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Sample records for analytical structural superposition

  1. Quantum superpositions of crystalline structures

    SciTech Connect

    Baltrusch, Jens D.; Morigi, Giovanna; Cormick, Cecilia; De Chiara, Gabriele; Calarco, Tommaso

    2011-12-15

    A procedure is discussed for creating coherent superpositions of motional states of ion strings. The motional states are across the structural transition linear-zigzag, and their coherent superposition is achieved by means of spin-dependent forces, such that a coherent superposition of the electronic states of one ion evolves into an entangled state between the chain's internal and external degrees of freedom. It is shown that the creation of such an entangled state can be revealed by performing Ramsey interferometry with one ion of the chain.

  2. A comparison between anisotropic analytical and multigrid superposition dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vincent W C; Tse, Teddy K H; Ho, Cola L M; Yeung, Eric C Y

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is currently the most accurate dose calculation algorithm in radiotherapy planning but requires relatively long processing time. Faster model-based algorithms such as the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) by the Eclipse treatment planning system and multigrid superposition (MGS) by the XiO treatment planning system are 2 commonly used algorithms. This study compared AAA and MGS against MC, as the gold standard, on brain, nasopharynx, lung, and prostate cancer patients. Computed tomography of 6 patients of each cancer type was used. The same hypothetical treatment plan using the same machine and treatment prescription was computed for each case by each planning system using their respective dose calculation algorithm. The doses at reference points including (1) soft tissues only, (2) bones only, (3) air cavities only, (4) soft tissue-bone boundary (Soft/Bone), (5) soft tissue-air boundary (Soft/Air), and (6) bone-air boundary (Bone/Air), were measured and compared using the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), which was a function of the percentage dose deviations from MC. Besides, the computation time of each treatment plan was recorded and compared. The MAPEs of MGS were significantly lower than AAA in all types of cancers (p<0.001). With regards to body density combinations, the MAPE of AAA ranged from 1.8% (soft tissue) to 4.9% (Bone/Air), whereas that of MGS from 1.6% (air cavities) to 2.9% (Soft/Bone). The MAPEs of MGS (2.6%±2.1) were significantly lower than that of AAA (3.7%±2.5) in all tissue density combinations (p<0.001). The mean computation time of AAA for all treatment plans was significantly lower than that of the MGS (p<0.001). Both AAA and MGS algorithms demonstrated dose deviations of less than 4.0% in most clinical cases and their performance was better in homogeneous tissues than at tissue boundaries. In general, MGS demonstrated relatively smaller dose deviations than AAA but required longer computation time

  3. A comparison between anisotropic analytical and multigrid superposition dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Tse, Teddy K.H.; Ho, Cola L.M.; Yeung, Eric C.Y.

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is currently the most accurate dose calculation algorithm in radiotherapy planning but requires relatively long processing time. Faster model-based algorithms such as the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) by the Eclipse treatment planning system and multigrid superposition (MGS) by the XiO treatment planning system are 2 commonly used algorithms. This study compared AAA and MGS against MC, as the gold standard, on brain, nasopharynx, lung, and prostate cancer patients. Computed tomography of 6 patients of each cancer type was used. The same hypothetical treatment plan using the same machine and treatment prescription was computed for each case by each planning system using their respective dose calculation algorithm. The doses at reference points including (1) soft tissues only, (2) bones only, (3) air cavities only, (4) soft tissue-bone boundary (Soft/Bone), (5) soft tissue-air boundary (Soft/Air), and (6) bone-air boundary (Bone/Air), were measured and compared using the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), which was a function of the percentage dose deviations from MC. Besides, the computation time of each treatment plan was recorded and compared. The MAPEs of MGS were significantly lower than AAA in all types of cancers (p<0.001). With regards to body density combinations, the MAPE of AAA ranged from 1.8% (soft tissue) to 4.9% (Bone/Air), whereas that of MGS from 1.6% (air cavities) to 2.9% (Soft/Bone). The MAPEs of MGS (2.6%±2.1) were significantly lower than that of AAA (3.7%±2.5) in all tissue density combinations (p<0.001). The mean computation time of AAA for all treatment plans was significantly lower than that of the MGS (p<0.001). Both AAA and MGS algorithms demonstrated dose deviations of less than 4.0% in most clinical cases and their performance was better in homogeneous tissues than at tissue boundaries. In general, MGS demonstrated relatively smaller dose deviations than AAA but required longer computation time.

  4. SAS-Pro: Simultaneous Residue Assignment and Structure Superposition for Protein Structure Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shweta B.; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.

    2012-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is the problem of determining an assignment between the amino-acid residues of two given proteins in a way that maximizes a measure of similarity between the two superimposed protein structures. By identifying geometric similarities, structure alignment algorithms provide critical insights into protein functional similarities. Existing structure alignment tools adopt a two-stage approach to structure alignment by decoupling and iterating between the assignment evaluation and structure superposition problems. We introduce a novel approach, SAS-Pro, which addresses the assignment evaluation and structure superposition simultaneously by formulating the alignment problem as a single bilevel optimization problem. The new formulation does not require the sequentiality constraints, thus generalizing the scope of the alignment methodology to include non-sequential protein alignments. We employ derivative-free optimization methodologies for searching for the global optimum of the highly nonlinear and non-differentiable RMSD function encountered in the proposed model. Alignments obtained with SAS-Pro have better RMSD values and larger lengths than those obtained from other alignment tools. For non-sequential alignment problems, SAS-Pro leads to alignments with high degree of similarity with known reference alignments. The source code of SAS-Pro is available for download at http://eudoxus.cheme.cmu.edu/saspro/SAS-Pro.html. PMID:22662161

  5. Strain-Rate Frequency Superposition (SRFS) - A rheological probe of structural relaxation in soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyss, Hans M.

    2007-03-01

    The rheological properties of soft materials such as concentrated suspensions, emulsions, or foams often exhibit surprisingly universal linear and nonlinear features. Here we show that their linear and nonlinear viscoelastic responses can be unified in a single picture by considering the effect of the strain-rate amplitude on the structural relaxation of the material. We present a new approach to oscillatory rheology, which keeps the strain rate amplitude fixed as the oscillation frequency is varied. This allows for a detailed study of the effects of strain rate on the structural relaxation of soft materials. Our data exhibits a characteristic scaling, which isolates the response due to structural relaxation, even when it occurs at frequencies too low to be accessible with standard techniques. Our approach is reminiscent of a technique called time-temperature superposition (TTS), where rheological curves measured at different temperatures are shifted onto a single master curve that reflects the viscoelastic behavior in a dramatically extended range of frequencies. By analogy, we call our approach strain-rate frequency superposition (SRFS). Our experimental results show that nonlinear viscoelastic measurements contain useful information on the slow relaxation dynamics of soft materials. The data indicates that the yielding behavior of soft materials directly probes the structural relaxation process itself, shifted towards higher frequencies by an applied strain rate. This suggests that SRFS will provide new insight into the physical mechanisms that govern the viscoelastic response of a wide range of soft materials.

  6. Controlling the optical properties of composite multilayered photonic structures: effect of superposition.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anupam; Ariza-Flores, A David; Balderas-Valadez, R Fabiola; Agarwal, Vivechana

    2013-07-15

    Tunability of the optical response of multilayered photonic structures has been compared with sequential (SQ) and superposition (SP) addition of refractive index profile functions. The optical response of the composite multilayered structure, formed after the SP addition of the two Bragg type refractive index profile functions has been studied as a function of percentage overlap and relative shift between the profiles. Apart from the substantial advantage in terms of the reduced physical thickness of the SP composite structures (over the SQ addition), at certain optimum values of relative shift, photonic structures with better quality factor resonant modes or a broader PBG could be designed. Similar analysis has been extended for rugate filters as well. The experimental verification of the optical response, was carried out through multilayered dielectric porous silicon structures fabricated by electrochemical anodization. PMID:23938579

  7. Similarity recognition of molecular structures by optimal atomic matching and rotational superposition.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Benjamin; Sierka, Marek

    2012-01-15

    An algorithm for similarity recognition of molecules and molecular clusters is presented which also establishes the optimum matching among atoms of different structures. In the first step of the algorithm, a set of molecules are coarsely superimposed by transforming them into a common reference coordinate system. The optimum atomic matching among structures is then found with the help of the Hungarian algorithm. For this, pairs of structures are represented as complete bipartite graphs with a weight function that uses intermolecular atomic distances. In the final step, a rotational superposition method is applied using the optimum atomic matching found. This yields the minimum root mean square deviation of intermolecular atomic distances with respect to arbitrary rotation and translation of the molecules. Combined with an effective similarity prescreening method, our algorithm shows robustness and an effective quadratic scaling of computational time with the number of atoms. PMID:21997798

  8. R3D Align: global pairwise alignment of RNA 3D structures using local superpositions

    PubMed Central

    Rahrig, Ryan R.; Leontis, Neocles B.; Zirbel, Craig L.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Comparing 3D structures of homologous RNA molecules yields information about sequence and structural variability. To compare large RNA 3D structures, accurate automatic comparison tools are needed. In this article, we introduce a new algorithm and web server to align large homologous RNA structures nucleotide by nucleotide using local superpositions that accommodate the flexibility of RNA molecules. Local alignments are merged to form a global alignment by employing a maximum clique algorithm on a specially defined graph that we call the ‘local alignment’ graph. Results: The algorithm is implemented in a program suite and web server called ‘R3D Align’. The R3D Align alignment of homologous 3D structures of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNA was compared to a high-quality hand alignment. A full comparison of the 16S alignment with the other state-of-the-art methods is also provided. The R3D Align program suite includes new diagnostic tools for the structural evaluation of RNA alignments. The R3D Align alignments were compared to those produced by other programs and were found to be the most accurate, in comparison with a high quality hand-crafted alignment and in conjunction with a series of other diagnostics presented. The number of aligned base pairs as well as measures of geometric similarity are used to evaluate the accuracy of the alignments. Availability: R3D Align is freely available through a web server http://rna.bgsu.edu/R3DAlign. The MATLAB source code of the program suite is also freely available for download at that location. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: r-rahrig@onu.edu PMID:20929913

  9. Solid-solid structural transformations in Lennard-Jones clusters: accurate simulations versus the harmonic superposition approximation.

    PubMed

    Sharapov, Vladimir A; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2007-10-18

    We consider systems undergoing very-low-temperature solid-solid transitions associated with minima of similar energy but different symmetry, and separated by a high potential barrier. In such cases the well-known "broken-ergodicity" problem is often difficult to overcome, even using the most advanced Monte Carlo (MC) techniques, including the replica exchange method (REM). The methodology that we develop in this paper is suitable for the above specified cases and is numerically accurate and efficient. It is based on a new MC move implemented within the REM framework, in which trial points are generated analytically using an auxiliary harmonic superposition system that mimics well the true system at low temperatures. Due to the new move, the low-temperature random walks are able to frequently switch the relevant potential energy funnels leading to an efficient sampling. Numerically accurate results are obtained for a number of Lennard-Jones clusters, including those that have so far been treated only by the harmonic superposition approximation (HSA). The latter is believed to provide good estimates for low-temperature equilibrium properties but is manifestly uncontrollable and is difficult to validate. The present results provide a good test for the HSA and demonstrate its reliability, particularly for estimation of the solid-solid transition temperatures in most cases considered. PMID:17685597

  10. Approximate message-passing with spatially coupled structured operators, with applications to compressed sensing and sparse superposition codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Jean; Schülke, Christophe; Krzakala, Florent

    2015-05-01

    We study the behavior of approximate message-passing (AMP), a solver for linear sparse estimation problems such as compressed sensing, when the i.i.d matrices—for which it has been specifically designed—are replaced by structured operators, such as Fourier and Hadamard ones. We show empirically that after proper randomization, the structure of the operators does not significantly affect the performances of the solver. Furthermore, for some specially designed spatially coupled operators, this allows a computationally fast and memory efficient reconstruction in compressed sensing up to the information-theoretical limit. We also show how this approach can be applied to sparse superposition codes, allowing the AMP decoder to perform at large rates for moderate block length.

  11. The Paraconsistent Logic of Quantum Superpositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, N.; de Ronde, C.

    2013-07-01

    Physical superpositions exist both in classical and in quantum physics. However, what is exactly meant by `superposition' in each case is extremely different. In this paper we discuss some of the multiple interpretations which exist in the literature regarding superpositions in quantum mechanics. We argue that all these interpretations have something in common: they all attempt to avoid `contradiction'. We argue in this paper, in favor of the importance of developing a new interpretation of superpositions which takes into account contradiction, as a key element of the formal structure of the theory, "right from the start". In order to show the feasibility of our interpretational project we present an outline of a paraconsistent approach to quantum superpositions which attempts to account for the contradictory properties present in general within quantum superpositions. This approach must not be understood as a closed formal and conceptual scheme but rather as a first step towards a different type of understanding regarding quantum superpositions.

  12. Analytical ultrasonics for structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupperman, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements to characterize the microstructure of structural materials is discussed. Velocity measurements in cast stainless steel are correlated with microstructural variations ranging from equiaxed (elastically isotropic) to columnar (elastically anisotropic) grain structure. The effect of the anisotropic grain structure on the deviation of ultrasonic waves in cast stainless steel is also reported. Field-implementable techniques for distinguishing equiaxed from columnar grain structures in cast strainless steel structural members are presented. The application of ultrasonic velocity measurements to characterize structural ceramics in the green state is also discussed.

  13. Multipartite entanglement of superpositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, D.; Terra Cunha, M. O.; Acín, A.

    2007-10-01

    The entanglement of superpositions [Linden , Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 100502 (2006)]is generalized to the multipartite scenario: an upper bound to the multipartite entanglement of a superposition is given in terms of the entanglement of the superposed states and the superposition coefficients. This bound is proven to be tight for a class of states composed of an arbitrary number of qubits. We also extend the result to a large family of quantifiers, which includes the negativity, the robustness of entanglement, and the best separable approximation measure.

  14. Multipartite entanglement of superpositions

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalcanti, D.; Terra Cunha, M. O.; Acin, A.

    2007-10-15

    The entanglement of superpositions [Linden et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 100502 (2006)]is generalized to the multipartite scenario: an upper bound to the multipartite entanglement of a superposition is given in terms of the entanglement of the superposed states and the superposition coefficients. This bound is proven to be tight for a class of states composed of an arbitrary number of qubits. We also extend the result to a large family of quantifiers, which includes the negativity, the robustness of entanglement, and the best separable approximation measure.

  15. Superposition of two tRNA{sup Ser} acceptor stem crystal structures: Comparison of structure, ligands and hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Eichert, Andre; Fuerste, Jens P.; Ulrich, Alexander; Betzel, Christian; Foerster, Charlotte

    2010-05-07

    We solved the X-ray structures of two Escherichia coli tRNA{sup Ser} acceptor stem microhelices. As both tRNAs are aminoacylated by the same seryl-tRNA-synthetase, we performed a comparative structure analysis of both duplexes to investigate the helical conformation, the hydration patterns and magnesium binding sites. It is well accepted, that the hydration of RNA plays an important role in RNA-protein interactions and that the extensive solvent content of the minor groove has a special function in RNA. The detailed comparison of both tRNA{sup Ser} microhelices provides insights into the structural arrangement of the isoacceptor tRNA aminoacyl stems with respect to the surrounding water molecules and may eventually help us to understand their biological function at atomic resolution.

  16. Analytic structure of one-loop coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bo; Wang, Honghui

    2013-05-01

    By the unitarity cut method, analytic expressions of one-loop coefficients have been given in spinor forms. In this paper, we present one-loop coefficients of various bases in Lorentz-invariant contraction forms of external momenta. Using these forms, the analytic structure of these coefficients becomes manifest. Firstly, coefficients of bases contain only second-type singularities while the first-type singularities are included inside scalar bases. Secondly, the highest degree of each singularity is correlated with the degree of the inner momentum in the numerator. Thirdly, the same singularities will appear in different coefficients, thus our explicit results could be used to provide a clear physical picture under various limits (such as soft or collinear limits) when combining contributions from all bases.

  17. Multidimensional detonation propagation modeled via nonlinear shock wave superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Andrew; Mehrjoo, Navid

    2010-11-01

    Detonation waves in gases are inherently multidimensional due to their cellular structure, and detonations in liquids and heterogeneous solids are often associated with instabilities and stochastic, localized reaction centers (i.e., hot spots). To explore the statistical nature of detonation dynamics in such systems, a simple model that idealizes detonation propagation as an ensemble of interacting blast waves originating from spatially random point sources has been proposed. Prior results using this model exhibited features that have been observed in real detonating systems, such as anomalous scaling between axisymmetric and two-dimensional geometries. However, those efforts used simple linear superposition of the blast waves. The present work uses a model of blast wave superposition developed for multiple-source explosions (the LAMB approximation) that incorporates the nonlinear interaction of shock waves analytically, permitting the effect of a more physical model of blast wave interaction to be explored. The results are suggestive of a universal behavior in systems of spatially randomized energy sources.

  18. Network Class Superposition Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Carl A. B.; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., for the yeast cell cycle process [1]), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix , which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for derived from Boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with . We show how to generate Derrida plots based on . We show that -based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on . We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology Boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for , for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses. PMID:23565141

  19. Superposition State Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Venkatnathan, Arun; Voth, Gregory A

    2005-01-01

    The ergodic sampling of rough energy landscapes is crucial for understanding phenomena like protein folding, peptide aggregation, polymer dynamics, and the glass transition. These rough energy landscapes are characterized by the presence of many local minima separated by high energy barriers, where Molecular Dynamics (MD) fails to satisfy ergodicity. To enhance ergodic behavior, we have developed the Superposition State Molecular Dynamics (SSMD) method, which uses a superposition of energy states to obtain an effective potential for the MD simulation. In turn, the dynamics on this effective potential can be used to sample the configurational free energy of the real potential. The effectiveness of the SSMD method for a one-dimensional rough potential energy landscape is presented as a test case. PMID:26641113

  20. Artificial neural superposition eye.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Andreas; Duparré, Jacques; Dannberg, Peter; Bräuer, Andreas; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-09-17

    We propose an ultra-thin imaging system which is based on the neural superposition compound eye of insects. Multiple light sensitive pixels in the footprint of each lenslet of this multi-channel configuration enable the parallel imaging of the individual object points. Together with the digital superposition of related signals this multiple sampling enables advanced functionalities for artificial compound eyes. Using this technique, color imaging and a circumvention for the trade-off between resolution and sensitivity of ultra-compact camera devices have been demonstrated in this article. The optical design and layout of such a system is discussed in detail. Experimental results are shown which indicate the attractiveness of microoptical artificial compound eyes for applications in the field of machine vision, surveillance or automotive imaging. PMID:19547555

  1. Concurrence of superpositions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-shui; Yi, X. X.; Song, He-shan

    2007-02-15

    Bounds on the concurrence of the superposition state in terms of the concurrences of the states being superposed are found in this paper. The bounds on concurrence are quite different from those on the entanglement measured by von Neumann entropy [Linden et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 100502 (2006)]. In particular, a nonzero lower bound can be provided if the states being superposed are properly constrained.

  2. Transient Response of Shells of Revolution by Direct Integration and Modal Superposition Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, W. B.; Adelman, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    The results of an analytical effort to obtain and evaluate transient response data for a cylindrical and a conical shell by use of two different approaches: direct integration and modal superposition are described. The inclusion of nonlinear terms is more important than the inclusion of secondary linear effects (transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia) although there are thin-shell structures where these secondary effects are important. The advantages of the direct integration approach are that geometric nonlinear and secondary effects are easy to include and high-frequency response may be calculated. In comparison to the modal superposition technique the computer storage requirements are smaller. The advantages of the modal superposition approach are that the solution is independent of the previous time history and that once the modal data are obtained, the response for repeated cases may be efficiently computed. Also, any admissible set of initial conditions can be applied.

  3. Reexamination of entanglement of superpositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gour, Gilad

    2007-11-01

    We find tight lower and upper bounds on the entanglement of a superposition of two bipartite states in terms of the entanglement of the two states constituting the superposition. Our upper bound is dramatically tighter than the one presented by Linden [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 100502 (2006)] and our lower bound can be used to provide lower bounds on different measures of entanglement such as the entanglement of formation and the entanglement of subspaces. We also find that in the case in which the two states are one-sided orthogonal, the entanglement of the superposition state can be expressed explicitly in terms of the entanglement of the two states in the superposition.

  4. Superposition Enhanced Nested Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiniani, Stefano; Stevenson, Jacob D.; Wales, David J.; Frenkel, Daan

    2014-07-01

    The theoretical analysis of many problems in physics, astronomy, and applied mathematics requires an efficient numerical exploration of multimodal parameter spaces that exhibit broken ergodicity. Monte Carlo methods are widely used to deal with these classes of problems, but such simulations suffer from a ubiquitous sampling problem: The probability of sampling a particular state is proportional to its entropic weight. Devising an algorithm capable of sampling efficiently the full phase space is a long-standing problem. Here, we report a new hybrid method for the exploration of multimodal parameter spaces exhibiting broken ergodicity. Superposition enhanced nested sampling combines the strengths of global optimization with the unbiased or athermal sampling of nested sampling, greatly enhancing its efficiency with no additional parameters. We report extensive tests of this new approach for atomic clusters that are known to have energy landscapes for which conventional sampling schemes suffer from broken ergodicity. We also introduce a novel parallelization algorithm for nested sampling.

  5. Structural features of bicomponent dust Coulomb balls formed by the superposition of fields of different origin in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Psakhie, S. G.; Zolnikov, K. P.; Kryzhevich, D. S.; Abdrashitov, A. V.

    2008-05-15

    A binary mixture of dust particles in plasma which are in an external electrostatic harmonic confining field as well as in the field consisting of gravitational, thermophoretic, and electrostatic force is simulated. The interparticle interaction is described by the Yukawa isotropic pair potential. The structural properties of the binary mixture of particles depending on composition are investigated. The segregation features of a system of particles of two species under the conditions of recent experiments on Coulomb ball formation are studied. It is shown that particles form a shell structure in which every shell contains only its own species of particles; in so doing, smaller-sized particles make up outer shells with respect to larger-sized particles. When the size difference between the particles becomes more and more pronounced, they are spatially separated up to the formation of two independent Coulomb balls.

  6. Engineering chiral density waves and topological band structures by multiple-Q superpositions of collinear up-up-down-down orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Satoru; Ozawa, Ryo; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic orders characterized by multiple ordering vectors harbor noncollinear and noncoplanar spin textures and can be a source of unusual electronic properties through the spin Berry phase mechanism. We theoretically show that such multiple-Q states are stabilized in itinerant magnets in the form of superpositions of collinear up-up-down-down (UUDD) spin states, which accompany the density waves of vector and scalar chirality. The result is drawn by examining the ground state of the Kondo lattice model with classical localized moments, especially when the Fermi surface is tuned to be partially nested by the symmetry-related commensurate vectors. We unveil the instability toward a double-Q UUDD state with vector chirality density waves on the square lattice and a triple-Q UUDD state with scalar chirality density waves on the triangular lattice, using the perturbative theory and variational calculations. The former double-Q state is also confirmed by large-scale Langevin dynamics simulations. We also show that, for a sufficiently large exchange coupling, the chirality density waves can induce rich nontrivial topology of electronic structures, such as the massless Dirac semimetal, Chern insulator with quantized topological Hall response, and peculiar edge states which depend on the phase of chirality density waves at the edges.

  7. H/D isotope effect on structures, binding energies, and basis set superposition errors in F-(H2O)n (n = 1-3) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udagawa, Taro; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2014-09-01

    The H/D isotope effects on structures, binding energies, and basis set superposition errors (BSSEs) of hydrated fluoride anion clusters, F-(H2O)n (n = 1-3), are theoretically analyzed by using the MP2 level of multi-component molecular orbital (MC_MO-MP2) method, in which quantum nature of proton/deuteron and electron-electron correlation are directly taken account. Our results clearly show that the additional water molecule to F-(H2O)n-1 cluster forms stronger water-water hydrogen bond than that in simple water cluster, whereas the additional F--water hydrogen bond formation in F-(H2O)n cluster weakens the original F--water hydrogen bonds in F-(H2O)n-1 cluster. The BSSEs estimated in the MC_MO-MP2 calculations are slightly larger than those in the conventional MP2 calculations, due to the H/D geometrical isotope effect on the intermolecular distances. Consequently, the order of stability in several F-(H2O)3 cluster isomers cannot be adequately evaluated without BSSE corrections in our MC_MO-MP2 calculations, rather than the conventional MP2 ones.

  8. Automated dynamic analytical model improvement for damped structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuh, J. S.; Berman, A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described to improve a linear nonproportionally damped analytical model of a structure. The procedure finds the smallest changes in the analytical model such that the improved model matches the measured modal parameters. Features of the method are: (1) ability to properly treat complex valued modal parameters of a damped system; (2) applicability to realistically large structural models; and (3) computationally efficiency without involving eigensolutions and inversion of a large matrix.

  9. Reexamination of entanglement of superpositions

    SciTech Connect

    Gour, Gilad

    2007-11-15

    We find tight lower and upper bounds on the entanglement of a superposition of two bipartite states in terms of the entanglement of the two states constituting the superposition. Our upper bound is dramatically tighter than the one presented by Linden et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 100502 (2006)] and our lower bound can be used to provide lower bounds on different measures of entanglement such as the entanglement of formation and the entanglement of subspaces. We also find that in the case in which the two states are one-sided orthogonal, the entanglement of the superposition state can be expressed explicitly in terms of the entanglement of the two states in the superposition.

  10. On the superposition principle in interference experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Aninda; H. Vijay, Aravind; Sinha, Urbasi

    2015-01-01

    The superposition principle is usually incorrectly applied in interference experiments. This has recently been investigated through numerics based on Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods as well as the Feynman path integral formalism. In the current work, we have derived an analytic formula for the Sorkin parameter which can be used to determine the deviation from the application of the principle. We have found excellent agreement between the analytic distribution and those that have been earlier estimated by numerical integration as well as resource intensive FDTD simulations. The analytic handle would be useful for comparing theory with future experiments. It is applicable both to physics based on classical wave equations as well as the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation. PMID:25973948

  11. Combined experimental/analytical modeling of shell/payload structures

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Miller, A.K.; Carne, T.G.

    1985-12-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of computed modal frequencies obtained from a combined experimental/analytical model of a shell/payload structure. A component mode synthesis technique was used which incorporated free modes and residual effects. The total structure is physically divided into the two subsystems which are connected through stiff joints. The payload was tested to obtain its free-free modes, while a finite element model of the shell was analyzed to obtain its modal description. Both the translational and rotational components of the experimental mode shapes at the payload interface were used in the coupling. Sensitivity studies were also performed to determine the effect of neglecting the residual terms of the payload. Results from a previous study of a combined experimental/analytical model for a beam structure are also given. The beam structure was used to examine the basic procedures and difficulties in experimentally measuring, and analytically accounting for the rotational and residual quantities.

  12. Analytic Structure of the Landau-Gauge Gluon Propagator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Stefan; Fischer, Christian S.; Kellermann, Christian

    2012-12-01

    The analytic structure of the nonperturbative gluon propagator contains information on the absence of gluons from the physical spectrum of the theory. We study this structure from numerical solutions in the complex momentum plane of the gluon and ghost Dyson-Schwinger equations in Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory. The resulting ghost and gluon propagators are analytic apart from a distinct cut structure on the real, timelike momentum axis. The propagator violates the Osterwalder-Schrader positivity condition, confirming the absence of gluons from the asymptotic spectrum of the theory.

  13. Analytic structure of the Landau-gauge gluon propagator.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Stefan; Fischer, Christian S; Kellermann, Christian

    2012-12-21

    The analytic structure of the nonperturbative gluon propagator contains information on the absence of gluons from the physical spectrum of the theory. We study this structure from numerical solutions in the complex momentum plane of the gluon and ghost Dyson-Schwinger equations in Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory. The resulting ghost and gluon propagators are analytic apart from a distinct cut structure on the real, timelike momentum axis. The propagator violates the Osterwalder-Schrader positivity condition, confirming the absence of gluons from the asymptotic spectrum of the theory. PMID:23368451

  14. General analytical shakedown solution for structures with kinematic hardening materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Baofeng; Zou, Zongyuan; Jin, Miao

    2016-04-01

    The effect of kinematic hardening behavior on the shakedown behaviors of structure has been investigated by performing shakedown analysis for some specific problems. The results obtained only show that the shakedown limit loads of structures with kinematic hardening model are larger than or equal to those with perfectly plastic model of the same initial yield stress. To further investigate the rules governing the different shakedown behaviors of kinematic hardening structures, the extended shakedown theorem for limited kinematic hardening is applied, the shakedown condition is then proposed, and a general analytical solution for the structural shakedown limit load is thus derived. The analytical shakedown limit loads for fully reversed cyclic loading and non-fully reversed cyclic loading are then given based on the general solution. The resulting analytical solution is applied to some specific problems: a hollow specimen subjected to tension and torsion, a flanged pipe subjected to pressure and axial force and a square plate with small central hole subjected to biaxial tension. The results obtained are compared with those in literatures, they are consistent with each other. Based on the resulting general analytical solution, rules governing the general effects of kinematic hardening behavior on the shakedown behavior of structure are clearly.

  15. Analytic semigroups: Applications to inverse problems for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rebnord, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Convergence and stability results for least squares inverse problems involving systems described by analytic semigroups are presented. The practical importance of these results is demonstrated by application to several examples from problems of estimation of material parameters in flexible structures using accelerometer data.

  16. Structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber: Experimental and analytical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Arya, Vinod K.; Kazaroff, John M.; Halford, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A new, structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber design has been validated through analysis and experiment. Subscale, tubular channel chambers have been cyclically tested and analytically evaluated. Cyclic lives were determined to have a potential for 1000 percent increase over those of rectangular channel designs, the current state of the art. Greater structural compliance in the circumferential direction gave rise to lower thermal strains during hot firing, resulting in lower thermal strain ratcheting and longer predicted fatigue lives. Thermal, structural, and durability analyses of the combustion chamber design, involving cyclic temperatures, strains, and low-cycle fatigue lives, have corroborated the experimental observations.

  17. Nucleic Acid i-Motif Structures in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alba, Joan Josep; Sadurní, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2016-09-01

    Under the appropriate experimental conditions of pH and temperature, cytosine-rich segments in DNA or RNA sequences may produce a characteristic folded structure known as an i-motif. Besides its potential role in vivo, which is still under investigation, this structure has attracted increasing interest in other fields due to its sharp, fast and reversible pH-driven conformational changes. This "on/off" switch at molecular level is being used in nanotechnology and analytical chemistry to develop nanomachines and sensors, respectively. This paper presents a review of the latest applications of this structure in the field of chemical analysis. PMID:26939549

  18. Analytic structure of Landau gauge ghost and gluon propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Stefan; Fischer, Christian S.; Kellermann, Christian

    2012-04-01

    We summarize first explicit results for the analytic structure of the ghost and gluon propagators in the complex momentum plane. To this end we work in Landau gauge and use a truncation of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for the propagators which is close to lattice results at real spacelike Euclidean momenta. Our results indicate the absence of singularities in the complex part of the momentum plane contrary to expectations from Gribov-Zwanziger-like effective theories.

  19. Linear superposition in nonlinear equations.

    PubMed

    Khare, Avinash; Sukhatme, Uday

    2002-06-17

    Several nonlinear systems such as the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified KdV equations and lambda phi(4) theory possess periodic traveling wave solutions involving Jacobi elliptic functions. We show that suitable linear combinations of these known periodic solutions yield many additional solutions with different periods and velocities. This linear superposition procedure works by virtue of some remarkable new identities involving elliptic functions. PMID:12059300

  20. Analytical Operations Relate Structural and Functional Connectivity in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Saggio, Maria Luisa; Ritter, Petra; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state large-scale brain models vary in the amount of biological elements they incorporate and in the way they are being tested. One might expect that the more realistic the model is, the closer it should reproduce real functional data. It has been shown, instead, that when linear correlation across long BOLD fMRI time-series is used as a measure for functional connectivity (FC) to compare simulated and real data, a simple model performs just as well, or even better, than more sophisticated ones. The model in question is a simple linear model, which considers the physiological noise that is pervasively present in our brain while it diffuses across the white-matter connections, that is structural connectivity (SC). We deeply investigate this linear model, providing an analytical solution to straightforwardly compute FC from SC without the need of computationally costly simulations of time-series. We provide a few examples how this analytical solution could be used to perform a fast and detailed parameter exploration or to investigate resting-state non-stationarities. Most importantly, by inverting the analytical solution, we propose a method to retrieve information on the anatomical structure directly from functional data. This simple method can be used to complement or guide DTI/DSI and tractography results, especially for a better assessment of inter-hemispheric connections, or to provide an estimate of SC when only functional data are available. PMID:27536987

  1. Analytical Operations Relate Structural and Functional Connectivity in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Saggio, Maria Luisa; Ritter, Petra; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state large-scale brain models vary in the amount of biological elements they incorporate and in the way they are being tested. One might expect that the more realistic the model is, the closer it should reproduce real functional data. It has been shown, instead, that when linear correlation across long BOLD fMRI time-series is used as a measure for functional connectivity (FC) to compare simulated and real data, a simple model performs just as well, or even better, than more sophisticated ones. The model in question is a simple linear model, which considers the physiological noise that is pervasively present in our brain while it diffuses across the white-matter connections, that is structural connectivity (SC). We deeply investigate this linear model, providing an analytical solution to straightforwardly compute FC from SC without the need of computationally costly simulations of time-series. We provide a few examples how this analytical solution could be used to perform a fast and detailed parameter exploration or to investigate resting-state non-stationarities. Most importantly, by inverting the analytical solution, we propose a method to retrieve information on the anatomical structure directly from functional data. This simple method can be used to complement or guide DTI/DSI and tractography results, especially for a better assessment of inter-hemispheric connections, or to provide an estimate of SC when only functional data are available. PMID:27536987

  2. Hydrogeologic role of geologic structures. Part 2: analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levens, Russell L.; Williams, Roy E.; Ralston, Dale R.

    1994-04-01

    This paper is the second of two papers that address the influence of geologic structures on ground water flow at various scales in fractured rocks. The ultimate purpose of this research is to investigate the feasibility of grouting preferentially permeable zones as a strategy to minimize the production of acid mine drainage in underground hard rock mines in which the major permeability is structure and fracture controlled. The aim of grouting is to reduce permeability around mined-out openings, to minimize the rate of inflow of ground water into such openings via the structurally controlled preferentially permeable pathways. A series of hydraulic stress tests were conducted to help characterize the role of geologic structures in controlling the ground water flow system in the vicinity of the Bunker Hill Mine in north Idaho. The results of these tests indicate that most of the ground water that flows from the underground drillholes used for hydraulic stress testing is derived from a few discrete, structurally produced fracture zones that are more or less connected through smaller-scale fractures. Four types of analytical models are considered as a means of analyzing the results of multiple drillhole hydraulic stress tests, as follows: cross-hole equivalent porous media; double-porosity equivalent porous media; a solution to flow in and around a single vertical fracture; leaky equivalent porous media, partial penetration. The estimation of hydraulic coefficients in complex fractured rock environments involves the combined application of a number of deterministic analytical models. The models to be used are selected dependent on the location of the drawdown observations relative to the water-producing zone and the length of the test. The result of the tests can be related to the permeability hierarchy discussed in our first paper.

  3. Macroscopic superposition of ultracold atoms with orbital degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-March, M. A.; Carr, L. D.; Dounas-Frazer, D. R.

    2011-04-15

    We introduce higher dimensions into the problem of Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential, taking into account orbital angular momentum. We completely characterize the eigenstates of this system, delineating new regimes via both analytical high-order perturbation theory and numerical exact diagonalization. Among these regimes are mixed Josephson- and Fock-like behavior, crossings in both excited and ground states, and shadows of macroscopic superposition states.

  4. Creating a Superposition of Unknown Quantum States.

    PubMed

    Oszmaniec, Michał; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michał; Wójcik, Antoni

    2016-03-18

    The superposition principle is one of the landmarks of quantum mechanics. The importance of quantum superpositions provokes questions about the limitations that quantum mechanics itself imposes on the possibility of their generation. In this work, we systematically study the problem of the creation of superpositions of unknown quantum states. First, we prove a no-go theorem that forbids the existence of a universal probabilistic quantum protocol producing a superposition of two unknown quantum states. Second, we provide an explicit probabilistic protocol generating a superposition of two unknown states, each having a fixed overlap with the known referential pure state. The protocol can be applied to generate coherent superposition of results of independent runs of subroutines in a quantum computer. Moreover, in the context of quantum optics it can be used to efficiently generate highly nonclassical states or non-Gaussian states. PMID:27035290

  5. Creating a Superposition of Unknown Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszmaniec, Michał; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michał; Wójcik, Antoni

    2016-03-01

    The superposition principle is one of the landmarks of quantum mechanics. The importance of quantum superpositions provokes questions about the limitations that quantum mechanics itself imposes on the possibility of their generation. In this work, we systematically study the problem of the creation of superpositions of unknown quantum states. First, we prove a no-go theorem that forbids the existence of a universal probabilistic quantum protocol producing a superposition of two unknown quantum states. Second, we provide an explicit probabilistic protocol generating a superposition of two unknown states, each having a fixed overlap with the known referential pure state. The protocol can be applied to generate coherent superposition of results of independent runs of subroutines in a quantum computer. Moreover, in the context of quantum optics it can be used to efficiently generate highly nonclassical states or non-Gaussian states.

  6. Ultrasonic field modeling for immersed components using Gaussian beam superposition.

    PubMed

    Spies, Martin

    2007-05-01

    The Gaussian beam (GB) superposition approach can be applied to model ultrasound propagation in complex-structured materials and components. In this article, progress made in extending and applying the Gaussian beam superposition technique to model the beam fields generated by transducers with flat and focused rectangular apertures as well as with circular focused apertures is addressed. The refraction of transducer beam fields through curved surfaces is illustrated by calculation results for beam fields generated in curved components during immersion testing. In particular, the following developments are put forward: (i) the use of individually determined sets of GBs to model transducer beam fields with a number of less than ten beams; (ii) the application of the GB representation of rectangular transducers to focusing probes, as well as to the problem of transmission through interfaces; and (iii) computationally efficient transient modeling by superposition of 'temporally limited' GBs. PMID:17335863

  7. Mesoscopic Superposition States in Relativistic Landau Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, A.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.; Solano, E.

    2007-09-21

    We show that a linear superposition of mesoscopic states in relativistic Landau levels can be built when an external magnetic field couples to a relativistic spin 1/2 charged particle. Under suitable initial conditions, the associated Dirac equation produces unitarily superpositions of coherent states involving the particle orbital quanta in a well-defined mesoscopic regime. We demonstrate that these mesoscopic superpositions have a purely relativistic origin and disappear in the nonrelativistic limit.

  8. Rotational superposition: a review of methods.

    PubMed

    Flower, D R

    1999-01-01

    Rotational superposition is one of the most commonly used algorithms in molecular modelling. Many different methods of solving superposition have been suggested. Of these, methods based on the quaternion parameterization of rotation are fast, accurate, and robust. Quaternion parameterization-based methods cannot result in rotation inversion and do not have special cases such as co-linearity or co-planarity of points. Thus, quaternion parameterization-based methods are the best choice for rotational superposition applications. PMID:10736782

  9. Superposition flows of entangled polymeric solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianniruberto, Giovanni; Unidad, Herwin Jerome

    2015-12-01

    Parallel and orthogonal superposition experiments by Vermant et al. (1998) on a polydisperse, entangled polymeric solution are here analyzed by using a simple, multi-mode differential constitutive equation based on the tube model, and also accounting for convective constraint release effects. Model predictions are in very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with parallel superposition data, while some discrepancies are found with orthogonal data, thus suggesting that orthogonal superposition experiments represent a more severe test for molecularly-based constitutive equations.

  10. Macroscopic optomechanical superposition via periodic qubit flipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Wenchao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme to generate macroscopic superpositions of well-distinguishable coherent states in an optomechanical system via periodic qubit flipping. Our scheme does not require the single-photon strong-coupling rate of an optomechanical system. The generated mechanical superposition state can be reconstructed using mechanical quantum-state reconstruction. The proposed scheme relies on recycling of an atom, fast atomic qubit flipping, and coherent state mapping between a single-photon superposition state and an atomic superposition state. We discuss the experimental feasibility of our proposal under current technology.

  11. Psychometric Structure of a Comprehensive Objective Structured Clinical Examination: A Factor Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkan, Kevin; Simon, Steven R.; Baker, Harley; Todres, I. David

    2004-01-01

    Problem Statement and Background: While the psychometric properties of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) have been studied, their latent structures have not been well characterized. This study examines a factor analytic model of a comprehensive OSCE and addresses implications for measurement of clinical performance. Methods: An…

  12. The M&M Superposition Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a physical system for demonstrating operators, eigenvalues, and superposition of states for a set of unusual wave functions. Uses candy to provide students with a visual and concrete picture of a superposition of states rather than an abstract plot of several overlaid mathematical states. (WRM)

  13. Engineering mesoscopic superpositions of superfluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hallwood, D. W.; Brand, J.

    2011-10-15

    Modeling strongly correlated atoms demonstrates the possibility to prepare quantum superpositions that are robust against experimental imperfections and temperature. Such superpositions of vortex states are formed by adiabatic manipulation of interacting ultracold atoms confined to a one-dimensional ring trapping potential when stirred by a barrier. Here, we discuss the influence of nonideal experimental procedures and finite temperature. Adiabaticity conditions for changing the stirring rate reveal that superpositions of many atoms are most easily accessed in the strongly interacting, Tonks-Girardeau, regime, which is also the most robust at finite temperature. NOON-type superpositions of weakly interacting atoms are most easily created by adiabatically decreasing the interaction strength by means of a Feshbach resonance. The quantum dynamics of small numbers of particles is simulated and the size of the superpositions is calculated based on their ability to make precision measurements. The experimental creation of strongly correlated and NOON-type superpositions with about 100 atoms seems feasible in the near future.

  14. A reciprocal space approach for locating symmetry elements in Patterson superposition maps

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrixson, T.

    1990-09-21

    A method for determining the location and possible existence of symmetry elements in Patterson superposition maps has been developed. A comparison of the original superposition map and a superposition map operated on by the symmetry element gives possible translations to the location of the symmetry element. A reciprocal space approach using structure factor-like quantities obtained from the Fourier transform of the superposition function is then used to determine the best'' location of the symmetry element. Constraints based upon the space group requirements are also used as a check on the locations. The locations of the symmetry elements are used to modify the Fourier transform coefficients of the superposition function to give an approximation of the structure factors, which are then refined using the EG relation. The analysis of several compounds using this method is presented. Reciprocal space techniques for locating multiple images in the superposition function are also presented, along with methods to remove the effect of multiple images in the Fourier transform coefficients of the superposition map. In addition, crystallographic studies of the extended chain structure of (NHC{sub 5}H{sub 5})SbI{sub 4} and of the twinning method of the orthorhombic form of the high-{Tc} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} are presented. 54 refs.

  15. Age Differences in Personality Structure: A Cluster Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Paul T., Jr.; McCrae, Robert R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented at the 81st APA Convention, Montreal, 1973, this study showed how a cluster analytic approach was used to determine age differences in personality measured by the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF). Subjects were 969 adult male volunteers, 25 to 34, 35 to 54, and 55 to 82. Openness to experience showed age-related…

  16. On the Use of Material-Dependent Damping in ANSYS for Mode Superposition Transient Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, J.; Wei, X.

    2011-07-17

    The mode superposition method is often used for dynamic analysis of complex structures, such as the seismic Category I structures in nuclear power plants, in place of the less efficient full method, which uses the full system matrices for calculation of the transient responses. In such applications, specification of material-dependent damping is usually desirable because complex structures can consist of multiple types of materials that may have different energy dissipation capabilities. A recent review of the ANSYS manual for several releases found that the use of material-dependent damping is not clearly explained for performing a mode superposition transient dynamic analysis. This paper includes several mode superposition transient dynamic analyses using different ways to specify damping in ANSYS, in order to determine how material-dependent damping can be specified conveniently in a mode superposition transient dynamic analysis.

  17. Experimental superposition of orders of quantum gates.

    PubMed

    Procopio, Lorenzo M; Moqanaki, Amir; Araújo, Mateus; Costa, Fabio; Alonso Calafell, Irati; Dowd, Emma G; Hamel, Deny R; Rozema, Lee A; Brukner, Časlav; Walther, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Quantum computers achieve a speed-up by placing quantum bits (qubits) in superpositions of different states. However, it has recently been appreciated that quantum mechanics also allows one to 'superimpose different operations'. Furthermore, it has been shown that using a qubit to coherently control the gate order allows one to accomplish a task--determining if two gates commute or anti-commute--with fewer gate uses than any known quantum algorithm. Here we experimentally demonstrate this advantage, in a photonic context, using a second qubit to control the order in which two gates are applied to a first qubit. We create the required superposition of gate orders by using additional degrees of freedom of the photons encoding our qubits. The new resource we exploit can be interpreted as a superposition of causal orders, and could allow quantum algorithms to be implemented with an efficiency unlikely to be achieved on a fixed-gate-order quantum computer. PMID:26250107

  18. An approximate CPHD filter for superpositional sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Ronald; El-Fallah, Adel

    2012-06-01

    Most multitarget tracking algorithms, such as JPDA, MHT, and the PHD and CPHD filters, presume the following measurement model: (a) targets are point targets, (b) every target generates at most a single measurement, and (c) any measurement is generated by at most a single target. However, the most familiar sensors, such as surveillance and imaging radars, violate assumption (c). This is because they are actually superpositional-that is, any measurement is a sum of signals generated by all of the targets in the scene. At this conference in 2009, the first author derived exact formulas for PHD and CPHD filters that presume general superpositional measurement models. Unfortunately, these formulas are computationally intractable. In this paper, we modify and generalize a Gaussian approximation technique due to Thouin, Nannuru, and Coates to derive a computationally tractable superpositional-CPHD filter. Implementation requires sequential Monte Carlo (particle filter) techniques.

  19. Macroscopic Quantum Superposition in Cavity Optomechanics.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Tian, Lin

    2016-04-22

    Quantum superposition in mechanical systems is not only key evidence for macroscopic quantum coherence, but can also be utilized in modern quantum technology. Here we propose an efficient approach for creating macroscopically distinct mechanical superposition states in a two-mode optomechanical system. Photon hopping between the two cavity modes is modulated sinusoidally. The modulated photon tunneling enables an ultrastrong radiation-pressure force acting on the mechanical resonator, and hence significantly increases the mechanical displacement induced by a single photon. We study systematically the generation of the Yurke-Stoler-like states in the presence of system dissipations. We also discuss the experimental implementation of this scheme. PMID:27152802

  20. Macroscopic Quantum Superposition in Cavity Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Tian, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Quantum superposition in mechanical systems is not only key evidence for macroscopic quantum coherence, but can also be utilized in modern quantum technology. Here we propose an efficient approach for creating macroscopically distinct mechanical superposition states in a two-mode optomechanical system. Photon hopping between the two cavity modes is modulated sinusoidally. The modulated photon tunneling enables an ultrastrong radiation-pressure force acting on the mechanical resonator, and hence significantly increases the mechanical displacement induced by a single photon. We study systematically the generation of the Yurke-Stoler-like states in the presence of system dissipations. We also discuss the experimental implementation of this scheme.

  1. Large energy superpositions via Rydberg dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazali, Mohammadsadegh; Lau, Hon Wai; Humeniuk, Adam; Simon, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    We propose to create superposition states of over 100 strontium atoms in a ground state or metastable optical clock state using the Kerr-type interaction due to Rydberg state dressing in an optical lattice. The two components of the superposition can differ by an order of 300 eV in energy, allowing tests of energy decoherence models with greatly improved sensitivity. We take into account the effects of higher-order nonlinearities, spatial inhomogeneity of the interaction, decay from the Rydberg state, collective many-body decoherence, atomic motion, molecular formation, and diminishing Rydberg level separation for increasing principal number.

  2. Factors Affecting Higher Order Thinking Skills of Students: A Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budsankom, Prayoonsri; Sawangboon, Tatsirin; Damrongpanit, Suntorapot; Chuensirimongkol, Jariya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to develop and identify the validity of factors affecting higher order thinking skills (HOTS) of students. The thinking skills can be divided into three types: analytical, critical, and creative thinking. This analysis is done by applying the meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) based on a database of…

  3. Many-Body Basis Set Superposition Effect.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, John F; Bettens, Ryan P A

    2015-11-10

    The basis set superposition effect (BSSE) arises in electronic structure calculations of molecular clusters when questions relating to interactions between monomers within the larger cluster are asked. The binding energy, or total energy, of the cluster may be broken down into many smaller subcluster calculations and the energies of these subsystems linearly combined to, hopefully, produce the desired quantity of interest. Unfortunately, BSSE can plague these smaller fragment calculations. In this work, we carefully examine the major sources of error associated with reproducing the binding energy and total energy of a molecular cluster. In order to do so, we decompose these energies in terms of a many-body expansion (MBE), where a "body" here refers to the monomers that make up the cluster. In our analysis, we found it necessary to introduce something we designate here as a many-ghost many-body expansion (MGMBE). The work presented here produces some surprising results, but perhaps the most significant of all is that BSSE effects up to the order of truncation in a MBE of the total energy cancel exactly. In the case of the binding energy, the only BSSE correction terms remaining arise from the removal of the one-body monomer total energies. Nevertheless, our earlier work indicated that BSSE effects continued to remain in the total energy of the cluster up to very high truncation order in the MBE. We show in this work that the vast majority of these high-order many-body effects arise from BSSE associated with the one-body monomer total energies. Also, we found that, remarkably, the complete basis set limit values for the three-body and four-body interactions differed very little from that at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level for the respective subclusters embedded within a larger cluster. PMID:26574311

  4. Extension of analytic results for a PT-symmetric structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, H. F.; Kulishov, M.

    2016-05-01

    The PT-symmetric optical grating with index profile {{{e}}}2{{i}β z} has been shown to have the interesting property of being essentially invisible for light incident from one side, while possessing greatly enhanced reflection at a particular wavelength for light incident from the other side. We extend a previous analysis of this grating to obtain an analytic solution for the case when the grating is embedded on a substrate, with different refractive indices on either side. We also generalize the previous case of normal incidence to incidence at an arbitrary angle. In that case the enhanced reflection occurs at a particular angle of incidence for a given wavelength. Finally we discuss how the grating may be used to give lasing.

  5. Experimental and Analytical Studies of Smart Morphing Structures Being Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Song, Gangbing

    2003-01-01

    The development of morphing aeropropulsion structural components offers the potential to significantly improve the performance of existing aircraft engines through the introduction of new inherent capabilities for shape control, vibration damping, noise reduction, health monitoring, and flow manipulation. One of the key factors in the successful development of morphing structures is the maturation of smart materials technologies.

  6. Failure detection and accommodation in structural dynamics systems using analytic redundancy. [in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. P.; Montgomery, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of analytic redundancy is extended to identify nonzero constant output failures in large spacecraft active control sensors and actuators, using a set of distributed sensors which do not nominally produce equivalent signals but are related through the structural dynamics of the system. The suboptimal technique uses a Sequential Probability Ratio Test on the residual sequence of a Kalman filter based on a modal structure model, to determine failure of a component based on an assumed failure hypothesis. The specific failure is identified and then the Kalman filter gains are reconfigured for the identified remaining working sensor set. Experimental data using an apparatus whose dynamics are representative of a large spacecraft show the nominal filter performance under failed and unfailed conditions.

  7. The principle of superposition in human prehension

    PubMed Central

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.; Gao, Fan; Shim, Jae Kun

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The experimental evidence supports the validity of the principle of superposition for multi-finger prehension in humans. Forces and moments of individual digits are defined by two independent commands: “Grasp the object stronger/weaker to prevent slipping” and “Maintain the rotational equilibrium of the object”. The effects of the two commands are summed up. PMID:20186284

  8. The Evolution and Development of Neural Superposition

    PubMed Central

    Agi, Egemen; Langen, Marion; Altschuler, Steven J.; Wu, Lani F.; Zimmermann, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Visual systems have a rich history as model systems for the discovery and understanding of basic principles underlying neuronal connectivity. The compound eyes of insects consist of up to thousands of small unit eyes that are connected by photoreceptor axons to set up a visual map in the brain. The photoreceptor axon terminals thereby represent neighboring points seen in the environment in neighboring synaptic units in the brain. Neural superposition is a special case of such a wiring principle, where photoreceptors from different unit eyes that receive the same input converge upon the same synaptic units in the brain. This wiring principle is remarkable, because each photoreceptor in a single unit eye receives different input and each individual axon, among thousands others in the brain, must be sorted together with those few axons that have the same input. Key aspects of neural superposition have been described as early as 1907. Since then neuroscientists, evolutionary and developmental biologists have been fascinated by how such a complicated wiring principle could evolve, how it is genetically encoded, and how it is developmentally realized. In this review article, we will discuss current ideas about the evolutionary origin and developmental program of neural superposition. Our goal is to identify in what way the special case of neural superposition can help us answer more general questions about the evolution and development of genetically “hard-wired” synaptic connectivity in the brain. PMID:24912630

  9. Superposition of Polytropes in the Inner Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a possible generalization of the equation of state and Bernoulli's integral when a superposition of polytropic processes applies in space and astrophysical plasmas. The theory of polytropic thermodynamic processes for a fixed polytropic index is extended for a superposition of polytropic indices. In general, the superposition may be described by any distribution of polytropic indices, but emphasis is placed on a Gaussian distribution. The polytropic density-temperature relation has been used in numerous analyses of space plasma data. This linear relation on a log-log scale is now generalized to a concave-downward parabola that is able to describe the observations better. The model of the Gaussian superposition of polytropes is successfully applied in the proton plasma of the inner heliosheath. The estimated mean polytropic index is near zero, indicating the dominance of isobaric thermodynamic processes in the sheath, similar to other previously published analyses. By computing Bernoulli's integral and applying its conservation along the equator of the inner heliosheath, the magnetic field in the inner heliosheath is estimated, B ˜ 2.29 ± 0.16 μG. The constructed normalized histogram of the values of the magnetic field is similar to that derived from a different method that uses the concept of large-scale quantization, bringing incredible insights to this novel theory.

  10. Analytical review of structure and regulation of hemopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    The development of knowledge on the structure of hemopoiesis and its regulation can be divided into four broad areas: descriptive morphology, kinetics of cell proliferation, regulation of rates of cell proliferation through interaction of molecular regulators and their cell surface receptors, and clinical applications. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Comparison of several NASTRAN analytical techniques for large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemer, D. T.

    1978-01-01

    In order to plan for the finite element structural analysis of future aircraft, five static analysis techniques using the MacNeal-Schwendler Corporation version of NASTRAN were evaluated. The structure was analyzed as: (1) a single model with a symmetric loading condition; (2) a single model with symmetric/nonsymmetric loading conditions; (3) three substructures in three phases using tape storage with a symmetric loading condition; (4) three superelements using data base storage with a symmetric loading condition; and (5) three superelements using data base storage with cyclic symmetry for symmetric/nonsymmetric loading conditions. The superelement techniques proved superior to the single model approaches by reducing computer time for redesign work by as much as 70 percent.

  12. Design Protocols and Analytical Strategies that Incorporate Structural Reliability Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and intermetallic materials (e.g., single crystal nickel aluminide) are high performance materials that exhibit attractive mechanical, thermal and chemical properties. These materials are critically important in advancing certain performance aspects of gas turbine engines. From an aerospace engineer's perspective the new generation of ceramic composites and intermetallics offers a significant potential for raising the thrust/weight ratio and reducing NO(x) emissions of gas turbine engines. These aspects have increased interest in utilizing these materials in the hot sections of turbine engines. However, as these materials evolve and their performance characteristics improve a persistent need exists for state-of-the-art analytical methods that predict the response of components fabricated from CMC and intermetallic material systems. This need provided the motivation for the technology developed under this research effort. Continuous ceramic fiber composites exhibit an increase in work of fracture, which allows for "graceful" rather than catastrophic failure. When loaded in the fiber direction, these composites retain substantial strength capacity beyond the initiation of transverse matrix cracking despite the fact that neither of its constituents would exhibit such behavior if tested alone. As additional load is applied beyond first matrix cracking, the matrix tends to break in a series of cracks bridged by the ceramic fibers. Any additional load is born increasingly by the fibers until the ultimate strength of the composite is reached. Thus modeling efforts supported under this research effort have focused on predicting this sort of behavior. For single crystal intermetallics the issues that motivated the technology development involved questions relating to material behavior and component design. Thus the research effort supported by this grant had to determine the statistical nature and source of fracture in a high strength, Ni

  13. Design Protocols and Analytical Strategies that Incorporate Structural Reliability Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and intermetallic materials (e.g., single crystal nickel aluminide) are high performance materials that exhibit attractive mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties. These materials are critically important in advancing certain performance aspects of gas turbine engines. From an aerospace engineers perspective the new generation of ceramic composites and intermetallics offers a significant potential for raising the thrust/weight ratio and reducing NO(sub x) emissions of gas turbine engines. These aspects have increased interest in utilizing these materials in the hot sections of turbine engines. However, as these materials evolve and their performance characteristics improve a persistent need exists for state-of-the-art analytical methods that predict the response of components fabricated from CMC and intermetallic material systems. This need provided the motivation for the technology developed under this research effort. Continuous ceramic fiber composites exhibit an increase in work of fracture, which allows for 'graceful' rather than catastrophic failure. When loaded in the fiber direction these composites retain substantial strength capacity beyond the initiation of transverse matrix cracking despite the fact that neither of its constituents would exhibit such behavior if tested alone. As additional load is applied beyond first matrix cracking, the matrix tends to break in a series of cracks bridged by the ceramic fibers. Any additional load is born increasingly by the fibers until the ultimate strength of the composite is reached. Thus modeling efforts supported under this research effort have focused on predicting this sort of behavior. For single crystal intermetallics the issues that motivated the technology development involved questions relating to material behavior and component design. Thus the research effort supported by this grant had to determine the statistical nature and source of fracture in a high strength, Ni

  14. Macroscopic Quantum Superposition in Cavity Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Tian, Lin

    Quantum superposition in mechanical systems is not only a key evidence of macroscopic quantum coherence, but can also be utilized in modern quantum technology. Here we propose an efficient approach for creating macroscopically distinct mechanical superposition states in a two-mode optomechanical system. Photon hopping between the two cavity-modes is modulated sinusoidally. The modulated photon tunneling enables an ultrastrong radiation-pressure force acting on the mechanical resonator, and hence significantly increases the mechanical displacement induced by a single photon. We present systematic studies on the generation of the Yurke-Stoler-like states in the presence of system dissipations. The state generation method is general and it can be implemented with either optomechanical or electromechanical systems. The authors are supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. NSF-DMR-0956064 and the DARPA ORCHID program through AFOSR.

  15. Concurrence of superpositions of many states

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad

    2011-04-15

    In this paper, we use the concurrence vector as a measure of entanglement, and investigate lower and upper bounds on the concurrence of a superposition of bipartite states as a function of the concurrence of the superposed states. We show that the amount of entanglement quantified by the concurrence vector is exactly the same as that quantified by I concurrence, so that our results can be compared to those given in Phys. Rev. A 76, 042328 (2007). We obtain a tighter lower bound in the case in which the two superposed states are orthogonal. We also show that when the two superposed states are not necessarily orthogonal, both lower and upper bounds are, in general, tighter than the bounds given in terms of the I concurrence. An extension of the results to the case with more than two states in the superpositions is also given.

  16. An Analytical Solution for Transient Thermal Response of an Insulated Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical solution was derived for the transient response of an insulated aerospace vehicle structure subjected to a simplified heat pulse. This simplified problem approximates the thermal response of a thermal protection system of an atmospheric entry vehicle. The exact analytical solution is solely a function of two non-dimensional parameters. A simpler function of these two parameters was developed to approximate the maximum structural temperature over a wide range of parameter values. Techniques were developed to choose constant, effective properties to represent the relevant temperature and pressure-dependent properties for the insulator and structure. A technique was also developed to map a time-varying surface temperature history to an equivalent square heat pulse. Using these techniques, the maximum structural temperature rise was calculated using the analytical solutions and shown to typically agree with finite element simulations within 10 to 20 percent over the relevant range of parameters studied.

  17. Approximate analytic solutions for the ionization structure of a pressure equilibrium Strömgren sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinoco Arenas, A.; González Bolívar, M.; Medina Covarrubias, R.; Raga, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present analytic models for a photoionized region in pressure equilibrium with the surrounding, neutral material. The models are based on the assumption of a linear relation between the H ionization fraction and the square of the sound speed of the gas. We show that under these assumptions the "grey" radiative transfer equation has analytic solutions that provide the ionization structure and the density of the nebula as a function of radius.

  18. Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling (MASEM): Comparison of the Multivariate Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Meta-analytic Structural Equation Modeling (MASEM) has drawn interest from many researchers recently. In doing MASEM, researchers usually first synthesize correlation matrices across studies using meta-analysis techniques and then analyze the pooled correlation matrix using structural equation modeling techniques. Several multivariate methods of…

  19. Design Protocols and Analytical Strategies that Incorporate Structural Reliability Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1995-01-01

    The general goal of this project is to establish design protocols that enable the engineer to analyze and predict certain types of behavior in ceramic composites. Sections of the final report addresses the following: Description of the Problem that Motivated the Technology Development, Description of the New Technology that was Developed, Unique and Novel Features of the Technology and Results/Benefits of Application (year by year accomplishments), and Utilization of New Technology in Non-Aerospace Applications. Activities for this reporting period included the development of a design analysis as part of a cooperative agreement with general Electric Aircraft Engines. The effort focused on modifying the Toughened Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (TCARES) algorithm for use in the design of engine components fabricated from NiAl. Other activities related to the development of an ASTM standard practice for estimating Weibull parameters. The standard focuses on the evaluation and reporting of uniaxial strength data, and the estimation of probability distribution parameters for ceramics which fail in a brittle fashion.

  20. On the analytical modeling of the nonlinear vibrations of pretensioned space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Belvin, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    Pretensioned structures are receiving considerable attention as candidate large space structures. A typical example is a hoop-column antenna. The large number of preloaded members requires efficient analytical methods for concept validation and design. Validation through analyses is especially important since ground testing may be limited due to gravity effects and structural size. The present investigation has the objective to present an examination of the analytical modeling of pretensioned members undergoing nonlinear vibrations. Two approximate nonlinear analysis are developed to model general structural arrangements which include beam-columns and pretensioned cables attached to a common nucleus, such as may occur at a joint of a pretensioned structure. Attention is given to structures undergoing nonlinear steady-state oscillations due to sinusoidal excitation forces. Three analyses, linear, quasi-linear, and nonlinear are conducted and applied to study the response of a relatively simple cable stiffened structure.

  1. Toward quantum superposition of living organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Isart, Oriol; Juan, Mathieu L.; Quidant, Romain; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2010-03-01

    The most striking feature of quantum mechanics is the existence of superposition states, where an object appears to be in different situations at the same time. The existence of such states has been previously tested with small objects, such as atoms, ions, electrons and photons (Zoller et al 2005 Eur. Phys. J. D 36 203-28), and even with molecules (Arndt et al 1999 Nature 401 680-2). More recently, it has been shown that it is possible to create superpositions of collections of photons (Deléglise et al 2008 Nature 455 510-14), atoms (Hammerer et al 2008 arXiv:0807.3358) or Cooper pairs (Friedman et al 2000 Nature 406 43-6). Very recent progress in optomechanical systems may soon allow us to create superpositions of even larger objects, such as micro-sized mirrors or cantilevers (Marshall et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 130401; Kippenberg and Vahala 2008 Science 321 1172-6 Marquardt and Girvin 2009 Physics 2 40; Favero and Karrai 2009 Nature Photon. 3 201-5), and thus to test quantum mechanical phenomena at larger scales. Here we propose a method to cool down and create quantum superpositions of the motion of sub-wavelength, arbitrarily shaped dielectric objects trapped inside a high-finesse cavity at a very low pressure. Our method is ideally suited for the smallest living organisms, such as viruses, which survive under low-vacuum pressures (Rothschild and Mancinelli 2001 Nature 406 1092-101) and optically behave as dielectric objects (Ashkin and Dziedzic 1987 Science 235 1517-20). This opens up the possibility of testing the quantum nature of living organisms by creating quantum superposition states in very much the same spirit as the original Schrödinger's cat 'gedanken' paradigm (Schrödinger 1935 Naturwissenschaften 23 807-12, 823-8, 844-9). We anticipate that our paper will be a starting point for experimentally addressing fundamental questions, such as the role of life and consciousness in quantum mechanics.

  2. Analytical modeling of structure-soil systems for lunar bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macari-Pasqualino, Jose Emir

    1989-01-01

    The study of the behavior of granular materials in a reduced gravity environment and under low effective stresses became a subject of great interest in the mid 1960's when NASA's Surveyor missions to the Moon began the first extraterrestrial investigation and it was found that Lunar soils exhibited properties quite unlike those on Earth. This subject gained interest during the years of the Apollo missions and more recently due to NASA's plans for future exploration and colonization of Moon and Mars. It has since been clear that a good understanding of the mechanical properties of granular materials under reduced gravity and at low effective stress levels is of paramount importance for the design and construction of surface and buried structures on these bodies. In order to achieve such an understanding it is desirable to develop a set of constitutive equations that describes the response of such materials as they are subjected to tractions and displacements. This presentation examines issues associated with conducting experiments on highly nonlinear granular materials under high and low effective stresses. The friction and dilatancy properties which affect the behavior of granular soils with low cohesion values are assessed. In order to simulate the highly nonlinear strength and stress-strain behavior of soils at low as well as high effective stresses, a versatile isotropic, pressure sensitive, third stress invariant dependent, cone-cap elasto-plastic constitutive model was proposed. The integration of the constitutive relations is performed via a fully implicit Backward Euler technique known as the Closest Point Projection Method. The model was implemented into a finite element code in order to study nonlinear boundary value problems associated with homogeneous as well as nonhomogeneous deformations at low as well as high effective stresses. The effect of gravity (self-weight) on the stress-strain-strength response of these materials is evaluated. The calibration

  3. Design and structural verification of locomotive bogies using combined analytical and experimental methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, I.; Popa, G.; Girnita, I.; Prenta, G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents a practical methodology for design and structural verification of the locomotive bogie frames using a modern software package for design, structural verification and validation through combined, analytical and experimental methods. In the initial stage, the bogie geometry is imported from a CAD program into a finite element analysis program, such as Ansys. The analytical model validation is done by experimental modal analysis carried out on a finished bogie frame. The bogie frame own frequencies and own modes by both experimental and analytic methods are determined and the correlation analysis of the two types of models is performed. If the results are unsatisfactory, the structural optimization should be performed. If the results are satisfactory, the qualification procedures follow by static and fatigue tests carried out in a laboratory with international accreditation in the field. This paper presents an application made on bogie frames for the LEMA electric locomotive of 6000 kW.

  4. A Visual Analytics Approach to Structured Data Analysis to Enhance Nonproliferation and Arms Control Verification Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, David S.

    2014-08-07

    Analysis activities for Nonproliferation and Arms Control verification require the use of many types of data. Tabular structured data, such as Excel spreadsheets and relational databases, have traditionally been used for data mining activities, where specific queries are issued against data to look for matching results. The application of visual analytics tools to structured data enables further exploration of datasets to promote discovery of previously unknown results. This paper discusses the application of a specific visual analytics tool to datasets related to the field of Arms Control and Nonproliferation to promote the use of visual analytics more broadly in this domain. Visual analytics focuses on analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces (Wong and Thomas 2004). It promotes exploratory analysis of data, and complements data mining technologies where known patterns can be mined for. Also with a human in the loop, they can bring in domain knowledge and subject matter expertise. Visual analytics has not widely been applied to this domain. In this paper, we will focus on one type of data: structured data, and show the results of applying a specific visual analytics tool to answer questions in the Arms Control and Nonproliferation domain. We chose to use the T.Rex tool, a visual analytics tool developed at PNNL, which uses a variety of visual exploration patterns to discover relationships in structured datasets, including a facet view, graph view, matrix view, and timeline view. The facet view enables discovery of relationships between categorical information, such as countries and locations. The graph tool visualizes node-link relationship patterns, such as the flow of materials being shipped between parties. The matrix visualization shows highly correlated categories of information. The timeline view shows temporal patterns in data. In this paper, we will use T.Rex with two different datasets to demonstrate how interactive exploration of

  5. Coherent Scattering of a Multiphoton Quantum Superposition by a Mirror BEC

    SciTech Connect

    De Martini, Francesco; Sciarrino, Fabio; Vitelli, Chiara; Cataliotti, Francesco S.

    2010-02-05

    We present the proposition of an experiment in which the multiphoton quantum superposition consisting of Napprox =10{sup 5} particles generated by a quantum-injected optical parametric amplifier, seeded by a single-photon belonging to an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled pair, is made to interact with a mirror-Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) shaped as a Bragg interference structure. The overall process will realize a macroscopic quantum superposition involving a microscopic single-photon state of polarization entangled with the coherent macroscopic transfer of momentum to the BEC structure, acting in spacelike separated distant places.

  6. Maximum predictive power and the superposition principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summhammer, Johann

    1994-01-01

    In quantum physics the direct observables are probabilities of events. We ask how observed probabilities must be combined to achieve what we call maximum predictive power. According to this concept the accuracy of a prediction must only depend on the number of runs whose data serve as input for the prediction. We transform each probability to an associated variable whose uncertainty interval depends only on the amount of data and strictly decreases with it. We find that for a probability which is a function of two other probabilities maximum predictive power is achieved when linearly summing their associated variables and transforming back to a probability. This recovers the quantum mechanical superposition principle.

  7. Atom Microscopy via Dual Resonant Superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Jabar, M. S.; Bakht, Amin Bacha; Jalaluddin, M.; Iftikhar, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    An M-type Rb87 atomic system is proposed for one-dimensional atom microscopy under the condition of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency. Super-localization of the atom in the absorption spectrum while its delocalization in the dispersion spectrum is observed due to the dual superposition effect of the resonant fields. The observed minimum uncertainty peaks will find important applications in Laser cooling, creating focused atom beams, atom nanolithography, and in measurement of the center-of-mass wave function of moving atoms.

  8. Design of artificial spherical superposition compound eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhaolou; Zhai, Chunjie; Wang, Keyi

    2015-12-01

    In this research, design of artificial spherical superposition compound eye is presented. The imaging system consists of three layers of lens arrays. In each channel, two lenses are designed to control the angular magnification and a field lens is added to improve the image quality and extend the field of view. Aspherical surfaces are introduced to improve the image quality. Ray tracing results demonstrate that the light from the same object point is focused at the same imaging point through different channels. Therefore the system has much higher energy efficiency than conventional spherical apposition compound eye.

  9. On Kolmogorov's superpositions and Boolean functions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1998-12-31

    The paper overviews results dealing with the approximation capabilities of neural networks, as well as bounds on the size of threshold gate circuits. Based on an explicit numerical (i.e., constructive) algorithm for Kolmogorov's superpositions they will show that for obtaining minimum size neutral networks for implementing any Boolean function, the activation function of the neurons is the identity function. Because classical AND-OR implementations, as well as threshold gate implementations require exponential size (in the worst case), it will follow that size-optimal solutions for implementing arbitrary Boolean functions require analog circuitry. Conclusions and several comments on the required precision are ending the paper.

  10. Reliability-based structural optimization: A proposed analytical-experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. Jefferson; Nikolaidis, Efstratios

    1993-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study for assessing the potential of reliability-based structural optimization is proposed and described. In the study, competing designs obtained by deterministic and reliability-based optimization are compared. The experimental portion of the study is practical because the structure selected is a modular, actively and passively controlled truss that consists of many identical members, and because the competing designs are compared in terms of their dynamic performance and are not destroyed if failure occurs. The analytical portion of this study is illustrated on a 10-bar truss example. In the illustrative example, it is shown that reliability-based optimization can yield a design that is superior to an alternative design obtained by deterministic optimization. These analytical results provide motivation for the proposed study, which is underway.

  11. Time-Temperature Superposition Applied to PBX Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Darla; Deluca, Racci

    2011-06-01

    The use of plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) in weapon applications requires a certain level of structural/mechanical integrity. Uniaxial tension and compression experiments characterize the mechanical response of materials over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates, providing the basis for predictive modeling in more complex geometries. After years of data collection on a wide variety of PBX formulations, we have applied time-temperature superposition principles to a mechanical properties database which includes PBX 9501, PBX 9502, PBXN-110, PBXN-9, and HPP (propellant). The results of quasi-static tension and compression, SHPB compression, and cantilever DMA are compared. Time-temperature relationships of maximum stress and corresponding strain values are analyzed in addition to the more conventional analysis of modulus. Our analysis shows adherence to the principles of time-temperature superposition and correlations of mechanical response to the binder glass transition and specimen density. Direct ties relate time-temperature analysis to the underlying basis of existing PBX mechanical models (ViscoSCRAM). Results suggest that, within limits, mechanical response can be predicted at conditions not explicitly measured. LA-UR 11-01096.

  12. Time-temperature superposition applied to PBX mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Darla; DeLuca, Racci; Wright, Walter J.

    2012-03-01

    The use of plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) in weapon applications requires that they possess and maintain a level of structural/mechanical integrity. Uniaxial tension and compression experiments are typically used to characterize the mechanical response of materials over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates, providing the basis for predictive modeling in more complex geometries. After many years of data collection on a variety of PBX formulations, we have here applied the principles of time-temperature superposition to a mechanical properties database which includes PBX 9501, PBX 9502, PBXN-110, PBXN-9, and HPP (propellant). Consistencies are demonstrated between the results of quasi-static tension and compression, dynamic Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) compression, and cantilever Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). Timetemperature relationships of maximum stress and corresponding strain values are analyzed, in addition to the more conventional analysis of modulus. The extensive analysis shows adherence to the principles of time-temperature superposition and correlations of mechanical response to binder glasstransition temperature (Tg) and specimen density. Direct ties exist between the time-temperature analysis and the underlying basis of a useful existing PBX mechanical model (ViscoSCRAM). Results give confidence that, with some limitations, mechanical response can be predicted at conditions not explicitly measured.

  13. An analytical comparison of two wing structures for Mach 5 cruise airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Cerro, J. A.; Scotti, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    Mach 5 cruise research conducted by NASA is related to aerodynamics, propulsion, and structures. The study of structures includes the propulsion system, fuselage, and wings. Various studies have shown that the achievement of adequate range is largely dependent on a low structural mass fraction. The present investigation is concerned with a study of two wing structure configurations for Mach 5 aircraft. An uprated version (Ti-6242 replacing B-120 titanium) of the YF-12/SR-71 wing structure is considered. The B-120 titanium structure represents the current art of high speed aircraft wing structures. The YF-12 wing structure was designed about 20 years ago when the analytical methods for calculating thermal stresses were limited. The second wing structural configuration studied in the present investigation also used Ti-6242 materials but replaced the corrugated-beaded panels with diffusion bonded honeycomb-core sandwich panels, and replaced the z-stiffened shear webs with sine-wave stiffened shear webs.

  14. Taxometric and Factor Analytic Models of Anxiety Sensitivity: Integrating Approaches to Latent Structural Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Amit; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Norton, Peter J.; Schmidt, Norman B.; Taylor, Steven; Forsyth, John P.; Lewis, Sarah F.; Feldner, Matthew T.; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W.; Stewart, Sherry H.; Cox, Brian

    2007-01-01

    This study represents an effort to better understand the latent structure of anxiety sensitivity (AS), as indexed by the 16-item Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI; S. Reiss, R. A. Peterson, M. Gursky, & R. J. McNally, 1986), by using taxometric and factor-analytic approaches in an integrative manner. Taxometric analyses indicated that AS has a…

  15. A Two-Stage Approach to Synthesizing Covariance Matrices in Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Mike W. L.; Chan, Wai

    2009-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) is widely used as a statistical framework to test complex models in behavioral and social sciences. When the number of publications increases, there is a need to systematically synthesize them. Methodology of synthesizing findings in the context of SEM is known as meta-analytic SEM (MASEM). Although correlation…

  16. Analyticity of event horizons of five-dimensional multi-black holes with nontrivial asymptotic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Masashi

    2008-08-15

    We show that there exist five-dimensional multi-black hole solutions which have analytic event horizons when the space-time has nontrivial asymptotic structure, unlike the case of five-dimensional multi-black hole solutions in asymptotically flat space-time.

  17. Band structure analysis of an analytically solvable Hill equation with continuous potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, G. V.; Sprung, D. W. L.

    2015-03-01

    This paper concerns analytically solvable cases of Hill’s equation containing a continuously differentiable periodic potential. We outline a procedure for constructing the Floquet-Bloch fundamental system, and analyze the band structure of the system. The similarities to, and differences from, the cases of a piecewise constant periodic potential and the Mathieu potential, are illuminated.

  18. Analytical modeling and experimental validation of a structurally integrated piezoelectric energy harvester on a thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aridogan, U.; Basdogan, I.; Erturk, A.

    2014-04-01

    Vibration-based energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers has been extensively studied over the past decade. As an alternative to cantilevered harvesters, piezoelectric patch harvesters integrated to thin plates can be more convenient for use in marine, aerospace and automotive applications since these systems are often composed of thin plate-like structures with various boundary conditions. In this paper, we present analytical electroelastic modeling of a piezoelectric energy harvester structurally integrated to a thin plate along with experimental validations. The distributed-parameter electroelastic model of the thin plate with the piezoceramic patch harvester is developed based on Kirchhoff’s plate theory for all-four-edges clamped (CCCC) boundary conditions. Closed-form steady-state response expressions for coupled electrical output and structural vibration are obtained under transverse point force excitation. Analytical electroelastic frequency response functions (FRFs) relating the voltage output and vibration response to force input are derived and generalized for different boundary conditions. Experimental validation and extensive theoretical analysis efforts are then presented with a case study employing a thin PZT-5A piezoceramic patch attached on the surface of a rectangular aluminum CCCC plate. The importance of positioning of the piezoceramic patch harvester is discussed through an analysis of dynamic strain distribution on the overall plate surface. The electroelastic model is validated by a comparison of analytical and experimental FRFs for a wide range of resistive electrical boundary conditions. Finally, power generation performance of the structurally integrated piezoceramic patch harvester from multiple vibration modes is investigated analytically and experimentally.

  19. Structural Isomer Identification via NMR: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment for Organic, Analytical, or Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szafran, Zvi

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment that examines the ability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to distinguish between structural isomers via resonance multiplicities and chemical shifts. Reasons for incorporating the experiment into organic, analytical, or physical chemistry…

  20. Gas turbine rotor/case structural response to rotating stall: Experimental documentation and analytical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The forcing functions and structural responses characterizing gas turbine rotor/case system vibration due to rotating stall in an axial flow compressor are described. Two data sets with fundamentally different response characteristics are presented; one is supersynchronous and the other subsynchronous. Conventional beam element rotor dynamics analysis is shown to be severely limited in its ability to predict these responses. A new analytical approach, which significantly increases structural response predictive capability for these phenomena, is briefly discussed.

  1. About simple nonlinear and linear superpositions of special exact solutions of Veselov-Novikov equation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovsky, V. G.; Topovsky, A. V.

    2013-03-15

    New exact solutions, nonstationary and stationary, of Veselov-Novikov (VN) equation in the forms of simple nonlinear and linear superpositions of arbitrary number N of exact special solutions u{sup (n)}, n= 1, Horizontal-Ellipsis , N are constructed via Zakharov and Manakov {partial_derivative}-dressing method. Simple nonlinear superpositions are represented up to a constant by the sums of solutions u{sup (n)} and calculated by {partial_derivative}-dressing on nonzero energy level of the first auxiliary linear problem, i.e., 2D stationary Schroedinger equation. It is remarkable that in the zero energy limit simple nonlinear superpositions convert to linear ones in the form of the sums of special solutions u{sup (n)}. It is shown that the sums u=u{sup (k{sub 1})}+...+u{sup (k{sub m})}, 1 Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To k{sub 1} < k{sub 2} < Horizontal-Ellipsis < k{sub m} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To N of arbitrary subsets of these solutions are also exact solutions of VN equation. The presented exact solutions include as superpositions of special line solitons and also superpositions of plane wave type singular periodic solutions. By construction these exact solutions represent also new exact transparent potentials of 2D stationary Schroedinger equation and can serve as model potentials for electrons in planar structures of modern electronics.

  2. About simple nonlinear and linear superpositions of special exact solutions of Veselov-Novikov equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, V. G.; Topovsky, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    New exact solutions, nonstationary and stationary, of Veselov-Novikov (VN) equation in the forms of simple nonlinear and linear superpositions of arbitrary number N of exact special solutions u(n), n = 1, …, N are constructed via Zakharov and Manakov overline{partial }-dressing method. Simple nonlinear superpositions are represented up to a constant by the sums of solutions u(n) and calculated by overline{partial }-dressing on nonzero energy level of the first auxiliary linear problem, i.e., 2D stationary Schrödinger equation. It is remarkable that in the zero energy limit simple nonlinear superpositions convert to linear ones in the form of the sums of special solutions u(n). It is shown that the sums u= u^{(k_1)}+ldots + u^{(k_m)}, 1 ⩽ k1 < k2 < … < km ⩽ N of arbitrary subsets of these solutions are also exact solutions of VN equation. The presented exact solutions include as superpositions of special line solitons and also superpositions of plane wave type singular periodic solutions. By construction these exact solutions represent also new exact transparent potentials of 2D stationary Schrödinger equation and can serve as model potentials for electrons in planar structures of modern electronics.

  3. A simple analytic treatment of linear growth of structure with baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepian, Zachary; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    In linear perturbation theory, all information about the growth of structure is contained in the Green's function, or equivalently, transfer function. These functions are generally computed using numerical codes or by phenomenological fitting formula anchored in accurate analytic results in the limits of large and small scale. Here, we present a framework for analytically solving all scales, in particular the intermediate scales relevant for the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We solve for the Green's function and transfer function using spherically averaged overdensities and the approximation that the density of the coupled baryon-photon fluid is constant interior to the sound horizon.

  4. Analytic Modeling of the Hydrodynamic, Thermal, and Structural Behavior of Foil Thrust Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Prahl, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    A simulation and modeling effort is conducted on gas foil thrust bearings. A foil bearing is a self acting hydrodynamic device capable of separating stationary and rotating components of rotating machinery by a film of air or other gaseous lubricant. Although simple in appearance these bearings have proven to be complicated devices in analysis. They are sensitive to fluid structure interaction, use a compressible gas as a lubricant, may not be in the fully continuum range of fluid mechanics, and operate in the range where viscous heat generation is significant. These factors provide a challenge to the simulation and modeling task. The Reynolds equation with the addition of Knudsen number effects due to thin film thicknesses is used to simulate the hydrodynamics. The energy equation is manipulated to simulate the temperature field of the lubricant film and combined with the ideal gas relationship, provides density field input to the Reynolds equation. Heat transfer between the lubricant and the surroundings is also modeled. The structural deformations of the bearing are modeled with a single partial differential equation. The equation models the top foil as a thin, bending dominated membrane whose deflections are governed by the biharmonic equation. A linear superposition of hydrodynamic load and compliant foundation reaction is included. The stiffness of the compliant foundation is modeled as a distributed stiffness that supports the top foil. The system of governing equations is solved numerically by a computer program written in the Mathematica computing environment. Representative calculations and comparisons with experimental results are included for a generation I gas foil thrust bearing.

  5. Quantum decoherence time scales for ionic superposition states in ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, V.; Moradi, N.; Sajadi, M.; Fazileh, F.; Shahbazi, F.

    2015-03-01

    There are many controversial and challenging discussions about quantum effects in microscopic structures in neurons of the brain and their role in cognitive processing. In this paper, we focus on a small, nanoscale part of ion channels which is called the "selectivity filter" and plays a key role in the operation of an ion channel. Our results for superposition states of potassium ions indicate that decoherence times are of the order of picoseconds. This decoherence time is not long enough for cognitive processing in the brain, however, it may be adequate for quantum superposition states of ions in the filter to leave their quantum traces on the selectivity filter and action potentials.

  6. Phase properties of multicomponent superposition states in various amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang-Soo; Kim, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    There have been theoretical studies for generation of optical coherent superposition states. Once the superposition state is generated it is natural to ask if it is possible to amplify it without losing the nonclassical properties of the field state. We consider amplification of the superposition state in various amplifiers such as a sub-Poissonian amplifier, a phase-sensitive amplifier and a classical amplifier. We show the evolution of phase probability distribution functions in the amplifier.

  7. Flight and analytical investigations of a structural mode excitation system on the YF-12A airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, E. A.; Murphy, R. C.; Beranek, J. A.; Davis, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    A structural excitation system, using an oscillating canard vane to generate force, was mounted on the forebody of the YF-12A airplane. The canard vane was used to excite the airframe structural modes during flight in the subsonic, transonic, and supersonic regimes. Structural modal responses generated by the canard vane forces were measured at the flight test conditions by airframe-mounted accelerometers. Correlations of analytical and experimental aeroelastic results were made. Doublet lattice, steady state double lattice with uniform lag, Mach box, and piston theory all produced acceptable analytical aerodynamic results within the restrictions that apply to each. In general, the aerodynamic theory methods, carefully applied, were found to predict the dynamic behavior of the YF-12A aircraft adequately.

  8. Magnetic anomaly depth and structural index estimation using different height analytic signals data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuai; Huang, Danian; Su, Chao

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a new semi-automatic inversion method for magnetic anomaly data interpretation that uses the combination of analytic signals of the anomaly at different heights to determine the depth and the structural index N of the sources. The new method utilizes analytic signals of the original anomaly at different height to effectively suppress the noise contained in the anomaly. Compared with the other high-order derivative calculation methods based on analytic signals, our method only computes first-order derivatives of the anomaly, which can be used to obtain more stable and accurate results. Tests on synthetic noise-free and noise-corrupted magnetic data indicate that the new method can estimate the depth and N efficiently. The technique is applied to a real measured magnetic anomaly in Southern Illinois caused by a known dike, and the result is in agreement with the drilling information and inversion results within acceptable calculation error.

  9. Analytic structure of the multichannel Jost matrix for potentials with Coulombic tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakityansky, S. A.; Elander, N.

    2013-12-01

    A quantum system is considered that can move in N two-body channels with the potentials that may include the Coulomb interaction. For this system, the Jost matrix is constructed in such a way that all its dependencies on the channel momenta and Sommerfeld parameters are factorized in the form of explicit analytic expressions. It is shown that the two remaining unknown matrices are single-valued analytic functions of the energy and therefore can be expanded in the Taylor series near an arbitrary point within the domain of their analyticity. It is derived a system of first-order differential equations whose solutions determine the expansion coefficients of these series. Alternatively, the unknown expansion coefficients can be used as fitting parameters for parametrizing experimental data similarly to the effective-range expansion. Such a parametrization has the advantage of preserving proper analytic structure of the Jost matrix and can be done not only near the threshold energies, but around any collision or even complex energy. As soon as the parameters are obtained, the Jost matrix (and therefore the S-matrix) is known analytically on all sheets of the Riemann surface, and thus enables one to locate possible resonances.

  10. Authentication Protocol using Quantum Superposition States

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Yoshito; Yoo, Seong-Moo; Gregory, Don A.; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2009-01-01

    When it became known that quantum computers could break the RSA (named for its creators - Rivest, Shamir, and Adleman) encryption algorithm within a polynomial-time, quantum cryptography began to be actively studied. Other classical cryptographic algorithms are only secure when malicious users do not have sufficient computational power to break security within a practical amount of time. Recently, many quantum authentication protocols sharing quantum entangled particles between communicators have been proposed, providing unconditional security. An issue caused by sharing quantum entangled particles is that it may not be simple to apply these protocols to authenticate a specific user in a group of many users. An authentication protocol using quantum superposition states instead of quantum entangled particles is proposed. The random number shared between a sender and a receiver can be used for classical encryption after the authentication has succeeded. The proposed protocol can be implemented with the current technologies we introduce in this paper.

  11. Superresolved imaging in digital holography by superposition of tilted wavefronts.

    PubMed

    Mico, Vicente; Zalevsky, Zeev; García-Martínez, Pascuala; García, Javier

    2006-02-10

    A technique based on superresolution by digital holographic microscopic imaging is presented. We used a two dimensional (2-D) vertical-cavity self-emitting laser (VCSEL) array as spherical-wave illumination sources. The method is defined in terms of an incoherent superposition of tilted wavefronts. The tilted spherical wave originating from the 2-D VCSEL elements illuminates the target in transmission mode to obtain a hologram in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration. Superresolved images of the input object above the common lens diffraction limit are generated by sequential recording of the individual holograms and numerical reconstruction of the image with the extended spatial frequency range. We have experimentally tested the approach for a microscope objective with an exact 2-D reconstruction image of the input object. The proposed approach has implementation advantages for applications in biological imaging or the microelectronic industry in which structured targets are being inspected. PMID:16512523

  12. Big data and high-performance analytics in structural health monitoring for bridge management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alampalli, Sharada; Alampalli, Sandeep; Ettouney, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) can be a vital tool for effective bridge management. Combining large data sets from multiple sources to create a data-driven decision-making framework is crucial for the success of SHM. This paper presents a big data analytics framework that combines multiple data sets correlated with functional relatedness to convert data into actionable information that empowers risk-based decision-making. The integrated data environment incorporates near real-time streams of semi-structured data from remote sensors, historical visual inspection data, and observations from structural analysis models to monitor, assess, and manage risks associated with the aging bridge inventories. Accelerated processing of dataset is made possible by four technologies: cloud computing, relational database processing, support from NOSQL database, and in-memory analytics. The framework is being validated on a railroad corridor that can be subjected to multiple hazards. The framework enables to compute reliability indices for critical bridge components and individual bridge spans. In addition, framework includes a risk-based decision-making process that enumerate costs and consequences of poor bridge performance at span- and network-levels when rail networks are exposed to natural hazard events such as floods and earthquakes. Big data and high-performance analytics enable insights to assist bridge owners to address problems faster.

  13. Decoherence-free evolution of time-dependent superposition states of two-level systems and thermal effects

    SciTech Connect

    Prado, F. O.; Duzzioni, E. I.; Almeida, N. G. de; Moussa, M. H. Y.; Villas-Boas, C. J.

    2011-07-15

    In this paper we detail some results advanced in a recent letter [Prado et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 073008 (2009).] showing how to engineer reservoirs for two-level systems at absolute zero by means of a time-dependent master equation leading to a nonstationary superposition equilibrium state. We also present a general recipe showing how to build nonadiabatic coherent evolutions of a fermionic system interacting with a bosonic mode and investigate the influence of thermal reservoirs at finite temperature on the fidelity of the protected superposition state. Our analytical results are supported by numerical analysis of the full Hamiltonian model.

  14. A Middleware Framework to Create and Manage Data Structures for Visual Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Juan; Gomez, Diego A.; Gonzalez, Antonio; Garcia, Francisco J.; Theron, Roberto

    Visual Analytics require the use of large datasets and most of the time visualizations use their own data structures definition or make use of simple standards such as XML, CVS, or text files. Our proposal presents a middleware framework that focuses on providing a way to manage those data structures, allowing to access heterogeneous data sources. The framework allows defining data structures for different visualizations using the same dataset. It dynamically generates a visual interface that allows users to define data structures according to the specific visualization requirements. It also provides a repository to store data structures to reuse them in other visualizations or by means of inheritance, composition and associations. We have implemented a first prototype, which is discussed in the results presented on this paper.

  15. Nonclassical Properties of Q-Deformed Superposition Light Field State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Min; Shenggui, Wang; Ma, Aiqun; Jiang, Zhuohong

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the squeezing effect, the bunching effect and the anti-bunching effect of the superposition light field state which involving q-deformation vacuum state and q-Glauber coherent state are studied, the controllable q-parameter of the squeezing effect, the bunching effect and the anti-bunching effect of q-deformed superposition light field state are obtained.

  16. Optical information encryption based on incoherent superposition with the help of the QR code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yi; Gong, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel optical information encryption approach is proposed with the help of QR code. This method is based on the concept of incoherent superposition which we introduce for the first time. The information to be encrypted is first transformed into the corresponding QR code, and thereafter the QR code is further encrypted into two phase only masks analytically by use of the intensity superposition of two diffraction wave fields. The proposed method has several advantages over the previous interference-based method, such as a higher security level, a better robustness against noise attack, a more relaxed work condition, and so on. Numerical simulation results and actual smartphone collected results are shown to validate our proposal.

  17. Analytical procedures for estimating structural response to acoustic fields generated by advanced launch systems, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, Isaac; Lin, Y. K.; Zhu, Li-Ping; Fang, Jian-Jie; Cai, G. Q.

    1994-01-01

    This report supplements a previous report of the same title submitted in June, 1992. It summarizes additional analytical techniques which have been developed for predicting the response of linear and nonlinear structures to noise excitations generated by large propulsion power plants. The report is divided into nine chapters. The first two deal with incomplete knowledge of boundary conditions of engineering structures. The incomplete knowledge is characterized by a convex set, and its diagnosis is formulated as a multi-hypothesis discrete decision-making algorithm with attendant criteria of adaptive termination.

  18. Hybrid experimental/analytical models of structural dynamics - Creation and use for predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balmes, Etienne

    1993-01-01

    An original complete methodology for the construction of predictive models of damped structural vibrations is introduced. A consistent definition of normal and complex modes is given which leads to an original method to accurately identify non-proportionally damped normal mode models. A new method to create predictive hybrid experimental/analytical models of damped structures is introduced, and the ability of hybrid models to predict the response to system configuration changes is discussed. Finally a critical review of the overall methodology is made by application to the case of the MIT/SERC interferometer testbed.

  19. Advanced superposition methods for high speed turbopump vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, C. E.; Campany, A. D.

    1981-01-01

    The small, high pressure Mark 48 liquid hydrogen turbopump was analyzed and dynamically tested to determine the cause of high speed vibration at an operating speed of 92,400 rpm. This approaches the design point operating speed of 95,000 rpm. The initial dynamic analysis in the design stage and subsequent further analysis of the rotor only dynamics failed to predict the vibration characteristics found during testing. An advanced procedure for dynamics analysis was used in this investigation. The procedure involves developing accurate dynamic models of the rotor assembly and casing assembly by finite element analysis. The dynamically instrumented assemblies are independently rap tested to verify the analytical models. The verified models are then combined by modal superposition techniques to develop a completed turbopump model where dynamic characteristics are determined. The results of the dynamic testing and analysis obtained are presented and methods of moving the high speed vibration characteristics to speeds above the operating range are recommended. Recommendations for use of these advanced dynamic analysis procedures during initial design phases are given.

  20. The design process for a pumpkin balloon: structural synthesis, structural analysis, and analytical assessment of some critical design issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schur, W. W.

    Effects of varying parameters in the design of super-pressure balloons of the "pumpkin" shape such as gore design, tendon stiffness, and structural lack-of-fit between tendons and gore seams are exhibited in analytical studies. The importance of an accurate representation of Poisson's effect for the film is demonstrated. Important design aspects that affect load paths and robustness of the design are discussed together with their resolution and quantification where applicable.

  1. A wave superposition method formulated in digital acoustic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yong-Sin

    In this thesis, a new formulation of the Wave Superposition method is proposed wherein the conventional mesh approach is replaced by a simple 3-D digital work space that easily accommodates shape optimization for minimizing or maximizing radiation efficiency. As sound quality is in demand in almost all product designs and also because of fierce competition between product manufacturers, faster and accurate computational method for shape optimization is always desired. Because the conventional Wave Superposition method relies solely on mesh geometry, it cannot accommodate fast shape changes in the design stage of a consumer product or machinery, where many iterations of shape changes are required. Since the use of a mesh hinders easy shape changes, a new approach for representing geometry is introduced by constructing a uniform lattice in a 3-D digital work space. A voxel (a portmanteau, a new word made from combining the sound and meaning, of the words, volumetric and pixel) is essentially a volume element defined by the uniform lattice, and does not require separate connectivity information as a mesh element does. In the presented method, geometry is represented with voxels that can easily adapt to shape changes, therefore it is more suitable for shape optimization. The new method was validated by computing radiated sound power of structures of simple and complex geometries and complex mode shapes. It was shown that matching volume velocity is a key component to an accurate analysis. A sensitivity study showed that it required at least 6 elements per acoustic wavelength, and a complexity study showed a minimal reduction in computational time.

  2. Novel computational and analytic techniques for nonlinear systems applied to structural and celestial mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgohary, Tarek Adel Abdelsalam

    In this Dissertation, computational and analytic methods are presented to address nonlinear systems with applications in structural and celestial mechanics. Scalar Homotopy Methods (SHM) are first introduced for the solution of general systems of nonlinear algebraic equations. The methods are applied to the solution of postbuckling and limit load problems of solids and structures as exemplified by simple plane elastic frames, considering only geometrical nonlinearities. In many problems, instead of simply adopting a root solving method, it is useful to study the particular problem in more detail in order to establish an especially efficient and robust method. Such a problem arises in satellite geodesy coordinate transformation where a new highly efficient solution, providing global accuracy with a non-iterative sequence of calculations, is developed. Simulation results are presented to compare the solution accuracy and algorithm performance for applications spanning the LEO-to-GEO range of missions. Analytic methods are introduced to address problems in structural mechanics and astrodynamics. Analytic transfer functions are developed to address the frequency domain control problem of flexible rotating aerospace structures. The transfer functions are used to design a Lyapunov stable controller that drives the spacecraft to a target position while suppressing vibrations in the flexible appendages. In astrodynamics, a Taylor series based analytic continuation technique is developed to address the classical two-body problem. A key algorithmic innovation for the trajectory propagation is that the classical averaged approximation strategy is replaced with a rigorous series based solution for exactly computing the acceleration derivatives. Evidence is provided to demonstrate that high precision solutions are easily obtained with the analytic continuation approach. For general nonlinear initial value problems (IVPs), the method of Radial Basis Functions time domain

  3. Applying stable isotopes to examine food-web structure: an overview of analytical tools.

    PubMed

    Layman, Craig A; Araujo, Marcio S; Boucek, Ross; Hammerschlag-Peyer, Caroline M; Harrison, Elizabeth; Jud, Zachary R; Matich, Philip; Rosenblatt, Adam E; Vaudo, Jeremy J; Yeager, Lauren A; Post, David M; Bearhop, Stuart

    2012-08-01

    Stable isotope analysis has emerged as one of the primary means for examining the structure and dynamics of food webs, and numerous analytical approaches are now commonly used in the field. Techniques range from simple, qualitative inferences based on the isotopic niche, to Bayesian mixing models that can be used to characterize food-web structure at multiple hierarchical levels. We provide a comprehensive review of these techniques, and thus a single reference source to help identify the most useful approaches to apply to a given data set. We structure the review around four general questions: (1) what is the trophic position of an organism in a food web?; (2) which resource pools support consumers?; (3) what additional information does relative position of consumers in isotopic space reveal about food-web structure?; and (4) what is the degree of trophic variability at the intrapopulation level? For each general question, we detail different approaches that have been applied, discussing the strengths and weaknesses of each. We conclude with a set of suggestions that transcend individual analytical approaches, and provide guidance for future applications in the field. PMID:22051097

  4. A novel analytical ultracentrifugation based approach to the low resolution structure of gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Richard B; Adams, Gary G; Alzahrani, Qushmua; Harding, Stephen E

    2016-09-01

    Under investigation are the structural properties of gum arabic, an industrially important biopolymer for use as a stabilizer or in drug delivery, using Analytical Ultracentrifugation-a well-established, matrix-free probe for macromolecular size and shape. These results are combined with chromatographically-coupled methods (multi-angle light scattering, differential press imbalance viscometry) to provide a global analysis of its structure in varying ionic strength conditions. This analysis indicates that gum Arabic may have a compact, elliptical structure in solution, the significance of which for biotechnological use is indicated. This modelling method can be applied to other biopolymers and synthetic polymers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 618-625, 2016. PMID:26899968

  5. Stand dynamics and tree coexistence in an analytical structured model: the role of recruitment.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Óscar; Bravo de la Parra, Rafael; López-Marcos, Juan C; Zavala, Miguel A

    2013-09-21

    Understanding the mechanisms of coexistence and niche partitioning in plant communities is a central question in ecology. Current theories of forest dynamics range between the so-called neutral theories which assume functional equivalence among coexisting species to forest simulators that explain species assemblages as the result of tradeoffs in species individual strategies at several ontogenetic stages. Progress in these questions has been hindered by the inherent difficulties of developing analytical size-structured models of stand dynamics. This precludes examination of the relative importance of each mechanism on tree coexistence. In previous simulation and analytical studies emphasis has been given to interspecific differences at the sapling stage, and less so to interspecific variation in seedling recruitment. In this study we develop a partial differential equation model of stand dynamics in which competition takes place at the recruitment stage. Species differ in their size-dependent growth rates and constant mortality rates. Recruitment is described as proportional to the basal area of conspecifics, to account for fecundity and seed supply per unit of basal area, and is corrected with a decreasing function of species specific basal area to account for competition. We first analyze conditions for population persistence in monospecific stands and second we investigate conditions of coexistence for two species. In the monospecific case we found a stationary stand structure based on an inequality between mortality rate and seed supply. In turn, intra-specific competition does not play any role on the asymptotic extinction or population persistence. In the two-species case we found that coexistence can be attained when the reciprocal negative effect on recruitment follows a given relation with respect to intraspecific competition. Specifically a tradeoff between recruitment potential (i.e. shade tolerance or predation avoidance) and fecundity or growth rate

  6. Superposition rules for higher order systems and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñena, J. F.; Grabowski, J.; de Lucas, J.

    2012-05-01

    Superposition rules form a class of functions that describe general solutions of systems of first-order ordinary differential equations in terms of generic families of particular solutions and certain constants. In this work, we extend this notion and other related ones to systems of higher order differential equations and analyse their properties. Several results concerning the existence of various types of superposition rules for higher order systems are proved and illustrated with examples extracted from the physics and mathematics literature. In particular, two new superposition rules for the second- and third-order Kummer-Schwarz equations are derived.

  7. Mathematical Models, Analytical Solutions and Numerical Simulations of Self-Assembled Magnetic Colloidal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piet, David L.

    Ferromagnetic microparticles suspended at the interface between immiscible liquids and energized by an external alternating magnetic field show a rich variety of self-assembled structures, from linear snakes to radial asters, elongated wires to spinning chains to less dense clouds of particles called snails. In order to obtain insight into the fundamental physical mechanisms and the overall balance of forces governing self-assembly, we develop a modeling approach based on analytical solutions of the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. These analytical expressions for the self-consistent hydrodynamic flows are then employed to modify effective interactions between the particles, which in turn are formulated in terms of the time-averaged quantities. Our method allows effective computational verification of the mechanisms of self-assembly and leads to a testable predictions on the transitions between various self-assembled patterns. In one set of experiments, it was observed that viscosity is the primary driving force that determines whether asters or snakes appear at steady state. In the second set of experiments where hydrodynamics are less critical, the amplitude and frequency of the applied magnetic field determine whether wires, spinners or snails will appear. The ability to better understand what drives self-assembly and how to control which dynamic structures appear is necessary for further development of such structures and their applications.

  8. Analytic structure of the S-matrix for singular quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camblong, Horacio E.; Epele, Luis N.; Fanchiotti, Huner; García Canal, Carlos A.

    2015-06-01

    The analytic structure of the S-matrix of singular quantum mechanics is examined within a multichannel framework, with primary focus on its dependence with respect to a parameter (Ω) that determines the boundary conditions. Specifically, a characterization is given in terms of salient mathematical and physical properties governing its behavior. These properties involve unitarity and associated current-conserving Wronskian relations, time-reversal invariance, and Blaschke factorization. The approach leads to an interpretation of effective nonunitary solutions in singular quantum mechanics and their determination from the unitary family.

  9. Matrix perturbation for analytical model improvement. [for modal analysis of structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Garba, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    A matrix perturbation method is proposed to calculate the Jacobian matrix and to compute the new eigendata for the parameter estimation procedure. The advantages of the method are the applicability to large complex structures without knowing the analytical expressions for the mass and stiffness matrices, and a cost effective approach for the re-computation of the eigendata. This method also allows the use of other measurements such as modal forces, kinetic energy distribution, and strain energy distributions in the estimation procedure. A realistic sample problem is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Analytic structure of the S-matrix for singular quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Camblong, Horacio E.; Epele, Luis N.; Fanchiotti, Huner; García Canal, Carlos A.

    2015-06-15

    The analytic structure of the S-matrix of singular quantum mechanics is examined within a multichannel framework, with primary focus on its dependence with respect to a parameter (Ω) that determines the boundary conditions. Specifically, a characterization is given in terms of salient mathematical and physical properties governing its behavior. These properties involve unitarity and associated current-conserving Wronskian relations, time-reversal invariance, and Blaschke factorization. The approach leads to an interpretation of effective nonunitary solutions in singular quantum mechanics and their determination from the unitary family.

  11. Analytical solution to a fracture problem in a tough layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yukari; Okumura, Ko

    2008-08-01

    Nacre causes the shining beauty of pearl due to its remarkable layered structure, which is also strong. We reconsider a simplified layered model of nacre proposed previously [Okumura and de Gennes, Eur. Phys. J. E 4, 121 (2001)] and obtain an analytical solution to a fundamental crack problem. The result asserts that the fracture toughness is enhanced due to a large displacement around the crack tip (even if the crack-tip stress is not reduced). The derivation offers ideas for solving a number of boundary problems for partial differential equations important in many fields.

  12. Analytic structure of the full fermion propagator in quenched and unquenched QED

    SciTech Connect

    Maris, P. )

    1994-09-15

    We study the analytic structure of the electron propagator in the entire complex [ital p][sup 2] plane, using the Dyson-Schwinger equation. It is shown that in the usual ladder approximation there are two complex conjugate branch points, both in quenched and in unquenched strong coupling QED. There is, however, an essential difference between the quenched and the unquenched approximation: using the unquenched approximation, the branch points seem to approach the real axis in the continuum limit, in contrast with what happens in the quenched approximation.

  13. Semi-analytic approach for electromagnetic problems of large arrays structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami-Angas, Masoud

    helps us in finding the microscopic charactristics of the structure. Building on the theory that the molecules can be modeled by electric dipoles; a semi-analytic and semi-classical approach is developed to solve the electromagnetic problem of large array of dipoles and simulate the optical response of molecular aggregates. In chapter 3, a double negative (DNG) metamaterial structure is designed by unit cells of multilayer (concentric) spheres. The dispersion diagram is analyzed to find the frequency band with negative group velocity and the losses in DNG region. Basically, the combination of a positive permittivity dielectric and a negative permittivity plasmonic material can control the resonances of unit cells and therefore the effective permittivity of the 3-D structure. It is also discussed how a novel design of multilayer sphere unit cells leads to the DNG performance at the desired frequency band. In chapter 4, analytical solution to the problem of electromagnetic wave scattering by an arbitrary array of non-concentric spheres is derived. A full wave multipole expansion method is applied to express the electromagnetic fields in terms of the electric and magnetic dipole modes and the higher order moments. Vector spherical wave functions are used as the basis functions of the multipole expansions and the translation addition theorem is implemented to expand fields in desired coordinate systems. The accuracy and computational performance of the model are investigated and some interesting applications are discussed.

  14. Experimental/analytical approaches to modeling, calibrating and optimizing shaking table dynamics for structural dynamic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetti, Tomaso

    This thesis presents an Experimental/Analytical approach to modeling and calibrating shaking tables for structural dynamic applications. This approach was successfully applied to the shaking table recently built in the structural laboratory of the Civil Engineering Department at Rice University. This shaking table is capable of reproducing model earthquake ground motions with a peak acceleration of 6 g's, a peak velocity of 40 inches per second, and a peak displacement of 3 inches, for a maximum payload of 1500 pounds. It has a frequency bandwidth of approximately 70 Hz and is designed to test structural specimens up to 1/5 scale. The rail/table system is mounted on a reaction mass of about 70,000 pounds consisting of three 12 ft x 12 ft x 1 ft reinforced concrete slabs, post-tensioned together and connected to the strong laboratory floor. The slip table is driven by a hydraulic actuator governed by a 407 MTS controller which employs a proportional-integral-derivative-feedforward-differential pressure algorithm to control the actuator displacement. Feedback signals are provided by two LVDT's (monitoring the slip table relative displacement and the servovalve main stage spool position) and by one differential pressure transducer (monitoring the actuator force). The dynamic actuator-foundation-specimen system is modeled and analyzed by combining linear control theory and linear structural dynamics. The analytical model developed accounts for the effects of actuator oil compressibility, oil leakage in the actuator, time delay in the response of the servovalve spool to a given electrical signal, foundation flexibility, and dynamic characteristics of multi-degree-of-freedom specimens. In order to study the actual dynamic behavior of the shaking table, the transfer function between target and actual table accelerations were identified using experimental results and spectral estimation techniques. The power spectral density of the system input and the cross power spectral

  15. Nonclassical properties and quantum resources of hierarchical photonic superposition states

    SciTech Connect

    Volkoff, T. J.

    2015-11-15

    We motivate and introduce a class of “hierarchical” quantum superposition states of N coupled quantum oscillators. Unlike other well-known multimode photonic Schrödinger-cat states such as entangled coherent states, the hierarchical superposition states are characterized as two-branch superpositions of tensor products of single-mode Schrödinger-cat states. In addition to analyzing the photon statistics and quasiprobability distributions of prominent examples of these nonclassical states, we consider their usefulness for highprecision quantum metrology of nonlinear optical Hamiltonians and quantify their mode entanglement. We propose two methods for generating hierarchical superpositions in N = 2 coupled microwave cavities, exploiting currently existing quantum optical technology for generating entanglement between spatially separated electromagnetic field modes.

  16. A Galois connection approach to superposition and inaccessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, Jeremy; Melia, Joseph

    1993-12-01

    Working in a quantum logic framework and using the idea of Galois connections, we give a natural sufficient condition for superposition and inaccessibility to give the same closure map on sets of states.

  17. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulus, M. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum weight hat-stiffened and open corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programming technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience suggests that most of the theoretical weight saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  18. The Structure of Temperament in Preschoolers: A Two-Stage Factor Analytic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Margaret W.; Olino, Thomas M.; Durbin, C. Emily; Goldsmith, H. Hill; Klein, Daniel N.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of temperament traits in young children has been the subject of extensive debate, with separate models proposing different trait dimensions. This research has relied almost exclusively on parent-report measures. The present study used an alternative approach, a laboratory observational measure, to explore the structure of temperament in preschoolers. A 2-stage factor analytic approach, exploratory factor analyses (n = 274) followed by confirmatory factor analyses (n = 276), was used. We retrieved an adequately fitting model that consisted of 5 dimensions: Sociability, Positive Affect/Interest, Dysphoria, Fear/Inhibition, and Constraint versus Impulsivity. This solution overlaps with, but is also distinct from, the major models derived from parent-report measures. PMID:21859196

  19. Quantum State Engineering Via Coherent-State Superpositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janszky, Jozsef; Adam, P.; Szabo, S.; Domokos, P.

    1996-01-01

    The quantum interference between the two parts of the optical Schrodinger-cat state makes possible to construct a wide class of quantum states via discrete superpositions of coherent states. Even a small number of coherent states can approximate the given quantum states at a high accuracy when the distance between the coherent states is optimized, e. g. nearly perfect Fock state can be constructed by discrete superpositions of n + 1 coherent states lying in the vicinity of the vacuum state.

  20. More accurate matrix-matched quantification using standard superposition method for herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Shi, Xiao-Wei; Liu, E-Hu; Sheng, Long-Sheng; Qi, Lian-Wen; Li, Ping

    2012-09-01

    Various analytical technologies have been developed for quantitative determination of marker compounds in herbal medicines (HMs). One important issue is matrix effects that must be addressed in method validation for different detections. Unlike biological fluids, blank matrix samples for calibration are usually unavailable for HMs. In this work, practical approaches for minimizing matrix effects in HMs analysis were proposed. The matrix effects in quantitative analysis of five saponins from Panax notoginseng were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Matrix components were found to interfere with the ionization of target analytes when mass spectrometry (MS) detection were employed. To compensate the matrix signal suppression/enhancement, two matrix-matched methods, standard addition method with the target-knockout extract and standard superposition method with a HM extract were developed and tested in this work. The results showed that the standard superposition method is simple and practical for overcoming matrix effects for quantitative analysis of HMs. Moreover, the interference components were observed to interfere with light scattering of target analytes when evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) was utilized for quantitative analysis of HMs but was not indicated when Ultraviolet detection (UV) were employed. Thus, the issue of interference effects should be addressed and minimized for quantitative HPLC-ELSD and HPLC-MS methodologies for quality control of HMs. PMID:22835696

  1. Entanglement and discord of the superposition of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Preeti; Rana, Swapan

    2011-03-15

    We calculate the analytic expression for geometric measure of entanglement for arbitrary superposition of two N-qubit canonical orthonormal Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states and the same for two W states. In the course of characterizing all kinds of nonclassical correlations, an explicit formula for quantum discord (via relative entropy) for the former class of states has been presented. Contrary to the GHZ state, the closest separable state to the W state is not classical. Therefore, in this case, the discord is different from the relative entropy of entanglement. We conjecture that the discord for the N-qubit W state is log{sub 2}N.

  2. Stability of a superposition of shock waves with contact discontinuities for systems of viscous conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Huihui

    In this paper, we show the large time asymptotic nonlinear stability of a superposition of viscous shock waves with viscous contact waves for systems of viscous conservation laws with small initial perturbations, provided that the strengths of these viscous waves are small with the same order. The results are obtained by elementary weighted energy estimates based on the underlying wave structure and a new estimate on the heat equation.

  3. A stereo triangulation system for structural identification: Analytical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkins, J. L.; James, G. H., III; Pollock, T. C.; Rahman, Z. H.

    1988-01-01

    Identification of large space structures' distributed mass, stiffness, and energy dissipation characteristics poses formidable analytical, numerical, and implementation difficulties. Development of reliable on-orbit structural identification methods is important for implementing active vibration suppression concepts which are under widespread study in the large space structures community. Near the heart of the identification problem lies the necessity of making a large number of spatially distributed measurements of the structure's vibratory response and the associated force/moment inputs with sufficient spatial and frequency resolution. In the present paper, we discuss a method whereby tens of active or passive (retro-reflecting) targets on the structure are tracked simultaneously by the focal planes of two or more video cameras mounted on an adjacent platform. Triangulation (optical ray intersection) of the conjugate image centroids yield inertial trajectories of each target on the structure. Given the triangulated motion of the targets, we apply and extend methodology developed by Creamer, Junkins, and Juang to identify the frequencies, mode shapes, and updated estimates for the mass/stiffness/damping parameterization of the structure. The methodology is semi-automated, for example, the post experiment analysis of the video imagery to determine the inertial trajectories of the targets typically requires less than thirty minutes of real time. Using methodology discussed herein, the frequency response of a large number of points on the structure (where reflective targets are mounted) on the structure can be determined from optical measurements alone. For comparison purposes, we also utilize measurements from accelerometers and a calibrated impulse hammer. While our experimental work remains in a research stage of development, we have successfully tracked and stereo triangulated 20 targets (on a vibrating cantilevered grid structure) at a sample frequency of 200 HZ

  4. Analytical solutions for the seismic response of underground structures under SH wave propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Smerzini, C.; Aviles, J.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2008-07-08

    A theoretical approach is presented to study the antiplane seismic response of underground structures subjected to the incidence of plane waves. The structure is assumed to be a circular inclusion embedded in a homogenous, isotropic and linear visco-elastic halfspace and its mathematical formulation is approached through the theory of multiple scattering and diffraction. The inclusion may consist either of a cavity, with or without a ring-shaped boundary, or it may be filled in with a linear-elastic material, without loss of generality. The seismic response of the inclusion and its influence on surface ground motions are analyzed in both frequency and time domains. The dependence of the transfer function amplitudes on several parameters, such as the angle of incident SH waves, the frequency content of the excitation, the impedance contrast between the inclusion and the surrounding medium and the position along the ground surface, is underlined. Considering the lack of analytical solutions for quantifying the modification of ground motions induced by subterranean inhomogeneities, the results of this study can be used, on one side, as benchmark for both geophysical investigations and numerical dynamic soil-structure interaction studies, and, on the other side, to support the formulation of simplified approaches and/or formulas for the seismic design and assessment of underground structures.

  5. Analytical and Experimental Characterization of Gravity Induced Deformations In Subscale Gossamer Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Blandino, Joseph R.; McEvoy, Kiley C.

    2004-01-01

    The development of gossamer space structures such as solar sails and sunshields presents many challenges due to their large size and extreme flexibility. The post-deployment structural geometry exhibited during ground testing may significantly depart from the in-space configuration due to the presence of gravity-induced deformations (gravity sag) of lightly preloaded membranes. This paper describes a study carried out to characterize gravity sag in two subscale gossamer structures: a single quadrant from a 2 m, 4 quadrant square solar sail and a 1.7 m membrane layer from a multi-layer sunshield The behavior of the test articles was studied over a range of preloads and in several orientations with respect to gravity. An experimental study was carried out to measure the global surface profiles using photogrammetry, and nonlinear finite element analysis was used to predict the behavior of the test articles. Comparison of measured and predicted surface profiles shows that the finite dement analysis qualitatively predicts deformed shapes comparable to those observed in the laboratory. Quantitatively, finite element analysis predictions for peak gravity-induced deformations in both test articles were within 10% of measured values. Results from this study provide increased insight into gravity sag behavior in gossamer structures, and demonstrates the potential to analytically predict gravity-induced deformations to within reasonable accuracy.

  6. Structural and binding properties of laminarin revealed by analytical ultracentrifugation and calorimetric analyses.

    PubMed

    Oda, Masayuki; Tanabe, Yoichi; Noda, Masanori; Inaba, Satomi; Krayukhina, Elena; Fukada, Harumi; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-08-01

    One of the β-1,3-glucans, laminarin, has been widely used as a substrate for enzymes including endo-1,3-β-glucanase. To obtain quantitative information about the molecular interaction between laminarin and endo-1,3-β-glucanase, the structural properties of laminarin should be determined. The results from pioneering work using analytical ultracentrifugation for carbohydrate analysis showed that laminarin from Laminaria digitata predominantly exists as a single-chain species with approximately 5% of triple-helical species. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments did not show a peak assignable to the transition from triple-helix to single-chain, supporting the notion that a large proportion of laminarin is the single-chain species. The interaction of laminarin with an inactive variant of endo-1,3-β-glucanase from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans, E119A, was quantitatively analyzed using isothermal titration calorimetry. The binding was enthalpically driven and the binding affinity was approximately 10(6) M(-1). The results from binding stoichiometric analysis indicated that on average, E119A binds to laminarin in a 2:1 ratio. This seems to be reasonable, because laminarin mainly exists as a monomer, the apparent molecular mass of laminarin is 3.6 kDa, and E119A would have substrate-binding subsites corresponding to 6 glucose units. The analytical ultracentrifugation experiments could detect different complex species of laminarin and endo-1,3-β-glucanase. PMID:27267066

  7. Quantum superposition at the half-metre scale.

    PubMed

    Kovachy, T; Asenbaum, P; Overstreet, C; Donnelly, C A; Dickerson, S M; Sugarbaker, A; Hogan, J M; Kasevich, M A

    2015-12-24

    The quantum superposition principle allows massive particles to be delocalized over distant positions. Though quantum mechanics has proved adept at describing the microscopic world, quantum superposition runs counter to intuitive conceptions of reality and locality when extended to the macroscopic scale, as exemplified by the thought experiment of Schrödinger's cat. Matter-wave interferometers, which split and recombine wave packets in order to observe interference, provide a way to probe the superposition principle on macroscopic scales and explore the transition to classical physics. In such experiments, large wave-packet separation is impeded by the need for long interaction times and large momentum beam splitters, which cause susceptibility to dephasing and decoherence. Here we use light-pulse atom interferometry to realize quantum interference with wave packets separated by up to 54 centimetres on a timescale of 1 second. These results push quantum superposition into a new macroscopic regime, demonstrating that quantum superposition remains possible at the distances and timescales of everyday life. The sub-nanokelvin temperatures of the atoms and a compensation of transverse optical forces enable a large separation while maintaining an interference contrast of 28 per cent. In addition to testing the superposition principle in a new regime, large quantum superposition states are vital to exploring gravity with atom interferometers in greater detail. We anticipate that these states could be used to increase sensitivity in tests of the equivalence principle, measure the gravitational Aharonov-Bohm effect, and eventually detect gravitational waves and phase shifts associated with general relativity. PMID:26701053

  8. Quantum superposition at the half-metre scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovachy, T.; Asenbaum, P.; Overstreet, C.; Donnelly, C. A.; Dickerson, S. M.; Sugarbaker, A.; Hogan, J. M.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The quantum superposition principle allows massive particles to be delocalized over distant positions. Though quantum mechanics has proved adept at describing the microscopic world, quantum superposition runs counter to intuitive conceptions of reality and locality when extended to the macroscopic scale, as exemplified by the thought experiment of Schrödinger’s cat. Matter-wave interferometers, which split and recombine wave packets in order to observe interference, provide a way to probe the superposition principle on macroscopic scales and explore the transition to classical physics. In such experiments, large wave-packet separation is impeded by the need for long interaction times and large momentum beam splitters, which cause susceptibility to dephasing and decoherence. Here we use light-pulse atom interferometry to realize quantum interference with wave packets separated by up to 54 centimetres on a timescale of 1 second. These results push quantum superposition into a new macroscopic regime, demonstrating that quantum superposition remains possible at the distances and timescales of everyday life. The sub-nanokelvin temperatures of the atoms and a compensation of transverse optical forces enable a large separation while maintaining an interference contrast of 28 per cent. In addition to testing the superposition principle in a new regime, large quantum superposition states are vital to exploring gravity with atom interferometers in greater detail. We anticipate that these states could be used to increase sensitivity in tests of the equivalence principle, measure the gravitational Aharonov-Bohm effect, and eventually detect gravitational waves and phase shifts associated with general relativity.

  9. IT vendor selection model by using structural equation model & analytical hierarchy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Sarit; Dominic, P. D. D.

    2012-11-01

    Selecting and evaluating the right vendors is imperative for an organization's global marketplace competitiveness. Improper selection and evaluation of potential vendors can dwarf an organization's supply chain performance. Numerous studies have demonstrated that firms consider multiple criteria when selecting key vendors. This research intends to develop a new hybrid model for vendor selection process with better decision making. The new proposed model provides a suitable tool for assisting decision makers and managers to make the right decisions and select the most suitable vendor. This paper proposes a Hybrid model based on Structural Equation Model (SEM) and Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) for long-term strategic vendor selection problems. The five steps framework of the model has been designed after the thorough literature study. The proposed hybrid model will be applied using a real life case study to assess its effectiveness. In addition, What-if analysis technique will be used for model validation purpose.

  10. Analytical description for the critical fixations of evolutionary coordination games on finite complex structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liye; Zou, Yong; Guan, Shuguang; Liu, Zonghua

    2015-04-01

    Evolutionary game theory is crucial to capturing the characteristic interaction patterns among selfish individuals. In a population of coordination games of two strategies, one of the central problems is to determine the fixation probability that the system reaches a state of networkwide of only one strategy, and the corresponding expectation times. The deterministic replicator equations predict the critical value of initial density of one strategy, which separates the two absorbing states of the system. However, numerical estimations of this separatrix show large deviations from the theory in finite populations. Here we provide a stochastic treatment of this dynamic process on complex networks of finite sizes as Markov processes, showing the evolutionary time explicitly. We describe analytically the effects of network structures on the intermediate fixations as observed in numerical simulations. Our theoretical predictions are validated by various simulations on both random and scale free networks. Therefore, our stochastic framework can be helpful in dealing with other networked game dynamics.

  11. GWAS in a Box: Statistical and Visual Analytics of Structured Associations via GenAMap

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Eric P.; Curtis, Ross E.; Schoenherr, Georg; Lee, Seunghak; Yin, Junming; Puniyani, Kriti; Wu, Wei; Kinnaird, Peter

    2014-01-01

    With the continuous improvement in genotyping and molecular phenotyping technology and the decreasing typing cost, it is expected that in a few years, more and more clinical studies of complex diseases will recruit thousands of individuals for pan-omic genetic association analyses. Hence, there is a great need for algorithms and software tools that could scale up to the whole omic level, integrate different omic data, leverage rich structure information, and be easily accessible to non-technical users. We present GenAMap, an interactive analytics software platform that 1) automates the execution of principled machine learning methods that detect genome- and phenome-wide associations among genotypes, gene expression data, and clinical or other macroscopic traits, and 2) provides new visualization tools specifically designed to aid in the exploration of association mapping results. Algorithmically, GenAMap is based on a new paradigm for GWAS and PheWAS analysis, termed structured association mapping, which leverages various structures in the omic data. We demonstrate the function of GenAMap via a case study of the Brem and Kruglyak yeast dataset, and then apply it on a comprehensive eQTL analysis of the NIH heterogeneous stock mice dataset and report some interesting findings. GenAMap is available from http://sailing.cs.cmu.edu/genamap. PMID:24905018

  12. LSP Simulation and Analytical Results on Electromagnetic Wave Scattering on Coherent Density Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T.

    2014-09-01

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics (HEDP) and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present PIC simulation results on EM scattering on vortex type density structures using the LSP code and compare them with analytical results. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Air Force Research laboratory, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Naval Research Laboratory and NNSA/DOE grant no. DE-FC52-06NA27616 at the University of Nevada at Reno.

  13. GWAS in a box: statistical and visual analytics of structured associations via GenAMap.

    PubMed

    Xing, Eric P; Curtis, Ross E; Schoenherr, Georg; Lee, Seunghak; Yin, Junming; Puniyani, Kriti; Wu, Wei; Kinnaird, Peter

    2014-01-01

    With the continuous improvement in genotyping and molecular phenotyping technology and the decreasing typing cost, it is expected that in a few years, more and more clinical studies of complex diseases will recruit thousands of individuals for pan-omic genetic association analyses. Hence, there is a great need for algorithms and software tools that could scale up to the whole omic level, integrate different omic data, leverage rich structure information, and be easily accessible to non-technical users. We present GenAMap, an interactive analytics software platform that 1) automates the execution of principled machine learning methods that detect genome- and phenome-wide associations among genotypes, gene expression data, and clinical or other macroscopic traits, and 2) provides new visualization tools specifically designed to aid in the exploration of association mapping results. Algorithmically, GenAMap is based on a new paradigm for GWAS and PheWAS analysis, termed structured association mapping, which leverages various structures in the omic data. We demonstrate the function of GenAMap via a case study of the Brem and Kruglyak yeast dataset, and then apply it on a comprehensive eQTL analysis of the NIH heterogeneous stock mice dataset and report some interesting findings. GenAMap is available from http://sailing.cs.cmu.edu/genamap. PMID:24905018

  14. Analysis of structural dynamic data from Skylab. Volume 2: Skylab analytical and test model data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demchak, L.; Harcrow, H.

    1976-01-01

    The orbital configuration test modal data, analytical test correlation modal data, and analytical flight configuration modal data are presented. Tables showing the generalized mass contributions (GMCs) for each of the thirty tests modes are given along with the two dimensional mode shape plots and tables of GMCs for the test correlated analytical modes. The two dimensional mode shape plots for the analytical modes and uncoupled and coupled modes of the orbital flight configuration at three development phases of the model are included.

  15. An analytical model for studying the structural effects and optimization of a capacitive tactile sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guanhao; Wang, Yancheng; Mei, Deqing; Xi, Kailun; Chen, Zichen

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to study the structural effects of a capacitive tactile sensor array on its capacitance changes and sensitivities. The tactile sensor array has 8  ×  8 sensor units, and each unit utilizes the truncated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pyramid array structure as the dielectric layer to enhance the sensing performance. To predict the capacitance changes of the sensor unit, it is simplified into a two-layered structure: upper polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film and bottom truncated PDMS pyramid array. The upper PET is modeled by a displacement field function, while each of the truncated pyramids is analyzed to obtain its stress-strain relation. Using the Ritz method, the displacement field functions are solved. The deformation of the upper electrodes and the capacitance changes of the sensor unit can then be calculated. Using the developed model, the structural effects of the truncated PDMS pyramid array and the PDMS bump on the capacitance changes and sensitivities are studied. To achieve the largest capacitance changes, the dimensions have been optimized for the sensor unit. To verify the developed model, we have fabricated the sensor array, and the average sensitivities of the sensor unit to the x-, y-, and z-axes force are 0.49, 0.50, and 0.32% mN-1, respectively, while the model predicted values are 0.54, 0.54, and 0.35% mN-1. Results demonstrate that the developed model can accurately predict the sensing performance of the sensor array and could be utilized for structural optimization.

  16. Quantum decoherence time scales for ionic superposition states in ion channels.

    PubMed

    Salari, V; Moradi, N; Sajadi, M; Fazileh, F; Shahbazi, F

    2015-03-01

    There are many controversial and challenging discussions about quantum effects in microscopic structures in neurons of the brain and their role in cognitive processing. In this paper, we focus on a small, nanoscale part of ion channels which is called the "selectivity filter" and plays a key role in the operation of an ion channel. Our results for superposition states of potassium ions indicate that decoherence times are of the order of picoseconds. This decoherence time is not long enough for cognitive processing in the brain, however, it may be adequate for quantum superposition states of ions in the filter to leave their quantum traces on the selectivity filter and action potentials. PMID:25871141

  17. From constants of motion to superposition rules for Lie-Hamilton systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, A.; Cariñena, J. F.; Herranz, F. J.; de Lucas, J.; Sardón, C.

    2013-07-01

    A Lie system is a non-autonomous system of first-order differential equations possessing a superposition rule, i.e. a map expressing its general solution in terms of a generic finite family of particular solutions and some constants. Lie-Hamilton systems form a subclass of Lie systems whose dynamics is governed by a curve in a finite-dimensional real Lie algebra of functions on a Poisson manifold. It is shown that Lie-Hamilton systems are naturally endowed with a Poisson coalgebra structure. This allows us to devise methods for deriving in an algebraic way their constants of motion and superposition rules. We illustrate our methods by studying Kummer-Schwarz equations, Riccati equations, Ermakov systems and Smorodinsky-Winternitz systems with time-dependent frequency.

  18. Observing a coherent superposition of an atom and a molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, Mark R.; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Rudolph, Terry; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2006-11-15

    We demonstrate that it is possible, in principle, to perform a Ramsey-type interference experiment to exhibit a coherent superposition of a single atom and a diatomic molecule. This gedanken experiment, based on the techniques of Aharonov and Susskind [Phys. Rev. 155, 1428 (1967)], explicitly violates the commonly accepted superselection rule that forbids coherent superpositions of eigenstates of differing atom number. A Bose-Einstein condensate plays the role of a reference frame that allows for coherent operations analogous to Ramsey pulses. We also investigate an analogous gedanken experiment to exhibit a coherent superposition of a single boson and a fermion, violating the commonly accepted superselection rule forbidding coherent superpositions of states of differing particle statistics. In this case, the reference frame is realized by a multimode state of many fermions. This latter case reproduces all of the relevant features of Ramsey interferometry, including Ramsey fringes over many repetitions of the experiment. However, the apparent inability of this proposed experiment to produce well-defined relative phases between two distinct systems each described by a coherent superposition of a boson and a fermion demonstrates that there are additional, outstanding requirements to fully 'lift' the univalence superselection rule.

  19. Comment on "Fast determination of the optimal rotational matrix for macromolecular superpositions" [J. Comp. Chem. 31, 1561 (2010)].

    PubMed

    Kneller, Gerald R

    2011-01-15

    Recently Liu et al. published a fast algorithm to solve the eigenvector problem arising in the quaternion-based method for the rotational superposition of molecular structures (J Comput Chem 2010, 31, 1561.). In this Comment, it is shown that the construction of the 4 × 4 matrix to be diagonalized—and not the diagonalization itself—represents the dominating part of the computational effort for the quaternion-based solution of the rotational superposition problem if molecules with more than about 100 atoms are considered. PMID:20662082

  20. Analytical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannelly, W. G.; Fabunmi, J. A.; Nagy, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical methods for combining flight acceleration and strain data with shake test mobility data to predict the effects of structural changes on flight vibrations and strains are presented. This integration of structural dynamic analysis with flight performance is referred to as analytical testing. The objective of this methodology is to analytically estimate the results of flight testing contemplated structural changes with minimum flying and change trials. The category of changes to the aircraft includes mass, stiffness, absorbers, isolators, and active suppressors. Examples of applying the analytical testing methodology using flight test and shake test data measured on an AH-1G helicopter are included. The techniques and procedures for vibration testing and modal analysis are also described.

  1. Non-coaxial superposition of vector vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Aadhi, A; Vaity, Pravin; Chithrabhanu, P; Reddy, Salla Gangi; Prabakar, Shashi; Singh, R P

    2016-02-10

    Vector vortex beams are classified into four types depending upon spatial variation in their polarization vector. We have generated all four of these types of vector vortex beams by using a modified polarization Sagnac interferometer with a vortex lens. Further, we have studied the non-coaxial superposition of two vector vortex beams. It is observed that the superposition of two vector vortex beams with same polarization singularity leads to a beam with another kind of polarization singularity in their interaction region. The results may be of importance in ultrahigh security of the polarization-encrypted data that utilizes vector vortex beams and multiple optical trapping with non-coaxial superposition of vector vortex beams. We verified our experimental results with theory. PMID:26906384

  2. Dissipative Optomechanical Preparation of Macroscopic Quantum Superposition States.

    PubMed

    Abdi, M; Degenfeld-Schonburg, P; Sameti, M; Navarrete-Benlloch, C; Hartmann, M J

    2016-06-10

    The transition from quantum to classical physics remains an intensely debated question even though it has been investigated for more than a century. Further clarifications could be obtained by preparing macroscopic objects in spatial quantum superpositions and proposals for generating such states for nanomechanical devices either in a transient or a probabilistic fashion have been put forward. Here, we introduce a method to deterministically obtain spatial superpositions of arbitrary lifetime via dissipative state preparation. In our approach, we engineer a double-well potential for the motion of the mechanical element and drive it towards the ground state, which shows the desired spatial superposition, via optomechanical sideband cooling. We propose a specific implementation based on a superconducting circuit coupled to the mechanical motion of a lithium-decorated monolayer graphene sheet, introduce a method to verify the mechanical state by coupling it to a superconducting qubit, and discuss its prospects for testing collapse models for the quantum to classical transition. PMID:27341233

  3. Robust mesoscopic superposition of strongly correlated ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hallwood, David W.; Ernst, Thomas; Brand, Joachim

    2010-12-15

    We propose a scheme to create coherent superpositions of annular flow of strongly interacting bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional ring trap. The nonrotating ground state is coupled to a vortex state with mesoscopic angular momentum by means of a narrow potential barrier and an applied phase that originates from either rotation or a synthetic magnetic field. We show that superposition states in the Tonks-Girardeau regime are robust against single-particle loss due to the effects of strong correlations. The coupling between the mesoscopically distinct states scales much more favorably with particle number than in schemes relying on weak interactions, thus making particle numbers of hundreds or thousands feasible. Coherent oscillations induced by time variation of parameters may serve as a 'smoking gun' signature for detecting superposition states.

  4. Dissipative Optomechanical Preparation of Macroscopic Quantum Superposition States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, M.; Degenfeld-Schonburg, P.; Sameti, M.; Navarrete-Benlloch, C.; Hartmann, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    The transition from quantum to classical physics remains an intensely debated question even though it has been investigated for more than a century. Further clarifications could be obtained by preparing macroscopic objects in spatial quantum superpositions and proposals for generating such states for nanomechanical devices either in a transient or a probabilistic fashion have been put forward. Here, we introduce a method to deterministically obtain spatial superpositions of arbitrary lifetime via dissipative state preparation. In our approach, we engineer a double-well potential for the motion of the mechanical element and drive it towards the ground state, which shows the desired spatial superposition, via optomechanical sideband cooling. We propose a specific implementation based on a superconducting circuit coupled to the mechanical motion of a lithium-decorated monolayer graphene sheet, introduce a method to verify the mechanical state by coupling it to a superconducting qubit, and discuss its prospects for testing collapse models for the quantum to classical transition.

  5. Theory of the electronic structure of substitutional semiconductor alloys: Analytical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, A. Yu.

    2015-07-15

    Methods of predicting the electronic structure of disordered semiconductor alloys involving mainly isoelectronic substitution are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on analytical methods of studying currently available models of alloys. An approximate equation for the localization threshold of electronic states in the Lifshitz model is considered, and the inaccuracy of this equation is estimated. The contributions of the perturbation potential of an individual impurity and of crystal-lattice distortions in the vicinity of the impurity center are analyzed on the basis of the Faddeev equations. The contributions of intrinsic impurity potentials and volume effects to the formation of the electronic structure of semiconductor alloys are esti- mated. Methods of calculating matrix elements of the perturbation potentials of isoelectronic impurities in alloys with consideration for deformation effects are considered. The procedure of calculating the compositional dependence of the band gap of multicomponent alloys is described. A comparative analysis of various methods for predicting the formation of electronic states bound at individual isoelectronic impurities in semiconductors is conducted. The theory of the energy spectrum of charged impurities in isoelectronic alloys is presented.

  6. WHAEM: PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION FOR THE WELLHEAD ANALYTIC ELEMENT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Wellhead Analytic Element Model (WhAEM) demonstrates a new technique for the definition of time-of-travel capture zones in relatively simple geohydrologic settings. he WhAEM package includes an analytic element model that uses superposition of (many) analytic solutions to gen...

  7. Seeing lens imaging as a superposition of multiple views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusche, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    In the conventional approach to lens imaging, rays are used to map object points to image points. However, many students want to think of the image as a whole. To answer this need, Kepler’s ray drawing is reinterpreted in terms of shifted camera obscura images. These images are uncovered by covering the lens with pinholes. Thus, lens imaging is seen as a superposition of sharp images from different viewpoints, so-called elemental images. This superposition is simulated with projectors, and with transparencies. Lens ray diagrams are constructed based on elemental images; the conventional construction method is included as a special case.

  8. Tight bounds on the concurrence of quantum superpositions

    SciTech Connect

    Niset, J.; Cerf, N. J.

    2007-10-15

    The entanglement content of superpositions of quantum states is investigated based on a measure called concurrence. Given a bipartite pure state in arbitrary dimension written as the quantum superposition of two other such states, we find simple inequalities relating the concurrence of the state to that of its components. We derive an exact expression for the concurrence when the component states are biorthogonal and provide elegant upper and lower bounds in all other cases. For quantum bits, our upper bound is tighter than the previously derived bound [N. Linden et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 100502 (2006)].

  9. Orbital angular momentum of superposition of identical shifted vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, A A; Kotlyar, V V

    2015-10-01

    We have formulated and proven the following theorem: the superposition of an arbitrary number of arbitrarily off-axis, identical nonparaxial optical vortex beams of arbitrary radially symmetric shape, integer topological charge n, and arbitrary real weight coefficients has the normalized orbital angular momentum (OAM) equal to that of individual constituent identical beams. This theorem enables generating vortex laser beams with different (not necessarily radially symmetric) intensity profiles but identical OAM. Superpositions of Bessel, Hankel-Bessel, Bessel-Gaussian, and Laguerre-Gaussian beams with the same OAM are discussed. PMID:26479934

  10. Dynamics of suspensions of hydrodynamically structured particles: analytic theory and applications to experiments.

    PubMed

    Riest, Jonas; Eckert, Thomas; Richtering, Walter; Nägele, Gerhard

    2015-04-14

    We present an easy-to-use analytic toolbox for the calculation of short-time transport properties of concentrated suspensions of spherical colloidal particles with internal hydrodynamic structure, and direct interactions described by a hard-core or soft Hertz pair potential. The considered dynamic properties include self-diffusion and sedimentation coefficients, the wavenumber-dependent diffusion function determined in dynamic scattering experiments, and the high-frequency shear viscosity. The toolbox is based on the hydrodynamic radius model (HRM) wherein the internal particle structure is mapped on a hydrodynamic radius parameter for unchanged direct interactions, and on an existing simulation data base for solvent-permeable and spherical annulus particles. Useful scaling relations for the diffusion function and self-diffusion coefficient, known to be valid for hard-core interaction, are shown to apply also for soft pair potentials. We further discuss extensions of the toolbox to long-time transport properties including the low-shear zero-frequency viscosity and the long-time self-diffusion coefficient. The versatility of the toolbox is demonstrated by the analysis of a previous light scattering study of suspensions of non-ionic PNiPAM microgels [Eckert et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2008, 129, 124902] in which a detailed theoretical analysis of the dynamic data was left as an open task. By the comparison with Hertz potential based calculations, we show that the experimental data are consistently and accurately described using the Verlet-Weis corrected Percus-Yevick structure factor as input, and for a solvent penetration length equal to three percent of the excluded volume radius. This small amount of solvent permeability of the microgel particles has a significant dynamic effect at larger concentrations. PMID:25707362

  11. Analysis of structural dynamic data from Skylab. Volume 2: Skylab analytical and test modal data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demchak, L.; Harcrow, H.

    1976-01-01

    A compendium is presented of orbital configuration test modal data, analytical test modal data, analytical test correlation modal data and analytical flight configuration 1.2 modal data. Section A presents tables showing the generalized mass contributions for each of the thirty test modes. Section B presents the two dimensional mode shape plots for the thirty test modes. Tables of GMC's for the test correlated analytical modes are presented in Section C. These analytical modes were generated from a model that was adjusted to match test results by use of the methodology discussed in Sections 2.3 and 5.4 of Volume I of this report. Section D presents the two dimensional mode shape plots for the analytical modes. Sections E and F contain the uncoupled and coupled modes of the orbital flight configuration 1.2 at three development phases of the model.

  12. A Superposition Technique for Deriving Photon Scattering Statistics in Plane-Parallel Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, S.

    1999-01-01

    Photon transport in a multiple scattering medium is critically dependent on scattering statistics, in particular the average number of scatterings. A superposition technique is derived to accurately determine the average number of scatterings encountered by reflected and transmitted photons within arbitrary layers in plane-parallel, vertically inhomogeneous clouds. As expected, the resulting scattering number profiles are highly dependent on cloud particle absorption and solar/viewing geometry. The technique uses efficient adding and doubling radiative transfer procedures, avoiding traditional time-intensive Monte Carlo methods. Derived superposition formulae are applied to a variety of geometries and cloud models, and selected results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. Cloud remote sensing techniques that use solar reflectance or transmittance measurements generally assume a homogeneous plane-parallel cloud structure. The scales over which this assumption is relevant, in both the vertical and horizontal, can be obtained from the superposition calculations. Though the emphasis is on photon transport in clouds, the derived technique is applicable to any scattering plane-parallel radiative transfer problem, including arbitrary combinations of cloud, aerosol, and gas layers in the atmosphere.

  13. Structural damage localization by outlier analysis of signal-processed mode shapes - Analytical and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulriksen, M. D.; Damkilde, L.

    2016-02-01

    Contrary to global modal parameters such as eigenfrequencies, mode shapes inherently provide structural information on a local level. Therefore, this particular modal parameter and its derivatives are utilized extensively for damage identification. Typically, more or less advanced mathematical methods are employed to identify damage-induced discontinuities in the spatial mode shape signals, hereby, potentially, facilitating damage detection and/or localization. However, by being based on distinguishing damage-induced discontinuities from other signal irregularities, an intrinsic deficiency in these methods is the high sensitivity towards measurement noise. In the present paper, a damage localization method which, compared to the conventional mode shape-based methods, has greatly enhanced robustness towards measurement noise is proposed. The method is based on signal processing of a spatial mode shape by means of continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) and subsequent application of a generalized discrete Teager-Kaiser energy operator (GDTKEO) to identify damage-induced mode shape discontinuities. In order to evaluate whether the identified discontinuities are in fact damage-induced, outlier analysis is conducted by applying the Mahalanobis metric to major principal scores of the sensor-located bands of the signal-processed mode shape. The method is tested analytically and benchmarked with other mode shape-based damage localization approaches on the basis of a free-vibrating beam and validated experimentally in the context of a residential-sized wind turbine blade subjected to an impulse load.

  14. Building disc structure and galaxy properties through angular momentum: The DARK SAGE semi-analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Adam R. H.; Croton, Darren J.; Mutch, Simon J.

    2016-06-01

    We present the new semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution, DARK SAGE, a heavily modified version of the publicly available SAGE code. The model is designed for detailed evolution of galactic discs. We evolve discs in a series of annuli with fixed specific angular momentum, which allows us to make predictions for the radial and angular-momentum structure of galaxies. Most physical processes, including all channels of star formation and associated feedback, are performed in these annuli. We present the surface density profiles of our model spiral galaxies, both as a function of radius and specific angular momentum, and find the discs naturally build a pseduobulge-like component. Our main results are focussed on predictions relating to the integrated mass-specific angular momentum relation of stellar discs. The model produces a distinct sequence between these properties in remarkable agreement with recent observational literature. We investigate the impact Toomre disc instabilities have on shaping this sequence and find they are crucial for regulating both the mass and spin of discs. Without instabilities, high-mass discs would be systematically deficient in specific angular momentum by a factor of ˜2.5, with increased scatter. Instabilities also appear to drive the direction in which the mass-spin sequence of spiral galaxy discs evolves. With them, we find galaxies of fixed mass have higher specific angular momentum at later epochs.

  15. Building disc structure and galaxy properties through angular momentum: the DARK SAGE semi-analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Adam R. H.; Croton, Darren J.; Mutch, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    We present the new semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution, DARK SAGE, a heavily modified version of the publicly available SAGE code. The model is designed for detailed evolution of galactic discs. We evolve discs in a series of annuli with fixed specific angular momentum, which allows us to make predictions for the radial and angular-momentum structure of galaxies. Most physical processes, including all channels of star formation and associated feedback, are performed in these annuli. We present the surface density profiles of our model spiral galaxies, both as a function of radius and specific angular momentum, and find that the discs naturally build a pseudo-bulge-like component. Our main results are focused on predictions relating to the integrated mass-specific angular momentum relation of stellar discs. The model produces a distinct sequence between these properties in remarkable agreement with recent observational literature. We investigate the impact Toomre disc instabilities have on shaping this sequence and find they are crucial for regulating both the mass and spin of discs. Without instabilities, high-mass discs would be systematically deficient in specific angular momentum by a factor of ˜2.5, with increased scatter. Instabilities also appear to drive the direction in which the mass-spin sequence of spiral galaxy discs evolves. With them, we find galaxies of fixed mass have higher specific angular momentum at later epochs.

  16. Analytical (mathematical) predictive modeling in fiber optics structural analysis (FOSA): review and extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, Ephraim

    2015-03-01

    An updated version of the paper with revised references has been published The review part of the paper addresses analytical (mathematical) modeling in structural analysis in fiber optics engineering, mostly fiber optics interconnects, and deals with optical fibers subjected to thermal and/or mechanical loading (stresses) in bending, tension, compression, or to the combinations of such loadings. Attributes and significance of predictive modeling are indicated and discussed. The review is based mostly on the author's research conducted at Bell Laboratories, Physical Sciences and Engineering Research Division, Murray Hill, NJ, USA, during his tenure with this company, and, to a lesser extent, on his recent work in the field. The addressed structures include, but are not limited to, optical fibers of finite length: bare fibers; jacketed and dual-coated fibers; fibers experiencing thermal loading; fibers soldered into ferrules or adhesively bonded into capillaries; as well as the roles of geometric and material non-linearity; dynamic response to shocks and vibrations; and possible applications of nano-materials in new generations of coating and cladding systems. The extension part is concerned with a novel, fruitful and challenging directionprobabilistic design for reliability (PDfR) of opto-electronic and photonic products, including optical fibers and interconnects. The rationale behind the PDfR concept is that there is no such thing as zero probability of failure, that the difference between a highly reliable product and an insufficiently reliable product is "merely" in the level of the never zero probability of its failure and that when the operational performance of the product is imperative, the ability to predict, quantify, assure and, if possible and appropriate, even specify its reliability is highly desirable. Accordingly, the objective of the PDfR effort is to quantify the likelihood of an operational failure of a material, device or a system, including the

  17. Taxometric and Factor Analytic Models of Anxiety Sensitivity among Youth: Exploring the Latent Structure of Anxiety Psychopathology Vulnerability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Amit; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Stewart, Sherry; Comeau, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    This study represents an effort to better understand the latent structure of anxiety sensitivity (AS), a well-established affect-sensitivity individual difference factor, among youth by employing taxometric and factor analytic approaches in an integrative manner. Taxometric analyses indicated that AS, as indexed by the Child Anxiety Sensitivity…

  18. Meta-Analytic Methods of Pooling Correlation Matrices for Structural Equation Modeling under Different Patterns of Missing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlow, Carolyn F.; Beretvas, S. Natasha

    2005-01-01

    Three methods of synthesizing correlations for meta-analytic structural equation modeling (SEM) under different degrees and mechanisms of missingness were compared for the estimation of correlation and SEM parameters and goodness-of-fit indices by using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. A revised generalized least squares (GLS) method for…

  19. Connecting Performance to Social Structure and Pedagogy as a Pathway to Scaling Learning Analytics in MOOCs: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goggins, S. P.; Galyen, K. D.; Petakovic, E.; Laffey, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study focuses on the design and evaluation of teaching analytics that relate social learning structure with performance measures in a massive open online course (MOOC) prototype environment. Using reflexive analysis of online learning trace data and qualitative performance measures we present an exploratory empirical study that:…

  20. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 3: Major component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, L. L.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations, performed to establish the feasibility of reinforcing metal aircraft structures with advanced filamentary composites, are reported. Aluminum-boron-epoxy and titanium-boron-epoxy were used in the design and manufacture of three major structural components. The components were representative of subsonic aircraft fuselage and window belt panels and supersonic aircraft compression panels. Both unidirectional and multidirectional reinforcement concepts were employed. Blade penetration, axial compression, and inplane shear tests were conducted. Composite reinforced structural components designed to realistic airframe structural criteria demonstrated the potential for significant weight savings while maintaining strength, stability, and damage containment properties of all metal components designed to meet the same criteria.

  1. The EFT of Large Scale Structures at all redshifts: analytical predictions for lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Simon; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    We study the prediction of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) for the matter power spectrum at different redshifts. In previous work, we found that the two-loop prediction can match the nonlinear power spectrum measured from N-body simulations at redshift zero within approximately 2% up to k~ 0.6 h Mpc-1 after fixing a single free parameter, the so-called "speed of sound". We determine the time evolution of this parameter by matching the EFTofLSS prediction to simulation output at different redshifts, and find that it is well-described by a fitting function that only includes one additional parameter. After the two free parameters are fixed, the prediction agrees with nonlinear data within approximately 2% up to at least k~ 1 h Mpc-1 at z>= 1, and also within approximately 5% up to k~ 1.2 h Mpc-1 at z=1 and k~ 2.3 h Mpc-1 at z=3, a major improvement with respect to other perturbative techniques. We also develop an accurate way to estimate where the EFTofLSS predictions at different loop orders should fail, based on the sizes of the next-order terms that are neglected, and find agreement with the actual comparisons to data. Finally, we use our matter power spectrum results to perform analytical calculations of lensing potential power spectra corresponding to both CMB and galaxy lensing. This opens the door to future direct applications of the EFTofLSS to observations of gravitational clustering on cosmic scales.

  2. Capillary electrophoresis-fluorescence line-narrowing system for on-line structural characterization of molecular analytes

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, R.; Zamzow, D.; Ding, W.; Small, G.J.

    1996-08-01

    We have demonstrated, for the first time, that capillary electrophoresis (CE) can be interfaced with low-temperature fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy for on-line structural characterization. Detection by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, under fluorescence non-line-narrowing and line-narrowing conditions, provides three-dimensional electropherograms and FLN spectra, which lead to significantly improved overall resolution and allow for structural characterization (`fingerprinting`) of molecular analytes. This novel CE-FLN system consists of a modular CE system, instrumentation for FLN spectroscopy, and a specially designed capillary cryostat (CC). An absorbance detector serves to determine the migration rates of analytes. After the 77 K fluorescence-based electropherogram is generated, the temperature of the capillary is lowered to 4.2 K for high-resolution FLN characterization. Automated translation of the CC and capillary in the direction of the capillary axis allows the separated analytes to be sequentially characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy as the capillary is translated through the laser excitation region. Detection of fluorescence from stationary CE-separated analytes significantly improves the accuracy of quantitation and structural characterization. 41 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Analytic magnetotelluric responses to a two-segment model with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Linjiang; Yang, Changfu

    2016-06-01

    The rocks in the crust and the upper mantle of the Earth are believed to exhibit electrical anisotropy to some extent. It is beneficial to further understand and recognize the propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the Earth by investigating the magnetotelluric (which is one of the main geophysical techniques to probe the deep structures in the Earth) responses of the media with anisotropic conductivity structures. In this study, we examine the magnetotelluric fields over an idealized 2-D model consisting of two segments with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor basement by a quasi-static analytic approach. The resulting analytic solution could not only contribute to the electromagnetic induction theory in the anisotropic Earth but also serve as at least an initial standard solution which could be used to validate the reliability and accuracy of the numerical algorithms developed for modelling the magnetotelluric responses of the 2-D media with much more general anisotropic conductivity.

  4. Analytic magnetotelluric responses to a two-segment model with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linjiang, QIN; Changfu, YANG

    2016-03-01

    The rocks in the crust and the upper mantle of the Earth are believed to exhibit electrical anisotropy to some extent. It is beneficial to further understand and recognize the propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the Earth by investigating the magnetotelluric (which is one of the main geophysical techniques to probe the deep structures in the Earth) responses of the media with anisotropic conductivity structures. In the present study, we examine the magnetotelluric fields over an idealized 2-D model consisting of two segments with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor basement by a quasi-static analytic approach. The resulting analytic solution could not only contribute to the electromagnetic induction theory in the anisotropic Earth but also serve as at least an initial standard solution which could be used to validate the reliability and accuracy of the numerical algorithms developed for modeling the magnetotelluric responses of the 2-D media with much more general anisotropic conductivity.

  5. A modular approach to the analytic calculation of spectral phase for grisms and other refractive/diffractive structures.

    PubMed

    Durfee, Charles G; Squier, Jeff A; Kane, Steve

    2008-10-27

    Analytic expressions for spectral phase for optical systems are very important for the design of wide-bandwidth optical systems. We describe a general formalism for analytically calculating the spectral phase for arbitrary optical structure made up of nested pairs of plane-parallel interfaces that can be diffractive or refractive. Our primary application is the calculation of the spectral phase of a grism pair, which is then used to analyze the behavior of higher-order phase terms. The analytic expressions for the grism spectral phase provide insight into the tunability of the third-order phase of grisms as well as the fourth-order limits. Our exact and approximate expressions are compared with a raytracing model. PMID:18958079

  6. Structurally integrated organic light-emitting device (OLED)-based multianalyte sensing through analyte-oxidase interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinar, Ruth; Qian, Chengliang; Cai, Yuankun; Zhou, Zhaoqun; Choudhury, Bhaskar; Shinar, Joseph

    2005-11-01

    The development of a compact structurally integrated platform for detection of multianalytes that consume oxygen in the presence of specific oxidase enzymes is described. The detection is based on monitoring the photoluminescence (PL) intensity or lifetime of a sensing element based on the oxygen sensitive dye Pt octaethyl porphyrin (PtOEP). The excitation source for the PL is an array of individually addressable green OLED pixels. The analytes are gas- phase and dissolved oxygen, glucose, lactate, and alcohol. The sensing element for each analyte includes a layer of PtOEP-doped polystyrene, whose PL lifetime decreases with increasing O II level, and a film or solution containing the oxidase enzyme specific to the analyte. Each sensing element is associated with two addressable ~2x2 mm2 OLED pixels. The operation and performance metrics of the sensor under various conditions are described and discussed.

  7. BetaSuperposer: superposition of protein surfaces using beta-shapes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Deok-Soo

    2012-01-01

    The comparison between two protein structures is important for understanding a molecular function. In particular, the comparison of protein surfaces to measure their similarity provides another challenge useful for studying molecular evolution, docking, and drug design. This paper presents an algorithm, called the BetaSuperposer, which evaluates the similarity between the surfaces of two structures using the beta-shape which is a geometric structure derived from the Voronoi diagram of molecule. The algorithm performs iterations of mix-and-match between the beta-shapes of two structures for the optimal superposition from which a similarity measure is computed, where each mix-and-match step attempts to solve an NP-hard problem. The devised heuristic algorithm based on the assignment problem formulation quickly produces a good superposition and an assessment of similarity. The BetaSuperposer was fully implemented and benchmarked against popular programs, the Dali and the Click, using the SCOP models. The BetaSuperposer is freely available to the public from the Voronoi Diagram Research Center ( http://voronoi.hanyang.ac.kr ). PMID:22812415

  8. Nonclassicality tests and entanglement witnesses for macroscopic mechanical superposition states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gittsovich, Oleg; Moroder, Tobias; Asadian, Ali; Gühne, Otfried; Rabl, Peter

    2015-02-01

    We describe a set of measurement protocols for performing nonclassicality tests and the verification of entangled superposition states of macroscopic continuous variable systems, such as nanomechanical resonators. Following earlier works, we first consider a setup where a two-level system is used to indirectly probe the motion of the mechanical system via Ramsey measurements and discuss the application of this method for detecting nonclassical mechanical states. We then show that the generalization of this technique to multiple resonator modes allows the conditioned preparation and the detection of entangled mechanical superposition states. The proposed measurement protocols can be implemented in various qubit-resonator systems that are currently under experimental investigation and find applications in future tests of quantum mechanics at a macroscopic scale.

  9. Quantum Delayed-Choice Experiment and Wave-Particle Superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qi; Cheng, Liu-Yong; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2015-08-01

    We propose a simple implementation scheme of quantum delayed-choice experiment in linear optical system without initial entanglement resource. By choosing different detecting devices, one can selectively observe the photon's different behaviors after the photon has been passed the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The scheme shows that the photon's wave behavior and particle behavior can be observed with a single experimental setup by postselection, that is, the photon can show the superposition behavior of wave and particle. Especially, we compare the wave-particle superposition behavior and the wave-particle mixture behavior in detail, and find the quantum interference effect between wave and particle behavior, which may be helpful to reveal the nature of photonessentially.

  10. Shadows of multi-black holes: Analytic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Akifumi; Nitta, Daisuke; Chiba, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2012-11-01

    Shadows of multi-black holes have structures distinct from the mere superposition of the shadow of a single black hole: the eyebrow-like structures outside the main shadows and the deformation of the shadows. We present analytic estimates of these structures using the static multi-black hole solution (Majumdar-Papapetrou solution). We show that the width of the eyebrow is related to the distance between the black holes and that the shadows are deformed into ellipses due to the presence of the second black holes. These results are helpful to understand qualitatively the features of the shadows of colliding black holes. We also present the shadows of colliding or coalescing black holes in the Kastor-Traschen solution.

  11. Capillary force and torque on spheroidal particles floating at a fluid interface beyond the superposition approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galatola, P.

    2016-02-01

    By means of a perturbative scheme, we determine analytically the capillary energy of a spheroidal colloid floating on a deformed fluid interface in terms of the local curvature tensor of the background deformation. We validate our results, that hold for small ellipticity of the particle and small deformations of the surface, by an exact numerical calculation. As an application of our perturbative approach, we determine the asymptotic interaction, for large separations d , between two different spheroidal particles. The dominant contribution is quadrupolar and proportional to d-4. It coincides with the known superposition approximation and is zero if one of the two particles is spherical. The next to leading approximation, proportional to d-8, is always attractive and independent of the orientation of the two colloids. It is the dominant contribution to the interaction between a spheroidal and a spherical colloid.

  12. Long-distance measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with coherent-state superpositions.

    PubMed

    Yin, H-L; Cao, W-F; Fu, Y; Tang, Y-L; Liu, Y; Chen, T-Y; Chen, Z-B

    2014-09-15

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) with decoy-state method is believed to be securely applied to defeat various hacking attacks in practical quantum key distribution systems. Recently, the coherent-state superpositions (CSS) have emerged as an alternative to single-photon qubits for quantum information processing and metrology. Here, in this Letter, CSS are exploited as the source in MDI-QKD. We present an analytical method that gives two tight formulas to estimate the lower bound of yield and the upper bound of bit error rate. We exploit the standard statistical analysis and Chernoff bound to perform the parameter estimation. Chernoff bound can provide good bounds in the long-distance MDI-QKD. Our results show that with CSS, both the security transmission distance and secure key rate are significantly improved compared with those of the weak coherent states in the finite-data case. PMID:26466295

  13. Tailoring quantum superpositions with linearly polarized amplitude-modulated light

    SciTech Connect

    Pustelny, S.; Koczwara, M.; Cincio, L.; Gawlik, W.

    2011-04-15

    Amplitude-modulated nonlinear magneto-optical rotation is a powerful technique that offers a possibility of controllable generation of given quantum states. In this paper, we demonstrate creation and detection of specific ground-state magnetic-sublevel superpositions in {sup 87}Rb. By appropriate tuning of the modulation frequency and magnetic-field induction the efficiency of a given coherence generation is controlled. The processes are analyzed versus different experimental parameters.

  14. Quantum Superposition, Collapse, and the Default Specification Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhah Shirazi, Armin

    2014-03-01

    Quantum Superposition and collapse lie at the heart of the difficulty in understanding what quantum mechanics is exactly telling us about reality. We present here a principle which permits one to formulate a simple and general mathematical model that abstracts these features out of quantum theory. A precise formulation of this principle in terms of a set-theoretic axiom added to standard set theory may directly connect the foundations of physics to the foundations of mathematics.

  15. Sensing Super-position: Visual Instrument Sensor Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Schipper, John F.

    2006-01-01

    The coming decade of fast, cheap and miniaturized electronics and sensory devices opens new pathways for the development of sophisticated equipment to overcome limitations of the human senses. This project addresses the technical feasibility of augmenting human vision through Sensing Super-position using a Visual Instrument Sensory Organ Replacement (VISOR). The current implementation of the VISOR device translates visual and other passive or active sensory instruments into sounds, which become relevant when the visual resolution is insufficient for very difficult and particular sensing tasks. A successful Sensing Super-position meets many human and pilot vehicle system requirements. The system can be further developed into cheap, portable, and low power taking into account the limited capabilities of the human user as well as the typical characteristics of his dynamic environment. The system operates in real time, giving the desired information for the particular augmented sensing tasks. The Sensing Super-position device increases the image resolution perception and is obtained via an auditory representation as well as the visual representation. Auditory mapping is performed to distribute an image in time. The three-dimensional spatial brightness and multi-spectral maps of a sensed image are processed using real-time image processing techniques (e.g. histogram normalization) and transformed into a two-dimensional map of an audio signal as a function of frequency and time. This paper details the approach of developing Sensing Super-position systems as a way to augment the human vision system by exploiting the capabilities of the human hearing system as an additional neural input. The human hearing system is capable of learning to process and interpret extremely complicated and rapidly changing auditory patterns. The known capabilities of the human hearing system to learn and understand complicated auditory patterns provided the basic motivation for developing an

  16. Interplay of gravitation and linear superposition of different mass eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, D. V.; Burgard, C.

    1998-04-01

    The interplay of gravitation and the quantum-mechanical principle of linear superposition induces a new set of neutrino oscillation phases. These ensure that the flavor-oscillation clocks, inherent in the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations, redshift precisely as required by Einstein's theory of gravitation. The physical observability of these phases in the context of the solar neutrino anomaly, type-II supernova, and certain atomic systems is briefly discussed.

  17. Single-Atom Gating of Quantum State Superpositions

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Christopher

    2010-04-28

    The ultimate miniaturization of electronic devices will likely require local and coherent control of single electronic wavefunctions. Wavefunctions exist within both physical real space and an abstract state space with a simple geometric interpretation: this state space - or Hilbert space - is spanned by mutually orthogonal state vectors corresponding to the quantized degrees of freedom of the real-space system. Measurement of superpositions is akin to accessing the direction of a vector in Hilbert space, determining an angle of rotation equivalent to quantum phase. Here we show that an individual atom inside a designed quantum corral1 can control this angle, producing arbitrary coherent superpositions of spatial quantum states. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and nanostructures assembled atom-by-atom we demonstrate how single spins and quantum mirages can be harnessed to image the superposition of two electronic states. We also present a straightforward method to determine the atom path enacting phase rotations between any desired state vectors. A single atom thus becomes a real-space handle for an abstract Hilbert space, providing a simple technique for coherent quantum state manipulation at the spatial limit of condensed matter.

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF THE ANALYTIC ELEMENT METHOD FOR WELLHEAD PROTECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new computer program has been developed to determine time-of-travel capture zones in relatively simple geohydrological settings. The WhAEM package contains an analytic element model that uses superposition of (many) closed form analytical solutions to generate a ground-water fl...

  19. Whole-brain analytic measures of network communication reveal increased structure-function correlation in right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wirsich, Jonathan; Perry, Alistair; Ridley, Ben; Proix, Timothée; Golos, Mathieu; Bénar, Christian; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Breakspear, Michael; Jirsa, Viktor; Guye, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo structure-function relationship is key to understanding brain network reorganization due to pathologies. This relationship is likely to be particularly complex in brain network diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy, in which disturbed large-scale systems are involved in both transient electrical events and long-lasting functional and structural impairments. Herein, we estimated this relationship by analyzing the correlation between structural connectivity and functional connectivity in terms of analytical network communication parameters. As such, we targeted the gradual topological structure-function reorganization caused by the pathology not only at the whole brain scale but also both in core and peripheral regions of the brain. We acquired diffusion (dMRI) and resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) data in seven right-lateralized TLE (rTLE) patients and fourteen healthy controls and analyzed the structure-function relationship by using analytical network communication metrics derived from the structural connectome. In rTLE patients, we found a widespread hypercorrelated functional network. Network communication analysis revealed greater unspecific branching of the shortest path (search information) in the structural connectome and a higher global correlation between the structural and functional connectivity for the patient group. We also found evidence for a preserved structural rich-club in the patient group. In sum, global augmentation of structure-function correlation might be linked to a smaller functional repertoire in rTLE patients, while sparing the central core of the brain which may represent a pathway that facilitates the spread of seizures. PMID:27330970

  20. Prediction in cases with superposition of different hydrological phenomena, such as from weather "cold drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, J. M.; Grau, J. B.; Tarquis, A. M.; Andina, D.; Sanchez, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    The authors have been involved in Model Codes for Construction prior to Eurocodes now Euronorms, and in a Drainage Instruction for Roads for Spain that adopted a prediction model from BPR (Bureau of Public Roads) of USA to take account of evident regional differences in Iberian Peninsula and Spanish Isles, and in some related studies. They used Extreme Value Type I (Gumbell law) models, with independent actions in superposition; this law was also adopted then to obtain maps of extreme rains by CEDEX. These methods could be extrapolated somehow with other extreme values distributions, but the first step was useful to set valid superposition schemas for actions in norms. As real case, in East of Spain rain comes usually extensively from normal weather perturbations, but in other cases from "cold drop" local high rains of about 400mm in a day occur, causing inundations and in cases local disasters. The city of Valencia in East of Spain was inundated at 1,5m high from a cold drop in 1957, and the river Turia formerly through that city was just later diverted some kilometers to South in a wider canal. With Gumbell law the expected intensity grows with time for occurrence, indicating a value for each given "return period", but the increasing speed grows with the "annual dispersion" of the Gumbell law, and some rare dangerous events may become really very possible in periods of many years. That can be proved with relatively simple models, e.g. with Extreme Law type I, and they could be made more precise or discussed. Such effects were used for superposition of actions on a structure for Model Codes, and may be combined with hydraulic effects, e.g. for bridges on rivers. These different Gumbell laws, or other extreme laws, with different dispersion may occur for marine actions of waves, earthquakes, tsunamis, and maybe for human perturbations, that could include industrial catastrophes, or civilization wars if considering historical periods.

  1. Analytical invariant manifolds near unstable points and the structure of chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, Christos; Contopoulos, George; Katsanikas, Matthaios

    2014-08-01

    It is known that the asymptotic invariant manifolds around an unstable periodic orbit in conservative systems can be represented by convergent series (Cherry, Proc Lond Math Soc ser 2, 27:151-170, 1926; Moser, Commun Pure Appl Math 9:673, 1956 and 11:257, 1958; Moser, Giorgilli, Discret Contin Dyn Syst 7:855, 2001). The unstable and stable manifolds intersect at an infinity of homoclinic points, generating a complicated homoclinic tangle. In the case of simple mappings it was found (Da Silva Ritter et al., Phys D 29:181, 1987) that the domain of convergence of the formal series extends to infinity along the invariant manifolds. This allows in practice the study of the homoclinic tangle using only series. However in the case of Hamiltonian systems, or mappings with a finite analyticity domain, the convergence of the series along the asymptotic manifolds is also finite. Here, we provide numerical indications that the convergence does not reach any homoclinic points. We discuss in detail the convergence problem in various cases and we find the degree of approximation of the analytical invariant manifolds to the real (numerical) manifolds as (i) the order of truncation of the series increases, and (ii) we use higher numerical precision in computing the coefficients of the series. Then we introduce a new method of series composition, by using action-angle variables, that allows the calculation of the asymptotic manifolds up to an a arbitrarily large extent. This is the first case of an analytic development that allows the computation of the invariant manifolds and their intersections in a Hamiltonian system for an extent long enough to allow the study of homoclinic chaos by analytical means.

  2. An Improved Analytic Signal Technique for the Depth and Structural Index from 2D Magnetic Anomaly Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guoqing; Du, Xiaojuan

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a new inversion method for the interpretation of 2D magnetic anomaly data, which uses the combination of the analytic signal and its total gradient to estimate the depth and the nature (structural index) of an isolated magnetic source. However, our proposed method is sensitive to noise. In order to lower the effect of noise, we apply upward continuation technique to smooth the anomaly. Tests on synthetic noise-free and noise corrupted magnetic data show that the new method can successfully estimate the depth and the nature of the causative source. The practical application of the technique is applied to measured magnetic anomaly data from Jurh area, northeast China, and the inversion results are in agreement with the inversion results from Euler deconvolution of the analytic signal.

  3. First-and Second-Order Displacement Transfer Functions for Structural Shape Calculations Using Analytically Predicted Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    New first- and second-order displacement transfer functions have been developed for deformed shape calculations of nonuniform cross-sectional beam structures such as aircraft wings. The displacement transfer functions are expressed explicitly in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains (uniaxial bending strains) obtained at equally spaced strain stations along the surface of the beam structure. By inputting the measured or analytically calculated surface strains into the displacement transfer functions, one could calculate local slopes, deflections, and cross-sectional twist angles of the nonuniform beam structure for mapping the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The accuracy of deformed shape calculations by the first- and second-order displacement transfer functions are determined by comparing these values to the analytically predicted values obtained from finite element analyses. This comparison shows that the new displacement transfer functions could quite accurately calculate the deformed shapes of tapered cantilever tubular beams with different tapered angles. The accuracy of the present displacement transfer functions also are compared to those of the previously developed displacement transfer functions.

  4. Accelerated Superposition State Molecular Dynamics for Condensed Phase Systems.

    PubMed

    Ceotto, Michele; Ayton, Gary S; Voth, Gregory A

    2008-04-01

    An extension of superposition state molecular dynamics (SSMD) [Venkatnathan and Voth J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2005, 1, 36] is presented with the goal to accelerate timescales and enable the study of "long-time" phenomena for condensed phase systems. It does not require any a priori knowledge about final and transition state configurations, or specific topologies. The system is induced to explore new configurations by virtue of a fictitious (free-particle-like) accelerating potential. The acceleration method can be applied to all degrees of freedom in the system and can be applied to condensed phases and fluids. PMID:26620930

  5. Scaling of macroscopic superpositions close to a quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, Tahereh; Karimipour, Vahid

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that in a quantum phase transition (QPT), entanglement remains short ranged [Osterloh et al., Nature (London) 416, 608 (2005), 10.1038/416608a]. We ask if there is a quantum property entailing the whole system which diverges near this point. Using the recently proposed measures of quantum macroscopicity, we show that near a quantum critical point, it is the effective size of macroscopic superposition between the two symmetry breaking states which grows to the scale of system size, and its derivative with respect to the coupling shows both singular behavior and scaling properties.

  6. Push-Pull Optical Pumping of Pure Superposition States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Miron, E.; Post, A. B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.

    2004-10-01

    A new optical pumping method, “push-pull pumping,” can produce very nearly pure, coherent superposition states between the initial and the final sublevels of the important field-independent 0-0 clock resonance of alkali-metal atoms. The key requirement for push-pull pumping is the use of D1 resonant light which alternates between left and right circular polarization at the Bohr frequency of the state. The new pumping method works for a wide range of conditions, including atomic beams with almost no collisions, and atoms in buffer gases with pressures of many atmospheres.

  7. Controllable photon bunching by atomic superpositions in a driven cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weijie; Wang, Yao; Wei, L. F.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a feasible approach to generate the desired light with controllable photon bunchings by adjusting the atomic superpositions in a driven cavity. Under the large detuning limit, i.e., the cavity is far resonance with the inside atom(s), we show that the photons in the cavity are always bunchings. Typically, when the effective dispersive interaction equals the detuning between the driving and cavity fields, we find that the value of second-order correlation g(2 )(0 ) inverses to the probability of the superposed atomic state. This suggests that such a value could be arbitrarily large, and thus the bunchings of the photons could be significantly enhanced.

  8. Analytical Challenges in Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glajch, Joseph L.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights five major analytical areas (electrophoresis, immunoassay, chromatographic separations, protein and DNA sequencing, and molecular structures determination) and discusses how analytical chemistry could further improve these techniques and thereby have a major impact on biotechnology. (JN)

  9. Analytical extraction of residual stresses and gradients in MEMS structures with application to CMOS-layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fachin, F.; Nikles, S. A.; Dugundji, J.; Wardle, B. L.

    2011-09-01

    Accurate thin-film characterization is a key requirement in the MEMS industry. Residual stresses determine both the final shape and the functionality of released micromachined structures, and should therefore be accurately assessed. To date, a number of techniques to characterize thin-film materials have been developed, from substrate curvature measurement to methods that exploit the post-release deformation of test structures. These techniques have some major drawbacks, from high implementation costs to accuracy limitations due to improper boundary condition modeling. Here, we present a new technique for the characterization of multilayered, composite MEMS structures that uses easily accessible experimental information on the post-release deformation of microbridges only, with no need for multiple beam lengths. The method is based on an analytical solution of the (post-)buckling problem of microbridges, including the effect of residual stresses (both mean and gradient) and non-ideal clamping (boundary flexibility). The method allows simultaneous characterization of both the mean and the gradient residual stress components, as well as the effective boundary condition associated with the fabrication process, yielding approximately one order of magnitude improvement in resolution compared to extant methods using the same type and number of test structures. The higher resolution is largely attributable to proper accounting for boundary flexibility by our method, with the boundary condition for the structures in this work being ~90% as stiff in bending relative to the commonly assumed perfectly clamped condition. Additional enhancement can be achieved with post-release deformation measurements of simple cantilevers in addition to the microbridges. The method is useful as it ensures very low stress extraction uncertainty using a limited number of microbridge test structures, and it is transferrable to package-stress characterization. The analytical approach can also be

  10. Superposition of nonparaxial vectorial complex-source spherically focused beams: Axial Poynting singularity and reverse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, counterintuitive effects such as the generation of an axial (i.e., long the direction of wave motion) zero-energy flux density (i.e., axial Poynting singularity) and reverse (i.e., negative) propagation of nonparaxial quasi-Gaussian electromagnetic (EM) beams are examined. Generalized analytical expressions for the EM field's components of a coherent superposition of two high-order quasi-Gaussian vortex beams of opposite handedness and different amplitudes are derived based on the complex-source-point method, stemming from Maxwell's vector equations and the Lorenz gauge condition. The general solutions exhibiting unusual effects satisfy the Helmholtz and Maxwell's equations. The EM beam components are characterized by nonzero integer degree and order (n ,m ) , respectively, an arbitrary waist w0, a diffraction convergence length known as the Rayleigh range zR, and a weighting (real) factor 0 ≤α ≤1 that describes the transition of the beam from a purely vortex (α =0 ) to a nonvortex (α =1 ) type. An attractive feature for this superposition is the description of strongly focused (or strongly divergent) wave fields. Computations of the EM power density as well as the linear and angular momentum density fluxes illustrate the analysis with particular emphasis on the polarization states of the vector potentials forming the beams and the weight of the coherent beam superposition causing the transition from the vortex to the nonvortex type. Should some conditions determined by the polarization state of the vector potentials and the beam parameters be met, an axial zero-energy flux density is predicted in addition to a negative retrograde propagation effect. Moreover, rotation reversal of the angular momentum flux density with respect to the beam handedness is anticipated, suggesting the possible generation of negative (left-handed) torques. The results are particularly useful in applications involving the design of strongly focused optical laser

  11. Studies of a sheath structure in an RF discharge using experimental, analytical and simulation approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. B.; Kawamura, K.; Bowden, M. D.; Muraoka, K.; Choi, Y. W.

    1999-10-01

    The electric field distributions in the sheath region were measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method in capacitively coupled RF glow discharges operated at different pressures in helium. The measured distributions and sheath thicknesses obtained from the electric field distributions were compared with those obtained from an existing analytical theory1 and with a numerical simulation2. The comparison yielded reasonable agreement, both in general tendency with regard to the pressure dependence and in the absolute magnitude. These results provided evidence of the validity of the analytical sheath theory and the numerical simulation for predicting the sheath properties of an RF glow discharge. 1. M. A. Lieberman and A. J. Lichtenberg, Principles of Plasma Discharges and Materials Processing, New York: Wiley, 1994 2. J. P. Verboncoeur, V. Vahedi, M. V. Alves, and C. K. Birdsall, \\x81gPDP1, PDC1, PDS1 plasma device 1 dimensional bounded electrostatic codes,\\x81h Reference manual PDx1 PC version 2.1, 1993

  12. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by vortex density structures associated with interchange instability: Analytical and large scale plasma simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2014-05-01

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics, and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present particle-in-cell simulation results of electromagnetic scattering on vortex type density structures using the large scale plasma code LSP and compare them with analytical results.

  13. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by vortex density structures associated with interchange instability: Analytical and large scale plasma simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2014-05-15

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics, and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present particle-in-cell simulation results of electromagnetic scattering on vortex type density structures using the large scale plasma code LSP and compare them with analytical results.

  14. The determination of molecular structures by density functional theory. The evaluation of analytical energy gradients by numerical integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Louis; Ziegler, Tom

    1988-01-01

    An algorithm, based on numerical integration, has been proposed for the evaluation of analytical energy gradients within the Hartree-Fock-Slater (HFS) method. The utility of this algorithm in connection with molecular structure optimization is demonstrated by calculations on organics, main group molecules, and transition metal complexes. The structural parameters obtained from HFS calculations are in at least as good agreement with experiment as structures obtained from ab initio HF calculations. The time required to evaluate the energy gradient by numerical integration constitutes only a fraction (40%-25%) of the elapsed time in a full HFS-SCF calculation. The algorithm is also suitable for density functional methods with exchange-correlation potential different from that employed in the HFS method.

  15. Analytical investigation of a three-dimensional FRP-retrofitted reinforced concrete structure's behaviour under earthquake load effect in ANSYS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altun, F.; Birdal, F.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, a 1:3 scaled, three-storey, FRP (Fiber Reinforced Polymer) retrofitted reinforced concrete model structure whose behaviour and crack development were identified experimentally in the laboratory was investigated analytically. Determination of structural behaviour under earthquake load is only possible in a laboratory environment with a specific scale, as carrying out structural experiments is difficult due to the evaluation of increased parameter numbers and because it requires an expensive laboratory setup. In an analytical study, structure was modelled using ANSYS Finite Element Package Program (2007), and its behaviour and crack development were revealed. When experimental difficulties are taken into consideration, analytical investigation of structure behaviour is more economic and much faster. At the end of the study, experimental results of structural behaviour and crack development were compared with analytical data. It was concluded that in a model structure retrofitted with FRP, the behaviour and cracking model can be determined without testing by determining the reasons for the points where analytical results are not converged with experimental data. Better understanding of structural behaviour is analytically enabled with the study.

  16. Evolution of superpositions of quantum states through a level crossing

    SciTech Connect

    Torosov, B. T.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2011-12-15

    The Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg-Majorana (LZSM) model is widely used for estimating transition probabilities in the presence of crossing energy levels in quantum physics. This model, however, makes the unphysical assumption of an infinitely long constant interaction, which introduces a divergent phase in the propagator. This divergence remains hidden when estimating output probabilities for a single input state insofar as the divergent phase cancels out. In this paper we show that, because of this divergent phase, the LZSM model is inadequate to describe the evolution of pure or mixed superposition states across a level crossing. The LZSM model can be used only if the system is initially in a single state or in a completely mixed superposition state. To this end, we show that the more realistic Demkov-Kunike model, which assumes a hyperbolic-tangent level crossing and a hyperbolic-secant interaction envelope, is free of divergences and is a much more adequate tool for describing the evolution through a level crossing for an arbitrary input state. For multiple crossing energies which are reducible to one or more effective two-state systems (e.g., by the Majorana and Morris-Shore decompositions), similar conclusions apply: the LZSM model does not produce definite values of the populations and the coherences, and one should use the Demkov-Kunike model instead.

  17. Experiments testing macroscopic quantum superpositions must be slow.

    PubMed

    Mari, Andrea; De Palma, Giacomo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    We consider a thought experiment where the preparation of a macroscopically massive or charged particle in a quantum superposition and the associated dynamics of a distant test particle apparently allow for superluminal communication. We give a solution to the paradox which is based on the following fundamental principle: any local experiment, discriminating a coherent superposition from an incoherent statistical mixture, necessarily requires a minimum time proportional to the mass (or charge) of the system. For a charged particle, we consider two examples of such experiments, and show that they are both consistent with the previous limitation. In the first, the measurement requires to accelerate the charge, that can entangle with the emitted photons. In the second, the limitation can be ascribed to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. On the other hand, when applied to massive particles our result provides an indirect evidence for the existence of gravitational vacuum fluctuations and for the possibility of entangling a particle with quantum gravitational radiation. PMID:26959656

  18. Experiments testing macroscopic quantum superpositions must be slow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Andrea; de Palma, Giacomo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-03-01

    We consider a thought experiment where the preparation of a macroscopically massive or charged particle in a quantum superposition and the associated dynamics of a distant test particle apparently allow for superluminal communication. We give a solution to the paradox which is based on the following fundamental principle: any local experiment, discriminating a coherent superposition from an incoherent statistical mixture, necessarily requires a minimum time proportional to the mass (or charge) of the system. For a charged particle, we consider two examples of such experiments, and show that they are both consistent with the previous limitation. In the first, the measurement requires to accelerate the charge, that can entangle with the emitted photons. In the second, the limitation can be ascribed to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. On the other hand, when applied to massive particles our result provides an indirect evidence for the existence of gravitational vacuum fluctuations and for the possibility of entangling a particle with quantum gravitational radiation.

  19. Modeling scattering from azimuthally symmetric bathymetric features using wavefield superposition.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, John A

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, an approach for modeling the scattering from azimuthally symmetric bathymetric features is described. These features are useful models for small mounds and indentations on the seafloor at high frequencies and seamounts, shoals, and basins at low frequencies. A bathymetric feature can be considered as a compact closed region, with the same sound speed and density as one of the surrounding media. Using this approach, a number of numerical methods appropriate for a partially buried target or facet problem can be applied. This paper considers the use of wavefield superposition and because of the azimuthal symmetry, the three-dimensional solution to the scattering problem can be expressed as a Fourier sum of solutions to a set of two-dimensional scattering problems. In the case where the surrounding two half spaces have only a density contrast, a semianalytic coupled mode solution is derived. This provides a benchmark solution to scattering from a class of penetrable hemispherical bosses or indentations. The details and problems of the numerical implementation of the wavefield superposition method are described. Example computations using the method for a simple scattering feature on a seabed are presented for a wide band of frequencies. PMID:18247740

  20. Experiments testing macroscopic quantum superpositions must be slow

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Andrea; De Palma, Giacomo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    We consider a thought experiment where the preparation of a macroscopically massive or charged particle in a quantum superposition and the associated dynamics of a distant test particle apparently allow for superluminal communication. We give a solution to the paradox which is based on the following fundamental principle: any local experiment, discriminating a coherent superposition from an incoherent statistical mixture, necessarily requires a minimum time proportional to the mass (or charge) of the system. For a charged particle, we consider two examples of such experiments, and show that they are both consistent with the previous limitation. In the first, the measurement requires to accelerate the charge, that can entangle with the emitted photons. In the second, the limitation can be ascribed to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. On the other hand, when applied to massive particles our result provides an indirect evidence for the existence of gravitational vacuum fluctuations and for the possibility of entangling a particle with quantum gravitational radiation. PMID:26959656

  1. X-ray optics simulation using Gaussian superposition technique.

    PubMed

    Idir, Mourad; Cywiak, Moisés; Morales, Arquímedes; Modi, Mohammed H

    2011-09-26

    We present an efficient method to perform x-ray optics simulation with high or partially coherent x-ray sources using Gaussian superposition technique. In a previous paper, we have demonstrated that full characterization of optical systems, diffractive and geometric, is possible by using the Fresnel Gaussian Shape Invariant (FGSI) previously reported in the literature. The complex amplitude distribution in the object plane is represented by a linear superposition of complex Gaussians wavelets and then propagated through the optical system by means of the referred Gaussian invariant. This allows ray tracing through the optical system and at the same time allows calculating with high precision the complex wave-amplitude distribution at any plane of observation. This technique can be applied in a wide spectral range where the Fresnel diffraction integral applies including visible, x-rays, acoustic waves, etc. We describe the technique and include some computer simulations as illustrative examples for x-ray optical component. We show also that this method can be used to study partial or total coherence illumination problem. PMID:21996845

  2. Runs in superpositions of renewal processes with applications to discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsmeyer, Gerold; Irle, Albrecht

    2006-02-01

    Wald and Wolfowitz [Ann. Math. Statist. 11 (1940) 147-162] introduced the run test for testing whether two samples of i.i.d. random variables follow the same distribution. Here a run means a consecutive subsequence of maximal length from only one of the two samples. In this paper we contribute to the problem of runs and resulting test procedures for the superposition of independent renewal processes which may be interpreted as arrival processes of customers from two different input channels at the same service station. To be more precise, let (Sn)n[greater-or-equal, slanted]1 and (Tn)n[greater-or-equal, slanted]1 be the arrival processes for channel 1 and channel 2, respectively, and (Wn)n[greater-or-equal, slanted]1 their be superposition with counting process . Let further be the number of runs in W1,...,Wn and the number of runs observed up to time t. We study the asymptotic behavior of and Rt, first for the case where (Sn)n[greater-or-equal, slanted]1 and (Tn)n[greater-or-equal, slanted]1 have exponentially distributed increments with parameters [lambda]1 and [lambda]2, and then for the more difficult situation when these increments have an absolutely continuous distribution. These results are used to design asymptotic level [alpha] tests for testing [lambda]1=[lambda]2 against [lambda]1[not equal to][lambda]2 in the first case, and for testing for equal scale parameters in the second.

  3. X-ray optics simulation using Gaussian superposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Idir, M.; Cywiak, M.; Morales, A. and Modi, M.H.

    2011-09-15

    We present an efficient method to perform x-ray optics simulation with high or partially coherent x-ray sources using Gaussian superposition technique. In a previous paper, we have demonstrated that full characterization of optical systems, diffractive and geometric, is possible by using the Fresnel Gaussian Shape Invariant (FGSI) previously reported in the literature. The complex amplitude distribution in the object plane is represented by a linear superposition of complex Gaussians wavelets and then propagated through the optical system by means of the referred Gaussian invariant. This allows ray tracing through the optical system and at the same time allows calculating with high precision the complex wave-amplitude distribution at any plane of observation. This technique can be applied in a wide spectral range where the Fresnel diffraction integral applies including visible, x-rays, acoustic waves, etc. We describe the technique and include some computer simulations as illustrative examples for x-ray optical component. We show also that this method can be used to study partial or total coherence illumination problem.

  4. Analytical study of the structural-dynamics and sound radiation of anisotropic multilayered fibre-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Täger, Olaf; Dannemann, Martin; Hufenbach, Werner A.

    2015-04-01

    Lightweight structures for high-technology applications are designed to meet the increasing demands on low structural weight and maximum stiffness. These classical lightweight properties result in lower inertial forces that consequently lead to higher vibration amplitudes thereby increasing sound radiation. Here, special anisotropic multilayered composites offer a high vibro-acoustic lightweight potential. The authors developed analytical vibro-acoustic simulation models, which allow a material-adapted structural-dynamic and sound radiation analysis of anisotropic multilayered composite plates. Compared to numerical methods FEM/BEM these analytical models allow a quick and physically based analysis of the vibro-acoustic properties of anisotropic composite plates. This advantage can be seen by the presented extensive parameter studies, which have been performed in order to analyse the influence of composite-specific design variables on the resulting vibro-acoustic behaviour. Here, it was found that the vibro-acoustic parameters like eigenfrequency and modal damping show direction-dependent properties. Furthermore, the investigations reveal that laminated composites show a so-called damping-dominated sound radiation behaviour. Based on these studies, a vibro-acoustic design procedure is proposed and design guidelines are derived.

  5. An analytical approach to wake interference effects on circular cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Rupert G.; Suaris, Wimal

    2006-08-01

    When a body is immersed in the wake of another body the additional buffeting force due to the vortices shed from the upstream structure magnifies the amplitude of vibration of the downstream structure. The proposed semi-empirical model is of the coupled Rayleigh wake-oscillator type with the equation of motion including an additional buffeting force. For two structures consisting of different structural parameters and placed in tandem with a wind flow, the buffeting force experienced by the downstream structure can be extrapolated from the lift force of the upstream structure, by using the ratios of the Scruton number, for the two structures. The paper highlights the aerodynamic response of tandem structures in the three primary interference regions: the proximity interference region, where the separation of the structures lies between 1.0 D and 1.1 D; the proximity induced galloping region where the separation lies between 1.1 D and 3.8 D; and the wake interference region where the separation is greater than 3.8 D.

  6. Spatial structure of 60- and 30-year variations of the geomagnetic field according to data of analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalugin, V. I.; Rotanova, N. M.; Golovkov, V. P.

    1984-10-01

    The distribution of the amplitudes and phases of 60-year variations of the geomagnetic field on the earth's surface is obtained on the basis of analytical models. It is shown that the characteristic features or foci of these variations have different configurations and a dissimilar intensity. A global map of the spatial distribution of 30-year variations is also obtained; and a comparison of maps of the 60- and 30-year variations shows that, although the structure of the latter variations is more complex, the characteristic foci of both types of variations are manifested in the same regions.

  7. Multi-level manual and autonomous control superposition for intelligent telerobot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirai, Shigeoki; Sato, T.

    1989-01-01

    Space telerobots are recognized to require cooperation with human operators in various ways. Multi-level manual and autonomous control superposition in telerobot task execution is described. The object model, the structured master-slave manipulation system, and the motion understanding system are proposed to realize the concept. The object model offers interfaces for task level and object level human intervention. The structured master-slave manipulation system offers interfaces for motion level human intervention. The motion understanding system maintains the consistency of the knowledge through all the levels which supports the robot autonomy while accepting the human intervention. The superposing execution of the teleoperational task at multi-levels realizes intuitive and robust task execution for wide variety of objects and in changeful environment. The performance of several examples of operating chemical apparatuses is shown.

  8. Analytical models for use in fan inflow control structure design. Inflow distortion and acoustic transmission models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedge, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to study the effect of flow contraction and screening on inflow distortions to identify qualitative design criteria. Results of the study are that: (1) static testing distortions are due to atmospheric turbulence, nacelle boundary layer, exhaust flow reingestion, flow over stand, ground plane, and engine casing; (2) flow contraction suppresses, initially, turbulent axial velocity distortions and magnifies turbulent transverse velocity distortions; (3) perforated plate and gauze screens suppress axial components of velocity distortions to a degree determined by the screen pressure loss coefficient; (4) honeycomb screen suppress transverse components of velocity distortions to a degree determined by the length to diameter ratio of the honeycomb; (5) acoustic transmission loss of perforated plate is controlled by the reactance of its acoustic impedance; (6) acoustic transmission loss of honeycomb screens is negligible; and (7) a model for the direction change due to a corner between honeycomb panels compares favorably with measured data.

  9. Analytical solutions and numerical procedures for minimum-weight Michell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewhurst, Peter

    2001-03-01

    A power-series method developed for plane-strain slip-line field theory is applied to the construction of minimum-weight Michell frameworks. The relationship between the space and force diagrams is defined as a basis for weight calculations. Analytical solutions obtained by the method are shown to agree with known solutions that were obtained through virtual displacement calculations. Framework boundary conditions are investigated, and matrix operators used in slip-line field theory are shown to apply to the force-free straight framework boundary-value problem. The matrix operator method is used to illustrate the transition from circular arc-based to cycloid-based Michell solutions. Finally, an example is given in the use of the method for evaluation of support boundary conditions.

  10. Development of Novel Analytical Method for Ab Initio Powder Structural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Makoto; Nishibori, Eiji; Sawa, Hiroshi

    Genetic Algorithm (GA) applied to ab initio structure determination from synchrotron powder diffraction is described. It seems to have an advantage over other real space methods for ab initio structure determination because of the existence of schema theorem. As an example, the case of Prednisolone Succinate is shown in some detail. Future development of GA in crystallography is briefly described.

  11. On the structural denaturation of biological analytes in trapped ion mobility spectrometry - mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanny C; Kirk, Samuel R; Bleiholder, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Key to native ion mobility/mass spectrometry is to prevent the structural denaturation of biological molecules in the gas phase. Here, we systematically assess structural changes induced in the protein ubiquitin during a trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) experiment. Our analysis shows that the extent of structural denaturation induced in ubiquitin ions is largely proportional to the amount of translational kinetic energy an ion gains from the applied electric field between two collisions with buffer gas particles. We then minimize the efficiency of the structural denaturation of ubiquitin ions in the gas phase during a TIMS experiment. The resulting "soft" TIMS spectra of ubiquitin are found largely identical to those observed on "soft" elevated-pressure ion mobility drift tubes and the corresponding calibrated cross sections are consistent with structures reported from NMR experiments for the native and A-state of ubiquitin. Thus, our analysis reveals that TIMS is useful for native ion mobility/mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:26998732

  12. Student ability to distinguish between superposition states and mixed states in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passante, Gina; Emigh, Paul J.; Shaffer, Peter S.

    2015-12-01

    Superposition gives rise to the probabilistic nature of quantum mechanics and is therefore one of the concepts at the heart of quantum mechanics. Although we have found that many students can successfully use the idea of superposition to calculate the probabilities of different measurement outcomes, they are often unable to identify the experimental implications of a superposition state. In particular, they fail to recognize how a superposition state and a mixed state (sometimes called a "lack of knowledge" state) can produce different experimental results. We present data that suggest that superposition in quantum mechanics is a difficult concept for students enrolled in sophomore-, junior-, and graduate-level quantum mechanics courses. We illustrate how an interactive lecture tutorial can improve student understanding of quantum mechanical superposition. A longitudinal study suggests that the impact persists after an additional quarter of quantum mechanics instruction that does not specifically address these ideas.

  13. Effects of superpositions of quantum states on quantum isoenergetic cycles: Efficiency and maximum power output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, X. Y.; Huang, X. L.; Shang, Y. F.; Wang, X. Y.

    2015-04-01

    Superposition principle plays a crucial role in quantum mechanics, thus its effects on thermodynamics is an interesting topic. Here, the effects of superpositions of quantum states on isoenergetic cycle are studied. We find superposition can improve the heat engine efficiency and release the positive work condition in general case. In the finite time process, we find the efficiency at maximum power output in superposition case is lower than the nonsuperposition case. This efficiency depends on one index of the energy spectrum of the working substance. This result does not mean the superposition discourages the heat engine performance. For fixed efficiency or fixed power, the superposition improves the power or efficiency respectively. These results show how quantum mechanical properties affect the thermodynamical cycle.

  14. Composite and case study analyses of the large-scale environments associated with West Pacific Polar and subtropical vertical jet superposition events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handlos, Zachary J.

    Though considerable research attention has been devoted to examination of the Northern Hemispheric polar and subtropical jet streams, relatively little has been directed toward understanding the circumstances that conspire to produce the relatively rare vertical superposition of these usually separate features. This dissertation investigates the structure and evolution of large-scale environments associated with jet superposition events in the northwest Pacific. An objective identification scheme, using NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 data, is employed to identify all jet superpositions in the west Pacific (30-40°N, 135-175°E) for boreal winters (DJF) between 1979/80 - 2009/10. The analysis reveals that environments conducive to west Pacific jet superposition share several large-scale features usually associated with East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM) northerly cold surges, including the presence of an enhanced Hadley Cell-like circulation within the jet entrance region. It is further demonstrated that several EAWM indices are statistically significantly correlated with jet superposition frequency in the west Pacific. The life cycle of EAWM cold surges promotes interaction between tropical convection and internal jet dynamics. Low potential vorticity (PV), high theta e tropical boundary layer air, exhausted by anomalous convection in the west Pacific lower latitudes, is advected poleward towards the equatorward side of the jet in upper tropospheric isentropic layers resulting in anomalous anticyclonic wind shear that accelerates the jet. This, along with geostrophic cold air advection in the left jet entrance region that drives the polar tropopause downward through the jet core, promotes the development of the deep, vertical PV wall characteristic of superposed jets. West Pacific jet superpositions preferentially form within an environment favoring the aforementioned characteristics regardless of EAWM seasonal strength. Post-superposition, it is shown that the west Pacific

  15. The origin of non-classical effects in a one-dimensional superposition of coherent states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzek, V.; Knight, P. L.; Barranco, A. Vidiella

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the quantum fluctuations in a light field created by the superposition of coherent fields. We give a physical explanation (in terms of Wigner functions and phase-space interference) why the 1-D superposition of coherent states in the direction of the x-quadrature leads to the squeezing of fluctuations in the y-direction, and show that such a superposition can generate the squeezed vacuum and squeezed coherent states.

  16. Analytical determination of the effect of structural elasticity on landing stability of a version of the Viking Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurenson, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    A limited analytical investigation was conducted to assess the effects of structural elasticity on the landing stability of a version of the Viking Lander. Two landing conditions and two lander mass and inertia distributions were considered. The results of this investigation show that the stability-critical surface slopes were lower for an uphill landing than for a downhill landing. In addition, the heavy footpad mass with its corresponding inertia distribution resulted in lower stability-critical ground slopes than were obtained for the light footpad mass and its corresponding inertia distribution. Structural elasticity was observed to have a large effect on the downhill landing stability of the light footpad mass configuration but had a negligible effect on the stability of the other configuration examined. Because of the limited nature of this study, care must be exercised in drawing conclusions from these results relative to the overall stability characteristics of the Viking Lander.

  17. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 1: Concept development and feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oken, S.; June, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    The analytical and experimental investigations are described in the first phase of a program to establish the feasibility of reinforcing metal aircraft structures with advanced filamentary composites. The interactions resulting from combining the two types of materials into single assemblies as well as their ability to function structurally were studied. The combinations studied were boron-epoxy reinforced aluminum, boron-epoxy reinforced titanium, and boron-polyimide reinforced titanium. The concepts used unidirectional composites as reinforcement in the primary loading direction and metal for carrying the transverse loads as well as its portion of the primary load. The program established that several realistic concepts could be fabricated, that these concepts could perform to a level that would result in significant weight savings, and that there are means for predicting their capability within a reasonable degree of accuracy. This program also encountered problems related to the application of polyimide systems that resulted in their relatively poor and variable performance.

  18. An analytical approach for detecting isolated periodic solution branches in weakly nonlinear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. L.; Neild, S. A.; Cammarano, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers isolated responses in nonlinear systems; both in terms of isolas in the forced responses, and isolated backbone curves (i.e. the unforced, undamped responses). As isolated responses are disconnected from other response branches, reliably predicting their existence poses a significant challenge. Firstly, it is shown that breaking the symmetry of a two-mass nonlinear oscillator can lead to the breaking of a bifurcation on the backbone curves, generating an isolated backbone. It is then shown how an energy-based, analytical method may be used to compute the points at which the forced responses cross the backbone curves at resonance, and how this may be used as a tool for finding isolas in the forced responses. This is firstly demonstrated for a symmetric system, where an isola envelops the secondary backbone curves, which emerge from a bifurcation. Next, an asymmetric configuration of the system is considered and it is shown how isolas may envelop a primary backbone curve, i.e. one that is connected directly to the zero-amplitude solution, as well as the isolated backbone curve. This is achieved by using the energy-based method to determine the relationship between the external forcing amplitude and the positions of the crossing points of the forced response. Along with predicting the existence of the isolas, this technique also reveals the nature of the responses, thus simplifying the process of finding isolas using numerical continuation.

  19. Analytical modeling of PET imaging with correlated functional and structural images

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.; Evans, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    Objective evaluation of dynamic imaging protocols needs a realistic simulation tool to model the data acquisition and image reconstruction of a PET system. Availability of correlated functional and anatomical images in many centers allows the creation of highly realistic objects to represent brain activity and attenuation distribution for each study. We have developed an analytical model incorporating key physical factors inherent in coincidence detection along with spatially variant 3-D detector response and detection efficiency. In this paper we use MR and PET data of a 3-D Hoffman brain phantom to demonstrate and validate our simulation methods. The simulated total projection, attenuation factor, and scatter profiles are in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. Regional analysis shows a discrepancy of {le} 8.5 % in the gray matter and white matter activity concentrations between the real and simulated images. Our results also reveal quantitative distortions due to partial volume effects with the same magnitude as in clinical PET scans. This tool is particularly useful in evaluating projection data processing and image reconstruction algorithms.

  20. Analytic study of chaos of the tent map: Band structures, power spectra, and critical behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Mori, H.; Shigematsu, H.

    1983-05-01

    Chaotic behaviors of the tent map (a piecewise-linear, continuous map with a unique maximum) are studied analytically throughout its chaotic region in terms of the invariant density and the power spectrum. As the height of the maximum is lowered, successive band-splitting transitions occur in the chaotic region and accumulate to the transition point into the nonchaotic region. The timecorrelation function of nonperiodic orbits and their power spectrum are calculated exactly at the band-splitting points and in the vicinity of these points. The method of eigenvalue problems of the Frobenius-Perron operator is used. 2 m-1 critical modes, where m = 1,2, 3, ..., are found which exhibit the critical slowing-down near the 2 m-1-band to 2 m -band transition point. After the transition these modes become periodic modes which represent the cycling of nonperiodic orbits among 2 m bands together with the periodic modes generated by the preceding band splittings. Scaling laws near the transition point into the nonchaotic region are investigated and a new scaling law is found for the total intensity of the periodic part of the spectrum.

  1. An Analytic Mathematical Model to Explain the Spiral Structure and Rotation Curve of NGC 3198

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Bruce; Rout, Cameron

    2016-06-01

    An analytical model of galactic morphology is presented. This model presents resolutions to two inter-related parameters of spiral galaxies: one being the flat velocity rotation profile and the other being the spiral morphology of such galaxies. This model is a mathematical transformation dictated by the general theory of relativity applied to rotating polar coordinate systems that conserve the metric. The model shows that the flat velocity rotation profile and spiral shape of certain galaxies are both products of the general theory. Validation of the model is presented by application to 878 rotation curves provided by Salucci, and by comparing the results of a derived distance modulus to those using Cepheid variables, water masers and Tully-Fisher calculations. The model suggests means of determining galactic linear density, mass and angular momentum. We also show that the morphology of NGC 3198 is congruent to the geodesic as observed within a rotating reference frame and that galaxies are gravitationally viscous and self bound.

  2. A new analytical form for the magnetic power spectrum: application to the internal structure of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, B.; Amit, H.; Larnier, H.; Thébault, E.; Mocquet, A.

    2013-09-01

    We propose two new analytical forms to the Mauersberger-Lowes geomagnetic field spectrum at the core-mantle boundary which can be used to determine the radius of the outer liquid core or more generally the radius of the electrically conductive and convective layer where the dynamo operates. We argue that two sub-families of the (geo)magnetic field exhibit flat spectra at the Earth's core-mantle boundary. The first is the non-zonal spectrum, the second is the spectrum associated with the field which is symmetric about the equator (the latter often termed the quadrupole family). We first test our two analytical forms using two approaches on the geomagnetic field. We estimate at the seismic core radius the agreement between the actual spectrum and the theoretical one. We then estimate the magnetic core radius, i.e. the maximum depth from the Earth's surface at which the spectrum flattens. In both cases we show that the two sub-families offer a better agreement with the actual spectrum compared with previously proposed analytical expressions, while predicting a magnetic core radius within less than 10 km of the seismic core radius. These new analytical forms supersede all existing expressions to infer the core radius from magnetic field information because the low degree terms (and especially degree 1 term) are used. The fact that the two new forms converge and return the same dynamo radius can also be used to determine the maximum spherical harmonic truncation degree of the model. Second we apply our new analytical forms to infer the radius of the dynamo regions on Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. We use the magnetic field models of Ridley [2012], Cao et al. [2011] and Holme and Bloxham [1996]. We give in Table 1 our estimates of the dynamo radii for given maximum truncation degrees. The axisymetric nature of the magnetic field of Saturn prevents the use of the non zonal form. For the three other planets both forms converge for Nmax equal to 4 or 5. These new

  3. On the Relationship Between World Knowledge and Comprehension of Texts. Effects of Truth Values and Analytic Level of the Belief Structure. Number 468.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waern, Yvonne

    It is suggested that a reader's idea structure will affect processing of incoming information. Two aspects of the idea structure are further developed--the truth value aspect and the analytic level aspect. The idea structure can be characterized by ideas consisting of propositions which are considered to be more or less true or false (beliefs), or…

  4. Robustness of superposition states evolving under the influence of a thermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Sales, J. S.; Almeida, N. G. de

    2011-06-15

    We study the evolution of superposition states under the influence of a reservoir at zero and finite temperatures in cavity quantum electrodynamics aiming to know how their purity is lost over time. The superpositions studied here are composed of coherent states, orthogonal coherent states, squeezed coherent states, and orthogonal squeezed coherent states, which we introduce to generalize the orthogonal coherent states. For comparison, we also show how the robustness of the superpositions studied here differs from that of a qubit given by a superposition of zero- and one-photon states.

  5. Macroscopicity of quantum superpositions on a one-parameter unitary path in Hilbert space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkoff, T. J.; Whaley, K. B.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze quantum states formed as superpositions of an initial pure product state and its image under local unitary evolution, using two measurement-based measures of superposition size: one based on the optimal quantum binary distinguishability of the branches of the superposition and another based on the ratio of the maximal quantum Fisher information of the superposition to that of its branches, i.e., the relative metrological usefulness of the superposition. A general formula for the effective sizes of these states according to the branch-distinguishability measure is obtained and applied to superposition states of N quantum harmonic oscillators composed of Gaussian branches. Considering optimal distinguishability of pure states on a time-evolution path leads naturally to a notion of distinguishability time that generalizes the well-known orthogonalization times of Mandelstam and Tamm and Margolus and Levitin. We further show that the distinguishability time provides a compact operational expression for the superposition size measure based on the relative quantum Fisher information. By restricting the maximization procedure in the definition of this measure to an appropriate algebra of observables, we show that the superposition size of, e.g., NOON states and hierarchical cat states, can scale linearly with the number of elementary particles comprising the superposition state, implying precision scaling inversely with the total number of photons when these states are employed as probes in quantum parameter estimation of a 1-local Hamiltonian in this algebra.

  6. Analytical and experimental study on the fluid structure interaction during air blast loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Erheng; Wright, Jefferson; Shukla, Arun

    2011-12-01

    A new fluid-structure interaction model that considers high gas compressibility is developed using the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. The impulse conservation between the gas and structure is utilized to determine the reflected pressure profile from the known incident pressure profile. The physical parameters of the gas such as the shock front velocity, gas density, local sound velocity, and gas particle velocity as well as the impulse transmitted onto the structure are also evaluated. A series of one-dimensional shock loading experiments on free standing monolithic aluminum plates were conducted using a shock tube to validate the proposed model. The momentum was evaluated using high speed digital imagery. The experimental peak reflected pressure, the reflected pressure profile, and the momentum transmitted onto the plate were compared with the predicted results. The comparisons show that the gas's compressibility significantly affects the fluid structure interaction behavior, and the new model can predict more accurate results than existing models. The effect of factors, such as the areal density of a plate and the peak incident pressure on momentum transfer are also discussed using the present model. Moreover, the maximum achievable momentum and the fluid structure interaction time are defined and calculated.

  7. Analytical and numerical investigation of structural response of compliant wall materials, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.

    1978-01-01

    Surface motion of compliant walls in drag reduction experiments was analyzed. Critical comparison was made between the dynamic motion of the structure and the postulated mechanism of drag reduction. The spectrum of surface motion indicated that membranes over deep cavities respond at low frequencies and large wavelengths. The membrane over a deep cavity is therefore found not to yield the desired response predicted by the postulated mechanism. The membrane over a thin air gap is found to act as a wavelength chopper, and analysis of the nonlinear response of that compliant surface indicated its possible suitability for compliant wall experiments. Periodic structures are found to lock in the desired wavelengths of motion, and it was shown that at least in Kramer's initial experiments they produced high frequency surface motions. Laminated structures are found to be very ineffective as compliant models, except when there is no bonding between the membrane and the backing. Computer programs developed for these analyses are documented.

  8. Analytical Approach for Estimating Preliminary Mass of ARES I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Pravin

    2007-01-01

    In January 2004, President Bush gave the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) a vision for Space Exploration by setting our sight on a bold new path to go back to the Moon, then to Mars and beyond. In response to this vision, NASA started the Constellation Program, which is a new exploration launch vehicle program. The primary mission for the Constellation Program is to carry out a series of human expeditions ranging from Low Earth Orbit to the surface of Mars and beyond for the purposes of conducting human exploration of space, as specified by the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE). The intent is that the information and technology developed by this program will provide the foundation for broader exploration activities as our operational experience grows. The ARES I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) has been designated as the launch vehicle that will be developed as a "first step" to facilitate the aforementioned human expeditions. The CLV Project is broken into four major elements: First Stage, Upper Stage Engine, Upper Stage (US), and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for the design of the CLV and has the prime responsibility to design the upper stage of the vehicle. The US is the second propulsive stage of the CLV and provides CEV insertion into low Earth orbit (LEO) after separation from the First Stage of the Crew Launch Vehicle. The fully integrated Upper Stage is a mix of modified existing heritage hardware (J-2X Engine) and new development (primary structure, subsystems, and avionics). The Upper Stage assembly is a structurally stabilized cylindrical structure, which is powered by a single J-2X engine which is developed as a separate Element of the CLV. The primary structure includes the load bearing liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) propellant tanks, a Forward Skirt, the Intertank structure, the Aft Skirt and the Thrust Structure. A Systems Tunnel, which carries fluid and

  9. Experimental and analytical investigations of fuselage modal characteristics and structural-acoustic coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Myles A.; Mathur, Gopal P.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section to define the shell and cavity modes of the fuselage, understand its structural-acoustic coupling characteristics, and measure its response to different types of acoustic and vibration excitations are reported. The data were processed to generate spatial plots and wavenumber maps of the shell acceleration and cabin acoustic pressure field. Analysis and interpretation of the spatial plots and wavenumber maps showed that the only structural-acoustic coupling occurred at 105 Hz between the N=2 circumferential structural mode and the (n=2, p=0) circumferential cavity mode. The fuselage response to vibration excitation was found to be dominated by modes whose order increases with frequency.

  10. Superposition method for analysis of free-edge stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.; Raju, I. S.

    1983-01-01

    Superposition techniques were used to transform the edge stress problem for composite laminates into a more lucid form. By eliminating loads and stresses not contributing to interlaminar stresses, the essential aspects of the edge stress problem are easily recognized. Transformed problem statements were developed for both mechanical and thermal loads. Also, a technique for approximate analysis using a two dimensional plane strain analysis was developed. Conventional quasi-three dimensional analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the transformed problems and the approximate two dimensional analysis. The transformed problems were shown to be exactly equivalent to the original problems. The approximate two dimensional analysis was found to predict the interlaminar normal and shear stresses reasonably well.