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Sample records for analytical scanning electron

  1. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography.

    PubMed

    Jesse, S; Chi, M; Belianinov, A; Beekman, C; Kalinin, S V; Borisevich, A Y; Lupini, A R

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called "big-data" methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy. PMID:27211523

  2. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy. PMID:27211523

  3. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  4. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. In this paper, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature andmore » does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. Finally, however, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.« less

  5. Endogenous pneumoconiosis: Analytical scanning electron microscopic analysis of a case.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Jonathan; Sporn, Thomas A; Ingram, Peter; Wahidi, Momen M; Roggli, Victor L

    2016-01-01

    Pneumoconiosis is often considered a disease of the lung initiated by exposure to dust or other airborne particles, resulting in injury to the lungs. The term "endogenous pneumoconiosis" has been used in the literature to describe the deposition of compounds on the elastic fibers of the lung, usually in the setting of cardiac failure. In the case we present here, the patient aspirated a foreign body resulting in damage to the lung tissue and subsequent deposition of endogenous compounds on the elastic fibers of the pulmonary parenchyma and vasculature. We determined the composition of this mineral and mapped the distribution of elements using a combination of backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. PMID:27281119

  6. Scanning Electron Microanalysis and Analytical Challenges of Mapping Elements in Urban Atmospheric Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental mapping with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) associated with scanning electron microscopy is highly useful for studying internally mixed atmospheric particles. Presented is a study of individual particles from urban airsheds and the analytical challenges in q...

  7. An in-situ analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigation of structure-property relationships in electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Andrew James

    As electronic and mechanical devices are scaled downward in size and upward in complexity, macroscopic principles no longer apply. Synthesis of three-dimensionally confined structures exhibit quantum confinement effects allowing, for example, silicon nanoparticles to luminesce. The reduction in size of classically brittle materials reveals a ductile-to-brittle transition. Such a transition, attributed to a reduction in defects, increases elasticity. In the case of silicon, elastic deformation can improve electronic carrier mobility by over 50%, a vital attribute of modern integrated circuits. The scalability of such principles and the changing atomistic processes which contribute to them presents a vitally important field of research. Beginning with the direct observation of dislocations and lattice planes in the 1950s, the transmission electron microscope has been a powerful tool in materials science. More recently, as nanoscale technologies have proliferated modern life, their unique ability to spatially resolve nano- and atomic-scale structures has become a critical component of materials research and characterization. Signals produced by an incident beam of high-energy electrons enables researchers to both image and chemically analyze materials at the atomic scale. Coherently and elastically-scattered electrons can be collected to produce atomic-scale images of a crystalline sample. New specimen stages have enabled routine investigation of samples heated up to 1000 °C and cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. MEMS-based transducers allow for sub-nm scale mechanical testing and ultrathin membranes allow study of liquids and gases. Investigation of a myriad of previously "unseeable" processes can now be observed within the TEM, and sometimes something new is found within the old. High-temperature annealing of pure a Si:H films leads to crystallization of the film. Such films provide higher carrier mobility compared to amorphous films, offering improved

  8. Analytical Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of Laboratory Impacts on Stardust Aluminium Foils: Interpreting Impact Crater Morphology and the Composition of Impact Residues.

    SciTech Connect

    Kearsley, A T; Graham, G A; Burchell, M J; Cole, M J; Dai, Z R; Teslich, N; Chater, R; Wozniakiewicz, P A; Spratt, J; Jones, G

    2006-10-19

    The known encounter velocity (6.1kms{sup -1}) between the Stardust spacecraft and the dust emanating from the nucleus of comet Wild 2 has allowed realistic simulation of dust collection in laboratory experiments designed to validate analytical methods for the interpretation of dust impacts on the aluminium foil components of the Stardust collector. In this report we present information on crater gross morphology, the pre-existing major and trace element composition of the foil, geometrical issues for energy dispersive X-ray analysis of the impact residues in scanning electron microscopes, and the modification of dust chemical composition during creation of impact craters as revealed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. Together, these observations help to underpin the interpretation of size, density and composition for particles impacted upon the Stardust aluminium foils.

  9. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  10. Plop Plop Fizz Fizz: Identifying and Characterizing Microejecta From Oceanic Extraterrestrial Impacts Using Analytical Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breger, D.; Abbott, D.; Burckle, L.; Gerard-Little, P.; Elkinton, H.; Martos, S.

    2006-12-01

    Recent evidence gathered from multiple lines of investigation converges to postulate a higher than average incidence of catastrophic oceanic impacts in the Holocene that affected global climate and thereby the course of human history. Oceanic impacts further back in time are also being documented. One productive technological tool used in the process of these investigations is the combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS), with which we define and characterize impact-related (ultra)microscopic particles. In support of our Holocene and related impact investigations, this presentation of SEM images and EDS data illustrates the application of these technologies in the examination of microscopic and ultramicroscopic fragments, grains, microtektites, and other spherules associated with two oceanic extraterrestrial impact events. Secondary electron micrographs record the microejecta's shapes, sizes, structures, and textures. Our EDS data identify the elemental or compound/mineral compositions of heterogeneous specimens as well as of individual spots and areas in nonhomogeneous host particles as "mapped" by backscatter imaging. The source craters covered here include twin ca.1500 ybp craters in the Gulf of Carpentaria (Australia) as well as one in the Ross Sea (Antarctica) dated to the late Pliocene. Important results from the Gulf of Carpentaria include magnetite impact spherules, impact glass, and minerals with odd, potentially indicative, fractures. From the Ross Sea, we show melted KCl fragments and possible melted ilmenite grains, "onion- skin"-type layered tektites composed of pure SiO2, pseudotachylite-like veined rock fragments, a glass with possible shatter cone structures, and other microejecta particles whose structural and chemical natures we interpret as diagnostic of these impact events.

  11. Aluminum-induced pneumoconiosis confirmed by analytical scanning electron microscopy: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Carney, John; McAdams, Page; McCluskey, James; Roggli, Victor L

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum-induced lung injury is an uncommon, yet recognized pneumoconiosis capable of causing severe interstitial fibrosis. Important attention to the clinical history including occupational exposure is an essential component to making the correct diagnosis, despite which careful examination of the lung specimen is necessary to exclude other more common disease entities. We present a case of aluminum-induced pneumoconiosis in the setting of a bilateral lung transplant patient. Additionally, we review the literature on aluminum-induced pneumoconiosis and demonstrate the use of ancillary techniques including backscattered electron imaging and energy-dispersive spectrometry to aid in diagnosis. PMID:26895029

  12. Analytical transmission electron microscopy in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Microcharacterization of materials on a scale of less than 10 nm has been afforded by recent advances in analytical transmission electron microscopy. The factors limiting accurate analysis at the limit of spatial resolution for the case of a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are examined in this paper.

  13. Electronically-Scanned Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, C. F.; Parra, G. T.; Kauffman, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Sensors not pneumatically switched. Electronic pressure-transducer scanning system constructed in modular form. Pressure transducer modules and analog to digital converter module small enough to fit within cavities of average-sized wind-tunnel models. All switching done electronically. Temperature controlled environment maintained within sensor modules so accuracy maintained while ambient temperature varies.

  14. Cautions Concerning Electronic Analytical Balances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bruce B.; Wells, John D.

    1986-01-01

    Cautions chemists to be wary of ferromagnetic samples (especially magnetized samples), stray electromagnetic radiation, dusty environments, and changing weather conditions. These and other conditions may alter readings obtained from electronic analytical balances. (JN)

  15. Electronic scanning-slit fluorography.

    PubMed

    Plenkovich, D

    1989-01-01

    Scattered radiation degrades contrast and signal-to-noise ratio of an x-ray image. If an image intensifier is used as the image receptor, scattering of light photons and electrons within the image intensifier, optical system, and video camera produces veiling glare. anti-scatter grids, air gaps, and paired scanning slits have been used for rejection of scattered radiation. However, none of these methods is effective against veiling glare, because veiling glare is generated after the radiation has passed through any of these anti-scatter devices. In chapter 1 is introduced an innovative approach for highly efficient rejection of both scattered radiation and veiling glare in digital fluorography. This method has been named electronic collimation, and the x-ray imaging technique based upon it is called electronic scanning-slit fluorography. It involves replacing paired fore and aft slits for scatter rejection with only one beam-defining tantalum fore aperture. As this aperture scans across the portion of the patient to be imaged, pulsed x-ray exposures produce images which are digitized and stored in the computer memory. Since the video signal within the projection of the aperture on the image intensifier is much more intense than behind the tantalum, one can discriminate electronically between these two signals and thus eliminate the unwanted x-ray scatter and veiling glare. Such electronic collimation does not require synchronization between the slit scanning and detector readout, which makes it much simpler than alternative methods and potentially adaptable to any digital fluorography system. Theoretical considerations relevant for the construction and evaluation of a prototype unit for electronic scanning slit fluorography are presented in Chapter 2. This chapter consists of four sections. In the first section 'Principles of image detection' the concepts of quantum efficiency and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are introduced as the most meaningful way to

  16. UAVSAR Active Electronically Scanned Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory, A.; Chamberlain, Neil F.; Zawadzki, Mark S.; Brown, Kyle M.; Fisher, Charles D.; Figueroa, Harry S.; Hamilton, Gary A.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Vorperian, Vatche; Grando, Maurio B.

    2011-01-01

    The Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a pod-based, L-band (1.26 GHz), repeatpass, interferometric, synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) used for Earth science applications. Repeat-pass interferometric radar measurements from an airborne platform require an antenna that can be steered to maintain the same angle with respect to the flight track over a wide range of aircraft yaw angles. In order to be able to collect repeat-pass InSAR data over a wide range of wind conditions, UAVSAR employs an active electronically scanned array (AESA). During data collection, the UAVSAR flight software continuously reads the aircraft attitude state measured by the Embedded GPS/INS system (EGI) and electronically steers the beam so that it remains perpendicular to the flight track throughout the data collection

  17. Estimation of changes in nickel and chromium content in nickel-titanium and stainless steel orthodontic wires used during orthodontic treatment: An analytical and scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Kararia, Vandana; Jain, Pradeep; Chaudhary, Seema; Kararia, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The biocompatibility of orthodontic dental alloys has been investigated over the past 20 years, but the results have been inconclusive. The study compares standard 3 M Unitek nickel-titanium (NiTi) and stainless steel archwires with locally available JJ orthodontics wires. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) study of surface changes and complexometric titration to study compositional change was performed. Materials and Methods: Ten archwires each of group 1–3 M 0.016” NiTi, group 2-JJ 0.016” NiTi, group 3–3 M 0.019” *0.025” SS and group 4-JJ SS contributed a 10 mm piece of wire for analysis prior to insertion in the patient and 6 weeks post insertion. SEM images were recorded at ×2000, ×4000 and ×6000 magnification. The same samples were subjected to complexiometric titration using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid to gauge the actual change in the composition. Observations and Results: The SEM images of all the archwires showed marked changes with deep scratches and grooves and dark pitting corrosion areas post intraoral use. 3M wires showed an uniform criss-cross pattern in as received wires indicating a coating which was absent after intraoral use. There was a significant release of Nickel and Chromium from both group 3 and 4. Group 2 wires released ions significantly more than group 1 (P = 0.0). Conclusion: Extensive and stringent trials are required before certifying any product to be used in Orthodontics. PMID:25684911

  18. Electronically-Scanned Fourier-Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Ocallaghan, F. G.

    1984-01-01

    Instrument efficient, lightweight, and stable. Fourier-transform spectrometer configuration uses electronic, instead of mechanical, scanning. Configuration insensitive to vibration-induced sampling errors introduced into mechanically scanned systems.

  19. Phase multiplying electronic scanning array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaton, A. F.

    1969-01-01

    Scanning array was designed with properties of low RF loss and phase control. The array consists of a series of special waveguides, hybrids made up of two variable reactance branch arms for input signals, an edge slot for the difference port, and a sum arm for the unradiated signal.

  20. The Scanning Electron Microscope and the Archaeologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponting, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Images from scanning electron microscopy are now quite common and they can be of great value in archaeology. Techniques such as secondary electron imaging, backscattered electron imaging and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis can reveal information such as the presence of weevils in grain in Roman Britain, the composition of Roman coins and the…

  1. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning. PMID:27150131

  2. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning. PMID:27150131

  3. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning.

  4. Computerized analytical electron microscope for elemental imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlen, K. E.; Barden, L. K.; Del Priore, J. S.; Fiori, C. E.; Gibson, C. C.; Leapman, R. D.

    1984-06-01

    A computer system has been interfaced to an analytical scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to form an integrated system for high-resolution mapping of the elemental constituents of a specimen. The system controls the electron beam position, acquires data from electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) detectors, and constructs elemental images by analyzing EELS and EDS spectra taken at each pixel. Data also are acquired and digitized from conventional STEM bright-field and dark-field detectors. Since image registration errors are eliminated by acquiring data from all detectors concurrently, elemental distribution images obtained from energy-loss and x-ray detectors can be correlated with morphological images taken from bright-field and dark-field detectors. Energy-loss and x-ray spectra of user-defined target areas can also be obtained. Data can be acquired, processed, and displayed at the same time because a satellite microcomputer interfaced to the microscope does much of the data acquisition, freeing the host computer to subtract the spectral background from the electron energy-loss and x-ray data ``on the fly,'' and also to display dynamically the background corrected energy-loss spectrum at each image pixel. Such a display is important for correct operation of the instrument and interpretation of the results. Images are displayed on a color display system equipped with a digital video array processor, where they can be enhanced, compared, measured, annotated, and photographed. Operation of the system is simplified by using menus for function selection and by filling out forms displayed on a video terminal to enter data-acquisition and processing parameters. The computer-controlled analytical electron microscope is used to provide elemental distributions from thin specimens in biology and materials science. Results show that concentrations of a few atomic percent can be mapped at a resolution of 10 to 20

  5. Analytical studies of coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2009-05-04

    Under certain assumptions and simplifications, we studied a few physics processes of Coherent Electron Cooling using analytical approach. In the modulation process, the effect due to merging the ion beam with the electron beam is studied under single kick approximation. In the free electron laser (FEL) amplifier, we studied the amplification of the electron density modulation using 1D analytical approach. Both the electron charge density and the phase space density are derived in the frequency domain. The solutions are then transformed into the space domain through Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT).

  6. Electron Beam Scanning in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongen, Yves; Herer, Arnold

    1996-05-01

    Scanned electron beams are used within many industries for applications such as sterilization of medical disposables, crosslinking of wire and cables insulating jackets, polymerization and degradation of resins and biomaterials, modification of semiconductors, coloration of gemstones and glasses, removal of oxides from coal plant flue gasses, and the curing of advanced composites and other molded forms. X-rays generated from scanned electron beams make yet other applications, such as food irradiation, viable. Typical accelerators for these applications range in beam energy from 0.5MeV to 10 MeV, with beam powers between 5 to 500kW and scanning widths between 20 and 300 cm. Since precise control of dose delivery is required in many of these applications, the integration of beam characteristics, product conveyance, and beam scanning mechanisms must be well understood and optimized. Fundamental issues and some case examples are presented.

  7. Analytical techniques of pilot scanning behavior and their application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. L., Sr.; Glover, B. J.; Spady, A. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The state of the art of oculometric data analysis techniques and their applications in certain research areas such as pilot workload, information transfer provided by various display formats, crew role in automated systems, and pilot training are documented. These analytical techniques produce the following data: real-time viewing of the pilot's scanning behavior, average dwell times, dwell percentages, instrument transition paths, dwell histograms, and entropy rate measures. These types of data are discussed, and overviews of the experimental setup, data analysis techniques, and software are presented. A glossary of terms frequently used in pilot scanning behavior and a bibliography of reports on related research sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center are also presented.

  8. Performance of analytical methods for tomographic gamma scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T.H.; Mercer, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    The use of gamma-ray computerized tomography for nondestructive assay of radioactive materials has led to the development of specialized analytical methods. Over the past few years, Los Alamos has developed and implemented a computer code, called ARC-TGS, for the analysis of data obtained by tomographic gamma scanning (TGS). ARC-TGS reduces TGS transmission and emission tomographic data, providing the user with images of the sample contents, the activity or mass of selected radionuclides, and an estimate of the uncertainty in the measured quantities. The results provided by ARC-TGS can be corrected for self-attenuation when the isotope of interest emits more than one gamma-ray. In addition, ARC-TGS provides information needed to estimate TGS quantification limits and to estimate the scan time needed to screen for small amounts of radioactivity. In this report, an overview of the analytical methods used by ARC-TGS is presented along with an assessment of the performance of these methods for TGS.

  9. Atomic sputtering in the analytical electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, C.R.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1988-08-01

    The advent of UHV medium voltage electron microscopes has brought the microanalyst to a regime of operating conditions in which electron beam induced damage can now be introduced to metallic specimens of medium to high atomic number. We report upon calculations of electron beam induced atomic sputtering which will have bearing upon the next generation of medium voltage analytical electron microscopes. The cross-section calculations reported herein have been completed for all solid elements of the periodic table for incident electron energies up to 1.5 MeV. All computer codes needed to duplicate these computations are available through the EMMPDL. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns about the environmental and public health effects of particulate matter (PM) have stimulated interest in analytical techniques capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSE...

  11. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOGICAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semi-quantitative scanning electron microscope (SEK) analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon (GAC) utilized as media for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment (combined processes). he procedure allows for the objective monitoring, com...

  12. Scanning electron microscopy studies of bacterial cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinger, Tracy; Blust, Brittni; Calabrese, Joseph; Tzolov, Marian

    2012-02-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is a powerful tool to study the morphology of bacteria. We have used conventional scanning electron microscope to follow the modification of the bacterial morphology over the course of the bacterial growth cycle. The bacteria were fixed in vapors of Glutaraldehyde and ruthenium oxide applied in sequence. A gold film of about 5 nm was deposited on top of the samples to avoid charging and to enhance the contrast. We have selected two types of bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis and Kocuria rhizophila. Their development was carefully monitored and samples were taken for imaging in equal time intervals during their cultivation. These studies are supporting our efforts to develop an optical method for identification of the Gram-type of bacterial cultures.

  13. Cryogenic Multichannel Pressure Sensor With Electronic Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopson, Purnell, Jr.; Chapman, John J.; Kruse, Nancy M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Array of pressure sensors operates reliably and repeatably over wide temperature range, extending from normal boiling point of water down to boiling point of nitrogen. Sensors accurate and repeat to within 0.1 percent. Operate for 12 months without need for recalibration. Array scanned electronically, sensor readings multiplexed and sent to desktop computer for processing and storage. Used to measure distributions of pressure in research on boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers, achieved by low temperatures.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  15. Scanning electron microscopic autoradiography of lung

    SciTech Connect

    Lauhala, K.E.; Sanders, C.L.; McDonald, K.E.

    1988-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) autoradiography of the lung is being used to determine the distribution of inhaled, alpha particle-emitting, plutonium dioxide particles. SEM autoradiography provides high visual impact views of alpha activity. Particles irradiating the bronchiolar epithelium were detected both on the bronchiolar surface and in peribronchiolar alveoli. The technique is being used to obtain quantitative data on the clearance rates of plutonium particles from bronchi and bronchioles.

  16. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques E; Castro, Luis Antonio Suita de

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  17. Immunogold Labeling for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Martin W; Fišerová, Jindřiška

    2016-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes are useful biological tools that can be used to image the surface of whole organisms, tissues, cells, cellular components, and macromolecules. Processes and structures that exist at surfaces can be imaged in pseudo, or real 3D at magnifications ranging from about 10× to 1,000,000×. Therefore a whole multicellular organism, such as a fly, or a single protein embedded in one of its cell membranes can be visualized. In order to identify that protein at high resolution, or to see and quantify its distribution at lower magnifications, samples can be labeled with antibodies. Any surface that can be exposed can potentially be studied in this way. Presented here is a generic method for immunogold labeling for scanning electron microscopy, using two examples of specimens: isolated nuclear envelopes and the cytoskeleton of mammalian culture cells. Various parameters for sample preparation, fixation, immunogold labeling, drying, metal coating, and imaging are discussed so that the best immunogold scanning electron microscopy results can be obtained from different types of specimens. PMID:27515090

  18. Characterization of uniform scanning proton beams with analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demez, Nebi

    Tissue equivalent phantoms have an important place in radiation therapy planning and delivery. They have been manufactured for use in conventional radiotherapy. Their tissue equivalency for proton beams is currently in active investigation. The Bragg-Kleeman rule was used to calculate water equivalent thickness (WET) for available tissue equivalent phantoms from CIRS (Norfolk, VA, USA). WET's of those phantoms were also measured using proton beams at Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute (HUPTI). WET measurements and calculations are in good agreement within ˜1% accuracy except for high Z phantoms. Proton beams were also characterized with an analytical proton dose calculation model, Proton Loss Model (PLM) [26], to investigate protons interactions in water and those phantoms. Depth-dose and lateral dose profiles of protons in water and in those phantoms were calculated, measured, and compared. Water Equivalent Spreadness (WES) was also investigated for those phantoms using the formula for scattering power ratio. Because WES is independent of incident energy of protons, it is possible to estimate spreadness of protons in different media by just knowing WES. Measurements are usually taken for configuration of the treatment planning system (TPS). This study attempted to achieve commissioning data for uniform scanning proton planning with analytical methods, PLM, which have been verified with published measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Depth doses and lateral profiles calculated by PLM were compared with measurements via the gamma analysis method. While gamma analysis shows that depth doses are in >90% agreement with measured depth doses, the agreement falls to <80% for some lateral profiles. PLM data were imported into the TPS (PLM-TPS). PLM-TPS was tested with different patient cases. The PLM-TPS treatment plans for 5 prostate cases show acceptable agreement. The Planning Treatment Volume (PTV) coverage was 100 % with PLM-TPS except for one case in

  19. [Pili annulati. A scanning electron microscopy study].

    PubMed

    Lalević-Vasić, B; Polić, D

    1988-01-01

    A case of ringed hair studied by light and electron microscopy is reported. The patient, a 20-year old girl, had been presenting with the hair abnormality since birth. At naked eye examination the hairs were dry, 6 to 7 cm long, and they showed dull and shining areas giving the scalp hair a scintillating appearance (fig. 1). Several samples of hair were taken and examined by light microscopy under white and polarized light. Hair shafts and cryo-fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS. 1. Light microscopy. Lesions were found in every hair examined. There were abnormal, opaque and fusiform areas alternating with normal areas all along the hair shaft (fig. 2). The abnormal areas resulted from intracortical air-filled cavities. Fractures similar to those of trichorrhexis nodosa were found in the opaque areas of the distal parts of the hairs. 2. Scanning electron microscopy. A. Hair shaft surface. The abnormal areas showed a longitudinal, "curtain-like" folding of the cuticular cells which had punctiform depressions on their surface and worn free edges (fig. 4, 5, 6); trichorrhexis-type fractures were seen in the distal parts of the hair shafts (fig. 7, 8). Normal areas regularly presented with longitudinal, superficial, short and non-systematized depressions (fig. 9); the cuticular cells were worn, and there were places where the denuded cortex showed dissociated cortical fibres (fig. 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3415147

  20. Characterizing wear with the scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.H.

    1991-07-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is used extensively to characterize and analyze wear mechanisms and coatings on material. Wear mechanisms and severity can be identified by the characteristic scars on sample surfaces and by examining wear debris. Backscattered electron imaging is very useful in identifying oxidized materials and locations where coatings have worn thin. These images are compared with spectra from energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy or wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy data to verify the identifications. Micrographs of typical wear mechanisms are presented and techniques for analysis of wear surfaces are discussed. Examples of the evaluation of coatings are also presented and an ultramicrohardness tester installed in the SEM to evaluate coating hardness and fracture toughness is described. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  1. Hexamethyldisilazane for scanning electron microscopy of Gastrotricha.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, R; Litvaitis, M K

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated treatment with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) as an alternative to critical-point drying (CPD) for preparing microscopic Gastrotricha for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We prepared large marine (2 mm) and small freshwater (100 microm) gastrotrichs using HMDS as the primary dehydration solvent and compared the results to earlier investigations using CPD. The results of HMDS dehydration are similar to or better than CPD for resolution of two important taxonomic features: cuticular ornamentation and patterns of ciliation. The body wall of both sculpted (Lepidodermella) and smooth (Dolichodasys) gastrotrichs retained excellent morphology as did the delicate sensory and locomotory cilia. The only unfavorable result of HMDS dehydration was an occasional coagulation of gold residue when the solvent had not fully evaporated before sputter-coating. We consider HMDS an effective alternative for preparing of gastrotrichs for SEM because it saves time and expense compared to CPD. PMID:10810982

  2. Electric fields in Scanning Electron Microscopy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arat, K. T.; Bolten, J.; Klimpel, T.; Unal, N.

    2016-03-01

    The electric field distribution and charging effects in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were studied by extending a Monte-Carlo based SEM simulator by a fast and accurate multigrid (MG) based 3D electric field solver. The main focus is on enabling short simulation times with maintaining sufficient accuracy, so that SEM simulation can be used in practical applications. The implementation demonstrates a gain in computation speed, when compared to a Gauss-Seidel based reference solver is roughly factor of 40, with negligible differences in the result (~10-6 𝑉). In addition, the simulations were compared with experimental SEM measurements using also complex 3D sample, showing that i) the modelling of e-fields improves the simulation accuracy, and ii) multigrid method provide a significant benefit in terms of simulation time.

  3. A cryogenic multichannel electronically scanned pressure module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.; Adcock, Edward E.; Kahng, Seun K.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a cryogenic multichannel electronically scanned pressure (ESP) module developed and tested over an extended temperature span from -184 to +50 C and a pressure range of 0 to 5 psig. The ESP module consists of 32 pressure sensor dice, four analog 8 differential-input multiplexers, and an amplifier circuit, all of which are packaged in a physical volume of 2 x 1 x 5/8 in with 32 pressure and two reference ports. Maximum nonrepeatability is measured at 0.21 percent of full-scale output. The ESP modules have performed consistently well over 15 times over the above temperature range and continue to work without any sign of degradation. These sensors are also immune to repeated thermal shock tests over a temperature change of 220 C/sec.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of tinea nigra*

    PubMed Central

    Guarenti, Isabelle Maffei; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Leitão, Aline Hatzenberger; Rocha, Nara Moreira; Silva, Ricardo Marques e

    2014-01-01

    Tinea nigra is a rare superficial mycosis caused by Hortaea werneckii. This infection presents as asymptomatic brown to black maculae mostly in palmo-plantar regions. We performed scanning electron microscopy of a superficial shaving of a tinea nigra lesion. The examination of the outer surface of the sample showed the epidermis with corneocytes and hyphae and elimination of fungal filaments. The inner surface of the sample showed important aggregation of hyphae among keratinocytes, which formed small fungal colonies. The ultrastructural findings correlated with those of dermoscopic examination - the small fungal aggregations may be the dark spicules seen on dermoscopy - and also allowed to document the mode of dissemination of tinea nigra, showing how hyphae are eliminated on the surface of the lesion. PMID:24770516

  5. Analytical electron microscopy study of radioactive ceramic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    O'Holleran, T. P.; Sinkler, W.; Moschetti, T. L.; Johnson, S. G.; Goff, K. M.

    1999-11-11

    A ceramic waste form has been developed to immobilize the halide high-level waste stream from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. Analytical electron microscopy studies, using both scanning and transmission instruments, have been performed to characterize the microstructure of this material. The microstructure consists primarily of sodalite granules (containing the bulk of the halides) bonded together with glass. The results of these studies are discussed in detail. Insight into the waste form fabrication process developed as a result of these studies is also discussed.

  6. From 3D Scanning to Analytical Heritage Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaich, M.

    During the last few years, the number of historical and archaeological items recorded using innovative, three dimensional surveying technologies has increased considerably. Comprehensive digital, photo-realistic 3D recording and modelling yields a huge range of new possibilities for documenting, analysing and safeguarding items of cultural importance. ArcTron GmbH has specialised in electronic surveying and the development of CAD and database information systems for heritage and archaeology for over 12 years employing total stations, laser pantographs and photogrammetry, as well as a variety of laser scanning systems, to generate 3D recordings. Innovative complementary combinations of these technologies allow their respective strengths to be fully exploited. The data resulting from recording techniques of these kinds can be used as a basis for producing documentation of outstanding quality. 3D digital models with photo-realistic texturing, orthophotos, coloured point clouds, 3D damage mapping, rapid prototyping models and multi-media presentations are just some of the potential resulting forms of documentation. Historical monuments and items ranging from huge sections of terrain down to the smallest artefact can be reproduced with such accuracy and to such a high level of realism that documentation of this kind is not only extremely useful for archaeologists, conservators and architectural historians etc. but practically indispensable.

  7. STEM electron tomography in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, M.; Signoroni, A.; Sanzogni, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Migliori, A.; Ortolani, L.; Christian, M.; Masini, L.; Morandi, V.

    2015-10-01

    The scanning-transmission imaging mode in the SEM allows for the threedimensional tomographic reconstruction of a specimen, starting from a set of projection images. Compressed sensing was used to solve the undetermined problem of structure reconstruction and was proven capable of overcoming the limitations arising from the sampling scheme. Reconstructions of cobalt particles within a carbon nanotube and collagen fibrils in a dermal tissue are presented, demonstrating the potential of this technique in the set of 3-D electron microscopy methods for both physical and biological science.

  8. The trajectories of secondary electrons in the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Konvalina, Ivo; Müllerová, Ilona

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of the trajectories of secondary electrons (SE) in the scanning electron microscope have been performed for plenty of real configurations of the specimen chamber, including all its basic components. The primary purpose was to evaluate the collection efficiency of the Everhart-Thornley detector of SE and to reveal fundamental rules for tailoring the set-ups in which efficient signal acquisition can be expected. Intuitive realizations about the easiness of attracting the SEs towards the biased front grid of the detector have shown themselves likely as false, and all grounded objects in the chamber have been proven to influence the spatial distribution of the signal-extracting field. The role of the magnetic field penetrating from inside the objective lens is shown to play an ambiguous role regarding possible support for the signal collection. PMID:17063762

  9. Analytical electron microscopy in mineralogy; exsolved phases in pyroxenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nord, G.L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy has been successfully used to characterize the structure and composition of lamellar exsolution products in pyroxenes. At operating voltages of 100 and 200 keV, microanalytical techniques of x-ray energy analysis, convergent-beam electron diffraction, and lattice imaging have been used to chemically and structurally characterize exsolution lamellae only a few unit cells wide. Quantitative X-ray energy analysis using ratios of peak intensities has been adopted for the U.S. Geological Survey AEM in order to study the compositions of exsolved phases and changes in compositional profiles as a function of time and temperature. The quantitative analysis procedure involves 1) removal of instrument-induced background, 2) reduction of contamination, and 3) measurement of correction factors obtained from a wide range of standard compositions. The peak-ratio technique requires that the specimen thickness at the point of analysis be thin enough to make absorption corrections unnecessary (i.e., to satisfy the "thin-foil criteria"). In pyroxenes, the calculated "maximum thicknesses" range from 130 to 1400 nm for the ratios Mg/Si, Fe/Si, and Ca/Si; these "maximum thicknesses" have been contoured in pyroxene composition space as a guide during analysis. Analytical spatial resolutions of 50-100 nm have been achieved in AEM at 200 keV from the composition-profile studies, and analytical reproducibility in AEM from homogeneous pyroxene standards is ?? 1.5 mol% endmember. ?? 1982.

  10. Analytical scanning evanescent microwave microscope and control stage

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Duewer, Fred; Yang, Hai Tao; Lu, Yalin

    2013-01-22

    A scanning evanescent microwave microscope (SEMM) that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties is disclosed. The SEMM is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The SEMM has the ability to map dielectric constant, loss tangent, conductivity, electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. Such properties are then used to provide distance control over a wide range, from to microns to nanometers, over dielectric and conductive samples for a scanned evanescent microwave probe, which enable quantitative non-contact and submicron spatial resolution topographic and electrical impedance profiling of dielectric, nonlinear dielectric and conductive materials. The invention also allows quantitative estimation of microwave impedance using signals obtained by the scanned evanescent microwave probe and quasistatic approximation modeling. The SEMM can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  11. Analytical scanning evanescent microwave microscope and control stage

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Duewer, Fred; Yang, Hai Tao; Lu, Yalin

    2009-06-23

    A scanning evanescent microwave microscope (SEMM) that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties is disclosed. The SEMM is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The SEMM has the ability to map dielectric constant, loss tangent, conductivity, electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. Such properties are then used to provide distance control over a wide range, from to microns to nanometers, over dielectric and conductive samples for a scanned evanescent microwave probe, which enable quantitative non-contact and submicron spatial resolution topographic and electrical impedance profiling of dielectric, nonlinear dielectric and conductive materials. The invention also allows quantitative estimation of microwave impedance using signals obtained by the scanned evanescent microwave probe and quasistatic approximation modeling. The SEMM can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  12. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  13. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. Correcting nonlinear drift distortion of scanning probe and scanning transmission electron microscopies from image pairs with orthogonal scan directions.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Nelson, Chris T

    2016-03-01

    Unwanted motion of the probe with respect to the sample is a ubiquitous problem in scanning probe and scanning transmission electron microscopies, causing both linear and nonlinear artifacts in experimental images. We have designed a procedure to correct these artifacts by using orthogonal scan pairs to align each measurement line-by-line along the slow scan direction, by fitting contrast variation along the lines. We demonstrate the accuracy of our algorithm on both synthetic and experimental data and provide an implementation of our method. PMID:26716724

  15. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  16. Electronic Single Molecule Measurements with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Jong One

    Richard Feynman said "There's plenty of room at the bottom". This inspired the techniques to improve the single molecule measurements. Since the first single molecule study was in 1961, it has been developed in various field and evolved into powerful tools to understand chemical and biological property of molecules. This thesis demonstrates electronic single molecule measurement with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and two of applications of STM; Break Junction (BJ) and Recognition Tunneling (RT). First, the two series of carotenoid molecules with four different substituents were investigated to show how substituents relate to the conductance and molecular structure. The measured conductance by STM-BJ shows that Nitrogen induces molecular twist of phenyl distal substituents and conductivity increasing rather than Carbon. Also, the conductivity is adjustable by replacing the sort of residues at phenyl substituents. Next, amino acids and peptides were identified through STM-RT. The distribution of the intuitive features (such as amplitude or width) are mostly overlapped and gives only a little bit higher separation probability than random separation. By generating some features in frequency and cepstrum domain, the classification accuracy was dramatically increased. Because of large data size and many features, supporting vector machine (machine learning algorithm for big data) was used to identify the analyte from a data pool of all analytes RT data. The STM-RT opens a possibility of molecular sequencing in single molecule level. Similarly, carbohydrates were studied by STM-RT. Carbohydrates are difficult to read the sequence, due to their huge number of possible isomeric configurations. This study shows that STM-RT can identify not only isomers of mono-saccharides and disaccharides, but also various mono-saccharides from a data pool of eleven analytes. In addition, the binding affinity between recognition molecule and analyte was investigated by comparing with

  17. Electron tomography of HEK293T cells using scanning electron microscope-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Liao, Hua-Yang; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Based on a scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV with a homemade specimen holder and a multiangle solid-state detector behind the sample, low-kV scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is presented with subsequent electron tomography for three-dimensional (3D) volume structure. Because of the low acceleration voltage, the stronger electron-atom scattering leads to a stronger contrast in the resulting image than standard TEM, especially for light elements. Furthermore, the low-kV STEM yields less radiation damage to the specimen, hence the structure can be preserved. In this work, two-dimensional STEM images of a 1-μm-thick cell section with projection angles between ±50° were collected, and the 3D volume structure was reconstructed using the simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique algorithm with the TomoJ plugin for ImageJ, which are both public domain software. Furthermore, the cross-sectional structure was obtained with the Volume Viewer plugin in ImageJ. Although the tilting angle is constrained and limits the resulting structural resolution, slicing the reconstructed volume generated the depth profile of the thick specimen with sufficient resolution to examine cellular uptake of Au nanoparticles, and the final position of these nanoparticles inside the cell was imaged. PMID:23026379

  18. Electron energy distribution in a dusty plasma: analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, I B; Kersten, H; Azarenkov, N A

    2015-09-01

    Analytical expressions describing the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a dusty plasma are obtained from the homogeneous Boltzmann equation for electrons. The expressions are derived neglecting electron-electron collisions, as well as transformation of high-energy electrons into low-energy electrons at inelastic electron-atom collisions. At large electron energies, the quasiclassical approach for calculation of the EEDF is applied. For the moderate energies, we account for inelastic electron-atom collisions in the dust-free case and both inelastic electron-atom and electron-dust collisions in the dusty plasma case. Using these analytical expressions and the balance equation for dust charging, the electron energy distribution function, the effective electron temperature, the dust charge, and the dust surface potential are obtained for different dust radii and densities, as well as for different electron densities and radio-frequency (rf) field amplitudes and frequencies. The dusty plasma parameters are compared with those calculated numerically by a finite-difference method taking into account electron-electron collisions and the transformation of high-energy electrons at inelastic electron-neutral collisions. It is shown that the analytical expressions can be used for calculation of the EEDF and dusty plasma parameters at typical experimental conditions, in particular, in the positive column of a direct-current glow discharge and in the case of an rf plasma maintained by an electric field with frequency f=13.56MHz. PMID:26465570

  19. UAVSAR Active Electronically-Scanned Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Chamberlain, Neil; Figueroa, Harry; Fisher, Charlie; Grando, Maurio; Hamilton, Gary; Vorperian, Vatche; Zawadzki, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) repeat pass, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) used for Earth science applications. Using complex radar images collected during separate passes on time scales of hours to years, changes in surface topography can be measured. The repeat-pass InSAR technique requires that the radar look angle be approximately the same on successive passes. Due to variations in aircraft attitude between passes, antenna beam steering is required to replicate the radar look angle. This paper describes an active, electronically steered array (AESA) that provides beam steering capability in the antenna azimuth plane. The array contains 24 transmit/receive modules generating 2800 W of radiated power and is capable of pulse-to-pulse beam steering and polarization agility. Designed for high reliability as well as serviceability, all array electronics are contained in single 178cm x 62cm x 12 cm air-cooled panel suitable for operation up 60,000 ft altitude.

  20. Visualizing bone porosities using a tabletop scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, D.; DaPonte, J.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Daniel, D.; Alter, L.

    2010-04-01

    Pores are naturally occurring entities in bone. Changes in pore size and number are often associated with diseases such as Osteoporosis and even microgravity during spaceflight. Studying bone perforations may yield great insight into bone's material properties, including bone density and may contribute to identifying therapies to halt or potentially reverse bone loss. Current technologies used in this field include nuclear magnetic resonance, micro-computed tomography and the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) 2, 5. However, limitations in each method limit further advancement. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using a new generation of analytical instruments, the TM-1000 tabletop, SEM with back-scatter electron (BSE) detector, to analyze cortical bone porosities. Hind limb unloaded and age-based controlled mouse femurs were extracted and tested in vitro for changes in pores on the periosteal surface. An important advantage of using the tabletop is the simplified sample preparation that excludes extra coatings, dehydration and fixation steps that are otherwise required for conventional SEM. For quantitative data, pores were treated as particles in order to use an analyze particles feature in the NIH ImageJ software. Several image-processing techniques for background smoothing, thresholding and filtering were employed to produce a binary image suitable for particle analysis. It was hypothesized that the unloaded bones would show an increase in pore area, as the lack of mechanical loading would affect bone-remodeling processes taking place in and around pores. Preliminary results suggest only a slight different in frequency but not in size of pores between unloaded and control femurs.

  1. Progress on Analytical Modeling of Coherent Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.; Webb, S.

    2010-05-23

    We report recent progresses on analytical studies of Coherent Electron Cooling. The phase space electron beam distribution obtained from the 1D FEL amplifier is applied to an infinite electron plasma model and the electron density evolution inside the kicker is derived. We also investigate the velocity modulation in the modulator and obtain a closed form solution for the current density evolution for infinite homogeneous electron plasma.

  2. A new clustering algorithm for scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Amr; Duraisamy, Prakash; Karim, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a type of electron microscope that produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons. The electrons interact with the sample atoms, producing various signals that are collected by detectors. The gathered signals contain information about the sample's surface topography and composition. The electron beam is generally scanned in a raster scan pattern, and the beam's position is combined with the detected signal to produce an image. The most common configuration for an SEM produces a single value per pixel, with the results usually rendered as grayscale images. The captured images may be produced with insufficient brightness, anomalous contrast, jagged edges, and poor quality due to low signal-to-noise ratio, grained topography and poor surface details. The segmentation of the SEM images is a tackling problems in the presence of the previously mentioned distortions. In this paper, we are stressing on the clustering of these type of images. In that sense, we evaluate the performance of the well-known unsupervised clustering and classification techniques such as connectivity based clustering (hierarchical clustering), centroid-based clustering, distribution-based clustering and density-based clustering. Furthermore, we propose a new spatial fuzzy clustering technique that works efficiently on this type of images and compare its results against these regular techniques in terms of clustering validation metrics.

  3. Analytical electron microscopy of LDEF impactor residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Barrett, Ruth A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1995-01-01

    The LDEF contained 57 individual experiment trays or tray portions specifically designed to characterize critical aspects of meteoroid and debris environment in low-Earth orbit (LEO). However, it was realized from the beginning that the most efficient use of the satellite would be to characterize impact features from the entire surface of the LDEF. With this in mind particular interest has focused on common materials facing in all 26 LDEF facing directions; among the most important of these materials has been the tray clamps. Therefore, in an effort to better understand the nature and flux of particulates in LEO, and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impact features on LDEF tray clamp surfaces. This paper summarizes all data from 79 clamps located on Bay A & B of the LDEF. We also describe current efforts to characterize impactor residues recovered from the impact craters, and we have found that a low, but significant, fraction of these residues have survived in a largely unmelted state. These residues can be characterized sufficiently to permit resolution of the impactor origin. We have concentrated on the residue from chondritic interplanetary dust particles (micrometeoroids), as these represent the harshest test of our analytical capabilities.

  4. Orientation mapping of semicrystalline polymers using scanning electron nanobeam diffraction.

    PubMed

    Panova, Ouliana; Chen, X Chelsea; Bustillo, Karen C; Ophus, Colin; Bhatt, Mahesh P; Balsara, Nitash; Minor, Andrew M

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a scanning electron nanobeam diffraction technique that can be used for mapping the size and distribution of nanoscale crystalline regions in a polymer blend. In addition, it can map the relative orientation of crystallites and the degree of crystallinity of the material. The model polymer blend is a 50:50w/w mixture of semicrystalline poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and amorphous polystyrene (PS). The technique uses a scanning electron beam to raster across the sample and acquires a diffraction image at each probe position. Through image alignment and filtering, the diffraction image dataset enables mapping of the crystalline regions within the scanned area and construction of an orientation map. PMID:27323282

  5. 'GIARDIA MURIS': SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF IN VITRO EXCYSTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently developed in vitro excystation procedure results in almost total excystation of Giardia muris, an intestinal parasite of mice. The present experiment examines the G. muris cyst morphology by scanning electron microscopy and evaluates the efficacy of the excystation pro...

  6. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    PubMed

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made. PMID:1659857

  7. Improved coating and fixation methods for scanning electron microscope autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Weiss, R L

    1984-01-01

    A simple apparatus for emulsion coating is described. The apparatus is inexpensive and easily assembled in a standard glass shop. Emulsion coating for scanning electron microscope autoradiography with this apparatus consistently yields uniform layers. When used in conjunction with newly described fixation methods, this new approach produces reliable autoradiographs of undamaged specimens. PMID:6234956

  8. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of corrosion degradation on tinplate substrates.

    PubMed

    Zumelzu, E; Cabezas, C; Vera, A

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of electrolytic tinplate used in food containers was analysed and evaluated, using scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements of microcorrosion and ion dissolution by atomic absorption to prevent food contamination caused by metal traces and to increase the durability of such tinplates. PMID:12627896

  9. Development of scanning electron and x-ray microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Tomokazu; Hirano, Tomohiko; Suyama, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new type of microscope possessing a unique feature of observing both scanning electron and X-ray images under one unit. Unlike former X-ray microscopes using SEM [1, 2], this scanning electron and X-ray (SELX) microscope has a sample in vacuum, thus it enables one to observe a surface structure of a sample by SEM mode, to search the region of interest, and to observe an X-ray image which transmits the region. For the X-ray observation, we have been focusing on the soft X-ray region from 280 eV to 3 keV to observe some bio samples and soft materials. The resolutions of SEM and X-ray modes are 50 nm and 100 nm, respectively, at the electron energy of 7 keV.

  10. Analytical electron microscopy characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site, FY1993 report

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.; Cunnane, J.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

    1994-10-01

    A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to determine the nature of uranium in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The information gained from these studies is being used to develop and test remediation technologies. Investigations using SEM have shown that uranium is contained within particles that are typically 1 to 100 {mu}m in diameter. Further analysis with AEM has shown that these uranium-rich regions are made up of discrete uranium-bearing phases. The distribution of these uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

  11. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  12. Simultaneous specimen and stage cleaning device for analytical electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1996-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus are provided for cleaning both a specimen stage, a specimen and an interior of an analytical electron microscope (AEM). The apparatus for cleaning a specimen stage and specimen comprising a plasma chamber for containing a gas plasma and an air lock coupled to the plasma chamber for permitting passage of the specimen stage and specimen into the plasma chamber and maintaining an airtight chamber. The specimen stage and specimen are subjected to a reactive plasma gas that is either DC or RF excited. The apparatus can be mounted on the analytical electron microscope (AEM) for cleaning the interior of the microscope.

  13. Low-Temperature Scanning Capacitance Probe for Imaging Electron Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, S.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Novel techniques to probe electronic properties at the nanoscale can shed light on the physics of nanoscale devices. In particular, studying the scattering of electrons from edges and apertures at the nanoscale and imaging the electron profile in a quantum dot, have been of interest [1]. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a cooled scanning capacitance probe that operates at liquid He temperatures to image electron waves in nanodevices. The conducting tip of a scanned probe microscope is held above the nanoscale structure, and an applied sample-to-tip voltage creates an image charge that is measured by a cooled charge amplifier [2] adjacent to the tip. The circuit is based on a low-capacitance, high- electron-mobility transistor (Fujitsu FHX35X). The input is a capacitance bridge formed by a low capacitance pinched-off HEMT transistor and tip-sample capacitance. We have achieved low noise level (0.13 e/VHz) and high spatial resolution (100 nm) for this technique, which promises to be a useful tool to study electronic behavior in nanoscale devices.

  14. Scanning-probe Single-electron Capacitance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kathleen A.; Romanowich, Megan E.; Gasseller, Morewell; Kuljanishvili, Irma; Ashoori, Raymond; Tessmer, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The integration of low-temperature scanning-probe techniques and single-electron capacitance spectroscopy represents a powerful tool to study the electronic quantum structure of small systems - including individual atomic dopants in semiconductors. Here we present a capacitance-based method, known as Subsurface Charge Accumulation (SCA) imaging, which is capable of resolving single-electron charging while achieving sufficient spatial resolution to image individual atomic dopants. The use of a capacitance technique enables observation of subsurface features, such as dopants buried many nanometers beneath the surface of a semiconductor material1,2,3. In principle, this technique can be applied to any system to resolve electron motion below an insulating surface. As in other electric-field-sensitive scanned-probe techniques4, the lateral spatial resolution of the measurement depends in part on the radius of curvature of the probe tip. Using tips with a small radius of curvature can enable spatial resolution of a few tens of nanometers. This fine spatial resolution allows investigations of small numbers (down to one) of subsurface dopants1,2. The charge resolution depends greatly on the sensitivity of the charge detection circuitry; using high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) in such circuits at cryogenic temperatures enables a sensitivity of approximately 0.01 electrons/Hz½ at 0.3 K 5. PMID:23929222

  15. Scanning electron microscope study of Pseudomonas putida colonies.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, J A

    1985-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida colonies were examined by scanning electron microscope. A variety of cell morphologies, multicellular arrangements, and extracellular materials were observed in the fixed material. Different regions of a single colony showed characteristic organizations of these architectural elements. In some cases, the detailed microstructure of the fixed colony surfaces observed by scanning electron microscopy could be correlated with macroscopic patterns visualized by histochemical staining and surface relief photography of live colonies. Extracellular materials were seen to extend onto the agar surface beyond the boundaries of the cell mass, and the final structures of these materials, after fixation and desiccation, were colony specific. The significance of these features of colony microstructure for formulating hypotheses about the control of colony morphogenesis is discussed. Images PMID:4066611

  16. Influence of mechanical noise inside a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudenzi de Faria, Marcelo; Haddab, Yassine Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2015-04-15

    The scanning electron microscope is becoming a popular tool to perform tasks that require positioning, manipulation, characterization, and assembly of micro-components. However, some of these applications require a higher level of performance with respect to dynamics and precision of positioning. One limiting factor is the presence of unidentified noises and disturbances. This work aims to study the influence of mechanical disturbances generated by the environment and by the microscope, identifying how these can affect elements in the vacuum chamber. To achieve this objective, a dedicated setup, including a high-resolution vibrometer, was built inside the microscope. This work led to the identification and quantification of main disturbances and noise sources acting on a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, the effects of external acoustic excitations were analysed. Potential applications of these results include noise compensation and real-time control for high accuracy tasks.

  17. Local dynamic range compensation for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Huang, Y H

    2015-01-01

    This is the extended project by introducing the modified dynamic range histogram modification (MDRHM) and is presented in this paper. This technique is used to enhance the scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging system. By comparing with the conventional histogram modification compensators, this technique utilizes histogram profiling by extending the dynamic range of each tile of an image to the limit of 0-255 range while retains its histogram shape. The proposed technique yields better image compensation compared to conventional methods. PMID:25969945

  18. Time-resolved scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frömter, Robert; Kloodt, Fabian; Rößler, Stefan; Frauen, Axel; Staeck, Philipp; Cavicchia, Demetrio R.; Bocklage, Lars; Röbisch, Volker; Quandt, Eckhard; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of investigating periodically driven magnetization dynamics in a scanning electron microscope with polarization analysis based on spin-polarized low-energy electron diffraction. With the present setup, analyzing the time structure of the scattering events, we obtain a temporal resolution of 700 ps, which is demonstrated by means of imaging the field-driven 100 MHz gyration of the vortex in a soft-magnetic FeCoSiB square. Owing to the efficient intrinsic timing scheme, high-quality movies, giving two components of the magnetization simultaneously, can be recorded on the time scale of hours.

  19. Surface morphology of Trichinella spiralis by scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.W.; Ledbetter, M.C.

    1980-02-01

    The surface morphology of larval and adult Trichinella spiralis was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fixed, dried, and metal-coated specimens. The results are compared with those found earlier by various investigators using light and transmission electron microscopy. Some morphological features reported here are revealed uniquely by SEM. These include the pores of the cephalic sense organs, the character of secondary cuticular folds, variations of the hypodermal gland cell openings or pores, and the presence of particles on the copulatory bell.

  20. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. PMID:27179301

  1. A fast iterative technique for restoring scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahira, Kenji; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Honda, Toshifumi

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a fast new technique for restoring scanning electron microscope images to improve their sharpness. The images with our approach are sharpened by deconvolution with the point spread function modeled as the intensity distribution of the electron beam at the specimen's surface. We propose an iterative technique that employs a modified cost function based on the Richardson-Lucy method to achieve faster processing. The empirical results indicate significant improvements in image quality. The proposed approach speeds up deconvolution by about 10-50 times faster than that with the conventional Richardson-Lucy method.

  2. Imaging Nanobubbles in Water with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Edward R.; Mecklenburg, Matthew; Singer, Scott B.; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, Brian Christopher

    2011-05-01

    We present a technique based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) that is capable of probing nanobubble dynamics with nanometer spatial resolution. A vacuum-tight vessel holds a sub-micrometer layer of water between two electron-transparent dielectric membranes. Electrical current pulses passing through a platinum wire on one of the membranes inject sufficient heat locally to initiate single bubble formation. In the absence of power input, all bubbles are observed to be unstable against collapse, but the STEM beam alone can cause a shrinking bubble to grow.

  3. Scanning electron microscope studies of human metaphase chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shemilt, L. A.; Estandarte, A. K. C.; Yusuf, M.; Robinson, I. K.

    2014-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to evaluate potential chromosome preparations and staining methods for application in high-resolution three-dimensional X-ray imaging. Our starting point is optical fluorescence microscopy, the standard method for chromosomes, which only gives structural detail at the 200 nm scale. In principle, with suitable sample preparation protocols, including contrast enhancing staining, the surface structure of the chromosomes can be viewed at the 1 nm level by SEM. Here, we evaluate a heavy metal nucleic-acid-specific stain, which gives strong contrast in the backscattered electron signal. This study uses SEM to examine chromosomes prepared in different ways to establish a sample preparation protocol for X-rays. Secondary electron and backscattered electron signals are compared to evaluate the effectiveness of platinum-based stains used to enhance the contrast. PMID:24470422

  4. Environmental scanning electron microscopy gold immunolabeling in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Francesco; Papale, Ferdinando; Barbarisi, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Immunogold labeling (IGL) technique has been utilized by many authors in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to obtain the identification/localization of receptors and antigens, both in cells and tissues. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) represents an important tool in biomedical research, since it does not require any severe processing of the sample, lowering the risk of generating artifacts and interfere with the IGL procedure. The absence of metal coating could yield further advantages for our purpose as the labeling detection is based on the atomic number difference between nanogold spheres and the biological material. Using the gaseous secondary electron detector, compositional contrast is easily revealed by the backscattered electron component of the signal. In spite of this fact, only few published papers present a combination of ESEM and IGL. Hereby we present our method, optimized to improve the intensity and the specificity of the labeling signal, in order to obtain a semiquantitative evaluation of the labeling signal.In particular, we used a combination of IGL and ESEM to detect the presence of a protein on the cell surface. To achieve this purpose, we chose as an experimental system 3T3 Swiss albino mouse fibroblasts and galectin-3. PMID:23027021

  5. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part II. Electron Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Focuses on fundamental aspects of each technique, important features of instrumentation, and some examples of how ESCA and AES have been applied to analytical surface problems. (JN)

  6. Low-pass secondary electron detector for outlens scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Takashi; Iwai, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    A low-pass secondary electron detector has been invented for outlens scanning electron microscopy. This detector is composed of a bias grid above and an electron detector below the specimen. The upward low-energy electrons emitted from the specimen are reflected downward by the bias grid and reach the secondary electron detector. The high-energy electrons penetrate the grid and are not detected. This detector has an advantage of quantitative analysis because the secondary electron trajectories are easily traced with simple parabolic motion. The energy-filtered images of the GaN/Si sample are obtained using this detector.

  7. Simulation and Characterization of a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Abbott, Terry O.; Sampson, Allen R.

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (mSEM) for in-situ lunar investigations is being developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with colleagues from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Advanced Research Systems (ARS), the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (UTK) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). This effort focuses on the characterization of individual components of the mSEM and simulation of the complete system. SEMs can provide information on the size, shape, morphology and chemical composition of lunar regolith. Understanding these basic properties will allow us to better estimate the challenges associated with In-Situ Resource Utilization and to improve our basic science knowledge of the lunar surface (either precluding the need for sample return or allowing differentiation of unique samples to be returned to Earth.) The main components of the mSEM prototype includes: a cold field emission electron gun (CFEG), focusing lens, deflection/scanning system and backscatter electron detector. Of these, the electron gun development is of particular importance as it dictates much of the design of the remaining components. A CFEG was chosen for use with the lunar mSEM as its emission does not depend on heating of the tungsten emitter (lower power), it offers a long operation lifetime, is orders of magnitude brighter than tungsten hairpin guns, has a small source size and exhibits low beam energy spread.

  8. Advantages of environmental scanning electron microscopy in studies of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Collins, S P; Pope, R K; Scheetz, R W; Ray, R I; Wagner, P A; Little, B J

    1993-08-01

    Microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and microalgae, are composed predominantly of water which prohibits direct observation in a traditional scanning electron microscope (SEM). Preparation for SEM requires that microorganisms be fixed, frozen or dehydrated, and coated with a conductive film before observation in a high vacuum environment. Sample preparation may mechanically disturb delicate samples, compromise morphological information, and introduce other artifacts. The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) provides a technology for imaging hydrated or dehydrated biological samples with minimal manipulation and without the need for conductive coatings. Sporulating cultures of three fungi, Aspergillus sp., Cunninghamella sp., and Mucor sp., were imaged in the ESEM to assess usefulness of the instrument in the direct observation of delicate, uncoated, biological specimens. Asexual sporophores showed no evidence of conidial displacement or disruption of sporangia. Uncoated algal cells of Euglena gracilis and Spirogyra sp. were examined using the backscatter electron detector (BSE) and the environmental secondary electron detector (ESD) of the ESEM. BSE images had more clearly defined intracellular structures, whereas ESD gave a clearer view of the surface E. gracilis cells fixed with potassium permanganate, Spirogyra sp. stained with Lugol's solution, and Saprolegnia sp. fixed with osmium tetroxide were compared using BSE and ESD to demonstrate that cellular details could be enhanced by the introduction of heavy metals. The effect of cellular water on signal quality was evaluated by comparing hydrated to critical point dried specimens. PMID:8400431

  9. Non-monotonic material contrast in scanning ion and scanning electron images.

    PubMed

    Giannuzzi, L A; Utlaut, M

    2011-11-01

    30keV Ga(+) focused ion beam induced secondary electron (iSE) imaging was used to determine the relative contrast between several materials. The iSE signal compared from C, Si, Al, Ti, Cr, Ni, Cu, Mo, Ag, and W metal layers does not decrease with an increase in target atomic number Z(2), and shows a non-monotonic relationship between contrast and Z(2). The non-monotonic relationship is attributed to periodic fluctuations of the stopping power and sputter yield inherent to the ion-solid interactions. In addition, material contrast from electron-induced secondary electron (eSE) and backscattered electron (BSE) images using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also shows non-monotonic contrast as a function of Z(2), following the periodic behavior of the stopping power for electron-solid interactions. A comparison of the iSE and eSE results shows similar relative contrast between the metal layers, and not complementary contrast as conventionally understood. These similarities in the contrast behavior can be attributed to similarities in the periodic and non-monotonic function defined by incident particle-solid interaction theory. PMID:21939622

  10. Low-loss electron images of uncoated photoresist in the scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Oliver C.

    1986-09-01

    Low voltage scanning electron microscopy is an important part of microelectronic inspection technique. This makes it possible to examine devices without changing the electrical properties, and to examine nonconducting samples such as photoresist without the use of a surface metal layer. The secondary electron imaging method suffers, however, from the difficulty that the image can be spoiled by slight charging of the specimen by the incident electron beam. This problem can be solved by the use of the low-loss electron image.

  11. Response function and optimum configuration of semiconductor backscattered-electron detectors for scanning electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, E. I.; Orlikovskiy, N. A.; Ivanova, E. S.

    2012-06-15

    A new highly efficient design for semiconductor detectors of intermediate-energy electrons (1-50 keV) for application in scanning electron microscopes is proposed. Calculations of the response function of advanced detectors and control experiments show that the efficiency of the developed devices increases on average twofold, which is a significant positive factor in the operation of modern electron microscopes in the mode of low currents and at low primary electron energies.

  12. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D.

    2012-07-15

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  13. Effects of instrument imperfections on quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Florian F; Schowalter, Marco; Grieb, Tim; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Several instrumental imperfections of transmission electron microscopes are characterized and their effects on the results of quantitative scanning electron microscopy (STEM) are investigated and quantified using simulations. Methods to either avoid influences of these imperfections during acquisition or to include them in reference calculations are proposed. Particularly, distortions inflicted on the diffraction pattern by an image-aberration corrector can cause severe errors of more than 20% if not accounted for. A procedure for their measurement is proposed here. Furthermore, afterglow phenomena and nonlinear behavior of the detector itself can lead to incorrect normalization of measured intensities. Single electrons accidentally impinging on the detector are another source of error but can also be exploited for threshold-less calibration of STEM images to absolute dose, incident beam current determination and measurement of the detector sensitivity. PMID:26686661

  14. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Nicholas; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Prof. Philip; Moore, Tom; Magel, Greg; Hartfield, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {micro}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  15. The theory and practice of high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.C. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation have produced the first commercial examples of what can justifiably be called High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopes. The key components of such instruments are a cold field emission gun, a small-gap immersion probe-forming lens, and a clean dry-pumped vacuum. The performance of these microscopes is characterized by several major features including a spatial resolution, in secondary electron mode on solid specimens, which can exceed 1nm on a routine basis; an incident probe current density of the order of 10{sup 6} amps/cm{sup 2}; and the ability to maintain these levels of performance over an accelerating voltage range of from 1 to 30keV. This combination of high resolution, high probe current, low contamination and flexible electron-optical conditions provides many new opportunitites for the application of the SEM to materials science, physics, and the life sciences. 27 refs., 14 figs.

  16. Measuring electron-phonon coupling with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Vidya

    Electron-boson interactions are ubiquitous in systems ranging from simple metals to novel materials such as graphene, high-temperature superconductors and topological insulators. Of particular interest is the coupling between electrons and phonons. In general, electron-phonon coupling gives rise to quasiparticles of decreased mobility and increased effective mass. Nearly all information about electron-phonon coupling is contained in the Eliashberg function (α2 F (ω k , E)) of the material. In this talk I discuss the various methods by which the effects of electron-phonon coupling can be measured by scanning tunneling microscopy. I will present STM data on a variety of systems ranging from metals to topological insulators and discuss the signatures of electron-phonon interactions in different types of STM data. In particular I discuss how high resolution measurements allow us to measure the dispersion and obtain the real part of the self-energy, which can in principle be inverted to obtain the Eliashberg function.

  17. A scanning transmission electron microscopy study of two dental amalgams.

    PubMed

    Williams, K R

    1983-10-01

    Two fully aged amalgam alloys were examined using a scanning transmission electron microscope both in the transmission and scanning mode. The dispersed type amalgam containing a distribution of silver-copper spheres in addition to the Ag3Sn powder showed a markedly reduced gamma 1 grain size compared to a conventional Ag3Sn type amalgam. It is suggested that the increased compressive creep strength of the dispersed type material is a direct result of the reduced gamma 1 grain size and not due to a dispersion hardening effect from the cores of the remaining Ag-Cu spheres. Similarly, the formation of complex Cu-Sn intermediate phases at the Ag-Cu sphere surfaces are unlikely to lead to a dispersion strengthening effect. It is postulated that the reduced grain size in high copper amalgams is a consequence of the enhanced nucleating effect of a copper based phase on gamma 1. PMID:6640049

  18. Electronic scanning pressure measuring system and transducer package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, C. F. (Inventor); Parra, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    An electronic scanning pressure system that includes a plurality of pressure transducers is examined. A means obtains an electrical signal indicative of a pressure measurement from each of the plurality of pressure transducers. A multiplexing means is connected for selectivity supplying inputs from the plurality of pressure transducers to the signal obtaining means. A data bus connects the plurality of pressure transducers to the multiplexing means. A latch circuit is connected to supply control inputs to the multiplexing means. An address bus is connected to supply an address signal of a selected one of the plurality of pressure transducers to the latch circuit. In operation, each of the pressure transducers is successively scanned by the multiplexing means in response to address signals supplied on the address bus to the latch circuit.

  19. Examination of Surveyor 3 parts with the scanning electron microscope and electron microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chodos, A. A.; Devaney, J. R.; Evens, K. C.

    1972-01-01

    Two screws and two washers, several small chips of tubing, and a fiber removed from a third screw were examined with the scanning electron microscope and the electron microprobe. The purpose of the examination was to determine the nature of the material on the surface of these samples and to search for the presence of meteoritic material.

  20. Liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy: Nanoscale imaging in micrometers-thick liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Tobias; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-02-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of specimens in liquid is possible using a microfluidic chamber with thin silicon nitride windows. This paper includes an analytic equation of the resolution as a function of the sample thickness and the vertical position of an object in the liquid. The equipment for STEM of liquid specimen is briefly described. STEM provides nanometer resolution in micrometer-thick liquid layers with relevance for both biological research and materials science. Using this technique, we investigated tagged proteins in whole eukaryotic cells, and gold nanoparticles in liquid with time-lapse image series. Possibly future applications are discussed.

  1. Scanning electron microscopic analyses of Ferrocyanide tank wastes for the Ferrocyanide safety program

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, W.S.

    1995-09-01

    This is Fiscal Year 1995 Annual Report on the progress of activities relating to the application of scanning electron microscopy in addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. The status of the FY 1995 activities directed towards establishing facilities capable of providing SEM based micro-characterization of ferrocyanide tank wastes is described. A summary of key events in the SEM task over FY 1995 and target activities in FY 1996 are presented. A brief overview of the potential applications of computer controlled SEM analytical data in light of analyses of ferrocyanide simulants performed by an independent contractor is also presented

  2. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, K. S. Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S.

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  3. Dynamic-pressure measurements using an electronically scanned pressure module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    Frequency response was measured for different lengths and diameters of tubing between a sinusoidal pressure source and a pressure sensing module from an electronically scanned pressure measuring system. Measurements were made for straight runs of both steel and vinyl tubing. For steel tubing, measured results are compared with results calculated by using equations developed by Tijdeman and Bergh. Measurements were also made with a bend in the vinyl tubing at the module. In addition, measurements were made with two coils placed in the tubing near the middle of the run.

  4. Controller for the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zomberg, Brian G.; Chren, William A., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype controller for the ESTAR (electronically scanned thinned array radiometer) instrument has been designed and tested. It manages the operation of the digital data subsystem (DDS) and its communication with the Small Explorer data system (SEDS). Among the data processing tasks that it coordinates are FEM data acquisition, noise removal, phase alignment and correlation. Its control functions include instrument calibration and testing of two critical subsystems, the output data formatter and Walsh function generator. It is implemented in a Xilinx XC3064PC84-100 field programmable gate array (FPGA) and has a maximum clocking frequency of 10 MHz.

  5. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-01-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments. PMID:26235517

  6. Scanning Electron Microscope Characterization of Erosive Enamel in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Worawongvasu, Ratthapong

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the surface characteristics of erosive enamel in extracted human teeth by scanning electron microscopy. Morphologic changes in naturally eroded enamel depend on the stages of dental erosion. In its early stages, the enamel surfaces show a honeycomb appearance due to the dissolution of enamel rod ends. In its advanced stages, the erosive process involves the underlying dentin and the eroded dentin shows exposed dentinal tubules and the dentinal matrix may be exposed due to the dissolution of the peri- and intertubular dentin. Evidence of remineralization is seen at the early stage of natural dental erosion. PMID:26214120

  7. Microcircuit failure analysis using the SEM. [Scanning Electron Microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope adds a new dimension to the knowledge that can be obtained from a failed microcircuit. When used with conventional techniques, SEM assists and clarifies the analysis, but it does not replace light microscopy. The most advantageous features for microcircuit analysis are long working distances and great depth of field. Manufacturer related failure modes of microcircuits are metallization defects, poor bonding, surface and particle contamination, and design and fabrication faults. User related failure modes are caused by abuse, such as overstress. The Physics of Failure Procedure followed by the Astrionics Laboratory in failure analysis is described, which is designed to obtain maximum information available from each step.

  8. A new apparatus for electron tomography in the scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, V. Maccagnani, P.; Masini, L.; Migliori, A.; Ortolani, L.; Pezza, A.; Del Marro, M.; Pallocca, G.; Vinciguerra, P.; Rossi, M.; Ferroni, M.; Sberveglieri, G.; Vittori-Antisari, M.

    2015-06-23

    The three-dimensional reconstruction of a microscopic specimen has been obtained by applying the tomographic algorithm to a set of images acquired in a Scanning Electron Microscope. This result was achieved starting from a series of projections obtained by stepwise rotating the sample under the beam raster. The Scanning Electron Microscope was operated in the scanning-transmission imaging mode, where the intensity of the transmitted electron beam is a monotonic function of the local mass-density and thickness of the specimen. The detection strategy has been implemented and tailored in order to maintain the projection requirement over the large tilt range, as required by the tomographic workflow. A Si-based electron detector and an eucentric-rotation specimen holder have been specifically developed for the purpose.

  9. Atomic scale characterization of materials using scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Jeffery Andrew

    Coupling the development of emerging experimental techniques in STEM and EELS with a fundamental understanding of atomic electronic structure afforded by DFT represents the unique approach and intention of this thesis. Scanning transmission electron microscopes equipped with high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) detectors and Gatan image filters (GIF) provide images and spectra, where the image brightness is interpreted as a function of atomic mass and thickness, and elemental specific spectra provide a means for the exploration of electronic and chemical structure of materials at the angstrom size scale. Over the past 20 years, the application of EELS in STEM has enabled more accurate elemental identification and exploration of electronic and chemical structure on angstrom-length scales, and arguably has provided an unprecedented wealth of materials characterization compared to other available techniques. Many materials issues related to specific novel properties that cannot be analyzed using the traditional techniques of the past, however, still remain unanswered. These concepts require a married approach of experiment and theory to fully explain. The intent of this dissertation is the development of improved analysis techniques that derive quantitative atomic scale information in connection with unraveling the origins of materials properties linked to the electronic structure and chemistry of materials.

  10. Sample heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, Teruo; Motai, Kumi

    2013-08-01

    A sample-heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) has been developed and used for microscopic magnetization analysis at temperatures up to 500°C. In this system, a compact ceramic heater and a preheating operation keep the ultra-high vacuum conditions while the sample is heated during spin SEM measurement. Moreover, the secondary-electron collector, which is arranged close to the sample, was modified so that it is not damaged at high temperatures. The system was used to heat a Co(1000) single-crystal sample from room temperature up to 500°C, and the magnetic-domain structures were observed. Changes of the domain structures were observed around 220 and 400°C, and these changes are considered to be due to phase transitions of this sample. PMID:23349241

  11. Scanning Tunneling Electron Transport into a Kondo Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fu-Bin; Wu, Hua

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically present the results for a scanning tunneling transport between a metallic tip and a Kondo lattice. We calculate the density of states (DOS) and the tunneling current and differential conductance (DC) under different conduction-fermion band hybridization and temperature in the Kondo lattice. It is found that the hybridization strength and temperature give asymmetric coherent peaks in the DOS separated by the Fermi energy. The corresponding current and DC intensity depend on the temperature and quantum interference effect among the c-electron and f-electron states in the Kondo lattice. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11547203, and the Research Project of Education Department in Sichuan Province of China under Grant No. 15ZB0457

  12. Scanning electron microscopy: preparation and imaging for SEM.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris G

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been almost universally applied for the surface examination and characterization of both natural and man-made objects. Although an invasive technique, developments in electron microscopy over the years has given the microscopist a much clearer choice in how invasive the technique will be. With the advent of low vacuum SEM in the 1970s (The environmental cold stage, 1970) and environmental SEM in the late 1980s (J Microsc 160(pt. 1):9-19, 1989), it is now possible in some circumstances to examine samples without preparation. However, for the examination of biological tissue and cells it is still advisable to chemically fix, dehydrate, and coat samples for SEM imaging and analysis. This chapter aims to provide an overview of SEM as an imaging tool, and a general introduction to some of the methods applied for the preparation of samples. PMID:22907399

  13. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G; Lupini, Andrew R; Kubel, Christian; Slusallek, Phillip; De Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  14. Applications of the Analytical Electron Microscope to Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.

    1992-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the analytical electron microscope (AEM) as allowed investigators to obtain chemical and structural information from less than 50 nanometer diameter regions in thin samples of materials and to explore problems where reactions occur at boundaries and interfaces or within small particles or phases in bulk samples. Examples of the application of the AEM to materials science problems are presented in this paper and demonstrate the usefulness and the future potential of this instrument.

  15. Dopant profiling based on scanning electron and helium ion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chee, Augustus K W; Boden, Stuart A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we evaluate and compare doping contrast generated inside the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and scanning helium ion microscope (SHIM). Specialised energy-filtering techniques are often required to produce strong doping contrast to map donor distributions using the secondary electron (SE) signal in the SEM. However, strong doping contrast can be obtained from n-type regions in the SHIM, even without energy-filtering. This SHIM technique is more sensitive than the SEM to donor density changes above its sensitivity threshold, i.e. of the order of 10(16) or 10(17)donorscm(-3) respectively on specimens with or without a p-n junction; its sensitivity limit is well above 2×10(17)acceptorscm(-3) on specimens with or without a p-n junction. Good correlation is found between the widths and slopes of experimentally measured doping contrast profiles of thin p-layers and the calculated widths and slopes of the potential energy distributions across these layers, at a depth of 1 to 3nm and 5 to 10nm below the surface in the SHIM and the SEM respectively. This is consistent with the mean escape depth of SEs in silicon being about 1.8nm and 7nm in the SHIM and SEM respectively, and we conclude that short escape depth, low energy SE signals are most suitable for donor profiling. PMID:26624515

  16. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tamer Vestlund, A.; Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, S.F.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T.; Drew, G.H.

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors.

  17. Acquisition of a High Resolution Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope for the Analysis of Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nittler, Larry R.

    2003-01-01

    This grant furnished funds to purchase a state-of-the-art scanning electron microscope (SEM) to support our analytical facilities for extraterrestrial samples. After evaluating several instruments, we purchased a JEOL 6500F thermal field emission SEM with the following analytical accessories: EDAX energy-dispersive x-ray analysis system with fully automated control of instrument and sample stage; EDAX LEXS wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for high sensitivity light-element analysis; EDAX/TSL electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system with software for phase identification and crystal orientation mapping; Robinson backscatter electron detector; and an in situ micro-manipulator (Kleindiek). The total price was $550,000 (with $150,000 of the purchase supported by Carnegie institution matching funds). The microscope was delivered in October 2002, and most of the analytical accessories were installed by January 2003. With the exception of the wavelength spectrometer (which has been undergoing design changes) everything is working well and the SEM is in routine use in our laboratory.

  18. Simultaneous Correlative Scanning Electron and High-NA Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Effting, Andries P. J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Lucas, Miriam S.; Hardwick, James C.; Wepf, Roger A.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM) analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown. PMID:23409024

  19. Solar cell evaluation using electron beam induced current with the large chamber scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Tara; Kintzel, Edward; Marienhoff, Peter; Klein, Martin

    2012-02-01

    An initial study using electron beam induced current (EBIC) to evaluate solar cells has been carried out with the large chamber scanning electron microscope (LC-SEM) at the Western Kentucky University Nondestructive Analysis Center. EBIC is a scanning electron microscope technique used for the characterization of semiconductors. To facilitate our studies, we developed a Solar Amplification System (SASY) for analyzing current distribution and defects within a solar cell module. Preliminary qualitative results will be shown for a solar cell module that demonstrates the viability of the technique using the LC-SEM. Quantitative EBIC experiments will be carried out to analyze defects and minority carrier properties. Additionally, a well-focused spot of light from an LED mounted at the side of the SEM column will scan the same area of the solar cell using the LC-SEM positioning system. SASY will then output the solar efficiency to be compared with the minority carrier properties found using EBIC.

  20. Ultrahigh vacuum scanning electron microscope system combined with wide-movable scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, A.; Homma, Y.; Hibino, H.; Ogino, T.

    2005-08-15

    A surface analysis system has been newly developed with combination of ultrahigh vacuum scanning electron microscope (SEM) and wide-movable scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The basic performance is experimentally demonstrated. These SEM and STM images are clear enough to obtain details of surface structures. The STM unit moves horizontally over several millimeters by sliding motion of PZT actuators. The motion resolution is proved to be submicrometers. The STM tip mounted on another PZT scanner can be guided to a specific object on the sample surface during SEM observation. In the observation of a Si(111) surface rapidly cooled from high temperature, the STM tip was accurately guided to an isolated atomic step and slightly moved along it during SEM observation. The STM observation shows an asymmetry of the (7x7)-transformed region along the step between the upper and lower terraces. (7x7) bands continuously formed along the edge of terraces, while (7x7) domains distributed on the terraces slightly far from the step. These experiments show the wide-movable STM unit resolves a gap of observation area between SEM and STM and the system enables a specific object found in the SEM image to be observed easily by STM.

  1. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  2. A radial mirror analyzer for scanning electron/ion microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Hung Quang; Khursheed, Anjam

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a high-resolution transmittance electron energy analyzer suitable for use as an attachment inside the specimen chambers of scanning electron/ion microscopes. The analyzer uses a rotationally symmetric electric field distribution to transport electrons/ions emitted from a central point source in a radial direction on to a ring-shaped collection/detection area. The analyzer is designed to fit around a conical shaped objective lens pole-piece/electrode, allowing for a relatively short minimum working distance, 5 mm or less. Simulation results for the analyzer design predict that it will have a relative energy resolution of 0.025% for an entrance angular spread of ±6°, around an order of magnitude better then the well-known Cylindrical Mirror Analyzer (CMA). The analyzer design allows for a parallel mode of operation in which the energy bandwidth on a conical shaped detection plane is predicted to be as high as 32% (±16%) of the central-band energy. On a flat ring-shaped detection plane, the energy bandwidth is predicted to be around 12% (±6%) of the central-band energy, over which the simulated relative energy resolution remains below 0.06% for angular spreads of ±6°.

  3. Three-Dimensional Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Biological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2–3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. PMID:20082729

  4. Atomic-scale mapping of electronic structures across heterointerfaces by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ya-Ping; Huang, Bo-Chao; Shih, Min-Chuan; Huang, Po-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Interfacial science has received much attention recently based on the development of state-of-the-art analytical tools that can create and manipulate the charge, spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom at interfaces. Motivated by the importance of nanoscale interfacial science that governs device operation, we present a technique to probe the electronic characteristics of heterointerfaces with atomic resolution. In this work, the interfacial characteristics of heteroepitaxial structures are investigated and the fundamental mechanisms that pertain in these systems are elucidated through cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (XSTM). The XSTM technique is employed here to directly observe epitaxial interfacial structures and probe local electronic properties with atomic-level capability. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy experiments with atomic precision provide insight into the origin and spatial distribution of electronic properties across heterointerfaces. The first part of this report provides a brief description of the cleavage technique and spectroscopy analysis in XSTM measurements. The second part addresses interfacial electronic structures of several model heterostructures in current condensed matter research using XSTM. Topics to be discussed include high-κ's/III-V's semiconductors, polymer heterojunctions, and complex oxide heterostructures, which are all material systems whose investigation using this technique is expected to benefit the research community. Finally, practical aspects and perspectives of using XSTM in interface science are presented. PMID:26202580

  5. Atomic-scale mapping of electronic structures across heterointerfaces by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ya-Ping; Huang, Bo-Chao; Shih, Min-Chuan; Huang, Po-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Interfacial science has received much attention recently based on the development of state-of-the-art analytical tools that can create and manipulate the charge, spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom at interfaces. Motivated by the importance of nanoscale interfacial science that governs device operation, we present a technique to probe the electronic characteristics of heterointerfaces with atomic resolution. In this work, the interfacial characteristics of heteroepitaxial structures are investigated and the fundamental mechanisms that pertain in these systems are elucidated through cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (XSTM). The XSTM technique is employed here to directly observe epitaxial interfacial structures and probe local electronic properties with atomic-level capability. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy experiments with atomic precision provide insight into the origin and spatial distribution of electronic properties across heterointerfaces. The first part of this report provides a brief description of the cleavage technique and spectroscopy analysis in XSTM measurements. The second part addresses interfacial electronic structures of several model heterostructures in current condensed matter research using XSTM. Topics to be discussed include high-κ‘s/III-V’s semiconductors, polymer heterojunctions, and complex oxide heterostructures, which are all material systems whose investigation using this technique is expected to benefit the research community. Finally, practical aspects and perspectives of using XSTM in interface science are presented.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW Electronic states of graphene nanoribbons and analytical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Katsunori; Sasaki, Ken-ichi; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Enoki, Toshiaki

    2010-10-01

    Graphene is a one-atom-thick layer of graphite, where low-energy electronic states are described by the massless Dirac fermion. The orientation of the graphene edge determines the energy spectrum of π-electrons. For example, zigzag edges possess localized edge states with energies close to the Fermi level. In this review, we investigate nanoscale effects on the physical properties of graphene nanoribbons and clarify the role of edge boundaries. We also provide analytical solutions for electronic dispersion and the corresponding wavefunction in graphene nanoribbons with their detailed derivation using wave mechanics based on the tight-binding model. The energy band structures of armchair nanoribbons can be obtained by making the transverse wavenumber discrete, in accordance with the edge boundary condition, as in the case of carbon nanotubes. However, zigzag nanoribbons are not analogous to carbon nanotubes, because in zigzag nanoribbons the transverse wavenumber depends not only on the ribbon width but also on the longitudinal wavenumber. The quantization rule of electronic conductance as well as the magnetic instability of edge states due to the electron-electron interaction are briefly discussed.

  7. Application of ESEM to environmental colloids. [Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttall, H.E.; Kale, R. . Dept. of Chemical/Nuclear Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    Environmental colloids are toxic or radioactive particles suspended in ground or surface water. These hazardous particles can facilitate and accelerate the transport of toxicants and enhance the threat to humans by exposure to pathogenic substances. The chemical and physical properties of hazardous colloids have not been well characterized nor are there standard colloid remediation technologies to prevent their deleterious effects. Colloid characterization requires measurement of their size distribution, zeta potential, chemical composition, adsorption capacity and morphology. The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) by ElectroScan, Inc., analyzes particle sizes, composition, and morphology. It is also used in this study to identify the attachment of colloids onto packing or rock surfaces in the development of a colloid remediation process. The ESEM has confirmed the composition of groundwater colloids in these studies to be generally the same material as the surrounding rock. The morphology studies have generally shown that colloids are simply small pieces of the rock surface that have exfoliated into the surrounding water. However, in general, the source and chemical composition of groundwater colloids is site dependent. The authors have found that an ESEM works best as a valuable analysis tool within a suite of colloid characterization instruments.

  8. [Using of scanning electron microscopy for detection of gunshot residue].

    PubMed

    Havel, J; Vajtr, D; Starý, V; Vrána, J; Zelenka, K; Adámek, T

    2006-07-01

    Scanning electron microscope improves the possibility of investigation of surroundings near of gunshot wounds in forensic medicine, it is the next subsequent method for differentiating of area of entrance and exit wound, supplemental method for determination of firing distance, permit of detection (GSR) on the hand of shooter and ensured describing of samples and their stored. Detection of GSR provides many information about composition of bullet and primer. Authors are demonstrating the possibility of detection of GSR on experimental shooting to the krupon (pigs' skin) in different situation (such as in a room and in outside area) and using of different weapon (hand gun CZ No.75 and machine gun No.58). PMID:16948447

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of human cortical bone failure surfaces.

    PubMed

    Braidotti, P; Branca, F P; Stagni, L

    1997-02-01

    Undecalcified samples extracted from human femoral shafts are fractured by bending and the fracture surfaces are examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The investigation is performed on both dry and wet (hydrated with a saline solution) specimens. SEM micrographs show patterns in many respects similar to those observed in fractography studies of laminated fiber-reinforced synthetic composites. In particular, dry and wet samples behave like brittle and ductile matrix laminates, respectively. An analysis carried out on the basis of the mechanisms that dominate the fracture process of laminates shows that a reasonable cortical bone model is that of a laminated composite material whose matrix is composed of extracellular noncollagenous calcified proteins, and the reinforcement is constituted by the calcified collagen fiber system. PMID:9001936

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of Purkinje fibres of the pig heart.

    PubMed

    Bytzer, P

    1979-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of Purkinje fibres (P-fibres) from the septal walls and the septomarginal trabecula was performed on deparaffinized sections, the identification in SEM made possible by comparative light microscopy. The myofibrils in P-fibres from the septal walls were arranged in a cart-wheel fashion, whereas P-fibres from the septomarginal trabecula showed a nearly parallel alignment of the contractile material. Z-line ridges resembling the T-tubules of the myocardial fibres were observed in both kinds of P-fibres. The myofibrillar arrangements are discussed in relation to the expected mechanical stress put upon P-fibres in the 2 locations during systolic-diastolic activity. An adaptive function of the contractile material to the mechanical stress is suggested and the possible need of a T-tubular system is discussed. PMID:507370

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of a liver cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Itoshima, T; Ito, T; Ukida, M; Ogawa, H; Kitadai, M; Hattori, S; Mizutani, S; Nagashima, H

    1983-02-01

    A 39-year-old female with a large cavernous hemangioma of the liver was successfully treated by ligation of the left hepatic artery. A wedge biopsy specimen of the hemangioma was obtained after the ligation and was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The hemangioma was demarcated from the surrounding normal liver parenchyma and had a labyrinth of caves 50-150 microns in diameter. The caves were separated by fibrous septa 20-40 microns in width. Endothelial cells of the caves were spindle-shaped and arranged in parallel. The surface property of the caves resembled that of the hepatic artery and differed from that of the portal vein or hepatic vein. These findings support that the cavernous hemangioma of the liver was supplied by the hepatic artery. The labyrinthine structure of the cavernous hemangioma may explain the long standing contrast enhancement of the hemangioma after hepatic arteriography. PMID:6832546

  12. Moessbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher L.; Oliver, Frederick W.; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Meteorites provide a wealth of information about the solar system's formation, since they have similar building blocks as the Earth's crust but have been virtually unaltered since their formation. Some stony meteorites contain minerals and silicate inclusions, called chondrules, in the matrix. Utilizing Moessbauer spectroscopy, we identified minerals in the Murchison meteorite, a carbonaceous chondritic meteorite, by the gamma ray resonance lines observed. Absorption patterns of the spectra were found due to the minerals olivine and phyllosilicate. We used a scanning electron microscope to describe the structure of the chondrules in the Murchison meteorite. The chondrules were found to be deformed due to weathering of the meteorite. Diameters varied in size from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Further enhancement of the microscopic imagery using a digital image processor was used to describe the physical characteristics of the inclusions.

  13. Scanning electron microscopic observations of Anopheles albimanus (Diptera: Culicidae) eggs.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M H; Chavez, B; Orozco, A; Loyola, E G; Martinez-Palomo, A

    1992-05-01

    To investigate the existence of subspecies of Anopheles albimanus Wiedeman in southern Mexico, the egg morphology of specimens obtained from several field populations and from insectary-adapted colonies of uniform pupal phenotype was examined. Scanning electron microscopic observations have shown that the eggs of An. albimanus are polymorphic in respect to the size and shape of their floats, but not in their ornamentation. Four types of eggs were found. Differences in the proportion of the various morphological types were statistically significant, although proportions of egg types were variable among individuals within the same population. These observations are suggestive of distinctive populations and warrant further studies using more sensitive methods to investigate sibling species in An. albimanus sensu lato. PMID:1625289

  14. [Scanning electron microscopy study of experimental chorioretinitis in guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Renard, G; Usui, M; De Kozak, Y; Faure, J P

    1976-04-01

    Retinal lesions are described with the scanning electron microscope in the uveo retinitis induced in guinea pigs by immunization with rod outer segments of bovine retina. The two surfaces in contact of the pigment epithelium and the photoreceptors are separated from each other and observed on flat preparations. On the epithelial side, the evolution of the degenerescence of epithelial cells is observed, from the early disappearance of villosities until the total destruction of the cells. Through lacks in the epithelial layer where the choroid appears, inflammatory cells migrate towards the retina. The impairement of the visual cells is characterized by progressive destruction of outer then inner segments, with preservation of the external limiting membrane. In some areas the degenerative process reaches the layer of visual cells nuclei. Macrophages, and local clusters of lymphocytes are seen in contact with the retinal surface. PMID:135548

  15. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cells Using Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhang, Wei; Soffe, Rebecca; Nahavandi, Sofia; Shukla, Ravi; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2014-01-01

    Ultrastructural analysis of cells can reveal valuable information about their morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to provide high-resolution images from the surface of biological samples. However, samples need to be dehydrated and coated with conductive materials for SEM imaging. Besides, immobilizing non-adherent cells during processing and analysis is challenging and requires complex fixation protocols. In this work, we developed a novel dielectrophoresis based microfluidic platform for interfacing non-adherent cells with high-resolution SEM at low vacuum mode. The system enables rapid immobilization and dehydration of samples without deposition of chemical residues over the cell surface. Moreover, it enables the on-chip chemical stimulation and fixation of immobilized cells with minimum dislodgement. These advantages were demonstrated for comparing the morphological changes of non-budding and budding yeast cells following Lyticase treatment. PMID:25089528

  16. Scanning electron microscopy of Strongylus spp. in zebra.

    PubMed

    Els, H J; Malan, F S; Scialdo-Krecek, R C

    1983-12-01

    The external ultrastructure of the anterior and posterior extremities of the nematodes, Strongylus asini , Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus equinus and Strongylus edentatus, was studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fresh specimens of S. asini were collected from the caecum, ventral colon and vena portae of Equus burchelli and Equus zebra hartmannae ; S. vulgaris from the caecum, colon and arteria ileocolica of E. burchelli ; S. equinus from the ventral colon of E. z. hartmannae and S. edentatus from the caecum and ventral colon of both zebras , during surveys of parasites in zebras in the Etosha Game Reserve, South West Africa/Namibia, and the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa. The worms were cleaned, fixed and mounted by standard methods and photographed in a JEOL JSM - 35C scanning electron microscope (SEM) operating at 12kV . The SEM showed the following differences: the tips of the external leaf-crowns varied and were fine and delicate in S. asini , coarse and broad in S. vulgaris and, in S. equinus and S. edentatus, closely adherent, separating into single elements for half their length. The excretory pores showed only slight variation, and the morphology of the copulatory bursae did not differ from those seen with light microscopy. The genital cones differed markedly: S. asini had a ventral triangular projection and laterally 2 finger-like projections: in S. vulgaris there were numerous bosses on the lateral and ventral aspects of the cone; in S. equinus 2 finger-like processes projected laterocaudally ; and in S. edentatus 2 pairs of papilla-like processes projected laterally on the ventral aspects, and a pair of rounded projections and a pair of hair-like structures adorned the dorsal aspects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6676687

  17. Determination of molecular weights of humic substances by analytical (UV scanning) ultracentrifugation

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, P.M.; Wilkinson, A.E.; Tipping, E.; Jones, M.N. Freshwater Biological Association, Ambleside, Cumbria )

    1990-01-01

    Samples of peat humic acid (PHA) and surface water humic (WBHA) and fulvic (WBFA) acids have been extracted from Whitray Beck in North Yorkshire, U.K. The molecular weights of the extracts have been investigated by sedimentation equilibrium using an analytical ultracentrifuge equipped with a UV scanning system. The system allows measurements to be made at low concentrations of humic substances, comparable to those existing in natural humic-rich water. A method is described for correcting UV scanning data for changes in the optical properties of the materials with changing molecular weight. Measurements have also been made on reference samples of Suwannee river humic (SRHA) and fulvic (SRFA) acids from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). The weight-average moleuclar weights of the extracted samples range from approximately 2,000 to 17,000 and follow a series PHA > WBHA > WBFA. Apparent specific volumes of these materials were in a range from 0.45 to 0.58 cm{sup 3} g{sup {minus}1} as measured by digital densimetry. Al the samples studied were analysed by gel filtration, but the molecular weights determined by this method based on a globular protein calibration are not in good accord with the absolute determinations by the sedimentation-equilibrium technique. The molecular weight of the SRHA determined by sedimentation equilibrium is in good agreement with that reported by BECKETT (1987) et al., based on flow field-flow fractionation.

  18. Determination of molecular weights of humic substances by analytical (UV scanning) ultracentrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Patrick M.; Wilkinson, Alan E.; Tipping, Edward; Jones, Malcolm N.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of peat humic acid (PHA) and surface water humic (WBHA) and fulvic (WBFA) acids have been extracted from Whitray Beck in North Yorkshire, U.K. The molecular weights of the extracts have been investigated by sedimentation equilibrium using an analytical ultracentrifuge equipped with a UV scanning system. The system allows measurements to be made at low concentrations of humic substances, comparable to those existing in natural humic-rich water. A method is described for correcting UV scanning data for changes in the optical properties of the materials with changing molecular weight. Measurements have also been made on reference samples of Suwannee river humic (SRHA) and fulvic (SRFA) acids from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). The weight-average molecular weights of the extracted samples range from approximately 2000 to 17000 and follow a series PHA > WBHA > WBFA. Apparent specific volumes of these materials were in a range from 0.45 to 0.58 cm 3 g -1 as measured by digital densimetry. All the samples studied were analysed by gel filtration, but the molecular weights determined by this method based on a globular protein calibration are not in good accord with the absolute determinations by the sedimentation-equilibrium technique. The molecular weight of the SRHA determined by sedimentation equilibrium is in good agreement with that reported by BECKETT (1987) et al., based on flow field-flow fractionation.

  19. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  20. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Barnaby D.A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M.C.; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Robinson, Richard D.; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A.; Hovden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data. PMID:27272459

  1. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data. PMID:27272459

  2. Analytical band Monte Carlo analysis of electron transport in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeoh, K. H.; Ong, D. S.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Yong, T. K.; Lim, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    An analytical band Monte Carlo (AMC) with linear energy band dispersion has been developed to study the electron transport in suspended silicene and silicene on aluminium oxide (Al2O3) substrate. We have calibrated our model against the full band Monte Carlo (FMC) results by matching the velocity-field curve. Using this model, we discover that the collective effects of charge impurity scattering and surface optical phonon scattering can degrade the electron mobility down to about 400 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and thereafter it is less sensitive to the changes of charge impurity in the substrate and surface optical phonon. We also found that further reduction of mobility to ∼100 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 as experimentally demonstrated by Tao et al (2015 Nat. Nanotechnol. 10 227) can only be explained by the renormalization of Fermi velocity due to interaction with Al2O3 substrate.

  3. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics. PMID:24420248

  4. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, N.; Watanabe, G.; Harada, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1988-11-01

    Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules.

  5. Implementing electronic health care predictive analytics: considerations and challenges.

    PubMed

    Amarasingham, Ruben; Patzer, Rachel E; Huesch, Marco; Nguyen, Nam Q; Xie, Bin

    2014-07-01

    The use of predictive modeling for real-time clinical decision making is increasingly recognized as a way to achieve the Triple Aim of improving outcomes, enhancing patients' experiences, and reducing health care costs. The development and validation of predictive models for clinical practice is only the initial step in the journey toward mainstream implementation of real-time point-of-care predictions. Integrating electronic health care predictive analytics (e-HPA) into the clinical work flow, testing e-HPA in a patient population, and subsequently disseminating e-HPA across US health care systems on a broad scale require thoughtful planning. Input is needed from policy makers, health care executives, researchers, and practitioners as the field evolves. This article describes some of the considerations and challenges of implementing e-HPA, including the need to ensure patients' privacy, establish a health system monitoring team to oversee implementation, incorporate predictive analytics into medical education, and make sure that electronic systems do not replace or crowd out decision making by physicians and patients. PMID:25006140

  6. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  7. Probing Individual Ice Nucleation Events with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup; Knopf, Daniel; Gilles, Mary; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is one of the processes of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied science and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by particles proceeds where microscopic properties of particle surfaces essentially control nucleation mechanisms. Ice nucleation in the atmosphere on particles governs the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds, which in turn influence the Earth's radiative budget and climate. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is still insufficiently understood and poses significant challenges in predictive understanding of climate change. We present a novel microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature range of 193-273 K and relative humidity relevant for ice formation in the atmospheric clouds. The approach utilizes a home built novel ice nucleation cell interfaced with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system is applied for direct observation of individual ice formation events, determining ice nucleation mechanisms, freezing temperatures, and relative humidity onsets. Reported microanalysis of the ice nucleating particles (INP) include elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), and advanced speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The performance of the IN-ESEM system is validated through a set of experiments with kaolinite particles with known ice nucleation propensity. We demonstrate an application of the IN-ESEM system to identify and characterize individual INP within a complex mixture of ambient particles.

  8. Analytic Validation of the Automated Bone Scan Index as an Imaging Biomarker to Standardize Quantitative Changes in Bone Scans of Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J.; Kaboteh, Reza; Båth, Lena; Sadik, May; Gjertsson, Peter; Lomsky, Milan; Edenbrandt, Lars; Minarik, David; Bjartell, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A reproducible and quantitative imaging biomarker is needed to standardize the evaluation of changes in bone scans of prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastasis. We performed a series of analytic validation studies to evaluate the performance of the automated bone scan index (BSI) as an imaging biomarker in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Methods Three separate analytic studies were performed to evaluate the accuracy, precision, and reproducibility of the automated BSI. Simulation study: bone scan simulations with predefined tumor burdens were created to assess accuracy and precision. Fifty bone scans were simulated with a tumor burden ranging from low to high disease confluence (0.10–13.0 BSI). A second group of 50 scans was divided into 5 subgroups, each containing 10 simulated bone scans, corresponding to BSI values of 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, and 10.0. Repeat bone scan study: to assess the reproducibility in a routine clinical setting, 2 repeat bone scans were obtained from metastatic prostate cancer patients after a single 600-MBq 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate injection. Follow-up bone scan study: 2 follow-up bone scans of metastatic prostate cancer patients were analyzed to determine the interobserver variability between the automated BSIs and the visual interpretations in assessing changes. The automated BSI was generated using the upgraded EXINI boneBSI software (version 2). The results were evaluated using linear regression, Pearson correlation, Cohen κ measurement, coefficient of variation, and SD. Results Linearity of the automated BSI interpretations in the range of 0.10–13.0 was confirmed, and Pearson correlation was observed at 0.995 (n = 50; 95% confidence interval, 0.99–0.99; P < 0.0001). The mean coefficient of variation was less than 20%. The mean BSI difference between the 2 repeat bone scans of 35 patients was 0.05 (SD = 0.15), with an upper confidence limit of 0.30. The interobserver agreement in the automated BSI

  9. Scanning transmission electron microscopy strain measurement from millisecond frames of a direct electron charge coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Knut; Rosenauer, Andreas; Ryll, Henning; Ordavo, Ivan; Ihle, Sebastian; Soltau, Heike; Strueder, Lothar; Volz, Kerstin; Zweck, Josef

    2012-11-19

    A high-speed direct electron detection system is introduced to the field of transmission electron microscopy and applied to strain measurements in semiconductor nanostructures. In particular, a focused electron probe with a diameter of 0.5 nm was scanned over a fourfold quantum layer stack with alternating compressive and tensile strain and diffracted discs have been recorded on a scintillator-free direct electron detector with a frame time of 1 ms. We show that the applied algorithms can accurately detect Bragg beam positions despite a significant point spread each 300 kV electron causes during detection on the scintillator-free camera. For millisecond exposures, we find that strain can be measured with a precision of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, enabling, e.g., strain mapping in a 100 Multiplication-Sign 100 nm{sup 2} region with 0.5 nm resolution in 40 s.

  10. A differentially pumped secondary electron detector for low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jacka, M; Zadrazil, M; Lopour, F

    2003-01-01

    A new design of secondary electron (SE) detector is described for use in low-vacuum scanning electron microscopes. Its distinguishing feature is a separate detector chamber, which can be maintained at a pressure independent of the pressure in the specimen chamber. The two chambers are separated by a perforated membrane or mesh across which an electric field is applied, making it relatively transparent to low-energy electrons but considerably less so to the gas molecules. The benefits of this arrangement are discussed. The final means of detecting the electrons can be a conventional scintillator and photomultiplier arrangement or any of the methods using the ambient gas as an amplifying medium. Images obtained with the detector show good SE contrast and low backscattered electron contribution. PMID:14748387

  11. Evaluation of anisotropic chitosan hydrogels using analytical Mueller matrix method and scanned laser pico-projector.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Ling; Chuang, Chin-Ho; Lo, Yu-Lung

    2013-07-25

    Chitosan has excellent biodegradable, biocompatible and bio-absorbable properties and has been found increasing use in the biomedical field in recent decades. The linear birefringence (LB), linear diattenuation (LD), circular birefringence (CB), circular diattenuation (CD), and depolarization properties of chitosan hydrogel films crosslinked in citrate acid buffer solution (CBS) are extracted using an analytical Mueller matrix method. It is shown that the optical phase retardance property of the hydrogel films provides a reliable indication of both the chitosan concentration of the film and the pH value of the CBS crosslinking environment. In addition, chitosan hydrogel suspension with low-concentration crosslinked in CBS environments with various pH values are studied by the speckle contrast of the projected images obtained when illuminating the suspension with a scanned laser pico-projector (SLPP). It is found that for the samples crosslinked in an acidic environment, the speckle contrast decreases with an increasing pH value. By contrast, for the samples crosslinked in an alkaline CBS environment, the speckle contrast increases as the pH value increases. It is concluded that both the phase retardance and the speckle contrast enable the pH value of the CBS crosslinking solution to be reliably determined. However, of the two methods, the SLPP method yields improved measurement sensitivity. Overall, the results presented in this study show that the analytical Mueller matrix method and SLPP method provide an effective means of characterizing the optical properties, concentration and crosslinking environment of chitosan hydrogel films and suspensions. PMID:23768591

  12. Quantifying the cellular uptake of semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles by analytical electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hondow, Nicole; Brown, M Rowan; Starborg, Tobias; Monteith, Alexander G; Brydson, Rik; Summers, Huw D; Rees, Paul; Brown, Andy

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles are in demand as optical biomarkers yet the cellular uptake process is not fully understood; quantification of numbers and the fate of internalized particles are still to be achieved. We have focussed on the characterization of cellular uptake of quantum dots using a combination of analytical electron microscopies because of the spatial resolution available to examine uptake at the nanoparticle level, using both imaging to locate particles and spectroscopy to confirm identity. In this study, commercially available quantum dots, CdSe/ZnS core/shell particles coated in peptides to target cellular uptake by endocytosis, have been investigated in terms of the agglomeration state in typical cell culture media, the traverse of particle agglomerates across U-2 OS cell membranes during endocytosis, the merging of endosomal vesicles during incubation of cells and in the correlation of imaging flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy to measure the final nanoparticle dose internalized by the U-2 OS cells. We show that a combination of analytical transmission electron microscopy and serial block face scanning electron microscopy can provide a comprehensive description of the internalization of an initial exposure dose of nanoparticles by an endocytically active cell population and how the internalized, membrane bound nanoparticle load is processed by the cells. We present a stochastic model of an endosome merging process and show that this provides a data-driven modelling framework for the prediction of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles in general. PMID:25762522

  13. Electron spin resonance scanning probe spectroscopy for ultrasensitive biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jason P; Ryan, Jason T; Shrestha, Pragya R; Liu, Zhanglong; Vaz, Canute; Kim, Ji-Hong; Georgiou, Vasileia; Cheung, Kin P

    2015-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy's affinity for detecting paramagnetic free radicals, or spins, has been increasingly employed to examine a large variety of biochemical interactions. Such paramagnetic species are broadly found in nature and can be intrinsic (defects in solid-state materials systems, electron/hole pairs, stable radicals in proteins) or, more often, purposefully introduced into the material of interest (doping/attachment of paramagnetic spin labels to biomolecules of interest). Using ESR to trace the reactionary path of paramagnetic spins or spin-active proxy molecules provides detailed information about the reaction's transient species and the label's local environment. For many biochemical systems, like those involving membrane proteins, synthesizing the necessary quantity of spin-labeled biomolecules (typically 50 pmol to 100 pmol) is quite challenging and often limits the possible biochemical reactions available for investigation. Quite simply, ESR is too insensitive. Here, we demonstrate an innovative approach that greatly enhances ESR's sensitivity (>20000× improvement) by developing a near-field, nonresonant, X-band ESR spectrometric method. Sensitivity improvement is confirmed via measurement of 140 amol of the most common nitroxide spin label in a ≈593 fL liquid cell at ambient temperature and pressure. This experimental approach eliminates many of the typical ESR sample restrictions imposed by conventional resonator-based ESR detection and renders the technique feasible for spatially resolved measurements on a wider variety of biochemical samples. Thus, our approach broadens the pool of possible biochemical and structural biology studies, as well as greatly enhances the analytical power of existing ESR applications. PMID:25867553

  14. In-vivo Candida biofilms in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Paulitsch, Astrid Helga; Willinger, Birgit; Zsalatz, Benedikt; Stabentheiner, Edith; Marth, Egon; Buzina, Walter

    2009-11-01

    Candida biofilms on indwelling devices are an increasing problem in patients treated at intensive care units. The goal of this study was to examine the occurrence and frequency of these biofilms. A total of 172 catheters were collected from 105 male and 67 female patients (the age range of both patient groups was from 3 weeks to 98 years old). The catheters were incubated on blood agar plates and the resulting yeast colonies were subsequently identified. Furthermore, pieces of catheters were fixed, dried and sputter coated with gold for investigation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Yeasts were recovered from significantly more catheters obtained from men than from women (chi(2): n = 67; P < 0.01). In SEM, 56.4% catheters turned out to be positive for biofilm formation. Again catheters from male patients were statistically significant (chi(2): n = 40; P < 0.01) more often positive than those from women. Candida albicans (71.1%) was the most common species isolated from the catheters, followed by C. glabrata (10.3%), C. parapsilosis (8.2%) and C. tropicalis (5.2%). Based on the results of this investigation, the epidemiology of Candida biofilms on indwelling devices seems to be a promising target for future investigations. PMID:19888801

  15. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Jäger, A.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.; Dejneka, A.

    2015-02-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained rat skin sections from plasma-treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  16. Semiautomatic classification of cementitious materials using scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumetz, Lucas; Mura, Mauro Dalla; Meulenyzer, Samuel; Lombard, Sébastien; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2015-11-01

    Segmentation and classification are prolific research topics in the image processing community. These topics have been increasingly used in the context of analysis of cementitious materials on images acquired with a scanning electron microscope. Indeed, there is a need to be able to detect and to quantify the materials present in a cement paste in order to follow the chemical reactions occurring in the material even days after the solidification. We propose a new approach for segmentation and classification of cementitious materials based on the denoising of the data with a block-matching three-dimensional (3-D) algorithm, binary partition tree (BPT) segmentation, support vector machines (SVM) classification, and interactivity with the user. The BPT provides a hierarchical representation of the spatial regions of the data, allowing a segmentation to be selected among the admissible partitions of the image. SVMs are used to obtain a classification map of the image. This approach combines state-of-the-art image processing tools with user interactivity to allow a better segmentation to be performed, or to help the classifier discriminate the classes better. We show that the proposed approach outperforms a previous method when applied to synthetic data and several real datasets coming from cement samples, both qualitatively with visual examination and quantitatively with the comparison of experimental results with theoretical ones.

  17. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lunov, O. Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  18. Search space scanning with planar electronically-controlled array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanle, E.

    The demands which radar installations have to satisfy are rising with increasing traffic density in the case of civil applications and a growing threat level in the case of the military sector. In many instances, these demands can only be met by adapting the value of the transmitted power to the traffic density or the magnitude of the threat. Such an approach requires the employment of computer-aided radar systems with electronically-controlled antennas. The considered systems have currently also advantages with respect to reliability and cost effectiveness. The present investigation is concerned with suitable procedures for the improvement of the energy management, taking into account mainly aspects of radar control and signal processing. The discussion is based on the consideration of a planar array antenna. Differences arising in connection with the use of other types of antennas are also briefly examined. The employment of an immobile radar antenna for ground-based airspace observation is considered. Attention is given to the appropriate selection of the width of the lobe, the scanning, the tilt of the antenna, and antenna performance characteristics.

  19. Life Cycle of Neurospora crassa Viewed by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seale, Thomas

    1973-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the major stages of the life cycle of two wild-type strains of Neurospora crassa Shear and Dodge (St. Lawrence 3.1a and 74A): mycelia, protoperithecium formation, perithecia, ascospores, ascospore germination and outgrowth, macro and microconidia, and germination and outgrowth of macroconidia. Structures seen at the limit of resolution of bright-field and phase-contrast microscopes, e.g., the ribbed surface of ascospores, are well resolved. New details of conidial development and surface structure are revealed. There appears to be only one distinguishable morphological difference between the two strains. The pattern of germination and outgrowth which seems relatively constant for strain 74A or strain 3.1a, appears to be different for each. Conidia from strain 3.1a almost always germinate from a site between interconidial attachment points; whereas the germ tubes of strain 74A usually emerge from or very near the interconidial attachment site. These germination patterns usually do not segregate 2:2 in asci dissected in order. This observation suggests that conidial germination pattern is not under the control of a single gene. Images PMID:4266170

  20. Surface treatment of feldspathic porcelain: scanning electron microscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Valian, Azam

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Topographic analysis of treated ceramics provides qualitative information regarding the surface texture affecting the micromechanical retention and locking of resin-ceramics. This study aims to compare the surface microstructure following different surface treatments of feldspathic porcelain. MATERIALS AND METHODS This in-vitro study was conducted on 72 porcelain discs randomly divided into 12 groups (n=6). In 9 groups, feldspathic surfaces were subjected to sandblasting at 2, 3 or 4 bar pressure for 5, 10 or 15 seconds with 50 µm alumina particles at a 5 mm distance. In group 10, 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HF) gel was applied for 120 seconds. In group 11, specimens were sandblasted at 3 bar pressure for 10 seconds and then conditioned with HF. In group 12, specimens were first treated with HF and then sandblasted at 3 bar pressure for 10 seconds. All specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at different magnifications. RESULTS SEM images of HF treated specimens revealed deep porosities of variable sizes; whereas, the sandblasted surfaces were more homogenous and had sharper peaks. Increasing the pressure and duration of sandblasting increased the surface roughness. SEM images of the two combined techniques showed that in group 11 (sandblasted first), HF caused deeper porosities; whereas in group 12 (treated with HF first) sandblasting caused irregularities with less homogeneity. CONCLUSION All surface treatments increased the surface area and caused porous surfaces. In groups subjected to HF, the porosities were deeper than those in sandblasted only groups. PMID:25352961

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of lung following alpha irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Lauhala, K.E.; McDonald, K.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Pulmonary aggregation of inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} particles leads to a cellular evolution of focal inflammation, fibrosis, epithelial dysplasia and lung tumor formation. Female Wistar rats were exposed to an aerosol of high-fired {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} (initial lung burden, 3.9 kBq) and the lungs examined at intervals from 1 day to 700 days after exposure by light and scanning electron microscopy and autoradiography. Peribronchiolar Pu particle aggregation increased with time, resulting in well-defined focal inflammatory lesions after 120 days and fibrotic lesions after 180 days. A generalized hypertrophy and hyperplasia of nonciliated bronchiolar cells was seen at 15 days and type II cell hyperplasia by 30 days after exposure. Focal dysplastic changes in type II alveolar epithelium and terminal nonciliated bronchiolar epithelium preceded carcinoma formation. Alveolar bronchiolarization was first noted at 120 days, squamous metaplasia at 210 days, squamous carcinoma at 270 days and adenocarcinoma at 600 days after exposure.

  2. Histological preparation of developing vestibular otoconia for scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The unique nature of vestibular otoconia as calcium carbonate biominerals makes them particularly susceptible to chemical deformation during histological processing. We fixed and stored otoconia from all three otolith endorgans of embryonic, hatchling and adult Japanese quail in glutaraldehyde containing either phosphate or non-phosphate buffers for varying lengths of time and processed them for scanning electron microscopy. Otoconia from all age groups and otolith endorgans processed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) showed abnormal surface morphology when compared to acetone fixed controls. Otoconia processed in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate or HEPES buffered artificial endolymph (pH 7.4) showed normal morphology that was similar to controls. The degree of otoconial deformation was directly related to the time exposed to phosphate buffer. Short duration exposure produced particulate deformations while longer exposures resulted in fused otoconia that formed solid sheets. Otoconial surface deformation and fusing was independent of the glutaraldehyde component of the histological processing. These findings should help vestibular researchers to develop appropriate histological processing protocols in future studies of otoconia.

  3. Electron Microscopy: an Analytical Tool for Solid State Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2013-03-01

    For too long the electron microscope has been considered as ``a big magnifying glass.'' Modern electron microscopy however has evolved into an analytical technique, able to provide quantitative data on structure, composition, chemical bonding and magnetic properties. Using lens corrected instruments it is now possible to determine atom shifts at interfaces with a precision of a few picometer; chemical diffusion at these interfaces can be imaged down to atomic scale. The chemical nature of the surface atoms can be visualized and even the bonding state of the elements (e.g. Mn2+ versus Mn3+) can be detected on an atomic scale. Electron microscopy is by principle a projection technique, but the final dream is to obtain atomic info of materials in three dimensions. We will show that this is no longer a dream, but that it is possible using advanced microscopy. We will show evidence of determining the valence change Ce4+ versus Ce3+ at the surface of a CeO2 nanocrystal; the atomic shifts at the interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 and the 3D relaxation of a Au nanocrystal.

  4. The Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW): a Platform for Analytics using Electronic Health Record Data

    PubMed Central

    Post, Andrew R.; Kurc, Tahsin; Cholleti, Sharath; Gao, Jingjing; Lin, Xia; Bornstein, William; Cantrell, Dedra; Levine, David; Hohmann, Sam; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To create an analytics platform for specifying and detecting clinical phenotypes and other derived variables in electronic health record (EHR) data for quality improvement investigations. Materials and Methods We have developed an architecture for an Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW). It supports transforming data represented in different physical schemas into a common data model, specifying derived variables in terms of the common model to enable their reuse, computing derived variables while enforcing invariants and ensuring correctness and consistency of data transformations, long-term curation of derived data, and export of derived data into standard analysis tools. It includes software that implements these features and a computing environment that enables secure high-performance access to and processing of large datasets extracted from EHRs. Results We have implemented and deployed the architecture in production locally. The software is available as open source. We have used it as part of hospital operations in a project to reduce rates of hospital readmission within 30 days. The project examined the association of over 100 derived variables representing disease and co-morbidity phenotypes with readmissions in five years of data from our institution’s clinical data warehouse and the UHC Clinical Database (CDB). The CDB contains administrative data from over 200 hospitals that are in academic medical centers or affiliated with such centers. Discussion and Conclusion A widely available platform for managing and detecting phenotypes in EHR data could accelerate the use of such data in quality improvement and comparative effectiveness studies. PMID:23402960

  5. High bandwidth secondary electron detection in variable pressure scanning electron microscopy using a Frisch grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, S. W.; Phillips, M. R.

    2008-03-01

    The bandwidth and contrast of secondary electron (SE) images obtained using variable pressure scanning electron microscopy are enhanced when a grounded Frisch grid is placed between the SE detecting anode and the negatively biased stage. The improvement in SE image quality occurs as a consequence of the grounded Frisch grid electrostatically screening the 'slow' induced ion current signal, generated below the grid, from the induced current detected above the grid by the anode. Ion induced artefacts, such as image smearing at fast scan rates, are virtually eliminated using a Frisch grid. Gas amplification data are presented to illustrate that gas gain can be optimized by varying the Frisch grid-stage (amplification region) separation Frisch grid-anode (drift region) separation and stage bias.

  6. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed review of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.

  7. Semi-analytical model of cosmic ray electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivascenko, A.; Spanier, F.

    2011-07-01

    We present a numerical extension to the analytical propagation model introduced in Hein and Spanier (2008) to describe the leptonic population in the galactic disc. The model is used to derive a possible identification of the components that contribute to the leptonic cosmic ray spectrum, as measured by PAMELA, Fermi and HESS, with an emphasis on secondary e+-e- production in collisions of cosmic ray particles with ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We find that besides secondaries, an additional source symmetric in e+ and e- production is needed to explain both the PAMELA anomaly and the Fermi bump, assuming a power-law primary electron spectrum. Our model also allows us to derive constraints for some properties of the ISM.

  8. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed reviewmore » of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.« less

  9. Electron channeling contrast imaging studies of nonpolar nitrides using a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Kraeusel, S.; Bruckbauer, J.; Edwards, P. R.; Hourahine, B.; Trager-Cowan, C.; Mauder, C.; Heuken, M.; Wang, K. R.; Trampert, A.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.; Giesen, C.; Day, A. P.

    2013-04-08

    Threading dislocations, stacking faults, and associated partial dislocations significantly degrade the optical and electrical properties of materials such as non-polar III-nitride semiconductor thin films. Stacking faults are generally difficult to detect and quantify with existing characterization techniques. We demonstrate the use of electron channeling contrast imaging in the scanning electron microscope to non-destructively reveal basal plane stacking faults terminated by partial dislocations in m-plane GaN and InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures grown on {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy.

  10. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOIGCAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic scanning election microscope analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon used a a medium for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment. The procedure allows for the objective monitoring, comparing, and trouble shooting of combined ...

  11. Ultra low-K shrinkage behavior when under electron beam in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lorut, F.; Imbert, G.; Roggero, A.

    2013-08-28

    In this paper, we investigate the tendency of porous low-K dielectrics (also named Ultra Low-K, ULK) behavior to shrink when exposed to the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope. Various experimental electron beam conditions have been used for irradiating ULK thin films, and the resulting shrinkage has been measured through use of an atomic force microscope tool. We report the shrinkage to be a fast, cumulative, and dose dependent effect. Correlation of the shrinkage with incident electron beam energy loss has also been evidenced. The chemical modification of the ULK films within the interaction volume has been demonstrated, with a densification of the layer and a loss of carbon and hydrogen elements being observed.

  12. Non-destructive imaging of buried electronic interfaces using a decelerated scanning electron beam.

    PubMed

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Murphy, Benedict A; Vick, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology enables the production of atomically abrupt interfaces in multilayered junctions, allowing for an increase in the number of transistors in a processor. However, uniform electron transport has not yet been achieved across the entire interfacial area in junctions due to the existence of local defects, causing local heating and reduction in transport efficiency. To date, junction uniformity has been predominantly assessed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, which requires slicing and milling processes that can potentially introduce additional damage and deformation. It is therefore essential to develop an alternative non-destructive method. Here we show a non-destructive technique using scanning electron microscopy to map buried junction properties. By controlling the electron-beam energy, we demonstrate the contrast imaging of local junction resistances at a controlled depth. This technique can be applied to any buried junctions, from conventional semiconductor and metal devices to organic devices. PMID:27586090

  13. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance. PMID:26048551

  14. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-07-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  15. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  16. SCAN+

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determinemore » the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.« less

  17. Raman spectroscopic and scanning electron microscopic analysis of a novel biological colonisation of volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge Villar, Susana E.; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Benning, Liane G.

    2006-09-01

    A novel type of colonisation of a basaltic rock, collected on the Arctic island of Svalbard, Norway, during the AMASE expedition in 2004, was characterised using Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The sample contains two different types of extremophile communities, one occurring behind a radial white crystallisation and the other occurring inside a dark vacuole. Several types of minerals and microbial colonies have been identified by both Raman spectroscopy and SEM analyses. It is the first time that photosynthetic communities have been documented to colonise the inside of dark basaltic rocks. Our discovery has important implications for planetary exploration because it extends the analytical capability and our understanding of microbial rock colonisations to subaerial volcanic outcrops and has wide implications towards the search for life in extraterrestrial planets. In this work we also demonstrate that the use of different laser wavelengths for Raman spectroscopic studies and complementary microscopic analysis are critical for a comprehensive organic and inorganic compound identification.

  18. Reproducible strain measurement in electronic devices by applying integer multiple to scanning grating in scanning moiré fringe imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suhyun; Jung, Younheum; Kim, Joong Jung; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum; Kondo, Yukihito

    2014-10-01

    Scanning moiré fringe (SMF) imaging by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the strain field in the channel of a transistor with a CoSi2 source and drain. Nanometer-scale SMFs were formed with a scanning grating size of ds at integer multiples of the Si crystal lattice spacing dl (ds ˜ ndl, n = 2, 3, 4, 5). The moiré fringe formula was modified to establish a method for quantifying strain measurement. We showed that strain fields in a transistor measured by SMF images were reproducible with an accuracy of 0.02%.

  19. [High resolution scanning electron microscopy of isolated outer hair cells].

    PubMed

    Koitschev, A; Müller, H

    1996-11-01

    Isolated hair cell preparations have gained wide acceptance as a model for studying physiological and molecular properties of the sensory cells involved in the hearing process. Ultrastructural details, such as stereocilia links, lateral membrane substructure or synaptic links are of crucial importance for normal sensory transduction. For this reason, we developed a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) procedure to study the surface of isolated hair cells. Cells were mechanically and/or enzymatically separated, isolated and immobilized on cover slips by alcian blue and fixed by 2% glutardialdehyde or 1% OsO4. After dehydration, preparations were critical point-dried and sputter-coated with gold-palladium (2-4 nm). Up to 5 nm resolution was achieved. Optimal fixation kept the cells in their typical cylindrical forms. Preservation of the stereocilia and the apical plates of the outer hair cells depended strongly on the fixation process. Tip- and side-links were observed only sporadically because of the aggressive preparation procedure. The lateral plasma membranes of the cell bodies showed regular granular structures of 5-7 nm diameter at maximal magnification. The granular structure of the cell membrane seemed to correspond to putative transmembrane proteins believed to generate membrane-based motility. The remnants of the nerve endings and/or supporting cells usually covered the cell base. The preservation of the cells was better when enzymatic isolation was omitted. The technique used allowed for high resolution ultrastructural examination of isolated hair cells and, when combined with immunological labeling, may permit the identification of proteins at a molecular level. PMID:9064297

  20. Optical microscopy versus scanning electron microscopy in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Marickar, Y M Fazil; Lekshmi, P R; Varma, Luxmi; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Stone analysis is incompletely done in many clinical centers. Identification of the stone component is essential for deciding future prophylaxis. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) still remains a distant dream for routine hospital work. It is in this context that optical microscopy is suggested as an alternate procedure. The objective of this article was to assess the utility of an optical microscope which gives magnification of up to 40x and gives clear picture of the surface of the stones. In order to authenticate the morphological analysis of urinary stones, SEM and elemental distribution analysis were performed. A total of 250 urinary stones of different compositions were collected from stone clinic, photographed, observed under an optical microscope, and optical photographs were taken at different angles. Twenty-five representative samples among these were gold sputtered to make them conductive and were fed into the SEM machine. Photographs of the samples were taken at different angles at magnifications up to 4,000. Elemental distribution analysis (EDAX) was done to confirm the composition. The observations of the two studies were compared. The different appearances of the stones under optical illuminated microscopy were mostly standardized appearances, namely bosselations of pure whewellite, spiculations of weddellite, bright yellow colored appearance of uric acid, and dirty white amorphous appearance of phosphates. SEM and EDAX gave clearer pictures and gave added confirmation of the stone composition. From the references thus obtained, it was possible to confirm the composition by studying the optical microscopic pictures. Higher magnification capacity of the SEM and the EDAX patterns are useful to give reference support for performing optical microscopy work. After standardization, routine analysis can be performed with optical microscopy. The advantage of the optical microscope is that, it

  1. Visualization of Microbial Biomarkers by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainwright, Norman R.; Allen, Carlton C.; Child, Alice

    2001-01-01

    . Fortunately, many antimicrobial defense systems of higher organisms require sensitive detection to combat microbial pathogens. We employ here the primitive immune system of the evolutionarily ancient horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. This species relies on multi-enzyme signal amplification detection of cell wall molecules and they can be applied to the development of useful detectors of life. An extension of this work includes the visualization of microbial signatures by labeling LAL components with chromogenic or electron dense markers. The protein Limulus Anti-LPS Factor (LALF) has an extremely high affinity for LPS. By coupling LALF binding with colloidal gold labels we demonstrate a correlation of the structures visible by electron microscopy with biochemical evidence of microbial cell wall materials. Pure silica particles were mixed with cultures of E. coli (10(exp 6) cfu/mL). Samples were washed sequentially with buffered saline, LALF, antibody to LALF and finally colloidal gold-labeled Protein A. Negative controls were not exposed to E. coli but received identical treatment otherwise. Samples were coated with carbon and imaged on a JEOL JSM-840 scanning electron microscope with LaB6 source in the back scatter mode with the JEOL annular back scatter detector. 20 nm-scale black spots in this contrast-reversed image originate from electrons back-scattered by gold atoms. Negative controls did not give any signal. Future work will expand application of this technique to soil simulants and mineralized rock samples.

  2. The characterization of nanoparticles using analytical electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Whitney B.

    2011-06-01

    Nanoparticles are often overlooked during routine trace evidence analyses because of their small size and the degree of difficulty needed to efficiently characterize them. However, analytical electron microscopy (AEM) enables the characterization and/or identification of nanoparticles because of its high magnification capability, the ability to gather elemental data and also the ability to determine the internal structure of a single nanoparticles(1). There is a wide variety of natural and manufactured nanoparticles that are prominent within the environment and their presence becomes very valuable in the absence of larger particles. The combustion of materials produces by-products such as nano-sized carbon soot, fumes, fly ash and gun-shot residue (GSR). Using AEM, nano-sized carbon soot, fumes, fly ash and GSR can not only be distinguished from other nanoparticles within the environment but can also be distinguished from each other because of differences in morphology, elemental composition, and internal structure. The elemental information gathered from combustion by-products during AEM analysis can also give an indication of the original source material. Other nanoparticles such as paint pigments and fillers can also be characterized by AEM using morphology, electron diffraction and elemental composition.

  3. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  4. Systematic analytical and numerical studies of highly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shan-Wen

    Strong electron correlations in condensed matter systems give rise to a wide range of striking physical properties, producing phenomena as varied as high temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator transitions and the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects. Quantum critical systems also exhibit strong correlations between a large number of degrees of freedom. In this thesis we study these complicated systems using a combination of analytical and numerical approaches. We perform systematic investigations, which adds to the robustness of our results. We develop a new method, based on the density-matrix renormalization-group (DMRG) algorithm combined with finite-size scaling analysis, to study critical behavior in quantum spin chains and extract critical exponents. Accurate results are obtained for spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic chains and the spin-1 chain at the critical point separating the Haldane and the dimerized phases. Disorder in a system can change its properties drastically. Plateau transitions in the integer quantum Hall effect provide the clearest example of quantum critical behavior in a disordered system. We provide analytical proof that the Chalker-Coddington model, which is used to describe the plateau transitions, is quantum critical. Starting from a field theory based on this model, equivalent to a non-Hermitian supersymmetric spin chain, we prove quantum criticality by a Lieb-Schultz-Mattis type theorem. This approach was motivated by numerical results obtained using the DMRG/finite-size scaling method. Our generalized LSM theorem also applies to the spin quantum Hall effect, which can appear in disordered d-wave superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry. The last part of the thesis is a renormalization-group study of two dimensional interacting electron systems. We obtain results relevant to high-temperature superconductors and also to the family of kappa - (BEDT - TTF)2X organic superconductors. At half filling, the fully nested

  5. Subsurface examination of a foliar biofilm using scanning electron- and focused-ion-beam microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dual beam scanning electron microscope, equipped with both a focused ion- and scanning electron- beam (FIB SEM) is a novel tool for the exploration of the subsurface structure of biological tissues. The FIB is capable of removing small cross sections to view the subsurface features and may be s...

  6. Analytical electron microscopy of biogenic and inorganic carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.

    1989-01-01

    In the terrestrial sedimentary environment, the mineralogically predominant carbonates are calcite-type minerals (rhombohedral carbonates) and aragonite-type minerals (orthorhombic carbonates). Most common minerals precipitating either inorganically or biogenically are high magnesium calcite and aragonite. High magnesium calcite (with magnesium carbonate substituting for more than 7 mole percent of the calcium carbonate) is stable only at temperatures greater than 700 C or thereabouts, and aragonite is stable only at pressures exceeding several kilobars of confining pressure. Therefore, these carbonates are expected to undergo chemical stabilization in the diagenetic environment to ultimately form stable calcite and dolomite. Because of the strong organic control of carbonate deposition in organisms during biomineralization, the microchemistry and microstructure of invertebrate skeletal material is much different than that present in inorganic carbonate cements. The style of preservation of microstructural features in skeletal material is therefore often quite distinctive when compared to that of inorganic carbonate even though wholesale recrystallization of the sediment has taken place. Microstructural and microchemical comparisons are made between high magnesium calcite echinoderm skeletal material and modern inorganic high magnesium calcite inorganic cements, using analytical electron microscopy and related techniques. Similar comparisons are made between analogous materials which have undergone stabilization in the diagenetic environment. Similar analysis schemes may prove useful in distinguishing between biogenic and inorganic carbonates in returned Martian carbonate samples.

  7. Investigations on CMOS photodiodes using scanning electron microscopy with electron beam induced current measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraxner, A.; Roger, F.; Loeffler, B.; Faccinelli, M.; Kirnstoetter, S.; Minixhofer, R.; Hadley, P.

    2014-09-01

    In this work the characterization of CMOS diodes with Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) measurements in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) are presented. Three-dimensional Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulations of the EBIC measurement were performed for the first time to help interpret the experimental results. The TCAD simulations provide direct access to the spatial distribution of physical quantities (like mobility, lifetime etc.) which are very difficult to obtain experimentally. For the calibration of the simulation to the experiments, special designs of vertical p-n diodes were fabricated. These structures were investigated with respect to doping concentration, beam energy, and biasing. A strong influence of the surface preparation on the measurements and the extracted diffusion lengths are shown.

  8. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  9. Unveiling nanometric plasmons optical properties with advanced electron spectroscopy in the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kociak, Mathieu

    Since the pioneering work of Yamamoto, the use of electron spectroscopy such as Cathodoluminescence (CL) and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) in a Scanning (Transmission) Electron Microscope (STEM) has considerably helped improving our understanding of the optical properties of metallic nanoparticles. The resemblance of spectroscopic signals from electron and pure optical techniques leads to the intuition that both types of techniques are very close, an idea theoretically discussed by F.J. Garcia de Abajo and coworkers. However, it is also quite intuitive that CL and EELS should be different. For example, EELS helps detecting any sort of modes while CL can only detect radiative ones. On the other hand, even between optical spectroscopy techniques, clear differences such as energy shifts or spectral shapes changes are expected in the case of plasmons. The lack of adapted instrumentation capable of performing combined EELS and CL, as well as theoretical developments allowing to account for the generic difference between EELS and CL and their optical counterparts impeached a comprehensive understanding of plasmons physics with the otherwise amazing electron spectroscopies. In this talk, I will present recent experimental results showing combined EELS and CL spectral mapping of plasmonic properties for nanoparticles with several shapes (triangles, cubes, stars...) and composition (gold, silver, aluminum...). Helped with different theoretical tools, I will try to show how these results can be related to their optical counterparts (extinction, scattering), and what type of physical insights can be gained from these combined measurements. Finally, if time allows, pointing the weaknesses of state-of-the-art CL and EELS (in terms of spectral range and/or spectral resolution), I will present EELS results obtained on highly monochromated electron beams that could cope with these limitations

  10. Evolutionary developments in x ray and electron energy loss microanalysis instrumentation for the analytical electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaluzec, Nester J.

    Developments in instrumentation for both X ray Dispersive and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (XEDS/EELS) over the last ten years have given the experimentalist a greatly enhanced set of analytical tools for characterization. Microanalysts have waited for nearly two decades now in the hope of getting a true analytical microscope and the development of 300 to 400 kV instruments should have allowed us to attain this goal. Unfortunately, this has not generally been the case. While there have been some major improvements in the techniques, there has also been some devolution in the modern AEM (Analytical Electron Microscope). In XEDS, the majority of today's instruments are still plagued by the hole count effect, which was first described in detail over fifteen years ago. The magnitude of this problem can still reach the 20 percent level for medium atomic number species in a conventional off-the-shelf intermediate voltage AEM. This is an absurd situation and the manufacturers should be severely criticized. Part of the blame, however, also rests on the AEM community for not having come up with a universally agreed upon standard test procedure. Fortunately, such a test procedure is in the early stages of refinement. The proposed test specimen consists of an evaporated Cr film approx. 500 to 1000A thick supported upon a 3mm diameter Molybdenum 200 micron aperture.

  11. Reproducible strain measurement in electronic devices by applying integer multiple to scanning grating in scanning moiré fringe imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhyun Jung, Younheum; Kim, Joong Jung; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum; Kondo, Yukihito

    2014-10-15

    Scanning moiré fringe (SMF) imaging by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the strain field in the channel of a transistor with a CoSi{sub 2} source and drain. Nanometer-scale SMFs were formed with a scanning grating size of d{sub s} at integer multiples of the Si crystal lattice spacing d{sub l} (d{sub s} ∼ nd{sub l}, n = 2, 3, 4, 5). The moiré fringe formula was modified to establish a method for quantifying strain measurement. We showed that strain fields in a transistor measured by SMF images were reproducible with an accuracy of 0.02%.

  12. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  13. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  14. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  15. The effect of beam diameter on the electron skirt in a high pressure scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Belkorissat, R; Kadoun, A; Khelifa, B; Mathieu, C

    2004-01-01

    Helium gas and air are commonly used in the high pressure scanning electron microscope (HPSEM). The presence of a gaseous environment in the specimen chamber modifies the electron beam profile. In order to fully understand the beam-gas interaction, we have investigated the beam-diameter effect for two gases (helium and air) by Monte Carlo simulation. In this calculation, we have assumed that the electron beam is Gaussian and we have explored the influence of the nature of the gas at low voltage. When the beam diameter varies between 1 and 100 nm, there is no influence on the beam profile for these two gases. The resolving power of the HPSEM is not affected by the beam-gas interaction. These theoretical results have been compared with experimental images obtained at low voltage under air and helium gases. The variation of image quality at low voltage has confirmed the interest of helium for use in a Field Emission Gun SEM (FEGSEM) in high pressure (or low vacuum) conditions. PMID:15219900

  16. Scanning image detection (SID) system for conventional transmission electron microscope (CTEM) images.

    PubMed

    Tanji, T; Tomita, M; Kobayashi, H

    1990-08-01

    A new image detection system has been developed to display transmission electron microscope (TEM) images on a CRT without a video camera system. Deflection coils placed in both the upper space of an objective lens and in the lower space of the first intermediate lens scan a small electron probe simultaneously. The electrical signal acquired through an improved scintillator and a photomultiplier is synchronized with the scanning signal and displayed in a similar fashion to a conventional scanning TEM (STEM) instrument. A preliminary system using a 100 kV conventional TEM (CTEM) equipped with a hairpin-type electron gun, produced an image with a spatial resolution of 1 nm. PMID:2391565

  17. Correcting for 3D distortion when using backscattered electron detectors in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    A variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) can produce a topographic surface relief of a physical object under examination, in addition to its two-dimensional (2D) image. This topographic surface relief is especially helpful when dealing with porous rock because it may elucidate the pore-space structure as well as grain shape and size. Whether the image accurately reproduces the physical object depends on the management of the hardware, acquisition, and postprocessing. Two problems become apparent during testing: (a) a topographic surface relief of a precision ball bearing is distorted and does not correspond to the physical dimensions of the actual sphere and (b) an image of a topographic surface relief of a Berea sandstone is geometrically tilted and topographically distorted even after standard corrections are applied. The procedure presented here is to ensure the veracity of the image, and includes: (a) adjusting the brightness and contrast levels originally provided by the manufacturer and (b) tuning the amplifiers of the backscatter detector plates to be equal to each other, and producing zero voltage when VPSEM is idle. This procedure is tested and verified on the said two physical samples. SCANNING 31: 59-64, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:19204999

  18. Electron sputtering in the analytical electron microscope: Calculations and experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N.J.; Mansfield, J.F.

    1987-03-01

    The environment of the electron microscope is particularly severe when one considers the energy deposited in a specimen during typical experimental conditions. Conventional imaging experiments tend to employ electron current densities ranging from approx.0.1 to 1 A/cm/sup 2/ while during microanalysis conditions probe current densities can range from 10 to values as high as 10/sup 5/ A/cm/sup 2/. At 100 kV this corresponds to power densities from 100 Kilowatts/cm/sup 2/ to 10/sup 4/ Megawatts/cm/sup 2/. These energy deposition rates can result in electron irradiation damage which can substantially alter the structure and composition of a specimen through either ionization damage in organics or by displacement damage in inorganics and/or combinations thereof. For the most part materials scientists operating an analytical electron microscope (AEM) in the 100 to 200 kV regime studying metallic and/or ceramic specimens have been spared the need to consider either of these effects as their specimens have tended to be sufficiently resilient. However, the advent of the new medium voltage microscopes operating in the 300 to 400 kV regime with high brightness guns and clean or ultrahigh vacuum systems has necessitated a reevaluation of the effects of higher voltage operation in light of the destructive nature of the electron beam particularly under microanalysis conditions.

  19. Automatic determination of recrystallization parameters in metals by electron backscatter pattern line scans

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Axel W.; Jensen, Dorte Juul

    2003-11-15

    In this paper, a new automatic procedure for determining critical recrystallization parameters, which are important when studying recrystallization kinetics, is presented. The method is based on electron backscatter patterns (EBSP) line scans using a scanning electron microscope, where three parallel lines are scanned. The concepts of equivalence and connectivity are used to group the data points into those originating in recrystallized grains and those originating in the deformed matrix. The computer program implementing the automatic procedure is tested in three different ways: three short scans are performed, where the calculations are also done by hand; the results of two long scans are compared to the direct observation of the microstructure seen in orientation image maps (OIMs) [Mater. Sci. Eng. A. 166 (1993) 59], and the results of scans from a series of samples are compared to statistical results obtained manually. A good correlation was achieved in all three cases.

  20. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  1. Electronic linearization of piezoelectric actuators and noise budget in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, G.; Santucci, A.; Carlà, M.; Dolci, D.; Lanzi, L.

    2006-07-01

    The maximum resolution achievable with a scanning probe microscope is limited by the probe size, by the mechanism of interaction with the sample, as is widely known, and by the electronic noise in the instrument. The evaluation of this noise for the three motion axes of a linearized high resolution scanning electrochemical microscope has been carried through and the intrinsic maximum resolution is discussed.

  2. SEM (SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY) EVIDENCE FOR A NEW SPECIES, 'GIARDIA PSITTACI' (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Giardia trophozoites were isolated from the small intestine of budgerigars (parakeets) and examined morphologically with light and scanning electron microscopy. The presence of a claw-hammer shape median body suggested classification of these trophozoites as G. duodenalis. Howeve...

  3. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Rasch, Christiane; Galic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for rapid, software-assisted alignment of fluorescence images with the corresponding scanning electron micrographs via a stochastic gold micro-pattern. Here, we provide detailed instructions for micro-pattern production and image processing, troubleshooting for critical intermediate steps, and examples of membrane ultra-structures aligned with the fluorescence signal of proteins enriched at such sites. Together, the presented method for correlative fluorescence – scanning electron microscopy is versatile, robust and easily integrated into existing workflows, permitting image alignment with accuracy comparable to existing approaches with negligible investment of time or capital. PMID:26647824

  4. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Rasch, Christiane; Galic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for rapid, software-assisted alignment of fluorescence images with the corresponding scanning electron micrographs via a stochastic gold micro-pattern. Here, we provide detailed instructions for micro-pattern production and image processing, troubleshooting for critical intermediate steps, and examples of membrane ultra-structures aligned with the fluorescence signal of proteins enriched at such sites. Together, the presented method for correlative fluorescence - scanning electron microscopy is versatile, robust and easily integrated into existing workflows, permitting image alignment with accuracy comparable to existing approaches with negligible investment of time or capital. PMID:26647824

  5. Electronically scanned multichannel pressure transducer system for cryogenic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Research into the application of custom doped piezoresistive silicon pressure sensors has led to a multichannel pressure sensor design that will operate accurately and reliably at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal effects upon multichannel pressure sensors are mapped by thermal calibrations and are represented by sets of nth order coefficients specific to each sensor. The thermal offset and sensitivity variations are corrected by computer algorithms which scan the sensors, recall correction coefficients from thermally induced sensor variations, and apply these to correct the sensor's output measurement uncertainty to within 0.5 percent of full scale output for combined offset and sensitivity. A prototype sensor system has been fabricated, and performance test data are presented.

  6. Analytical distance distributions in systems of spherical symmetry with applications to double electron-electron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Daniel R.; Hinderberger, Dariush

    2013-05-01

    Based on a simple geometrical approach, we derive analytical expression of the probability density functions (pdfs) of distance of probe molecules distributed homogeneously in spherical aggregates with shell structure. These distance distributions can be utilized in the investigation of double electron-electron resonance (DEER) data of disordered nanometer-sized spin clusters. Structural insights and geometrical parameters of the aggregates can be extracted by modeling the DEER time traces based on the analytical pdfs. This approach is efficient and avoids difficulties of the model-free solution of the inverse problem that are related to multi-spin effects, limited excitation bandwidth, bias introduced by the regularization scheme, or ambiguity resulting from broad distance distributions. The derived pdfs can serve as building blocks, from which the distance distributions in arbitrary spherically symmetric objects can be assembled. The scenario of the pumped species being chemically distinct from the observed species is covered as well as that of a single type of probe molecules. We demonstrate the merits of analytical distance distributions by studying the distribution of three different spin probes in SDS micelles. By simultaneously analyzing DEER data corresponding to different spin probe concentrations, the distribution of the spin probes over the micelle can be determined. Employing Bayesian inference it is found that for all probes studied, a spherical shell model is most appropriate among the studied models and by orders of magnitude more likely than a homogeneous distribution in a ball. This statement also applies to probes that are deemed nonpolar. We envisage that the spin probe distributions in disordered soft and hard matter systems can now be quantified using DEER spectroscopy with greater precision and reduced ambiguity.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis studies of human pineal concretions.

    PubMed

    Kodaka, T; Mori, R; Debari, K; Yamada, M

    1994-10-01

    The calcareous concretions of human pineal bodies were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The initial concretions measuring 5-7 microns in diameter may have started at the calcified pinealocytes. They grew appositionally forming concentric laminations, and then the simple calcospherulites over 20 microns occasionally aggregated with each other. Some of them became numerous spherulite-aggregated concretions. Others individually grew with scallop-shaped concentric laminations at intervals of 0.05-1 microns and became lobated calcospherulites up to 0.5 mm. The concretions over 0.5 mm were formed by their attachments. The major elements were Ca and P, while traces of S, Mg, and Na were detected. In the calcification and crystallization values, the center of the concretions over 50 microns was significantly higher than the periphery, while there were no differences among the centers and also among the peripheries. The Ca and P amounts in the center were 30.8% and 14.2% by weight and the Ca/P molar ratio was 1.68; thereby the sand-grain-shaped crystals may be nearly hydroxyapatite, as reported previously. PMID:7699308

  8. Nondestructive determination of the depth of planar p-n junctions by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, J.-Y.; Gatos, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    A method was developed for measuring nondestructively the depth of planar p-n junctions in simple devices as well as in integrated-circuit structures with the electron-beam induced current (EBIC) by scanning parallel to the junction in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results were found to be in good agreement with those obtained by the commonly used destructive method of lapping at an angle to the junction and staining to reveal the junction.

  9. Nanoscale 3D cellular imaging by axial scanning transmission electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann-Marriott, Martin F.; Sousa, Alioscka A.; Azari, Afrouz A.; Glushakova, Svetlana; Zhang, Guofeng; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Leapman, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional structural information about supramolecular assemblies and organelles in a cellular context but image degradation, caused by scattering of transmitted electrons, limits applicability in specimens thicker than 300 nm. We show that scanning transmission electron tomography of 1000 nm thick samples using axial detection provides resolution comparable to conventional electron tomography. The method is demonstrated by reconstructing a human erythrocyte infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:19718033

  10. Large area fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structure by conventional scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sudheer, Tiwari, P.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Mukharjee, C.

    2015-06-24

    Plasmonic nanoparticle grating (PNG) structure of different periods has been fabricated by electron beam lithography using silver halide based transmission electron microscope film as a substrate. Conventional scanning electron microscope is used as a fabrication tool for electron beam lithography. Optical microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) have been used for its morphological and elemental characterization. Optical characterization is performed by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopic technique.

  11. Xylem feeding by spittlebug nymphs: some observations by optical and cryo-scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Crews, L; McCully, M; Canny, M; Huang, C; Ling, L

    1998-04-01

    The feeding of spittlebug nymphs (Philaenus spumarius) from mature xylem vessels was studied by optical and cryo-analytical scanning electron microscopy. Feeding did not produce xylem embolisms and vessels remained liquid-filled during the day. Saliva secreted by the insect forms a hardened lining (salivary sheath) between the stylet bundle and the plant tissues. This sheath is continuous through the hole made by the stylets as they enter a vessel, and it extends into the vessel and along its periphery beyond the breach. The sheath is heterogeneous, with a thin outer layer adjoining the plant tissues and a thicker layer that contacts the stylet bundle. Both layers give positive histochemical reactions for proteins and, in fresh tissues, contain a red, strongly autofluorescent pigment, possibly condensed tannin derived from the plant (which is lost during tissue preparation), and other phenyl propanoid compounds, which are retained and which may produce the intense reaction of the periodic-acid-Schiff's-positive inner layer. It is concluded that the salivary sheath allows the insects to feed from functioning vessels without embolizing them or losing xylem fluid to the surrounding tissues. These findings and others in the entomological literature indicate low daytime tensions in the xylem conduits of the host plants. PMID:21684926

  12. The Effect of Fragaria vesca Extract on Smear Layer Removal: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Amin; Razavi, Sayed Alireza; Mosaddeghmehrjardi, Mohammad Hossein; Tabrizizadeh, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Successful endodontic treatment depends on elimination of the microorganisms through chemomechanical debridement. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Fragaria vesca (wild strawberry) extract (FVE) on the removal of smear layer (SL). Methods and Materials: In this analytical-observational study, 40 extracted mandibular and maxillary human teeth were selected. After canal preparation with standard step-back technique, the teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the irrigation solution: saline (negative control), 5.25% NaOCl+EDTA (positive control), FVE and FVE+EDTA. The teeth were split longitudinally so that scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs could be taken to evaluate the amount of remnant SL in coronal, middle and apical thirds. The data were analyzed statistically by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Significant differences were found among the groups (P<0.001). The use of NaOCl+EDTA was the most effective regimen for removing the SL followed by FVE+EDTA. FVE alone was significantly more effective than saline (P<0.001). Conclusion: FVE with and without EDTA could effectively remove the smear layer; however, compared to NaOCl group it was less effective. PMID:26526069

  13. Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence Analysis of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnets.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Kawai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis was performed for neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets to analyze the rare-earth elements present in the magnets. We examined the advantages of SEM-CL analysis over conventional analytical methods such as SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and SEM-wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectroscopy for elemental analysis of rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets. Luminescence spectra of chloride compounds of elements in the magnets were measured by the SEM-CL method. Chloride compounds were obtained by the dropwise addition of hydrochloric acid on the magnets followed by drying in vacuum. Neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, and dysprosium were separately detected in the NdFeB magnets, and samarium was detected in the Sm-Co magnet by the SEM-CL method. In contrast, it was difficult to distinguish terbium and dysprosium in the NdFeB magnet with a dysprosium concentration of 1.05 wt% by conventional SEM-EDX analysis. Terbium with a concentration of 0.02 wt% in an NdFeB magnet was detected by SEM-CL analysis, but not by conventional SEM-WDX analysis. SEM-CL analysis is advantageous over conventional SEM-EDX and SEM-WDX analyses for detecting trace rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets, particularly dysprosium and terbium. PMID:26739864

  14. Photoemission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum’s magnetosome chains

    SciTech Connect

    Keutner, Christoph; von Bohlen, Alex; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Schneider, Claus M.; Westphal, Carsten

    2014-10-07

    Magnetotactic bacteria are of great interdisciplinary interest, since a vast field of applications from magnetic recording media to medical nanorobots is conceivable. A key feature for a further understanding is the detailed knowledge about the magnetosome chain within the bacteria. We report on two preparation procedures suitable for UHV experiments in reflective geometry. Further, we present the results of scanning electron microscopy, as well as the first photoemission electron microscopy experiments, both accessing the magnetosomes within intact magnetotactic bacteria and compare these to scanning electron microscopy data from the literature. From the images, we can clearly identify individual magnetosomes within their chains.

  15. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  16. Some strategies for quantitative scanning Auger electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browning, R.; Peacock, D. C.; Prutton, M.

    1985-01-01

    The general applicability of power law forms of the background in electron spectra is pointed out and exploited for background removal from under Auger peaks. This form of B(E) is found to be extremely sensitive to instrumental alignment and to fault-free construction - an observation which can be used to set up analyser configurations in an accurate way. Also, differences between N(E) and B(E) can be used to derive a spectrometer transmission function T(E). The questions of information density in an energy-analysing spatially-resolving instrument are addressed after reliable instrumental characterization has been established. Strategies involving ratio histograms, showing the population distribution of the ratio of a pair of Auger peak heights, composition scatter diagrams and windowed imaging are discussed and illustrated.

  17. Electron detection characteristics of a slow-scan CCD camera, imaging plates and film, and electron image restoration.

    PubMed

    Zuo, J M

    2000-05-01

    Electron detection characteristics are summarized for the slow scan CCD (SSC) camera, imaging plates, and film. The advantage of each detector is demonstrated with the selected examples of electron diffraction and imaging. The Richardson-Lucy algorithm for image restoration is described and tested for images recorded with the SSC camera. The effectiveness of image restoration is demonstrated for the recorded high-resolution lattice image, energy-loss spectrum, and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) pattern. PMID:10816266

  18. Imaging interactions of metal oxide nanoparticles with macrophage cells by ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques†

    PubMed Central

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Starr, Clarise R.; Armstrong, Linda S.; Ponce, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Use of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles in a plethora of biological applications and custom products has warned about some possible dose-dependent cytotoxic effects. Macrophages are key components of the innate immune system used to study possible toxic effects and internalization of different nanoparticulate materials. In this work, ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to offer new insights into the dynamical processes of interaction of nanomaterials with macrophage cells dosed with different concentrations of metal oxide nanoparticles (CeO2, TiO2 and ZnO). The versatility of FE-SEM has allowed obtaining a detailed characterization of processes of adsorption and endocytosis of nanoparticles, by using advanced analytical and imaging techniques on complete unstained uncoated cells, including secondary electron imaging, high-sensitive backscattered electron imaging, X-ray microanalysis and stereoimaging. Low voltage BF/DF-STEM confirmed nanoparticle adsorption and internalization into endosomes of CeO2 and TiO2, whereas ZnO develop apoptosis after 24 h of interaction caused by dissolution and invasion of cell nucleus. Ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques provided new insights into interactions of inorganic nanoparticles with macrophage cells with high spatial resolution. PMID:23023106

  19. Structural examination of lithium niobate ferroelectric crystals by combining scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, P. V.; Ped'ko, B. B.; Kuznecova, Yu. V.

    2016-02-01

    The structure of lithium niobate single crystals is studied by a complex technique that combines scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. By implementing the piezoresponse force method on an atomic force microscope, the domain structure of lithium niobate crystals, which was not revealed without electron beam irradiation, is visualized

  20. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of High Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Software and hardware updates to further extend the capability of the electron microscope were carried out. A range of materials such as intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, ceramic-matrix composites, ceramics and intermetallic compounds, based on refractory elements were examined under this research. Crystal structure, size, shape and volume fraction distribution of various phases which constitute the microstructures were examined. Deformed materials were studied to understand the effect of interfacial microstructure on the deformation and fracture behavior of these materials. Specimens tested for a range of mechanical property requirements, such as stress rupture, creep, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue, etc. were examined. Microstructural and microchemical stability of these materials exposed to simulated operating environments were investigated. The EOIM Shuttle post-flight samples were also examined to understand the influence of low gravity processing on microstructure. In addition, fractographic analyses of Nb-Zr-W, titanium aluminide, molybdenum silicide and silicon carbide samples were carried out. Extensive characterization of sapphire fibers in the fiber-reinforced composites made by powder cloth processing was made. Finally, pressure infiltration casting of metal-matrix composites was carried out.

  1. The material dependence of temperature measurement resolution in thermal scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiaowei; Hull, Robert

    2013-03-18

    Thermal scanning electron microscopy is a recently developed temperature mapping technique based on thermal diffuse scattering in electron backscatter diffraction in a scanning electron microscope. It provides nano-scale and non-contact temperature mapping capabilities. Due to the specific temperature sensitive mechanism inherent to this technique, the temperature resolution is highly material dependent. A thorough investigation of what material properties affect the temperature resolution is important for realizing the inherent temperature resolution limit for each material. In this paper, three material dependent parameters-the Debye-Waller B-factor temperature sensitivity, backscatter yield, and lattice constant-are shown to control the temperature resolution.

  2. New methods for cathodoluminescence in the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Boyde, A; Reid, S A

    1983-01-01

    Experiments using the CL imaging mode to recognise osteoid in the polished, cut surfaces of bone biopsies embedded in PMMA led to the development of a number of new methods for contrast formation in CL images in the SEM. These involve: (1) enhancing or (2) reducing the CL signal by staining the specimen, (3) utilising the cathodoluminescence of glass microscope slides to produce images of histological sections mounted on glass so that features in the section which scatter the electron beam appear dark against a light background, and (4) enhancing the CL signal from PMMA so that features which are less penetrated by the scintillator show up dark against a bright background. Efforts to increase the efficiency of light collection resulted in the development of a new means for manufacturing reflector-cum-light guide CL detectors by wrapping aluminum foil around a wooden former. These detectors enshroud the specimen so that CL light can only escape to the photomultiplier window (or back up the final lens). A variety of such designs have proved more efficient than the conventional plastic light guides used as CL detectors. By enlarging the beam entry aperture, other SE and BSE detectors can be used simultaneously. Examples of the value of the CL mode in mineralised tissue research include the use of enhanced CL plastic embedding media to detect marrow space and of enhanced osteoid CL to detect unmineralised bone matrix; the use of tetracycline as a growth marker in pathological studies of bone and experimental studies with bone, dentine and enamel; the use of bisbenzamid to locate and count nuclei in osteoclasts, the hard tissue resorbtive cells; and the use of superficial stain absorption of auto-CL to locate stained material on tooth surfaces, with the view to monitor the efficiency of periodontal therapy. PMID:6669948

  3. Customized patterned substrates for highly versatile correlative light-scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Lorena; Sogne, Elisa; Rodighiero, Simona; Marchesi, Davide; Milani, Paolo; Francolini, Maura

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) combines the advantages of light and electron microscopy, thus making it possible to follow dynamic events in living cells at nanometre resolution. Various CLEM approaches and devices have been developed, each of which has its own advantages and technical challenges. We here describe our customized patterned glass substrates, which improve the feasibility of correlative fluorescence/confocal and scanning electron microscopy. PMID:25391455

  4. Customized patterned substrates for highly versatile correlative light-scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Lorena; Sogne, Elisa; Rodighiero, Simona; Marchesi, Davide; Milani, Paolo; Francolini, Maura

    2014-11-01

    Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) combines the advantages of light and electron microscopy, thus making it possible to follow dynamic events in living cells at nanometre resolution. Various CLEM approaches and devices have been developed, each of which has its own advantages and technical challenges. We here describe our customized patterned glass substrates, which improve the feasibility of correlative fluorescence/confocal and scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Jonghwan; Pua, Rizza; Cho, Seungryong; Kim, Insoo; Han, Bumsoo

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: A beam-blocker composed of multiple strips is a useful gadget for scatter correction and/or for dose reduction in cone-beam CT (CBCT). However, the use of such a beam-blocker would yield cone-beam data that can be challenging for accurate image reconstruction from a single scan in the filtered-backprojection framework. The focus of the work was to develop an analytic image reconstruction method for CBCT that can be directly applied to partially blocked cone-beam data in conjunction with the scatter correction. Methods: The authors developed a rebinned backprojection-filteration (BPF) algorithm for reconstructing images from the partially blocked cone-beam data in a circular scan. The authors also proposed a beam-blocking geometry considering data redundancy such that an efficient scatter estimate can be acquired and sufficient data for BPF image reconstruction can be secured at the same time from a single scan without using any blocker motion. Additionally, scatter correction method and noise reduction scheme have been developed. The authors have performed both simulation and experimental studies to validate the rebinned BPF algorithm for image reconstruction from partially blocked cone-beam data. Quantitative evaluations of the reconstructed image quality were performed in the experimental studies. Results: The simulation study revealed that the developed reconstruction algorithm successfully reconstructs the images from the partial cone-beam data. In the experimental study, the proposed method effectively corrected for the scatter in each projection and reconstructed scatter-corrected images from a single scan. Reduction of cupping artifacts and an enhancement of the image contrast have been demonstrated. The image contrast has increased by a factor of about 2, and the image accuracy in terms of root-mean-square-error with respect to the fan-beam CT image has increased by more than 30%. Conclusions: The authors have successfully demonstrated that the

  6. Monte Carlo modelling of the low-loss electron signal in scanning electron microscopy and comparison with the BSE signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonet, C.; El-Gomati, M. M.; Matthew, J. A. D.; Tear, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Nanotechnology places increasing demands on techniques for sample characterisation on the sub-100 nm length scale, and the low-loss electron (LLE) signal may provide one possible way of addressing this need. Simulations of the LLE signal from a line-scan across a semiconductor superlattice structure have been performed using two different Monte Carlo models in order to assess their effectiveness in predicting spatial resolution for compositional imaging. Additionally, experimental measurements of LLE data using a detector added to a scanning electron microscope were made to investigate compositional contrast.

  7. Analytic procedures for determining dimensional redundancies in electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herskowitz, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    Methods for ascertaining dimensional redundancies in mathematical functions related to electronic phenomena and for removal of redundancies are presented. Two computer programs, one to determine a complete B-matrix and the other to optimize the matrix, are discussed. Three subroutines are analyzed.

  8. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues in LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed optical scanning of tray clamps is being conducted in the Facility for the Optical Inspection of Large Surfaces at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns in diameter. Residues from selected impacts are then being characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis at CNES. Results from this analysis will be the initial step to classifying projectile residues into specific sources.

  9. Imaging of Nitroxides at 250 MHz using Rapid-Scan Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Joshua R.; Tseitlin, Mark; Quine, Richard W.; Rinard, George A.; Weismiller, Hilary A.; Elajaili, Hanan; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2014-01-01

    Projections for 2D spectral-spatial images were obtained by continuous wave and rapid-scan electron paramagnetic resonance using a bimodal cross-loop resonator at 251 MHz. The phantom consisted of three 4 mm tubes containing different 15N,2H-substituted nitroxides. Rapid-scan and continuous wave images were obtained with 5 min total acquisition times. For comparison, images also were obtained with 29 s acquisition time for rapid scan and 15 min for continuous wave. Relative to continuous wave projections obtained for the same data acquisition time, rapid-scan projections had significantly less low-frequency noise and substantially higher signal-to-noise at higher gradients. Because of the improved image quality for the same data acquisition time, linewidths could be determined more accurately from the rapid-scan images than from the continuous wave images. PMID:24650729

  10. Probing electron transport and structural properties of nanostructures on Si with a quadraprobe scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Wendelken, J F; Li, An-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The electron transport and structural properties of nanostructured materials have been examined with a newly developed low temperature quadraprobe scanning tunneling microscope (STM) system. The quadraprobe STM system, as a "nano" version of a four-probe station provides an integrated research platform with a low temperature four-probe STM, a molecular-beam epitaxy growth chamber, a high resolution scanning electron microscope, and a scanning Auger microscope. The four STM probes can be driven independently with sub-nanometer precision, enabling conventional STM imaging and four-point electrical transport study of surface electronic systems and nanostructured materials at temperatures down to 10 K. Self-assembled nanostructures grown on Si by doping with metal atoms (Au, Gd, Ag) have been fabricated and characterized in situ.

  11. Volumetric LiDAR scanning of a wind turbine wake and comparison with a 3D analytical wake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    A correct estimation of the future power production is of capital importance whenever the feasibility of a future wind farm is being studied. This power estimation relies mostly on three aspects: (1) a reliable measurement of the wind resource in the area, (2) a well-established power curve of the future wind turbines and, (3) an accurate characterization of the wake effects; the latter being arguably the most challenging one due to the complexity of the phenomenon and the lack of extensive full-scale data sets that could be used to validate analytical or numerical models. The current project addresses the problem of obtaining a volumetric description of a full-scale wake of a 2MW wind turbine in terms of velocity deficit and turbulence intensity using three scanning wind LiDARs and two sonic anemometers. The characterization of the upstream flow conditions is done by one scanning LiDAR and two sonic anemometers, which have been used to calculate incoming vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, wind direction and an approximation to turbulence intensity, as well as the thermal stability of the atmospheric boundary layer. The characterization of the wake is done by two scanning LiDARs working simultaneously and pointing downstream from the base of the wind turbine. The direct LiDAR measurements in terms of radial wind speed can be corrected using the upstream conditions in order to provide good estimations of the horizontal wind speed at any point downstream of the wind turbine. All this data combined allow for the volumetric reconstruction of the wake in terms of velocity deficit as well as turbulence intensity. Finally, the predictions of a 3D analytical model [1] are compared to the 3D LiDAR measurements of the wind turbine. The model is derived by applying the laws of conservation of mass and momentum and assuming a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake. This model has already been validated using high resolution wind-tunnel measurements

  12. Three-dimensional imaging of carbon nanostructures by scanning confocal electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Ayako; Shimojo, Masayuki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2009-10-01

    Although scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) shows a promise for optical depth sectioning with high resolution, practical and theoretical problems have prevented its application to three-dimensional (3D) imaging. We employed a stage-scanning system in which only the specimen is moved three dimensionally under a fixed lens configuration, and an annular dark-field (ADF) aperture which blocks direct beams and selects only the scattered electrons. This ADF-SCEM improved depth resolution sufficiently to perform optical depth sectioning. Finally, we succeeded in demonstrating the 3D reconstruction of carbon nanocoils using ADF-SCEM.

  13. Analytical transmission electron microscopy in the third dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudfeld, Daniela; Lourie, Oleg; Kujawa, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    For researchers in metallurgy, energy storage or functional nanomaterials, where elemental distribution is crucial to performance, full characterization is more difficult by decreasing feature sizes and increasingly complex architectures. Two-dimensional imaging and analytical techniques often cannot characterize nanostructures completely. A new three-dimensional (3D) tomography technique for STEM XEDS, namely ChemiSTEMTM Technology [1], reveals the true microstructure of materials offering high X-ray collection efficiency via its windowless detector design, and fast XEDS mapping with tilt response at all angles. ChemiSTEM features the X-FEG and Super X, containing four symmetric detectors for 3D chemical imaging at 0 degree tilt, with significant EDX signal collected under all tilt conditions. The EDS signal of STEM XEDS image tilt series can be processed like normal z-contrast images, because of the monotonic relationship between the EDS signal and the thickness of the TEM foil. Four symmetrically arranged silicon drift detectors (SDD) provide extreme high output count rates (300 kcps) required for acquisition of EDX maps of thick samples, especially on 3 mm disk samples for 3D tomography studies. Examples of 3D chemical mapping using XEDS are given on (InGa)N Nanopyramid LEDs, Ni based super alloy material for turbine blades, dielectric transistor, and catalytic particles. In lithium ion batteries, the elemental segregation of manganese and nickel, which is responsible for the aging of electrode materials made from lithium-nickel-manganese oxide layered nanoparticles was analyzed in 3D XEDS mapping [2].

  14. Morphology and deflection properties of bat wing sensory hairs: scanning electron microscopy, laser scanning vibrometry, and mechanics model.

    PubMed

    Sterbing-D'Angelo, S J; Liu, H; Yu, M; Moss, C F

    2016-01-01

    Bat wings are highly adaptive airfoils that enable demanding flight maneuvers, which are performed with astonishing robustness under turbulent conditions, and stability at slow flight velocities. The bat wing is sparsely covered with microscopically small, sensory hairs that are associated with tactile receptors. In a previous study we demonstrated that bat wing hairs are involved in sensing airflow for improved flight maneuverability. Here, we report physical measurements of these hairs and their distribution on the wing surface of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, based on scanning electron microscopy analyses. The wing hairs are strongly tapered, and are found on both the dorsal and ventral wing surfaces. Laser scanning vibrometry tests of 43 hairs from twelve locations across the wing of the big brown bat revealed that their natural frequencies inversely correlate with length and range from 3.7 to 84.5 kHz. Young's modulus of the average wing hair was calculated at 4.4 GPa, which is comparable with rat whiskers or arthropod airflow-sensing hairs. PMID:27545727

  15. Scanning Transmission X-Ray, Laser Scanning, and Transmission Electron Microscopy Mapping of the Exopolymeric Matrix of Microbial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J. R.; Swerhone, G. D. W.; Leppard, G. G.; Araki, T.; Zhang, X.; West, M. M.; Hitchcock, A. P.

    2003-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) were used to map the distribution of macromolecular subcomponents (e.g., polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) of biofilm cells and matrix. The biofilms were developed from river water supplemented with methanol, and although they comprised a complex microbial community, the biofilms were dominated by heterotrophic bacteria. TEM provided the highest-resolution structural imaging, CLSM provided detailed compositional information when used in conjunction with molecular probes, and STXM provided compositional mapping of macromolecule distributions without the addition of probes. By examining exactly the same region of a sample with combinations of these techniques (STXM with CLSM and STXM with TEM), we demonstrate that this combination of multimicroscopy analysis can be used to create a detailed correlative map of biofilm structure and composition. We are using these correlative techniques to improve our understanding of the biochemical basis for biofilm organization and to assist studies intended to investigate and optimize biofilms for environmental remediation applications. PMID:12957944

  16. Watching Domains Grow: In-situ studies of polarization switching by combined Scanning Probe and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hye Jung; Kalinin, Sergei V; Yang, S.Y; Yu, P; Bhattacharya, S.; Wu, P; Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Chen, Long-Qing; Ramesh, R.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Borisevich, Albina Y

    2011-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain nucleation and growth in multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} films is observed directly by applying a local electric field with a conductive tip inside a scanning transmission electron microscope. The nucleation and growth of a ferroelastic domain and its interaction with pre-existing 71{sup o} domain walls are observed and compared with the results of phase-field modeling. In particular, a preferential nucleation site and direction-dependent pinning of domain walls are observed due to slow kinetics of metastable switching in the sample without a bottom electrode. These in situ spatially resolved observations of a first-order bias-induced phase transition reveal the mesoscopic mechanisms underpinning functionality of a wide range of multiferroic materials.

  17. Semi-empirical model for the generation of dose distributions produced by a scanning electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, R.; Gignac, C.E.; Agostinelli, A.G.; Rothberg, S.; Schulz, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    There are linear accelerators (Sagittaire and Saturne accelerators produced by Compagnie Generale de Radiologie (CGR/MeV) Corporation) which produce broad, flat electron fields by magnetically scanning the relatively narrow electron beam as it emerges from the accelerator vacuum system. A semi-empirical model, which mimics the scanning action of this type of accelerator, was developed for the generation of dose distributions in homogeneous media. The model employs the dose distributions of the scanning electron beams. These were measured with photographic film in a polystyrene phantom by turning off the magnetic scanning system. The mean deviation calculated from measured dose distributions is about 0.2%; a few points have deviations as large as 2 to 4% inside of the 50% isodose curve, but less than 8% outside of the 50% isodose curve. The model has been used to generate the electron beam library required by a modified version of a commercially-available computerized treatment-planning system. (The RAD-8 treatment planning system was purchased from the Digital Equipment Corporation. It is currently available from Electronic Music Industries (EMI), Ltd.)

  18. Feynman Path Integral Approach to Electron Diffraction for One and Two Slits: Analytical Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beau, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an analytic solution of the famous problem of diffraction and interference of electrons through one and two slits (for simplicity, only the one-dimensional case is considered). In addition to exact formulae, various approximations of the electron distribution are shown which facilitate the interpretation of the results.…

  19. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Xu, Chunkai; Zhang, Panke; Li, Zhean; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam. PMID:27587179

  20. Scanning precession electron tomography for three-dimensional nanoscale orientation imaging and crystallographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Eggeman, Alexander S; Krakow, Robert; Midgley, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from electron tomography provide important morphological, compositional, optical and electro-magnetic information across a wide range of materials and devices. Precession electron diffraction, in combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy, can be used to elucidate the local orientation of crystalline materials. Here we show, using the example of a Ni-base superalloy, that combining these techniques and extending them to three dimensions, to produce scanning precession electron tomography, enables the 3D orientation of nanoscale sub-volumes to be determined and provides a one-to-one correspondence between 3D real space and 3D reciprocal space for almost any polycrystalline or multi-phase material. PMID:26028514

  1. Scanning precession electron tomography for three-dimensional nanoscale orientation imaging and crystallographic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eggeman, Alexander S.; Krakow, Robert; Midgley, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from electron tomography provide important morphological, compositional, optical and electro-magnetic information across a wide range of materials and devices. Precession electron diffraction, in combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy, can be used to elucidate the local orientation of crystalline materials. Here we show, using the example of a Ni-base superalloy, that combining these techniques and extending them to three dimensions, to produce scanning precession electron tomography, enables the 3D orientation of nanoscale sub-volumes to be determined and provides a one-to-one correspondence between 3D real space and 3D reciprocal space for almost any polycrystalline or multi-phase material. PMID:26028514

  2. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Xu, Chunkai; Zhang, Panke; Li, Zhean; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam.

  3. X-Ray Microanalysis in the Variable Pressure (Environmental) Scanning Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Newbury, Dale E.

    2002-01-01

    Electron-excited x-ray microanalysis performed in the variable pressure and environmental scanning electron microscopes is subject to additional artifacts beyond those encountered in the conventional scanning electron microscope. Gas scattering leads to direct contributions to the spectrum from the environmental gas, as well as remote generation of x rays by electrons scattered out of the focussed beam. The analyst can exert some degree of control over these artifacts, but depending on the exact situation, spurious elements can appear at the trace (< 0.01 mass fraction), minor (0.01 mass fraction to 0.1 mass fraction), or even major (> 0.1 mass fraction) levels. Dispersed particle samples give the least compromised results, while fine scale microstructures are the most severely compromised. Procedures to optimize the situation based upon specimen preparation as well as spectral processing are described. PMID:27446754

  4. Micro-column Scanning Electron Microscope and X-ray Spectrometer (MSEMS) for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaya, B.; Niemann, D.; Makarewicz, J.; Clevenson, H.; McKenzie, C.; Nguyen, C.; Blake, D. F.

    2009-12-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy combined with electron-induced X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) is one of the most powerful techniques for characterizing sub-µm surface morphology and composition. In terrestrial laboratories, SEM-EDX is used to elucidate natural processes such as low-temperature diagenesis, thermal or pressure induced metamorphism, volcanism/magmatism, atmosphere/crust interaction and biological activity. Such information would be highly useful for investigating the natural history of the terrestrial planets, satellites and primitive bodies, providing morphological and elemental information that is 2 orders of magnitude higher in resolution than optical techniques. Below we describe the development of a Micro-column Scanning Electron Microscope and X-ray Spectrometer (MSEMS) for flight. The enabling technology of the MSEMS is a carbon nanotube field emission (CNTFE) electron source that is integrated with micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) - based electron gun and electron optical structures. A hallmark of CNTFE electron sources is their low chromatic aberration, which reduces the need for high accelerating voltages to obtain small spot size. The CNTFE also offers exceptional brightness and nanometer source size, eliminating the need for condenser lenses, making simple electrostatic focusing optics possible. Moreover, the CNT field emission gun (CFEG) at low operating voltage dissipates 103 less power than thermally-assisted Schottky emitters. A key feature of the MSEMS design is the lack of scanning coils. Rather, a piezoelectric sample stage capable of sub-nanometer resolution scans the sample past the fixed crossover of the MSEMS electron beam. We will describe a MEMS-based templating technique for fabricating mechanically and electrically stable miniature CFEGs. Using existing silicon (Si) technology, we fabricated highly controlled and precise MEMS structures for both the CNT cathode and focusing optics for the micro-column. The

  5. The scanning electron microscope in microbiology and diagnosis of infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Golding, Christine G; Lamboo, Lindsey L; Beniac, Daniel R; Booth, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Despite being an excellent tool for investigating ultrastructure, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is less frequently used than transmission electron microscopy for microbes such as viruses or bacteria. Here we describe rapid methods that allow SEM imaging of fully hydrated, unfixed microbes without using conventional sample preparation methods. We demonstrate improved ultrastructural preservation, with greatly reduced dehydration and shrinkage, for specimens including bacteria and viruses such as Ebola virus using infiltration with ionic liquid on conducting filter substrates for SEM. PMID:27212232

  6. The scanning electron microscope in microbiology and diagnosis of infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Christine G.; Lamboo, Lindsey L.; Beniac, Daniel R.; Booth, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being an excellent tool for investigating ultrastructure, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is less frequently used than transmission electron microscopy for microbes such as viruses or bacteria. Here we describe rapid methods that allow SEM imaging of fully hydrated, unfixed microbes without using conventional sample preparation methods. We demonstrate improved ultrastructural preservation, with greatly reduced dehydration and shrinkage, for specimens including bacteria and viruses such as Ebola virus using infiltration with ionic liquid on conducting filter substrates for SEM. PMID:27212232

  7. Probing core-electron orbitals by scanning transmission electron microscopy and measuring the delocalization of core-level excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Odlyzko, Michael L.; Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat; Mkhoyan, K. Andre

    2016-04-01

    By recording low-noise energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy maps from crystalline specimens using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is possible to probe core-level electron orbitals in real space. Both the 1 s and 2 p orbitals of Sr and Ti atoms in SrTi O3 are probed, and their projected excitation potentials are determined. This paper also demonstrates experimental measurement of the electronic excitation impact parameter and the delocalization of an excitation due to Coulombic beam-orbital interaction.

  8. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams. PMID:26750260

  9. Evaluation of gas chromatography - electron ionization - full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Mol, Hans G J; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50-500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg(-1)) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5-250 μg kg(-1). The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive alternative to GC

  10. Scanning electron microscope image enhancement using spread spectrum through dither signal imposition.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang Oh; Joo, Wonjong; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2011-12-01

    Noise is a primary issue in obtaining an image in a scanning microscope. This noise needs to be minimized in order to have a clear image of the sample in case of a nanosize level measurement. In this work, we propose a method to improve the image quality by applying dither signal injection to the scanning signal. This method involves minimizing the noise that occurs in scan control circuits, which results in a blurry or distorted image. The collected secondary electrons are first multiplied through a photomultiplier tube and are then converted into digital form using an analog/digital (A/D) converter. We propose a solution for the noise from the scan control circuit that appears on the image by adopting the spread spectrum method. PMID:21990426

  11. Development of a fast electromagnetic beam blanker for compressed sensing in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béché, A.; Goris, B.; Freitag, B.; Verbeeck, J.

    2016-02-01

    The concept of compressed sensing was recently proposed to significantly reduce the electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) while still maintaining the main features in the image. Here, an experimental setup based on an electromagnetic beam blanker placed in the condenser plane of a STEM is proposed. The beam blanker deflects the beam with a random pattern, while the scanning coils are moving the beam in the usual scan pattern. Experimental images at both the medium scale and high resolution are acquired and reconstructed based on a discrete cosine algorithm. The obtained results confirm that compressed sensing is highly attractive to limit beam damage in experimental STEM even though some remaining artifacts need to be resolved.

  12. Focusing on Environmental Biofilms With Variable-Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubert, L.; Wolfaardt, G. M.; Du Plessis, K.

    2006-12-01

    Since the term biofilm has been coined almost 30 years ago, visualization has formed an integral part of investigations on microbial attachment. Electron microscopic (EM) biofilm studies, however, have been limited by the hydrated extracellular matrix which loses structural integrity with conventional preparative techniques, and under required high-vacuum conditions, resulting in a loss of information on spatial relationships and distribution of biofilm microbes. Recent advances in EM technology enable the application of Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy (VP SEM) to biofilms, allowing low vacuum and hydrated chamber atmosphere during visualization. Environmental biofilm samples can be viewed in situ, unfixed and fully hydrated, with application of gold-sputter-coating only, to increase image resolution. As the impact of microbial biofilms can be both hazardous and beneficial to man and his environment, recognition of biofilms as a natural form of microbial existence is needed to fully assess the potential role of microbial communities on technology. The integration of multiple techniques to elucidate biofilm processes has become imperative for unraveling complex phenotypic adaptations of this microbial lifestyle. We applied VP SEM as integrative technique with traditional and novel analytical techniques to (1)localize lignocellulosic microbial consortia applied for producing alternative bio-energy sources in the mining wastewater industry, (2) characterize and visualize wetland microbial communities in the treatment of winery wastewater, and (3)determine the impact of recombinant technology on yeast biofilm behavior. Visualization of microbial attachment to a lignocellulose substrate, and degradation of exposed plant tissue, gave insight into fiber degradation and volatile fatty acid production for biological sulphate removal from mining wastewater. Also, the 3D-architecture of complex biofilms developing in constructed wetlands was correlated with

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of dentition: methodology and ultrastructural morphology of tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Shkurkin, G V; Almquist, A J; Pfeihofer, A A; Stoddard, E L

    1975-01-01

    Scanning electron micrographs were taken of sets of human molars-those of paleo-Indians used in mastication of, ostensibly, a highly abrasive diet, and those of contemporary Americans. Different ultrastructural patterns of enamel wear were observed between the groups. PMID:1090642

  14. Study of the grasping spines and teeth of 6 chaetognath species observed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moreno, I

    1979-01-01

    The grasping spines and teeth of 6 species of Chaetognatha have been studied with the scanning electron microscope, describing in the grasping spines: curvature, surface, ridge and insertion and in the teeth, its characters and their arrangement on the head. PMID:507374

  15. Scanning electron microscope view of iron crystal growing on pyroxene crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope photograph of a four-micron size iron crystal growing on a pyroxene crystal (calcium-magnesium-iron silicate) from the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennino lunar landing site. The well developed crystal faces indicate that the crystal was formed from a hot vapor as the rock was cooling.

  16. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory


    Recent interest in monitoring and speciation of particulate matter has led to increased application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) to individual particle analysis. SEM/EDX provides information on the size, shape, co...

  17. Electronic properties of graphene: a perspective from scanning tunneling microscopy and magnetotransport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, Eva Y.; Li, Guohong; Du, Xu

    2012-05-01

    This review covers recent experimental progress in probing the electronic properties of graphene and how they are influenced by various substrates, by the presence of a magnetic field and by the proximity to a superconductor. The focus is on results obtained using scanning tunneling microscopy, spectroscopy, transport and magnetotransport techniques.

  18. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY/X-RAY FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF POST-ABATEMENT DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laboratory X-ray fluorescence (XRF) were used to characterize post-abatement dust collected with a HEPA filtered vacuum. hree size fractions of resuspended dust (0-30 pm, 2.5-15 pm, and <2.5 pm) were collected on teflon filters and analyzed ...

  19. Practical application of HgI2 detectors to a space-flight scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.; Albee, A. L.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Mercuric iodide X-ray detectors have been undergoing tests in a prototype scanning electron microscope system being developed for unmanned space flight. The detector program addresses the issues of geometric configuration in the SEM, compact packaging that includes separate thermoelectric coolers for the detector and FET, X-ray transparent hermetic encapsulation and electrical contacts, and a clean vacuum environment.

  20. Evaluation of Fan-Pattern Spray Nozzle Wear Using Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Worn nozzles on spray equipment severely affect efficiency of crop management system while causing unnecessary pesticide contamination of non-target areas. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis that have been used to directly measure pesticide deposition, was used to observe both wor...

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of the nail plate in onychomycosis patients with negative fungal culture.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xueping; Li, Qing; Wang, Hongwei; Sun, Yilin; Wang, Aiping; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Cuiping

    2016-03-01

    Onychomycosis is a common dermatological problem and can be identified by direct microscopic examination and fungal culture. However, the positive rate of fungal culture is low. This study investigated the application of scanning electron microscopy in the diagnosis of onychomycosis in 20 patients with negative fungal culture. In this study, a routine glutaraldehyde fixation method was used to prepare specimens for electron microscope examination. Results showed that under the scanning electron microscope, significant structural damage was observed in the nail plate in all patients. Hyphaes were seen in 70% of cases. A mixture of scattered hyphaes, pseudohyphaes, and spores was observed in 30% of cases. A mixture of spores and bacteria was observed in 10% of cases. A mixture of hyphaes and bacteria was observed in 20% of cases. The typical hyphae pierced a thin layer or single layer of corneocytes. Hyphaes could be smooth, sleek, and straight with visible separation, or dry, bent, and folded with a smooth surface. The diameter of hyphaes was 1-2 µm. The scattered spores were the main form of spore growth, and the growth of budding spores can be seen attached to the surface of layered armor. Most of the bacteria were gathered in clumps on the ventral surface, especially in grooves. In conclusion, scanning electron microscopy can be used to preliminarily identify the pathogen involved and the degree of damage in cases where onychomycosis is clinically diagnosed, but fungal culture is negative. SCANNING 38:172-176, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26291603

  2. A new method of magnifying photographic images using the scanning electron microscope in the backscattered electron detection mode

    SciTech Connect

    Frasca, P.; Galkin, B.; Feig, S.; Muir, H.; Soriano, R.; Kaufman, H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a new method of magnifying small images in photographic film by means of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) operated in the backscattered electron detection mode. The study included tests of several types of radiographic film, transmission electron microscopy film, and black and white 35 mm film. The electron optical enlargement method is particularly useful in situations where the film sample is opaque to light and for generating enlarged images at magnifications beyond the reach of light optical enlargement methods, i.e. up to approximately 2000X with ease and rapidity in a single step. The electron optical enlargements compare favorably in contrast and detail with the enlargements made with a light microscope and with a darkroom enlarger.

  3. Analytical Electron Microscopy for Characterization of Fluid or Semi-Solid Multiphase Systems Containing Nanoparticulate Material

    PubMed Central

    Klang, Victoria; Valenta, Claudia; Matsko, Nadejda B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of nanomaterials in pharmaceutical or cosmetic preparations is an important aspect both in formulation development and quality control of marketed products. Despite the increased popularity of nanoparticulate compounds especially in dermal preparations such as emulsions, methods and protocols of analysis for the characterization of such systems are scarce. This work combines an original sample preparation procedure along with different methods of analytical electron microscopy for the comprehensive analysis of fluid or semi-solid dermal preparations containing nanoparticulate material. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and high resolution imaging were performed on model emulsions and a marketed product to reveal different structural aspects of both the emulsion bulk phase and incorporated nanosized material. An innovative analytical approach for the determination of the physical stability of the emulsion under investigation is presented. Advantages and limitations of the employed analytical imaging techniques are highlighted. PMID:24300401

  4. Field emission characteristics of a graphite nanoneedle cathode and its application to scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Neo, Yoichiro; Mimura, Hidenori; Matsumoto, Takahiro

    2006-02-13

    A high-brightness electron beam of more than 10{sup 11} A sr{sup -1} m{sup -2} was achieved from a graphite nanoneedle cathode, which was fabricated by simple hydrogen plasma etching of a graphite rod. A field emission was obtained at a high residual pressure of 10{sup -6} Torr. The performance of this cold cathode was demonstrated by the fabrication of a scanning electron microscope, which was operated at a high residual pressure of 10{sup -5}-10{sup -6} Torr. The brightness of this cathode offers a convenient field electron emission source that does not require a massive ultrahigh vacuum system.

  5. Correlative In Vivo 2 Photon and Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Maco, Bohumil; Holtmaat, Anthony; Cantoni, Marco; Kreshuk, Anna; Straehle, Christoph N.; Hamprecht, Fred A.; Knott, Graham W.

    2013-01-01

    Correlating in vivo imaging of neurons and their synaptic connections with electron microscopy combines dynamic and ultrastructural information. Here we describe a semi-automated technique whereby volumes of brain tissue containing axons and dendrites, previously studied in vivo, are subsequently imaged in three dimensions with focused ion beam scanning electron microcopy. These neurites are then identified and reconstructed automatically from the image series using the latest segmentation algorithms. The fast and reliable imaging and reconstruction technique avoids any specific labeling to identify the features of interest in the electron microscope, and optimises their preservation and staining for 3D analysis. PMID:23468982

  6. Atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy through 50-nm-thick silicon nitride membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandra, Ranjan; Jonge, Niels de; Demers, Hendrix

    2011-02-28

    Silicon nitride membranes can be used for windows of environmental chambers for in situ electron microscopy. We report that aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) achieved atomic resolution on gold nanoparticles placed on both sides of a 50-nm-thick silicon nitride membrane at 200 keV electron beam energy. Spatial frequencies of 1/1.2 A were visible for a beam semi-angle of 26.5 mrad. Imaging though a 100-nm-thick membrane was also tested. The achieved imaging contrast was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of the STEM imaging of a sample of with a representative geometry and composition.

  7. Surface sensitivity in scanning transmission x-ray microspectroscopy using secondary electron detection.

    PubMed

    Hub, C; Wenzel, S; Raabe, J; Ade, H; Fink, R H

    2010-03-01

    The successful integration of electron detection into an existing scanning transmission x-ray microspectroscope (STXM) at the Swiss Light Source is demonstrated. In conventional x-ray detection using a photomultiplier, STXM offers mainly bulk sensitivity combined with high lateral resolution. However, by implementation of a channeltron electron multiplier, the surface sensitivity can be established by the detection of secondary electrons emitted from the sample upon resonant excitation. We describe the experimental setup and discuss several relevant aspects, in particular the schemes to correct for self-absorption in the specimen due to back illumination in case of thicker films. PMID:20370182

  8. SEM, TEM and SLEEM (scanning low energy electron microscopy) of CB2 steel after creep testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasl, J.; Mikmeková, Š.; Jandová, D.

    2014-03-01

    The demand to produce electrical power with higher efficiency and with lower environmental pollution is leading to the use of new advanced materials in the production of power plant equipment. To understand the processes taking place in parts produced from these materials during their operation under severe conditions (such as high temperature, high stress, and environmental corrosion) requires detailed evaluation of their substructure. It is usually necessary to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, this method is very exacting and time-consuming. So there is an effort to use new scanning electron microscopy techniques instead of TEM. One of them is scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM). This paper deals with an assessment of the possibility to use SLEEM for describing the substructure of creep resistant steel CB2 after long-term creep testing. In the SLEEM images more information is contained about the microstructure of the material in comparison with standard scanning electron microscopy. Study of materials using slow and very slow electrons opens the way to better understanding their microstructures.

  9. High-contrast en bloc staining of neuronal tissue for field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Juan Carlos; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Hayworth, Kenneth J; Schalek, Richard; Lichtman, Jeff W; Smith, Stephen J; Buchanan, JoAnn

    2012-02-01

    Conventional heavy metal poststaining methods on thin sections lend contrast but often cause contamination. To avoid this problem, we tested several en bloc staining techniques to contrast tissue in serial sections mounted on solid substrates for examination by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Because FESEM section imaging requires that specimens have higher contrast and greater electrical conductivity than transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples, our technique uses osmium impregnation (OTO) to make the samples conductive while heavily staining membranes for segmentation studies. Combining this step with other classic heavy metal en bloc stains, including uranyl acetate (UA), lead aspartate, copper sulfate and lead citrate, produced clean, highly contrasted TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) samples of insect, fish and mammalian nervous systems. This protocol takes 7-15 d to prepare resin-embedded tissue, cut sections and produce serial section images. PMID:22240582

  10. Characterization of non-conductive materials using field emission scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cong; Gao, Ran; Shang, Huayan; Peng, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    With the development of science and technology, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) plays an important role in nano-material measurements because of its advantages of high magnification, high resolution and easy operation. A high-quality secondary electron image is a significant prerequisite for accurate and precise length measurements. In order to obtain high-quality secondary electron images, the conventional treatment method for non-conductive materials is coating conductive films with gold, carbon or platinum to reduce charging effects, but this method will cover real micro structures of materials, change the sample composition properties and meanwhile introduce a relatively big error to nano-scale microstructure measurements. This paper discusses how to reduce or eliminate the impact of charging effects on image quality to the greatest extent by changing working conditions, such as voltage, stage bias, scanning mode and so on without treatment of coating, to obtain real and high-quality microstructure information of materials.

  11. A compilation of cold cases using scanning electron microscopy at the University of Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platek, Michael J.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2015-10-01

    Scanning electron microscopy combined with microchemical analysis has evolved into one of the most widely used instruments in forensic science today. In particular, the environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), has created unique opportunities in forensic science in regard to the examination of trace evidence; i.e. the examination of evidence without altering the evidence with conductive coatings, thereby enabling criminalists to solve cases that were previously considered unsolvable. Two cold cases were solved at URI using a JEOL 5900 LV SEM in conjunction with EDS. A cold case murder and a cold missing person case will be presented from the viewpoint of the microscopist and will include sample preparation, as well as image and chemical analysis of the trace evidence using electron microscopy and optical microscopy.

  12. In vivo and scanning electron microscopy imaging of up-converting nanophosphors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shuang Fang; Riehn, Robert; Ryu, William S; Khanarian, Nora; Tung, Chih-Kuan; Tank, David; Austin, Robert H

    2006-02-01

    We show here that upconversion phosphors can be imaged both by infrared excitation and in a scanning electron microscope. We have synthesized and characterized for this work up-converting phosphor nanoparticles nonaggregated nanocrystals of size range 50-200 nm. We have investigated the optical properties of 50-200 nm nanoparticles and found a square dependence of the emitted visible fluorescence on the infrared excitation and verified that under electron excitation similar narrow band emission spectra can be obtained as is seen with IR upconversion. The viability of the nanoparticles for biological imaging was confirmed by imaging the digestive system of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, and we have confirmed using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis that the up-conversion nanoparticles can be identified in a scanning electron microscope at high spatial resolution. PMID:16464029

  13. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccione, M.; Bartel, J.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.; Sciambi, A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2014-11-03

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called “virtual scanning tunneling microscopy” that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  14. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccione, M.; Bartel, J.; Sciambi, A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2014-11-01

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called "virtual scanning tunneling microscopy" that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  15. Analytical electron microscopy of Mg-SiO smokes - A comparison with infrared and XRD studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Nuth, J. A.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy conducted for Mg-SiO smokes (experimentally obtained from samples previously characterized by IR spectroscopy) indicates that the microcrystallinity content of unannealed smokes increases with increased annealing for up to 30 hr. The growth of forsterite microcrystallites in the initially nonstoichiometric smokes may give rise to the contemporaneous growth of the SiO polymorph tridymite and MgO; after 4 hr of annealing, these react to form enstatite. It is suggested that XRD analysis and IR spectroscopy should be conducted in conjunction with detailed analytical electron microscopy for the detection of emerging crystallinity in vapor-phase condensates.

  16. ZnO(0001) surfaces probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy: Evidence for an inhomogeneous electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, J.; Hackens, B.; Faniel, S.; Mouthuy, P.-O.; Sporken, R.; Melinte, S.

    2009-09-01

    The stability of the polar Zn-terminated ZnO surface is probed by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Surface states in the bandgap of ZnO are evidenced by STS and their presence is correlated with the local surface corrugation. Very defective surface regions are characterized by a bulk electronic structure showing a wide bandgap while nanometer-scale defect free regions exhibit a narrower bandgap and surface states. We also image atomically resolved (√3 ×√3 )R30° reconstructions on the defect-free areas.

  17. An electro-conductive organic coating for scanning electron microscopy (déjà vu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Bryan R.

    2014-09-01

    An organic compound, originally marketed as an antistatic, can form an extremely thin electro-conductive coating upon drying. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) application for this compound was first explored in the late 1960s. A coating of this compound eliminates the need for carbon or gold coating in some applications. It is well suited for the viewing of fabric samples and associated gunshot residue (GSR) in the SEM and makes it possible to quickly analyze fabric bullet wipe and bore wipe GSR. Fabric samples can also be examined for GSR from intermediate-range shots to estimate muzzle-target distances. Scanning

  18. Exact analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitating in Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranskis, R. R.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2014-06-10

    The original continuity equation (CE) used for the interpretation of the power law energy spectra of beam electrons in flares was written and solved for an electron beam flux while ignoring an additional free term with an electron density. In order to remedy this omission, the original CE for electron flux, considering beam's energy losses in Coulomb collisions, was first differentiated by the two independent variables: depth and energy leading to partial differential equation for an electron beam density instead of flux with the additional free term. The analytical solution of this partial differential continuity equation (PDCE) is obtained by using the method of characteristics. This solution is further used to derive analytical expressions for mean electron spectra for Coulomb collisions and to carry out numeric calculations of hard X-ray (HXR) photon spectra for beams with different parameters. The solutions revealed a significant departure of electron densities at lower energies from the original results derived from the CE for the flux obtained for Coulomb collisions. This departure is caused by the additional exponential term that appeared in the updated solutions for electron differential density leading to its faster decrease at lower energies (below 100 keV) with every precipitation depth similar to the results obtained with numerical Fokker-Planck solutions. The effects of these updated solutions for electron densities on mean electron spectra and HXR photon spectra are also discussed.

  19. A scanning drift tube apparatus for spatiotemporal mapping of electron swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolov, I.; Vass, M.; Bastykova, N. Kh.; Donkó, Z.

    2016-06-01

    A "scanning" drift tube apparatus, capable of mapping of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms, developing between two plane electrodes under the effect of a homogeneous electric field, is presented. The electron swarms are initiated by photoelectron pulses and the temporal distributions of the electron flux are recorded while the electrode gap length (at a fixed electric field strength) is varied. Operation of the system is tested and verified with argon gas; the measured data are used for the evaluation of the electron bulk drift velocity. The experimental results for the space-time maps of the electron swarms — presented here for the first time — also allow clear observation of deviations from hydrodynamic transport. The swarm maps are also reproduced by particle simulations.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of solid-state nanopores using a field emission scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Hung; Iqbal, Samir M.; Stach, Eric A.; King, Alexander H.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Bashir, Rashid

    2006-03-06

    The fabrication of solid-state nanopores using the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been reported in the past. Here, we report a similar method to fabricate solid-state nanopores using the electron source of a conventional field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) instead. Micromachining was used to create initial pore diameters between 50 nm and 200 nm, and controlled pore shrinking to sub 10 nm diameters was performed subsequently during in situ processing in the FESEM. Noticeably, different shrinking behavior was observed when using irradiation from the electron source of the FESEM than the TEM. Unlike previous reports of TEM mediated pore shrinkage, the mechanism of pore shrinkage when using the FESEM could be a result of surface defects generated by radiolysis and subsequent motion of silicon atoms to the pore periphery.

  1. A scanning drift tube apparatus for spatiotemporal mapping of electron swarms.

    PubMed

    Korolov, I; Vass, M; Bastykova, N Kh; Donkó, Z

    2016-06-01

    A "scanning" drift tube apparatus, capable of mapping of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms, developing between two plane electrodes under the effect of a homogeneous electric field, is presented. The electron swarms are initiated by photoelectron pulses and the temporal distributions of the electron flux are recorded while the electrode gap length (at a fixed electric field strength) is varied. Operation of the system is tested and verified with argon gas; the measured data are used for the evaluation of the electron bulk drift velocity. The experimental results for the space-time maps of the electron swarms - presented here for the first time - also allow clear observation of deviations from hydrodynamic transport. The swarm maps are also reproduced by particle simulations. PMID:27370421

  2. Detection Improvement for Electron Energy Spectra for Surface Analysis Using a Field Emission Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirade, Masato; Arai, Toyoko; Tomitori, Masahiko

    2003-07-01

    For identification of the atomic species on a sample surface with high spatial resolution, we developed a field emission scanning tunneling microscopy (FE-STM) combined with an energy analyzer to perform surface electron spectroscopy: the primary electrons are field-emitted from the STM tip to excite sample surfaces. The energy spectra of backscattered electrons obtained using this combined instrument exhibited the elemental features, though the energy peaks and their signal height in the spectra were affected by the electric field between the tip and the sample. In the present study, we have examined and improved the electric shield of an STM tip holder. The metal parts of the holder at a high voltage, which face the gap left for electrons to pass through, were shielded to reduce the electric field. We have successfully demonstrated the effect of the field reduction for surface electron spectroscopy with the FE-STM.

  3. Comparison of spatial resolutions obtained with different signal components in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Merli, P G; Migliori, A; Nacucchi, M; Vittor Antisari, M

    1996-09-01

    Comparative studies on the ultimate spatial resolution of the Scanning Electron Microscope, using different components of the electron signal have been performed on specimens providing compositional contrast. By operating the microscope in conventional way as well as with a specifically designed set-up we have ascertained that the delocalized components of the signal provide a spatial resolution of the order of the beam size, even if the practical use can be limited by the noise. To amplify the contribution of the delocalized components of the signal, as backscattered electrons by a bulk specimen or forward scattered electrons by a thin specimen, we used a device consisting of a plate of a material with high secondary yield placed above or below the sample. An important practical implication arises from this study. A detecting system consisting of a standard Everhart-Thornley detector coupled with a converter of backscattered or transmitted electrons represents a high performance detecting device for low voltage observations. PMID:8961547

  4. Investigation of the thermal processes in electron-beam surface modification by means of a scanning electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormanova, M.; Angelov, Vl; Petrov, P.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present a study of the thermal processes taking place during surface modification of steels performed by a scanning electron beam. The model is based on solving the heat transfer equation by means of Green functions. The thermal field was calculated, together with the size of the zone of structural changes in tool steel samples. The comparison of the zones of thermal treatment as experimentally obtained and theoretically calculated and the corresponding structural changes show a very good agreement.

  5. Nanoscale Energy-Filtered Scanning Confocal Electron Microscopy Using a Double-Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I.; Nellist, Peter D.; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2010-05-21

    We demonstrate that a transmission electron microscope fitted with two spherical-aberration correctors can be operated as an energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscope. A method for establishing this mode is described and initial results showing 3D chemical mapping with nanoscale sensitivity to height and thickness changes in a carbon film are presented. Importantly, uncorrected chromatic aberration does not limit the depth resolution of this technique and moreover performs an energy-filtering role, which is explained in terms of a combined depth and energy-loss response function.

  6. Investigation of radiation-induced transformations in thin NbN films by analytical electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhodko, К; Gurovich, B.; Dement'eva, M.; Kutuzov, L.; Komarov, D.

    2016-04-01

    This work demonstrates implementation of low energy electron energy loss technique (EELS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to investigate the changes of free electron density at room temperature in ultra-thin NbN films under composite ion beam irradiation up to the deses of ∼3 d.p.a. for nitrogen atoms. It was found the constant value of the free electron density ∼1.6 ·1029 m-3 in this dose range while the irradiated material was characterized by metal type of electrical conductivity.

  7. Thickness determination of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride films by scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, P. Sutter, E.

    2014-09-01

    We assess scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for thickness measurements on few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), the layered dielectric of choice for integration with graphene and other two-dimensional materials. Observations on h-BN islands with large, atomically flat terraces show that the secondary electron intensity in SEM reflects monolayer height changes in films up to least 10 atomic layers thickness. From a quantitative analysis of AES data, the energy-dependent electron escape depth in h-BN films is deduced. The results show that AES is suitable for absolute thickness measurements of few-layer h-BN of 1 to 6 layers.

  8. The Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation in Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Whole Cells in Liquid.

    PubMed

    Hermannsdörfer, Justus; Tinnemann, Verena; Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Whole cells can be studied in their native liquid environment using electron microscopy, and unique information about the locations and stoichiometry of individual membrane proteins can be obtained from many cells thus taking cell heterogeneity into account. Of key importance for the further development of this microscopy technology is knowledge about the effect of electron beam radiation on the samples under investigation. We used environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detection to examine the effect of radiation for whole fixed COS7 fibroblasts in liquid. The main observation was the localization of nanoparticle labels attached to epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). It was found that the relative distances between the labels remained mostly unchanged (<1.5%) for electron doses ranging from the undamaged native state at 10 e-/Å2 toward 103 e-/Å2. This dose range was sufficient to determine the EGFR locations with nanometer resolution and to distinguish between monomers and dimers. Various different forms of radiation damage became visible at higher doses, including severe dislocation, and the dissolution of labels. PMID:27137077

  9. Analytic model of the energy distribution function for highly energetic electrons in magnetron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gallian, Sara Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Hitchon, William N. G.

    2015-01-14

    This paper analyzes a situation which is common for magnetized technical plasmas such as dc magnetron discharges and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) systems, where secondary electrons enter the plasma after being accelerated in the cathode fall and encounter a nearly uniform bulk. An analytic calculation of the distribution function of hot electrons is presented; these are described as an initially monoenergetic beam that slows down by Coulomb collisions with a Maxwellian distribution of bulk (cold) electrons, and by inelastic collisions with neutrals. Although this analytical solution is based on a steady-state assumption, a comparison of the characteristic time-scales suggests that it may be applicable to a variety of practical time-dependent discharges, and it may be used to introduce kinetic effects into models based on the hypothesis of Maxwellian electrons. The results are verified for parameters appropriate to HiPIMS discharges, by means of time-dependent and fully kinetic numerical calculations.

  10. 2D MEMS scanning for LIDAR with sub-Nyquist sampling, electronics, and measurement procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Thorsten; Janes, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    Electrostatic driven 2D MEMS scanners resonantly oscillate in both axes leading to Lissajous trajectories of a digitally modulated laser beam reflected from the micro mirror. A solid angle of about 0.02 is scanned by a 658nm laser beam with a maximum repetition rate of 350MHz digital pulses. Reflected light is detected by an APD with a bandwidth of 80MHz. The phase difference between the scanned laser light and the light reflected from an obstacle is analyzed by sub-Nyquist sampling. The FPGA-based electronics and software for the evaluation of distance and velocity of objects within the scanning range are presented. Furthermore, the measures to optimize the Lidar accuracy of about 1mm and the dynamic range of up to 2m are examined. First measurements demonstrating the capability of the system and the evaluation algorithms are discussed.

  11. Simulation of multicomponent losses in electron beam melting and refining at varying scan frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J.; Van Den Avyle, J.; Damkroger, B.

    1995-10-12

    A two-stage model is presented to describe alloy element evaporation rates from molten metal due to transient local heating by an electron beam. The first stage is a simulation of transient phenomena near the melt surface due to periodic heating by a scanning beam, the output of which is the relationship between operating parameters, surface temperature, and evaporation rate. At high scan rates, this can be done using a simple one-dimensional heat transfer model of the surface layer; at lower scan rates, a more complex three-dimensional model with fluid flow and periodic boundary conditions is necessary. The second stage couples this evaporation-surface temperature relationship with a larger steady state heat transfer and fluid flow model of an entire melting hearth or mold, in order to calculate local and total evaporation rates. Predictions are compared with experimental results from Sandia`s 310-kW electron beam melting furnace, in which evaporation rates and vapor compositions were studied in pure titanium and Ti-6%Al-4%V alloy. Evaporation rates were estimated from rate of condensation on a substrate held over the hearth, and were characterized as a function of beam power (150 and 225 kW), scan frequency (30, 115 and 450 Hz) and background pressure (10{sup {minus}3}, 10{sup {minus}4} and 10{sup {minus}5} torr).

  12. Scanning Electron Microscope Calibration Using a Multi-Image Non-Linear Minimization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Le; Marchand, Éric

    2015-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) calibrating approach based on non-linear minimization procedure is presented in this article. A part of this article has been published in IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2014. . Both the intrinsic parameters and the extrinsic parameters estimations are achieved simultaneously by minimizing the registration error. The proposed approach considers multi-images of a multi-scale calibration pattern view from different positions and orientations. Since the projection geometry of the scanning electron microscope is different from that of a classical optical sensor, the perspective projection model and the parallel projection model are considered and compared with distortion models. Experiments are realized by varying the position and the orientation of a multi-scale chessboard calibration pattern from 300× to 10,000×. The experimental results show the efficiency and the accuracy of this approach.

  13. Picometre-precision analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy images of platinum nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, Andrew B; Berkels, Benjamin; Dahmen, W; Binev, P; Sanchez, S I; Bradley, S A; Li, Ao; Szlufarska, Izabela; Voyles, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Measuring picometre-scale shifts in the positions of individual atoms in materials provides new insight into the structure of surfaces, defects and interfaces that influence a broad variety of materials' behaviour. Here we demonstrate sub-picometre precision measurements of atom positions in aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy images based on the non-rigid registration and averaging of an image series. Non-rigid registration achieves five to seven times better precision than previous methods. Non-rigidly registered images of a silica-supported platinum nanocatalyst show pm-scale contraction of atoms at a (111)/(111) corner towards the particle centre and expansion of a flat (111) facet. Sub-picometre precision and standardless atom counting with <1 atom uncertainty in the same scanning transmission electron microscopy image provide new insight into the three-dimensional atomic structure of catalyst nanoparticle surfaces, which contain the active sites controlling catalytic reactions. PMID:24916914

  14. Picometre-precision analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy images of platinum nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.; Berkels, Benjamin; Dahmen, W.; Binev, P.; Sanchez, S. I.; Bradley, S. A.; Li, Ao; Szlufarska, Izabela; Voyles, Paul M.

    2014-06-01

    Measuring picometre-scale shifts in the positions of individual atoms in materials provides new insight into the structure of surfaces, defects and interfaces that influence a broad variety of materials’ behaviour. Here we demonstrate sub-picometre precision measurements of atom positions in aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy images based on the non-rigid registration and averaging of an image series. Non-rigid registration achieves five to seven times better precision than previous methods. Non-rigidly registered images of a silica-supported platinum nanocatalyst show pm-scale contraction of atoms at a ()/() corner towards the particle centre and expansion of a flat () facet. Sub-picometre precision and standardless atom counting with <1 atom uncertainty in the same scanning transmission electron microscopy image provide new insight into the three-dimensional atomic structure of catalyst nanoparticle surfaces, which contain the active sites controlling catalytic reactions.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of experimental bone hacking trauma of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Alunni-Perret, Véronique; Borg, Cybèle; Laugier, Jean-Pierre; Bertrand, Marie-France; Staccini, Pascal; Bolla, Marc; Quatrehomme, Gérald; Muller-Bolla, Michèle

    2010-12-01

    The authors report on a macroscopic and microscopic study of human mandible bone lesions achieved by a single-blade knife and a hatchet. The aim of this work was to complete the previous data (scanning electron microscopy analysis of bone lesions made by a single-blade knife and a hatchet, on human femurs) and to compare the lesions of the femur with those of the mandible. The results indicate that the mandible is a more fragile bone, but the features observed on the mandible are quite similar to those previously observed on the femur. This work spells out the main scanning electron microscopy characteristics of sharp (bone cutting) and blunt (exerting a pressure on the bone) mechanisms on human bone. Weapon characteristics serve to explain all of these features. PMID:20890172

  16. Low thermal power electron beam annealing of scanning tunneling microscope tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.; Agne, M.; Breitenstein, O.; Jenniches, H.

    1997-08-01

    An add-on unit was developed that allows the cleaning of scanning tunneling microscope tips by electron beam annealing even if they cannot be disconnected from the piezo scanner in situ. The whole scanner tip combination, which is attached to a linear motion stage, is subjected to a pulsed annealing treatment. The heat impact is focused on the outermost tip by sticking the tip through a hole in a grounded Mo screening plate with the cathode mounted on the opposite side. Tungsten tips attached to the scanner of the Omicron ultrahigh vacuum Multiscan Lab were annealed to achieve atomic resolution of ultrahigh vacuum cleaved GaAs (110) faces. A highly doped superlattice package grown on semi-insulating GaAs was also able to be investigated on the cleaved (110) face due to the ability of exact tip positioning with a scanning electron microscope.

  17. Observation of the freeze-drying process of biological materials with a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Nei, T; Fujikawa, S

    1976-10-01

    Over the past few decades, numerous studies have been done on the freeze-drying of biological materials from a physical, chemical and biological point of view. Morphological observation of the freeze-drying process of specimens, however, has been tried by only a few investigators. In those studies, thin-layered aqueous specimens, which were sandwiched between two cover slips, were mostly observed with an optical microscope. For ultrastructural and stereoscopic observation, the scanning electron microscope has a great advantage, unlike that of the optical microscope. A specially designed cryo-scanning electron microscope, employed in the present study, made it possible to observe the freezing patterns of the specimens and also the sublimation process of ice in frozen specimens under vacuum. With this specially designed microscope, shrinkage of some specimens due to dehydration during the freeze-drying process was revealed and the extent of such shrinkage was quantitatively determined. PMID:1036327

  18. Accurate Nanoscale Crystallography in Real-Space Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dycus, J Houston; Harris, Joshua S; Sang, Xiahan; Fancher, Chris M; Findlay, Scott D; Oni, Adedapo A; Chan, Tsung-Ta E; Koch, Carl C; Jones, Jacob L; Allen, Leslie J; Irving, Douglas L; LeBeau, James M

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report reproducible and accurate measurement of crystallographic parameters using scanning transmission electron microscopy. This is made possible by removing drift and residual scan distortion. We demonstrate real-space lattice parameter measurements with <0.1% error for complex-layered chalcogenides Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3, and a Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 nanostructured alloy. Pairing the technique with atomic resolution spectroscopy, we connect local structure with chemistry and bonding. Combining these results with density functional theory, we show that the incorporation of Se into Bi2Te3 causes charge redistribution that anomalously increases the van der Waals gap between building blocks of the layered structure. The results show that atomic resolution imaging with electrons can accurately and robustly quantify crystallography at the nanoscale. PMID:26169835

  19. Depth Sectioning with the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Borisevich, Albina Y; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition brings depth resolution at the nanometer scale. Aberration correction therefore opens up the possibility of 3D imaging by optical sectioning. Here we develop a definition for the depth resolution for scanning transmission electron microscope depth sectioning and present initial results from this method. Objects such as catalytic metal clusters and single atoms on various support materials are imaged in three dimensions with a resolution of several nanometers. Effective focal depth is determined by statistical analysis and the contributing factors are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future capabilities available through new instruments are discussed.

  20. The development of field-emission scanning electron microscopy for imaging biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pawley, J

    1997-08-01

    This article traces the important milestones in the development of high-resolution, field-emission, scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Such instruments are now capable of producing images of the surfaces of biological specimens that rival, in terms of resolution and contrast, those produced by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Even though one of the first instruments to produce a useful transmission electron microscope image was, in fact, an early scanning microscope, TEM reached its full potential for biological imaging almost 30 years sooner than did SEM. The main reason for this slow rate of development is the dependence of any scanning technique on source brightness. The only suitable electron source was the field-emission source, originally developed in the 1930's. Making this into a stable and reliable electron source for microscopy required many technical barriers to be overcome. An additional delay may have been caused by the great success that attended the introduction of early SEM instruments. These instruments which employed heated, tungsten hairpin cathodes, were inexpensive and reliable, but they that were also far from optimal in terms of optical performance. Their market success may have engendered the sense of inertia and complacency that further delayed the introduction of low aberrations objective lenses and field-emission sources for almost 20 years after they were first introduced to electron microscopy. In addition, the fact that these early SEMs accustomed users to operating with a much higher beam voltage than was either necessary or wise, lead many to assume that the SEM was incapable of producing high-resolution images of biological surfaces. This left them open to fascination with newer ahd slower techniques that, on balance, were less suitable than optimized SEM for most of their imaging needs. In parallel to these developments in instrumentation, major improvements were also made in the way that the specimen surface

  1. Nanoscale diffraction gratings and electron vortex beams in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachtner, Alexander; Wright, Carly; McMorran, Benjamin; Harvey, Tyler; Yahn, Tyler; Pierce, Jordan

    2012-10-01

    We use focused ion beam nanofabrication to manufacture forked diffraction gratings capable of producing electron beams with helical wavefronts and orbital angular momentum (OAM). A vast number of unique beam modes carrying OAM can be produced through manipulation of grating fork number or position. Generally these gratings are milled such that they produce a phase shift in the beam and are used with high energy electrons (300keV) in a TEM to investigate the quantum or magnetic properties of the electron or image magnetic materials. Our latest work focuses on manufacturing sub-100-nm pitch binary transmission gratings that produce only an amplitude modulation, which opens up imaging capability to lower energy electrons (5-30 keV) and thus expands their use to a wider range of commercially available SEMs. We use these amplitude gratings to show the relationship between the number/position of forks and OAM inherited by the beam. This work could lead to advances in imaging capability, and also creates a widely accessible and scalable demonstration of the quantum properties of the electron which can be leveraged by any science program with SEM access.

  2. Bacterial Biofilm Morphology on a Failing Implant with an Oxidized Surface: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study.

    PubMed

    Simion, Massimo; Kim, David M; Pieroni, Stefano; Nevins, Myron; Cassinelli, Clara

    2016-01-01

    This case report provided a unique opportunity to investigate the extent of microbiota infiltration on the oxidized implant surface that has been compromised by peri-implantitis. Scanning electron microscopic analysis confirmed the etiologic role of the bacteria on the loss of supporting structure and the difficulty in complete removal of bacterial infiltration on the implant surface. This case report emphasizes the need to perform definitive surface decontamination on failing dental implants prior to a regeneration procedure. PMID:27333005

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of egg hatching of Anopheles albimanus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M H; Orozco, A; Chavez, B; Martinez-Palomo, A

    1992-09-01

    Scanning electron and light microscopic observations showed that egg hatching in Anopheles albimanus Wiedemann is aided by a chisel-shaped spine. This hatching tooth is surrounded by a thin flexible membrane fixed to a groove in the head of the larvae. Increased intracranial pressure may force the spine against the egg shell until a fissure is produced. Further opening of the egg is achieved by movements of the head and the entire body of the larva. PMID:1404271

  4. Observation of an amalgam-bonded tooth through a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Orosa, Jose Luis B

    2003-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth reduces the occurrence of marginal leakage, fracture and sensitivity. However, most studies of amalgam bonding have made use of resin cements and the conventional three-bottle bonding agents. In this study, a newer, single-bottle bonding agent was used to bond amalgam both to dentin and enamel. Interfaces of bonded amalgam and unbonded amalgam were observed under the scanning electron microscope. PMID:13677864

  5. Scanning electron microscopy of a pink inclusion from the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, L.; Fruland, R. M.; Mckay, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope study of a fine-grained, pin, Ca-rich inclusion from the Allende meteorite has revealed strong evidence for direct condensation of its constituent minerals from a vapor. This observation extends to the alkali-bearing phases in addition to the Ca-, Al-silicates and suggests that the feldspathoids as well as the refractory silicates are solar nebular condensates.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of lunar regolith from the Sea of Fertility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoshin, M. K.; Ilin, N. P.; Spivak, G. V.

    1974-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used in studying the morphology and cathodoluminescence of lunar regolith particles. Surface and structure of two groups of particles are differentiated: (1) Crystalline with well defined facets and spalling surfaces, which are grains of minerals and rock fragments: and (2) amorphous, fused, and partially or entirely glazed particles. Local melting of particles and the round openings on their surfaces are attributed to secondary influence on the regolith of factors of lunar weathering and above all micrometeoric impacts.

  7. Corneal endothelium of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, João A T; Laus, José L; Santos, Jaime M; Cerva, Cristine; Cunha, Luciana S; Ruoppolo, Valéria; Barros, Paulo S M

    2005-12-01

    The corneal endothelium is essential for the maintenance of the corneal transparency. The aim of this study was to examine the morphology of the endothelial surface and perform morphometric analysis of the normal corneal endothelial cells of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) using scanning electron microscopy. The present work demonstrates that the corneal endothelium of the Magellanic penguin is similar to those described in other vertebrates. PMID:17312730

  8. Electron transport in two-dimensional arrays of gold nanocrystals investigated by scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liljeroth, Peter; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; Ruiz, Virginia; Kontturi, Kyösti; Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko; Quinn, Bernadette M

    2004-06-01

    This article reports the use of the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) to investigate the electronic properties of Langmuir monolayers of alkane thiol protected gold nanocrystals (NCs). A substantial increase in monolayer conductivity upon mechanical compression of the Au NC monolayer is reported for the first time. This may be the room temperature signature of the insulator to metal transition previously reported for comparable silver NC monolayers. Factors influencing the conductivity of the monolayer NC array are discussed. PMID:15174884

  9. Multi-Channel Electronically Scanned Cryogenic Pressure Sensor And Method For Making Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Hopson, Purnell, Jr. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A miniature, multi-channel, electronically scanned pressure measuring device uses electrostatically bonded silicon dies in a multi-element array. These dies are bonded at specific sites on a glass, pre-patterned substrate. Thermal data is multiplexed and recorded on each individual pressure measuring diaphragm. The device functions in a cryogenic environment without the need of heaters to keep the sensor at constant temperatures.

  10. Metal resist for extreme ultraviolet lithography characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Sato, Yuta; Koshino, Masanori; Suenaga, Kazu; Itani, Toshiro

    2016-03-01

    We characterized the structures of metal resists used in EUV lithography by low-voltage aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). This study presents the first atomic-level observation of resist components in resist film. The structures of metal (zirconium or titanium) oxide cores are unambiguously identified, and the local elemental distribution in the resist film is obtained. The initial size of zirconium oxide cores is well maintained in the resist film. However, titanium oxide cores tend to aggregate to form an indefinite structure. The spatial distribution of metal cores may influence lithographic characteristics.

  11. Visualizing Macromolecular Complexes with In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Wong, Peony C. K.; Chiu, Po-Lin; Dutrow, Gavin H.; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-11-01

    A central focus of biological research is understanding the structure/function relationship of macromolecular protein complexes. Yet conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques are limited to static observations. Here we present the first direct images of purified macromolecular protein complexes using in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy. Our results establish the capability of this technique for visualizing the interface between biology and nanotechnology with high fidelity while also probing the interactions of biomolecules within solution. This method represents an important advancement towards allowing future high-resolution observations of biological processes and conformational dynamics in real-time.

  12. SEM analysis of ionizing radiation effects in linear integrated circuits. [Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, A. G.; Gauthier, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    A successful diagnostic technique was developed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a precision tool to determine ionization effects in integrated circuits. Previous SEM methods radiated the entire semiconductor chip or major areas. The large area exposure methods do not reveal the exact components which are sensitive to radiation. To locate these sensitive components a new method was developed, which consisted in successively irradiating selected components on the device chip with equal doses of electrons /10 to the 6th rad (Si)/, while the whole device was subjected to representative bias conditions. A suitable device parameter was measured in situ after each successive irradiation with the beam off.

  13. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy and the reconstruction of plant cell membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Kittelmann, M; Hawes, C; Hughes, L

    2016-08-01

    Serial block face imaging with the scanning electron microscope has been developed as an alternative to serial sectioning and transmission electron microscopy for the ultrastructural analysis of the three-dimensional organization of cells and tissues. An ultramicrotome within the microscope specimen chamber permits sectioning and imaging to a depth of many microns within resin-embedded specimens. The technology has only recently been adopted by plant microscopists and here we describe some specimen preparation procedures suitable for plant tissue, suggested microscope imaging parameters and discuss the software required for image reconstruction and analysis. PMID:27197647

  14. Electron-stimulated desorption of hydrogen from the Si(111) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzkopff, M.; Radojkovic, P.; Enachescu, M.; Hartmann, E.; Koch, F.

    1996-03-01

    Preparation of suitable silicon (111) wafers in weakly alkaline HF solutions results in the formation of atomically flat, hydrogen-terminated surfaces. Under high-vacuum conditions, the scanning tunneling microscope has been employed to selectively desorb the passivating hydrogen from nanometer-sized surface regions. The hydrogen depassivation process is studied as a function of current and applied bias voltage, voltage polarity, and exposure time to incident electrons either on individual surface locations or by varying the speed of tip motion to control the electron dose. The experimental findings are interpreted in terms of two distinct desorption mechanisms and the respective desorption yields are specified. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  15. Reliable strain measurement in transistor arrays by robust scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhyun; Kim, Joong Jung; Jung, Younheum; Lee, Kyungwoo; Byun, Gwangsun; Hwang, KyoungHwan; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Kyupil

    2013-09-15

    Accurate measurement of the strain field in the channels of transistor arrays is critical for strain engineering in modern electronic devices. We applied atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy to quantitative measurement of the strain field in transistor arrays. The quantitative strain profile over 20 transistors was obtained with high reliability and a precision of 0.1%. The strain field was found to form homogeneously in the channels of the transistor arrays. Furthermore, strain relaxation due to the thin foil effect was quantitatively investigated for thicknesses of 35 to 275 nm.

  16. Charging compensation of alumina samples by using an oxygen microinjector in the environmental scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xueling; Ji, Yuan; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yinqi; Xu, Xuedong; Zhong, Taoxing

    2006-01-01

    A gas microinjector system was set up in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) to create an oxygen atmosphere around the alumina samples for the charging compensation under a pressure between 2 x 10(-5) Pa approximately 2 x 10(-2) Pa. At low pressures, the skirt effect of the electron scattering can be degraded, which results in improvement of the imaging contrast and increase of the signal/noise ratio. The sample current (I(SC)) and the Duane-Hunt limit were measured to evaluate the charging effect. PMID:17063769

  17. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  18. Rapid Nondestructive Analysis of Threading Dislocations in Wurtzite Materials Using the Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Hourahine, B.; Edwards, P. R.; Day, A. P.; Winkelmann, A.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Parbrook, P. J.; England, G.; Trager-Cowan, C.

    2012-03-01

    We describe the use of electron channeling contrast imaging in the scanning electron microscope to rapidly and reliably image and identify threading dislocations (TDs) in materials with the wurtzite crystal structure. In electron channeling contrast imaging, vertical TDs are revealed as spots with black-white contrast. We have developed a simple geometric procedure which exploits the differences observed in the direction of this black-white contrast for screw, edge, and mixed dislocations for two electron channeling contrast images acquired from two symmetrically equivalent crystal planes whose g vectors are at 120° to each other. Our approach allows unambiguous identification of all TDs without the need to compare results with dynamical simulations of channeling contrast.

  19. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  20. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of residual stresses in ceramics: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1992-01-01

    Several reviews have highlighted a number of applications of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to metals and semiconductors which show that SEAM can provide new information on surface and near-surface features of such materials, but there have been few studies attempting to determine the capabilities of SEAM for characterizing ceramic materials. We have recently observed image contrast in SEAM from residual stress fields induced in brittle materials by Vickers indentations that is strongly dependent on the electron beam chopping frequency. We have also recently developed a three-dimensional mathematical model of signal generation and contrast in SEAM, appropriate to the brittle materials studied, that we use as a starting point in this paper for modeling the effect of residual stress fields on the generated electron acoustic signal. The influence of the electron beam chopping frequency is also considered under restrictive assumptions.

  1. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  2. Electron backscattering on single-wall carbon nanotubes observed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauss, W.; Bergeron, D. J.; Freitag, M.; Kane, C. L.; Mele, E. J.; Johnson, A. T.

    1999-09-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes, seamless cylindrical molecules formed from a graphene sheet, are either conducting or semiconducting, depending on the particular "wrapping vector" that defines the waist of the tube. Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have tested this idea by simultaneously measuring a tube's lattice structure and electronic properties. Here we present a series of STM images of single-wall carbon nanotubes with a strikingly rich set of superstructures. The observed patterns can be understood as due to interference between propagating electron waves that are reflected from defects on the tube walls and ends, or as intrinsic to states propagating on semiconducting tubes. The measured broken symmetries can be used to directly probe electronic backscattering on the tube and provide a key element in the understanding of low-energy electron transport on these structures.

  3. Helium ion microscopy and energy selective scanning electron microscopy - two advanced microscopy techniques with complementary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenburg, C.; Jepson, M. A. E.; Boden, Stuart A.; Bagnall, Darren M.

    2014-06-01

    Both scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and helium ion microscopes (HeIM) are based on the same principle of a charged particle beam scanning across the surface and generating secondary electrons (SEs) to form images. However, there is a pronounced difference in the energy spectra of the emitted secondary electrons emitted as result of electron or helium ion impact. We have previously presented evidence that this also translates to differences in the information depth through the analysis of dopant contrast in doped silicon structures in both SEM and HeIM. Here, it is now shown how secondary electron emission spectra (SES) and their relation to depth of origin of SE can be experimentally exploited through the use of energy filtering (EF) in low voltage SEM (LV-SEM) to access bulk information from surfaces covered by damage or contamination layers. From the current understanding of the SES in HeIM it is not expected that EF will be as effective in HeIM but an alternative that can be used for some materials to access bulk information is presented.

  4. Electron back-scattering coefficient below 5 keV: Analytical expressions and surface-barrier effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazaux, J.

    2012-10-01

    Simple analytical expressions for the electron backscattering coefficient, η, are established from published data obtained in the ˜0.4-5 keV range for 21 elements ranging from Be to Au. They take into account the decline in η with a decrease in energy E° for high-Z elements and the reverse behavior for low-Z elements. The proposed expressions for η (E°) lead to crossing energies situated in the 0.4-1 keV range and they may be reasonably extended to any of the other elements—via an interpolation procedure—to metallic alloys and probably to compounds. The influence of the surface barrier on the escape probability of the back-scattered electrons is next evaluated. This evaluation provides a theoretical basis to explain the observed deviation between various published data as a consequence of surface contamination or oxidation. Various practical applications and strategies are deduced for the η-measurements in dedicated instruments as well for the image interpretation in low voltage scanning electron microscopy based on the backscattered electron detection. In this microscopy, the present investigation allows to generalize the scarce contrast changes and contrast reversals previously observed on multi elemental samples and it suggests the possibility of a new type of contrast: the work function contrast.

  5. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of incinerated teeth: An aid to forensic identification

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Chetan A; Gosavi, Suchitra R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Forensic dental identification of victims involved in fire accidents is often a complex and challenging endeavor. Knowledge of the charred human dentition and residues of restorative material can help in the recognition of bodies burned beyond recognition. Aim: To observe the effects of predetermined temperatures on healthy unrestored teeth and different restorative materials in restored teeth, by scanning electron microscope, for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 135 extracted teeth, which were divided into four groups. Group 1-healthy unrestored teeth, group 2-teeth restored with all ceramic crowns, group 3-teeth restored with class I composite resin and group 4-teeth restored with class I glass ionomer cement (GIC). Results: The scanning electron microscope is useful in the analysis of burned teeth, as it gives fine structural details, requires only a small sample and does not destroy the already fragile specimen. Conclusion: Scanning electron microscope can be a useful tool for the characterization and study of severely burnt teeth for victim identification. PMID:24959034

  6. Challenges of microtome‐based serial block‐face scanning electron microscopy in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    WANNER, A. A.; KIRSCHMANN, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Serial block‐face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) is becoming increasingly popular for a wide range of applications in many disciplines from biology to material sciences. This review focuses on applications for circuit reconstruction in neuroscience, which is one of the major driving forces advancing SBEM. Neuronal circuit reconstruction poses exceptional challenges to volume EM in terms of resolution, field of view, acquisition time and sample preparation. Mapping the connections between neurons in the brain is crucial for understanding information flow and information processing in the brain. However, information on the connectivity between hundreds or even thousands of neurons densely packed in neuronal microcircuits is still largely missing. Volume EM techniques such as serial section TEM, automated tape‐collecting ultramicrotome, focused ion‐beam scanning electron microscopy and SBEM (microtome serial block‐face scanning electron microscopy) are the techniques that provide sufficient resolution to resolve ultrastructural details such as synapses and provides sufficient field of view for dense reconstruction of neuronal circuits. While volume EM techniques are advancing, they are generating large data sets on the terabyte scale that require new image processing workflows and analysis tools. In this review, we present the recent advances in SBEM for circuit reconstruction in neuroscience and an overview of existing image processing and analysis pipelines. PMID:25907464

  7. High-resolution spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM).

    PubMed

    Kohashi, Teruo; Konoto, Makoto; Koike, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    We have developed spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) with a 5-nm resolution. The secondary electron optics is very important, as it needs to transfer a sufficient number of secondary electrons to the spin polarimeter, due to the low efficiency of the polarimeter. The optics was designed using a three-dimensional (3D) simulation program of the secondary electron trajectories, and it achieves highly efficient collection and transport of the secondary electrons even though the distance between the sample and the objective lens exit of the electron gun remains short. Moreover, the designed optics enables us to obtain clear SEM images in the spin SEM measurement and to precisely adjust the probe beam shape. These functions lead to images with high spatial resolution and sufficient signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios. This optics has been installed in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) spin SEM chamber with a Schottky-type electron gun for the probe electron beam. We observed recorded bits on a perpendicular magnetic recording medium and visualized small irregularities in the bit shapes around the track edges and bit boundaries. The high resolution of 5 nm was demonstrated by observing the smallest domain composed by a single grain in the recording medium. PMID:19840986

  8. Conditions required for high quality high magnification images in secondary electron-I scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peters, K R

    1982-01-01

    High quality of secondary electron (SE) images, taken at useful magnifications of 100,000 to 200,000, require new signal generation and collection methods and new metal coating procedures. High quality is defined as the condition under which image contrast describes accurately the topographic features of the specimen in a size range that approximates the beam diameter. Such high resolution contrasts are produced by the SE (SE-I) generated by a small electron probe on the specimen surface. Tobacco mosiac virus and ferritin molecules deposited on bulk substrates were introduced as test specimens to check the image quality obtained. The SE-I signal contrast could be imaged when SE (SE-III), produced by backscattered electrons (BSE) at the pole piece of the final lens, were eliminated with an electron absorption device attached to the pole piece. This signal collection procedure will be referred to as "Secondary Electron-I Image" (SE-I image) mode. In addition to the SE-III, BSE generate SE-II in the specimen itself. On specimens deposited on bulk gold or platinum, and coated with the same metals SE-II produced a microroughness contrast that limited particle resolution in the SE-I image mode to approximately 10 nm. Reduction of SE-II and enrichment of the signal in SE-I was achieved by using continuous fine crystalline coatings of tantalum, niobium and chromium. By applying these metals in films of approximately 2.0 nm thickness, the SE-I contrast generation was found to be indepedent of the atomic number of the metal. Edge sharpness was improved when the specimens were coated with low atomic number metals. Under these conditions, the quality of images obtained in SE-I image mode equals that of images obtained in TEM from identically coated specimens and was limited only by the size of the topographic details, beam diameter and beam current. PMID:7184136

  9. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Lupini, Andrew R; Borisevich, Albina Y; Cullen, David A; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-08-25

    The highly energetic electron beam (e-beam) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from knock-on and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and to localized chemical/electrochemical reactions. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional STEM e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here, an automated liquid phase nanolithography method has been developed that enables the direct writing of nanometer scaled features within microfabricated liquid cells. An external e-beam control system, connected to the scan coils of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan rate of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H2PdCl4 are irradiated to deposit palladium nanocrystals onto silicon nitride membranes in a highly controlled manner. The threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium has been determined, the influence of electron dose on the nanolithographically patterned feature size and morphology is explored, and a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring is proposed. This approach enables fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter in liquid cells and opens new pathways to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid-phase precursors. PMID:27510435

  10. Analytical estimates of electron quasi-linear diffusion by fast magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourenas, D.; Artemyev, A. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2013-06-01

    Quantifying the loss of relativistic electrons from the Earth's radiation belts requires to estimate the effects of many kinds of observed waves, ranging from ULF to VLF. Analytical estimates of electron quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for whistler-mode chorus and hiss waves of arbitrary obliquity have been recently derived, allowing useful analytical approximations for lifetimes. We examine here the influence of much lower frequency and highly oblique, fast magnetosonic waves (also called ELF equatorial noise) by means of both approximate analytical formulations of the corresponding diffusion coefficients and full numerical simulations. Further analytical developments allow us to identify the most critical wave and plasma parameters necessary for a strong impact of fast magnetosonic waves on electron lifetimes and acceleration in the simultaneous presence of chorus, hiss, or lightning-generated waves, both inside and outside the plasmasphere. In this respect, a relatively small frequency over ion gyrofrequency ratio appears more favorable, and other propitious circumstances are characterized. This study should be useful for a comprehensive appraisal of the potential effect of fast magnetosonic waves throughout the magnetosphere.

  11. Analytic band Monte Carlo model for electron transport in Si including acoustic and optical phonon dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Eric; Dutton, Robert W.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-11-01

    We describe the implementation of a Monte Carlo model for electron transport in silicon. The model uses analytic, nonparabolic electron energy bands, which are computationally efficient and sufficiently accurate for future low-voltage (<1V) nanoscale device applications. The electron-lattice scattering is incorporated using an isotropic, analytic phonon-dispersion model, which distinguishes between the optical/acoustic and the longitudinal/transverse phonon branches. We show that this approach avoids introducing unphysical thresholds in the electron distribution function, and that it has further applications in computing detailed phonon generation spectra from Joule heating. A set of deformation potentials for electron-phonon scattering is introduced and shown to yield accurate transport simulations in bulk silicon across a wide range of electric fields and temperatures. The shear deformation potential is empirically determined at Ξu=6.8eV, and consequently, the isotropically averaged scattering potentials with longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons are DLA=6.39eV and DTA=3.01eV, respectively, in reasonable agreement with previous studies. The room-temperature electron mobility in strained silicon is also computed and shown to be in better agreement with the most recent phonon-limited data available. As a result, we find that electron coupling with g-type phonons is about 40% lower, and the coupling with f-type phonons is almost twice as strong as previously reported.

  12. Analysis of high quality monatomic chromium films used in biological high resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Apkarian, R P

    1994-01-01

    During the recent employment of field emission (FE) in-lens scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), refractory metal deposition technology has co-evolved to provide enhanced contrast of 1-10 nm hydrocarbon based biological structures imaged at high magnifications (> 200,000 times). Pioneer development employing the Penning sputter system in a high vacuum chamber proved that imaging of chromium (Cr) coated biological specimens contained enriched secondary electron (SE)-(I) contrasts. Single nanometer size fibrillar and particulate ectodomains within the context of complex biological membranes were accurately imaged without significant enlargement using the high resolution SE-I mode (HRSEM). This paper reports the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) testing of ultrathin (0.5-2.0 nm) Cr films deposited by planar magnetron sputter coating (PMSC). Essential parameters necessary to reproduce quality sputtered films of refractory metals used in HRSEM studies were described for the vacuum system and target operation conditions (current, voltage, and target distance). HRSEM imaging of biological specimens is presented to assess contrast attained from ultrathin fine grain Cr films deposited by PMSC. High magnification images were recorded to illustrate high quality contrasts attainable by HRSEM at low (1-5 kV) and high (10-30 kV) voltages. Dispersed molecules on formvar coated grids were sputter coated with a 1 nm thick Cr film before employing scanning transmission (STEM)/SEM modes of the FESEM to establish non-decorative image accuracy in the transmitted electron mode. PMID:7701300

  13. Variable Temperature Setup for Scanning Electron Microscopy in Liquids and Atmospheric Pressure Gaseous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Asadi, Ahmed; Zhang, Jie; Li, Jianbo; Denault, Lauraine; Potyrailo, Radislav; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2014-03-01

    A thermoelectric cooling / heating setup for commercial Quantomix QX WETSEM scanning electron microscopy environmental cells was designed and tested. This addition allows extending ambient pressure in situ studies to be conducted in a wide temperature range both in liquid and gaseous environments. Instead of cooling/heating the entire body of QX-WETCELL, ultrathin polyimide electron transparent membrane window supported by metal mesh on the top of the cell has been used as an agent for heat transfer to/ from the Pelltier element. A butterfly wing of Morph sulkowskyi has been used as a model object in the QX-WETCELL's chamber due to its unique micro/nanostructure and peculiar wettability behavior. The dynamics of the water desorption, condensation and freezing processes were observed complementary using both optical microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy in vivo. The observations revel that the initial droplet formation were most likely taking place on the top of the wing ridges due to the waxy component of its surface. In addition, The SEM observation showed that the high intensity electron beam can heat the butterfly wing locally delaying the water condensation and freezing processes.

  14. Application of low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy for renal biopsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hiroki; Uozaki, Hiroshi; Tojo, Akihiro; Hirashima, Sayuri; Inaga, Sumire; Sakuma, Kei; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2012-09-15

    Low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM) has been developed which enables the observation of soft, moist, and electrically insulating materials without any pretreatment unlike conventional scanning electron microscopy, in which samples must be solid, dry and usually electrically conductive. The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of LV-SEM for renal biopsy specimens. We analyzed 20 renal biopsy samples obtained for diagnostic purposes. The sections were stained with periodic acid methenamine silver to enhance the contrast, and subsequently examined by LV-SEM. LV-SEM showed a precise and fine structure of the glomerulus in both formalin fixed paraffin and glutaraldehyde-osmium tetroxide-fixed epoxy resin sections up to 10,000-fold magnification. The spike formation on the basement membrane was clearly observed in the membranous nephropathy samples. Similarly to transmission electron microscopy, electron dense deposits were observed in the epoxy resin sections of the IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy samples. LV-SEM could accurately show various glomerular lesions at high magnification after a simple and rapid processing of the samples. We consider that this is a novel and useful diagnostic tool for renal pathologies. PMID:22795691

  15. Specimen preparation by ion beam slope cutting for characterization of ductile damage by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Gerstein, Gregory; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate ductile damage in parts made by cold sheet-bulk metal forming a suited specimen preparation is required to observe the microstructure and defects such as voids by electron microscopy. By means of ion beam slope cutting both a targeted material removal can be applied and mechanical or thermal influences during preparation avoided. In combination with scanning electron microscopy this method allows to examine voids in the submicron range and thus to analyze early stages of ductile damage. In addition, a relief structure is formed by the selectivity of the ion bombardment, which depends on grain orientation and microstructural defects. The formation of these relief structures is studied using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction and the use of this side effect to interpret the microstructural mechanisms of voids formation by plastic deformation is discussed. A comprehensive investigation of the suitability of ion beam milling to analyze ductile damage is given at the examples of a ferritic deep drawing steel and a dual phase steel. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:321-327, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26854331

  16. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) as an approach for nanoparticle detection inside cells.

    PubMed

    Havrdova, M; Polakova, K; Skopalik, J; Vujtek, M; Mokdad, A; Homolkova, M; Tucek, J; Nebesarova, J; Zboril, R

    2014-12-01

    When developing new nanoparticles for bio-applications, it is important to fully characterize the nanoparticle's behavior in biological systems. The most common techniques employed for mapping nanoparticles inside cells include transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). These techniques entail passing an electron beam through a thin specimen. STEM or TEM imaging is often used for the detection of nanoparticles inside cellular organelles. However, lengthy sample preparation is required (i.e., fixation, dehydration, drying, resin embedding, and cutting). In the present work, a new matrix (FTO glass) for biological samples was used and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to generate images comparable to those obtained by TEM. Using FE-SEM, nanoparticle images were acquired inside endo/lysosomes without disruption of the cellular shape. Furthermore, the initial steps of nanoparticle incorporation into the cells were captured. In addition, the conductive FTO glass endowed the sample with high stability under the required accelerating voltage. Owing to these features of the sample, further analyses could be performed (material contrast and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS)), which confirmed the presence of nanoparticles inside the cells. The results showed that FE-SEM can enable detailed characterization of nanoparticles in endosomes without the need for contrast staining or metal coating of the sample. Images showing the intracellular distribution of nanoparticles together with cellular morphology can give important information on the biocompatibility and demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle utilization in medicine. PMID:25173605

  17. A high-speed area detector for novel imaging techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Caswell, T A; Ercius, P; Tate, M W; Ercan, A; Gruner, S M; Muller, D A

    2009-03-01

    A scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) produces a convergent beam electron diffraction pattern at each position of a raster scan with a focused electron beam, but recording this information poses major challenges for gathering and storing such large data sets in a timely manner and with sufficient dynamic range. To investigate the crystalline structure of materials, a 16x16 analog pixel array detector (PAD) is used to replace the traditional detectors and retain the diffraction information at every STEM raster position. The PAD, unlike a charge-coupled device (CCD) or photomultiplier tube (PMT), directly images 120-200keV electrons with relatively little radiation damage, exhibits no afterglow and limits crosstalk between adjacent pixels. Traditional STEM imaging modes can still be performed by the PAD with a 1.1kHz frame rate, which allows post-acquisition control over imaging conditions and enables novel imaging techniques based on the retained crystalline information. Techniques for rapid, semi-automatic crystal grain segmentation with sub-nanometer resolution are described using cross-correlation, sub-region integration, and other post-processing methods. PMID:19162398

  18. The probe profile and lateral resolution of scanning transmission electron microscopy of thick specimens.

    PubMed

    Demers, Hendrix; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Drouin, Dominique; de Jonge, Niels

    2012-06-01

    Lateral profiles of the electron probe of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were simulated at different vertical positions in a micrometers-thick carbon sample. The simulations were carried out using the Monte Carlo method in CASINO software. A model was developed to fit the probe profiles. The model consisted of the sum of a Gaussian function describing the central peak of the profile and two exponential decay functions describing the tail of the profile. Calculations were performed to investigate the fraction of unscattered electrons as a function of the vertical position of the probe in the sample. Line scans were also simulated over gold nanoparticles at the bottom of a carbon film to calculate the achievable resolution as a function of the sample thickness and the number of electrons. The resolution was shown to be noise limited for film thicknesses less than 1 μm. Probe broadening limited the resolution for thicker films. The validity of the simulation method was verified by comparing simulated data with experimental data. The simulation method can be used as quantitative method to predict STEM performance or to interpret STEM images of thick specimens. PMID:22564444

  19. SXR Continuum Radiation Transmitted Through Metallic Filters: An Analytical Approach To Fast Electron Temperature Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Tritz, K.; Kramer, T.; Stutman, D.; Finkentha, M.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.

    2010-08-26

    A new set of analytic formulae describes the transmission of soft X-ray (SXR) continuum radiation through a metallic foil for its application to fast electron temperature measurements in fusion plasmas. This novel approach shows good agreement with numerical calculations over a wide range of plasma temperatures in contrast with the solutions obtained when using a transmission approximated by a single-Heaviside function [S. von Goeler, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 20, 599, (1999)]. The new analytic formulae can improve the interpretation of the experimental results and thus contribute in obtaining fast teperature measurements in between intermittent Thomson Scattering data.

  20. A Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeter System for the Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy Performed on a Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehata, K.; Hara, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Hidaka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2015-11-01

    We are conducting the development of a transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter system for energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), performed using a scanning-transmission electron microscope (STEM). The operating temperature of the TES microcalorimeter was maintained using a compact dry 3 He-4 He dilution refrigerator. This was pre-cooled by a remote helium cooling loop system and a Gifford-McMahon cooler. These conditions allowed for high-resolution STEM imaging to be achieved. A single-pixel TES microcalorimeter with a polycapillary optic was selected to demonstrate the analytical operation of the EDS system in the STEM. For a Ti-It-Pt sample, an X-ray energy resolution of 8.6 eV full-width at half maximum (FWHM) was obtained at Ir M_{α 1} , Pt M_{α 1} , and Ir M_{β } . Using an electron device sample, element distribution maps of Si, Ti, and W were obtained using a Si K_{α 1} X-ray energy resolution of 9.7 eV FWHM.

  1. A Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeter System for the Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy Performed on a Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehata, K.; Hara, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Hidaka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2016-07-01

    We are conducting the development of a transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter system for energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), performed using a scanning-transmission electron microscope (STEM). The operating temperature of the TES microcalorimeter was maintained using a compact dry 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. This was pre-cooled by a remote helium cooling loop system and a Gifford-McMahon cooler. These conditions allowed for high-resolution STEM imaging to be achieved. A single-pixel TES microcalorimeter with a polycapillary optic was selected to demonstrate the analytical operation of the EDS system in the STEM. For a Ti-It-Pt sample, an X-ray energy resolution of 8.6 eV full-width at half maximum (FWHM) was obtained at Ir M_{α 1}, Pt M_{α 1}, and Ir M_{β }. Using an electron device sample, element distribution maps of Si, Ti, and W were obtained using a Si K_{α 1} X-ray energy resolution of 9.7 eV FWHM.

  2. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachtel, J. A.; Marvinney, C.; Mouti, A.; Mayo, D.; Mu, R.; Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A. R.; Chisholm, M. F.; Haglund, R. F.; Pantelides, S. T.

    2016-04-01

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows us to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. The approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications.

  3. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hachtel, J A; Marvinney, C; Mouti, A; Mayo, D; Mu, R; Pennycook, S J; Lupini, A R; Chisholm, M F; Haglund, R F; Pantelides, S T

    2016-04-15

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows us to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. The approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications. PMID:26934391

  4. New area detector for atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Naoya; Kohno, Yuji; Findlay, Scott D; Sawada, Hidetaka; Kondo, Yukihito; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    A new area detector for atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is developed and tested. The circular detector is divided into 16 segments which are individually optically coupled with photomultiplier tubes. Thus, 16 atomic-resolution STEM images which are sensitive to the spatial distribution of scattered electrons on the detector plane can be simultaneously obtained. This new detector can be potentially used not only for the simultaneous formation of common bright-field, low-angle annular dark-field and high-angle annular dark-field images, but also for the quantification of images by detecting the full range of scattered electrons and even for exploring novel atomic-resolution imaging modes by post-processing combination of the individual images. PMID:20406732

  5. In situ nanomechanical testing in focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gianola, D. S.; Sedlmayr, A.; Moenig, R.; Kraft, O.; Volkert, C. A.; Major, R. C.; Cyrankowski, E.; Asif, S. A. S.; Warren, O. L.

    2011-06-15

    The recent interest in size-dependent deformation of micro- and nanoscale materials has paralleled both technological miniaturization and advancements in imaging and small-scale mechanical testing methods. Here we describe a quantitative in situ nanomechanical testing approach adapted to a dual-beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscope. A transducer based on a three-plate capacitor system is used for high-fidelity force and displacement measurements. Specimen manipulation, transfer, and alignment are performed using a manipulator, independently controlled positioners, and the focused ion beam. Gripping of specimens is achieved using electron-beam assisted Pt-organic deposition. Local strain measurements are obtained using digital image correlation of electron images taken during testing. Examples showing results for tensile testing of single-crystalline metallic nanowires and compression of nanoporous Au pillars will be presented in the context of size effects on mechanical behavior and highlight some of the challenges of conducting nanomechanical testing in vacuum environments.

  6. Detectable distance calculations for a visual navigation system using a scanning semiconductor laser with electronic pumping.

    PubMed

    Kaloshin, G A; Shishkin, S A

    2011-07-10

    Results of detectable distance calculations for a visual navigation system based on a scanning semiconductor laser with electronic pumping (SSLEP) are presented. A semiconductor crystal in the laser is pumped with an electron beam, which is scanned across the crystal in the television-frame scan mode. The navigation system forms three orientation sectors with radiation wavelengths λ=0.52, 0.57, and 0.63 μm. Herein, calculations of energetic characteristics of output radiation are performed for the navigation system described above. The calculations were performed using the Range software package, which considers microphysical and optical characteristics of aerosol and observation path geometry for the case of coastal environment. Finally, comparison of results of the calculations with data obtained in marine and flight experiments is presented. It is demonstrated that minor discrepancies between calculated and measured values of detectable distance are observed in the coastal haze at lower values of meteorological visibility range S(m). As S(m) increases, the discrepancies become significant. PMID:21743551

  7. Simulation of multicomponent losses in electron beam melting and refining at varying scan frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J.; Avyle, J.V.D.; Damkroger, B.

    1995-12-31

    A two-stage model is presented to describe alloy element evaporation rates from molten metal due to transient local heating by an electron beam. The first stage is a simulation of transient phenomena near the melt surface due to periodic heating by a scanning beam, the output of which is the relationship between operating parameters, surface temperature, and evaporation rate. At high scan rates, this can be done using a simple one-dimensional heat transfer model of the surface layer; at lower scan rates, a more complex three-dimensional model with fluid flow and periodic boundary conditions is necessary. The second stage couples this evaporation-surface temperature relationship with a larger steady state heat transfer and fluid flow model of an entire melting hearth or mold, in order to calculate local and total evaporation rates. Predictions are compared with experimental results from Sandia`s 310-kW electron beam melting furnace, in which evaporation rates and vapor compositions were studied in pure titanium and Ti-6%Al-4%V alloy. Evaporation rates were estimated from rate of condensation on a substrate held over the hearth, and were characterized as a function of beam power (10{sup {minus}3}, 10{sup {minus}4} and 10{sup {minus}5} torr).

  8. Electron Beam Return-Current Losses in Solar Flares: Initial Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated electrons play an important role in the energetics of solar flares. Understanding the process or processes that accelerate these electrons to high, nonthermal energies also depends on understanding the evolution of these electrons between the acceleration region and the region where they are observed through their hard X-ray or radio emission. Energy losses in the co-spatial electric field that drives the current-neutralizing return current can flatten the electron distribution toward low energies. This in turn flattens the corresponding bremsstrahlung hard X-ray spectrum toward low energies. The lost electron beam energy also enhances heating in the coronal part of the flare loop. Extending earlier work by Knight & Sturrock (1977), Emslie (1980), Diakonov & Somov (1988), and Litvinenko & Somov (1991), I have derived analytical and semi-analytical results for the nonthermal electron distribution function and the self-consistent electric field strength in the presence of a steady-state return-current. I review these results, presented previously at the 2009 SPD Meeting in Boulder, CO, and compare them and computed X-ray spectra with numerical results obtained by Zharkova & Gordovskii (2005, 2006). The phYSical significance of similarities and differences in the results will be emphasized. This work is supported by NASA's Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  9. Optical and analytical electron microscopy of ductility-dip cracking in Ni-base filler metal 52 -- Initial studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cola, M.J.; Teter, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    Microcharacterization studies were performed on weld-metal microstructures of a Ni-base filler metal. Specimens were taken from the fusion zone and the weld-metal heat-affected zone of transverse- and spot-Varestraint welds. The filler metal was first deposited onto a steel substrate by hot-wire, gas tungsten arc welding before specimen removal. Optical microscopy indicates the crack morphology is intergranular and is along high-angle, migrated grain boundaries. At low magnifications, scanning electron microscopy reveals a relatively smooth fracture surface. However, at higher magnifications the grain faces exhibit microductility. Analytical electron microscopy reveals high-angle, migrated grain boundaries decorated with MC (Ti, Cr) and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (Cr, Ni, Fe) precipitates ranging from 10 to 200 n. Auger electron spectroscopy of pre-strained Gleeble specimens fractured in situ revealed internal ductility-dip cracks decorated with magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel particles (1,000 nm).

  10. A scanning electron microscope technique for studying the sclerites of Cichlidogyrus.

    PubMed

    Fannes, Wouter; Vanhove, Maarten P M; Huyse, Tine; Paladini, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    The genus Cichlidogyrus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) includes more than 90 species, most of which are gill parasites of African cichlid fishes. Cichlidogyrus has been studied extensively in recent years, but scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations of the isolated hard parts have not yet been undertaken. In this paper, we describe a method for isolating and scanning the sclerites of individual Cichlidogyrus worms. Twenty-year-old, formol-fixed specimens of Cichlidogyrus casuarinus were subjected to proteinase K digestion in order to release the sclerites from the surrounding soft tissues. SEM micrographs of the haptoral sclerites and the male copulatory organ are presented. The ability to digest formol-fixed specimens makes this method a useful tool for the study of historical museum collections. PMID:25828814

  11. Studies of the fossil dinosaur bone in the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Pawlicki, R

    1975-01-01

    A fossil dinosaur bone, 80 million years old, was subjected to investigation in the scanning microscope. The bone surfaces to be examined were prepared with appropritely modified methods used in the technique of replication in transmission electron microscopy. In the scanning microscope pictures of vascular canals were obtained. The walls of these canals were shown to be formed of collagen fibrils. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the internal surface of the canal wall is made up of bundles of collagen fibrils which run obliquely, corkscrewwise, and in the form of plexus to the long axis of tke canal; Besides, osteocytes of the dinosaur bone were isolated and pictures of their spatial structure together with characteristic points of departure of processes from the cell body were obtained. PMID:1224770

  12. Depth-resolved whole-field displacement measurement by wavelength-scanning electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Huntley, Jonathan M.; Wildman, Ricky D.

    2005-07-01

    We show, for the first time to our knowledge, how wavelength-scanning interferometry can be used to measure depth-resolved displacement fields through semitransparent scattering surfaces. Temporal sequences of speckle interferograms are recorded while the wavelength of the laser is tuned at a constant rate. Fourier transformation of the resultant three-dimensional (3-D) intensity distribution along the time axis reconstructs the scattering potential within the medium, and changes in the 3-D phase distribution measured between two separate scans provide the out-of-plane component of the 3-D displacement field. The principle of the technique is explained in detail and illustrated with a proof-of-principle experiment involving two independently tilted semitransparent scattering surfaces. Results are validated by standard two-beam electronic speckle pattern interferometry.

  13. Energy-selective SESD imaging utilizing a CMA. [Scanning Electron Stimulated Desorption with Cylindrical Mirror Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, L. A.; Soria, F.; Poppa, H.

    1980-01-01

    A particularly simple conversion of a scanning Auger system for ESD ion energy distributions and scanning ESD has been developed. This approach combines the advantages of the small spot-size electron guns and mapping systems developed for SAM with the capability of ESD for the detection of hydrogen. Our intended use for the device is detection and mapping of surface concentrations of hydrogen on metals. The characteristics of SESD are illustrated with the preliminary results of an investigation into the ESD properties of hydrogenic adsorbates on Nb. It is shown that the ESDIED exhibit distinct differences indicative of the surface preparation, and that the ESD ion angular distributions have an effect on the observed contrast relationships in SESD.

  14. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Chikara; Manaka, Sachie; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Miyata, Makoto; Maruyama, Yuusuke

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycoplasma mobile was observed in buffer with the Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M. mobile attached to sialic acid on the SiN film surface within minutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells were observed at low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASEM should promote study and early-stage diagnosis of mycoplasma. -- Abstract: Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3 {mu}m-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis.

  15. Large-scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Nanotomy) of Healthy and Injured Zebrafish Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Jeroen; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Wolters, Anouk H. G.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale 2D electron microscopy (EM), or nanotomy, is the tissue-wide application of nanoscale resolution electron microscopy. Others and we previously applied large scale EM to human skin pancreatic islets, tissue culture and whole zebrafish larvae1-7. Here we describe a universally applicable method for tissue-scale scanning EM for unbiased detection of sub-cellular and molecular features. Nanotomy was applied to investigate the healthy and a neurodegenerative zebrafish brain. Our method is based on standardized EM sample preparation protocols: Fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium, followed by epoxy-resin embedding, ultrathin sectioning and mounting of ultrathin-sections on one-hole grids, followed by post staining with uranyl and lead. Large-scale 2D EM mosaic images are acquired using a scanning EM connected to an external large area scan generator using scanning transmission EM (STEM). Large scale EM images are typically ~ 5 - 50 G pixels in size, and best viewed using zoomable HTML files, which can be opened in any web browser, similar to online geographical HTML maps. This method can be applied to (human) tissue, cross sections of whole animals as well as tissue culture1-5. Here, zebrafish brains were analyzed in a non-invasive neuronal ablation model. We visualize within a single dataset tissue, cellular and subcellular changes which can be quantified in various cell types including neurons and microglia, the brain's macrophages. In addition, nanotomy facilitates the correlation of EM with light microscopy (CLEM)8 on the same tissue, as large surface areas previously imaged using fluorescent microscopy, can subsequently be subjected to large area EM, resulting in the nano-anatomy (nanotomy) of tissues. In all, nanotomy allows unbiased detection of features at EM level in a tissue-wide quantifiable manner. PMID:27285162

  16. Large-scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Nanotomy) of Healthy and Injured Zebrafish Brain.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Jeroen; Kalicharan, Ruby D; Wolters, Anouk H G; van Ham, Tjakko J; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale 2D electron microscopy (EM), or nanotomy, is the tissue-wide application of nanoscale resolution electron microscopy. Others and we previously applied large scale EM to human skin pancreatic islets, tissue culture and whole zebrafish larvae(1-7). Here we describe a universally applicable method for tissue-scale scanning EM for unbiased detection of sub-cellular and molecular features. Nanotomy was applied to investigate the healthy and a neurodegenerative zebrafish brain. Our method is based on standardized EM sample preparation protocols: Fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium, followed by epoxy-resin embedding, ultrathin sectioning and mounting of ultrathin-sections on one-hole grids, followed by post staining with uranyl and lead. Large-scale 2D EM mosaic images are acquired using a scanning EM connected to an external large area scan generator using scanning transmission EM (STEM). Large scale EM images are typically ~ 5 - 50 G pixels in size, and best viewed using zoomable HTML files, which can be opened in any web browser, similar to online geographical HTML maps. This method can be applied to (human) tissue, cross sections of whole animals as well as tissue culture(1-5). Here, zebrafish brains were analyzed in a non-invasive neuronal ablation model. We visualize within a single dataset tissue, cellular and subcellular changes which can be quantified in various cell types including neurons and microglia, the brain's macrophages. In addition, nanotomy facilitates the correlation of EM with light microscopy (CLEM)(8) on the same tissue, as large surface areas previously imaged using fluorescent microscopy, can subsequently be subjected to large area EM, resulting in the nano-anatomy (nanotomy) of tissues. In all, nanotomy allows unbiased detection of features at EM level in a tissue-wide quantifiable manner. PMID:27285162

  17. 3D imaging of the early embryonic chicken heart with focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, Monique Y.; Gahan, Curran G.; López, Claudia S.; Thornburg, Kent L.; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Early embryonic heart development is a period of dynamic growth and remodeling, with rapid changes occurring at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. A detailed understanding of the events that establish the components of the heart wall has been hampered by a lack of methodologies for three dimensional (3D), high-resolution imaging. Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) is a novel technology for imaging 3D tissue volumes at the subcellular level. FIB-SEM alternates between imaging the block face with a scanning electron beam and milling away thin sections of tissue with a focused ion beam, allowing for collection and analysis of 3D data. FIB-SEM was used to image the three layers of the day 4 chicken embryo heart: myocardium, cardiac jelly, and endocardium. Individual images obtained with FIB-SEM were comparable in quality and resolution to those obtained with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Up to 1100 serial images were obtained in 4 nm increments at 4.88 nm resolution, and image stacks were aligned to create volumes 800–1500 μm3 in size. Segmentation of organelles revealed their organization and distinct volume fractions between cardiac wall layers. We conclude that FIB-SEM is a powerful modality for 3D subcellular imaging of the embryonic heart wall. PMID:24742339

  18. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of ampullary segment of oviduct during estrous cycle in caprines.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Singh, R; Bhardwaj, J K

    2015-01-01

    The ampullary segment of the mammalian oviduct provides suitable milieu for fertilization and development of zygote before implantation into uterus. It is, therefore, in the present study, the cyclic changes in the morphology of ampullary segment of goat oviduct were studied during follicular and luteal phases using scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Topographical analysis revealed the presence of uniformly ciliated ampullary epithelia, concealing apical processes of non-ciliated cells along with bulbous secretory cells during follicular phase. The luteal phase was marked with decline in number of ciliated cells with increased occurrence of secretory cells. The ultrastructure analysis has demonstrated the presence of indented nuclear membrane, supranuclear cytoplasm, secretory granules, rough endoplasmic reticulum, large lipid droplets, apically located glycogen masses, oval shaped mitochondria in the secretory cells. The ciliated cells were characterized by the presence of elongated nuclei, abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum, oval or spherical shaped mitochondria with crecentric cristae during follicular phase. However, in the luteal phase, secretory cells were possessing highly indented nucleus with diffused electron dense chromatin, hyaline nucleosol, increased number of lipid droplets. The ciliated cells had numerous fibrous granules and basal bodies. The parallel use of scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques has enabled us to examine the cyclic and hormone dependent changes occurring in the topography and fine structure of epithelium of ampullary segment and its cells during different reproductive phases that will be great help in understanding major bottle neck that limits success rate in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer technology. PMID:25491952

  19. Sparsity based noise removal from low dose scanning electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, A.; Fodor, P. S.

    2015-03-01

    Scanning electron microscopes are some of the most versatile tools for imaging materials with nanometer resolution. However, images collected at high scan rates to increase throughput and avoid sample damage, suffer from low signalto- noise ratio (SNR) as a result of the Poisson distributed shot noise associated with the electron production and interaction with the surface imaged. The signal is further degraded by additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) from the detection electronics. In this work, denoising frameworks are applied to this type of images, taking advantage of their sparsity character, along with a methodology for determining the AWGN. A variance stabilization technique is applied to the raw data followed by a patch-based denoising algorithm. Results are presented both for images with known levels of mixed Poisson-Gaussian noise, and for raw images. The quality of the image reconstruction is assessed based both on the PSNR as well as on measures specific to the application of the data collected. These include accurate identification of objects of interest and structural similarity. High-quality results are recovered from noisy observations collected at short dwell times that avoid sample damage.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy study of adhesion in sea urchin blastulae. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowther, Susan D.

    1988-01-01

    The dissociation supernatant (DS) isolated by disaggregating Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae in calcium- and magnesium-free seawater specifically promotes reaggregation of S. purpuratus blastula cells. The purpose of this study was to use scanning electron microscopy to examine the gross morphology of aggregates formed in the presence of DS to see if it resembles adhesion in partially dissociated blastulae. A new reaggregation procedure developed here, using large volumes of cell suspension and a large diameter of rotation, was utilized to obtain sufficient quantities of aggregates for scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that aggregates formed in the presence of DS resemble partially dissociated intact embryos in terms of the direct cell-cell adhesion observed. DS did not cause aggregation to form as a result of the entrapment of cells in masses of extracellular material. These studies provide the groundwork for further studies using transmission electron microscopy to more precisely define the adhesive contacts made by cells in the presence of the putative adhesion molecules present in DS.

  1. Photosynthetic Electron Transport in Single Guard Cells as Measured by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Tsionsky, M.; Cardon, Z. G.; Bard, A. J.; Jackson, R. B.

    1997-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is a powerful new tool for studying chemical and biological processes. It records changes in faradaic current as a microelectrode ([less than equal]7 [mu]m in diameter) is moved across the surface of a sample. The current varies as a function of both distance from the surface and the surface's chemical and electrical properties. We used SECM to examine in vivo topography and photosynthetic electron transport of individual guard cells in Tradescantia fluminensis, to our knowledge the first such analysis for an intact plant. We measured surface topography at the micrometer level and concentration profiles of O2 evolved in photosynthetic electron transport. Comparison of topography and oxygen profiles above single stomatal complexes clearly showed photosynthetic electron transport in guard cells, as indicated by induction of O2 evolution by photosynthetically active radiation. SECM is unique in its ability to measure topography and chemical fluxes, combining some of the attributes of patch clamping with scanning tunneling microscopy. In this paper we suggest several questions in plant physiology that it might address. PMID:12223651

  2. Low temperature scanning electron microscopy of dog and guinea-pig hyaline articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, D L; O'Connor, P; Oates, K

    1981-01-01

    Fifty seven blocks of cartilage excised from the femoral condyles of 20 beagle dogs, and whole lower ends of 5 guinea-pig femora, were examined at -195 degrees (78 K), by scanning electron microscopy. The unfixed tissue, taken into slushy nitrogen at -210 degrees (63 K), was not exposed to atmospheric air after quenching and remained fully hydrated throughout long periods of observation. Images susceptible to analysis were obtained from washed and from unwashed cartilage surfaces. Preliminary coating with gold or with aluminium, known to be possible without exposing cold cartilage surfaces to changes in temperature likely to cause water loss by sublimation, was valuable in minimising charging and in facilitating the recording of electron images at higher magnifications. Although examination was possible without coating, the resultant images were of low resolution. Microscopy revealed a pattern of secondary surface irregularities of tertiary elevations closely resembling those seen by the conventional scanning electron microscopy of fixed, dehydrated hyaline cartilage. However, the pattern of tertiary surface structures was predominantly that of elevations, not of hollows. Quaternary surface ridges were common on the surfaces of excised dog cartilage blocks and were not seen on the surfaces of guinea-pig cartilage which remained on the femoral condyles. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:7024225

  3. Three-dimensional architecture of podocytes revealed by block-face scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Sadayama, Shoji; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Koike, Masato; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Block-face imaging is a scanning electron microscopic technique which enables easier acquisition of serial ultrastructural images directly from the surface of resin-embedded biological samples with a similar quality to transmission electron micrographs. In the present study, we analyzed the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes using serial block-face imaging. It was previously believed that podocytes are divided into three kinds of subcellular compartment: cell body, primary process, and foot process, which are simply aligned in this order. When the reconstructed podocytes were viewed from their basal side, the foot processes were branched from a ridge-like prominence, which was formed on the basal surface of the primary process and was similar to the usual foot processes in structure. Moreover, from the cell body, the foot processes were also emerged via the ridge-like prominence, as found in the primary process. The ridge-like prominence anchored the cell body and primary process to the glomerular basement membrane, and connected the foot processes to the cell body and primary process. In conclusion, serial block-face imaging is a powerful tool for clear understanding the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes through its ability to reveal novel structures which were difficult to determine by conventional transmission and scanning electron microscopes alone. PMID:25759085

  4. Use of analytical electron microscopy for the individual particle analysis of the Arctic haze aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    To explore the usefulness of the analytical electron microscope for the analysis and source apportionment of individual aerosol particles, aerosol samples amenable to individual particle analysis were collected from a remote region. These samples were from the Arctic haze aerosol, and were collected on board a research aircraft during the Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program in spring 1983. Before elemental analysis by analytical electron microscopy (AEM) could be performed, an extensive relative sensitivity factor study was undertaken to calibrate the microscope/detector system for quanitative x-ray microanalysis. Subsequently determined elemental data, along with morphological information, were used to group the particles into classes with similar characteristics. Forty-seven classes of particles were found in the Arctic samples, the most populous classes containing H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ droplets, carbonaceous particles, lithophilic particles, CaSO/sub 4/ or NaCl. Several classes containing anthropogenic particles were also identified.

  5. An analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite indium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shulong; Liu, Hongxia; Song, Xin; Guo, Yulong; Yang, Zhaonian

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of anisotropic transport properties and develops an anisotropic low-field electron analytical mobility model for wurtzite indium nitride (InN). For the different effective masses in the Γ-A and Γ-M directions of the lowest valley, both the transient and steady state transport behaviors of wurtzite InN show different transport characteristics in the two directions. From the relationship between velocity and electric field, the difference is more obvious when the electric field is low in the two directions. To make an accurate description of the anisotropic transport properties under low field, for the first time, we present an analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite InN. The effects of different ionized impurity scattering models on the low-field mobility calculated by Monte Carlo method (Conwell-Weisskopf and Brooks-Herring method) are also considered.

  6. Electronic structure of carbon nanotube systems measured with scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbaker, Daniel Jay

    Carbon fullerenes are unusually structured molecules with robust mechanical and electronic properties. Their versatility is astounding; envisioned applications range from field emission displays to impregnated metal composites, battery storage media, and nanoelectronic devices. The combination of simple constituency, diverse behavior, and ease of fabrication makes these materials a cornerstone topic in current research. This thesis details scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments investigating how carbon nanotube fullerenes interact with and couple to their local environment. Scanning tunneling microscopy continues to be a key method for characterizing fullerenes, particularly in regards to their electronic properties. The atomic scale nature of this technique makes it uniquely suited for observing individual molecules and determining correlations between locally measured electronic properties and the particular environment of the molecule. The primary subject of this study is single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which were observed under various perturbative influences resulting in measurable changes in the electronic structure. Additionally, fullerene heterostructures formed by the encapsulation of C60 molecules within the hollow interiors of SWNTs were characterized for the first time with STM. These novel macromolecules (dubbed "peapods") demonstrate the potential for custom engineering the properties of fullerene materials. Measurements indicate that the properties of individual nanotubes depend sensitively on local interactions. In particular, pronounced changes in electronic behavior are observed in nanotubes exhibiting mechanical distortion, interacting with extrinsic materials (including other nanotubes), and possessing intrinsic defects in the atomic lattice. In fullerene peapods, while no discernable change in the atomic ordering of the encapsulating nanotubes was evident, the presence of interior C60 molecules has a dramatic effect on the

  7. Updated analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitation - II. Mixed energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Dobranskis, R. R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we consider simultaneous analytical solutions of continuity equations for electron beam precipitation (a) in collisional losses and (b) in ohmic losses, or mixed energy losses (MEL) by applying the iterative method to calculate the resulting differential densities at given precipitation depth. The differential densities of precipitating electrons derived from the analytical solutions for MELs reveal increased flattening at energies below 10-30 keV compared to a pure collisional case. This flattening becomes stronger with an increasing precipitation depth turning into a positive slope at greater precipitation depths in the chromosphere resulting in a differential density distribution with maximum that shifts towards higher energies with increase in column depth, while the differential densities combining precipitating and returning electrons are higher at lower energies than those for a pure collisional case. The resulting hard X-ray (HXR) emission produced by the beams with different initial energy fluxes and spectral indices is calculated using the MEL approach for different ratios between the differential densities of precipitating and returning electrons. The number of returning electrons can be even further enhanced by a magnetic mirroring, not considered in the present model, while dominating at lower atmospheric depths where the magnetic convergence and magnitude are the highest. The proposed MEL approach provides an opportunity to account simultaneously for both collisional and ohmic losses in flaring events, which can be used for a quick spectral fitting of HXR spectra and evaluation of a fraction of returning electrons versus precipitating ones. The semi-analytical MEL approach is used for spectral fitting to Reuven High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observations of nine C, M and X class flares revealing a close fit to the observations and good resemblance to numerical FP solutions.

  8. Boron concentration profiling by high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy in homoepitaxial δ-doped diamond layers

    SciTech Connect

    Araújo, D.; Alegre, M. P.; Piñero, J. C.; Fiori, A.; Bustarret, E.; Jomard, F.

    2013-07-22

    To develop further diamond related devices, the concentration and spatial location of dopants should be controlled down to the nanometer scale. Scanning transmission electron microscopy using the high angle annular dark field mode is shown to be sensitive to boron doping in diamond epilayers. An analytical procedure is described, whereby local boron concentrations above 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} were quantitatively derived down to nanometer resolution from the signal dependence on thickness and boron content. Experimental boron local doping profiles measured on diamond p{sup −}/p{sup ++}/p{sup −} multilayers are compared to macroscopic profiles obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry, avoiding reported artefacts.

  9. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Patricia K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Mahaffee, Walt F.

    2011-08-01

    The dual beam scanning electron microscope, equipped with both a focused ion- and scanning electron- beam (FIB SEM) is a novel tool for the exploration of the subsurface structure of biological tissues. The FIB can remove a predetermined amount of material from a selected site to allow for subsurface exploration and when coupled with SEM or scanning ion- beam microscopy (SIM) could be suitable to examine the subsurface structure of bacterial biofilms on the leaf surface. The suitability of chemical and cryofixation was examined for use with the FIB SEM to examine bacterial biofilms on leaf surfaces. The biological control agent, Burkholderia pyroccinia FP62, that rapidly colonizes the leaf surface and forms biofilms, was inoculated onto geranium leaves and incubated in a greenhouse for 7 or 14 days. Cryofixation was not suitable for examination of leaf biofilms because it created a frozen layer over the leaf surface that cracked when exposed to the electron beam and the protective cap required for FIB milling could not be accurately deposited. With chemically fixed samples, it was possible to precisely FIB mill a single cross section (5 µm) or sequential cross sections from a single site without any damage to the surrounding surface. Biofilms, 7 days post-inoculation (DPI), were composed of 2 to 5 bacterial cell layers while biofilms 14 DPI ranged from 5 to greater than 30 cell layers. Empty spaces between bacteria cells in the subsurface structure were observed in biofilms 7- and 14-DPI. Sequential cross sections inferred that the empty spaces were often continuous between FP62 cells and could possibly make up a network of channels throughout the biofilm. FIB SEM was a useful tool to observe the subsurface composition of a foliar biofilm.

  10. Use of fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy as tools in teaching biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Nabarun; Silva, Jessica; Vazquez, Aracely; Das, A. B.; Smith, Don W.

    2011-06-01

    Recent nationwide surveys reveal significant decline in students' interest in Math and Sciences. The objective of this project was to inspire young minds in using various techniques involved in Sciences including Scanning Electron Microscopy. We used Scanning Electron Microscope in demonstrating various types of Biological samples. An SEM Tabletop model in the past decade has revolutionized the use of Scanning Electron Microscopes. Using SEM Tabletop model TM 1000 we studied biological specimens of fungal spores, pollen grains, diatoms, plant fibers, dust mites, insect parts and leaf surfaces. We also used fluorescence microscopy to view, to record and analyze various specimens with an Olympus BX40 microscope equipped with FITC and TRITC fluorescent filters, a mercury lamp source, DP-70 digital camera with Image Pro 6.0 software. Micrographs were captured using bright field microscopy, the fluoresceinisothiocyanate (FITC) filter, and the tetramethylrhodamine (TRITC) filter settings at 40X. A high pressure mercury lamp or UV source was used to excite the storage molecules or proteins which exhibited autofluorescence. We used fluorescent microscopy to confirm the localization of sugar beet viruses in plant organs by viewing the vascular bundles in the thin sections of the leaves and other tissues. We worked with the REU summer students on sample preparation and observation on various samples utilizing the SEM. Critical Point Drying (CPD) and metal coating with the sputter coater was followed before observing some cultured specimen and the samples that were soft in textures with high water content. SEM Top allowed investigating the detailed morphological features that can be used for classroom teaching. Undergraduate and graduate researchers studied biological samples of Arthropods, pollen grains and teeth collected from four species of snakes using SEM. This project inspired the research students to pursue their career in higher studies in science and 45% of the

  11. High-Resolution Analytical Electron Microscopy Characterization of Corrosion and Cracking at Buried Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2001-07-01

    Recent results are presented demonstrating the application of cross-sectional analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) to corrosion and cracking in high-temperature water environments. Microstructural, chemical and crystallographic characterization of buried interfaces at near-atomic resolutions is shown to reveal evidence for unexpected local environments, corrosion reactions and material transformations. Information obtained by a wide variety of high-resolution imaging and analysis methods indicates the processes occurring during crack advance and provides insights into the mechanisms controlling environmental degradation.

  12. Analytic matrix elements for the two-electron atomic basis with logarithmic terms

    SciTech Connect

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2014-08-01

    The two-electron problem for the helium-like atoms in S-state is considered. The basis containing the integer powers of ln r, where r is a radial variable of the Fock expansion, is studied. In this basis, the analytic expressions for the matrix elements of the corresponding Hamiltonian are presented. These expressions include only elementary and special functions, what enables very fast and accurate computation of the matrix elements. The decisive contribution of the correct logarithmic terms to the behavior of the two-electron wave function in the vicinity of the triple-coalescence point is reaffirmed.

  13. Analytic derivatives for the Cholesky representation of the two-electron integrals.

    PubMed

    Aquilante, Francesco; Lindh, Roland; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo

    2008-07-21

    We propose a formalism for calculating analytic derivatives of the electronic energy with respect to nuclear coordinates using Cholesky decomposition of the two-electron integrals. The formalism is derived by exploiting the equivalence of Cholesky decomposition and density fitting when a suitable auxiliary basis set is used for expanding atomic orbital product densities in the latter. An implementation of gradients at the nonhybrid density functional theory level is presented, and sample calculations demonstrate that the errors in equilibrium geometries due to the Cholesky representation of the integrals can be controlled by adjusting the decomposition threshold. PMID:18647015

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of a blister roof in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Monteiro, Luciane; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; Rocha, Nara Moreira; Scheffer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa the genetic defect of anchoring fibrils leads to cleavage beneath the basement membrane, with its consequent loss. We performed scanning electron microscopy of an inverted blister roof of a case of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, confirmed by immunomapping and gene sequencing. With a magnification of 2000 times a net attached to the blister roof could be easily identified. This net was composed of intertwined flat fibers. With higher magnifications, different fiber sizes could be observed, some thin fibers measuring around 80 nm and thicker ones measuring between 200 and 300 nm. PMID:24474107

  15. A method of comparing spermatozoa with light and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sauvalle, A M; Prigent, J R; Izard, J Y

    1982-01-01

    A new method of comparing light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy in the study of small cells, such as spermatozoa, that must be examined under oil immersion is described. A grid is etched on the corner of a microscope glass slide, and its inner edges are incised. Its surface area is calculated as a function f the chamber of the critical-point drying apparatus. This method dispenses with the need for any special coverslip and enables the cells to be observed under oil immersion. PMID:6179330

  16. Robust atomic resolution imaging of light elements using scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, S. D.; Shibata, N.; Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Ikuhara, Y.

    2009-11-09

    We show that an annular detector placed within the bright field cone in scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of light elements in crystals. In contrast to common high angle annular dark field imaging, both light and heavy atom columns are visible simultaneously. In contrast to common bright field imaging, the images are directly and robustly interpretable over a large range of thicknesses. We demonstrate this through systematic simulations and present a simple physical model to obtain some insight into the scattering dynamics.

  17. On the visibility of very thin specimens in annular bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P. J.; Klie, R. F.

    2013-07-15

    Annular bright field (ABF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is emerging as an important observation mode for its ability to simultaneously image both heavy and light elements. However, recent results have demonstrated that in the limit of a very thin specimen (a few atomic layers), the ABF and high angle annular dark field (HAADF) signals cease to be intuitively related: a phenomenon which is generally irrelevant when imaging 'normal' specimens. ABF/HAADF STEM observations and multislice image simulations of two catalyst samples of differing atomic weights are presented; it is shown that the nature of the ABF signal is specimen dependent.

  18. Use of low-temperature scanning electron microscopy to observe icicles, ice fabric, rime and frost

    SciTech Connect

    Wergin, W.P.; Rango, A.; Erbe, E.F.

    1996-12-31

    Previous studies showed that low temperature scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can be used to record images of precipitated snow crystals, which collectively form structures that are commonly known as snowflakes. Information about the structure of snow crystals can be used to improve models that estimate the water equivalent of the winter snowpack. These models, which are based on satellite microwave data, have practical use in approximating the quantity of water that will be available for crop irrigation and hydroelectric power. Our previous success of using low temperature SEM to image snow crystals has encouraged us to utilize this technique for other types of frozen aqueous specimens.

  19. Gallocyanin-chromalum for improved scanning electron microscopy of whole nuclei without critical point drying.

    PubMed

    Welter, D A; Schöler, J; Rosenquist, T H

    1978-11-01

    Bone marrow nuclei fixed with modified Carnoy's, then stained with gallocyanin chromalum followed by air drying showed no difference in morphology when compared by means of scanning electron microscopy with similar nuclei prepared by critical point drying. Glutaraldehyde at pH 4.0 and 7.1, mercury-containing Zenker's fluid, and chromalum alone, all of which are considered to be nuclear protein cross-linking fixatives, failed to preserve the nuclear morphology as well as gallocyanin-chromalum or critical point prepared bone marro nuclei. PMID:89717

  20. 3D scanning electron microscopy applied to surface characterization of fluorosed dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Limandri, Silvina; Galván Josa, Víctor; Valentinuzzi, María Cecilia; Chena, María Emilia; Castellano, Gustavo

    2016-05-01

    The enamel surfaces of fluorotic teeth were studied by scanning electron stereomicroscopy. Different whitening treatments were applied to 25 pieces to remove stains caused by fluorosis and their surfaces were characterized by stereomicroscopy in order to obtain functional and amplitude parameters. The topographic features resulting for each treatment were determined through these parameters. The results obtained show that the 3D reconstruction achieved from the SEM stereo pairs is a valuable potential alternative for the surface characterization of this kind of samples. PMID:26930005

  1. A low temperature scanning tunneling microscope for electronic and force spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, R. H. M.; Grande, R.; Lasanta, B.; Riquelme, J. J.; Rubio-Bollinger, G.; Agraiet, N.

    2007-11-15

    In this article, we describe and test a novel way to extend a low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with the capability to measure forces. The tuning fork that we use for this is optimized to have a high quality factor and frequency resolution. Moreover, as this technique is fully compatible with the use of bulk tips, it is possible to combine the force measurements with the use of superconductive or magnetic tips, advantageous for electronic spectroscopy. It also allows us to calibrate both the amplitude and the spring constant of the tuning fork easily, in situ and with high precision.

  2. Scanning electron microscopy of growing dental plaque: a quantitative study with different mouth rinses.

    PubMed

    Jentsch, Holger; Mozaffari, Eshan; Jonas, Ludwig

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the influence of different mouth rinses on dental plaque. Wearing splints with enamel pieces 24 volunteers rinsed with essential oils, amine/stannous fluoride, or chlorhexidine digluconate (0.12%) mouth rinses. After 24, 48, 72, and 96 h the enamel pieces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The counts of cocci and bacilli in different plaque layers and the plaque thickness were almost similar using essential oils and amine/stannous fluoride. These results differed significantly from those of chlorhexidine digluconate mouth rinses. The results for plaque thickness were without significant differences between the groups at any appointment. PMID:23758106

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of scales and its taxonomic application in the fish genus Channa.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sudip; Biswas, Shyama P; Dey, Samujjwal; Bhattacharyya, Shankar P

    2014-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of scales in six species of the fish genus Channa revealed certain features relevant to taxonomic significance. The location of focus, inter-radial distance and width of circuli, inter-circular space, width of radii, shape and size of lepidonts, etc. were found to be different in different species. The importance of SEM of scales in poorly understood taxonomy and phylogeny of the fish genus Channa is discussed with the help of relevant literature. Further, the role of SEM of fish scales for taxonomic applications is discussed in detail. PMID:24870451

  4. Scanning gate microscopy of electronic inhomogeneities in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Steven R.; Collins, Phillip G.

    2010-03-01

    The electronic properties of graphitic carbon devices are primarily determined by the contact metal and the carbon band structure. However, inhomogeneities such as substrate imperfections, surface defects, and mobile contaminants also contribute and can lead to transistor-like behaviors. We experimentally investigate this phenomena in the 1-D limit using metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) before and after the electrochemical creation of sidewall defects. While scanning gate microscopy readily identifies the defect sites, the energy-dependence of the technique allows quantitative analysis of the defects and discrimination of different defect types. This research is partly supported by the NSF (DMR 08-xxxx).

  5. Three-dimensional aspects of superficial disseminated porokeratosis with scanning electron microscopy*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; de Abreu, Luciana Boff; Rampon, Greice; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; Rocha, Nara Moreira

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional findings of the surface and from a cross section from a case of disseminated superficial porokeratois using scanning electron microscopy are reported. On the surface of the skin, irregular keratin with a serpiginous distribution was seen. A gross aspect of keratin in the hyperkeratotic wall was also observed and compared to the normal area, in which the release of corneocytes seemed normal. The cross-sectional imaging easily identified the cornoid lamella, with compact keratin surrounded by normal stratum corneum. PMID:25387509

  6. Three-dimensional aspects of superficial disseminated porokeratosis with scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Abreu, Luciana Boff de; Rampon, Greice; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; Rocha, Nara Moreira

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional findings of the surface and from a cross section from a case of disseminated superficial porokeratois using scanning electron microscopy are reported. On the surface of the skin, irregular keratin with a serpiginous distribution was seen. A gross aspect of keratin in the hyperkeratotic wall was also observed and compared to the normal area, in which the release of corneocytes seemed normal. The cross-sectional imaging easily identified the cornoid lamella, with compact keratin surrounded by normal stratum corneum. PMID:25387509

  7. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on ZnO(0001) surfaces : evidence for an inhomogeneous electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackens, B.; Rodrigues, M. S.; Faniel, S.; Mouthuy, P. O.; Melinte, S.; Dumont, J.; Sporken, R.

    2010-03-01

    We performed low temperature (77 K) scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) on the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface [1]. STM and STS data show that the surface electronic structure strongly depends on the local morphology : we observe a narrow bandgap and surface states in the flat regions, and, in the defective surface regions, a wide bandgap without surface states. We also image atomically-resolved (√3 x√3)R30^o reconstructions in small defect-free areas.[4pt] [1] J. Dumont et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 132102 (2009).

  8. Application of low vacuum scanning electron microscopy for Papanicolaou-stained slides for cytopathology examinations.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tetsuya; Soejima, Yurie; Sawabe, Motoji

    2016-06-01

    Papanicolaou (Pap)-stained slides are usually observed using a transmitted light microscope for cytopathology. However, progress in pathological examinations has created a need for new diagnostic tools, because cytopathological preparations do not allow additional examinations without a loss of specimen, unlike histopathology. Low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) can reveal the surface topography at an ultrastructual resolution without metal coating. The aim of this study was to determine the conditions required for observing Pap-stained slides of oral smears using LVSEM without any loss of specimen and to reexamine the same slides again using light microscopy, while preserving the cytopathological information. PMID:26957591

  9. Scanning electron micrographs of Oryzophagus oryzae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), plastron structure and swimming behavior.

    PubMed

    Martins, Camila B C; de Almeida, Lúcia M; Zarbin, Paulo H G

    2012-02-01

    The morphological structures that permit Oryzophagus oryzae aquatic activities and swimming behavior were studied and compared with various weevils and other relevant species. The use of scanning electron microscopy facilitated the recognition of three different hydrofuge scales and sensilla. Based on the microscopic observations of behavior, morphological evidence, and comparisons with other curculionid species, it was supported that the gas exchange in O. oryzae adults relies on a subelytral air store maintained by hydrofuge scales and a ribbed margin on the adult elytra. The plastron structure is identical to Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus supporting the application of similar control measures for both species. PMID:22055468

  10. Scanning-electron-microscope study of normal-impingement erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the erosion of annealed copper and aluminum surfaces produced by both single- and multiple-particle impacts. Macroscopic 3.2 mm diameter steel balls and microscopic, brittle erodant particles were projected by a gas gun system so as to impact at normal incidence at speeds up to 140 m/sec. During the impacts by the brittle erodant particles, at lower speeds the erosion behavior was similar to that observed for the larger steel balls. At higher velocities, particle fragmentation and the subsequent cutting by the radial wash of debris created a marked change in the erosion mechanism.

  11. Phase aligner for the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chren, William A., Jr.; Zomberg, Brian G.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype Phase Aligner (PA) or the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer instrument has been designed and tested. Implemented in a single Xilinx XC3042PC84-125 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), it is a dual-port register file which allows independent storage and phase coherent retrieval of antenna array data by the Central Processing Unit (CPU). It has dimensions of 4 x 20 bits and can be used at clock frequencies as high as 25 MHz. The ESTAR is a passive synthetic-aperture radiometer designed to sense soil moisture and ocean salinity at L-band.

  12. Walsh function generator for the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chren, William A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype Walsh Function Generator (WFG) for the ESTAR (Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer) instrument has been designed and tested. Implemented in a single Xilinx XC3020PC68-50 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), it generates a user-programmable set of 32 consecutive Walsh Functions for noise cancellation in the analog circuitry of the Front-End Modules (FEM's). It is implemented in a 68-pin plastic leaded chip carrier (PLCC) package, is fully testable, and can be used for noise cancellation periods as small as 2 msec.

  13. Diffusion length measurement using the scanning electron microscope. [for silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.

    1975-01-01

    The present work describes a measuring technique employing the scanning electron microscope in which values of the true bulk diffusion length are obtained. It is shown that surface recombination effects can be eliminated through application of highly doped surface field layers. The effects of high injection level and low-high junction current generation are investigated. Results obtained with this technique are compared to those obtained by a penetrating radiation (X-ray) method, and a close agreement is found. The SEM technique is limited to cells that contain a back surface field layer.

  14. Ti-6Al-4V electron beam weld qualification using laser scanning confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wanjara, P. . E-mail: priti.wanjara@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca; Brochu, M.; Jahazi, M.

    2005-03-15

    Processing conditions for manufacturing Ti-6Al-4V components by welding using an electron beam source are known to influence the transformation microstructure in the narrow fusion and heat-affected zones of the weld region. This work examined the effect of multiple-sequence welding on the characteristics of the transformed beta microstructure, using laser scanning confocal microscopy to resolve the Widmanstaetten alpha-beta structure in the fusion zone. The evolution in the alpha interlamellar spacing and plate thickness with processing was then related to microhardness measurements in the weld region.

  15. Study of environmental biodegradation of LDPE films in soil using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Tabassum; Khan, M R; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2010-07-01

    An outdoor soil burial test was carried out to evaluate the degradation of commercially available LDPE carrier bags in natural soil for up to 2 years. Biodegradability of low density polyethylene films in soil was monitored using both optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 7-9 months of soil exposure, microbial colonization was evident on the film surface. Exposed LDPE samples exhibit progressive changes towards degradation after 17-22 months. SEM images reveal signs of degradation such as exfoliation and formation of cracks on film leading to disintegration. The possible degradation mode and consequences on the use and disposal of LDPE films is discussed. PMID:20207547

  16. Output data formatter for the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chren, William A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype Output Data Formatter (ODF) for the ESTAR (Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer) instrument has been designed and tested. It employs programmable logic devices to format and tag correlator data for transmission to Earth. After accepting 170 bits or correlator and error data in parallel, it appends an identification word and then serially passes the data to the Small Explorer Data System (SEDS) for transmission at a maximum rate of greater than 15 Mb/sec. Implemented with two reprogrammable field programmable gate arrays (FPGA's), each contained in a 132-pin plastic pin grid array (PGA) package, the design is cascadeable, fully testable, and low-power.

  17. Manipulation of nanoparticles of different shapes inside a scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Polyakov, Boris; Dorogin, Leonid M; Butikova, Jelena; Antsov, Mikk; Oras, Sven; Lõhmus, Rünno; Kink, Ilmar

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this work polyhedron-like gold and sphere-like silver nanoparticles (NPs) were manipulated on an oxidized Si substrate to study the dependence of the static friction and the contact area on the particle geometry. Measurements were performed inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) that was equipped with a high-precision XYZ-nanomanipulator. To register the occurring forces a quartz tuning fork (QTF) with a glued sharp probe was used. Contact areas and static friction forces were calculated by using different models and compared with the experimentally measured force. The effect of NP morphology on the nanoscale friction is discussed. PMID:24605279

  18. Verifying Data Integrity of Electronically Scanned Pressure Systems at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    The proper operation of the Electronically Scanned Pressure (ESP) System critical to accomplish the following goals: acquisition of highly accurate pressure data for the development of aerospace and commercial aviation systems and continuous confirmation of data quality to avoid costly, unplanned, repeat wind tunnel or turbine testing. Standard automated setup and checkout routines are necessary to accomplish these goals. Data verification and integrity checks occur at three distinct stages, pretest pressure tubing and system checkouts, daily system validation and in-test confirmation of critical system parameters. This paper will give an overview of the existing hardware, software and methods used to validate data integrity.

  19. Assessing electronic health record systems in emergency departments: Using a decision analytic Bayesian model.

    PubMed

    Ben-Assuli, Ofir; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    In the last decade, health providers have implemented information systems to improve accuracy in medical diagnosis and decision-making. This article evaluates the impact of an electronic health record on emergency department physicians' diagnosis and admission decisions. A decision analytic approach using a decision tree was constructed to model the admission decision process to assess the added value of medical information retrieved from the electronic health record. Using a Bayesian statistical model, this method was evaluated on two coronary artery disease scenarios. The results show that the cases of coronary artery disease were better diagnosed when the electronic health record was consulted and led to more informed admission decisions. Furthermore, the value of medical information required for a specific admission decision in emergency departments could be quantified. The findings support the notion that physicians and patient healthcare can benefit from implementing electronic health record systems in emergency departments. PMID:26033468

  20. Deconvolution of sinusoidal rapid EPR scans.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-02-01

    In rapid scan EPR the magnetic field is scanned through the signal in a time that is short relative to electron spin relaxation times. Previously it was shown that the slow-scan lineshape could be recovered from triangular rapid scans by Fourier deconvolution. In this paper a general Fourier deconvolution method is described and demonstrated to recover the slow-scan lineshape from sinusoidal rapid scans. Since an analytical expression for the Fourier transform of the driving function for a sinusoidal scan was not readily apparent, a numerical method was developed to do the deconvolution. The slow scan EPR lineshapes recovered from rapid triangular and sinusoidal scans are in excellent agreement for lithium phthalocyanine, a trityl radical, and the nitroxyl radical, tempone. The availability of a method to deconvolute sinusoidal rapid scans makes it possible to scan faster than is feasible for triangular scans because of hardware limitations on triangular scans. PMID:21163677

  1. Deconvolution of Sinusoidal Rapid EPR Scans

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid scan EPR the magnetic field is scanned through the signal in a time that is short relative to electron spin relaxation times. Previously it was shown that the slow scan lineshape could be recovered from triangular rapid scans by Fourier deconvolution. In this paper a general Fourier deconvolution method is described and demonstrated to recover the slow scan lineshape from sinusoidal rapid scans. Since an analytical expression for the Fourier transform of the driving function for a sinusoidal scan was not readily apparent, a numerical method was developed to do the deconvolution. The slow scan EPR lineshapes recovered from rapid triangular and sinusoidal scans are in excellent agreement for lithium phthalocyanine, a trityl radical, and the nitroxyl radical, tempone. The availability of a method to deconvolute sinusoidal rapid scans makes it possible to scan faster than is feasible for triangular scans because of hardware limitations on triangular scans. PMID:21163677

  2. Analytical modeling and numerical simulation of the short-wave infrared electron-injection detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassaghi, Yashar; Fathipour, Vala; Fathipour, Morteza; Mohseni, Hooman

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes comprehensive analytical and simulation models for the design and optimization of the electron-injection based detectors. The electron-injection detectors evaluated here operate in the short-wave infrared range and utilize a type-II band alignment in InP/GaAsSb/InGaAs material system. The unique geometry of detectors along with an inherent negative-feedback mechanism in the device allows for achieving high internal avalanche-free amplifications without any excess noise. Physics-based closed-form analytical models are derived for the detector rise time and dark current. Our optical gain model takes into account the drop in the optical gain at high optical power levels. Furthermore, numerical simulation studies of the electrical characteristics of the device show good agreement with our analytical models as well experimental data. Performance comparison between devices with different injector sizes shows that enhancement in the gain and speed is anticipated by reducing the injector size. Sensitivity analysis for the key detector parameters shows the relative importance of each parameter. The results of this study may provide useful information and guidelines for development of future electron-injection based detectors as well as other heterojunction photodetectors.

  3. Experimental evaluation of environmental scanning electron microscopes at high chamber pressure.

    PubMed

    Fitzek, H; Schroettner, H; Wagner, J; Hofer, F; Rattenberger, J

    2015-11-01

    In environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) high pressure applications have become increasingly important. Wet or biological samples can be investigated without time-consuming sample preparation and potential artefacts from this preparation can be neglected. Unfortunately, the signal-to-noise ratio strongly decreases with increasing chamber pressure. To evaluate the high pressure performance of ESEM and to compare different electron microscopes, information about spatial resolution and detector type is not enough. On the one hand, the scattering of the primary electron beam increases, which vanishes the contrast in images; and on the other hand, the secondary electrons (SE) signal amplification decreases. The stagnation gas thickness (effective distance the beam has to travel through the imaging gas) as well as the SE detection system depend on the microscope and for a complete and serious evaluation of an ESEM or low vacuum SEM it is necessary to specify these two parameters. A method is presented to determine the fraction of scattered and unscattered electrons and to calculate the stagnation gas thickness (θ). To evaluate the high pressure performance of the SE detection system, a method is presented that allows for an analysis of a single image and the calculation of the signal-to-noise ratio of this image. All investigations are performed on an FEI ESEM Quanta 600 (field emission gun) and an FEI ESEM Quanta 200 (thermionic gun). These methods and measurements should represent opportunities for evaluating the high pressure performance of an ESEM. PMID:26173072

  4. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM. PMID:26206941

  5. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope with open sample space observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas.

    PubMed

    Suga, Mitsuo; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji; Iwamatsu, Shinnosuke; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi; Sato, Chikara

    2011-12-01

    Although conventional electron microscopy (EM) requires samples to be in vacuum, most chemical and physical reactions occur in liquid or gas. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) can observe dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas under atmospheric pressure in real time. An electron-permeable window made of pressure-resistant 100 nm-thick silicon nitride (SiN) film, set into the bottom of the open ASEM sample dish, allows an electron beam to be projected from underneath the sample. A detector positioned below captures backscattered electrons. Using the ASEM, we observed the radiation-induced self-organization process of particles, as well as phenomena accompanying volume change, including evaporation-induced crystallization. Using the electrochemical ASEM dish, we observed tree-like electrochemical depositions on the cathode. In silver nitrate solution, we observed silver depositions near the cathode forming incidental internal voids. The heated ASEM dish allowed observation of patterns of contrast in melting and solidifying solder. Finally, to demonstrate its applicability for monitoring and control of industrial processes, silver paste and solder paste were examined at high throughput. High resolution, imaging speed, flexibility, adaptability, and ease of use facilitate the observation of previously difficult-to-image phenomena, and make the ASEM applicable to various fields. PMID:22088441

  6. Scanning-electron-microscopy observations and mechanical characteristics of ion-beam-sputtered surgical implant alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigand, A. J.; Meyer, M. L.; Ling, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    An electron bombardment ion thruster was used as an ion source to sputter the surfaces of orthopedic prosthetic metals. Scanning electron microscopy photomicrographs were made of each ion beam textured surface. The effect of ion texturing an implant surface on its bond to bone cement was investigated. A Co-Cr-W alloy and surgical stainless steel were used as representative hard tissue implant materials to determine effects of ion texturing on bulk mechanical properties. Work was done to determine the effect of substrate temperature on the development of an ion textured surface microstructure. Results indicate that the ultimate strength of the bulk materials is unchanged by ion texturing and that the microstructure will develop more rapidly if the substrate is heated prior to ion texturing.

  7. Reporting methods for processing and analysis of data from serial block face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Borrett, S; Hughes, L

    2016-07-01

    Serial block face scanning electron microscopy is rapidly becoming a popular tool for collecting large three-dimensional data sets of cells and tissues, filling the resolution and volume gap between fluorescence microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy. The automated collection of data within the instrument occupies the smallest proportion of the time required to prepare and analyse biological samples. It is the processing of data once it has been collected that proves the greatest challenge. In this review we discuss different methods that are used to process data. We suggest potential workflows that can be used to facilitate the transfer of raw image stacks into quantifiable data as well as propose a set of criteria for reporting methods for data analysis to enable replication of work. PMID:26800017

  8. Scanning tunneling microscopy characterization of the geometric and electronic structure of hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, W. J.; Bell, L. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1988-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) methods are used to characterize hydrogen-terminated Si surfaces prepared by a novel method. The surface preparation method is used to expose the Si-SiO2 interface. STM images directly reveal the topographic structure of the Si-SiO2 interface. The dependence of interface topography on oxide preparation conditions observed by STM is compared to the results of conventional surface characterization methods. Also, the electronic structure of the hydrogen-terminated surface is studied by STM spectroscopy. The near-ideal electronic structure of this surface enables direct tunnel spectroscopy measurements of Schottky barrier phenomena. In addition, this method enables probing of semiconductor subsurface properties by STM.

  9. Prospects for titanium alloy comparison control by electron beam scan frequency manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Pal, U.; Avyle, J.V.D.; Damkroger, B.

    1996-12-31

    Using mathematical modelling, the authors evaluate the prospects for using beam spot size and scan frequency to control titanium-aluminum alloy composition in electron beam melting and refining. Composition control is evaluated in terms of attainable steady-state extremes of composition, and the time scales required to change hearth and mold composition between those extremes. Mathematical models predict spot size-evaporation and frequency-evaporation relationships by simulating heat transfer in the surface of the melt, and predict overall composition change using simplifying assumptions about the fluid flow field in a melting hearth. Corroborating experiments were run on the electron beam furnace at Sandia National Laboratories in order to verify predicted relationships between frequency and evaporation and to calculate activity coefficients of aluminum and vanadium in titanium.

  10. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Karel H W; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-17

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures. PMID:27367396

  11. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology

    SciTech Connect

    Forslind, B.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is frequently applied to dermatological problems, as is evident from a review of the recent literature. In this paper, preparation methods and new techniques allowing experimental studies on the integumentary system are emphasized. Quantitative analysis in the electron microscope by use of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) has become an important accessory technique. EDX can, for instance, be used to study problems involving physiological changes induced in skin by agents causing contact reactions. Recently, it has been shown that treatment with DNCB, chromate and nickel causes changes in elemental distribution in guinea-pig skin. In addition, elemental uptake in the integumentary system and in pathological inclusions in skin can be analyzed.

  12. Scanning transmission electron microscopic tomography of cortical bone using Z-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth; Nan, Feihong; Botton, Gianluigi A; Schwarcz, Henry P

    2013-06-01

    Previously we presented (McNally et al., 2012) a model for the ultrastructure of bone showing that the mineral resides principally outside collagen fibrils in the form of 5 nm thick mineral structures hundreds of nanometers long oriented parallel to the fibrils. Here we use high-angle annular dark-field electron tomography in the scanning transmission electron microscope to confirm this model and further elucidate the composite structure. Views of a section cut parallel to the fibril axes show bundles of mineral structures extending parallel to the fibrils and encircling them. The mineral density inside the fibrils is too low to be visualized in these tomographic images. A section cut perpendicular to the fibril axes, shows quasi-circular walls composed of mineral structures, wrapping around apparently empty holes marking the sites of fibrils. These images confirm our original model that the majority of mineral in bone resides outside the collagen fibrils. PMID:23545162

  13. Identification of light elements in silicon nitride by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Idrobo, Juan C; Walkosz, Weronika; Klie, Robert F; Oğüt, Serdar

    2012-12-01

    In silicon nitride structural ceramics, the overall mechanical and thermal properties are controlled by the atomic and electronic structures at the interface between the ceramic grains and the amorphous intergranular films (IGFs) formed by various sintering additives. In the last ten years the atomic arrangements of heavy elements (rare-earths) at the Si(3)N(4)/IGF interfaces have been resolved. However, the atomic position of light elements, without which it is not possible to obtain a complete description of the interfaces, has been lacking. This review article details the authors' efforts to identify the atomic arrangement of light elements such as nitrogen and oxygen at the Si(3)N(4)/SiO(2) interface and in bulk Si(3)N(4) using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. PMID:22726263

  14. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bos, Karel H. W.; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T.; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D.; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures.

  15. High contrast en bloc staining of neuronal tissue for field emission scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Juan C.; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Hayworth, Kenneth; Schalek, Richard; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Smith, Stephen J; Buchanan, JoAnn

    2013-01-01

    Conventional heavy metal post staining methods on thin sections lend contrast but often cause contamination. To avoid this problem, we tested several en bloc staining techniques to contrast tissue in serial sections mounted on solid substrates for examination by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). Because FESEM section imaging requires that specimens have higher contrast and greater electrical conductivity than transmission electron microscope (TEM) samples, our technique utilizes osmium impregnation (OTO) to make the samples conductive while heavily staining membranes for segmentation studies. Combining this step with other classic heavy metal en bloc stains including uranyl acetate, lead aspartate, copper sulfate and lead citrate produced clean, highly contrasted TEM and SEM samples of insect, fish, and mammalian nervous system. This protocol takes 7–15 days to prepare resin embedded tissue, cut sections and produce serial section images. PMID:22240582

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.; Bekar, Kursat B.

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  17. Silver methenamine staining for scanning electron microscopy of bone sections containing biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Frayssinet, P; Hanker, J S; Rouquet, N; Primout, I; Giammara, B

    1999-01-01

    Sections of tissue containing orthopedic materials are currently used to study the compatibility of those materials and to perform electron probe microanalysis at the material-tissue interface. Identification of the cells in contact with the material by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is of interest. We have developed a method for staining cells and tissue structures embedded in polymethyl methacrylate with silver methenamine once the sections have been obtained. Sections were prepared by grinding, and the silver methenamine was applied after oxidation with periodic acid. The procedure was carried out in a microwave oven. Backscatter SEM showed staining of the cell nucleus membrane, chromatin, the nuclear organizers, and the chromosomes of dividing cells. The cytoplasm and the cytoplasmic membrane were also stained. Collagen fibers of the extracellular matrix and the mineralized matrix of bone were labeled. Material particles in the macrophages were easily recognizable and Energy-Dispersive Spectrometer were not impaired by the presence of silver in the preparation. PMID:10190255

  18. Probing plasmons in three dimensions in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachtel, Jordan; Mouti, Anas; Mayo, Daniel; Marvinney, Claire; Mu, Richard; Haglund, Richard; Pennycook, Stephen; Chisholm, Matthew; Pantelides, Sokrates

    2015-03-01

    The optical behavior of nanostructured materials is of significant interest across many fields. Surface plasmons and their interactions with emitters in nanoscale devices allow us to control light below the coherence limit. By understanding the nature of plasmonics at the local level we can move towards unlocking the full potential of photonic devices. To this end, we examine plasmonic Ag nanoparticles suspended on insulating nanowires by combining cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and high resolution annular dark field imaging in a scanning transmission electron microscope. The complementary nature of CL and EELS allow us to extract optical data from a randomly shaped and oriented nanoparticle, and understand its plasmonic behavior in all three spatial dimensions. This work was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, as well as NSF-EPS-1004083 and NSF-TN-SCORE.

  19. 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy: Single-particle imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ortalan, Volkan; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-07-20

    We report the development of 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM). The method was demonstrated in the imaging of silver nanowires and gold nanoparticles. For the wire, the mechanical motion and shape morphological dynamics were imaged, and from the images we obtained the resonance frequency and the dephasing time of the motion. Moreover, we demonstrate here the simultaneous acquisition of dark-field images and electron energy loss spectra from a single gold nanoparticle, which is not possible with conventional methods. The local probing capabilities of ST-UEM open new avenues for probing dynamic processes, from single isolated to embedded nanostructures, without being affected by the heterogeneous processes of ensemble-averaged dynamics. Such methodology promises to have wide-ranging applications in materials science and in single-particle biological imaging. PMID:21615171

  20. A new method for measurement of the vitrification rate of earthenware texture by scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun Jung; Kim, Su Kyeong; Han, Min Su; Lee, Eun Woo; Heo, Jun Su; Lee, Han Hyoung

    2013-08-01

    A new method for determining the vitrification rate of pottery depending on the firing temperature was devised using secondary electron images (SEI) of scanning electron microscope (SEM). Several tests were performed to establish the appropriate operating conditions of SEM and reproducibility as well as to examine the applicability of the method. The grayscale values converted from each pixel of SEI were used to determine the vitrification rate of pottery, which in our study were artificially fired specimens composed of three types of clay. A comparison between the vitrification rate value and appearance temperature of minerals shows that mullite formation starts at 1,100°C, during which the vitrification rate rapidly increases by over 10%. In consequence, the result presented here demonstrates that the new method can be applied to estimate the firing temperature of pottery. PMID:23920198

  1. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM).

    PubMed

    Sato, Chikara; Manaka, Sachie; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Miyata, Makoto; Maruyama, Yuusuke

    2012-01-27

    Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3μm-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis. PMID:22226908

  2. Hormonal regulation of capillary fenestrae in the rat adrenal cortex: quantitative studies using objective lens staging scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Apkarian, R P; Curtis, J C

    1986-01-01

    High magnification studies of the fenestrated capillary endothelium in the zona fasciculata (ZF) of rat adrenal glands were performed using the objective lens stage of an analytical scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a lanthanum hexaboride emitter (LaB6). Resolution of surface substructure of the luminal membrane obtained with specimens decorated with gold/palladium (Au/Pd) was compared with that observed in others sputter coated with tantalum (Ta). High magnification (50,000x) of the fenestrated endothelium demonstrates that tantalum coating of the cryofractured adrenals improves the substructural detail compared to that seen in Au/Pd decorated specimens. The procedures used in specimen preparation, metal deposition and secondary electron imaging (SEI) are described. Quality imaging achieved using the objective lens stage is a result of the elimination of the SE-III component derived from backscattered electrons. Rat adrenals exhibited uniformly patent capillaries. High magnification micrographs of capillary walls were randomly recorded in two morphometric studies of the fenestral content of capillaries in the rat adrenal cortex. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), when administered to rats following dexamethasone (DEX) treatment, significantly reduced the fenestrae/micron 2 of endothelial surface and increased the mean size of fenestrae. After hypophysectomy, the number of fenestrae/micron 2 declined over 48 h; within 2 h after ACTH was given to rats hypophysectomized 48 hours earlier, the fenestrae/micron 2 had increased two-fold. These studies indicate that ACTH plays an important role in modulating fenestral content of the capillary endothelium in the adrenal cortex. PMID:3027881

  3. New Aspidoderidae species parasite of Didelphis aurita (Mammalia: Didelphidae): a light and scanning electron microscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Chagas-Moutinho, V A; Sant'anna, V; Oliveira-Menezes, A; De Souza, W

    2014-02-01

    Nematodes of the family Aspidoderidae (Nematoda: Heterakoidea) Skrjabin and Schikobalova, 1947, are widely distributed in the Americas. The family Aspidoderidae includes the subfamilies Aspidoderinae Skrjabin and Schikobalova, 1947, and Lauroiinae Skrjabin and Schikobalova, 1951. These two subfamilies are delineated by the presence or absence of cephalic cordons at the anterior region. The nematodes in the subfamily Aspidoderinae, which includes the genus AspidoderaRailliet and Henry, 1912, are represented by nematodes with anterior cephalic cordons at the anterior end. The nematodes of the genus AspidoderaRailliet and Henry, 1912, are found in the cecum and large intestine of mammals of the orders Edentata, Marsupialia and Rodentia. Species within this genus have many morphological similarities. The use of scanning electron microscopy allows the specific characterization of the species within this genus. In the present work, we describe a new species of Aspidodera parasite of the large intestine of Didelphis aurita (Mammalia: Didelphidae) Wied-Neuwied, 1826, collected from Cachoeiras de Macacu, Rio de Janeiro. The combination of light and scanning electron microscopy allowed us a detailed analysis of this nematode. PMID:24129095

  4. Novel method for controlled wetting of materials in the environmental scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Anna; Nafari, Alexandra; Sanz-Velasco, Anke; Svensson, Krister; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hermansson, Anne-Marie; Olsson, Eva

    2013-02-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscopy has been extensively used for studying the wetting properties of different materials. For some types of investigation, however, the traditional ways of conducting in situ dynamic wetting experiments do not offer sufficient control over the wetting process. Here, we present a novel method for controlled wetting of materials in the environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). It offers improved control of the point of interaction between the water and the specimen and renders it more accessible for imaging. It also enables the study of water transport through a material by direct imaging. The method is based on the use of a piezo-driven nanomanipulator to bring a specimen in contact with a water reservoir in the ESEM chamber. The water reservoir is established by local condensation on a Peltier-cooled surface. A fixture was designed to make the experimental setup compatible with the standard Peltier cooling stage of the microscope. The developed technique was successfully applied to individual cellulose fibers, and the absorption and transport of water by individual cellulose fibers were imaged. PMID:23332145

  5. Calibration improvements to electronically scanned pressure systems and preliminary statistical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.

    1996-01-01

    Orifice-to-orifice inconsistencies in data acquired with an electronically-scanned pressure system at the beginning of a wind tunnel experiment forced modifications to the standard, instrument calibration procedures. These modifications included a large increase in the number of calibration points which would allow a critical examination of the calibration curve-fit process, and a subsequent post-test reduction of the pressure data. Evaluation of these data has resulted in an improved functional representation of the pressure-voltage signature for electronically-scanned pressures sensors, which can reduce the errors due to calibration curve fit to under 0.10 percent of reading compared to the manufacturer specified 0.10 percent of full scale. Application of the improved calibration function allows a more rational selection of the calibration set-point pressures. These pressures should be adjusted to achieve a voltage output which matches the physical shape of the pressure-voltage signature of the sensor. This process is conducted in lieu of the more traditional approach where a calibration pressure is specified and the resulting sensor voltage is recorded. The fifteen calibrations acquired over the two-week duration of the wind tunnel test were further used to perform a preliminary, statistical assessment of the variation in the calibration process. The results allowed the estimation of the bias uncertainty for a single instrument calibration; and, they form the precursor for more extensive and more controlled studies in the laboratory.

  6. Novel scanning electron microscope bulge test technique integrated with loading function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuanwei; Xie, Huimin E-mail: xiehm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Zhanwei E-mail: xiehm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-10-15

    Membranes and film-on-substrate structures are critical elements for some devices in electronics industry and for Micro Electro Mechanical Systems devices. These structures are normally at the scale of micrometer or even nanometer. Thus, the measurement for the mechanical property of these membranes poses a challenge over the conventional measurements at macro-scales. In this study, a novel bulge test method is presented for the evaluation of mechanical property of micro thin membranes. Three aspects are discussed in the study: (a) A novel bulge test with a Scanning Electron Microscope system realizing the function of loading and measuring simultaneously; (b) a simplified Digital Image Correlation method for a height measurement; and (c) an imaging distortion correction by the introduction of a scanning Moiré method. Combined with the above techniques, biaxial modulus as well as Young's modulus of the polyimide film can be determined. Besides, a standard tensile test is conducted as an auxiliary experiment to validate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  7. 3D imaging of mammalian cells with ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Jurgen A W; Shi, Dan; Kim, Sang; Bliss, Donald; Milne, Jacqueline L S; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the hierarchical organization of molecules and organelles within the interior of large eukaryotic cells is a challenge of fundamental interest in cell biology. We are using ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IA-SEM) to visualize this hierarchical organization in an approach that combines focused ion-beam milling with scanning electron microscopy. Here, we extend our previous studies on imaging yeast cells to image subcellular architecture in human melanoma cells and melanocytes at resolutions as high as approximately 6 and approximately 20 nm in the directions parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the direction of ion-beam milling. The 3D images demonstrate the striking spatial relationships between specific organelles such as mitochondria and membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, and the distribution of unique cellular components such as melanosomes. We also show that 10nm-sized gold particles and quantum dot particles with 7 nm-sized cores can be detected in single cross-sectional images. IA-SEM is thus a useful tool for imaging large mammalian cells in their entirety at resolutions in the nanometer range. PMID:19116171

  8. Plasmonic Field Enhancement of Individual Nanoparticles by Correlated Scanning and Photoemission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Peppernick, Samuel J.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2011-01-21

    We present results of a combined two-photon photoemission and scanning electron microscopy investigation to determine the electromagnetic enhancement factors of silver-coated spherical nanoparticles deposited on an atomically flat mica substrate. Femtosecond laser excitation, of the nanoparticles, produces intense photoemission, attributed to near-resonant excitation of localized surface plasmons. Enhancement factors are determined by comparing the respective two-photon photoemission yield measured for equal areas between single nanoparticles to that of the surrounding flat surface. For s-polarized, 400 nm (~ 3.1 eV) femtosecond radiation a distribution of enhancement factors are found with a large percentage (77%) of the nanoparticles falling within a median range. A correlated scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the nanoparticles typifying the median of the distribution were characterized by ideal spherical shapes and defect-free morphologies. The single largest enhancement factors were in contrast produced by a very small percentage (8%) of the total, for which evidence of silver defect anomalies were found that contributed to the overall structure of the nanoparticle. Comparisons are made between the experimentally measured enhancement factors and previously reported theoretical predictions of the localized surface plasmon near-field intensities for isolated nanometer-sized silver spheres.

  9. A scanning electron microscopy study of the macro-crystalline structure of 2-(2,4-dinitrobenzyl) pyridine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, Jacqueline; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The compound, 2-(2,4-dinitrobenzyl) pyridine, was synthesized in the laboratory; an introductory level electron microscopy study of the macro-crystalline structure was conducted using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The structure of these crystals was compared with the macrostructure of the crystal of 2-(2,4-dinitrobenzyl) pyridinium bromide, the hydrobromic salt of the compound which was also synthesized in the laboratory. A scanning electron microscopy crystal study was combined with a study of the principle of the electron microscope.

  10. Analytical electron microscopy characterization of Fernald soils. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

    1995-03-01

    A combination of backscattered electron imaging and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) with electron diffraction have been used to determine the physical and chemical properties of uranium contamination in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project in Ohio. The information gained from these studies has been used in the development and testing of remediation technologies. Most chemical washing techniques have been reasonably effective with uranyl [U(VI)] phases, but U(IV) phases have proven difficult to remove from the soils. Carbonate leaching in an oxygen environment (heap leaching) has removed some of the U(IV) phases, and it appears to be the most effective technique developed in the program. The uranium metaphosphate, which was found exclusively at an incinerator site, has not been removed by any of the chemical methods. We suggest that a physical extraction procedure (either a magnetic separation or aqueous biphasic process) be used to remove this phase. Analytical electron microscopy has also been used to determine the effect of the chemical agents on the uranium phases. It has also been used to examine soils from the Portsmouth site in Ohio. The contamination there took the form of uranium oxide and uranium calcium oxide phases. Technology transfer efforts over FY 1994 have led to industry-sponsored projects involving soil characterization.

  11. Calculated sputtering and atomic displacement cross-sections for applications to medium voltage analytical electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, C.R.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1987-08-01

    The development of medium voltage electron microscopes having high brightness electron sources and ultra-high vacuum environments has been anticipated by the microscopy community now for several years. The advantages of such a configuration have been discussed to great lengths, while the potential disadvantages have for the most part been neglected. The most detrimental of these relative to microcharacterization are the effects of electron sputtering and atomic displacement to the local specimen composition. These effects have in the past been considered mainly in the high voltage electron microscope regime and generally were ignored in lower voltage instruments. Recent experimental measurements have shown that the effects of electron sputtering as well as radiation induced segregation can be observed in conventional transmission electron microscopes. It is, therefore, important to determine at what point the effects will begin to manifest themselves in the new generation of medium voltage analytical electron microscopes. In this manuscript we present new calculations which allow the individual experimentalist to determine the potential threshold levels for a particular elemental system and thus avoid the dangers of introducing artifacts during microanalysis. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  12. New insights into subsurface imaging of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J.; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T.; Villarrubia, J. S.; Vladár, András E.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by three-dimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  13. Synthesis and Cs-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Multimetallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Subarna; Bhattarai, Nabraj; Velázquez-Salazar, Jesus; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Subarna Khanal Team

    2014-03-01

    Multimetallic nanoparticles have been attracted greater attention both in materials science and nanotechnology due to its unique electronic, optical, biological, and catalytic properties lead by physiochemical interactions among different atoms and phases. The distinct features of multimetallic nanoparticles enhanced synergetic properties, large surface to volume ratio and quantum size effects ultimately lead to novel and wide range of possibilities for different applications than monometallic counterparts. For instance, PtPd, Pt/Cu, Au-Au3Cu, AgPd/Pt, AuCu/Pt and many other multimetallic nanoparticles have raised interest for their various applications in fuel cells, ethanol and methanol oxidation reactions, hydrogen storage, and so on. The nanostructures were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-corrected STEM), in combination with high angle annular dark field (HAADF), bright field (BF), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) detectors. These techniques allowed us to probe the structure at the atomic level of the nanoparticles revealing new structural information and elemental composition of the nanoparticles. The authors would like to acknowledge NSF grants DMR-1103730, ``Alloys at the Nanoscale: The Case of Nanoparticles Second Phase'' and NSF PREM Grant # DMR 0934218.

  14. 3D imaging by serial block face scanning electron microscopy for materials science using ultramicrotomy.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Zhou, Xiaorong; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) has emerged as a means of obtaining three dimensional (3D) electron images over volumes much larger than possible by focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning and at higher spatial resolution than achievable with conventional X-ray computed tomography (CT). Such high resolution 3D electron images can be employed for precisely determining the shape, volume fraction, distribution and connectivity of important microstructural features. While soft (fixed or frozen) biological samples are particularly well suited for nanoscale sectioning using an ultramicrotome, the technique can also produce excellent 3D images at electron microscope resolution in a time and resource-efficient manner for engineering materials. Currently, a lack of appreciation of the capabilities of ultramicrotomy and the operational challenges associated with minimising artefacts for different materials is limiting its wider application to engineering materials. Consequently, this paper outlines the current state of the art for SBFSEM examining in detail how damage is introduced during slicing and highlighting strategies for minimising such damage. A particular focus of the study is the acquisition of 3D images for a variety of metallic and coated systems. PMID:26855205

  15. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, makingmore » it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Ultimately, simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.« less

  16. Development of Parallel Image Detection System Using Annular Pupils for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Matsutani, Takaomi; Taya, Masaki; Ikuta, Takashi; Tanaka, Takeo; Kimura, Yoshihide; Takai, Yoshizo; Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Ichihashi, Mikio

    2010-10-13

    A parallel image detection system using an annular pupil for electron optics were developed to realize an increase in the depth of focus, aberration-free imaging and separation of amplitude and phase images under scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Apertures for annular pupils able to suppress high-energy electron scattering were developed using a focused ion beam (FIB) technique. The annular apertures were designed with outer diameter of oe 40 {mu}m and inner diameter of oe32 {mu}m. A taper angle varying from 20 deg. to 1 deg. was applied to the slits of the annular apertures to suppress the influence of high-energy electron scattering. Each azimuth angle image on scintillator was detected by a multi-anode photomultiplier tube assembly through 40 optical fibers bundled in a ring shape. To focus the image appearing on the scintillator on optical fibers, an optical lens relay system attached with CCD camera was developed. The system enables the taking of 40 images simultaneously from different scattered directions.

  17. Photoresist cross-sectional shape change caused by scanning electron microscope-induced shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Takeyoshi; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Junichi; Kawada, Hiroki

    2015-07-01

    Change in the cross-sectional profile of a photoresist (PR) pattern due to shrinkage was evaluated to investigate the mechanism of electron beam-induced shrinkage. A scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) was used to observe the cross-sectional profiles of PR lines after atomic-layer deposition of metal oxide and carbon deposition on the sample surface. A HfO2 thin layer enhanced the profile contrast in the STEM measurements without blurring the edge, which enabled the precise cross-sectional measurement of the PR patterns. We found interesting features associated with shrinkage from the detailed profile change obtained using this method, such as a rounding of the pattern top, a necking of the sidewall profile, a rounding of the foot in the pattern on the organic underlying layer, and voltage-independent sidewall shrinkage under a large electron beam dose. These behaviors along with the results from a Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Consequently, these observations experimentally clarified that the elastic deformation effect and the impact of the secondary electrons emitted from the spaces around the pattern into the sidewall are important to interpret the change in the shape of the pattern induced by shrinkage.

  18. Analytical electron microscopy of Al/TiN contacts on silicon for applications to very large scale integrated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armigliato, A.; Valdré, G.

    1987-01-01

    Aluminum contacts on silicon have been realized for very large scale integration applications by interposing a titanium nitride diffusion barrier. The TiN films have been prepared by implanting nitrogen ions on silicon wafers coated with titanium layers of different thicknesses (60, 80, and 100 nm); by a subsequent annealing in vacuum, films of TiSi2, from 0 up to 75 nm thick, grow at the nitride/silicon interface. The Al/TiN/Si and Al/TiN/TiSi2/Si structures have been annealed at 600 °C for 30 and 10 min, which in some cases results in barrier degradation, due to Al/Si interdiffusion. Cross-sectioned specimens of these contacts have been studied by analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) employing a Philips EM 400T microscope, equipped with a field emission gun. It has been found that, contrary to previous suggestions, the TiN film does not dissolve during the failure process, but retains its morphology and a sharp interface with the neighboring layers. Unlike scanning electron microscopy experiments, where the Al film must be removed after the barrier degradation to investigate the pits formed by the massive migration of Si into Al, AEM on cross sections allowed us to make an accurate structural and compositional characterization of the material filling these pits. In addition, when the annealing treatment does not result in the barrier failure, the migration of Al, Ti, and Si throughout the structure can be easily detected and analyzed.

  19. Comparison of the layer structure of vapor phase and leached SRL glass by use of AEM [analytical electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B.M.; Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Bradley, J.P.

    1989-12-31

    Test samples of 131 type glass that have been reacted for extended time periods in water vapor atmospheres of different relative humidities and in static leaching solution have been examined to characterize the reaction products. Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) was used to characterize the leached samples, and a complicated layer structure was revealed, consisting of phases that precipitate from solution and also form within the residual glass layer. The precipitated phases include birnes-site, saponite, and an iron species, while the intralayer phases include the U-Ti containing phase brannerite distributed within a matrix consisting of bands of an Fe rich montmorillonite clay. Comparison is made between samples leached at 40{degrees}C for 4 years with those leached at 90{degrees}C for 3-1/2 years. The samples reacted in water vapor were examined with scanning electron microscopy and show increasing reaction as both the relative humidity and time of reaction increases. These samples also contain a layered structure with reaction products on the glass surface. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Immuno-electron microscopy of primary cell cultures from genetically modified animals in liquid by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Takaaki; Mori, Yosio; Hirano, Kazumi; Sugimoto, Shinya; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Matsumoto, Shunsuke; Namiki, Takeshi; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Kawata, Masaaki; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Sato, Mari; Suga, Mitsuo; Higashiyama, Kenichi; Sonomoto, Kenji; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Nishihara, Shoko; Sato, Chikara

    2014-04-01

    High-throughput immuno-electron microscopy is required to capture the protein-protein interactions realizing physiological functions. Atmospheric scanning electron microscopy (ASEM) allows in situ correlative light and electron microscopy of samples in liquid in an open atmospheric environment. Cells are cultured in a few milliliters of medium directly in the ASEM dish, which can be coated and transferred to an incubator as required. Here, cells were imaged by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM, sometimes with additional metal staining. Axonal partitioning of neurons was correlated with specific cytoskeletal structures, including microtubules, using primary-culture neurons from wild type Drosophila, and the involvement of ankyrin in the formation of the intra-axonal segmentation boundary was studied using neurons from an ankyrin-deficient mutant. Rubella virus replication producing anti-double-stranded RNA was captured at the host cell's plasma membrane. Fas receptosome formation was associated with clathrin internalization near the surface of primitive endoderm cells. Positively charged Nanogold clearly revealed the cell outlines of primitive endoderm cells, and the cell division of lactic acid bacteria. Based on these experiments, ASEM promises to allow the study of protein interactions in various complexes in a natural environment of aqueous liquid in the near future. PMID:24564988

  1. Materials Characterization in the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Varela del Arco, Maria; Lupini, Andrew R; van Benthem, Klaus; Borisevich, Albina Y; Chisholm, Matthew F; Shibata, Naoya; Abe, E.; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2005-01-01

    In the nanoscience era, the properties of many exciting new materials and devices will depend on the details of their composition down to the level of single atoms. Thus the characterization of the structure and electronic properties of matter at the atomic scale is becoming ever more vital for economic and technological as well as for scientific reasons. The combination of atomic-resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) represents a powerful method to link the atomic and electronic structure to macroscopic properties, allowing materials, nanoscale systems, and interfaces to be probed in unprecedented detail. Z-contrast STEM uses electrons that have been scattered to large angles for imaging. The relative intensity of each atomic column is roughly proportional to Z{sup 2}, where Z is the atomic number. Recent developments in correcting the aberrations of the lenses in the electron microscope have pushed the achievable spatial resolution and the sensitivity for imaging and spectroscopy in the STEM into the sub-Angstrom (sub-{angstrom}) regime, providing a new level of insight into the structure/property relations of complex materials. Images acquired with an aberration-corrected instrument show greatly improved contrast. The signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high to allow sensitivity even to single atoms in both imaging and spectroscopy. This is a key achievement because the detection and measurement of the response of individual atoms has become a challenging issue to provide new insight into many fields, such as catalysis, ceramic materials, complex oxide interfaces, or grain boundaries. In this article, the state-of-the-art for the characterization of all of these different types of materials by means of aberration-corrected STEM and EELS are reviewed.

  2. Analytical bunch compression studies for a linac-based electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, M.; Wesolowski, P.

    2015-10-01

    The current paper deals with analytical bunch compression studies for FLUTE whose results are compared to simulations. FLUTE is a linac-based electron accelerator with a design energy of approximately 40 MeV currently being constructed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. One of the goals of FLUTE is to generate electron bunches with their length lying in the femtosecond regime. In the first phase this will be accomplished using a magnetic bunch compressor. This compressor forms the subject of the studies presented. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part deals with pure geometric investigations of the bunch compressor where space charge effects and the backreaction of bunches with coherent synchrotron radiation are neglected. The second part is dedicated to the treatment of space charge effects. The upshot is that the analytical results in the two parts agree quite well with what is obtained from simulations. This paper shall form the basis for future analytical studies of the FLUTE bunch compressor and of bunch compression, in general.

  3. Reactive gas plasma specimen processing for use in microanalysis and imaging in analytical electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N.J.; Kestel, B.J.; Henriks, D.

    1997-01-01

    It has long been the bane of analytical electron microscopy (AEM) that the use of focused probes during microanalysis of specimens increases the local rate of hydrocarbon contamination. This is most succinctly observed by the formation of contamination deposits during focused probe work typical of AEM studies. While serving to indicate the location of the electron probe, the contamination obliterates the area of the specimen being analyzed and adversely affects all quantitative microanalysis methodologies. A variety of methods including: UV, electron beam flooding, heating and/or cooling can decrease the rate of contamination, however, none of these methods directly attack the source of specimen borne contamination. Research has shown that reactive gas plasmas may be used to clean both the specimen and stage for AEM, in this study the authors report on quantitative measurements of the reduction in contamination rates in an AEM as a function of operating conditions and plasma gases.

  4. Probing Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Atmospheric Particles Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Iedema, Martin J.; Cowin, James P.; Laskin, Alexander

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of single-particle analysis to investigate the chemistry of isolated, individual particles of atmospheric relevance such as NaCl, sea salt, CaCO3, and SiO2. A variety of state-of-th-art scanning electron microscopy techniques, including environmental scanning electon microscopy and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, were utilized for monitoring and quantifying phase transitions of individual particles, morphology, and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid.

  5. Fibrous architecture of cementodentinal junction in disease: A scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakar, R; Pratebha, B

    2015-01-01

    Background: The cementodentinal junction (CDJ) forms a biological and structural link between cementum and dentin. This biological link is regarded as a distinct tissue in its own right. Certain important proteins responsible for periodontal regeneration are said to be present in this tissue. Few studies have described the structure and composition of this layer by light and electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopic studies pertaining to CDJ in health and disease are few and documentation of periodontal pathological changes of CDJ is unclear. In the first phase of our study, the collagenous architecture of CDJ of healthy teeth has been reported. Aim: The objective of this study is to observe and report periodontal pathological changes in the fibrous or collagenous architecture of CDJ of periodontitis-affected teeth and discuss the probable clinical implications of CDJ in disease. Materials and Methods: Twenty periodontitis-affected teeth were collected and processed for observing under a scanning electron microscope. Results: The results are as follows: Increased width of interface at CDJ in periodontitis samples (7.1 μ) compared to that of healthy samples; fewer areas of fiber intermingling at CDJ in periodontitis samples as compared to healthy samples; frequent detachment of cementum from dentin during sodium hydroxide maceration of samples. Conclusion: It may be inferred from results that there is a possibility of a definite weakening of CDJ in periodontally affected root surfaces and we believe that clinical procedures such as scaling and root planning may have a detrimental effect on the cementodentinal attachment of periodontally involved root surfaces. PMID:26980960

  6. Optimization of a coaxial electron cyclotron resonance plasma thruster with an analytical model

    SciTech Connect

    Cannat, F. E-mail: felix.cannat@gmail.com; Lafleur, T.; Jarrige, J.; Elias, P.-Q.; Packan, D.; Chabert, P.

    2015-05-15

    A new cathodeless plasma thruster currently under development at Onera is presented and characterized experimentally and analytically. The coaxial thruster consists of a microwave antenna immersed in a magnetic field, which allows electron heating via cyclotron resonance. The magnetic field diverges at the thruster exit and forms a nozzle that accelerates the quasi-neutral plasma to generate a thrust. Different thruster configurations are tested, and in particular, the influence of the source diameter on the thruster performance is investigated. At microwave powers of about 30 W and a xenon flow rate of 0.1 mg/s (1 SCCM), a mass utilization of 60% and a thrust of 1 mN are estimated based on angular electrostatic probe measurements performed downstream of the thruster in the exhaust plume. Results are found to be in fair agreement with a recent analytical helicon thruster model that has been adapted for the coaxial geometry used here.

  7. Optimization of a coaxial electron cyclotron resonance plasma thruster with an analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannat, F.; Lafleur, T.; Jarrige, J.; Chabert, P.; Elias, P.-Q.; Packan, D.

    2015-05-01

    A new cathodeless plasma thruster currently under development at Onera is presented and characterized experimentally and analytically. The coaxial thruster consists of a microwave antenna immersed in a magnetic field, which allows electron heating via cyclotron resonance. The magnetic field diverges at the thruster exit and forms a nozzle that accelerates the quasi-neutral plasma to generate a thrust. Different thruster configurations are tested, and in particular, the influence of the source diameter on the thruster performance is investigated. At microwave powers of about 30 W and a xenon flow rate of 0.1 mg/s (1 SCCM), a mass utilization of 60% and a thrust of 1 mN are estimated based on angular electrostatic probe measurements performed downstream of the thruster in the exhaust plume. Results are found to be in fair agreement with a recent analytical helicon thruster model that has been adapted for the coaxial geometry used here.

  8. Exact Analytical Solutions of Continuity Equation for Electron Beams Precipitating in Ohmic and Mixed Energy Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobranskis, Rytis; Zharkova, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we extend the approach presented in Dobranskis & Zharkova (2014a,b) by updating the analytical solutions of continuity equation (CE) for pure Ohmic losses and developing a method for analytical solutions to account simultaneously for both collisional and Ohmic losses. The exact solutions of CE for electron density of the beams precipitating in Ohmic losses are found at different precipitation depths for precipitating and "returning") electrons. Then the iterative process was applied to calculate the differential density for mixed (Ohmic and collisional) energy losses (MEL). The differential densities obtained from the updated CE for Coulomb collisions and MEL are used to calculate the HXR intensity for relativistic cross-section and to compare the outcome with more accurate results found from the numerical Fokker-Planck (FP) solution for the same collisional and Ohmic losses. The HXR intensity distribution produced by MEL solution reveals a close resemblance to the results from the numerical FP solution, being almost identical for weaker soft electron beams. However, the MEL simulation can be run up to 30 times faster than the numerical FP. This method implemented in IDL is to be incorporated into the RHESSI software that can be used for quick estimation of the effect of Ohmic losses versus collisions from the RHESSI data.

  9. Electron Tomography: A Three-Dimensional Analytic Tool for Hard and Soft Materials Research.

    PubMed

    Ercius, Peter; Alaidi, Osama; Rames, Matthew J; Ren, Gang

    2015-10-14

    Three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis is essential to understand the relationship between the structure and function of an object. Many analytical techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, neutron spectroscopy, and electron microscopy imaging, are used to provide structural information. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), one of the most popular analytic tools, has been widely used for structural analysis in both physical and biological sciences for many decades, in which 3D objects are projected into two-dimensional (2D) images. In many cases, 2D-projection images are insufficient to understand the relationship between the 3D structure and the function of nanoscale objects. Electron tomography (ET) is a technique that retrieves 3D structural information from a tilt series of 2D projections, and is gradually becoming a mature technology with sub-nanometer resolution. Distinct methods to overcome sample-based limitations have been separately developed in both physical and biological science, although they share some basic concepts of ET. This review discusses the common basis for 3D characterization, and specifies difficulties and solutions regarding both hard and soft materials research. It is hoped that novel solutions based on current state-of-the-art techniques for advanced applications in hybrid matter systems can be motivated. PMID:26087941

  10. Comprehensive Characterization of Extended Defects in Semiconductor Materials by a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Hieckmann, Ellen; Nacke, Markus; Allardt, Matthias; Bodrov, Yury; Chekhonin, Paul; Skrotzki, Werner; Weber, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Extended defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries have a strong influence on the performance of microelectronic devices and on other applications of semiconductor materials. However, it is still under debate how the defect structure determines the band structure, and therefore, the recombination behavior of electron-hole pairs responsible for the optical and electrical properties of the extended defects. The present paper is a survey of procedures for the spatially resolved investigation of structural and of physical properties of extended defects in semiconductor materials with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Representative examples are given for crystalline silicon. The luminescence behavior of extended defects can be investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. They are particularly valuable because spectrally and spatially resolved information can be obtained simultaneously. For silicon, with an indirect electronic band structure, CL measurements should be carried out at low temperatures down to 5 K due to the low fraction of radiative recombination processes in comparison to non-radiative transitions at room temperature. For the study of the electrical properties of extended defects, the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique can be applied. The EBIC image reflects the local distribution of defects due to the increased charge-carrier recombination in their vicinity. The procedure for EBIC investigations is described for measurements at room temperature and at low temperatures. Internal strain fields arising from extended defects can be determined quantitatively by cross-correlation electron backscatter diffraction (ccEBSD). This method is challenging because of the necessary preparation of the sample surface and because of the quality of the diffraction patterns which are recorded during the mapping of the sample. The spatial resolution of the three experimental techniques is compared. PMID:27285177

  11. Comprehensive Characterization of Extended Defects in Semiconductor Materials by a Scanning Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Hieckmann, Ellen; Nacke, Markus; Allardt, Matthias; Bodrov, Yury; Chekhonin, Paul; Skrotzki, Werner; Weber, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Extended defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries have a strong influence on the performance of microelectronic devices and on other applications of semiconductor materials. However, it is still under debate how the defect structure determines the band structure, and therefore, the recombination behavior of electron-hole pairs responsible for the optical and electrical properties of the extended defects. The present paper is a survey of procedures for the spatially resolved investigation of structural and of physical properties of extended defects in semiconductor materials with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Representative examples are given for crystalline silicon. The luminescence behavior of extended defects can be investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. They are particularly valuable because spectrally and spatially resolved information can be obtained simultaneously. For silicon, with an indirect electronic band structure, CL measurements should be carried out at low temperatures down to 5 K due to the low fraction of radiative recombination processes in comparison to non-radiative transitions at room temperature. For the study of the electrical properties of extended defects, the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique can be applied. The EBIC image reflects the local distribution of defects due to the increased charge-carrier recombination in their vicinity. The procedure for EBIC investigations is described for measurements at room temperature and at low temperatures. Internal strain fields arising from extended defects can be determined quantitatively by cross-correlation electron backscatter diffraction (ccEBSD). This method is challenging because of the necessary preparation of the sample surface and because of the quality of the diffraction patterns which are recorded during the mapping of the sample. The spatial resolution of the three experimental techniques is compared. PMID:27285177

  12. Understanding the structure of nanocatalysts with high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, L. D.; Rivas, J.; José-Yacamán, M.

    2014-03-01

    Nanomaterials including nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. Thanks to the rapid improvement of the electron microscopic techniques and with the advent of aberration corrected electron microscopy as well as theoretical methodologies, the potential effects induced by nanocatalysts are better understood than before by unravelling their atomic structure. A brief introduction to advanced electron microscopic techniques namely aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) is presented and subsequently two examples of nanocatalysts are considered in the present review. The first example will focus on the study of bimetallic/core-shell nanoalloys. In heterogeneous catalysis, catalysts containing two or more metals might show significantly different catalytic properties compared to the parent metals and thus are widely utilized in several catalytic reactions. Atom-by-atom insights of the nanoalloy based catalysts ex: Au-Pd will be described in the present review using a combination of advanced electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A related example on the understanding of bimetallic clusters by HAADF-STEM will also be presented in addition to nanoparticles. In the second case understanding the structure of transition metal chalcogenide based nanocatalysts by HRTEM and aberration corrected STEM, for the case of MoS2 will be discussed. MoS2-based catalysts serve as model catalysts and are employed in the hydrodesulphurisations (HDS) reactions in the removal of sulphur from gasoline and related petrochemical products. They have been studied in various forms including nanowires, nanotubes and nanoplates. Their structure, atomic insights and as a consequence elucidation of their corresponding catalytic activity are thus important.

  13. Cytogenetic Characterization of the TM4 Mouse Sertoli Cell Line. II. Chromosome Microdissection, FISH, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael; Guttenbach, Martina; Steinlein, Claus; Wanner, Gerhard; Houben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomes and interphase cell nuclei of the permanent mouse Sertoli cell line TM4 were examined by chromosome microdissection, FISH, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The already known marker chromosomes m1-m5 were confirmed, and 2 new large marker chromosomes m6 and m7 were characterized. The minute heterochromatic marker chromosomes m4 and m5 were microdissected and their DNA amplified by DOP-PCR. FISH of this DNA probe on TM4 metaphase chromosomes demonstrated that the m4 and m5 marker chromosomes have derived from the centromeric regions of normal telocentric mouse chromosomes. Ectopic pairing of the m4 and m5 marker chromosomes with the centromeric region of any of the other chromosomes (centromeric associations) was apparent in ∼60% of the metaphases. Scanning electron microscopy revealed DNA-protein bridges connecting the centromeric regions of normal chromosomes and the associated m4 and m5 marker chromosomes. Interphase cell nuclei of TM4 Sertoli cells did not exhibit the characteristic morphology of Sertoli cells in the testes of adult mice as shown by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:26900862

  14. Three-dimensional machining of carbon nanotube forests using water-assisted scanning electron microscope processing

    SciTech Connect

    Rajabifar, Bahram; Maschmann, Matthew R.; Kim, Sanha; Hart, A. John; Slinker, Keith; Ehlert, Gregory J.

    2015-10-05

    We demonstrate that vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be precisely machined in a low pressure water vapor ambient using the electron beam of an environmental scanning electron microscope. The electron beam locally damages the irradiated regions of the CNT forest and also dissociates the water vapor molecules into reactive species including hydroxyl radicals. These species then locally oxidize the damaged region of the CNTs. The technique offers material removal capabilities ranging from selected CNTs to hundreds of cubic microns. We study how the material removal rate is influenced by the acceleration voltage, beam current, dwell time, operating pressure, and CNT orientation. Milled cuts with depths between 0–100 microns are generated, corresponding to a material removal rate of up to 20.1 μm{sup 3}/min. The technique produces little carbon residue and does not disturb the native morphology of the CNT network. Finally, we demonstrate direct machining of pyramidal surfaces and re-entrant cuts to create freestanding geometries.

  15. Scanning electron microscope studies of bone samples: Influence of simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rahul; Chowdhury, Parimal; Ali, Nawab

    2007-08-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with backscatter and secondary electron emission detectors plus a Si(Li) detector for photon yield measurements was used to study bone samples from skull and leg of mice and rats. These animals were either suspended by their tail to induce simulated microgravity, characterized as hind-limb suspension (HLS) or not suspended (control). Analyses of the SEM images and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) spectra using Si(Li) detector indicate variation in the lattice structures, and in intensities of the characteristics X-rays, produced from the exposed bone surface due to its interaction with the electron beam. Using Flame software, the X-ray spectra were analyzed and normalized ratios of the elements determined. The elemental analysis indicated a variation in the density of calcium, potassium, and oxygen near the knee joints and near the sutures in the skull bones. The comparison of simulated microgravity subjected samples of the rat skull bones with that of the control samples revealed that in the suture region there was a large increase in the ratio of calcium, and to some degree for phosphorus, suggesting simulated microgravity affects distribution of these elements. Elemental composition for control samples with depth (within the cross section of the leg bones) revealed decrease of oxygen and increase of calcium in the first millimeter of the bone depth after which the relative percentage of elements stayed constant.

  16. Three-dimensional machining of carbon nanotube forests using water-assisted scanning electron microscope processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabifar, Bahram; Kim, Sanha; Slinker, Keith; Ehlert, Gregory J.; Hart, A. John; Maschmann, Matthew R.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be precisely machined in a low pressure water vapor ambient using the electron beam of an environmental scanning electron microscope. The electron beam locally damages the irradiated regions of the CNT forest and also dissociates the water vapor molecules into reactive species including hydroxyl radicals. These species then locally oxidize the damaged region of the CNTs. The technique offers material removal capabilities ranging from selected CNTs to hundreds of cubic microns. We study how the material removal rate is influenced by the acceleration voltage, beam current, dwell time, operating pressure, and CNT orientation. Milled cuts with depths between 0-100 microns are generated, corresponding to a material removal rate of up to 20.1 μm3/min. The technique produces little carbon residue and does not disturb the native morphology of the CNT network. Finally, we demonstrate direct machining of pyramidal surfaces and re-entrant cuts to create freestanding geometries.

  17. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy for In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jungjohann, K. L.; Evans, James E.; Aguiar, Jeff; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-06-04

    Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle, and demonstrate characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution based catalysis and biological research.

  18. Magnetic lens apparatus for use in high-resolution scanning electron microscopes and lithographic processes

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particlesis brought to a focus by means of a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. In illustrative embodiments, a lens apparatus is employed in a scanning electron microscopeas the sole lens for high-resolution focusing of an electron beam, and in particular, an electron beam having an accelerating voltage of from about 10 to about 30,000 V. In one embodiment, the lens apparatus comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. In other embodiments, the lens apparatus comprises a magnetic dipole or virtual magnetic monopole fabricated from a variety of materials, including permanent magnets, superconducting coils, and magnetizable spheres and needles contained within an energy-conducting coil. Multiple-array lens apparatus are also disclosed for simultaneous and/or consecutive imaging of multiple images on single or multiple specimens. The invention further provides apparatus, methods, and devices useful in focusing charged particle beams for lithographic processes.

  19. Direct Observation of Magnetic Vortex Cores using Scanning Electron Microscopy with Polarization Analysis (SEMPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Seok-Hwan; Pierce, Daniel; Unguris, John

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic singularities associated with magnetic vortex cores are a common feature in patterned magnetic nanostructures. Their small size, on the order of 10 nm, makes them technologically interesting, but also difficult to measure or image directly. We used Scanning Electron Microscopy with Polarization Analysis (SEMPA) to image magnetic vortices in a wide variety of patterned nanostructures. Since SEMPA can measure both the in-plane and the out-of-plane component of the surface magnetization, SEMPA can potentially determine both the chirality and the polarity of the vortex core, simultaneously. Samples consisted of NiFe (25nm) / Ta (3nm), and other soft magnetic films, patterned by electron beam lithography and lift-off into disks with various diameters. The films were grown on 85nm thick SiN membranes to reduce image degradation from backscattered electrons. The experimental results were compared to micromagnetic simulations and the vortex core profile showed a good correspondence with theoretical predictions, which considers only the exchange and magnetostatic energy. This work has been supported in part by the NIST-CNST/UMD-NanoCenter Cooperative Agreement.

  20. rRNA sequence-based scanning electron microscopic detection of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kenzaka, Takehiko; Ishidoshiro, Ai; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Tani, Katsuji; Nasu, Masao

    2005-09-01

    A new scanning electron microscopic method was developed for gaining both phylogenetic and morphological information about target microbes using in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes (SEM-ISH). Target cells were hybridized with oligonucleotide probes after gold labeling. Gold enhancement was used for amplification of probe signals from hybridized cells. The hybridized cells released a strong backscatter electron signal due to accumulation of gold atoms inside cells. SEM-ISH was applied to analyze bacterial community composition in freshwater samples, and bacterial cell counts determined by SEM-ISH with rRNA-targeted probes for major phyla within the domain Bacteria were highly correlated to those by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The bacterial composition on surface of river sediment particles before and after cell dispersion treatment by sonication was successfully revealed by SEM-ISH. Direct enumeration of bacterial cells on the surface of sonicated sediment particles by SEM-ISH demonstrated that members of Cytophaga-Flavobacterium existed tightly on the surface of particles. SEM-ISH allows defining the number and distribution of phylogenetically defined cells adherent to material surfaces, which is difficult in FISH, and it gives new insight into electron microscopic studies of microorganisms in their natural environment. PMID:16151145

  1. Development of a scanning tunneling potentiometry system for measurement of electronic transport at short length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozler, Michael

    It is clear that complete understanding of macroscopic properties of materials is impossible without a thorough knowledge of behavior at the smallest length scales. While the past 25 years have witnessed major advances in a variety of techniques that probe the nanoscale properties of matter, electrical transport measurements -- the heart of condensed matter research -- have lagged behind, never progressing beyond bulk measurements. This thesis describes a scanning tunneling potentiometry (STP) system developed to simultaneously map the transport-related electrochemical potential distribution of a biased sample along with its surface topography, extending electronic transport measurements to the nanoscale. Combining a novel sample biasing technique with a continuous current-nulling feedback scheme pushes the noise performance of the measurement to its fundamental limit - the Johnson noise of the STM tunnel junction. The resulting 130 nV voltage sensitivity allows us to spatially resolve local potentials at scales down to 2 nm, while maintaining atomic scale STM imaging, all at scan sizes of up to 15 microns. A mm-range two-dimensional coarse positioning stage and the ability to operate from liquid helium to room temperature with a fast turn-around time greatly expand the versatility of the instrument. Use of carefully selected model materials, combined with excellent topographic and voltage resolution has allowed us to distinguish measurement artifacts caused by surface roughness from true potentiometric features, a major problem in previous STP measurements. The measurements demonstrate that STP can produce physically meaningful results for homogeneous transport as well as non-uniform conduction dominated by material microstructures. Measurements of several physically interesting materials systems are presented as well, revealing new behaviors at the smallest length sales. The results establish scanning tunneling potentiometry as a useful tool for physics and

  2. Analytical treatment of electron trajectory straightener issues in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, C.J.; Quimby, D.C.; Spectra Technology, Inc., Bellevue, WA )

    1989-01-01

    The poincare orbit of the electron's journey must be straight and narrow through a many period FEL. To utilize an available technology level, the straightest wiggler orbit operating point (SWOOP) is chosen by adjusting the spacing parameter of an orbit correction scheme. This eases the requirements for achieving the full potential of FEL wigglers. One quality index, one cost index, two quality factors, two measures of field noise, an improvement index, and a straightener classification scheme are concepts that facilitate the analysis. Only when the field noise is large, is this analysis of direct use. A reader-friendly description culminates in the comparison of two schemes to illustrate the methods. Two coupled first order langevin equations have solutions that are proven to be gaussian variables. The solutions are used to give the required cross correlations. These results are coupled with a simple graphical technique and give an expression for the angular variance in the correction corridor. The two components of this variance are compared to a fiducial scheme and yield the two quality factors from which the quality, improvement and cost indices are computed. 68 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Combined infrared and analytical electron microscope studies of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Humecki, H. J.; Germani, M. S.

    1992-08-01

    Ultramicrotomed thin sections (less than 100 nm thick) of eight chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) were studied by analytical electron microscopy and IR microspectroscopy with the objective of identifying IDPs or their specific components with IR spectral transmission characteristics at 10 microns similar to those of comets. Two IDPs are identified whose silicate emission characteristics between 8 and 12 microns are similar to those of comets Halley and Bradfield. Implanted solar flare tracks and sputtered rims resulting from solar wind damage suggest that the minerology and petrography of these IDPs have not been significantly perturbed since ejection from their parent bodies.

  4. Skeletal growth phases of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa shown by scanning electron microscope and electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouchi, Vincent; Vonlanthen, Pierre; Verrecchia, Eric P.; Crowley, Quentin G.

    2016-04-01

    Lophelia pertusa is a cold-water coral, which may form reefs by the association of multiple coralites within which a polyp lives. Each individual polyp builds an aragonite skeleton by an initial phase of early mineralization (traditionally referred to as centres of calcification) from which aragonite fibres grow in thickening deposits. The skeleton wall features successive optically opaque and translucent bands previously attributed to different regimes of growth as either uniform in crystal orientation (translucent bands) or with a chaotic organization (opaque bands). The processes involved in any organizational changes are still unknown. Microlayers in the coral wall, which represent separate periods of skeletal growth, have been recently identified and described. These growth patterns are readily visible under scanning electron microscope (SEM) after etching in dilute formic acid, but they do not necessarily form continuously visible structures. Here we present high quality SEM images and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps to study aragonite fibre orientation across the wall of L. pertusa. Both microlayers and opaque and translucent bands are compared to the crystallographic orientation of the aragonite fibres. EBSD maps and SEM images indicate that aragonite fibres do not exhibit a chaotic orientation, even in opaque bands. The absence of continuity of microlayers is partially explained by an association of multiple crystallographic preferred orientations of aragonite fibres. In the case of L. pertusa, careful textural characterisation is necessary prior to elemental or isotope analysis in order to select a skeletal transect representing a linear and continuous time period.

  5. A sensitive charge scanning probe based on silicon single electron transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lina, Su; Xinxing, Li; Hua, Qin; Xiaofeng, Gu

    2016-04-01

    Single electron transistors (SETs) are known to be extremely sensitive electrometers owing to their high charge sensitivity. In this work, we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a silicon-on-insulator-based SET scanning probe. The fabricated SET is located about 10 μm away from the probe tip. The SET with a quantum dot of about 70 nm in diameter exhibits an obvious Coulomb blockade effect measured at 4.1 K. The Coulomb blockade energy is about 18 meV, and the charge sensitivity is in the order of 10‑5‑10‑3 e/Hz1/2. This SET scanning probe can be used to map charge distribution and sense dynamic charge fluctuation in nanodevices or circuits under test, realizing high sensitivity and high spatial resolution charge detection. Project supported by the Instrument Developing Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. YZ201152), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11403084), the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities (Nos. JUSRP51510, JUDCF12032), and the Graduate Student Innovation Program for Universities of Jiangsu Province (No. CXLX12_0724).

  6. Investigation of C3S hydration by environmental scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Sakalli, Y; Trettin, R

    2015-07-01

    Tricalciumsilicate (C(3)S, Alite) is the major component of the Portland cement clinker, The hydration of the Alite is decisive for the properties of the resulting material due to the high content in cement. The mechanism of the hydration of C(3)S is very complicated and not yet fully understood. There are some models that describe the hydration of C(3)S in various ways. The Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) working in gaseous atmosphere enables high-resolution dynamic observations of structure of materials, from micrometre to nanometre scale. This provides a new perspective in material research. ESEM significantly allows imaging of specimen in their natural state without the need for special preparation (coating, drying, etc.) that can alter the physical properties. This paper presents the results of our experimental studies of hydration of C(3)S using ESEM. The ESEM turned out to be an important extension of the conventional scanning microscopy. The purpose of these investigations is to gain insight of hydration mechanism to determine which hydration products are formed and to analyze if there are any differences in the composition of the hydration products. PMID:25882158

  7. Examination of Scanning Electron Microscope and Computed Tomography Images of PICA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Shklover, Valery

    2010-01-01

    Micrographs of PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) taken using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D images taken with a Computed Tomography (CT) system are examined. PICA is a carbon fiber based composite (Fiberform ) with a phenolic polymer matrix. The micrographs are taken at different surface depths and at different magnifications in a sample after arc jet testing and show different levels of oxidative removal of the charred matrix (Figs 1 though 13). CT scans, courtesy of Xradia, Inc. of Concord CA, were captured for samples of virgin PICA, charred PICA and raw Fiberform (Fig. 14). We use these images to calculate the thermal conductivity (TC) of these materials using correlation function (CF) methods. CF methods give a mathematical description of how one material is embedded in another and is thus ideally suited for modeling composites like PICA. We will evaluate how the TC of the materials changes as a function of surface depth. This work is in collaboration with ETH-Zurich, which has expertise in high temperature materials and TC modeling (including CF methods).

  8. Multispectral elastic scanning lidar for industrial flare research: characterizing the electronic subsystem and application.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Facundes da Costa, Renata; Bedoya, Andrés Esteban; Guardani, Roberto; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Bastidas, Álvaro Efrain; Landulfo, Eduardo

    2014-12-15

    This work deals with the analysis of the electronic subsystem of a multiwavelength elastic scanning lidar. Several calibration tests are applied to the Cubatão scanning lidar placed at the industrial area of Cubatão in the State of São Paulo (Brazil), in order to improve the knowledge of its performing itself and to design protocols for correcting lidar signal for undesirable instrumental effects. In particular, the trigger delay is assessed by means of zero-bin and bin-shift tests for analog (AN) and photo-counting (PC) signals, respectively. Dark current test is also performed to detect potential range-dependency that could affect lidar products. All tests were performed at different spatial resolutions. These instrumental corrections were applied to a case study of data acquired for characterizing the optical and microphysical properties of particles in an industrial flare. To that aim, a graphical method based on the space defined by the extinction-related Angström exponent versus its spectral curvature is used to derive the contribution of fine aerosol to extinction and the size of the fine aerosols in the industrial flare, therefore revealing features of the processes occurring inside the flame. Our study demonstrates the potential of this new technique for the study and measurement of industrial emissions. PMID:25607056

  9. Development of Step-and-Scan-Type XY-Stage System for Electron Beam Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Hiroyuki; Komatsubara, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Saji, Nobuhito; Miyashita, Masahiro; Amada, Akihisa; Tsunoda, Michio

    2007-09-01

    The trend towards minimization in ultralarge-scale integration (ULSI) fabrication requires an increasingly precise motion accuracy for an XY-stage in a high-vacuum environment of electron beam (e-beam) systems. Aerostatic bearings allow for an extremely smooth motion, because the slider of the XY-stage is supported by an air film under a noncontact condition. However, such an XY-stage in aerostatic bearings is not easily introduced into the e-beam systems because of the markedly high amount of exhaust gas leaking into a vacuum chamber. In this paper, we describe a newly developed hybrid XY-stage guided by aerostatic bearings equipped with a noncontact seal mechanism for scanning motion and by mechanical rolling guides for stepping motion.

  10. Fractal evaluation of drug amorphicity from optical and scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriloaia, Bogdan-Mihai G.; Vizireanu, Radu C.; Neamtu, Catalin I.; Gavriloaia, Gheorghe V.

    2013-09-01

    Amorphous materials are metastable, more reactive than the crystalline ones, and have to be evaluated before pharmaceutical compound formulation. Amorphicity is interpreted as a spatial chaos, and patterns of molecular aggregates of dexamethasone, D, were investigated in this paper by using fractal dimension, FD. Images having three magnifications of D were taken from an optical microscope, OM, and with eight magnifications, from a scanning electron microscope, SEM, were analyzed. The average FD for pattern irregularities of OM images was 1.538, and about 1.692 for SEM images. The FDs of the two kinds of images are less sensitive of threshold level. 3D images were shown to illustrate dependence of FD of threshold and magnification level. As a result, optical image of single scale is enough to characterize the drug amorphicity. As a result, the OM image at a single scale is enough to characterize the amorphicity of D.

  11. Cryogenic Pressure Calibrator for Wide Temperature Electronically Scanned (ESP) Pressure Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulcon, Nettie D.

    2001-01-01

    Electronically scanned pressure (ESP) modules have been developed that can operate in ambient and in cryogenic environments, particularly Langley's National Transonic Facility (NTF). Because they can operate directly in a cryogenic environment, their use eliminates many of the operational problems associated with using conventional modules at low temperatures. To ensure the accuracy of these new instruments, calibration was conducted in a laboratory simulating the environmental conditions of NTF. This paper discusses the calibration process by means of the simulation laboratory, the system inputs and outputs and the analysis of the calibration data. Calibration results of module M4, a wide temperature ESP module with 16 ports and a pressure range of +/- 4 psid are given.

  12. Evaluation of vermicompost maturity using scanning electron microscopy and paper chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Senthil Kumar, D; Satheesh Kumar, P; Rajendran, N M; Uthaya Kumar, V; Anbuganapathi, G

    2014-04-01

    Vermicompost was produced from flower waste inoculated with biofertilizers using the earthworm Eisenia fetida. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) were carried out on the basis of physicochemical parameters of vermicomposted samples. From the results of the PCA and CA, it was possible to classify two different groups of vermicompost samples in the following categories: E2 and E5; and E1, E3, E4, and control. Scanning electron microscopy and biodynamic circular paper chromatography analysis were used to investigate the changes in surface morphology and functional groups in the control and vermicompost products. SEM analysis of E1-E5 shows more fragment and pores than the control. Chromatographic analysis of vermicompost indicated the mature condition of the compost materials. PMID:24634991

  13. Morphological study of Tetratrichomonas didelphidis isolated from opossum Lutreolina crassicaudata by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Tiana; De Carli, Geraldo Attilio

    2007-05-01

    Tetratrichomonas didelphidis is a flagellate protozoan found in the intestine of opossums Didelphis marsupialis, Didelphis albiventris, and Lutreolina crassicaudata. The isolate used in this study was from L. crassicaudata and it was cultivated in monoxenic culture with Escherichia coli in Diamond (TYM) medium without maltose and with starch solution (trypticase-yeast extract-starch), pH 7.5 at 28 degrees C. Scanning electron microscopy showed the fine morphological features of the trophozoites: the emergence of the anterior flagella, the structure of the undulating membrane, the axostyle and posterior flagellum. In addition, we described spherical forms that are probably pseudocysts. Our data will contribute to a better understanding of surface structures in T. didelphidis. PMID:17252276

  14. Small-scale patterning methods for digital image correlation under scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammers, A. D.; Daly, S.

    2011-12-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is a powerful, length-scale-independent methodology for examining full-field surface deformations. Recently, it has become possible to combine DIC with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), enabling the investigation of small-scale deformation mechanisms such as the strains accommodated within grains in polycrystalline metals, or around micro-scale constituents in composite materials. However, there exist significant challenges that need to be surmounted before the combination of DIC and SEM (here termed SEM-DIC) can be fully exploited. One of the primary challenges is the ability to pattern specimens at microstructural length scales with a random, isotropic and high contrast pattern needed for DIC. This paper provides a thorough survey of small-scale patterning methods for SEM-DIC and discusses their advantages and disadvantages for different applications.

  15. A maturation change detected in the semilunar cartilages with the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Moshurchak, E M; Ghadially, F N

    1978-01-01

    The surface of rabbit, cat, monkey and human semilunar cartilages was examined with the scanning electron microscope. A common feature was the occurrence of numerous ridges, undulations and furrows on the surface, but this was thought to be due to marked shrinkage and distortion of cartilage not firmly attached to bone. Humps were seen on the semilunar cartilages of young animals, but pits occurred in adults. This is thought to reflect a maturation change. Humps were seen in a young human semilunar cartilage, but pits were not seen in adult specimens. It is not clear whether pits are truly absent or just masked by the severe ridging produced during the preparation of large human specimens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 PMID:99411

  16. Big Data and Deep data in scanning and electron microscopies: functionality from multidimensional data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex; Vasudevan, Rama K; Strelcov, Evgheni; Steed, Chad A; Yang, Sang Mo; Tselev, Alexander; Jesse, Stephen; Biegalski, Michael D; Shipman, Galen M; Symons, Christopher T; Borisevich, Albina Y; Archibald, Richard K; Kalinin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    The development of electron, and scanning probe microscopies in the second half of the twentieth century have produced spectacular images of internal structure and composition of matter with, at nanometer, molecular, and atomic resolution. Largely, this progress was enabled by computer-assisted methods of microscope operation, data acquisition and analysis. The progress in imaging technologies in the beginning of the twenty first century has opened the proverbial floodgates of high-veracity information on structure and functionality. High resolution imaging now allows information on atomic positions with picometer precision, allowing for quantitative measurements of individual bond length and angles. Functional imaging often leads to multidimensional data sets containing partial or full information on properties of interest, acquired as a function of multiple parameters (time, temperature, or other external stimuli). Here, we review several recent applications of the big and deep data analysis methods to visualize, compress, and translate this data into physically and chemically relevant information from imaging data.

  17. Ultrahigh-vacuum third-order spherical aberration (Cs) corrector for a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Takeguchi, Masaki; Kondo, Yukihito; Hosokawa, Fumio; Okamoto, Kimiharu; Sannomiya, Takumi; Hori, Madoka; Iwama, Takeshi; Kawazoe, Muneyuki; Furuya, Kazuo

    2006-12-01

    Initial results from an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) third-order spherical aberration (Cs) corrector for a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscopy, installed at the National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Japan, are presented here. The Cs corrector is of the dual hexapole type. It is UHV compatible and was installed on a UHV column. The Ronchigram obtained showed an extension of the sweet spot area, indicating a successful correction of the third-order spherical aberration Cs. The power spectrum of an image demonstrated that the resolution achieved was 0.1 nm. A first trial of the direct measurement of the fifth-order spherical aberration C5 was also attempted on the basis of a Ronchigram fringe measurement. PMID:19830936

  18. Frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser for use in periodontology: a scanning electron microscopic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Hennig, Thomas

    1996-12-01

    During prior studies it could be demonstrated that engaging a frequency double Alexandrite-laser allows a fast and strictly selective ablation of supra- and subgingival calculus. Furthermore, the removal of unstained microbial plaque was observed. First conclusions were drawn following light microscopic investigations on undecalcified sections of irradiated teeth. In the present study the cementum surface after irradiation with a frequency doubled Alexandrite-laser was observed by means of a scanning electron microscope. After irradiation sections of teeth were dried in alcohol and sputtered with gold. In comparison irradiated cementum surfaces of unerupted operatively removed wisdom teeth and tooth surfaces after the selective removal of calculus were investigated. A complete removal of calculus was observed as well as a remaining smooth surface of irradiated cementum.

  19. Bright-field imaging of compound semiconductors using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Toshihiro; Lu, Jing; McCartney, Martha R.; Smith, David J.

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the observation of six different zincblende compound semiconductors in [110] projection using large-collection-angle bright-field (LABF) imaging with an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Phase contrast is completely suppressed when the collection semi-angle is set equal to the convergence semi-angle and there are no reversals in image contrast with changes in defocus or thickness. The optimum focus for imaging closely separated pairs of atomic columns (‘dumbbells’) is unique and easily recognized, and the positions of atomic columns occupied by heavier atoms always have darker intensity than those occupied by lighter atoms. Thus, the crystal polarity of compound semiconductors can be determined unambiguously. Moreover, it is concluded that the LABF imaging mode will be highly beneficial for studying other more complicated heterostructures at the atomic scale.

  20. An In vitro Study on Post Bleaching Pigmentation Susceptibility of Teeth and Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Latha, S Pushpa; Hegde, Vani; Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Tarakji, Bassel; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Background: To determine the susceptibility of teeth for repigmentation after bleaching. Materials and Methods: Forty premolars were assigned to three groups (n = 12). Group 1 was bleached using 30% w/v hydrogen peroxide 15 min 3 times a day every other day for 4 days. In Group 2 was bleached using 16% carbamide peroxide (Polanight), 90 min a day for 15 days. 2 days later, the shades of the bleached teeth were recorded. Remaining 4 teeth were bleached according to Group 1 and 2 and were subjected to atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy analysis. Results: Specimens of athome bleaching were lighter than the specimens of inoffice bleaching. Conclusion: The susceptibility of enamel to pigmentation can be increased after bleaching, and pigmentation is greater if bleaching is performed with H2O2. The percentage change (lighter) was more for athome bleaching specimens as compared to inoffice bleaching specimens. PMID:25395800

  1. Morphology of the dentin structure of sloths Bradypus tridactylus: a light and scanning electron microscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Santana, L N S; Barbosa, L V M; Teixeira, F B; Costa, A M P; Fernandes, L M P; Lima, R R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dentine morphology of sloths (Bradypus tridactylus). The sloth teeth were removed and prepared for light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy analyses (SEM). LM revealed two patterns of tubular dentins: an outer with dentinary tubules over the all tooth length and one in the inner part with larger diameter and more spaced tubules, when compared to those present in the outer dentine. These findings were confirmed by SEM, which revealed a tubular pattern in the outer dentine like in humans. The inner dentine displayed pared grouped tubules that were characterized as vascular channels. It can be concluded that this sloth species present two types of dentins: an inner dentin (ortodentin) and an outer dentin characterized as a vascular dentin. This suggests a partial evolutive/adaptive process of this dental tissue, as compared to other mammalian species. PMID:23410180

  2. Devolatilization Studies of Oil Palm Biomass for Torrefaction Process through Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daud, D.; Abd. Rahman, A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, palm oil biomass consisting of empty fruit bunch (EFB), mesocarp fibre and palm kernel shell (PKS) were chosen as raw material for torrefaction process. Torrefaction process was conducted at various temperatures of 240 °C, 270 °C and 300 °C with a residence time of 60 minutes. The morphology of the raw and torrefied biomass was then observed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. Also, through this experiment the correlation between the torrefaction temperatures with the volatile gases released were studied. From the observation, the morphology structure of the biomass exhibited inter-particle gaps due to the release of volatile gases and it is obviously seen more at higher temperatures. Moreover, the change of the biomass structure is influenced by the alteration of the lignocellulose biomass.

  3. New parallel wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based on scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Erko, Alexei; Firsov, Alexander; Gubzhokov, Renat; Bjeoumikhov, Anjuar; Günther, Andreas; Langhoff, Norbert; Bretschneider, Mario; Höhn, Yvonne; Wedell, Reiner

    2014-07-14

    A new wavelength - dispersive X-ray spectrometer for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been developed. This spectrometer can cover an energy range from 50 eV to 1120 eV by using an array made of seventeen reflection zone plates. Soft X-ray emission spectra of simple elements of Li, Be, B, C, N, Ti, V, O, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ga were measured. The overall energy resolving power on the order of E/ΔE ~80 to 160 has been demonstrated. Spectrometer with 200 reflection zone plates has been used as a multi-channel analyser in the energy range of 100 - 1000 eV for quasi - continuous spectra measurements. The predicted energy-resolving power on the order of E/ΔE = 50 has been achieved in the entire energy range. PMID:25090506

  4. Scanning electron microscope study of ancient parasite eggs recovered from Korean mummies of the Joseon Dynasty.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Lim, Do-Seon; Choi, Ki-Ju; Oh, Chang Seok; Kim, Myeung Ju; Lee, In Sun; Kim, Seok Bae; Shin, Jeong Eun; Bok, Gi Dae; Chai, Jong Yil; Seo, Min

    2009-02-01

    We have previously shown that parasite eggs have been identified in the coprolites of Korean mummies. These eggs have shed light on parasitic infection patterns in Korean populations living several hundred years ago. We conducted a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study on ancient Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, Metagonimus yokogawai, Paragonimus westermani, and Gymnophalloides seoi eggs recovered from Korean mummies of the Joseon Dynasty. We anticipated that the taphonomic conditions of mummification would alter the eggs of certain species but not of others. Our SEM data show that each species of ancient egg exhibited different degrees of preservation. Thus, some of them, for example, M. yokogawai, exhibited a better preservation status than others, suggesting that they should be the first candidates considered when choosing subjects for future paleoparasitological studies. PMID:18601576

  5. Mapping electron-beam-injected trapped charge with scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tranca, Denis E; Sánchez-Ortiga, Emilio; Saavedra, Genaro; Martínez-Corral, Manuel; Tofail, Syed A M; Stanciu, Stefan G; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A

    2016-03-01

    Scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) has been demonstrated as a valuable tool for mapping the optical and optoelectronic properties of materials with nanoscale resolution. Here we report experimental evidence that trapped electric charges injected by an electron beam at the surface of dielectric samples affect the sample-dipole interaction, which has direct impact on the s-SNOM image content. Nanoscale mapping of the surface trapped charge holds significant potential for the precise tailoring of the electrostatic properties of dielectric and semiconductive samples, such as hydroxyapatite, which has particular importance with respect to biomedical applications. The methodology developed here is highly relevant to semiconductor device fabrication as well. PMID:26974112

  6. An assessment of the formation of electrodeposited scales using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morizot, A. P.; Neville, A.; Taylor, J. D.

    2002-04-01

    The deposition of insoluble salts onto surfaces in process systems represents an important operational problem. Mineral scale formation (e.g. CaCO 3 and BaSO 4) can result from fluid streams becoming supersaturated when incompatible waters combine (e.g. in oil recovery) or can be formed when cathodic protection is applied and electrodeposition occurs. In this study, electrodeposition is studied on metal rotating disk electrodes (RDE) in artificial seawater under static conditions and under rotation at 400 rpm. Also, a Ca-free brine and a Mg-free brine of the same dissolved solids level were used in static tests. The focus of the study is the assessment of the electrochemical response of the system under potentiostatic control and correlation of the current versus time measurements to the characteristics of the scale determined via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis.

  7. Residual acrylic adhesive after removal of plastic orthodontic brackets: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Caspersen IVAR

    1977-06-01

    After etching for one minute with 35 per cent phosphoric acid, thirty-eight permanent teeth were furnished with plastic brackets. An additional twelve teeth were used as references and were etched but were not furnished with brackets. Four teeth served as untreated controls. Eight brackets had fallen off one week later. The remaining brackets were removed with various instruments. All the teeth were extracted and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On all of the teeth originally furnished with brackets, residual acrylic was found on the tooth surface. The SEM examination was supplemented with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (ED) which confirmed that the observed residues differed in their chemical composition from the dental substance. PMID:326059

  8. A conceptual design study for a two-dimensional, electronically scanned thinned array radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutton, Philip; Chromik, Christopher C.; Dixon, Iain; Statham, Richard B.; Stillwagen, Frederic H.; Vontheumer, Alfred E.; Sasamoto, Washito A.; Garn, Paul A.; Cosgrove, Patrick A.; Ganoe, George G.

    1993-01-01

    A conceptual design for the Two-Dimensional, Electronically Steered Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) is described. This instrument is a synthetic aperture microwave radiometer that operates in the L-band frequency range for the measurement of soil moisture and ocean salinity. Two auxiliary instruments, an 8-12 micron, scanning infrared radiometer and a 0.4-1.0 micron, charge coupled device (CCD) video camera, are included to provided data for sea surface temperature measurements and spatial registration of targets respectively. The science requirements were defined by Goddard Space Flight Center. Instrument and the spacecraft configurations are described for missions using the Pegasus and Taurus launch vehicles. The analyses and design trades described include: estimations of size, mass and power, instrument viewing coverage, mechanical design trades, structural and thermal analyses, data and communications performance assessments, and cost estimation.

  9. Scanning Electron Microscopic Studies of the Pecten Oculi in the Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica)

    PubMed Central

    Pourlis, Aris F.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to extend the microscopic investigations of the pecten oculi in the quail in order to add some information on the unresolved functional anatomy of this unique avian organ. The pecten oculi of the quail was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Eighteen- to-twenty two highly vascularised accordion-like folds were joined apically by a heavily pigmented bridge of tissue, which holds the pecten in a fanlike shape, widest at the base. The structure of the double layered limiting membrane was recorded. The presence of hyalocytes with macrophage-like appearance was illustrated. It is assumed that the pecten oculi of the quail resembles that of the chicken. Illustrated morphological features of this species may add information on the active physiological role of the pecten. But still, the functional significance of this organ is a matter of controversies. PMID:24198967

  10. Interaction of water with different cellulose ethers: a Raman spectroscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Fechner, P M; Wartewig, S; Kiesow, A; Heilmann, A; Kleinebudde, P; Neubert, R H H

    2005-06-01

    Different non-ionic cellulose ethers like methyl cellulose (MC), hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) were investigated. The characterization of the cellulose ethers was carried out by thermogravimetry and sorption/desorption isotherms. Differences in the properties of the cellulose ether films were described by time-dependent contact angle measurements. Changes in molecular structure of the raw materials, gels and films caused by water contact were studied using Raman spectroscopy. Differences between the substitution types and changes due to the gel or film formation were observed. An environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) technique was used to distinguish the morphological behaviour of the cellulose ether films in contact with water. Based on in-situ ESEM experiments, the swelling and drying behaviour of the various stages of cellulose ether films (film-hydrated film-dried film) were quantified by using image analysis. PMID:15969923

  11. A low-cost technique to manufacture a container to process meiofauna for scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abolafia, J

    2015-09-01

    An easy and low-cost method to elaborate a container to dehydrate nematodes and other meiofauna in order to process them for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is presented. Illustrations of its elaboration, step by step, are included. In addition, a brief methodology to process meiofauna, especially nematodes and kinorhynchs, and illustrations are provided. With this methodology it is possible to easily introduce the specimens, to lock them in a closed chamber allowing the infiltration of fluids and gases (ethanol, acetone, carbon dioxide) but avoiding losing the specimens. After using this meiofauna basket for SEM the results are efficient. Examples of nematode and kinorhynch SEM pictures obtained using this methodology are also included. PMID:26178782

  12. Microcirculation of human fetal posterior root ganglia: a scanning electron microscopic study of corrosion casts.

    PubMed

    Gorczyca, J; Skawina, A; Litwin, J A; Miodoński, A J

    1998-02-01

    The vasculature of lumbar posterior root ganglia was investigated in human fetuses aged 17-24 weeks; using the corrosion casting technique and scanning electron microscopy. The arterial supply consisted of one main artery and occasional arterioles entering the ganglion at its pole and running axially, while the venous drainage was located at the periphery of the ganglion, thus indicating a centrifugal pattern of blood flow. The dense capillary network of the ganglion showed the roughly parallel course of the vessels in the central zone and an irregular arrangement in the peripheral zone where capillaries formed "nests", probably surrounding individual perikaryons of ganglionic cells. The capillaries had a sinusoidal character with numerous dilatations about twice the normal capillary size, as well as occasional larger vascular spaces resulting from capillary interconnections and suggesting the intussusceptive type of angiogenesis. PMID:9488902

  13. [Scanning electron microscopic study of films of the loose connective tissue of mice exposed to DMBA].

    PubMed

    Ol'shevskaia, L V

    1979-01-01

    Under examination by scanning electron microscopy were film samples of the subcutaneous connective tissue. The surface of the films from intact mice was even and smooth, fibroblasts have a spread pattern. Following the saline injection the film was even, collagen fibres, differing in the character of surface and the size of diameter, were readily seen. The collagen fibres formed a multilayer system with a definite orientation inside the layer. After DMBA injection the film surface would get uneven and tuberous, the fibroblast body rising over the film surface, thus the orientation of fibres and all strata was disturbed. There was a spacial rearrangement of all tissue components. It is suggested that carcinogenic agents affecting the relationship between tissue components could interfere the contact inhibition of cell division and result in the development of focal cell proliferates. PMID:113934

  14. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-09-15

    We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells. PMID:23742956

  15. Identifying dislocations and stacking faults in GaN films by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, X. J.; Niu, M. T.; Zeng, X. H.; Huang, J.; Zhang, J. C.; Zhang, J. P.; Wang, J. F.; Xu, K.

    2016-08-01

    The application of annular bright field (ABF) and medium-angle annular dark field (MAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging to crystalline defect analysis has been extended to dislocations and stacking faults (SFs). Dislocations and SFs have been imaged under zone-axis and two-beam diffraction conditions. Comparing to conventional two-beam diffraction contrast images, the ABF and MAADF images of dislocations and SFs not only are complementary and symmetrical with their peaks at dislocation core and SFs plane, but also show similar extinction phenomenon. It is demonstrated that conventional TEM rules for diffraction contrast, i.e. g · b and g · R invisibility criteria remain applicable. The contrast mechanism and extinction of dislocation and SFs in ABF and MAADF STEM are illuminated by zero-order Laue zone Kikuchi diffraction.

  16. Applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in inner ear pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Anniko, M.; Lim, D.J.; Sobin, A.; Wroblewski, R.

    1985-01-01

    Surface pathology of inner ear structures so far described in detail concern cochlear and vestibular hair cells and the stria vascularis. In man, surgical intervention into the inner ear is very uncommon and when performed is in general with the primary objective of destroying the diseased peripheral end organs. The vast majority of inner ear tissue available for use with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is therefore obtained from animals. The present paper reviews the progression of surface pathology caused by aminoglycoside antibiotics, acoustic overstimulation and in a guinea pig strain with genetic inner ear disease. The primary site of onset of surface pathology differs, depending on the underlying cause. Advanced surface pathology shows a similar type of morphological degeneration independent of cause. The combination of SEM and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (XRMA) of inner ear pathology has as yet been reported in only three studies, all concerning inner ear fluids or otoconia.

  17. Quantitative scanning electron microscopic autoradiography of inhaled /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Lauhala, K.E.; McDonald, K.E.

    1989-03-01

    We have applied the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to obtain autoradiographs of particles of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ deposited in rat lung. The technique was used to obtain quantitative information on the clearance rates of particles from the alveoli, bronchioles and trachea up to 240 d after exposure. At all times, the concentration of particles on the surface of the bronchioles was an order of magnitude greater than on the tracheal surface. The clearance of Pu from both regions followed a biphasic pattern, similar to that obtained by radiometric analysis of the whole lung. Most of the radiation dose to the bronchiolar epithelium originated from Pu particles in peribronchiolar alveoli in which they were preferentially retained, compared to other alveolar regions. The prolonged retention of particles in the peribronchiolar alveoli may be a significant factor in the induction of lung carcinomas.

  18. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  19. Characterization of defect growth structure in ion plated films by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1979-01-01

    Copper and gold films (0.2 to 2 microns) were ion plated onto polished 304-stainless-steel surfaces. These coatings were examined by scanning electron microscopy for coating growth defects. Three types of defects were distinguished: nodular growth, abnormal or runaway growth, and spits. The cause and origin for each type of defect was traced. Nodular growth is primarily due to inherent substrate microdefects, abnormal or runaway growth is due to external surface inclusions, and spits are due to nonuniform evaporation. All these defects have adverse effects on the coatings. They induce stresses and produce porosity in the coatings and thus weaken their mechanical properties. Friction and wear characteristics are affected by coating defects, since the large nodules are pulled out and additional wear debris is generated.

  20. Method of improving image sharpness for annular-illumination scanning electron microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enyama, Momoyo; Hamada, Koichi; Fukuda, Muneyuki; Kazumi, Hideyuki

    2016-06-01

    Annular illumination is effective in enhancing the depth of focus for scanning electron microscopes (SEMs). However, owing to high side lobes of the point-spread function (PSF), annular illumination results in poor image sharpness. The conventional deconvolution method, which converts the PSF to a delta function, can improve image sharpness, but results in artifacts due to noise amplification. In this paper, we propose an image processing method that can reduce the deterioration of image sharpness. With this method, the PSF under annular illumination is converted to that under standard illumination. Through simulations, we verified that the image sharpness of SEM images under annular illumination with the proposed method can be improved without noise amplification.