.

    2013-12-01

    We employed a broadly tunable pulsed external cavity (EC)-QC laser with a spectral tuning range from 1030 cm-1 to 1230 cm-1 and a tuning speed of 166 cm-1/s for direct absorption spectroscopy of aqueous solutions. The laser offered spectral power densities of up to four orders of magnitude higher than available with a conventional FTIR spectrometer. Therefore, a portable demonstration system with a large optical path length transmission flow cell (165 μm) could be realized preventing clogging of the flow cell. In pulsed mode an EC-QC laser provides significantly higher peak power levels than in continuous-wave mode, but pulse-to-pulse intensity variations, intra-pulse mode hops and mechanical imperfections of the scanning mechanism significantly impair the quality of resulting absorbance spectra. This article reports on measures which we found appropriate to reduce the initially high noise level of EC-QC laser absorbance spectra. These measures include a spectral self-referencing algorithm that makes use of the inherent structure of the EC-QC laser's gain curve to correct laser instabilities, as well as Fourier filtering, among others. This enabled us to derive infrared spectra which were finally useful for quantitative analysis in blood plasma samples. Finally, with the appropriate measures in place and using partial least squares regression analysis it was possible to simultaneously quantify 6 blood analytes from a single physical measurement of a 200 μL blood sample. This proves the potential of EC-QC lasers for practical application in clinical point of care analysis.

  4. Orthogonal array design as a chemometric method for the optimization of analytical procedures. Part 5. Three-level design and its application in microwave dissolution of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Lan, W G; Wong, M K; Chen, N; Sin, Y M

    1995-04-01

    The theory and methodology of a three-level orthogonal array design as a chemometric method for the optimization of analytical procedures were developed. In the theoretical section, firstly, the matrix of a three-level orthogonal array design is described and orthogonality is proved by a quadratic regression model. Next, the assignment of experiments in a three-level orthogonal array design and the use of the triangular table associated with the corresponding orthogonal array matrix are illustrated, followed by the data analysis strategy, in which significance of the different factor effects is quantitatively evaluated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique and the percentage contribution method. Then, a quadratic regression equation representing the response surface is established to estimate each factor that has a significant influence. Finally, on the basis of the quadratic regression equation established, the derivative algorithm is used to find the optimum value for each variable considered. In the application section, microwave dissolution for the determination of selenium in biological samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry is employed, as a practical example, to demonstrate the application of the proposed three-level orthogonal array design in analytical chemistry. PMID:7771675

  5. Phonon dispersion on Ag (100) surface: A modified analytic embedded atom method study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Jun, Zhang; Chang-Le, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Within the harmonic approximation, the analytic expression of the dynamical matrix is derived based on the modified analytic embedded atom method (MAEAM) and the dynamics theory of surface lattice. The surface phonon dispersions along three major symmetry directions , and X¯M¯ are calculated for the clean Ag (100) surface by using our derived formulas. We then discuss the polarization and localization of surface modes at points X¯ and M¯ by plotting the squared polarization vectors as a function of the layer index. The phonon frequencies of the surface modes calculated by MAEAM are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical data. It is found that the present results are generally in agreement with the referenced experimental or theoretical results, with a maximum deviation of 10.4%. The agreement shows that the modified analytic embedded atom method is a reasonable many-body potential model to quickly describe the surface lattice vibration. It also lays a significant foundation for studying the surface lattice vibration in other metals. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61471301 and 61078057), the Scientific Research Program Funded by Shaanxi Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. 14JK1301), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20126102110045).

  6. Analytical study of stresses recorded in the DH 2011 rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kretz, M.; Aubrun, J. N.; Larche, M.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical study of stresses in the blades recorded during the tests of the DH 2011 jet flap rotor was performed. The main objective of the study was to compare the experimental results with analyticaly determined stresses. The comparison extended over 15 specific flight cases has been only partially successful. In fact computed 3P and 4P stress components showed only a poor correlation with the test data obtained. It is believed that the simplified model of aeroelastic effects used is mainly responsible for this lack of agreement with test results.

  7. An analytical method to find the optimal parameters for gas detectors based on correlation spectroscopy using a Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Rodriguez, Everardo; Rutt, Harvey

    2005-10-01

    Several designs of infrared absorption based gas detector use a Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) to modulate the incident light. In these systems, generally the FPI's fringes are matched with very well defined rotational absorption lines of a target molecule such as CO2, CO, N2O, CH4, etc. In order to obtain modulation the cavity length of the FPI is scanned over one half of the reference wavelength. In this work, we present a simple analytical method based on the Fourier Transform that describes the performance of these systems. Using this method the optimal reflectivity and optical spacing of the FPI can be determined. Furthermore, the modulated signal generated by the system as a function of the cavity length scan can be calculated by applying the inverse Fourier Transform. Finally, this method describes the underlying reasons why for some filters the background amplitude is severe, and gives guidance on the choice of optimised filters. Our method evaluates the optimal FPI parameters and the modulated signal much faster than the direct numerical computation which is used currently. Simulation results for different molecules in combination with diverse filters shapes are presented, with a comparison to directly computed results.

  8. Analytical performance of a versatile laboratory microscopic X-ray fluorescence system for metal uptake studies on argillaceous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, Felicián; Osán, János; Szabó, B. Katalin; Török, Szabina

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory-scale microscopic X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) plays an increasingly important role in various fields where multielemental investigations of samples are indispensable. In case of geological samples, the reasonable detection limits (LOD) and spatial resolutions are necessary to identify the trace element content in microcrystalline level. The present study focuses on the analytical performance of a versatile laboratory-scale micro-XRF system with various options of X-ray sources and detectors to find the optimal experimental configuration in terms of sensitivities and LOD for selected elements in loaded petrographic thin sections. The method was tested for sorption studies involving thin sections prepared from cores of Boda Claystone Formation, which is a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. Loaded ions in the sorption measurements were Cs(I) and Ni(II) chemically representing fission and corrosion products. Based on the collected elemental maps, the correlation between the elements representative of main rock components and the selected loaded ion was studied. For the elements of interest, Cs(I) and Ni(II) low-power iMOXS source with polycapillary and silicon drift detector was found to be the best configuration to reach the optimal LOD values. Laboratory micro-XRF was excellent to identify the responsible key minerals for the uptake of Cs(I). In case of nickel, careful corrections were needed because of the relatively high Ca content of the rock samples. The results were compared to synchrotron radiation micro-XRF.

  9. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  10. An intercomparison study of analytical methods used for quantification of levoglucosan in ambient aerosol filter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Schnelle-Kreiss, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Alves, C.; Bossi, R.; Bjerke, A.; Claeys, M.; Dye, C.; Evtyugina, M.; García-Gacio, D.; Gülcin, A.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Hyder, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; López-Mahia, P. L.; Pio, C.; Piot, C.; Ramirez-Santa-Cruz, C.; Sciare, J.; Teinilä, K.; Vermeylen, R.; Vicente, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2014-07-01

    The monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs) levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan are products of incomplete combustion and pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses, and are found to be major constituents of biomass burning aerosol particles. Hence, ambient aerosol particle concentrations of levoglucosan are commonly used to study the influence of residential wood burning, agricultural waste burning and wild fire emissions on ambient air quality. A European-wide intercomparison on the analysis of the three monosaccharide anhydrides was conducted based on ambient aerosol quartz fiber filter samples collected at a Norwegian urban background site during winter. Thus, the samples' content of MAs is representative for biomass burning particles originating from residential wood burning. The purpose of the intercomparison was to examine the comparability of the great diversity of analytical methods used for analysis of levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in ambient aerosol filter samples. Thirteen laboratories participated, of which three applied High-Performance Anion-Exchange Chromatography (HPAEC), four used High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) or Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC), and six resorted to Gas Chromatography (GC). The analytical methods used were of such diversity that they should be considered as thirteen different analytical methods. All of the thirteen laboratories reported levels of levoglucosan, whereas nine reported data for mannosan and/or galactosan. Eight of the thirteen laboratories reported levels for all three isomers. The accuracy for levoglucosan, presented as the mean percentage error (PE) for each participating laboratory, varied from -63 to 23%; however, for 62% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%, and for 85% the mean PE was within ±20%. For mannosan, the corresponding range was -60 to 69%, but as for levoglucosan, the range was substantially smaller for a subselection of the laboratories; i.e., for 33% of

  11. An intercomparison study of analytical methods used for quantification of levoglucosan in ambient aerosol filter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Abbaszade, G.; Alves, C.; Bjerke, A.; Bonnier, N.; Bossi, R.; Claeys, M.; Dye, C.; Evtyugina, M.; García-Gacio, D.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Hyder, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; López-Mahia, P. L.; Pio, C.; Piot, C.; Ramirez-Santa-Cruz, C.; Sciare, J.; Teinilä, K.; Vermeylen, R.; Vicente, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs) levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan are products of incomplete combustion and pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses, and are found to be major constituents of biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Hence, ambient aerosol particle concentrations of levoglucosan are commonly used to study the influence of residential wood burning, agricultural waste burning and wildfire emissions on ambient air quality. A European-wide intercomparison on the analysis of the three monosaccharide anhydrides was conducted based on ambient aerosol quartz fiber filter samples collected at a Norwegian urban background site during winter. Thus, the samples' content of MAs is representative for BB particles originating from residential wood burning. The purpose of the intercomparison was to examine the comparability of the great diversity of analytical methods used for analysis of levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in ambient aerosol filter samples. Thirteen laboratories participated, of which three applied high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC), four used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and six resorted to gas chromatography (GC). The analytical methods used were of such diversity that they should be considered as thirteen different analytical methods. All of the thirteen laboratories reported levels of levoglucosan, whereas nine reported data for mannosan and/or galactosan. Eight of the thirteen laboratories reported levels for all three isomers. The accuracy for levoglucosan, presented as the mean percentage error (PE) for each participating laboratory, varied from -63 to 20%; however, for 62% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%, and for 85% the mean PE was within ±20%. For mannosan, the corresponding range was -60 to 69%, but as for levoglucosan, the range was substantially smaller for a subselection of the laboratories; i.e. for 33% of the

  12. Effective Permeability of Fractured Rocks by Analytical Methods: A 3D Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sævik, P. N.; Berre, I.; Jakobsen, M.; Lien, M.

    2013-12-01

    matrix permeability. For λ ≈ 1, all the analytical methods agree well with the numerical results, even for large fracture densities. When the contrast between fracture and matrix permeability is increased (λ ≥ 10), the differential method is only accurate for fracture densities well below the percolation threshold, i.e., when the fracture network is disconnected. The symmetric and asymmetric self-consistent methods have an acceptable accuracy for both small and high densities, even for very high values of λ. The symmetric method may be somewhat more accurate for moderate densities, but only the asymmetric method has the correct limiting behavior for very high densities. The asymmetric method is also surprisingly accurate at predicting the percolation thresholds of the fracture geometries we have studied.Nomenclature

  13. Experimental, numerical and analytical studies of abrasive wear: correlation between wear mechanisms and friction coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezlini, Salah; Zidi, M.; Arfa, H.; Ben Tkaya, Mohamed; Kapsa, Philippe

    2005-11-01

    The transport of granular material often generates severe damage. Understanding the correlation between the friction coefficient, particle geometry and wear mechanisms is of primary importance for materials undergoing abrasive wear. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of particle geometry on wear mechanisms and the friction coefficient. Numerical and analytical simulations and experimental results have been compared. The process to be studied is the scratch made by a rigid cone with different attack angles on a 5xxx aluminium alloy (Al-Mg) flat surface. A scratch test was used and the wear mechanisms were observed for different attack angles. A numerical study with a finite element code was made in order to understand the effect of attack angle on the friction coefficient. The contact surface and the friction coefficient were also studied, and the results compared to the Bowden and Tabor model. The superposition of the numerical, analytical and experimental results showed a better correlation between the wear mechanisms and the friction coefficient. It also showed the importance of the model hypothesis used to simulate the scratch phenomenon. To cite this article: S. Mezlini et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  14. Analytical gradients of complete active space self-consistent field energies using Cholesky decomposition: Geometry optimization and spin-state energetics of a ruthenium nitrosyl complex

    SciTech Connect

    Delcey, Mickaël G.; Freitag, Leon; González, Leticia; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Aquilante, Francesco; Lindh, Roland

    2014-05-07

    We present a formulation of analytical energy gradients at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level of theory employing density fitting (DF) techniques to enable efficient geometry optimizations of large systems. As an example, the ground and lowest triplet state geometries of a ruthenium nitrosyl complex are computed at the DF-CASSCF level of theory and compared with structures obtained from density functional theory (DFT) using the B3LYP, BP86, and M06L functionals. The average deviation of all bond lengths compared to the crystal structure is 0.042 Å at the DF-CASSCF level of theory, which is slightly larger but still comparable with the deviations obtained by the tested DFT functionals, e.g., 0.032 Å with M06L. Specifically, the root-mean-square deviation between the DF-CASSCF and best DFT coordinates, delivered by BP86, is only 0.08 Å for S{sub 0} and 0.11 Å for T{sub 1}, indicating that the geometries are very similar. While keeping the mean energy gradient errors below 0.25%, the DF technique results in a 13-fold speedup compared to the conventional CASSCF geometry optimization algorithm. Additionally, we assess the singlet-triplet energy vertical and adiabatic differences with multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) using the DF-CASSCF and DFT optimized geometries. It is found that the vertical CASPT2 energies are relatively similar regardless of the geometry employed whereas the adiabatic singlet-triplet gaps are more sensitive to the chosen triplet geometry.

  15. Analytical gradients of complete active space self-consistent field energies using Cholesky decomposition: geometry optimization and spin-state energetics of a ruthenium nitrosyl complex.

    PubMed

    Delcey, Mickaël G; Freitag, Leon; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Aquilante, Francesco; Lindh, Roland; González, Leticia

    2014-05-01

    We present a formulation of analytical energy gradients at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level of theory employing density fitting (DF) techniques to enable efficient geometry optimizations of large systems. As an example, the ground and lowest triplet state geometries of a ruthenium nitrosyl complex are computed at the DF-CASSCF level of theory and compared with structures obtained from density functional theory (DFT) using the B3LYP, BP86, and M06L functionals. The average deviation of all bond lengths compared to the crystal structure is 0.042 Å at the DF-CASSCF level of theory, which is slightly larger but still comparable with the deviations obtained by the tested DFT functionals, e.g., 0.032 Å with M06L. Specifically, the root-mean-square deviation between the DF-CASSCF and best DFT coordinates, delivered by BP86, is only 0.08 Å for S0 and 0.11 Å for T1, indicating that the geometries are very similar. While keeping the mean energy gradient errors below 0.25%, the DF technique results in a 13-fold speedup compared to the conventional CASSCF geometry optimization algorithm. Additionally, we assess the singlet-triplet energy vertical and adiabatic differences with multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) using the DF-CASSCF and DFT optimized geometries. It is found that the vertical CASPT2 energies are relatively similar regardless of the geometry employed whereas the adiabatic singlet-triplet gaps are more sensitive to the chosen triplet geometry. PMID:24811621

  16. Analytical gradients of complete active space self-consistent field energies using Cholesky decomposition: Geometry optimization and spin-state energetics of a ruthenium nitrosyl complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcey, Mickaël G.; Freitag, Leon; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Aquilante, Francesco; Lindh, Roland; González, Leticia

    2014-05-01

    We present a formulation of analytical energy gradients at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level of theory employing density fitting (DF) techniques to enable efficient geometry optimizations of large systems. As an example, the ground and lowest triplet state geometries of a ruthenium nitrosyl complex are computed at the DF-CASSCF level of theory and compared with structures obtained from density functional theory (DFT) using the B3LYP, BP86, and M06L functionals. The average deviation of all bond lengths compared to the crystal structure is 0.042 Å at the DF-CASSCF level of theory, which is slightly larger but still comparable with the deviations obtained by the tested DFT functionals, e.g., 0.032 Å with M06L. Specifically, the root-mean-square deviation between the DF-CASSCF and best DFT coordinates, delivered by BP86, is only 0.08 Å for S0 and 0.11 Å for T1, indicating that the geometries are very similar. While keeping the mean energy gradient errors below 0.25%, the DF technique results in a 13-fold speedup compared to the conventional CASSCF geometry optimization algorithm. Additionally, we assess the singlet-triplet energy vertical and adiabatic differences with multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) using the DF-CASSCF and DFT optimized geometries. It is found that the vertical CASPT2 energies are relatively similar regardless of the geometry employed whereas the adiabatic singlet-triplet gaps are more sensitive to the chosen triplet geometry.

  17. Analytical Study of Vertical and Torsional Free Vibration of Cable Supported Bridge Decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, Daniel J.

    The superposition method is employed to obtain an analytical type solution for the free vibration of cable supported bridge decks. Each pair of vertical elastic cables is considered to impart a vertical force to the deck by means of a rigid cross-member passing transversely beneath it. Rigid knife-edge support encountered at bridge towers is handled as well. In this introductory study the deck is treated as a thin isotropic plate. Any number of support cable pairs, of any stiffness, may be handled. Inter cross-member distances are referred to as spans. Free vibration eigenvalues and mode shapes are presented for three and four span illustrative cases.

  18. Analytical and experimental study of two delay-coupled excitable units.

    PubMed

    Weicker, Lionel; Erneux, Thomas; Keuninckx, Lars; Danckaert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of time-periodic oscillations for a system of two identical delay-coupled excitable (nonoscillatory) units. We first analyze these solutions by using asymptotic methods. The oscillations are described as relaxation oscillations exhibiting successive slow and fast changes. The analysis highlights the determinant role of the delay during the fast transition layers. We then study experimentally a system of two coupled electronic circuits that is modeled mathematically by the same delay differential equations. We obtain quantitative agreements between analytical and experimental bifurcation diagrams. PMID:24580298

  19. Analytical estimation of solid angle subtended by complex well-resolved surfaces for infrared detection studies.

    PubMed

    Mahulikar, Shripad P; Potnuru, Santosh K; Kolhe, Pankaj S

    2007-08-01

    The solid angle (Omega) subtended by the hot power-plant surfaces of a typical fighter aircraft, on the detector of an infrared (IR) guided missile, is analytically obtained. The use of the parallel rays projection method simplifies the incorporation of the effect of the optical blocking by engine surfaces, on Omega-subtended. This methodology enables the evaluation of the relative contribution of the IR signature from well-resolved distributed sources, and is important for imaging infrared detection studies. The complex 3D surface of a rear fuselage is projected onto an equivalent planar area normal to the viewing aspect, which would give the same Omega-subtended. PMID:17676106

  20. A study of the Perkin-Elmer laboratory robotic system for analytical sample preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenstein, S.D.; Delmastro, J.R.

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abilities of a Perkin-Elmer (PE) robotic system in performing complex analytical sample preparation procedures. Until this time, reports have been written describing the physical capabilities of the robotic arm marketed by PE and the use of this arm in a pick-and-place application at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Since the robotic arm is only capable of handling and transporting objects, the ability of the PE system is dependent upon the performance capabilities of the auxiliary devices marketed with the arm. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Combined infrared and analytical electron microscope studies of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Humecki, H. J.; Germani, M. S.

    1992-08-01

    Ultramicrotomed thin sections (less than 100 nm thick) of eight chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) were studied by analytical electron microscopy and IR microspectroscopy with the objective of identifying IDPs or their specific components with IR spectral transmission characteristics at 10 microns similar to those of comets. Two IDPs are identified whose silicate emission characteristics between 8 and 12 microns are similar to those of comets Halley and Bradfield. Implanted solar flare tracks and sputtered rims resulting from solar wind damage suggest that the minerology and petrography of these IDPs have not been significantly perturbed since ejection from their parent bodies.

  2. Analytical and experimental study of two delay-coupled excitable units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weicker, Lionel; Erneux, Thomas; Keuninckx, Lars; Danckaert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of time-periodic oscillations for a system of two identical delay-coupled excitable (nonoscillatory) units. We first analyze these solutions by using asymptotic methods. The oscillations are described as relaxation oscillations exhibiting successive slow and fast changes. The analysis highlights the determinant role of the delay during the fast transition layers. We then study experimentally a system of two coupled electronic circuits that is modeled mathematically by the same delay differential equations. We obtain quantitative agreements between analytical and experimental bifurcation diagrams.

  3. Non-degenerate two-photon absorption in silicon waveguides. Analytical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanbing; Husko, Chad; Lefrancois, Simon; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Schröder, Jochen; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2015-06-22

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the nonlinear evolution of two optical pulses in a silicon waveguide. We provide an analytic solution for the weak probe wave undergoing non-degenerate two-photon absorption (TPA) from the strong pump. At larger pump intensities, we employ a numerical solution to study the interplay between TPA and photo-generated free carriers. We develop a simple and powerful approach to extract and separate out the distinct loss contributions of TPA and free-carrier absorption from readily available experimental data. Our analysis accounts accurately for experimental results in silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

  4. An analytical study of reduced-gravity liquid reorientation using a simplified marker and cell technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, W. S., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program called HOPI was developed to predict reorientation flow dynamics, wherein liquids move from one end of a closed, partially filled, rigid container to the other end under the influence of container acceleration. The program uses the simplified marker and cell numerical technique and, using explicit finite-differencing, solves the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible viscous fluid. The effects of turbulence are also simulated in the program. HOPI can consider curved as well as straight walled boundaries. Both free-surface and confined flows can be calculated. The program was used to simulate five liquid reorientation cases. Three of these cases simulated actual NASA LeRC drop tower test conditions while two cases simulated full-scale Centaur tank conditions. It was concluded that while HOPI can be used to analytically determine the fluid motion in a typical settling problem, there is a current need to optimize HOPI. This includes both reducing the computer usage time and also reducing the core storage required for a given size problem.

  5. Optimization in generalized linear models: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Eliana Costa e.; Correia, Aldina; Lopes, Isabel Cristina

    2016-06-01

    The maximum likelihood method is usually chosen to estimate the regression parameters of Generalized Linear Models (GLM) and also for hypothesis testing and goodness of fit tests. The classical method for estimating GLM parameters is the Fisher scores. In this work we propose to compute the estimates of the parameters with two alternative methods: a derivative-based optimization method, namely the BFGS method which is one of the most popular of the quasi-Newton algorithms, and the PSwarm derivative-free optimization method that combines features of a pattern search optimization method with a global Particle Swarm scheme. As a case study we use a dataset of biological parameters (phytoplankton) and chemical and environmental parameters of the water column of a Portuguese reservoir. The results show that, for this dataset, BFGS and PSwarm methods provided a better fit, than Fisher scores method, and can be good alternatives for finding the estimates for the parameters of a GLM.

  6. Study of genetic direct search algorithms for function optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, B. P.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of a study to determine the performance of genetic direct search algorithms in solving function optimization problems arising in the optimal and adaptive control areas. The findings indicate that: (1) genetic algorithms can outperform standard algorithms in multimodal and/or noisy optimization situations, but suffer from lack of gradient exploitation facilities when gradient information can be utilized to guide the search. (2) For large populations, or low dimensional function spaces, mutation is a sufficient operator. However for small populations or high dimensional functions, crossover applied in about equal frequency with mutation is an optimum combination. (3) Complexity, in terms of storage space and running time, is significantly increased when population size is increased or the inversion operator, or the second level adaptation routine is added to the basic structure.

  7. Collisional evolution - an analytical study for the nonsteady-state mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, R. Vieira

    1999-05-01

    To study the collisional evolution of asteroidal groups we can use an analytical solutionfor the self-similar collision cascades. This solution is suitable to study the steady-state massdistribution of the collisional fragmentation. However, out of the steady-state conditions, thissolution is not satisfactory for some values of the collisional parameters. In fact, for some valuesfor the exponent of the mass distribution power law of an asteroidal group and its relation to theexponent of the function which describes how rocks break we arrive at singular points for theequation which describes the collisional evolution. These singularities appear since someapproximations are usually made in the laborious evaluation of many integrals that appear in theanalytical calculations. They concern the cutoff for the smallest and the largest bodies. Thesesingularities set some restrictions to the study of the analytical solution for the collisionalequation. To overcome these singularities we performed an algebraic computationconsidering the smallest and the largest bodies and we obtained the analytical expressions for theintegrals that describe the collisional evolution without restriction on the parameters. However,the new distribution is more sensitive to the values of the collisional parameters. In particular thesteady-state solution for the differential mass distribution has exponents slightly different from11⧸6 for the usual parameters in the Asteroid Belt. The sensitivity of this distribution with respectto the parameters is analyzed for the usual values in the asteroidal groups. With anexpression for the mass distribution without singularities, we can evaluate also its time evolution.We arrive at an analytical expression given by a power series of terms constituted by a smallparameter multiplied by the mass to an exponent, which depends on the initial power lawdistribution. This expression is a formal solution for the equation which describes the collisionalevolution

  8. An analytical study on the diffraction quality factor of open cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y. J.; Chu, K. R.; Yeh, L. H.

    2014-10-15

    Open cavities are often employed as interaction structures in a new generation of coherent millimeter, sub-millimeter, and terahertz (THz) radiation sources called the gyrotron. One of the open ends of the cavity is intended for rapid extraction of the radiation generated by a powerful electron beam. Up to the sub-THz regime, the diffraction loss from this open end dominates over the Ohmic losses on the walls, which results in a much lower diffraction quality factor (Q{sub d}) than the Ohmic quality factor (Q{sub ohm}). Early analytical studies have led to various expressions for Q{sub d} and shed much light on its properties. In this study, we begin with a review of these studies, and then proceed with the derivation of an analytical expression for Q{sub d} accurate to high order. Its validity is verified with numerical solutions for a step-tunable cavity commonly employed for the development of sub-THz and THz gyrotrons. On the basis of the results, a simplified equation is obtained which explicitly expresses the scaling laws of Q{sub d} with respect to mode indices and cavity dimensions.

  9. An analytical study on the diffraction quality factor of open cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. J.; Yeh, L. H.; Chu, K. R.

    2014-10-01

    Open cavities are often employed as interaction structures in a new generation of coherent millimeter, sub-millimeter, and terahertz (THz) radiation sources called the gyrotron. One of the open ends of the cavity is intended for rapid extraction of the radiation generated by a powerful electron beam. Up to the sub-THz regime, the diffraction loss from this open end dominates over the Ohmic losses on the walls, which results in a much lower diffraction quality factor (Qd) than the Ohmic quality factor (Qohm). Early analytical studies have led to various expressions for Qd and shed much light on its properties. In this study, we begin with a review of these studies, and then proceed with the derivation of an analytical expression for Qd accurate to high order. Its validity is verified with numerical solutions for a step-tunable cavity commonly employed for the development of sub-THz and THz gyrotrons. On the basis of the results, a simplified equation is obtained which explicitly expresses the scaling laws of Qd with respect to mode indices and cavity dimensions.

  10. A combined analytical and experimental study on the formation of sheath folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, J. E.; Galland, O.; Dabrowski, M.; Schmid, D. W.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2012-04-01

    The term 'sheath fold' describes a cone-shaped structure with a rounded apex. Such folds can occur in all rock-types and range in size from sub-millimeters to kilometers. They are in many cases associated with shear zones and shear deformation. Even though sheath folds are three-dimensional structures they are rarely exposed as such. In the field they are more commonly recognized in cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction where they exhibit eye-structures. How sheath folds form and how they evolve with increasing strain is still a matter of debate. Several mechanisms for the sheath fold development have been proposed, such as the passive amplification of pre-existing structures, for example buckle folds, or the disturbance of the flow in simple shear by, for example, weak or rigid inclusions. In this study we trigger the sheath fold development with a slip surface (weak inclusion) embedded in a layered matrix subjected to simple shear. We study the impact of the slip surface orientation, the cross-section location, the viscosity ratio between the layers and the layer thickness on the evolving eye-structures. To address these questions we employ a combined approach of analytical and experimental modeling. In the analytical model setup we place an elliptical, weak inclusion, acting as a slip surface, in a stiff matrix and apply simple shear of up to γ=10. The analytical model is three-dimensional where the flow around the inclusion is obtained with an adapted external Eshelby solution for incompressible viscous materials in the limit of an elliptical and inviscid inclusion. The evolving structures are visualized by tracking passive marker layers in the matrix. We tested the influence of the initial inclusion orientation (0°, 90°, or 135° with respect to the shear direction) on the development of sheath folds. The analytical model shows that the sheath folds and consequently eye-structures develop irrespectively of the initial inclusion orientation

  11. Conceptual framework for outcomes research studies of hepatitis C: an analytical review

    PubMed Central

    Sbarigia, Urbano; Denee, Tom R; Turner, Norris G; Wan, George J; Morrison, Alan; Kaufman, Anna S; Rice, Gary; Dusheiko, Geoffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection is one of the main causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. Until recently, the standard antiviral regimen for hepatitis C was a combination of an interferon derivative and ribavirin, but a plethora of new antiviral drugs is becoming available. While these new drugs have shown great efficacy in clinical trials, observational studies are needed to determine their effectiveness in clinical practice. Previous observational studies have shown that multiple factors, besides the drug regimen, affect patient outcomes in clinical practice. Here, we provide an analytical review of published outcomes studies of the management of hepatitis C virus infection. A conceptual framework defines the relationships between four categories of variables: health care system structure, patient characteristics, process-of-care, and patient outcomes. This framework can provide a starting point for outcomes studies addressing the use and effectiveness of new antiviral drug treatments. PMID:27313473

  12. Conceptual framework for outcomes research studies of hepatitis C: an analytical review.

    PubMed

    Sbarigia, Urbano; Denee, Tom R; Turner, Norris G; Wan, George J; Morrison, Alan; Kaufman, Anna S; Rice, Gary; Dusheiko, Geoffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection is one of the main causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. Until recently, the standard antiviral regimen for hepatitis C was a combination of an interferon derivative and ribavirin, but a plethora of new antiviral drugs is becoming available. While these new drugs have shown great efficacy in clinical trials, observational studies are needed to determine their effectiveness in clinical practice. Previous observational studies have shown that multiple factors, besides the drug regimen, affect patient outcomes in clinical practice. Here, we provide an analytical review of published outcomes studies of the management of hepatitis C virus infection. A conceptual framework defines the relationships between four categories of variables: health care system structure, patient characteristics, process-of-care, and patient outcomes. This framework can provide a starting point for outcomes studies addressing the use and effectiveness of new antiviral drug treatments. PMID:27313473

  13. Analytical and experimental study of the acoustics and the flow field characteristics of cavitating self-resonating water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G.L.; Genoux, P.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Frederick, G.S.

    1984-09-01

    Waterjet nozzles (STRATOJETS) have been developed which achieve passive structuring of cavitating submerged jets into discrete ring vortices, and which possess cavitation incipient numbers six times higher than obtained with conventional cavitating jet nozzles. In this study we developed analytical and numerical techniques and conducted experimental work to gain an understanding of the basic phenomena involved. The achievements are: (1) a thorough analysis of the acoustic dynamics of the feed pipe to the nozzle; (2) a theory for bubble ring growth and collapse; (3) a numerical model for jet simulation; (4) an experimental observation and analysis of candidate second-generation low-sigma STRATOJETS. From this study we can conclude that intensification of bubble ring collapse and design of highly resonant feed tubes can lead to improved drilling rates. The models here described are excellent tools to analyze the various parameters needed for STRATOJET optimizations. Further analysis is needed to introduce such important factors as viscosity, nozzle-jet interaction, and ring-target interaction, and to develop the jet simulation model to describe the important fine details of the flow field at the nozzle exit.

  14. Cyclodextrin-assisted enantioseparation of warfarin and 10-hydroxywarfarin by capillary electrophoresis studied from the analytical and thermodynamic points of view.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Paweł Mateusz; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2016-07-15

    In this work cyclodextrin-assisted enantioseparation of warfarin and 10-hydroxywarfarin by CE has been studied from the analytical and thermodynamic points of view. The role of cyclodextrin concentration and temperature has been analyzed in reference to three different analytical parameters, corresponding to selectivity, resolution and resolution/analysis time ratio. The optimal conditions for enantioseparation have been found, they have been selected on the basis of critical difference in electrophoretic mobility and possibly short analysis time. The values of complexation percentage have also been calculated, to provide a link between the state of complexation equilibrium and the effectiveness of enantioseparation. In the optimal conditions the difference in complexation degree between enantiomers reaches 2.5% and 7.3% for warfarin and 10-hydroxywarfarin, respectively. At each temperature the highest enantioresolution is observed when the average complexation degree is close to 50%. In each case complexation is exothermic and driven by some enthalpically favorable process. 10-hydroxywarfarin exerts the stronger affinity to cyclodextrin and the stronger stereoselective effect. The presented results may be helpful in optimization and understanding of chiral separations by CE. PMID:27160739

  15. D-Amino acid metabolism in mammals: biosynthesis, degradation and analytical aspects of the metabolic study.

    PubMed

    Ohide, Hiroko; Miyoshi, Yurika; Maruyama, Rindo; Hamase, Kenji; Konno, Ryuichi

    2011-11-01

    It was believed for long time that d-amino acids are not present in mammals. However, current technological advances and improvements in analytical instruments have enabled studies that now indicate that significant amounts of D-amino acids are present in mammals. The most abundant D-amino acids are D-serine and D-aspartate. D-Serine, which is synthesized by serine racemase and is degraded by D-amino-acid oxidase, is present in the brain and modulates neurotransmission. D-Aspartate, which is synthesized by aspartate racemase and degraded by D-aspartate oxidase, is present in the neuroendocrine and endocrine tissues and testis. It regulates the synthesis and secretion of hormones and spermatogenesis. D-Serine and D-aspartate bind to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors and function as a coagonist and agonist, respectively. The enzymes that are involved in the synthesis and degradation of these D-amino acids are associated with neural diseases where the NMDA receptors are involved. Knockout mice for serine racemase and D-aspartate oxidase have been generated, and natural mutations in the d-amino-acid oxidase gene are present in mice and rats. These mutant animals display altered behaviors caused by enhanced or decreased NMDA receptor activity. In this article, we review currently available studies on D-amino acid metabolism in mammals and discuss analytical methods used to assay activity of amino acid racemases and D-amino-acid oxidases. PMID:21757409

  16. Analytical and Computational Study of Flame Acceleration due to Wall Friction in Combustion Tubes and Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirgok, Berk; Akkerman, V'yacheslav

    2013-11-01

    Deflagration-to-detonation transition constitutes one of the fundamental problems within the studies of reacting flows. It occurs when a subsonic flamefront accelerates, with velocity jump by several orders of magnitude. According to the Shelkin model, the key element of the process is wall friction at non-slip walls, driving a flow of the fresh pre-mixture to be non-uniform, leading to a positive flame-flow feedback and thereby flame acceleration. We perform analytical and computational study of the phenomenon, with very good agreement between them in the domain of intrinsic accuracy of the theory. Theory assumes large Reynolds number (Re) and thermal expansion as well as plane-parallel flow ahead of flamefront. Simulations are performed for complete set of combustion and hydrodynamic equations. Analytical and computational results are also validated by recent experiments on ethylene-oxygen combustion. It is proven realistic flames with a large density drop at the front accelerate in a self-sustained manner and may initiate detonation in a sufficiently long tube. Before this event, the flame shape and the velocity profile remain self-similar. Acceleration rate grows with thermal expansion in the burning process but decreases with Re related to flame propagation.

  17. The path dependency theory: analytical framework to study institutional integration. The case of France

    PubMed Central

    Trouvé, Hélène; Couturier, Yves; Etheridge, Francis; Saint-Jean, Olivier; Somme, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Background The literature on integration indicates the need for an enhanced theorization of institutional integration. This article proposes path dependence as an analytical framework to study the systems in which integration takes place. Purpose PRISMA proposes a model for integrating health and social care services for older adults. This model was initially tested in Quebec. The PRISMA France study gave us an opportunity to analyze institutional integration in France. Methods A qualitative approach was used. Analyses were based on semi-structured interviews with actors of all levels of decision-making, observations of advisory board meetings, and administrative documents. Results Our analyses revealed the complexity and fragmentation of institutional integration. The path dependency theory, which analyzes the change capacity of institutions by taking into account their historic structures, allows analysis of this situation. The path dependency to the Bismarckian system and the incomplete reforms of gerontological policies generate the coexistence and juxtaposition of institutional systems. In such a context, no institution has sufficient ability to determine gerontology policy and build institutional integration by itself. Conclusion Using path dependence as an analytical framework helps to understand the reasons why institutional integration is critical to organizational and clinical integration, and the complex construction of institutional integration in France. PMID:20689740

  18. An analytical model and parametric study of electrical contact resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiliang; Wang, Shuxin; Zhang, Lianhong; Hu, S. Jack

    This paper presents an analytical model of the electrical contact resistance between the carbon paper gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and the graphite bipolar plates (BPPs) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The model is developed based on the classical statistical contact theory for a PEM fuel cell, using the same probability distributions of the GDL structure and BPP surface profile as previously described in Wu et al. [Z. Wu, Y. Zhou, G. Lin, S. Wang, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 182 (2008) 265-269] and Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Results show that estimates of the contact resistance compare favorably with experimental data by Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Factors affecting the contact behavior are systematically studied using the analytical model, including the material properties of the two contact bodies and factors arising from the manufacturing processes. The transverse Young's modulus of chopped carbon fibers in the GDL and the surface profile of the BPP are found to be significant to the contact resistance. The factor study also sheds light on the manufacturing requirements of carbon fiber GDLs for a better contact performance in PEM fuel cells.

  19. Metabolomics Study of Urine in Autism Spectrum Disorders Using a Multiplatform Analytical Methodology.

    PubMed

    Diémé, Binta; Mavel, Sylvie; Blasco, Hélène; Tripi, Gabriele; Bonnet-Brilhault, Frédérique; Malvy, Joëlle; Bocca, Cinzia; Andres, Christian R; Nadal-Desbarats, Lydie; Emond, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with no clinical biomarker. The aims of this study were to characterize a metabolic signature of ASD and to evaluate multiplatform analytical methodologies in order to develop predictive tools for diagnosis and disease follow-up. Urine samples were analyzed using (1)H and (1)H-(13)C NMR-based approaches and LC-HRMS-based approaches (ESI+ and ESI- on HILIC and C18 chromatography columns). Data tables obtained from the six analytical modalities on a training set of 46 urine samples (22 autistic children and 24 controls) were processed by multivariate analysis (orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis, OPLS-DA). The predictions from each of these OPLS-DA models were then evaluated using a prediction set of 16 samples (8 autistic children and 8 controls) and receiver operating characteristic curves. Thereafter, a data fusion block-scaling OPLS-DA model was generated from the 6 best models obtained for each modality. This fused OPLS-DA model showed an enhanced performance (R(2)Y(cum) = 0.88, Q(2)(cum) = 0.75) compared to each analytical modality model, as well as a better predictive capacity (AUC = 0.91, p-value = 0.006). Metabolites that are most significantly different between autistic and control children (p < 0.05) are indoxyl sulfate, N-α-acetyl-l-arginine, methyl guanidine, and phenylacetylglutamine. This multimodality approach has the potential to contribute to find robust biomarkers and characterize a metabolic phenotype of the ASD population. PMID:26538324

  20. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulus, M. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum weight hat-stiffened and open corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programming technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience suggests that most of the theoretical weight saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  1. Genetic studies of plasma analytes identify novel potential biomarkers for several complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Del-Aguila, Jorge L.; Fernandez, Maria Victoria; Carrell, David; Black, Kathleen; Budde, John; Ma, ShengMei; Saef, Benjamin; Howells, Bill; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; Ridge, Perry G.; Hefti, Franz; Fillit, Howard; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Carrillo, Maria; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Trncic, Nadira; Burke, Anna; Tariot, Pierre; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Beiden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Green, Robert C.; Marshall, Gad; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Snyder, Peter; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Ravdin, Lisa; Paul, Steven; Flashman, Laura A.; Seltzer, Marc; Hynes, Mary L.; Santulli, Robert B.; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Friedl, Karl; Murali Doraiswamy, P.; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; James, Olga; Wong, Terence; Coleman, Edward; Schwartz, Adam; Cellar, Janet S.; Levey, Allan L.; Lah, James J.; Behan, Kelly; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Fatica, Parianne; Farlow, Martin R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelly; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Brosch, Jared R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matthew; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Chertkow, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Mintzer, Jacob; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Potter, William; Buckholtz, Neil; Hsiao, John; Kittur, Smita; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Johnson, Nancy; Chuang-Kuo; Kerwin, Diana; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Weintraub, Sandra; Grafman, Jordan; Lipowski, Kristine; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Silbert, Lisa; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Sadowsky, Carl; Khachaturian, Zaven; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Frank, Richard; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Shah, Raj C.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Sorensen, Greg; Finger, Elizabeth; Pasternack, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Furst, Ansgar J.; Chad, Stevan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Fox, Nick; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Ekstam Smith, Karen; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Brooks, William M.; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Natelson Love, Marissa; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Maillard, Pauline; Fletcher, Evan; Nguyen, Dana; Preda, Andrian; Potkin, Steven; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; McAdams-Ortiz, Catherine; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Thompson, Paul; Donohue, Michael; Thomas, Ronald G.; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Balasubramanian, Archana B.; Mason, Jennifer; Sim, Iris; Aisen, Paul; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Harvey, Danielle; Thal, Lean; Beckett, Laurel; Neylan, Thomas; Finley, Shannon; Weiner, Michael W.; Hayes, Jacqueline; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Perry, David; Massoglia, Dino; Brawman-Mentzer, Olga; Schuff, Norbert; Smith, Charles D.; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Koeppe, Robert A.; Lord, Joanne L.; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Clark, Christopher M.; Trojanowki, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Foster, Norm; Montine, Tom; Fruehling, J. Jay; Harding, Sandra; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Petrie, Eric C.; Peskind, Elaine; Li, Gail; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Smith, Amanda; Ashok Raj, Balebail; Fargher, Kristin; Kuller, Lew; Mathis, Chet; Ann Oakley, Mary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Simpson, Donna M.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Gordineer, Leslie; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Cairns, Nigel J.; Raichle, Marc; Morris, John C.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Holtzman, David; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Creech, Mary L.; Franklin, Erin; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Varma, Pradeep; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Carson, Richard E.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Davies, Peter; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C.; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Heitsch, Laura; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Piccio, Laura; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of 146 plasma protein levels in 818 individuals revealed 56 genome-wide significant associations (28 novel) with 47 analytes. Loci associated with plasma levels of 39 proteins tested have been previously associated with various complex traits such as heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Type 2 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. These data suggest that these plasma protein levels may constitute informative endophenotypes for these complex traits. We found three potential pleiotropic genes: ABO for plasma SELE and ACE levels, FUT2 for CA19-9 and CEA plasma levels, and APOE for ApoE and CRP levels. We also found multiple independent signals in loci associated with plasma levels of ApoH, CA19-9, FetuinA, IL6r, and LPa. Our study highlights the power of biological traits for genetic studies to identify genetic variants influencing clinically relevant traits, potential pleiotropic effects, and complex disease associations in the same locus.

  2. A Study on the Optimization for Metal Injection Molding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M. K.; Jang, K. C.; Lee, D. G.; Kim, M. H.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is study the optimization for metal injection molding process by using the design of experiments (DOE) and numerical analysis. In order to determine optimal process parameters, experiment and computerized analysis have been performed for various process conditions. Proper coded and uncoded regression equations and optimization for responses (flow front temperature, part weight, filling time, cycle time, and volumetric shrinkage) achieved from studying and verifying interrelation of the factors. About 70% of whole binder extracted within about 10 minutes and temperature of solvent is higher, the debinding rate is fast. 50° C was the most suitable condition for solvent extraction because of crack occurrence on green body at 55° C. It took about 14.5 hours to perform secondary thermal debinding, which was only about 35% of the entire time taken compared with single thermal debinding process, even if it considers solvent extraction time required. Therefore, the applied method greatly reduces the debinding time. The excellent process capability showed that the PPM total and Z.Bench were 9,946.8 and 2.33 showing good quality rate of around 99.01% and sigma level of 3.83. As a result, the process and optimization have been improved, and the proposed approach could be successfully reflected on the metal injection molding.

  3. Optimization of PET instrumentation for brain activation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlbom, M.; Cherry, S.R.; Hoffman, E.J. . Dept. of Radiological Science); Eriksson, L. . Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology); Wienhard, K. )

    1993-08-01

    By performing cerebral blood flow studies with positron emission tomography (PET), and comparing blood flow images of different states of activation, functional mapping of the brain is possible. The ability of current commercial instruments to perform such studies is investigated in this work, based on a comparison of noise equivalent count (NEC) rates. Differences in the NEC performance of the different scanners in conjunction with scanner design parameters, provide insights into the importance of block design (size, dead time, crystal thickness) and overall scanner design (sensitivity and scatter fraction) for optimizing data from activation studies. The newer scanners with removable septa, operating with 3-D acquisition, have much higher sensitivity, but require new methodology for optimized operation. Only by administering multiple low doses (fractionation) of the flow tracer can the high sensitivity be utilized.

  4. An analytical model applied to a multicenter pneumococcal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay study.

    PubMed

    Plikaytis, B D; Goldblatt, D; Frasch, C E; Blondeau, C; Bybel, M J; Giebink, G S; Jonsdottir, I; Käyhty, H; Konradsen, H B; Madore, D V; Nahm, M H; Schulman, C A; Holder, P F; Lezhava, T; Elie, C M; Carlone, G M

    2000-06-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines will eventually be licensed after favorable results from phase III efficacy trials. After licensure of a conjugate vaccine for invasive pneumococcal disease in infants, new conjugate vaccines will likely be licensed primarily on the basis of immunogenicity data rather than clinical efficacy. Analytical methods must therefore be developed, evaluated, and validated to compare immunogenicity results accurately within and between laboratories for different vaccines. At present no analytical technique is uniformly accepted and used in vaccine evaluation studies to determine the acceptable level of agreement between a laboratory result and the assigned value for a given serum sample. This multicenter study describes the magnitude of agreement among 12 laboratories quantifying an identical series of 48 pneumococcal serum specimens from 24 individuals (quality-control sera) by a consensus immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed for this study. After provisional or trial antibody concentrations were assigned to the quality-control serum samples for this study, four methods for comparison of a series of laboratory-determined values with the assigned concentrations were evaluated. The percent error between assigned values and laboratory-determined concentrations proved to be the most informative of the four methods. We present guidelines that a laboratory may follow to analyze a series of quality-control sera to determine if it can reproduce the assigned antibody concentrations within an acceptable level of tolerance. While this study focused on a pneumococcal IgG ELISA, the methods that we describe are easily generalizable to other immunological assays. PMID:10834951

  5. An analytical study of PPP-RTK corrections: precision, correlation and user-impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodabandeh, A.; Teunissen, P. J. G.

    2015-11-01

    PPP-RTK extends the PPP concept by providing single-receiver users, next to orbits and clocks, also information about the satellite phase and code biases, thus enabling single-receiver ambiguity resolution. It is the goal of the present contribution to provide an analytical study of the quality of the PPP-RTK corrections as well as of their impact on the user ambiguity resolution performance. We consider the geometry-free and the geometry-based network derived corrections, as well as the impact of network ambiguity resolution on these corrections. Next to the insight that is provided by the analytical solutions, the closed form expressions of the variance matrices also demonstrate how the corrections depend on network parameters such as number of epochs, number of stations, number of satellites, and number of frequencies. As a result we are able to describe in a qualitative sense how the user ambiguity resolution performance is driven by the data from the different network scenarios.

  6. Analytical studies of a backscatter x-ray imaging landmine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavmurthy, Shyam P.; Dugan, Edward T.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Jacobs, Alan M.

    1996-05-01

    The Compton Backscatter Imaging (CBI) technique has been applied successfully to detect buried plastic anti-tank landmines. The images acquired by a CBI system are often cluttered by surface features. Additionally, some buried objects give the same response as the plastic landmines. The landmine detection can be successful only when the detection system is capable of distinguishing between surface features and the mine-like objects. This can be accomplished by designing detectors that differentiate between the surface features and the buried objects. An understanding of the physical phenomena underlining the CB image formation helps us to design these detectors. To study the physics of the Compton backscattering, the photon transport in a CBI system is simulated using Monte-Carlo calculations with the generalized particle transport program MCNP. The photon tracks are graphically displayed using a visualization program SABRINA. On the basis of the results from these Monte-Carlo analyses, a four-detector system has been designed. This detector design utilizes the unique nature of various collision components of the scattered photons to generate separate images of buried objects and surface features. The success of this detector design is demonstrated through a series of analytically generated images. The results of the experimental measurements that validate these analytical predictions are brought out in a separate paper to be presented in this conference.

  7. Modelling and analytic studies of sheared flow effects on tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, D.; Thyagaraja, A.; Sen, A.; Ham, C. J.; Hender, T. C.; Hastie, R. J.; Connor, J. W.; Kaw, P.; Mendonca, J.

    2015-05-01

    The effects of flow shear on the stability of a (2,1) tearing mode are examined using numerical and analytic studies on a number of model systems. For a cylindrical reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, linear computations using the CUTIE code show that sheared axial flows have a destabilizing effect, while sheared poloidal flows tend to reduce the growth rate of the mode. These effects are independent of the direction of the flow. For helical flows the sign of the shear in the flow matters. This symmetry breaking is also seen in the nonlinear regime where the island saturation level is found to depend on the sign of the flows. In the absence of flow, the CUTIE simulations show that the linear mode is more stable in a two fluid as compared to a single fluid model. However, in the presence of sheared axial flows a negative sheared flow is more destabilizing while a positive sheared flow is more stabilizing, compared to the single fluid model. In contrast to the cylindrical model, simulations in a toroidal model, using the MHD code NEAR, always show a stabilizing effect in the presence of a sheared toroidal flow. This is understood analytically in terms of a flow induced ‘Shafranov’ like shift in the profiles of the equilibrium current that results in a stabilizing change in Δ‧ and the saturated island size.

  8. Environmental concentrations of engineered nanomaterials: review of modeling and analytical studies.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Fadri; Sun, Tianyin; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Scientific consensus predicts that the worldwide use of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) leads to their release into the environment. We reviewed the available literature concerning environmental concentrations of six ENMs (TiO2, ZnO, Ag, fullerenes, CNT and CeO2) in surface waters, wastewater treatment plant effluents, biosolids, sediments, soils and air. Presently, a dozen modeling studies provide environmental concentrations for ENM and a handful of analytical works can be used as basis for a preliminary validation. There are still major knowledge gaps (e.g. on ENM production, application and release) that affect the modeled values, but over all an agreement on the order of magnitude of the environmental concentrations can be reached. True validation of the modeled values is difficult because trace analytical methods that are specific for ENM detection and quantification are not available. The modeled and measured results are not always comparable due to the different forms and sizes of particles that these two approaches target. PMID:23856352

  9. Analytical and experimental study of free oscillations of neutral buoyancy bodies in a continuously stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A. Yu.

    2009-04-01

    We study analytically and experimentally flow pattern forming by free oscillating sphere and vertical cylinder near a neutral buoyancy horizon. Calculations of the free body displacements are based on complete set of fundamental governing equations including continuity and Navier-Stokes equations and incompressibility equation for the fluid with no-slip boundary conditions and the Newton's second law for the body. The set is transformed into system of integro-differential equations which is solved by multi-scale perturbation method. Solutions for different variables are constructed in infinite series, then truncated and the first approximation which depended on two empiric parameters is analysed. The parameters, characterising frequency and typical rate of decay of oscillations are defined from experiments. Experiments are performed in a stratified tank using markers, schlieren instruments and conductivity sensors. Internal waves and autocumulative jets were observed in the fluid. Analytical calculations rather good fit the dates of measurements. Extrapolation of theoretical and experimental data on environmental condition shows that singular surfaces around free oscillating marine "ARGO" buoys can impact on measurement accuracy.

  10. Collective excitations in supercritical fluids: Analytical and molecular dynamics study of ``positive'' and ``negative'' dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryk, Taras; Mryglod, Ihor; Scopigno, Tullio; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Gorelli, Federico; Santoro, Mario

    2010-07-01

    The approach of generalized collective modes is applied to the study of dispersion curves of collective excitations along isothermal lines of supercritical pure Lennard-Jones fluid. An effect of structural relaxation and other nonhydrodynamic relaxation processes on the dispersion law is discussed. A simple analytical expression for the dispersion law in the long-wavelength region of acoustic excitations is obtained within a three-variable viscoelastic model of generalized hydrodynamics. It is shown that the deviation from the linear dependence in the long-wavelength region can be either "positive" or "negative" depending on the ratio between the high-frequency (elastic) and isothermal speed of sound. An effect of thermal fluctuations on positive and negative dispersion is estimated from the analytical solution of a five-variable thermoviscoelastic model that generalizes the results of the viscoelastic treatment. Numerical results are reported for a Lennard-Jones supercritical fluid along two isothermal lines T∗=1.71,4.78 with different densities and discussed along the theoretical expressions derived.

  11. Visual analytics for multimodal social network analysis: a design study with social scientists.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Sohaib; Kwon, Bum Chul; Lee, Seungyoon; Yi, Ji Soo; Elmqvist, Niklas

    2013-12-01

    Social network analysis (SNA) is becoming increasingly concerned not only with actors and their relations, but also with distinguishing between different types of such entities. For example, social scientists may want to investigate asymmetric relations in organizations with strict chains of command, or incorporate non-actors such as conferences and projects when analyzing coauthorship patterns. Multimodal social networks are those where actors and relations belong to different types, or modes, and multimodal social network analysis (mSNA) is accordingly SNA for such networks. In this paper, we present a design study that we conducted with several social scientist collaborators on how to support mSNA using visual analytics tools. Based on an openended, formative design process, we devised a visual representation called parallel node-link bands (PNLBs) that splits modes into separate bands and renders connections between adjacent ones, similar to the list view in Jigsaw. We then used the tool in a qualitative evaluation involving five social scientists whose feedback informed a second design phase that incorporated additional network metrics. Finally, we conducted a second qualitative evaluation with our social scientist collaborators that provided further insights on the utility of the PNLBs representation and the potential of visual analytics for mSNA. PMID:24051769

  12. Analytical study of Yang-Mills theory in the infrared from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siringo, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Pure Yang-Mills SU(N) theory is studied in the Landau gauge and four dimensional space. While leaving the original Lagrangian unmodified, a double perturbative expansion is devised, based on a massive free-particle propagator. In dimensional regularization, all diverging mass terms cancel exactly in the double expansion, without the need to include mass counterterms that would spoil the symmetry of the Lagrangian. No free parameters are included that were not in the original theory, yielding a fully analytical approach from first principles. The expansion is safe in the infrared and is equivalent to the standard perturbation theory in the UV. At one-loop, explicit analytical expressions are given for the propagators and the running coupling and are found in excellent agreement with the data of lattice simulations. A universal scaling property is predicted for the inverse propagators and shown to be satisfied by the lattice data. Higher loops are found to be negligible in the infrared below 300 MeV where the coupling becomes small and the one-loop approximation is under full control.

  13. Influence of strut inertia on the vibrations in initially symmetric Gough-Stewart Platforms-an analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzali-Far, Behrouz; Andersson, Anette; Nilsson, Kristina; Lidström, Per

    2015-09-01

    Consideration of strut inertia can have significant influence on the modal behavior of a Gough-Stewart Platform (GSP). However, in the literature, the strut inertia has not yet been taken into account in its vibration study with a parametric approach. In this paper, we present a fully parametric approach to formulate the damped vibrations of GSPs taking into account the strut masses and moments of inertia for symmetric configurations. For the first time, a combined 6×6 equivalent inertia matrix (mass matrix), including both the inertia properties of the platform and the struts, is formulated parametrically. Subsequently, the eigenvectors and the damped eigenfrequencies are also parametrically developed in the Cartesian space. Furthermore, the conditions for the decoupled vibrations and the effect of strut inertia on these conditions are analytically investigated. With the aid of a reference GSP, the influence of the strut inertia on its modal behavior is systematically investigated. Accordingly, it is concluded that the parametric equations established in this paper can be directly employed in the analysis, optimization and control of GSPs in any application.

  14. Study of Analytic Statistical Model for Decay of Light and Medium Mass Nuclei in Nuclear Fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1996-01-01

    The angular momentum independent statistical decay model is often applied using a Monte-Carlo simulation to describe the decay of prefragment nuclei in heavy ion reactions. This paper presents an analytical approach to the decay problem of nuclei with mass number less than 60, which is important for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) studies. This decay problem of nuclei with mass number less than 60 incorporates well-known levels of the lightest nuclei (A less than 11) to improve convergence and accuracy. A sensitivity study of the model level density function is used to determine the impact on mass and charge distributions in nuclear fragmentation. This angular momentum independent statistical decay model also describes the momentum and energy distribution of emitted particles (n, p, d, t, h, and a) from a prefragment nucleus.

  15. Semi-analytical fluid study of the laser wake field excitation in the strong intensity regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, D.; Fedele, R.; Belić, M.; De Nicola, S.

    2016-09-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the interaction of a multi-petawatt, pancake-shaped laser pulse with an unmagnetized plasma. The study has been performed in the ultrarelativistic regime of electron jitter velocities, in which the plasma electrons are almost completely expelled from the pulse region. The calculations are applied to a laser wake field acceleration scheme with specifications that may be available in the next generation of Ti:Sa lasers and with the use of recently developed pulse compression techniques. A set of novel nonlinear equations is derived using a three-timescale description, with an intermediate timescale associated with the nonlinear phase of the electromagnetic wave and with the spatial bending of its wave front. They describe, on an equal footing, both the strong and the moderate laser intensity regimes, pertinent to the core and to the edges of the pulse.

  16. Use of stable isotopes of selenium in human metabolic studies: development of analytical methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Janghorbani, M.; Ting, B.T.; Young, V.R.

    1981-12-01

    Use of stable isotopes of selenium in relation to enrichment of diets for studies of selenium absorption and metabolism in human subjects is discussed. A method based on radiochemical neutron activation analysis is described which allows accurate measurement of stable isotopes 74Se, 76Se, and 80Se in matrices (feces, plasma, red blood cells, and urine) of interest in metabolic studies. We show that these isotopes can routinely be measured with analytical precision and accuracy of 10% in samples of available size. This precision and accuracy is satisfactory for conduct of many nutritional experiments concerned with gastrointestinal absorption, plasma and red cell selenium turnover, and urinary excretion of the element, using an oral dose of 74Se. Original, experimental data are presented to illustrate the degree of enrichment of 74Se in feces, plasma, and urine after a single oral ingestion of 50 micrograms of the isotope with a breakfast meal in healthy young men.

  17. Studies on controllability of directed networks with extremal optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jin; Lu, Yong-Zai; Chu, Jian

    2013-12-01

    Almost all natural, social and man-made-engineered systems can be represented by a complex network to describe their dynamic behaviors. To make a real-world complex network controllable with its desired topology, the study on network controllability has been one of the most critical and attractive subjects for both network and control communities. In this paper, based on a given directed-weighted network with both state and control nodes, a novel optimization tool with extremal dynamics to generate an optimal network topology with minimum control nodes and complete controllability under Kalman’s rank condition has been developed. The experimental results on a number of popular benchmark networks show the proposed tool is effective to identify the minimum control nodes which are sufficient to guide the whole network’s dynamics and provide the evolution of network topology during the optimization process. We also find the conclusion: “the sparse networks need more control nodes than the dense, and the homogeneous networks need fewer control nodes compared to the heterogeneous” (Liu et al., 2011 [18]), is also applicable to network complete controllability. These findings help us to understand the network dynamics and make a real-world network under the desired control. Moreover, compared with the relevant research results on structural controllability with minimum driver nodes, the proposed solution methodology may also be applied to other constrained network optimization problems beyond complete controllability with minimum control nodes.

  18. Optimization Shield Materials Trade Study for Lunar/Gateway Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Anderson, B. M.; Simonsen, L. C.

    2002-01-01

    The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in many deep space missions. For this enabling technology, we are developing tools for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of various space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. Preliminary studies of deep space missions indicate that for long duration space missions, improved shield materials will be required. The details of this new method and its impact on space missions and other technologies will be discussed. This study will provide a vital tool for evaluating Gateway designs in their usage context. Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is one of the challenges to the Gateway infrastructure designs. We will use the mission optimization software to scope the impact of Gateway operations on human exposures and the effectiveness of alternate shielding materials on Gateway infrastructure designs. It is being proposed to use Moon and the Lagrange points as the hub for deep space missions. This study will provide a guide to the effectiveness of multifunctional materials in preparation to more detailed geometry studies in progress.

  19. Analytical and numerical studies of photo-injected charge transport in molecularly-doped polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, Amrita

    The mobility of photo-injected charge carriers in molecularly-doped polymers (MDPs) exhibits a commonly observed, and nearly universal Poole-Frenkel field dependence, mu exp√(beta0E), that has been shown to arise from the correlated Gaussian energy distribution of transport sites encountered by charges undergoing hopping transport through the material. Analytical and numerical studies of photo-injected charge transport in these materials are presented here with an attempt to understand how specific features of the various models developed to describe these systems depend on the microscopic parameters that define them. Specifically, previously published time-of-flight mobility data for the molecularly doped polymer 30% DEH:PC (polycarbonate doped with 30 wt.% aromatic hydrazone DEH) is compared with direct analytical and numerical predictions of five disorder-based models, the Gaussian disorder model (GDM) of Bassler, and four correlated disorder models introduced by Novikov, et al., and by Parris, et al. In these numerical studies, disorder parameters describing each model were varied from reasonable starting conditions, in order to give the best overall fit. The uncorrelated GDM describes the Poole-Frenkel field dependence of the mobility only at very high fields, but fails for fields lower than about 64 V/mum. The correlated disorder models with small amounts of geometrical disorder do a good over-all job of reproducing a robust Poole-Frenkel field dependence, with correlated disorder theories that employ polaron transition rates showing qualitatively better agreement with experiment than those that employ Miller-Abrahams rates. In a separate study, the heuristic treatment of spatial or geometric disorder incorporated in existing theories is critiqued, and a randomly-diluted lattice gas model is developed to describe the spatial disorder of the transport sites in a more realistic way.

  20. Optimization of an improved analytical method for the determination of 1-nitropyrene in milligram diesel soot samples by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barreto, R P; Albuquerque, F C; Netto, Annibal D Pereira

    2007-09-01

    A method for determination of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) in diesel soot by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and detection by ion-trap following ultrasonic extraction is described. The determination of 1-nitropyrene that it is the predominant NPAH in diesel soot was emphasized. Vaporization and drying temperatures of the APCI interface, electronic parameters of the MS detector and the analytical conditions in reversed-phase HPLC were optimized. The patterns of fragmentation of representative NPAHs were evaluated by single and multiple fragmentation steps and negative ionization led to the largest signals. The transition (247-->217) was employed for quantitative analysis of 1-nitropyrene. Calibration curves were linear between 1 and 15 microgL(-1) with correlation coefficients better than 0.999. Typical detection limit (DL) of 0.2 microgL(-1) was obtained. Samples of diesel soot and of the reference material (SRM-2975, NIST, USA) were extracted with methylene chloride. Recoveries were estimated by analysis of SRM 2975 and were between 82 and 105%. DL for 1-nitropyrene was better than 1.5 mg kg(-1), but the inclusion of an evaporation step in the sample processing procedure lowered the DL. The application of the method to diesel soot samples from bench motors showed levels

  1. OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR FILL STEM MANUFACTURINGAND PINCH WELD PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; Karl Arnold, K

    2006-09-06

    A statistically designed experiment was conducted as part of a six sigma project for Fill Stem Manufacturing and Pinch Weld Processing. This multi-year/multi-site project has successfully completed a screening study and used those results as inputs to this optimization study. Eleven welds were made using fairly tight current and cycle range. The welds demonstrate increased burst strength, longer closure length, more net displacement, and improved bond rating with increased current. However, excessive melting remains a concern from a processing viewpoint and may cause adverse metallurgical interactions. Therefore, the highest current levels specified cannot be utilized. A Validation Study is proposed for the Defense Programs Inert Facility.

  2. Analytic optimizations in crisis stability

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-03-01

    Second strikes are dominated by submarine launched missiles in the absence of defenses, but shift to aircraft at modest levels of defense. Defenses protect some retaliatory missiles, but not enough to retaliate strongly. With defenses, missiles should be vestigial and could be eliminated without penalty. Then aircraft could also be significantly reduced without impacting stability. The combination of parameters that maximizes cost effectiveness also maximizes midcourse effectiveness and crisis stability. 15 refs., 20 figs.

  3. The comparative study on analytical solutions and numerical solutions of displacement in transversely isotropic rock mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhizeng; Zhao, Zhao; Li, Yongtao

    2016-06-01

    This paper attempts to verify the correctness of the analytical displacement solution in transversely isotropic rock mass, and to determine the scope of its application. The analytical displacement solution of a circular tunnel in transversely isotropic rock mass was derived firstly. The analytical solution was compared with the numerical solution, which was carried out by FLAC3D software. The results show that the expression of the analytical displacement solution is correct, and the allowable engineering range is that the dip angle is less than 15 degrees.

  4. Ground Based Studies of Thermocapillary Flows in Levitated Drops: Analytical Part

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, S. S.; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1997-01-01

    The main objectives of the analytical part of this investigation are to study the fluid flow phenomena together with the thermal effects on drops levitated in an acoustic field. To a large extent, experimentation on ground requires a strong acoustic field that has a significant interference with other thermal-fluid effects. While most of the work has been directed towards particles in strong acoustic fields to overcome gravity, some results for microgravity have been obtained. One of the objectives was to obtain the thermocapillary flow in a spot-heated drop, and set up a model for the prediction of thermophysical properties. In addition, for acoustically levitated particles, a clear understanding of the underlying fluid mechanics was required. Also, the interaction of acoustics with steady and pulsating thermal stimuli was required to be analyzed. The experimental part of the work was funded through JPL, and has been reported separately.

  5. Effect of Potassium on the Mechanisms of Biomass Pyrolysis Studied using Complementary Analytical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Le Brech, Yann; Ghislain, Thierry; Leclerc, Sébastien; Bouroukba, Mohammed; Delmotte, Luc; Brosse, Nicolas; Snape, Colin; Chaimbault, Patrick; Dufour, Anthony

    2016-04-21

    Complementary analytical methods have been used to study the effect of potassium on the pyrolysis mechanisms of cellulose and lignocellulosic biomasses. Thermogravimetry, calorimetry, high-temperature (1) H NMR spectroscopy (in situ and real-time analysis of the fluid phase formed during pyrolysis), and water extraction of quenched char followed by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry have been combined. Potassium impregnated in cellulose suppresses the formation of anhydrosugars, reduces the formation of mobile protons, and gives rise to a mainly exothermic signal. The evolution of mobile protons formed from K-impregnated cellulose has a very similar pattern to the evolution of the mass loss rate. This methodology has been also applied to analyze miscanthus, demineralized miscanthus, miscanthus re-impregnated with potassium after demineralization, raw oak, and Douglas fir. Hydrogen mobility and transfer are of high importance in the mechanisms of biomass pyrolysis. PMID:26990591

  6. Focused Experimental and Analytical Studies of the RBCC Rocket-Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, M.; Pal, S.; Schwes, D.; Chen, J. D.; Santoro, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The rocket-ejector mode of a Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engine (RBCC) was studied through a joint experimental/analytical approach. A two-dimensional variable geometry rocket-ejector system with enhanced optical access was designed and fabricated for experimentation. The rocket-ejector system utilizes a single two-dimensional gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen rocket as the ejector. To gain a systematic understanding of the rocket ejector's internal fluid mechanic/combustion phenomena, experiments were conducted with both direct-connect and sea-level static configurations for a range of rocket operating conditions Overall system performance was obtained through Global measurements of wall static pressure profiles, heat flux profiles and engine thrust, whereas detailed mixing and combustion information was obtained through Raman spectroscopy measurements of major species (gaseous oxygen, hydrogen. nitrogen and water vapor). These experimental efforts were complemented by Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) flowfield analyses.

  7. High temperature dielectric constant measurement - another analytical tool for ceramic studies?

    SciTech Connect

    Hutcheon, R.M.; Hayward, P.; Alexander, S.B.

    1995-12-31

    The automation of a high-temperature (1400{degrees}C), microwave-frequency, dielectric constant measurement system has dramatically increased the reproducibility and detail of data. One can now consider using the technique as a standard tool for analytical studies of low-conductivity ceramics and glasses. Simultaneous temperature and frequency scanning dielectric analyses (SDA) yield the temperature-dependent complex dielectric constant. The real part of the dielectric constant is especially sensitive to small changes in the distance and distribution of neighboring ions or atoms, while the absorptive part is strongly dependent on the position and population of electron/hole conduction bands, which are sensitive to impurity concentrations in the ceramic. SDA measurements on a few specific materials will be compared with standard differential thermal analysis (DTA) results and an attempt will be made to demonstrate the utility of both the common and complementary aspects of the techniques.

  8. Psychological and physical well-being during unemployment: a meta-analytic study.

    PubMed

    McKee-Ryan, Frances; Song, Zhaoli; Wanberg, Connie R; Kinicki, Angelo J

    2005-01-01

    The authors used theoretical models to organize the diverse unemployment literature, and meta-analytic techniques were used to examine the impact of unemployment on worker well-being across 104 empirical studies with 437 effect sizes. Unemployed individuals had lower psychological and physical well-being than did their employed counterparts. Unemployment duration and sample type (school leaver vs. mature unemployed) moderated the relationship between mental health and unemployment, but the current unemployment rate and the amount of unemployment benefits did not. Within unemployed samples, work-role centrality, coping resources (personal, social, financial, and time structure), cognitive appraisals, and coping strategies displayed stronger relationships with mental health than did human capital or demographic variables. The authors identify gaps in the literature and propose directions for future unemployment research. PMID:15641890

  9. An analytical electron microscope study of airborne industrial particles in Sosnowiec, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Janeczek, Janusz

    The types and the relative amounts of airborne particles in the city of Sosnowiec (Poland) during 21-22 June, 1994 were identified by analytical electron microscope analyses. They are mostly aspherical angular Al-bearing silica particles (0.1-5.15 μm) and clusters thereof. Carbonaceous particles form sheets of soluble volatile-rich materials (0.3-33.9 μm) and rare soot. Numerous nanometer-sized Al-bearing silica grains and salt minerals are associated with the larger particles. They resulted from inefficient combustion of low-grade coals by the local industries whereby the silica particles are coal impurities that survived combustion. The total particle emission was constant during a 24 h period but silica shards dominated the nighttime emission while carbonaceous particles abounded during the daytime. This study showed that tropospheric particles in regions dominated by inefficient coal combustion are fundamentally different from typical coal fly ash spheres.

  10. Analytic study of heat transfer with variable viscosity on solid particle motion in dusty Jeffery fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, M. M.; Zeeshan, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, effects of variable viscosity with heat transfer on solid particle motion of dusty Jeffrey fluid model through a planar channel has been examined. The governing flow problem for fluid phase and dusty phase is formulated with the help of momentum and energy equation. The resulting coupled ordinary differential equations have been solved analytically and closed form solutions are presented. The influence of all the physical parameters are sketched for velocity profile, pressure rise and temperature profile. Numerical computation is used to evaluate the expression for pressure rise. The present analysis is also presented for Newtonian fluid by taking λ1 → 0 as a special case of our study. It is found that due to the influence of variable viscosity, the fluid velocity changes in the center of the channel and shows opposite behavior near the walls. It is also found that temperature profile increases for larger values of Prandtl number (Pr) and Eckert number (Ec).

  11. Applications of surface analytical techniques for study of the interactions between mercury and fluorescent lamp materials.

    PubMed

    Dang, Twan A; Frisk, T A; Grossman, M W

    2002-08-01

    Several surface analytical techniques, including electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA)(X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS), were used to study the interaction between Hg and other components of fluorescent lamps, a very critical issue in lighting industries. Active sites, responsible for Hg interaction/deposition, can be successfully identified by comparing the x- y distribution (obtained by ESCA mapping) and depth distribution (available through SNMS) of respective lamp components with that of Hg. A correlation in both depth and x- y distribution is strong evidence of site preference for Hg interaction/deposition. A burial mechanism is, however, proposed when only depth distribution, not x- y, is correlated. Other modes of ESCA (high resolution, angle-resolved, etc.) were also helpful. Information about the valence states of the interacted Hg species would help to define the nature of the interaction. PMID:12185568

  12. Analytical and Numerical Study of the Air Breathing Model for Laser Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Tang, Zhiping

    2004-03-01

    Laser propulsion is a new concept technique of propulsion and will have important application in future space technology. In this paper, the analytic formulas for the impulse and momentum coupling coefficient based on point explosion theory have been derived by considering the restraint of the reflector. In the numerical study, a new method that combining the self-similarity solution for point-explosion at the first stage and the high resolution PPM mesh at the second stage, has been applied to calculate the high-temperature plasma flow field generated by the focused laser beam. The simulated results show that the efficiency of laser propulsion, such as thrust, total impulse, momentum coupling coefficient etc are strongly related to the geometry of the reflector and the power of the input laser beam.

  13. Extended analytical study of the free-wing/free-trimmer concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. F.; Hall, D. W.; Vergara, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The free wing/free trimmer concept was analytically studied in order to: (1) compare the fore and aft trimmer configurations on the basis of equal lift capability, rather than equal area; (2) assess the influence of tip mounted aft trimmers, both free and fixed, on the lateral directional modes and turbulence responses; (3) examine the feasibility of using differential tip mounted trimmer deflection for lateral control; (4) determine the effects of independent fuselage attitude on the lateral directional behavior; and (5) estimate the influence of wing sweep on dynamic behavior and structural weight. Results indicate that the forward trimmer concept is feasible with the reduced size examined, but it remains inferior to the aft trimmer in every respect except structural weight. Differential motion of the aft trimmer is found to provide powerful lateral control; while the effect of fuselage deck angle is a reduction of the dutch roll damping ratio for nose-down attitudes.

  14. An Analytical Study of Fuzzy Control of a Flexible Rod Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, D.; Lee, S. W.; Boghiu, D.

    1998-02-01

    The non-linear nature of very high speed, flexible rod mechanisms has been previously confirmed, both experimentally and analytically in reference [1]. Therefore, effective control system design for flexible mechanisms operating at very high speeds must consider the non-linearities when designing a controller for very high speeds. Active control via fuzzy logic is assessed as means to suppress the elastic transverse bending vibration of a flexible rod of a slider crank mechanism. Several pairs of piezoelectric elements are used to provide the control action. Sensor output of deflection is fed to the fuzzy controller, which determines the voltage input to the actuators. A three mode approximation is used in the simulation study. Computer simulation shows that fuzzy control can be used to suppress bending vibrations at high speeds, and even at speeds where the uncontrolled response would be unstable.

  15. High-resolution spectroscopy using an echelle spectrometer with predisperser-II. Analytical optimization for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumans, P. W. J. M.; Vrakking, J. J. A. M.

    This work is primarily concerned with the optimization of the slit width (and thus the practical resolving power) of a new type of echelle spectrometer coupled to a 50-MHz ICP operated with a pneumatic nebulizer, as described in Part I of this article series (Spectrochim. Acta39B, this issue (1984)). The optimization is carried out under "ICP compromise conditions" and uses detection power as criterion. With a "pure water" matrix, the effects of slit width on net line and background signals, signal-to-background ratio (SBR), relative standard deviation (RSD) of background signal and detection limit were evaluated for a set of prominent ICP lines spread over wavelengths between 190 and 500 nm. The detection limits eventually attained under optimum conditions were an order of magnitude better than "standard" values reported in the literature (winge et al., Appl. Spectrosc.33, 206 (1979)). The optimization was extended to a Ni-Co matrix, the latter serving as an example of samples that emit line-rich spectra. In this context, a detailed analysis was made of the background enhancements associated with the presence of major elements that emit line-rich spectra. Accordingly the effects of slit width on SBR, background RSD and detection limit were differentiated in dependence on whether the background enhancement was due to quasicontinuous background, due to complete coincidence of the analysis line with a line of the matrix, or due to partial line overlap. The quasi-continuous background was attributed to the wings of strong lines of the matrix, as described in Part III ( Spectrochim. Acta39B, this issue (1984)). It was established that with pure line wing interference the gain in detection power achieved by improving the practical spectral bandwidth from, say, 0.015-0.005 nm is approximately similar to that found for pure water, that is, a factor of 2-3. In the case of partial line overlap, larger improvements can be achieved depending on the physical widths of the

  16. Aerial optimization and canopy penetration study of Dibrom 14 Concentrate.

    PubMed

    Brown, James R; Reynolds, W H; Palmisano, C; Taylor, V

    2005-03-01

    This document describes the results of collaborative trials between St. Tammany Parish Mosquito Control, ADAPCO, Inc., and the Navy Disease Vector Ecology and Control Center, Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, FL. These tests provide data on the aerial optimization testing of Dibrom 14 Concentrate adulticide. During the week of June 17, 2002, 1 canopy penetration and 3 optimization studies were conducted in St. Tammany Parish, LA, using a Britton Norman twin turbine Islander equipped with 10-800067 flat fan nozzles. Dibrom 14 Concentrate (AMVAC Chemical Corp., Los Angeles, CA) was applied at 3.12 liter per min from a release height of 60.96 m above ground level (agl) at 140 kts indicated airspeed. This resulted in an application rate of 0.65 oz/acre. PMID:15825773

  17. Optimizing Quantum Simulation for Heterogeneous Computing: a Hadamard Transformation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avila, Anderson B.; Schumalfuss, Murilo F.; Reiser, Renata H. S.; Pilla, Mauricio L.; Maron, Adriano K.

    2015-10-01

    The D-GM execution environment improves distributed simulation of quantum algorithms in heterogeneous computing environments comprising both multi-core CPUs and GPUs. The main contribution of this work consists in the optimization of the environment VirD-GM, conceived in three steps: (i) the theoretical studies and implementation of the abstractions of the Mixed Partial Process defined in the qGM model, focusing on the reduction of the memory consumption regarding multidimensional QTs; (ii) the distributed/parallel implementation of such abstractions allowing its execution on clusters of GPUs; (iii) and optimizations that predict multiplications by zero-value of the quantum states/transformations, implying reduction in the number of computations. The results obtained in this work embrace the distribute/parallel simulation of Hadamard gates up to 21 qubits, showing scalability with the increase in the number of computing nodes.

  18. Study of experimental parameters for IRT applications in building elements using multi-layered analytical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Catarina; Simões, Nuno; Tadeu, António

    2015-05-01

    This paper compares experimental and heat transfer modeling results for thermography applications in building elements. Over the years most building envelope inspections using infrared thermography (IRT) have been focused on qualitative analysis using mostly passive thermography techniques. However, increased need for the monitorization and assessment of the energy performance and thermal behavior of buildings, along with ongoing structural safety concerns, has raised interest in quantitative studies and active IRT applications in buildings. Numerous other fields have benefited from developments in defect detection studies and from countless non-destructive testing applications. Pulse phase thermography, in which phase images are studied (instead of temperature images) using a long heating pulse have been proposed to be the most effective for Civil Engineering applications. However, the particular characteristics of building elements and materials, along with the complex nature of heat transfer phenomena, demand specific experimental procedures and processing techniques. In this paper, analytical solutions to simulate heat transfer in the frequency domain in multi-layered media are used to compute thermal wave phase results. These are compared to experimental IRT phase analysis results of experiments performed on test specimens simulating building elements with embedded defects. Crucial test parameters such as test duration and defect characteristics are changed and their influence is studied. In this way, this paper contributes to the understanding of building envelope thermal patterns using active IRT in defect detection studies and to the definition of test parameters.

  19. Action Video Game Training for Healthy Adults: A Meta-Analytic Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Han-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Ting; Meng, Tian; Li, Hui-Jie; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Action video game (AVG) has attracted increasing attention from both the public and from researchers. More and more studies found video game training improved a variety of cognitive functions. However, it remains controversial whether healthy adults can benefit from AVG training, and whether young and older adults benefit similarly from AVG training. In the present study, we aimed to quantitatively assess the AVG training effect on the cognitive ability of adults and to compare the training effects on young and older adults by conducting a meta-analysis on previous findings. We systematically searched video game training studies published between January 1986 and July 2015. Twenty studies were included in the present meta-analysis, for a total of 313 participants included in the training group and 323 participants in the control group. The results demonstrate that healthy adults achieve moderate benefit from AVG training in overall cognitive ability and moderate to small benefit in specific cognitive domains. In contrast, young adults gain more benefits from AVG training than older adults in both overall cognition and specific cognitive domains. Age, education, and some methodological factors, such as the session duration, session number, total training duration, and control group type, modulated the training effects. These meta-analytic findings provide evidence that AVG training may serve as an efficient way to improve the cognitive performance of healthy adults. We also discussed several directions for future AVG training studies. PMID:27378996

  20. Action Video Game Training for Healthy Adults: A Meta-Analytic Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Han-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Ting; Meng, Tian; Li, Hui-Jie; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Action video game (AVG) has attracted increasing attention from both the public and from researchers. More and more studies found video game training improved a variety of cognitive functions. However, it remains controversial whether healthy adults can benefit from AVG training, and whether young and older adults benefit similarly from AVG training. In the present study, we aimed to quantitatively assess the AVG training effect on the cognitive ability of adults and to compare the training effects on young and older adults by conducting a meta-analysis on previous findings. We systematically searched video game training studies published between January 1986 and July 2015. Twenty studies were included in the present meta-analysis, for a total of 313 participants included in the training group and 323 participants in the control group. The results demonstrate that healthy adults achieve moderate benefit from AVG training in overall cognitive ability and moderate to small benefit in specific cognitive domains. In contrast, young adults gain more benefits from AVG training than older adults in both overall cognition and specific cognitive domains. Age, education, and some methodological factors, such as the session duration, session number, total training duration, and control group type, modulated the training effects. These meta-analytic findings provide evidence that AVG training may serve as an efficient way to improve the cognitive performance of healthy adults. We also discussed several directions for future AVG training studies. PMID:27378996

  1. Analytical sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.W. . Dept. of Geology); McConchie, D.M. . Centre for Coastal Management)

    1994-01-01

    Both a self instruction manual and a cookbook'' guide to field and laboratory analytical procedures, this book provides an essential reference for non-specialists. With a minimum of mathematics and virtually no theory, it introduces practitioners to easy, inexpensive options for sample collection and preparation, data acquisition, analytic protocols, result interpretation and verification techniques. This step-by-step guide considers the advantages and limitations of different procedures, discusses safety and troubleshooting, and explains support skills like mapping, photography and report writing. It also offers managers, off-site engineers and others using sediments data a quick course in commissioning studies and making the most of the reports. This manual will answer the growing needs of practitioners in the field, either alone or accompanied by Practical Sedimentology, which surveys the science of sedimentology and provides a basic overview of the principles behind the applications.

  2. IRT-Sofia BNCT beam tube optimization study.

    PubMed

    Belousov, S; Mitev, M; Ilieva, K; Riley, K; Harling, O

    2011-12-01

    An optimization study of IRT-Sofia BNCT beam tube is presented. In the study we used the MIT/FCB experience. The enlarging of filter/moderator cross section dimensions and the decreasing of collimator length within the limits of the IRT-Sofia reactor design were analyzed. The influence of beam and reactor core axes non-coincidence on the beam properties was also evaluated. The irradiation resistance of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon(®)) was also evaluated. The results provide information for making decisions on the IRT-Sofia BNCT beam construction. PMID:21439839

  3. Development and Validation of a Learning Analytics Framework: Two Case Studies Using Support Vector Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ifenthaler, Dirk; Widanapathirana, Chathuranga

    2014-01-01

    Interest in collecting and mining large sets of educational data on student background and performance to conduct research on learning and instruction has developed as an area generally referred to as learning analytics. Higher education leaders are recognizing the value of learning analytics for improving not only learning and teaching but also…

  4. Factors Influencing Beliefs for Adoption of a Learning Analytics Tool: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Liaqat; Asadi, Mohsen; Gasevic, Dragan; Jovanovic, Jelena; Hatala, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Present research and development offer various learning analytics tools providing insights into different aspects of learning processes. Adoption of a specific tool for practice is based on how its learning analytics are perceived by educators to support their pedagogical and organizational goals. In this paper, we propose and empirically validate…

  5. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR A NATIONAL STUDY OF CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FISH - II. PESTICIDES AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical methods and a quality assurance plan have been developed to determine the concentration of a select group of bioaccumulatable chemicals in fish tissue. he analytes include PCBs and 21 pesticides and industrial chemicals. he methodology has been used to conduct a survey...

  6. Factors Affecting Higher Order Thinking Skills of Students: A Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budsankom, Prayoonsri; Sawangboon, Tatsirin; Damrongpanit, Suntorapot; Chuensirimongkol, Jariya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to develop and identify the validity of factors affecting higher order thinking skills (HOTS) of students. The thinking skills can be divided into three types: analytical, critical, and creative thinking. This analysis is done by applying the meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) based on a database of…

  7. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN DUST ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 1,906 dust samples. Dust samples were collected to assess potential residential sources of dermal and inhalation exposures and to examine relationships between analyte levels in dust and in personal and bioma...

  8. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN SPIKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 49 field control samples (spikes). Measurements were made for up to 11 metals in samples of water, blood, and urine. Field controls were used to assess recovery of target analytes from a sample media during s...

  9. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR VOCS IN SPIKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of VOCs in 53 field control samples (spikes). Measurements were made for up to 23 VOCs in samples of air and water. Field controls were used to assess recovery of target analytes from sample media during storage, shipment...

  10. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 128 soil samples. These samples were collected at a subset of homes to examine the source relationship between analyte levels in soil and those measured in personal, indoor, and biomarker samples. Samples of ...

  11. Analytical strategies for discovery and replication of genetic effects in pharmacogenomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Jared R; Guennel, Tobias; Marshall, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, the pharmaceutical industry and biomedical research sector have devoted considerable resources to pharmacogenomics (PGx) with the hope that understanding genetic variation in patients would deliver on the promise of personalized medicine. With the advent of new technologies and the improved collection of DNA samples, the roadblock to advancements in PGx discovery is no longer the lack of high-density genetic information captured on patient populations, but rather the development, adaptation, and tailoring of analytical strategies to effectively harness this wealth of information. The current analytical paradigm in PGx considers the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) as the genomic feature of interest and performs single SNP association tests to discover PGx effects – ie, genetic effects impacting drug response. While it can be straightforward to process single SNP results and to consider how this information may be extended for use in downstream patient stratification, the rate of replication for single SNP associations has been low and the desired success of producing clinically and commercially viable biomarkers has not been realized. This may be due to the fact that single SNP association testing is suboptimal given the complexities of PGx discovery in the clinical trial setting, including: 1) relatively small sample sizes; 2) diverse clinical cohorts within and across trials due to genetic ancestry (potentially impacting the ability to replicate findings); and 3) the potential polygenic nature of a drug response. Subsequently, a shift in the current paradigm is proposed: to consider the gene as the genomic feature of interest in PGx discovery. The proof-of-concept study presented in this manuscript demonstrates that genomic region-based association testing has the potential to improve the power of detecting single SNP or complex PGx effects in the discovery stage (by leveraging the underlying genetic architecture and reducing the

  12. Analytical studies of collimated winds. IV. Rotating and collimated MHD outflows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trussoni, E.; Tsinganos, K.; Sauty, C.

    1997-09-01

    This paper continues the study of the initial acceleration and final collimation of magnetized and rotating astrophysical winds, via analytical and exact steady MHD solutions, self-similar in the meridional direction. By prescribing the shape of the streamlines on the poloidal plane for a nonspherically symmetric gas pressure, related a posteriori to the density via a nonconstant polytropic index γ relationship (P{prop.to}ρgamma^), the main physical features of the outflowing plasma are deduced. Simple analytical relations show that cylindrical collimation and superAlfvenic terminal velocities can be attained asymptotically which depend on the rotation rate, the collimation distance from the base and the pressure gradient. If the plasma is overpressured at the flow axis, the pinching magnetic field can confine the jet, while if the gas is under-pressured at its axis, the centrifugal force cannot always counterbalance the pinching magnetic stress and inwards pressure gradient. Physically acceptable solutions are obtained by a numerical integration of the radial dependence of the MHD system from the subAlfvenic to the asymptotically collimated regions and by a smooth crossing of the Alfven critical surface. Two classes of solutions are found where either the flow speed increases monotonically to an asymptotic value, or it reaches a maximum value at an intermediate region. In the last case it is the toroidal magnetic field that collimates asymptotically the wind, while in the former the outflow of a slow rotator (respectively fast rotator) is collimated by the gas pressure (respectively by the magnetic field). The possible implications of these results on the modelling of astrophysical winds from slow and fast magnetic rotators are shortly discussed.

  13. Comparative study of ion acceleration by linearly polarized laser pulses from optimized targets of solid and near-critical density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Yu; Brantov, A. V.; Govras, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of a 3D optimization study of ion acceleration from ultrathin solid density foils (Brantov et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Spec. Top. Accel. Beams 18 021301) are complemented with an improved analytic model of the directed Coulomb explosion. Similarly to optimizing overdense targets, we also optimize low-density targets to obtain maximum ion energy, motivated by progress in producing a new generation of low-density slab targets whose density can be very homogeneous and as low as the relativistic critical density. Using 3D simulations, we show that for the same laser pulse, the ion energy can be significantly increased with low-density targets. A new acceleration mechanism is responsible for such an increase. This mechanism is described qualitatively, and it explains an advantage of low-density targets for high-energy ion production by lasers.

  14. Analytical methods used for the discrimination of substances suspected to be bar soap: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Marlo; LaPorte, Gerald M; Wilson, Jeffrey D; McConnell, Tyra; Shaffer, Douglas K; Stam, Marianne

    2006-11-01

    The submission to forensic laboratories of unknown specimens suspected of being biological or chemical warfare agents has increased tremendously with the threat of terrorism. Oftentimes, a threatening correspondence that contains hoax materials is intended to make the recipient(s) believe they have been exposed to a toxin. In some cases, the perpetrator can use standard household products, such as detergents and soaps. Once these materials are received, they become forensic evidence and may be analyzed for identification and/or comparison with known seized material from a suspect(s). Two separate studies were conducted using different analytical protocols for bar soaps. In the first set, the forensic laboratory at the United States Secret Service conducted tests on 68 bars of soap using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The 68 different soaps displayed unique total ion chromatogram profiles. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy was also used to characterize 46 of the 68 soaps as a preliminary study. In a second set of studies, as part of a homicide investigation, the laboratory at the California Department of Justice, Riverside, conducted examinations on 13 bars of soap by utilizing Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy. The case study demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish some bar soaps using infrared analysis. Furthermore, the bar soaps could be distinguished from typical laundry detergents using this technique. PMID:17199619

  15. [Study on the optimization methods of common-batch identification of amphetamine samples].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianxin; Zhang, Daming

    2008-07-01

    The essay introduced the technology of amphetamine identification and its optimization method. Impurity profiling of amphetamine was analyzed by GC-MS. Identification of common-batch amphetamine samples could be successfully finished by the data transition and pre-treating of the peak areas. The analytical method was improved by optimizing the techniques of sample extraction, gas chromatograph, sample separation and detection. PMID:18839544

  16. Monte Carlo studies for medical imaging detector optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fois, G. R.; Cisbani, E.; Garibaldi, F.

    2016-02-01

    This work reports on the Monte Carlo optimization studies of detection systems for Molecular Breast Imaging with radionuclides and Bremsstrahlung Imaging in nuclear medicine. Molecular Breast Imaging requires competing performances of the detectors: high efficiency and high spatial resolutions; in this direction, it has been proposed an innovative device which combines images from two different, and somehow complementary, detectors at the opposite sides of the breast. The dual detector design allows for spot compression and improves significantly the performance of the overall system if all components are well tuned, layout and processing carefully optimized; in this direction the Monte Carlo simulation represents a valuable tools. In recent years, Bremsstrahlung Imaging potentiality in internal radiotherapy (with beta-radiopharmaceuticals) has been clearly emerged; Bremsstrahlung Imaging is currently performed with existing detector generally used for single photon radioisotopes. We are evaluating the possibility to adapt an existing compact gamma camera and optimize by Monte Carlo its performance for Bremsstrahlung imaging with photons emitted by the beta- from 90 Y.

  17. Optimization study on a single-cylinder compressed air engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qihui; Cai, Maolin; Shi, Yan; Xu, Qiyue

    2015-11-01

    The current research of compressed air engine (CAE) mainly focused on simulations and system integrations. However, energy efficiency and output torque of the CAE is limited, which restricts its application and popularization. In this paper, the working principles of CAE are briefly introduced. To set a foundation for the study on the optimization of the CAE, the basic mathematical model of working processes is set up. A pressure-compensated valve which can reduce the inertia force of the valve is proposed. To verify the mathematical model, the prototype with the newly designed pressure-compensated intake valve is built and the experiment is carried out, simulation and experimental results of the CAE are conducted, and pressures inside the cylinder and output torque of the CAE are obtained. Orthogonal design and grey relation analysis are utilized to optimize structural parameters. The experimental and optimized results show that, first of all, pressure inside the cylinder has the same changing tendency in both simulation curve and experimental curve. Secondly, the highest average output torque is obtained at the highest intake pressure and the lowest rotate speed. Thirdly, the optimization of the single-cylinder CAE can improve the working efficiency from an original 21.95% to 50.1%, an overall increase of 28.15%, and the average output torque increases also increases from 22.047 5 N • m to 22.439 N • m. This research designs a single-cylinder CAE with pressure-compensated intake valve, and proposes a structural parameters design method which improves the single-cylinder CAE performance.

  18. Sustainable in-well vapor stripping: A design, analytical model, and pilot study for groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Patrick T; Ginn, Timothy R

    2014-12-15

    A sustainable in-well vapor stripping system is designed as a cost-effective alternative for remediation of shallow chlorinated solvent groundwater plumes. A solar-powered air compressor is used to inject air bubbles into a monitoring well to strip volatile organic compounds from a liquid to vapor phase while simultaneously inducing groundwater circulation around the well screen. An analytical model of the remediation process is developed to estimate contaminant mass flow and removal rates. The model was calibrated based on a one-day pilot study conducted in an existing monitoring well at a former dry cleaning site. According to the model, induced groundwater circulation at the study site increased the contaminant mass flow rate into the well by approximately two orders of magnitude relative to ambient conditions. Modeled estimates for 5h of pulsed air injection per day at the pilot study site indicated that the average effluent concentrations of dissolved tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene can be reduced by over 90% relative to the ambient concentrations. The results indicate that the system could be used cost-effectively as either a single- or multi-well point technology to substantially reduce the mass of dissolved chlorinated solvents in groundwater. PMID:25461885

  19. Sustainable in-well vapor stripping: A design, analytical model, and pilot study for groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Patrick T.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2014-12-01

    A sustainable in-well vapor stripping system is designed as a cost-effective alternative for remediation of shallow chlorinated solvent groundwater plumes. A solar-powered air compressor is used to inject air bubbles into a monitoring well to strip volatile organic compounds from a liquid to vapor phase while simultaneously inducing groundwater circulation around the well screen. An analytical model of the remediation process is developed to estimate contaminant mass flow and removal rates. The model was calibrated based on a one-day pilot study conducted in an existing monitoring well at a former dry cleaning site. According to the model, induced groundwater circulation at the study site increased the contaminant mass flow rate into the well by approximately two orders of magnitude relative to ambient conditions. Modeled estimates for 5 h of pulsed air injection per day at the pilot study site indicated that the average effluent concentrations of dissolved tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene can be reduced by over 90% relative to the ambient concentrations. The results indicate that the system could be used cost-effectively as either a single- or multi-well point technology to substantially reduce the mass of dissolved chlorinated solvents in groundwater.

  20. Gloss paints in late paintings by Francis Picabia: a multi-analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkori, Maria; Hubert, Marie-Odile; Balcar, Nathalie; Barabant, Gilles; Sutherland, Ken; Casadio, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-analytical approach for the study of the materials used by Francis Picabia in two paintings dating from 1949 and 1950 is reported, with a particular reference to the possible use of enamel paints. The study is complemented by analysis of paints that had the appearance of glossy enamel sampled from the artist's easel in the collection of the Comité Francis Picabia. Analysis with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry with thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM-Py-GCMS) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that only few paints match the composition of historical reference samples of Ripolin enamels, while the majority of the glossy paints sampled likely consist of mixtures of binders and varnishes made by the artist. This study confirms the importance of scientific testing and comparison with reference materials, when determining artists' use of enamel paints. Results should be interpreted in the context of documentary/historical evidence, for a more informed characterization of oleoresinous paint media.

  1. Multi-analytical characterization of archaeological ceramics. A case study from the Sforza Castle (Milano, Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberini, V.; Maspero, F.; Galimberti, L.; Fusi, N.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work was the characterization, using several analytical techniques, of a sample of ancient pottery found during archaeological excavations in the 14th century's Sforza Castle in Milano. The use of a multi-analytical approach is well established in the study of archaeological materials (e.g. Tite et al. 1984, Ribechini et al. 2008). The chemical composition of the sample was determined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The chemical composition is: SiO2 61.3(±3)%, Al2O3 22.5(±2)%, Fe2O3 7.19(±6)%, K2O 3.85(±1)%, MgO 1.6(±1)%, Na2O 1.6(±4)% (probably overestimated), TiO2 1.02(±2)%, CaO 0.93(±1)%, MnO 0.15(±1)% and P2O5 0.06(±2)%. The K2O content, important when dealing with TL dating, was determined also with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The K2O content determined with atomic absorption is 3.86(±3)%, in agreement with X-ray fluorescence analysis. The mineralogical composition of the sample was determined with X-ray powder diffraction: quartz 59.6(±1) wt%, mica 37.8(±3) wt% and feldspar (plagioclase) 2.6(±2) wt%. The sample homogeneity was assessed with X-ray computerised tomography (CT), which is a very powerful non-destructive analysis tool for 3D characterization (Sèguin, 1991). CT images show differences in materials with different X-ray absorption (mainly depending on different densities) and 3D reconstruction has many interesting archaeological applications (e.g. study of sealed jars). CT images of the studied sample showed the presence of angular fragments (probably quartz) few millimetres wide immersed in a fine grained matrix. Moreover, before and after the CT analysis, some ceramic powder was sampled to perform thermoluminescence analysis (TL, the powder used for this analysis can not be recovered). It was thus possible to evaluate the dose absorbed by the material due the X-ray irradiation. The dose absorbed after 3 hours of irradiation, the time needed for a complete scan of a 7 x 5 x 1 cm, is about 100 Gy, which

  2. Optimal designs for epidemiologic longitudinal studies with binary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mehtälä, Juha; Auranen, Kari; Kulathinal, Sangita

    2015-12-01

    Alternating presence and absence of a medical condition in human subjects is often modelled as an outcome of underlying process dynamics. Longitudinal studies provide important insights into research questions involving such dynamics. This article concerns optimal designs for studies in which the dynamics are modelled as a binary continuous-time Markov process. Either one or both the transition rate parameters in the model are to be estimated with maximum precision from a sequence of observations made at discrete times on a number of subjects. The design questions concern the choice of time interval between observations, the initial state of each subject and the choice between number of subjects versus repeated observations per subject. Sequential designs are considered due to dependence of the designs on the model parameters. The optimal time spacing can be approximated by the reciprocal of the sum of the two rates. The initial distribution of the study subjects should be taken into account when relatively few repeated samples per subject are to be collected. A study with a reasonably large size should be designed in more than one phase because there are then enough observations to be spent in the first phase to revise the time spacing for the subsequent phases. PMID:22170892

  3. In vitro placental model optimization for nanoparticle transport studies

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Laura; Poulsen, Marie Sønnegaard; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Pojana, Giulio; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Saunders, Margaret; Rytting, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Advances in biomedical nanotechnology raise hopes in patient populations but may also raise questions regarding biodistribution and biocompatibility, especially during pregnancy. Special consideration must be given to the placenta as a biological barrier because a pregnant woman’s exposure to nanoparticles could have significant effects on the fetus developing in the womb. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to optimize an in vitro model for characterizing the transport of nanoparticles across human placental trophoblast cells. Methods The growth of BeWo (clone b30) human placental choriocarcinoma cells for nanoparticle transport studies was characterized in terms of optimized Transwell® insert type and pore size, the investigation of barrier properties by transmission electron microscopy, tight junction staining, transepithelial electrical resistance, and fluorescein sodium transport. Following the determination of nontoxic concentrations of fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles, the cellular uptake and transport of 50 nm and 100 nm diameter particles was measured using the in vitro BeWo cell model. Results Particle size measurements, fluorescence readings, and confocal microscopy indicated both cellular uptake of the fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles and the transcellular transport of these particles from the apical (maternal) to the basolateral (fetal) compartment. Over the course of 24 hours, the apparent permeability across BeWo cells grown on polycarbonate membranes (3.0 μm pore size) was four times higher for the 50 nm particles compared with the 100 nm particles. Conclusion The BeWo cell line has been optimized and shown to be a valid in vitro model for studying the transplacental transport of nanoparticles. Fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticle transport was size-dependent, as smaller particles reached the basal (fetal) compartment at a higher rate. PMID:22334780

  4. Compressed Air System Optimization: Case Study Food Industry in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayati, Endang; Nuzahar, Hasril

    2016-01-01

    Compressors and compressed air systems was one of the most important utilities in industries or factories. Approximately 10% of the cost of electricity in the industry was used to produce compressed air. Therefore the potential for energy savings in the compressors and compressed air systems had a big challenge. This field was conducted especially in Indonesia food industry or factory. Compressed air system optimization was a technique approach to determine the optimal conditions for the operation of compressors and compressed air systems that included evaluation of the energy needs, supply adjustment, eliminating or reconfiguring the use and operation of inefficient, changing and complementing some equipment and improving operating efficiencies. This technique gave the significant impact for energy saving and costs. The potential savings based on this study through measurement and optimization e.g. system that lowers the pressure of 7.5 barg to 6.8 barg would reduce energy consumption and running costs approximately 4.2%, switch off the compressor GA110 and GA75 was obtained annual savings of USD 52,947 ≈ 455 714 kWh, running GA75 light load or unloaded then obtained annual savings of USD 31,841≈ 270,685 kWh, install new compressor 2x132 kW and 1x 132 kW VSD obtained annual savings of USD 108,325≈ 928,500 kWh. Furthermore it was needed to conduct study of technical aspect of energy saving potential (Investment Grade Audit) and performed Cost Benefit Analysis. This study was one of best practice solutions how to save energy and improve energy performance in compressors and compressed air system.

  5. Analytical and Experimental Study of Near-Threshold Interactions Between Crack Closure Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of an analytical closure model that considers contributions and interactions between plasticity-, roughness-, and oxide-induced crack closure mechanisms are presented and compared with experimental data. The analytical model is shown to provide a good description of the combined influences of crack roughness, oxide debris, and plasticity in the near-threshold regime. Furthermore, analytical results indicate that closure mechanisms interact in a non-linear manner such that the total amount of closure is not the sum of closure contributions for each mechanism.

  6. Drift parameters optimization of a TPC polarimeter: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhee, K.; Radhakrishna, V.; Koushal, V.; Baishali, G.; Vinodkumar, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    Time Projection Chamber (TPC) based X-ray polarimeters using Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) are currently being developed to make sensitive measurement of polarization in 2-10 keV energy range. The emission direction of the photoelectron ejected via photoelectric effect carries the information of the polarization of the incident X-ray photon. Performance of a gas based polarimeter is affected by the operating drift parameters such as gas pressure, drift field and drift-gap. We present simulation studies carried out in order to understand the effect of these operating parameters on the modulation factor of a TPC polarimeter. Models of Garfield are used to study photoelectron interaction in gas and drift of electron cloud towards GEM. Our study is aimed at achieving higher modulation factors by optimizing drift parameters. Study has shown that Ne/DME (50/50) at lower pressure and drift field can lead to desired performance of a TPC polarimeter.

  7. Schedule Optimization Study, Hanford RI/FS Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    A Schedule Optimization Study (SOS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Program was conducted by an independent team of professionals from other federal agencies and the private sector experienced in environmental restoration. This team spent two weeks at Hanford in September 1992 examining the reasons for the lengthy RI/FS process at Hanford and developing recommendations to expedite the process. The need for the study arose out of a schedule dispute regarding the submission of the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit RI/FS Work Plan. This report documents the study called for in the August 29, 1991, Dispute Resolution Committee Decision Statement. Battelle's Environmental Management Operations (EMO) coordinated the effort for DOE's Richland Field Office (RL).

  8. Analytical study of a gas-fired adsorptive air-conditioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Poyelle, F.; Guilleminot, J.J.; Meunier, F.

    1996-11-01

    Adsorptive air conditioning represents a potential alternative to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) systems. But to compete with other systems, adsorption systems must exhibit sufficient figures of merit and energetic densities. An analytical study to predict the overall heat transfer coefficient in an adsorber has been conducted and is presented here. This study, based on a method-of-moment analysis, shows the influence of three parameters limiting the heat transfer in adsorbent beds. Heat transfer in adsorbent beds has been intensified. Using new consolidated materials, the machine utilizes two uniform temperature adsorbent beds in a cycle that incorporates both heat and mass recovery. It uses a zeolite-water pair. It is designed to produce 3 kW of cooling. Expected cooling performances are 300 W/kg of adsorbent with a coefficient of performance (COP) close to 0.8 and a cycle time of 20 minutes. The thermal conditions used to test the cycle are: the heater, 220 C; the cooler, 40 C; and the evaporation temperature, 3 C.

  9. Analytical study of terahertz wave intensity measurements by ZnTe electro-optic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Muhammad; Yang, Suhui; Li, Zhuo; Li, Ping

    2008-03-01

    An analytical study of THz-waves' intensity measurement generated by Terahertz Parametric Oscillator (TPO) and detection of the THz pulses occurs via free-space electro optic detection by ZnTe crystal has been studied. The pump-probe technique has been used to observe the dynamics of an optically excited ZnTe electro-optic crystal. THz wave will be used as modulation source for electro-optical phenomena in ZnTe crystal. The THz pulses generated by TPO are 10-25 ns pulses at a repetition rate of 1Hz. ZnTe crystal is being used for intensity measurement of THz-waves. In this theoretical proposed experiment, a short pump pulse (THz-wave) and probe pulse (near IR laser) with duration of typically 10 to 25 ns interacts in the ZnTe. In electro-optic sampling the two effects namely Pockels effect and Kerr effect have been discussed and interaction of two beams from or transmission through the ZnTe, the probe pulse Intensity contains information about the THz-waves' intensity and so on.

  10. An analytical study on artesian flow conditions in unconfined-aquifer drainage basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Zhi; Jiang, Xiao-Wei; Wan, Li; Wörman, Anders; Wang, Heng; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Li, Hailong

    2015-10-01

    Although it has been reported that flowing artesian wells could be topographically controlled, there is no quantitative research on artesian flow conditions in unconfined aquifers. In this study, the water table, which has a lower amplitude than the land surface, is damped from the topography and used as the boundary condition to obtain the analytical solution of hydraulic head of a unit basin with a single flow system. The term artesian head is defined to characterize the condition of flowing artesian wells. The zone with positive artesian head is called artesian zone while with negative artesian head is nonartesian zone. The maximum artesian head and the size of artesian zones are found to increase with the damping factor and the anisotropy ratio, and decrease with the ratio of basin width to depth and the depth-decay exponent of hydraulic conductivity. Moreover, the artesian head increases with depth nearby the valley and decreases with depth near by the divide, and the variation rates are influenced by the decay exponent and the anisotropy ratio. Finally, the distribution of flowing artesian wells and the artesian head measurements in different depths of a borehole in a small catchment in the Ordos Plateau, Northwestern China is used to illustrate the theoretical findings. The change in artesian head with depth was used to estimate the anisotropy ratio and the decay exponent. This study opens up a new door to analyze basin-scale groundwater flow.

  11. Team consultancy using cognitive analytic therapy: a controlled study in assertive outreach.

    PubMed

    Kellett, S; Wilbram, M; Davis, C; Hardy, Gillian

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical and organizational efficacy of formulation-based consultancy to clinical teams using a randomized control trial methodology. Patients in an Assertive Outreach Team (AOT) were randomized into cognitive analytic consultancy (CAC; n = 10) or treatment as usual (TAU; n = 10). CAC consisted of three consultancy sessions with individual team members to formulate and map the dysfunctional roles and procedures adopted by both patient and team. Subsequent changes to practice were then supported via team supervision. Measures of patient and team functioning were taken across four discrete study phases; (1) baseline team training, (2) case consultation, (3) team supervision and (4) 3-month follow-up. Team members were additionally interviewed before and following the trial. No differences were evident between CAC and TAU in terms of patient outcomes. However, the climate of the AOT significantly improved longitudinally over the course of the trial, with CAC facilitating enhanced clinical and team practices. The results are discussed in terms of methodological limitations, the advantages/disadvantages of team consultation and the potential for the further development of the CAC model. PMID:24571961

  12. Penetration of chlorhexidine coating into tooth enamel: A surface analytical study.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Rana N S; Symington, John

    2016-01-01

    Chlorhexidine has proved an efficient antibacterial agent and has been used successfully to prevent new carious lesions in the teeth of adults and children. The substantivity of chlorhexidine has not been identified with any precision, but is certainly not of short duration. In this work, surface analytical techniques have been applied to study the chemical composition, distribution, and penetration of an applied liquid coating containing chlorhexidine onto tooth enamel in order to ascertain mechanisms by which chlorhexidine keeps its long term substantivity. Several hypotheses have been put forward with regard to its substantivity, including concepts of chlorhexidine remaining as a reservoir upon application either in the epithelial surfaces, the tooth surface, or the biofilm. Alternatively, it has been proposed the teeth themselves act as the reservoir. To study this, a chlorhexidine containing liquid coating was applied to the surface of teeth. These were subsequently transversely cross-sectioned. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were performed on both surfaces to ascertain chemical composition and distribution of the applied coating. It was found that it formed a coating layer of about 25 μm thick. High spatial ToF-SIMS images showed little evidence of substantial diffusion of chlorhexidine into the enamel, either from the surface or via the enamel lamellae. PMID:27094389

  13. An analytical study of seismoelectric signals produced by 1-D mesoscopic heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachesi, Leonardo B.; Rubino, J. Germán; Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Jougnot, Damien; Linde, Niklas; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    The presence of mesoscopic heterogeneities in fluid-saturated porous rocks can produce measurable seismoelectric signals due to wave-induced fluid flow between regions of differing compressibility. The dependence of these signals on the petrophysical and structural characteristics of the probed rock mass remains largely unexplored. In this work, we derive an analytical solution to describe the seismoelectric response of a rock sample, containing a horizontal layer at its centre, that is subjected to an oscillatory compressibility test. We then adapt this general solution to compute the seismoelectric signature of a particular case related to a sample that is permeated by a horizontal fracture located at its centre. Analyses of the general and particular solutions are performed to study the impact of different petrophysical and structural parameters on the seismoelectric response. We find that the amplitude of the seismoelectric signal is directly proportional to the applied stress, to the Skempton coefficient contrast between the host rock and the layer, and to a weighted average of the effective excess charge of the two materials. Our results also demonstrate that the frequency at which the maximum electrical potential amplitude prevails does not depend on the applied stress or the Skempton coefficient contrast. In presence of strong permeability variations, this frequency is rather controlled by the permeability and thickness of the less permeable material. The results of this study thus indicate that seismoelectric measurements can potentially be used to estimate key mechanical and hydraulic rock properties of mesoscopic heterogeneities, such as compressibility, permeability and fracture compliance.

  14. Hardy personality and burnout syndrome among nursing students in three Brazilian universities—an analytic study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nursing students may exhibit the characteristics of resistance to stress, such as hardiness, which can reduce the risk of burnout. However, we found only one published study about these phenomena among nursing students. Thus, we investigated the association between hardiness and burnout in such students. Methods An analytic, cross-sectional study was conducted among 570 nursing students from three Brazilian universities. Data were collected relating to sociodemographic characteristics, hardiness, and burnout, which we analyzed using inferential statistics. Results We observed that 64.04% of nursing students in the sample had a high level of emotional exhaustion, 35.79% had a high level of cynicism, and 87.72% had a low level of professional efficacy: these are dimensions of burnout. We also found that 48.77% had a high level of control, 61.40% a high level of commitment, and 35.44% a high level of challenge: these are dimensions of hardiness. Only 24.74% of the students experienced burnout, and 21.93% met the criteria for a hardy personality. There was a statistically significant difference between the frequency of hardiness and burnout (p = 0.033), with 68.00% of hardy students not exhibiting burnout. Conclusions Although nursing students live with educational stressors, burnout was not preponderant in our sample students; this may be linked to hardiness. Thus, given its benefits to student life and health, we recommend the development of strategies to promote hardiness among nursing students. PMID:24678676

  15. Cloud-Enabled Climate Analytics-as-a-Service using Reanalysis data: A case study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, D.; Duffy, D.; Schnase, J. L.; McInerney, M.; Tamkin, G.; Potter, G. L.; Thompson, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) maintains advanced data capabilities and facilities that allow researchers to access the enormous volume of data generated by weather and climate models. The NASA Climate Model Data Service (CDS) and the NCCS are merging their efforts to provide Climate Analytics-as-a-Service for the comparative study of the major reanalysis projects: ECMWF ERA-Interim, NASA/GMAO MERRA, NOAA/NCEP CFSR, NOAA/ESRL 20CR, JMA JRA25, and JRA55. These reanalyses have been repackaged to netCDF4 file format following the CMIP5 Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata convention prior to be sequenced into the Hadoop Distributed File System ( HDFS ). A small set of operations that represent a common starting point in many analysis workflows was then created: min, max, sum, count, variance and average. In this example, Reanalysis data exploration was performed with the use of Hadoop MapReduce and accessibility was achieved using the Climate Data Service(CDS) application programming interface (API) created at NCCS. This API provides a uniform treatment of large amount of data. In this case study, we have limited our exploration to 2 variables, temperature and precipitation, using 3 operations, min, max and avg and using 30-year of Reanalysis data for 3 regions of the world: global, polar, subtropical.

  16. Improving cognitive therapy for depression with functional analytic psychotherapy: Theory and case study

    PubMed Central

    Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Tsai, Mavis

    1994-01-01

    A behavioral reconceptualization of cognitive therapy is presented to illustrate that clinical behavior analysis (CBA) has much to offer traditional cognitive behavior therapy. Particular attention is given to the distinction between cognitive structures and products and the theoretical dilemma facing cognitive therapists when they attempt to devise interventions aimed at changing nonbehavioral entities. The distinction between rule-governed and contingency-shaped behavior and the implications of functional analytic psychotherapy (Kohlenberg & Tsai, 1991) are used to resolve the dilemma and to suggest methods for enhancing cognitive therapy. In a case study, a CBA-enhanced version of cognitive therapy was introduced after 7 weeks of standard cognitive treatment for a 35-year-old depressed male. The client—therapist relationship provided opportunities during the therapy session for learning new behavior called for in the behaviorally reconceptualized cognitive therapy. The enhanced treatment improved clinical efficacy and increased the client's focus on his deficits in interpersonal repertoires. Because the present case study involved only one of several enhancements suggested by CBA, the possibility of increased efficacy from a more comprehensive application is discussed. PMID:22478194

  17. Fluorescence studies of anti-cancer drugs--analytical and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Jean-Jacques; Trajkovska, Snezana

    2006-09-01

    The fluorescence properties of anticancer drugs (ACDs), including steady-state native fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, fluorescence polarization, excimer and exciplex emission, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) with one- or two-photon excitation are reviewed, as well as the use of fluorogenic labels and fluorescent probes for the non-fluorescent ACDs. The interest of monitoring the fluorescence spectral changes to study the interactions of ACDs with biomolecules, such as DNA, proteins, vesicles, and the formation of complexes is discussed. The fluorescence methodologies used for ACDs studies, including fluorescence with two-photon excitation, liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis with fluorescence and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection, and fluorescence microscopy, are also surveyed. Analytical and bioanalytical applications of fluorescence, indicating good selectivity and very low limits of detection at the nanomolar and picomolar level for most ACDs, are described. Biomedical and clinical applications of the fluorescence methods, mostly oriented towards the evaluation of the cytoxicity and anti-tumor potential of ACDs in single cells as well as in biological fluids, including blood, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, urine and feces, are also discussed in detail. This review is based on selected literature published in the last decade (1994-2003). PMID:17017886

  18. Empirical and Analytic Studies Human/Automation Dynamics in Airspace Management for Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Planich, G.; Bunzo, M.; Labacqz, J. Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NASA and the FAA have initiated programs of research and development to provide flight crew, airline operations and air traffic managers with automation aids to increase capacity in en route and terminal area to support the goals of free flight for safe, flexible, predictable, and efficient operations. To support the development of those aiding systems human performance in automated aiding has been examined in empirical and computationally analytic studies. This paper presents a set of those studies in full mission simulation and the development of a predictive computational model of human performance. We have found that the combination of methodologies provide a powerful design-aiding process. We will describe three research programs in support of Free Flight Operations from the perspective of human performance requirements. We have examined procedures and communications in the use of voice and data-link operation at the transition between unconstrained (enroute) and constrained (terminal) airspace operations. We have examined the timing and form of Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) advisories in descent. We have investigated the shape and dimensions of an 'alert zone' for air-based separation in unconstrained operations. Finally, we have examined the interaction of a ground-based conflict detection/resolution aiding system, as it interacts with a cockpit-based conflict alerting mechanism. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Analytical study of ancient pottery from the archaeological site of Aiani, northern Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Iordanidis, A. Garcia-Guinea, J.

    2009-04-15

    The present study is a multi-analytical approach on the characterization of several potsherd samples, dated from prehistoric to hellenistic times, from Aiani, ancient Upper Macedonia, northern Greece. In particular, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy, coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray system (ESEM-EDX) were used for the determination of the morphological, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the potsherds. The preliminary results indicated a rather local provenance of the analyzed ancient pottery samples and a finer texture and thus better ceramic manufacture as getting to hellenistic era. The use of a silicious or calcerous raw material is probably related to the specific utilization of each ceramic vessel in ancient times. The presence of gehlenite or pyroxene minerals in the ceramic matrix indicated higher firing temperatures, while lower temperatures were deduced when finding phylosilicate minerals. The preliminary results of this study do not necessarily imply that all the pottery of this area, belonging to the same chronological type, have similar physicochemical characteristics.

  20. Analytical study of the self-healing property of Airy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiuxiang; Zhou, Guoquan; Chen, Ruipin

    2012-01-01

    An analytical expression for the optical field of an Airy beam partially blocked by an opaque obstacle is derived. The self-healing properties of the Airy beam are studied and discussed in detail. The study shows that the self-healing process of the Airy beam is affected by many factors such as the opaque obstacle size, propagation distance, wavelength, and parameters of the Airy beam. The self-healing process is caused by the convergence of energy from the side to the position of the opaque obstacle and is finished when the convergence of energy flow disappears. When the propagation distance is short, the main lobe of the Airy beam is affected by the obstruction located near the main lobe. When the propagation distance is long, the main lobe of the Airy beam can be affected by the obstruction located far away from the main lobe. The result agrees with the existing results and can be explained by the caustic of the Airy beam.

  1. Optimized Analytical Procedures for the Untargeted Metabolomic Profiling of Human Urine and Plasma by Combining Hydrophilic Interaction (HILIC) and Reverse-Phase Liquid Chromatography (RPLC)-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Contrepois, Kévin; Jiang, Lihua; Snyder, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Profiling of body fluids is crucial for monitoring and discovering metabolic markers of health and disease and for providing insights into human physiology. Since human urine and plasma each contain an extreme diversity of metabolites, a single liquid chromatographic system when coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) is not sufficient to achieve reasonable metabolome coverage. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) offers complementary information to reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) by retaining polar metabolites. With the objective of finding the optimal combined chromatographic solution to profile urine and plasma, we systematically investigated the performance of five HILIC columns with different chemistries operated at three different pH (acidic, neutral, basic) and five C18-silica RPLC columns. The zwitterionic column ZIC-HILIC operated at neutral pH provided optimal performance on a large set of hydrophilic metabolites. The RPLC columns Hypersil GOLD and Zorbax SB aq were proven to be best suited for the metabolic profiling of urine and plasma, respectively. Importantly, the optimized HILIC-MS method showed excellent intrabatch peak area reproducibility (CV < 12%) and good long-term interbatch (40 days) peak area reproducibility (CV < 22%) that were similar to those of RPLC-MS procedures. Finally, combining the optimal HILIC- and RPLC-MS approaches greatly expanded metabolome coverage with 44% and 108% new metabolic features detected compared with RPLC-MS alone for urine and plasma, respectively. The proposed combined LC-MS approaches improve the comprehensiveness of global metabolic profiling of body fluids and thus are valuable for monitoring and discovering metabolic changes associated with health and disease in clinical research studies. PMID:25787789

  2. An analytic review of studies on measuring effects of external QI in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin W

    2004-01-01

    Scientists have long been interested in measuring external qi (EQ or wai qi) during qigong healing, and have produced a large body of literature over the past 20 years. This paper reviews the major research on measuring EQ in China and tries to help other researchers to get a picture on what has been done so as to eliminate the simple replication of already verified results. Starting with the historical background of EQ studies in China, this paper analytically reviews the major studies of EQ effects from five different categories of detectors: 1) physical signal detectors; 2) chemical dynamics methods; 3) detectors using biological materials; 4) detectors using life sensors; and 5) detectors using the human body. The focus is on the pros and cons of each detector. These studies documented some important correlates of EQ process or qi healing, which cannot be explained by psychological effect or the known biological processes. Even though the extant literature suggests that intent plays a critical role in the effect or characteristics of EQ we know little about its role in EQ effect and its relationship with qigong healing from these experiments. These studies have confirmed the existence of measurable EQ effects from various perspectives; however, none has really revealed the primary nature of EQ or how EQ healing works. Given the fact that qigong therapy is based on the dialectic view of two interdependent spheres, while modern science and medicine is based on the reductionist view of one material world, it is recommended that future studies should use more biological or life-sensor detectors to increase our understanding of the healing potentials of qigong, instead of stay at the level of verification of signals. New methodologies, new theories, and new perspectives are urgently needed for further understanding what qigong is and how EQ healing works. PMID:15285273

  3. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--VOCS IN BLOOD ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) in 145 blood samples. These samples were collected to examine the relationships between personal exposure measurements, environmental measurements, and body burden. Venous blood sample...

  4. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN BLOOD ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 165 blood samples. These samples were collected to examine the relationships between personal exposure measurements, environmental measurements, and body burden. Venous blood samples were collected by venipun...

  5. An analytical study on bistability of Fabry Perot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Shuqiang; Yang, Huajun

    2016-06-01

    Optical bistabilities have been considered to be useful for sensor applications. As a typical nonlinear device, Fabry-Perot semiconductor optical amplifiers (FPSOAs) exhibit bistability under certain conditions. In this paper, the bistable characteristics in FPSOAs are investigated theoretically. Based on Adams's relationship between the incident optical intensity I in and the z-independent average intracavity intensity I av, an analytical expression of the bistable loop width in SOAs is derived. Numerical simulations confirm the accuracy of the analytical result.

  6. Industrial Cogeneration Optimization Program: A summary of two studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    Two industrial cogeneration optimization programs were performed to examine the economic and energy saving impacts of adding cogeneration to site specific plants in the chemical, food, pulp and paper, petroleum refining, and textile industries. Industrial cogeneration is reviewed. The two parallel ICOP studies are described. The five industrial sectors are also described, followed by highlights of each of the site specific case studies. Steam turbine cogeneration systems fired by coal or alternative fuels are generally the most attractive in terms of economic performance and oil/gas savings potential. Of the 15 cogeneration systems selected as optimum in the ICOP studies, 11 were coal or wood fired steam turbines. By contrast, gas turbines, combined cycles, and diesel engines, which are limited to oil or gas firing, are usually less economical.

  7. Experimental and analytical studies of flow through a ventral and axial exhaust nozzle system for STOVL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esker, Barbara S.; Debonis, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Flow through a combined ventral and axial exhaust nozzle system was studied experimentally and analytically. The work is part of an ongoing propulsion technology effort at NASA Lewis Research Center for short takeoff, vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft. The experimental investigation was done on the NASA Lewis Powered Lift Facility. The experiment consisted of performance testing over a range of tailpipe pressure ratios from 1 to 3.2 and flow visualization. The analytical investigation consisted of modeling the same configuration and solving for the flow using the PARC3D computational fluid dynamics program. The comparison of experimental and analytical results was very good. The ventral nozzle performance coefficients obtained from both the experimental and analytical studies agreed within 1.2 percent. The net horizontal thrust of the nozzle system contained a significant reverse thrust component created by the flow overturning in the ventral duct. This component resulted in a low net horizontal thrust coefficient. The experimental and analytical studies showed very good agreement in the internal flow patterns.

  8. MLH1 promoter hypermethylation in the analytical algorithm of Lynch syndrome: a cost-effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Gausachs, Mireia; Mur, Pilar; Corral, Julieta; Pineda, Marta; González, Sara; Benito, Llúcia; Menéndez, Mireia; Espinàs, Josep Alfons; Brunet, Joan; Iniesta, María Dolores; Gruber, Stephen B; Lázaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Capellá, Gabriel

    2012-07-01

    The analytical algorithm of Lynch syndrome (LS) is increasingly complex. BRAF V600E mutation and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation have been proposed as a screening tool for the identification of LS. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical usefulness and cost-effectiveness of both somatic alterations to improve the yield of the diagnostic algorithm of LS. A total of 122 colorectal tumors from individuals with family history of colorectal cancer that showed microsatellite instability and/or loss of mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression were studied. MMR germline mutations were detected in 57 cases (40 MLH1, 15 MSH2 and 2 MSH6). BRAF V600E mutation was assessed by single-nucleotide primer extension. MLH1 promoter hypermethylation was assessed by methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in a subset of 71 cases with loss of MLH1 protein. A decision model was developed to estimate the incremental costs of alternative case-finding methods for detecting MLH1 mutation carriers. One-way sensitivity analysis was performed to assess robustness of estimations. Sensitivity of the absence of BRAF mutations for depiction of LS patients was 96% (23/24) and specificity was 28% (13/47). Specificity of MLH1 promoter hypermethylation for depiction of sporadic tumors was 66% (31/47) and sensitivity of 96% (23/24). The cost per additional mutation detected when using hypermethylation analysis was lower when compared with BRAF study and germinal MLH1 mutation study. Somatic hypermethylation of MLH1 is an accurate and cost-effective pre-screening method in the selection of patients that are candidates for MLH1 germline analysis when LS is suspected and MLH1 protein expression is absent. PMID:22274583

  9. Experimental Study and Analytical Methods for Particle Bed Dryout With Heterogeneous Particles and Pressure Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Sairanen, Risto; Lindholm, Ilona; Holmstrom, Stefan

    2002-07-01

    The interest to study the dryout heat flux in particle beds is related to interest of quantify the debris coolability margins during a hypothetical severe reactor accident. When the molten core has relocated to the containment floor, one accident management concept is based on the cooling of the corium by the water injection on top. Earlier experimental and analytical work has concentrated on homogeneous particle beds at atmospheric pressures. For plant safety assessment in Finland, there is a need to consider heterogeneous particle mixtures, layered particle bed setups and varied pressures. A facility has been constructed at VTT to measure dryout heat flux in a heterogeneous particle bed. The bed dimensions are 0.3 m in diameter and 0.6 m in height, with a mixture of 0.1 to 10 mm particles. The facility has a pressure range from atmospheric to 6 bar (overpressure). The bed is heated by spirals of a resistance band. The preliminary experiments have been carried out, but a more systematic set of data is expected to be available in the spring 2002. To support the experiments analytical models have been developed for qualification of the experimental results. The first comparison is done against various critical heat flux correlations developed in 1980's and 1990's for homogeneous bed conditions. The second comparison is done against 1-D and 0-D models developed by Lipinski. The most detailed analysis of the transient process conditions and dryout predictions are done by using the two-dimensional, drift-flux based thermohydraulic solution for the particle bed immersed into the water. The code is called PILEXP. Already the first validation results against the preliminary tests indicate that the transient process conditions and the mechanisms related to the dryout can be best explained and understood by using a multidimensional, transient code, where all details of the process control can be modeled as well. The heterogeneous bed and stratified bed can not be well

  10. Experimental and Analytical Studies of Shielding Concepts for Point Sources and Jet Noises.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Raymond Lee Man

    This analytical and experimental study explores concepts for jet noise shielding. Model experiments centre on solid planar shields, simulating engine-over-wing installations, and 'sugar scoop' shields. Tradeoff on effective shielding length is set by interference 'edge noise' as the shield trailing edge approaches the spreading jet. Edge noise is minimized by (i) hyperbolic cutouts which trim off the portions of most intense interference between the jet flow and the barrier and (ii) hybrid shields--a thermal refractive extension (a flame); for (ii) the tradeoff is combustion noise. In general, shielding attenuation increases steadily with frequency, following low frequency enhancement by edge noise. Although broadband attenuation is typically only several dB, the reduction of the subjectively weighted perceived noise levels is higher. In addition, calculated ground contours of peak PN dB show a substantial contraction due to shielding: this reaches 66% for one of the 'sugar scoop' shields for the 90 PN dB contour. The experiments are complemented by analytical predictions. They are divided into an engineering scheme for jet noise shielding and more rigorous analysis for point source shielding. The former approach combines point source shielding with a suitable jet source distribution. The results are synthesized into a predictive algorithm for jet noise shielding: the jet is modelled as a line distribution of incoherent sources with narrow band frequency (TURN)(axial distance)('-1). The predictive version agrees well with experiment (1 to 1.5 dB) up to moderate frequencies. The insertion loss deduced from the point source measurements for semi-infinite as well as finite rectangular shields agrees rather well with theoretical calculation based on the exact half plane solution and the superposition of asymptotic closed-form solutions. An approximate theory, the Maggi-Rubinowicz line integral, is found to yield reasonable predictions for thin barriers including

  11. Connecting Performance to Social Structure and Pedagogy as a Pathway to Scaling Learning Analytics in MOOCs: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goggins, S. P.; Galyen, K. D.; Petakovic, E.; Laffey, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study focuses on the design and evaluation of teaching analytics that relate social learning structure with performance measures in a massive open online course (MOOC) prototype environment. Using reflexive analysis of online learning trace data and qualitative performance measures we present an exploratory empirical study that:…

  12. A Meta-Analytic Review of Studies of the Effectiveness of Small-Group Learning Methods on Statistics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalaian, Sema A.; Kasim, Rafa M.

    2014-01-01

    This meta-analytic study focused on the quantitative integration and synthesis of the accumulated pedagogical research in undergraduate statistics education literature. These accumulated research studies compared the academic achievement of students who had been instructed using one of the various forms of small-group learning methods to those who…

  13. Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, S. Surendran; Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences}; Post, Wilfred M; Wang, Dali; Wullschleger, Stan D; Kline, Keith L; Wei, Yaxing; Singh, Nagendra; Kang, Shujiang

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

  14. Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical Framework and Case Study for Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shujiang; Kline, Keith L; Nair, S. Surendran; Nichols, Dr Jeff A; Post, Wilfred M; Brandt, Craig C; Wullschleger, Stan D; Wei, Yaxing; Singh, Nagendra

    2013-01-01

    A global energy crop productivity model that provides geospatially explicit quantitative details on biomass potential and factors affecting sustainability would be useful, but does not exist now. This study describes a modeling platform capable of meeting many challenges associated with global-scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed an analytical framework for bioenergy crops consisting of six major components: (i) standardized natural resources datasets, (ii) global field-trial data and crop management practices, (iii) simulation units and management scenarios, (iv) model calibration and validation, (v) high-performance computing (HPC) simulation, and (vi) simulation output processing and analysis. The HPC-Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (HPC-EPIC) model simulated a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), estimating feedstock production potentials and effects across the globe. This modeling platform can assess soil C sequestration, net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, nonpoint source pollution (e.g., nutrient and pesticide loss), and energy exchange with the atmosphere. It can be expanded to include additional bioenergy crops (e.g., miscanthus, energy cane, and agave) and food crops under different management scenarios. The platform and switchgrass field-trial dataset are available to support global analysis of biomass feedstock production potential and corresponding metrics of sustainability.

  15. Analytical and experimental studies on the strain rate effects in penetration of 10wt % ballistic gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Jia, Z.; Ma, X. L.; Fan, Y. R.

    2013-07-01

    This work concentrates on modeling the super-elastic behavior of 10wt% ballistic gelatin at 4°C and the mechanical responses at quasi-static and high-speed penetrations. Uniaxial compression and simple shearing experiments were carried out to determine the moduli in Mooney-Rivlin model describing the elastic behavior of gelatin at low strain rates. The failure mode is determined to be elastic fracture as the tensile stretch ratio exceeds a critical value. For high compression strain rates, the available results from the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments for 10wt% gelatin were carefully examined and assessed. Linear relationship between the moduli and the strain rate is established. Based on these material parameters, an analytic solution of stress for the quasi-static and quasi-dynamic expansion of spherical cavity in gelatin is derived. As a consequence, the work needed to open unit volume of cavity, Ps, which is the key parameter in studying penetration problems, is linearly increasing with the characteristic strain rate. The application of Ps to our quasi-static and high-speed penetration experiments is discussed and assessed.

  16. In Their Own Words: A Content-Analytic Study of College Women's Resistance to Sexual Assault.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Katie M; Probst, Danielle R; Tansill, Erin C; Dixon, Kristiana J; Bennett, Sidney; Gidycz, Christine A

    2014-02-12

    The purpose of this study was to utilize a mixed methodological approach to better understand the co-occurrence of perpetrator tactics and women's resistance strategies during a sexual assault and women's reflections on these experiences. College women were recruited from introductory psychology courses and completed both forced-choice response and open-ended survey questions for course credit. Content-analytic results of college women's written responses to an open-ended question suggested that women's resistance strategies generally mirrored the tactics of the perpetrator (e.g., women responded to perpetrator verbal pressure with verbal resistance). However, there were some instances in which this was not the case. Furthermore, a number of women expressed a degree of self-blame for the sexual assault in their responses, as well as minimization and normalization of the experience. These findings suggest that sexual assault risk reduction programs need to directly address victims' self-blame as well as create an atmosphere where societal factors that lead to minimization can be addressed. PMID:24522857

  17. An analytical electron microscopy study of paraequilibrium cementite precipitation in ultra-high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G.; Olson, G. B.; Campbell, C. E.

    1999-03-01

    To support quantitative design of ultra-high-strength (UHS) secondary-hardening steels, the precipitation of cementite prior to the precipitation of the M2C phase is investigated using a model alloy. The microstructure of cementite is investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Consistent with earlier studies on tempering of Fe-C martensite, lattice imaging of cementite suggests microsyntactic intergrowth of M5C2 (Hägg carbide). The concentration of substitutional alloying elements in cementite are quantified by high-resolution analytical electron microscopy (AEM) using extraction replica specimens. Quantification of the substitutional elements in cementite confirms its paraequilibrium (PE) state with ferrite at the very early stage of tempering. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of the thermodynamic driving force for nucleation of the primary-strengthening, coherent M2C carbide phase. The ferrite-cementite PE condition reduces the carbon concentration in the ferrite matrix with a significant reduction of M2C driving force. The kinetics of dissolution of PE cementite and its transition to other intermediate states will also influence the kinetics of secondary hardening behavior in UHS steels.

  18. Assessment of Environmental Enteropathy in the MAL-ED Cohort Study: Theoretical and Analytic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Margaret; Guerrant, Richard L.; Kang, Gagandeep; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Gratz, Jean; Gottlieb, Michael; Lang, Dennis; Lee, Gwenyth; Haque, Rashidul; Mason, Carl J.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Lima, Aldo; Petri, William A.; Houpt, Eric; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Seidman, Jessica C.; Mduma, Estomih; Samie, Amidou; Babji, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Individuals in the developing world live in conditions of intense exposure to enteric pathogens due to suboptimal water and sanitation. These environmental conditions lead to alterations in intestinal structure, function, and local and systemic immune activation that are collectively referred to as environmental enteropathy (EE). This condition, although poorly defined, is likely to be exacerbated by undernutrition as well as being responsible for permanent growth deficits acquired in early childhood, vaccine failure, and loss of human potential. This article addresses the underlying theoretical and analytical frameworks informing the methodology proposed by the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study to define and quantify the burden of disease caused by EE within a multisite cohort. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to improve, standardize, and harmonize laboratory practices within the MAL-ED Network. These efforts will address current limitations in the understanding of EE and its burden on children in the developing world. PMID:25305293

  19. Assessment of environmental enteropathy in the MAL-ED cohort study: theoretical and analytic framework.

    PubMed

    Kosek, Margaret; Guerrant, Richard L; Kang, Gagandeep; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Gratz, Jean; Gottlieb, Michael; Lang, Dennis; Lee, Gwenyth; Haque, Rashidul; Mason, Carl J; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Lima, Aldo; Petri, William A; Houpt, Eric; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Seidman, Jessica C; Mduma, Estomih; Samie, Amidou; Babji, Sudhir

    2014-11-01

    Individuals in the developing world live in conditions of intense exposure to enteric pathogens due to suboptimal water and sanitation. These environmental conditions lead to alterations in intestinal structure, function, and local and systemic immune activation that are collectively referred to as environmental enteropathy (EE). This condition, although poorly defined, is likely to be exacerbated by undernutrition as well as being responsible for permanent growth deficits acquired in early childhood, vaccine failure, and loss of human potential. This article addresses the underlying theoretical and analytical frameworks informing the methodology proposed by the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study to define and quantify the burden of disease caused by EE within a multisite cohort. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to improve, standardize, and harmonize laboratory practices within the MAL-ED Network. These efforts will address current limitations in the understanding of EE and its burden on children in the developing world. PMID:25305293

  20. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. A.; Merrigan, M. A.; Elder, M. G.; Sena, J. T.; Keddy, E. S.; Silverstein, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, it is found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700 F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90,000 ft lowers the peak hot-section temperatures to around 2800 F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature.

  1. Review of preparative and analytical procedures for the study of proteins in grape juice and wine.

    PubMed

    Le Bourse, D; Jégou, S; Conreux, A; Villaume, S; Jeandet, P

    2010-05-14

    Proteins have a great influence on wine quality as they exhibit a various range of properties. In fact, they are involved among others in white wine turbidity, organoleptic characteristics and foam formation in sparkling wines. These compounds could also be of major interest for varietal differentiation, regarding wine authentication and traceability issues. To provide a better understanding of the role played by these biomolecules in wine processing and explore their potential applications, there is a manifest need for the quantification and characterization of each individual one in terms of sequence, structure and intrinsic and functional properties. We thus present an overview of preparative and analytical methods for the study of proteins in grape juices and wines, from routine techniques to dedicated methodologies. They include sample preparation with chromatographic methods for the purification and identification of proteins, quantification protocols and characterization procedures such as electrophoretic techniques, immunological methods, sequencing, mass spectrometry, physico-chemical and structural analyses, and so on. We expose advantages and limits of each technique and focus on the different but complementary information they can provide. Despite the past years advances in the field proteins identification, the elucidation of the full protein profile for grape juices and wines remains strenuous. Their interactions with other wine compounds make the challenge even harder. We therefore emphasize the requirement of the techniques to be refined and suggest the developments to be expected. PMID:20441863

  2. Thermal cycling damage of metal matrix composites. Analytical study on dimensional change

    SciTech Connect

    Taya, Minoru ); Armstrong, W.D. ); Dunn, M. )

    1993-05-01

    An analytical model to predict dimensional changes in thermal cycled metal matrix composites (MMCs) with and without constant stress is proposed. The present model assumes that the temperature-time relation to simulate thermal cycling is of a step-function type and the matrix metal deforms as elastic/plastic/creep material while the fiber remains elastic throughout thermal cycling. The model can explain well the experimental results of W-ThO[sub 2]/FeC[sub r]AlY composite during the early stage of cycling and those of the previous works. The present model is then compared with the existing ones including our previous model. Another model is also constructed to simulate the later stage of thermal cycling damage where the debonding of the matrix-fiber interface would presumably take place progressively with number of cycles. This model with a progressive debonded interface was found to explain reasonably well the later stage of dimensional changes observed in W-ThO[sub 2]/FeCrAlY composite. Then, the dimensional change in thermal cycled MMC under constant stress loading is studied by use of the above model for early (first) stage of thermal cycling that is modified to account for applied stress. This model can explain well the experimental results of W/Cu composite. 20 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Inverse patchy colloids with two and three patches. Analytical and numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyuzhnyi, Y. V.; Vasilyev, O. A.; Cummings, P. T.

    2015-07-28

    We propose an analytical solution of the multi-density Ornstein-Zernike equation supplemented by the associative Percus-Yevick closure relations specifically designed to describe the equilibrium properties of the novel class of patchy colloidal particles represented by the inverse patchy colloids with arbitrary number of patches. Using Baxter’s factorization method, we reduce solution of the problem to the solution of one nonlinear algebraic equation for the fraction of the particles with one non-bonded patch. We present closed-form expressions for the structure (structure factor) and thermodynamic (internal energy) properties of the system in terms of this fraction (and parameters of the model). We perform computer simulation studies and compare theoretical and computer simulation predictions for the pair distribution function, internal energy, and number of single and double bonds formed in the system, for two versions of the model, each with two and three patches. We consider the models with formation of the double bonds blocked by the patch-patch repulsion and the models without patch-patch repulsion. In general very good agreement between theoretical and computer simulation results is observed.

  4. Preliminary study of simultaneous multi-anticoagulant deficiency diagnosis by fiber optic multi-analyte biosensor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Kang, Kyung A

    2005-01-01

    Protein C (PC), protein S (PS), antithrombin III, and plasminogen are four important anticoagulants in blood plasma. Deficiency of any of these biomolecules may lead to thrombo-embolic complications including lung embolism, heart attack, and stroke. A multi-factor sensing system is beneficial for identifying the cause of abnormal blood clotting more effectively, rapidly, and cost-effectively. As an initial effort toward simultaneous multi-anticoagulant detection, a PC and PS dual-sensing system has been under development in our research group. A fiberoptic PC biosensor utilizing fluorophore-mediated sandwich immunoassay was already developed for rapid (-5 minutes) PC deficiency diagnosis. After a single PS sensor was developed for the PS deficiency diagnosis, the two sensors were connected in series to form a dual-sensing system. The cross-reactivity between the analytes and the sensors was found to be minimal. For easier sensing operation, a mixture of fluorophore-linked anti-PC and anti-PS was applied. The results showed that the mixture can be used with a slight signal reduction. When PC and PS was mixed in a sample, the signal intensity was decreased by approximately 5% for both sensors. A study is currently being performed to overcome the signal reduction by increasing the flow velocity and incubation time. PMID:16594166

  5. Vibration Based Crack Detection in a Rotating Disk. Part 1; An Analytical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the analytical results concerning the detection of a crack in a rotating disk. The concept of the approach is based on the fact that the development of a disk crack results in a distorted strain field within the component. As a result, a minute deformation in the disk's geometry as well as a change in the system s center of mass occurs. Finite element analyses were conducted concerning a notched disk in order to define the sensitivity of the method. The notch was used to simulate an actual crack and will be the method utilized for upcoming experiments. Various notch sizes were studied. The geometric deformations and shifts of center of mass were documented as a function of rotational speed. In addition, a rotordynamic analysis of a 2-bearing, disk and shaft system was conducted. The overall response of the system was required in order to design the experimental system for operation beyond the first critical. The results of the FE analyses of the disk indicated that the overall changes in the disk s geometry and center of mass were rather small. The difference between the maximum centrifugal radial displacements between the undamaged and damaged disks at 8000 RPM was 0.00014 in. for a 0.963 in. notch length. The shift in center of mass was also of this magnitude. The next step involves running experiments to verify the analysis.

  6. Analytic study of chaos of the tent map: Band structures, power spectra, and critical behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Mori, H.; Shigematsu, H.

    1983-05-01

    Chaotic behaviors of the tent map (a piecewise-linear, continuous map with a unique maximum) are studied analytically throughout its chaotic region in terms of the invariant density and the power spectrum. As the height of the maximum is lowered, successive band-splitting transitions occur in the chaotic region and accumulate to the transition point into the nonchaotic region. The timecorrelation function of nonperiodic orbits and their power spectrum are calculated exactly at the band-splitting points and in the vicinity of these points. The method of eigenvalue problems of the Frobenius-Perron operator is used. 2 m-1 critical modes, where m = 1,2, 3, ..., are found which exhibit the critical slowing-down near the 2 m-1-band to 2 m -band transition point. After the transition these modes become periodic modes which represent the cycling of nonperiodic orbits among 2 m bands together with the periodic modes generated by the preceding band splittings. Scaling laws near the transition point into the nonchaotic region are investigated and a new scaling law is found for the total intensity of the periodic part of the spectrum.

  7. Analytical and numerical study of dirty bosons in a quasi-one-dimensional harmonic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khellil, Tama; Balaž, Antun; Pelster, Axel

    2016-06-01

    The emergence of a Bose-glass region in a quasi one-dimensional Bose–Einstein-condensed gas in a harmonic trapping potential with an additional delta-correlated disorder potential at zero temperature is studied using three approaches. At first, the corresponding time-independent Gross–Pitaevskii equation is numerically solved for the condensate wave function, and disorder ensemble averages are evaluated. In particular, we analyse quantitatively the emergence of mini-condensates in the local minima of the random potential, which occurs for weak disorder preferentially at the border of the condensate, while for intermediate disorder strength this happens in the trap centre. Second, in view of a more detailed physical understanding of this phenomenon, we extend a quite recent non-perturbative approach towards the weakly interacting dirty boson problem, which relies on the Hartree–Fock theory and is worked out on the basis of the replica method, from the homogeneous case to a harmonic confinement. Finally, in the weak disorder regime we also apply the Thomas–Fermi approximation, while in the intermediate disorder regime we additionally use a variational ansatz in order to describe analytically the numerically observed redistribution of the fragmented mini-condensates with increasing disorder strength.

  8. Analytical study of heat transfer from circular cylinder in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, W. A.; Culham, J. R.; Yovanovich, M. M.

    2006-09-01

    In this study the influence of a thin hydrodynamic boundary layer on the heat transfer from a single circular cylinder in liquid metals having low Prandtl number (0.004 0.03) is investigated under isothermal and isoflux boundary conditions. Two separate analytical heat transfer models, viscous and inviscid, are developed to clarify the discrepancy between previous results. For both models, integral approach of the boundary layer analysis is employed to derive closed form expressions for the calculation of the average heat transfer coefficients. For an inviscid model, the energy equation is solved using potential flow velocity only whereas for a viscous model, a fourth-order velocity profile is used in the hydrodynamic boundary layer and potential flow velocity is used outside the boundary layer. The third-order temperature profile is used inside the thermal boundary layer for both models. It is shown that the inviscid model gives higher heat transfer coefficients whereas viscous flow model gives heat transfer results in a fairly good agreement with the previous experimental/numerical results.

  9. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. ); Silverstein, C.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

  10. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S.; Silverstein, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

  11. Interaction of airborne and structureborne noise radiated by plates. Volume 1: Analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of airborne and structureborne noise radiated by aircraft materials was examined. The theory and results of several computer simulations of the noise radiated by thin, isotropic, rectangular aluminum plates due to fully coherent combined acoustic and vibrational inputs is presented. The most significant finding was the extremely large influence that the relative phase between inputs has on the combined noise radiation of the plates. Phase dependent effects manifest themselves as cross terms in both the dynamic and acoustic portions of the analysis. Computer simulations show that these cross terms can radically alter the combined sound power radiated by plates constructed of aircraft-type materials. The results suggest that airborne-structureborne interactive effects could be responsible for a significant portion of the overall noise radiated by aircraft-type structures in the low frequency regime. This implies that previous analytical and experimental studies may have neglected an important physical phenomenon in the analayses of the interior noise of propeller dirven aircraft.

  12. Process analytical technology case study part I: feasibility studies for quantitative near-infrared method development.

    PubMed

    Cogdill, Robert P; Anderson, Carl A; Delgado-Lopez, Miriam; Molseed, David; Chisholm, Robert; Bolton, Raymond; Herkert, Thorsten; Afnán, Ali M; Drennen, James K

    2005-01-01

    This article is the first of a series of articles detailing the development of near-infrared (NIR) methods for solid-dosage form analysis. Experiments were conducted at the Duquesne University Center for Pharmaceutical Technology to qualify the capabilities of instrumentation and sample handling systems, evaluate the potential effect of one source of a process signature on calibration development, and compare the utility of reflection and transmission data collection methods. A database of 572 production-scale sample spectra was used to evaluate the interbatch spectral variability of samples produced under routine manufacturing conditions. A second database of 540 spectra from samples produced under various compression conditions was analyzed to determine the feasibility of pooling spectral data acquired from samples produced at diverse scales. Instrument qualification tests were performed, and appropriate limits for instrument performance were established. To evaluate the repeatability of the sample positioning system, multiple measurements of a single tablet were collected. With the application of appropriate spectral preprocessing techniques, sample repositioning error was found to be insignificant with respect to NIR analyses of product quality attributes. Sample shielding was demonstrated to be unnecessary for transmission analyses. A process signature was identified in the reflection data. Additional tests demonstrated that the process signature was largely orthogonal to spectral variation because of hardness. Principal component analysis of the compression sample set data demonstrated the potential for quantitative model development. For the data sets studied, reflection analysis was demonstrated to be more robust than transmission analysis. PMID:16353986

  13. Quality of Public Hospitals Websites: A Cross-Sectional Analytical Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Salarvand, Shahin; Samadbeik, Mahnaz; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad; Salarvand, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, hospitals have turned increasingly towards the Internet and develop their own web presence. Hospital Websites could be operating as effective web resources of information and interactive communication mediums to enhance hospital services to the public. Aim: Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the quality of websites in Tehran’s public hospitals. Material and methods: This cross-sectional analysis involved all public hospitals in Iran’s capital city, Tehran, with a working website or subsites between April and June, 2014 (N=59). The websites were evaluated using three validated instruments: a localized checklist, Google page rank, and the Alexa traffic ranking. The mentioned checklist consisted of 112 items divided into five sections: technical characteristics, hospital information and facilities, medical services, interactive on-line services and external activities. Data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: The mean website evaluation score was 45.7 out of 224 for selected public hospitals. All the studied websites were in the weak category based on the earned quality scores. There was no statistically significant association between the website evaluation score with Google page rank (P=0.092), Alexa global traffic rank and Alexa traffic rank in Iran (P>0.05). The hospital websites had a lower quality score in the interactive online services and external activities criteria in comparing to other criteria. Due to the low quality level of the studied websites and the importance of hospital portals in providing information and services on the Internet, the authorities should do precise planning for the appreciable improvement in the quality of hospital websites. PMID:27147806

  14. Interaction between omeprazole and tacrolimus in renal allograft recipients: a clinical-analytical study.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J; Marcén, R; Orea, O E; Navarro, M; Alarcón, M C; Ocaña, J; Villafruela, J J; Burgos, F J; Ortuño, J

    2005-11-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor with a number of pharmacokinetic drug interactions due to interference with cytochrome P450. Some studies show absence of relevant interaction between omeprazole and cyclosporine, but little is known about possible interactions between omeprazole and tacrolimus. In vitro studies suggest such interference, but no clinical data are available so far. We assessed interactions between omeprazole and tacrolimus among patients fulfilling two criteria: (1) renal allograft recipients receiving immunosuppression based on tacrolimus and acid-related disorder prophylaxis with omeprazole 20 mg/d since the day of the transplant procedure and (2) stopped omeprazole when it was considered unnecessary. Fifty-one transplant recipients received concomitant immunosuppression with MMF-prednisone (n = 47) or azathioprine-prednisone (n = 1), or rapamycin-prednisone (n = 2) or only prednisone (n = 1). omeprazole was stopped after 6.2 +/- 3 months of treatment. Tacrolimus doses and levels were recorded during 3 outpatient visits before omeprazole withdrawal (Pre3/Pre2/Pre1), at the withdrawal visit (Susp), and at 3 visits after withdrawal (Pos1/Pos2/Pos3). Weight gain was significant (72.5 +/- 13 kg Pre3; 73.4 +/- 13 kg Susp; 74 +/- 12.9 kg Pos3, P < .0001) and serum creatinine (SCr) decreased (1.70 +/- 0.49 mg/dL Pre3; 1.63 + 0.49 Susp; 1.58 +/- 0.48 Pos3, P < .0001). The progressive decrease in tacrolimus doses and levels was significant (ANOVA including the 7 visits <0.01 in all cases); whereas the level/dose ratio remained constant. Tacrolimus doses and levels continued a slow, progressive and significant decrease without any relevant change between visits during on versus off omeprazole. This clinical-analytical study supported the conclusion that an omeprazole-tacrolimus interaction is not clinically relevant. Despite possible competition or interaction at the molecular level, clinical management was not significantly affected in renal allograft

  15. Toward a quality guide to facilitate the transference of analytical methods from research to testing laboratories: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bisetty, Krisnha; Gumede, Njabulo Joyfull; Escuder-Gilabert, Laura; Sagrado, Salvador

    2009-01-01

    At present, there is no single viewpoint that defines QA strategies in analytical chemistry. On the other hand, there are no unique protocols defining a set of analytical tasks and decision criteria to be performed during the method development phase (e.g., by a single research laboratory) in order to facilitate the transference to the testing laboratories intending to adapt, validate, and routinely use this method. This study proposes general criteria, a priori valid for any developed method, recommended as a provisional quality guide containing the minimum internal tasks necessary to publish new analytical method results. As an application, the selection of some basic internal quality tasks and the corresponding accepted criteria are adapted to a concrete case study: indirect differential pulse polarographic determination of nitrate in water samples according to European Commission requisites. Extra tasks to be performed by testing laboratories are also outlined. PMID:20166601

  16. Analytical and Numerical Studies of the Complex Interaction of a Fast Ion Beam Pulse with a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-11-25

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion beam pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, high energy physics, etc. Comprehensive analytical, numerical, and experimental studies are underway to investigate the complex interaction of a fast ion beam with a background plasma. The positively charged ion beam attracts plasma electrons, and as a result the plasma electrons have a tendency to neutralize the beam charge and current. A suite of particle-in-cell codes has been developed to study the propagation of an ion beam pulse through the background plasma. For quasi-steady-state propagation of the ion beam pulse, an analytical theory has been developed using the assumption of long charge bunches and conservation of generalized vorticity. The analytical results agree well with the results of the numerical simulations. The visualization of the data obtained in the numerical simulations shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry into and ex it from the plasma.

  17. An analytical/numerical correlation study of the multiple concentric cylinder model for the thermoplastic response of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.; Williams, Todd O.

    1993-01-01

    The utility of a recently developed analytical micromechanics model for the response of metal matrix composites under thermal loading is illustrated by comparison with the results generated using the finite-element approach. The model is based on the concentric cylinder assemblage consisting of an arbitrary number of elastic or elastoplastic sublayers with isotropic or orthotropic, temperature-dependent properties. The elastoplastic boundary-value problem of an arbitrarily layered concentric cylinder is solved using the local/global stiffness matrix formulation (originally developed for elastic layered media) and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions. These features of the model facilitate efficient investigation of the effects of various microstructural details, such as functionally graded architectures of interfacial layers, on the evolution of residual stresses during cool down. The available closed-form expressions for the field variables can readily be incorporated into an optimization algorithm in order to efficiently identify optimal configurations of graded interfaces for given applications. Comparison of residual stress distributions after cool down generated using finite-element analysis and the present micromechanics model for four composite systems with substantially different temperature-dependent elastic, plastic, and thermal properties illustrates the efficacy of the developed analytical scheme.

  18. DoE optimization of a mercury isotope ratio determination method for environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Berni, Alex; Baschieri, Carlo; Covelli, Stefano; Emili, Andrea; Marchetti, Andrea; Manzini, Daniela; Berto, Daniela; Rampazzo, Federico

    2016-05-15

    By using the experimental design (DoE) technique, we optimized an analytical method for the determination of mercury isotope ratios by means of cold-vapor multicollector ICP-MS (CV-MC-ICP-MS) to provide absolute Hg isotopic ratio measurements with a suitable internal precision. By running 32 experiments, the influence of mercury and thallium internal standard concentrations, total measuring time and sample flow rate was evaluated. Method was optimized varying Hg concentration between 2 and 20ngg(-1). The model finds out some correlations within the parameters affect the measurements precision and predicts suitable sample measurement precisions for Hg concentrations from 5ngg(-1) Hg upwards. The method was successfully applied to samples of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) coming from the Marano and Grado lagoon (NE Italy), a coastal environment affected by long term mercury contamination mainly due to mining activity. Results show different extents of both mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) phenomena in clams according to their size and sampling sites in the lagoon. The method is fit for determinations on real samples, allowing for the use of Hg isotopic ratios to study mercury biogeochemical cycles in complex ecosystems. PMID:26992509

  19. Second-generation-heliostat optimization studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    The objective of this study was to define and quantify cost reductions in the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace Second Generation Heliostat resulting from design and cost optimization. These cost reductions were based on optimizing the heliostat performance vs. cost and engineering design, and reviewing the design specification in selected technological areas with a goal of removing nonrealistic requirements and eliminating or minimizing overdesign. Specific technological areas investigated were: (1) designing the heliostat for survival strength rather than stiffness and reducing the operational wind requirements as dictated by this design approach; (2) reducing the pointing accuracy and/or beam quality required for some fraction or all of the heliostat field; (3) modifying the operational temperature range; (4) relaxing the rate at which the heliostat must move in the slew mode; (5) using alternate beam safety strategies; (6) analyzing actual wind data for selected sites in the southwest United States vs. the heliostat design specification survival wind requirements; (7) estimating heliostat damage for winds in excess of the design specification over a 30 year period; (8) evaluating the impact of designing the heliostat for higher wind loads; and (9) investigating the applicability to heliostat design of the standard engineering practices for designing buildings.

  20. Caregiver's education level and child's dental caries in African Americans: a path analytic study.

    PubMed

    Heima, Masahiro; Lee, Wonik; Milgrom, Peter; Nelson, Suchita

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of caregiver education level on children's dental caries mediated by both caregiver and child oral health behaviors. Participants were 423 low-income African American kindergarteners and their caregivers who were part of a school-based randomized clinical trial. Path analysis tested the hypothesis that caregiver education level affected untreated dental caries and cumulative overall caries experience (decayed or filled teeth) through the mediating influence of frequency of dental visits, use of routine care, and frequency of toothbrushing for both the caregiver and the child. The results supported the hypothesis: caregivers who completed high school were 1.76 times more likely to visit dentists compared with those who did not complete high school (e(0.56) = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.03-2.99), which in turn was associated with 5.78 times greater odds of dental visits among their children (e(1.76) = 5.78, 95% CI: 3.53-9.48). Children's dental visits, subsequently, were associated with 26% fewer untreated decayed teeth compared with children without dental visits (e(-0.31) = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60-0.91). However, this path was not present in the model with overall caries experience. Additionally, caregiver education level was directly associated with 34% less untreated decayed teeth (e(-0.42) = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.54-0.79) and 28% less decayed or filled teeth (e(-0.32) = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.60-0.88) among the children. This study overcomes important conceptual and analytic limitations in the existing literature. The findings confirm the role of caregiver education in child dental caries and indicate that caregiver's behavioral factors are important mediators of child oral health. PMID:25661111