Science.gov

Sample records for anatomy project nci

  1. Cancer Genome Anatomy Project | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the research community access to biological tissue characterization data. Request a free copy of the CGAP Website Virtual Tour CD from ocg@mail.nih.gov.

  2. EHS and FME Lend Their Expertise to NCI Campus Refurbishment Project | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    In October 2015, the NCI executive officer and the director of NCI’s Office of Space and Facilities Management (OSFM) announced a wide-ranging refurbishment plan for NCI at Frederick. Since then, a project team comprising members from the Office of Scientific Operations, the Management Operations Support Branch, OSFM, the Center for Cancer Research, the Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS) directorate, and the Facilities Maintenance and Engineering (FME) directorate have met regularly with the laboratory groups affected by the refurbishment plan. Read more...

  3. RAS Projects at the NCI Frederick National Lab

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Initiative involves a number of projects focusing on ways to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells by mutant RAS proteins. Projects are conducted at the FNLCR hub, with collaboration from the research community nationwide.

  4. The Use of Creative Projects in a Gross Anatomy Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Johanna; Nguyen, Vincent; Mourra, Sarah; Ross, Marianne; Thai, Trung; Leonard, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students often describe the gross anatomy course as both stressful and a rite of passage. Research differs as to whether the stress it engenders is significant or transitory. This qualitative study of first year anatomy student reports on the use of optional creative projects to promote reflection and reduce stress. Methods:…

  5. Design Projects in Human Anatomy & Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polizzotto, Kristin; Ortiz, Mary T.

    2008-01-01

    Very often, some type of writing assignment is required in college entry-level Human Anatomy and Physiology courses. This assignment can be anything from an essay to a research paper on the literature, focusing on a faculty-approved topic of interest to the student. As educators who teach Human Anatomy and Physiology at an urban community college,

  6. Design Projects in Human Anatomy & Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polizzotto, Kristin; Ortiz, Mary T.

    2008-01-01

    Very often, some type of writing assignment is required in college entry-level Human Anatomy and Physiology courses. This assignment can be anything from an essay to a research paper on the literature, focusing on a faculty-approved topic of interest to the student. As educators who teach Human Anatomy and Physiology at an urban community college,…

  7. Anatomy External [Sahuarita High School Career Curriculum Project].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esser, Robert

    This course entitled "Anatomy External" is concerned with the dissection of the fetal pig, and is one of a series of instructional guides prepared by the teachers for the Sahuarita High School (Arizona) Career Curriculum Project. It consists of five units of study, and 13 behavioral objectives relating to these units are stated. The topics covered…

  8. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Currents Blog Research Findings Drug Approvals Precision Medicine Leadership Views 2017 Annual Plan & Budget Proposal All Press ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Previous NCI Directors NCI Organization Advisory ...

  9. Anatomy of the Chaco cryogenic project

    SciTech Connect

    Milios, P.B.; Harris, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    In the first quarter of 1996 El Paso Field Services (EPFS) began operation of a new Chaco liquids extraction plant. The plant, located in northwest New Mexico, has the capacity to extract more natural gas liquids (NGL) than any other turboexpander plant in the lower 48 states; 50,000 b/d of NGL from 600 MMscfd of gas. Its existence is the result of El Paso`s desire to combine state-of-the-art processing with processing rates that align EPFS`s interests with the interests of the producers, in order to secure a long term competitive position in the San Juan Basin. All the project stakeholders, the producers, the liquids transporter, the construction contractor, and the processor have benefited from the project. Without regulatory reform the project would not have happened.

  10. Using Independent Research Projects to Foster Learning in the Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghedotti, Michael J.; Fielitz, Christopher; Leonard, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching methodology involving an independent research project component for use in undergraduate Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy laboratory courses. The proposed project introduces cooperative, active learning in a research context to comparative vertebrate anatomy. This project involves pairs or groups of three students…

  11. NCI Drug Development Collaborative

    Cancer.gov

    CAPR NCI Center for Advanced Preclinical Research-CCR CBC Chemical Biology Consortium CCR Center for Cancer Research-NCI CDA Confidential Disclosure Agreement CRADA Cooperative Research and Development Agreement CSBF Chemical and Structural Biology Facult

  12. NCI Grant Resources Room

    Cancer.gov

    If you’re interested in information about NCI grants, visit the Grant Resources Room. You can talk to NCI staff about grant application and review processes, and even schedule a one-on-one consultation.

  13. Emergency Preparedness at NCI

    Cancer.gov

    Information to help prepare for an emergency. Includes resources for patients and health care providers to continue cancer care, NCI contacts for grantees, and resources to prepare and update NCI employees and contractors.

  14. NCI & Division Obligations

    Cancer.gov

    Displays obligations for grants, contracts, training fellowships, intramural research, and management and support, including the number of grant awards, funding amounts, and percent of the total NCI budget.

  15. NCI Rare Tumor Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    The mission of the Rare Tumors Initiative is to better leverage existing NCI expertise in basic and clinical science studies of rare tumors to identify and more effectively translate potential new therapies. The NCI Rare Tumor Initiative was launched in 2

  16. NCI Contact Center

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI offers free, scientifically accurate, and easy-to-understand information on a range of cancer topics in English and Spanish. Get live help from compassionate information specialists at 1-800-4-CANCER.

  17. NCI at ASCO

    Cancer.gov

    NCI-designated cancer centers are being extensively represented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago this year with a large array of clinical trial results and findings.

  18. NCI Cohort Consortium Membership

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium membership is international and includes investigators responsible for more than 40 high-quality cohorts who are studying large and diverse populations in more than 15 different countries.

  19. NCI Visuals Online

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Visuals Online contains images from the collections of the National Cancer Institute's Office of Communications and Public Liaison, including general biomedical and science-related images, cancer-specific scientific and patient care-related images, and portraits of directors and staff of the National Cancer Institute.

  20. NCI Rare Tumor Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    Contact Information   For more information on the Rare Tumors Initiative or to become a member please contact:   Abby Sandler, Ph.D. Special Assistant to the Director, Rare Tumors Initiative, OD, CCR, NCI 301-496-9983 sandlera@mail.nih.gov Karlyne Reilly,

  1. NCI Cohort Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium is an extramural-intramural partnership formed by the National Cancer Institute to address the need for large-scale collaborations to pool the large quantity of data and biospecimens necessary to conduct a wide range of cancer studies.

  2. Hojas informativas del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    La colección de hojas informativas del NCI trata de una variedad de temas relacionados con el cáncer. Las hojas informativas se revisan y ponen al día de acuerdo a las investigaciones más recientes sobre el cáncer.

  3. NCI Relapse Workshop November 2009

    Cancer.gov

    For question about this site contact Brenda Boersma (NCI) boersmab@mail.nih.gov For questions about the NCI relapse after transplant program contact Alan Wayne (NCI) waynea@mail.nih.gov To learn more about the Center for Cancer Research please visit http:

  4. Relationship of creative projects in anatomy to medical student professionalism, test performance and stress: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Johanna; Nguyen, Vincent P; Mourra, Sarah; Boker, John R; Ross, Marianne; Thai, Trung M; Leonard, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Background The anatomy course offers important opportunities to develop professionalism at an early stage in medical education. It is an academically significant course that also engenders stress in some students. Methods Over a three-year period, 115 of 297 students completed creative projects. Thirty-four project completers and 47 non-completers consented to participate in the study. Projects were analyzed for professionalism themes using grounded theory. A subset of project completers and non-completers were interviewed to determine their views about the stress of anatomy and medical school, as well as the value of the creative projects. We also compared test performance of project completers and non-completers. Results Projects completed early in the course often expressed ambivalence about anatomy, whereas later projects showed more gratitude and sense of awe. Project completers tended to report greater stress than noncompleters, but stated that doing projects reduced stress and caused them to develop a richer appreciation for anatomy and medicine. Project completers performed significantly lower than non-completers on the first written exam (pre-project). Differences between groups on individual exams after both the first and second creative project were nonsignificant. Conclusion For some students, creative projects may offer a useful way of reflecting on various aspects of professionalism while helping them to manage stress. PMID:19887011

  5. Cardiac anatomy for the interventional arrhythmologist: I.terminology and fluoroscopic projections.

    PubMed

    Farré, Jerónimo; Anderson, Robert H; Cabrera, José A; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Rubio, José M; Benezet-Mazuecos, Juan; Del Castillo, Silvia; Macía, Ester

    2010-04-01

    Cardiac anatomy is complex and its understanding is essential for the interventional arrhythmologist. The first difficulty is the terminology used to describe the location of sites of mapping and ablation. For many years, electrophysiologists have named these positions following the conventional electrocardiographical vocabulary, or the terminology used by surgeons performing arrhythmic surgery. This traditional nomenclature, however, failed to take note of the crucial principle of considering the location of the heart in the human body as viewed in its erect position. In other words, it had failed to use an attitudinally appropriate terminology. Almost 10 years ago, a new attitudinal nomenclature was proposed for the right and left atrioventricular junctions. In this first of a series of reviews of cardiac anatomy as seen by the interventional arrhythmologist, we discuss the role of attitudinally appropriate terminology, and relate this to the projections used for cardiac fluoroscopy, fluorography, and angiography. Throughout our series of reviews, we will illustrate the value of The Visible Human Slice and Surface Server in facilitating the understanding of the fluoroscopic anatomy. (PACE 2010; 497-507). PMID:20059709

  6. Data Sets from Major NCI Initiaves

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Data Catalog includes links to data collections produced by major NCI initiatives and other widely used data sets, including animal models, human tumor cell lines, epidemiology data sets, genomics data sets from TCGA, TARGET, COSMIC, GSK, NCI60.

  7. Digital Standards for NCI Websites

    Cancer.gov

    The Digital Standards for NCI Websites and Social Media provide developers and content managers guidance on the visual and content standards, as well as policies and procedures, in effect for National Cancer Institute (NCI) digital media – including traditional and mobile websites, as well as social and new media channels.

  8. NCI Women Scientist Advisors (WSA)

    Cancer.gov

    NIH WSA Website Women in Biomedical Careers NIH Office on Research on Women's Health AACR-Women in Cancer Research NCI Office of Workforce Development For assistance with Career Development, Managers' Toolbox, Organizational Development, Work Life Issues

  9. Humanities in Gross Anatomy Project: A Novel Humanistic Learning Tool at Des Moines University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canby, Craig A.; Bush, Traci A.

    2010-01-01

    Gross anatomy affords physical therapy students an opportunity to discover human morphology by intimately studying the dead. Moreover, it also exposes future physical therapists to the humanistic aspects of the profession. In 2007, anatomy faculty decided to socialize students to the humanities with a new course requirement: Humanities in Gross

  10. Humanities in Gross Anatomy Project: A Novel Humanistic Learning Tool at Des Moines University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canby, Craig A.; Bush, Traci A.

    2010-01-01

    Gross anatomy affords physical therapy students an opportunity to discover human morphology by intimately studying the dead. Moreover, it also exposes future physical therapists to the humanistic aspects of the profession. In 2007, anatomy faculty decided to socialize students to the humanities with a new course requirement: Humanities in Gross…

  11. The LINDSAY Virtual Human Project: An immersive Approach to Anatomy and Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tworek, Janet K.; Jamniczky, Heather A.; Jacob, Christian; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Wright, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of digital anatomy teaching software packages challenges anatomy educators on how to best integrate these tools for teaching and learning. Realistically, there exists a complex interplay of design, implementation, politics, and learning needs in the development and integration of software for education, each of which may be…

  12. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - NCI Alliance Bulletin

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Bulletin is a resource that serves to connect Alliance participants, partners, and affiliates by highlighting the innovative work of the Alliance members in their efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  13. Join TTC! | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) offers a unique opportunity for training through the NCI TTC Fellowship program. TTC also has a unit dedicated to marketing these research opportunities and their underlying technologies to potential collaborators and licensees.

  14. GSRP - NCI Graduate Student Recruiting Program

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks candidates to participate in the Graduate Student Recruiting Program, which is held yearly in Bethesda, Maryland. The purpose of this event is to recruit outstanding senior graduate students to postdoctoral positions at the NCI.

  15. NCI Women Scientist Advisors (WSA)

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Women Scientist Advisors (WSA) was established 1992 for IRP women scientists to have an open forum to discuss and exchange ideas. Each WSA is elected by the women scientists of her IC or appointed and serves a two-year term. The NCI WSA's are resp

  16. NCI Relapse Workshop November 2009

    Cancer.gov

    Name Institute email Sub-committee Bishop, Michael NCI michael.bishop@nih.hhs.gov Co-Chair Giralt, Sergio MD Anderson sgiralt@mail.mdanderson.org Co-Chair Alyea, Edwin Dana-Farber edwin_alyea@dfci.harvard.edu Strategie/therapies to prevent relapse, Co-Cha

  17. NCI Relapse Workshop November 2009

    Cancer.gov

    Committee members Name Institue email Pavletic, Steve (Co-Chair) NCI pavletis@mail.nih.gov Weisdorf, Daniel (Co-Chair) University of Minnesota weisd001@umn.edu De Lima, Marcos MD Anderson Cancer Center mdelima@mdanderson.org Foran, James University of Ala

  18. NCI Relapse Workshop November 2009

    Cancer.gov

    Committee members Name Institue email Kröger, Nicolaus (Co-chair) University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf nkroeger@uke.uni-hamburg.de Wayne, Alan (Co-chair) NCI waynea@mail.nih.gov Bacher, Ulrike University of Hamburg u.bacher@uke.de Bader, Peter University

  19. NCI Relapse Workshop November 2009

    Cancer.gov

    This page will serve as a home page of the NCI International Workshop on The Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation held on November 2-3, 2009 at the Natcher Auditorium, Bethesda, MD, USA Mee

  20. NCI Women Scientist Advisors (WSA)

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI prize honors the commitment of women in cancer research and is given in tribute to Dr. Franklin, who played a critical role in the discovery of the DNA double helix. Past Award Winners Maxine Singer, Carnegie Institute, no title, January 2002 Marg

  1. Larynx Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Larynx Anatomy View/Download: Small: 648x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Larynx Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the larynx; drawing shows the ...

  2. Vulva Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Vulva Anatomy View/Download: Small: 720x634 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Vulva Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the vulva; drawing shows the ...

  3. Pharynx Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pharynx Anatomy View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pharynx Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pharynx; drawing shows the ...

  4. NCI-Frederick” Is Retired; Replaced with “NCI at Frederick” | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer If you are used to using the term “NCI-Frederick” to identify your work location, please note that this name has been officially retired. This change was made to ensure consistency with the naming conventions used by other NCI locations, such as NCI at Shady Grove. Please be aware of the distinction between the terms “NCI at Frederick” and “the NCI Campus at Frederick,” as follows:

  5. NCI Drug Development Collaborative

    Cancer.gov

    Things to consider prior to submitting a proposal to the DDC 1) Is the target novel? 2) Can you verify the target is not being developed by pharma? 3) Can you invest time, resources and personnel to this project for several years? 4) Is the target critica

  6. Robert Wiltrout Says Goodbye to NCI in 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    After 34 years at NCI, Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., said he is looking forward to trading his I-270 commute for another type of commute: exploring the waterways of Maryland, Alaska, and Wyoming to fulfill his love of fishing. Wiltrout officially retired as director of the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) on July 2 of last year. Throughout his college academic career, Wiltrout had an interest in science, but it was not until he was working on a research project for his master’s degree that he considered a career in scientific research.

  7. Pros and Cons of a Group Webpage Design Project in a Freshman Anatomy and Physiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Kevin M.; Jensen, Murray; Moore, Randy

    2007-01-01

    To generate motivation and promote the development of written communication skills, students in a freshman-level anatomy and physiology course for nonmajors created group webpages describing historically important diseases. After the groups had been formed, each individual was assigned specific components of the disease (e.g., causes or…

  8. Pros and Cons of a Group Webpage Design Project in a Freshman Anatomy and Physiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Kevin M.; Jensen, Murray; Moore, Randy

    2007-01-01

    To generate motivation and promote the development of written communication skills, students in a freshman-level anatomy and physiology course for nonmajors created group webpages describing historically important diseases. After the groups had been formed, each individual was assigned specific components of the disease (e.g., causes or

  9. Project TAPS. Teaching Anatomy with Programmed Schematics. Progress Report Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desch, S. H.; Stolurow, L. M.

    Experimental Programed Instruction of the anatomy of the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve is being conducted by the Harvard Computer-Aided Instruction Laboratory in cooperation with Tufts University Dental School. Two nearly identical programs are presented, one (PF) using representational diagrams and the other (PD) a schematic diagram…

  10. Anatomy and art.

    PubMed

    Laios, Konstantinos; Tsoukalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Androutsos, George

    2013-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci, Jean Falcon, Andreas Vesalius, Henry Gray, Henry Vandyke Carter and Frank Netter created some of the best atlases of anatomy. Their works constitute not only scientific medical projects but also masterpieces of art. PMID:24640589

  11. The LINDSAY Virtual Human Project: an immersive approach to anatomy and physiology.

    PubMed

    Tworek, Janet K; Jamniczky, Heather A; Jacob, Christian; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Wright, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of digital anatomy teaching software packages challenges anatomy educators on how to best integrate these tools for teaching and learning. Realistically, there exists a complex interplay of design, implementation, politics, and learning needs in the development and integration of software for education, each of which may be further amplified by the somewhat siloed roles of programmers, faculty, and students. LINDSAY Presenter is newly designed software that permits faculty and students to model and manipulate three-dimensional anatomy presentations and images, while including embedded quizzes, links, and text-based content. A validated tool measuring impact across pedagogy, resources, interactivity, freedom, granularity, and factors outside the immediate learning event was used in conjunction with observation, field notes, and focus groups to critically examine the impact of attitudes and perceptions of all stakeholders in the early implementation of LINDSAY Presenter before and after a three-week trial period with the software. Results demonstrate that external, personal media usage, along with students' awareness of the need to apply anatomy to clinical professional situations drove expectations of LINDSAY Presenter. A focus on the software over learning, which can be expected during initial orientation, surprisingly remained after three weeks of use. The time-intensive investment required to create learning content is a detractor from user-generated content and may reflect the consumption nature of other forms of digital learning. Early excitement over new technologies needs to be tempered with clear understanding of what learning is afforded, and how these constructively support future application and integration into professional practice. PMID:22791664

  12. NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Trial

    Cancer.gov

    Information about the NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Program, in which researchers will examine tumor tissue from patients with advanced solid tumors and lymphomas that have stopped responding to treatment

  13. Eye Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  14. Hand Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... del pulgar Dedo en gatillo See More... Hand Anatomy Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ... del pulgar Dedo en gatillo See More... Hand Anatomy Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ...

  15. Paraganglioma Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Paraganglioma Anatomy View/Download: Small: 648x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Paraganglioma Anatomy Description: Paraganglioma of the head and neck; drawing ...

  16. NCI Relapse/Transplant Meeting 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Co-Chairs: Hardy, Nancy NCI hardyn@mail.nih.gov Battiwalla, Minoo NHLBI battiwam@mail.nih.gov Committee Members: Name Institute Session Miller, Jeffrey S. U of Minnesota Biology of Relapse Gress, Ron NCI Biology of Relapse Wu, Catherine Dana-Farber Cancer

  17. NCI Center of Excellence in Immunology

    Cancer.gov

    Members Name and E-mail Phone Affiliation Lee Helman, MD Chair 301.496.4345 Acting Director, CCR Jonathan Ashwell, MD 301.496.4931 Laboratory of Immune Cell Biology, CCR, NCI Jay Berzofsky, MD, PhD 301.496.6874 Vaccine Branch, CCR, NCI Kevin Conlon, MD 30

  18. Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group (PPWG)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group to support development of a comprehensive and interdisciplinary pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacogenomics cancer research program.

  19. NCI Holds on to Defelice Cup | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI kept the Defelice Cup trophy this year after beating Leidos Biomedical Research, 15 to 9, at the 10th annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament held on Columbus Day. Sixteen players on each team battled it out at the yearly contractor vs. government tournament held at Rattlewood Golf Course in Mount Airy, Md. NCI leads the series 6–4. “The score was the highest NCI margin of victory in the 10-year series,” said Denny Dougherty, retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick. “The intensity of the annual competition has increased each year and has become...

  20. NCI at AACR 2016 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) will be participating at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting, to be held April 16-20, 2016, in New Orleans at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Sessions Featuring NCI Staff An overview of the NCI-sponsored sessions and NCI experts presenting at AACR. |

  1. NCI Relapse/Transplant Meeting 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Aims of the NCI-Sponsored Second International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation The Primary Aim of the Workshop is to facilitate the development of multicenter clinical trials rela

  2. NCI Relapse/Transplant Meeting 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Name Institute Gooley, Ted Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Devlin, Sean Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center  Logan, Brett Medical College of Wisconsin Neuberg, Donna Harvard University Steinberg, Seth NCI Zhang, Mei-Jie Medical College of Wiscon

  3. NCI Center of Excellence in Immunology

    Cancer.gov

    The Center of Excellence in Immunology (CEI) is one of 5 Centers of Excellence within the NCI Intramural Research Program (IRP). These Centers are multi-disciplinary venues that generate connections among diverse intellectual, financial, and physical reso

  4. NCI Center of Excellence in Chromosome Biology

    Cancer.gov

    Participation CECB participation is open to all NCI intramural investigators who are interested in chromosome biology. Membership Full membership, which includes a research listing on the CECB website, is open to all CCR Principal Investigators and Senior

  5. NCI Center of Excellence in Immunology

    Cancer.gov

    Membership is open to all NCI intramural principal investigators, scientists, clinicians, and science administrators as well as scientists from other NIH institutes. Please contact Dr. Diana Linnekin if you are interested in joining. – A – Stephen K. Ande

  6. NCI Intramural Faculties and Working Groups

    Cancer.gov

    1) Goals The NCI intramural faculties, working groups, and interest groups are dynamic teams that provide a forum for scientists working in different areas of research to engage one another to promote interaction and communication. The goals are to: Promo

  7. NCI Central Review Board Receives Accreditation

    Cancer.gov

    The Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs has awarded the NCI Central Institutional Review Board full accreditation. AAHRPP awards accreditation to organizations demonstrating the highest ethical standards in clinical res

  8. Dinutuximab (Unituxin™) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    In 2010, NCI entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with United Therapeutics Corp., under which the company assumed responsibility for manufacturing dinutuximab and moving it through the steps required for regulatory approval.

  9. Constructing failure in big biology: The socio-technical anatomy of Japan's Protein 3000 Project.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Masato

    2016-02-01

    This study focuses on the 5-year Protein 3000 Project launched in 2002, the largest biological project in Japan. The project aimed to overcome Japan's alleged failure to contribute fully to the Human Genome Project, by determining 3000 protein structures, 30 percent of the global target. Despite its achievement of this goal, the project was fiercely criticized in various sectors of society and was often branded an awkward failure. This article tries to solve the mystery of why such failure discourse was prevalent. Three explanatory factors are offered: first, because some goals were excluded during project development, there was a dynamic of failed expectations; second, structural genomics, while promoting collaboration with the international community, became an 'anti-boundary object', only the absence of which bound heterogeneous domestic actors; third, there developed an urgent sense of international competition in order to obtain patents on such structural information. PMID:26983170

  10. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  11. NCI at Frederick Employees Recognized at the 2013 NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer More than 60 NCI at Frederick government and contractor employees were recognized at the NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony on Nov. 14, held on the main NIH campus in Bethesda.

  12. NCI at Frederick Employees Honored at NCI Director’s Awards Program | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Nineteen staff members affiliated with NCI at Frederick or the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) were recognized at the 2014 NCI Director’s Award Ceremony for their outstanding contributions to advancing cancer research. The ceremony, held Dec. 1, took place at the NIH Natcher Conference Center, on the main campus in Bethesda.

  13. 78 FR 27974 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ...In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Written......

  14. 76 FR 22714 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Health Information National Trends Survey 4 (HINTS 4) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ...In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval.......

  15. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current Avaya phone system with a Cisco Unified Communications phone system. The Cisco system is already in use at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  16. Analysis of superiorly projecting anterior communicating artery aneurysms: anatomy, techniques, and outcome. A proposed classification system.

    PubMed

    Nossek, Erez; Setton, Avi; Karimi, Reza; Dehdashti, Amir R; Langer, David J; Chalif, David J

    2016-04-01

    Superiorly projecting (SP) anterior communicating artery (AComA) aneurysms are typically described as a homogenous group. Clinically and microsurgically, these aneurysms vary in multiple important characteristics. We propose a microsurgical classification system for these complex aneurysms and review its implications regarding presentation, microsurgical techniques, and outcome. This retrospective analysis reviews patients undergoing clipping of SP AComA aneurysms (2005-2013). The classification system is based on the virtual plane created by the A2 segments and its relationship to the aneurysm. Aneurysm type was assessed by intraoperative images and videos. Type 1 is defined by bisection of the dome by the virtual plane. Type 2 is defined by dome projection posterior to this plane. Sagittal rotation of the plane defines type 3. We analyzed clinical presentation, morphology, angiographic characteristics, operative technique, and outcome relative to the classification types. There were 44 SP AComA aneurysms. 3D angiographic images predicted classification type in 83 %. Type 1 presented more often with SAH (95.5 %, p = 0.0046). There was no statistically significant difference between the types regarding patient demographics or aneurysm characteristics. In type 2, fenestrated clips were used frequently (87.5 % p= 0.0016), and there was higher rate of intraoperative rupture (37.5 %). Although there was no statistically significant difference between the types in respect to HH grade upon presentation, patients with type 2 aneurysms experienced higher rates of poor GOS (50 %). The proposed classification system for SP AComA aneurysms has implications regarding surgical planning, micro-dissection, clipping, and outcome. Type 2 aneurysms carry significant surgical risk. PMID:26631225

  17. Acoustic stria: anatomy of physiologically characterized cells and their axonal projection patterns.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip H; Massie, Ann; Joris, Philip X

    2005-02-21

    The mammalian cochlear nucleus (CN) has been a model structure to study the relationship between physiological and morphological cell classes. Several issues remain, in particular with regard to the projection patterns and physiology of neurons that exit the CN dorsally via the dorsal (DAS), intermediate (IAS), and commissural stria. We studied these neurons physiologically and anatomically using the intra-axonal labeling method. Multipolar cells with onset chopper (O(C)) responses innervated the ipsilateral ventral and dorsal CN before exiting the CN via the commissural stria. Upon reaching the midline they turned caudally to innervate the opposite CN. No collaterals were seen innervating any olivary complex nuclei. Octopus cells typically showed onset responses with little or no sustained activity. The main axon used the IAS and followed one of two routes occasionally giving off olivary complex collaterals on their way to the contralateral ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL). Here they can have elaborate terminal arbors that surround VNLL cells. Fusiform and giant cells have overlapping but not identical physiology. Fusiform but not giant cells typically show pauser or buildup responses. Axons of both cells exit via the DAS and take the same course to reach the contralateral IC without giving off any collaterals en route. PMID:15669051

  18. NCI Center of Excellence in Integrative Cancer Biology and Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Participation CEICBG participation is open to all NCI intramural investigators who are interested in cancer biology or genomics. Membership Full membership, which includes a research listing on the CEICBG website, is open to all intramural NCI principal i

  19. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry.

  20. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Since the government cannot engage in the development, manufacture, and sale of products, the NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) makes its discoveries (and discoveries from nine other NIH Institutes) available to organizations that can assist in the further development and commercialization of these basic science discoveries, to convert them into public health benefits.

  1. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  2. At NCI, Supporting the Best Science

    Cancer.gov

    Yesterday, at the AACR annual meeting, Dr. Doug Lowy spoke directly to the research community about his goals as NCI Acting Director. Dr. Lowy said that he plans to continue many of the programs launched by his predecessor, Dr. Harold Varmus, and to sharp

  3. NCI Genitourinary Malignancies Center of Excellence

    Cancer.gov

    Participation GUM-COE participation is open to all NCI intramural staff who are interested in GU cancers. Membership Full membership, which includes a research listing on the GUM-COE website, is open to all CCR Principal Investigators and Senior Scientist

  4. NCI Cancer Health Disparities Interest Group

    Cancer.gov

    Across all of the major lethal cancers, disparities in the incidence and/or survival, of cancer patients by race is evident. While some of the causes have been determined, most remain unexplored and undefined. There are a number of investigators at NCI, f

  5. NCI-MATCH Trial Draws Strong Interest.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    After 800 cancer patients enrolled during the first 3 months of the NCI-MATCH trial, organizers have extended a temporary halt in enrollment to gear up for the next phase. The basket study, which matches patients to approved or experimental drugs based on specific genetic mutations in their tumors, is expected to resume in April or May. PMID:26896095

  6. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  7. NCI/DCCPS R21 Program Announcements

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  8. NCI Approves Funding Plan for NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2014, the Scientific Program Leaders (SPL) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) approved the funding plan for the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP will conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States. The program will receive $93 million a year for five years. |

  9. NCI Approves Funding Plan for NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2014, the Scientific Program Leaders (SPL) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) approved the funding plan for theNCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP will conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States. The program will receive $93 million a year for five years. |

  10. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... español An Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The ... all the vessels of this network in your body were laid end-to-end, they would extend for about 60,000 miles (more than 96,500 kilometers), which is far enough to ... Please contact our Webmaster with ...

  11. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out in 2014 in West Africa, staff members from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research responded quickly. Members of the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) were instrumental not only in setting up the clinical trials of the vaccine in Liberia, but also in providing training, community outreach, and recruitment strategies for the trials.

  12. The Anatomy of Learning Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsson, Niklas; Dahlgren, Lars Owe; Hult, Hakan; Scheja, Max; Lonka, Kirsti; Josephson, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The experience of clinical teachers as well as research results about senior medical students' understanding of basic science concepts has much been debated. To gain a better understanding about how this knowledge-transformation is managed by medical students, this work aims at investigating their ways of setting about learning anatomy.

  13. The Anatomy of Learning Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsson, Niklas; Dahlgren, Lars Owe; Hult, Hakan; Scheja, Max; Lonka, Kirsti; Josephson, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The experience of clinical teachers as well as research results about senior medical students' understanding of basic science concepts has much been debated. To gain a better understanding about how this knowledge-transformation is managed by medical students, this work aims at investigating their ways of setting about learning anatomy.…

  14. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreas Anatomy View/Download: Small: 761x736 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows the ...

  15. Thymus Gland Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Quick Search Image Details Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the thymus gland; drawing shows ...

  16. Normal Female Reproductive Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Quick Search Image Details Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy View/Download: Small: 720x756 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the female reproductive system; drawing ...

  17. METAvivor Reps Visit NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Three representatives of METAvivor visited NCI at Frederick on April 13 to meet and tour with Balamurugan Kuppusamy, Ph.D., staff scientist in the laboratory of Esta Sterneck, Ph.D., senior investigator, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research.  The purpose of the visit was to learn more about Kuppusamy’s research. Kuppusamy is a recipient of a $50,000, two-year grant awarded by METAvivor to study the role of the CEBPD-FBXW7 signaling pathway in inflammatory breast cancer.

  18. 77 FR 4334 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Solar Cell: A Mobile UV Manager for Smart Phones (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ...In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval.......

  19. 77 FR 2734 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Solar Cell: A Mobile UV Manager for Smart Phones (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ...In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval.......

  20. Halaven® - eribulin mesylate (analog of halichondrin B) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Under a CRADA with NCI, Eisai Co. provided eribulin for NCI's preclinical development activities and to support NCI's Phase I clinical trials. Eisai ultimately took the product, Halaven®, to licensure.

  1. Regulatory Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape. PMID:26139952

  2. The Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    After making such a discovery, NCI researchers should immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention and consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Specialist about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form.

  3. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Approved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2013, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Board of Scientific Advisors approved the creation of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). NCORP will bring state-of-the art cancer prevention, control, treatment and imaging clinical trials, cancer care delivery research, and disparities studies to individuals in their own communities. |

  4.              NCI Ethics

    Cancer.gov

    STORY:  Sharing resources, research and ideas are fundamental to the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) mission. Many NCI employees are invited to participate in activities outside of typical job duties, such as teaching a class at a university or editing

  5.              NCI Ethics

    Cancer.gov

    September 2012 NCI ETHICS OFFICE UPDATES Office of Ethics to Welcome New Director       Effective October 7, 2012, the NCI Office of Ethics welcomes Nancy O’Hanlon as its Director and Deputy Ethics Counselor.Nancy was most recently the Director of the Eth

  6. Nail anatomy.

    PubMed

    de Berker, David

    2013-01-01

    The nail unit comprises the nail plate, the surrounding soft tissues, and their vasculature and innervation based upon the distal phalanx. The nail plate is a laminated keratinized structure lying on the nail matrix (15-25%), the nail bed with its distal onychodermal band (75-85%), and the hyponychium at its free edge. The distal part of the matrix, the lunula characterized by its half-moon shape, can be observed in some digits. The nail plate is embedded by the proximal and lateral folds. From the proximal nail fold, the cuticle (also known as the eponychium), adheres to the superficial surface of the proximal nail plate. The nail unit possesses a complex and abundant vascular network to ensure adequate blood supply. Finally, both the periungual soft tissues and the nail folds are innervated. The shapes, structure, and inter-relationships of these tissues are factors in the way nails present with disease and how we understand and manage those diseases. In particular, an understanding of the surgical anatomy is important for those undertaking diagnostic or curative operations on the nail. With this knowledge, the most appropriate surgery can be planned and the patient can be provided with accurate and clear guidance to enable informed consent. PMID:24079579

  7. NCI at Frederick Contributes to Feds Feed Families | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Once again, NCI at Frederick participated in the annual Feds Feed Families event, which challenges federal workers to help knock out hunger with a food drive. This year, NIH collected 26,315 pounds of non-perishable goods, beating its goal of collecting 20,000 pounds. This includes over four tons of food that was collected at satellite locations, including NCI at Frederick. The food collected at NCI at Frederick was donated locally to the Frederick Rescue Mission. These donations help feed local families in need through the holiday season.

  8. Build a Human Project: Improving Attitude and Increasing Anatomy Content Knowledge and Skills for Middle-Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houtz, Lynne E.; Quinn, Thomas H.

    2006-01-01

    For four years middle-level students and science teachers have participated in a two-week summer workshop outreach project collaboratively designed and implemented by School of Medicine and Department of Education faculty. The project's goals included improving the attitude of student participants toward the study of science; increasing…

  9. Anatomy of the Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... Errors Scientists in the Laboratory Visual Acuity Testing Anatomy of the Eye View complete NEI image albums ... Eye Normally Developing Eye Drawing of the Eye Anatomy of the Eye Drawing of the Eye NEI ...

  10. Anatomy of the Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anatomy of the Eye En Español Read in Chinese External (Extraocular) Anatomy Extraocular Muscles: There are six muscles that are ...

  11. NCI Director Also to Be Interim FDA Commissioner

    Cancer.gov

    Andrew von Eschenbach, M.D., director of the NCI, was asked by President Bush on Friday, September 23, 2005, to assume the additional role of interim Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

  12. 2014 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  13. 2012 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2012 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  14. NCI and the Precision Medicine Initiative®

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's activities related to precision medicine focuses on new and expanded precision medicine clinical trials; mechanisms to overcome drug resistance to cancer treatments; and developing a shared digital repository of precision medicine trials data.

  15. Micatu Tissue Arrayer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI researcher recognized a critical need to create a low-cost, easy-to-use tissue microarrayer (TMA), an instrument used by researchers and pathologists to accurately examine tissue samples from patients.

  16. 2009 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2009 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  17. NCI Center of Excellence in Integrative Cancer Biology and Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Highlighted Article 1 The Center of Excellence in Integrative Cancer Biology and Genomics (CEICBG) is one of four Centers of Excellence established within the NCI Intramural Research Program (IRP). The Centers of Excellence build upon existing structures

  18. NCI scientists at forefront of new prostate cancer diagnostics

    Cancer.gov

    Introduction of the UroNav was the result of nearly a decade’s research and development, principally conducted at NCI. Resembling a stylized computer workstation on wheels, the system electronically fuses together pictures from magnetic resonance imaging

  19. Revealing non-covalent interactions in solids: NCI plots revisited.

    PubMed

    Otero-de-la-Roza, Alberto; Johnson, Erin R; Contreras-García, Julia

    2012-09-21

    In this article, the NCI method [Johnson et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2010, 132, 6498] for plotting and analysing non-covalent interactions (NCI) is extended to periodic (solid-state) electron densities and implemented in the critic program. The new code uses self-consistent electron densities from a variety of electronic structure methods (pseudopotentials/plane-wave, FP-LAPW, local orbitals, etc.), and it can also build the promolecular density from the crystal geometry alone. As an example of the new code, intermolecular interactions in several molecular crystals are presented and analyzed. The connection with QTAIM studies is established and a reinterpretation of the NCI domains is given regarding the current knowledge of the field. The connection between NCI domains and intermolecular vibrations is made apparent, as well as the ability of the method to reveal the locality of bonding. PMID:22850808

  20. 2013 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  1. 2011 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2011 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  2. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Alliance in the News

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is conducting cutting-edge research using nanotechnology to transform the diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and clinical outcomes for cancer patients. Read news stories and announcements below about the Alliance's multidisciplinary work.

  3. NCI at ASCO: A brief overview on women's cancers

    Cancer.gov

    The 2014 annual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago in June highlighted results from a number of NCI-supported and -sponsored clinical trial results in women’s cancers. Taken together, these results represent important advances

  4. Líneas Vitales: Programas y servicios del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    Artículos y videos sobre los programas y servicios del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer de la serie educativa Líneas Vitales del NCI, la cual está dirigida especialmente a poblaciones multiculturales.

  5. 2008 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2008 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  6. 2010 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2010 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  7. Centro para la Salud Mundial (CGH) del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    El Centro para la Salud Mundial (CGH) del NCI coordina actividades de investigación y trabaja con socios nacionales e internacionales para comprender y enfrentar la carga que representa el cáncer a nivel mundial.

  8. Invention Development Program Helps Nurture NCI at Frederick Technologies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Invention Development Fund (IDF) was piloted by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC) in 2014 to facilitate the commercial development of NCI technologies. The IDF received a second round of funding from the NCI Office of the Director and the Office of Budget and Management to establish the Invention Development Program (IDP) for fiscal year 2016. The IDP is using these funds to help advance a second set of inventions.

  9. The quail anatomy portal.

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Avnika A; Simkin, Johanna E; Salgado, David; Newgreen, Donald F; Martins, Gabriel G; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese quail is a widely used model organism for the study of embryonic development; however, anatomical resources are lacking. The Quail Anatomy Portal (QAP) provides 22 detailed three-dimensional (3D) models of quail embryos during development from embryonic day (E)1 to E15 generated using optical projection tomography. The 3D models provided can be virtually sectioned to investigate anatomy. Furthermore, using the 3D nature of the models, we have generated a tool to assist in the staging of quail samples. Volume renderings of each stage are provided and can be rotated to allow visualization from multiple angles allowing easy comparison of features both between stages in the database and between images or samples in the laboratory. The use of JavaScript, PHP and HTML ensure the database is accessible to users across different operating systems, including mobile devices, facilitating its use in the laboratory.The QAP provides a unique resource for researchers using the quail model. The ability to virtually section anatomical models throughout development provides the opportunity for researchers to virtually dissect the quail and also provides a valuable tool for the education of students and researchers new to the field. DATABASE URL: http://quail.anatomyportal.org (For review username: demo, password: quail123). PMID:24715219

  10. Reflections as near-peer facilitators of an inquiry project for undergraduate anatomy: Successes and challenges from a term of trial-and-error.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Lauren M; Michels, Alison; Szymus, Julianna; Law, Wyanne; Edwin Ho, Man-Hymn; Qu, Fei; Yeung, Ralph T T; Chow, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Near-peer facilitators (senior students serving as facilitators to their more junior peers) bring a unique student-based perspective to teaching. With fewer years of teaching experience however, students who become involved in a facilitator role typically develop related skills quickly through a process of trial-and-error within the classroom. The aim of this paper is to report on the authors' own experiences and reflections as student near-peer facilitators for an inquiry-based project in an undergraduate anatomy course. Three areas of the facilitator experience are explored: (1) offering adequate guidance as facilitators of inquiry, (2) motivating students to engage in the inquiry process, and (3) fostering creativity in learning. A practical framework for providing guidance to students is discussed which offers facilitators a scaffold for asking questions and assisting students through the inquiry process. Considerations for stimulating intrinsic motivations toward inquiry learning are made, paying attention to ways in which facilitators might influence feelings of motivation towards learning. Also, the role of creativity in inquiry learning is explored by highlighting the actions facilitators can take to foster a creative learning environment. Finally, recommendations are made for the development of formalized training programs that aid near-peer facilitators in the acquisition of facilitation skills before entering into a process of trial-and-error within the classroom. PMID:23813933

  11. A sex comparison of the anatomy and function of the main olfactory bulb-medial amygdala projection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, N; McCarthy, E A; Cherry, J A; Baum, M J

    2011-01-13

    We previously reported that some main olfactory bulb (MOB) mitral/tufted (M/T) cells send a direct projection to the "vomeronasal" amygdala in female mice and selectively respond to volatile male mouse urinary odors. We asked whether MOB M/T cells that project to the vomeronasal amygdala exist in male mice and whether there is a sexually dimorphic response of these neurons to volatile male urinary pheromones. Gonadectomized male and female mice received bilateral injections of the retrograde tracer, Cholera toxin-B (CTb) into the medial amygdala (Me), which is part of the vomeronasal amygdala. All subjects were then treated with estradiol benzoate and progesterone before being exposed to volatile male urinary odors whereupon they were sacrificed 90 min later. Sections of the MOB were immunostained for Fos protein and/or CTb. Male mice, like females, displayed a small population of MOB M/T cells that project to the Me. While the general localization of these cells was similar in the two sexes, there were statistically significant sex differences in the percentage of MOB M/T cells in the anterior and posterior medial segments of the MOB that were retrogradely labeled by CTb. Male urinary volatiles stimulated equivalent, significant increases in Fos expression by MOB M/T neurons projecting to the Me in the two sexes. By contrast, in the same mice exposure to male urinary volatiles stimulated a significant increase in Fos expression by mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) only in female subjects. Thus any sexually dimorphic behavioral or neuroendocrine responses to male urinary volatiles likely depend on the differential processing of these odor inputs in the AOB and/or other downstream forebrain structures after their detection by the main olfactory system. PMID:21070839

  12. An NCI perspective on creating sustainable biospecimen resources.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Jimmie; Rogers, Joyce; Myers, Kimberly; Lim, Mark David; Lockhart, Nicole; Moore, Helen; Sawyer, Sherilyn; Furman, Jeffrey L; Compton, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    High-quality biospecimens with appropriate clinical annotation are critical in the era of personalized medicine. It is now widely recognized that biospecimen resources need to be developed and operated under established scientific, technical, business, and ethical/legal standards. To date, such standards have not been widely practiced, resulting in variable biospecimen quality that may compromise research efforts. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR) was established in 2005 to coordinate NCI's biospecimen resource activities and address those issues that affect access to the high-quality specimens and data necessary for its research enterprises as well as the broader translational research field. OBBR and the NCI Biorepository Coordinating Committee developed NCI's "Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources" after consultation with a broad array of experts. A Biospecimen Research Network was established to fund research to develop additional evidence-based practices. Although these initiatives will improve the overall availability of high-quality specimens and data for cancer research, OBBR has been authorized to implement a national biobanking effort, cancer HUman Biobank (caHUB). caHUB will address systematically the gaps in knowledge needed to improve the state-of-the-science and strengthen the standards for human biobanking. This commentary outlines the progressive efforts by NCI in technical, governance, and economic considerations that will be important as the new caHUB enterprise is undertaken. PMID:21672889

  13. NCI at Frederick Receives a Royal Visit | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and NCI at Frederick recently had the honor of hosting Professor Dr. Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol of Thailand.  Her Royal Highness has a special interest in scientific research related to the use of natural products for treating disease. The purpose of her visit was to discuss the work on natural products being undertaken at NCI at Frederick. Her Royal Highness attended talks by researchers from both the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), CCR, and the Natural Products Branch (NPB), Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD).

  14. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports SUMMARY..., Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer... (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports,...

  15. Anatomy Comic Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective…

  16. Anatomy Comic Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective

  17. Anatomy: Spotlight on Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Beverley; Pather, Nalini; Ihunwo, Amadi O.

    2008-01-01

    Anatomy departments across Africa were surveyed regarding the type of curriculum and method of delivery of their medical courses. While the response rate was low, African anatomy departments appear to be in line with the rest of the world in that many have introduced problem based learning, have hours that are within the range of western medical…

  18. Anatomy comic strips.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective imagination. The comics were drawn on paper and then recreated with digital graphics software. More than 500 comic strips have been drawn and labeled in Korean language, and some of them have been translated into English. All comic strips can be viewed on the Department of Anatomy homepage at the Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea. The comic strips were written and drawn by experienced anatomists, and responses from viewers have generally been favorable. These anatomy comic strips, designed to help students learn the complexities of anatomy in a straightforward and humorous way, are expected to be improved further by the authors and other interested anatomists. PMID:21634024

  19. Provocative Questions in Cancer: NCI Seminar

    Cancer.gov

    science writers' seminar to discuss various aspects of one of NCI’s signature efforts -- the Provocative Questions project. Discussion will focus on the scientific research that surrounds some of these questions.

  20. NCI intramural research highlighted at 2014 AACR meeting

    Cancer.gov

    This year’s American Association for Cancer Research meeting featured plenary talks by two NCI scientists, Steven Rosenberg, M.D., and Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., that highlighted the challenges in developing varied and potentially synergistic treatments f

  1. Creating Start-up Companies around NCI Inventions | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Rose Freel, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer The National Cancer Institute (NCI), led by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC),  the Avon Foundation, and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge.

  2. NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of cancer care investigators, providers, academia, and other organizations that care for diverse populations in health systems. View the list of publications from NCORP. | Clinical Trials network of cancer care professionals who care for diverse populations across the U.S.

  3.              NCI Ethics

    Cancer.gov

       Thanks for visiting the NCI Ethics Newsletter webpage!  Click on the links below to access the most current version of the newsletter, as well as the archives.   Volume 1, January 2012  Volume 2, May 2012  Volume 3, September 2012

  4.              NCI Ethics

    Cancer.gov

      May 2012 NCI ETHICS OFFICE UPDATES Widely Attended Gathering Form Now Available in NEES The NIH-2803 Request for Approval to Accept Free Attendance under the Widely Attended Gathering (WAG) exception is now ready for use by employees in the NIH Enterpri

  5.              NCI Ethics

    Cancer.gov

    Welcome to the first edition of the NCI Office of Ethics Newsletter!  We created this newsletter to keep staff up to date on ethics topics, news, and current events.  Please feel free to contact us with questions, requests for newsletter article topics or

  6. 2013 NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Annual Bulletin

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Bulletin is a resource that serves to connect Alliance participants, partners, and affiliates by highlighting the innovative work of the Alliance members in their efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  7. Centros oncológicos designados por el NCI

    Cancer.gov

    El programa de centros oncológicos designados por el Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI) reconoce a los centros de todo el país que cumplen con rigurosos criterios para participar en proyectos avanzados de primer nivel para la investigación multidisciplinaria del cáncer.

  8. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Training Funding

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer awards training grants to facilitate the training and education of the next generation of nanotechnology researchers. The grants also provide an opportunity for experienced researchers and established institutions to work together in sharing their knowledge to positively influence the future of nanotechnology.

  9. Skull Base Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag R; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Wang, Wei-Hsin; Wang, Eric W

    2016-02-01

    The anatomy of the skull base is complex with multiple neurovascular structures in a small space. Understanding all of the intricate relationships begins with understanding the anatomy of the sphenoid bone. The cavernous sinus contains the carotid artery and some of its branches; cranial nerves III, IV, VI, and V1; and transmits venous blood from multiple sources. The anterior skull base extends to the frontal sinus and is important to understand for sinus surgery and sinonasal malignancies. The clivus protects the brainstem and posterior cranial fossa. A thorough appreciation of the anatomy of these various areas allows for endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base. PMID:26614826

  10. Comparison of a Gross Anatomy Laboratory to Online Anatomy Software for Teaching Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathiowetz, Virgil; Yu, Chih-Huang; Quake-Rapp, Cindee

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction between occupational therapy students who used a gross anatomy laboratory versus online anatomy software (AnatomyTV) as tools to learn anatomy at a large public university and a satellite campus in the mid-western United States. The goal was to determine if…

  11. Comparison of a Gross Anatomy Laboratory to Online Anatomy Software for Teaching Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathiowetz, Virgil; Yu, Chih-Huang; Quake-Rapp, Cindee

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction between occupational therapy students who used a gross anatomy laboratory versus online anatomy software (AnatomyTV) as tools to learn anatomy at a large public university and a satellite campus in the mid-western United States. The goal was to determine if

  12. Evidence-based anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yammine, Kaissar

    2014-09-01

    Anatomy is a descriptive basic medical science that is no longer considered a research-led discipline. Many publications in clinical anatomy are prevalence studies treating clinically relevant anatomical variations and reporting their frequencies and/or associations with variables such as age, sex, side, laterality, and ancestry. This article discusses the need to make sense of the available literature. A new concept, evidence-based anatomy (EBA), is proposed to find, appraise, and synthetize the results reported in such publications. It consists in applying evidence-based principles to the field of epidemiological anatomy research through evidence synthesis using systematic reviews and meta-analyses to generate weighted pooled results. Pooled frequencies and associations based on large pooled sample size are likely to be more accurate and to reflect true population statistics and associations more closely. A checklist of a typical systematic review in anatomy is suggested and the implications of EBA for practice and future research, along with its scope, are discussed. The EBA approach would have positive implications for the future preservation of anatomy as a keystone basic science, for sound knowledge of anatomical variants, and for the safety of medical practice. PMID:24797314

  13. NCI Updates Tobacco Policies Following Re-accreditation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    This year, NCI was re-accredited as one of nearly 200 CEO Cancer Gold Standard employers across the United States. According to its website, “the CEO Cancer Gold Standard provides a framework for employers to have a healthier workplace by focusing on cancer risk reduction, early detection, and access to clinical trials and high-quality care.”  As part of this re-accreditation, NCI has updated its Tobacco-Free Policy. Part of this policy includes posting signs around campus reminding visitors and staff that NCI’s campus is tobacco-free. Therefore, the use of all tobacco products is prohibited. This includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

  14. Susan Koogle Marks 40+ Years at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer In 1973, Susan Koogle commuted from Washington County to a small data processing company in Arlington, Va. When gas prices spiked from 25 to 54 cents a gallon, she began to look for a job closer to home. That’s when she came to work at NCI at Frederick, and in December 2013, she marked her 40th year with the facility.

  15. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Tutorials and Seminar Series

    Cancer.gov

    View details about tutorials and seminars hosted by Alliance members and members of the cancer research community. These events provide a forum for sharing innovative perspectives on research and development efforts in the field of nanotechnology and their application to cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Also visit the Event Listing section to find scientific meetings and events where NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer leaders and members are participating.

  16. NCI investment in nanotechnology: achievements and challenges for the future.

    PubMed

    Dickherber, Anthony; Morris, Stephanie A; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers an exceptional and unique opportunity for developing a new generation of tools addressing persistent challenges to progress in cancer research and clinical care. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) recognizes this potential, which is why it invests roughly $150 M per year in nanobiotechnology training, research and development. By exploiting the various capacities of nanomaterials, the range of nanoscale vectors and probes potentially available suggests much is possible for precisely investigating, manipulating, and targeting the mechanisms of cancer across the full spectrum of research and clinical care. NCI has played a key role among federal R&D agencies in recognizing early the value of nanobiotechnology in medicine and committing to its development as well as providing training support for new investigators in the field. These investments have allowed many in the research community to pursue breakthrough capabilities that have already yielded broad benefits. Presented here is an overview of how NCI has made these investments with some consideration of how it will continue to work with this research community to pursue paradigm-changing innovations that offer relief from the burdens of cancer. PMID:25429991

  17. Ontology-enriched Visualization of Human Anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Pouchard, LC

    2005-12-20

    The project focuses on the problem of presenting a human anatomical 3D model associated with other types of human systemic information ranging from physiological to anatomical information while navigating the 3D model. We propose a solution that integrates a visual 3D interface and navigation features with the display of structured information contained in an ontology of anatomy where the structures of the human body are formally and semantically linked. The displayed and annotated anatomy serves as a visual entry point into a patient's anatomy, medical indicators and other information. The ontology of medical information provides labeling to the highlighted anatomical parts in the 3D display. Because of the logical organization and links between anatomical objects found in the ontology and associated 3D model, the analysis of a structure by a physician is greatly enhanced. Navigation within the 3D visualization and between this visualization and objects representing anatomical concepts within the model is also featured.

  18. Contemporary art and the ethics of anatomy.

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y Michael

    2007-01-01

    The ethics of anatomy bears on the ways in which we present and behold human bodies and human remains, as well as on the duties we have with regard to the persons whose bodies or body parts are presented. Anatomy is also a mode of thought and of social organization. Following Merleau-Ponty's assertion that the human body belongs both to the particular and to the metaphysical, I contend that art's ways of rendering of the particular in human anatomy often bring into relief metaphysical and ethical insights relevant to clinical medicine. This paper discusses the art of Gideon Gechtman, Mary Ellen Mark, Shari Zolla, and Christine Borland. It considers the relationship of these artists to earlier artistic traditions and the implications of their work for contemporary medicine and the biopsychosocial paradigm. Andrew Wyeth, the Visible Male Project, the Isenheim Altarpiece by GrA(1/4)newald, and an anonymous Dutch Baroque portrait are also discussed. PMID:17259679

  19. Collaboration Opportunities with the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB) at NCI | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB) at the National Cancer Institute has developed the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB), which is a unique infrastructure for collecting biospecimens for the purpose of conducting biospecimen research. Biospecimens from the BPV program will be made available to collaborators with the capability to perform molecular analysis as part of a collaborative research agreement with the NCI-BBRB.

  20. [Viennese school of anatomy].

    PubMed

    Angetter, D C

    1999-10-01

    Anatomical science played a minor role in Vienna for centuries until Gerard van Swieten, in the 18th century, recognized the importance of anatomy for medical education. In the 19th century the anatomical school at the University of Vienna development to its height. A new building and a collection of preparations attracted a large number of students. Finally, a second department of anatomy was established. Political ideologies started to affect this institution in the beginning of the 20th century. Anti-Semitism emerged and caused uproars and fights among the students of the two departments. In 1938 both were united under Eduard Pernkopf, a dedicated Nazi and chairman of the department of anatomy, Decan of the medical faculty (1938-1943) and later on President of the University of Vienna (1943-1945). He was suspected of using cadavers of executed persons for the purpose of research and education. PMID:10546321

  1. [Anatomy lessons on animals].

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Alain

    2006-01-01

    The first anatomical studies were realized on the animal by Galen and Vesalius. Bourgelat created the first veterinarian school in Lyons, then in Paris where the famous dissection of a man on his horse can be seen (Fragonard). The Lafosse dynasty was interested in the study of the horse care and the painter Sollier showed the most beautiful coloured engravings about the horses. A chair of anatomy was created to compare the human and animal anatomy by the school of Jardin des Plantes en 1855. PMID:17526401

  2. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  3. Learning Anatomy Enhances Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Klaassen, Tim P. F. M.; Donders, A. R. T.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of medicine ("n" = 242, intervention) and…

  4. Learning Anatomy Enhances Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Klaassen, Tim P. F. M.; Donders, A. R. T.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of medicine ("n" = 242, intervention) and

  5. Organization of a Regional NCI Cancer Center Core Network

    PubMed Central

    Ambulos, Nicholas P.

    2013-01-01

    Institutional funding to support academic core facilities is increasingly more difficult to obtain. Grant funding is more competitive than ever. Should investigators lose grant funding, the impact to core facilities is far-reaching. Not only does the core lab lose user fees from that funded study, but the institution loses the indirect costs that support the institutional infrastructure, including core facilities, and the effect can be profound, reducing or eliminating institutional support for active core labs and eliminating funds that allow development of new technology. To remedy this problem, a group of NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the Mid-Atlantic region established a ‘consortium’ that encourages collaborative interactions among the participating centers. Members of the consortium include the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center's Lombardi Cancer Center, the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, and the University of Virginia School of Medicine Cancer Center. The function of the consortium is to develop a multi-center infrastructure to provide local NCI-designated cancer center members access to those shared resources not available at their home institution. This provides an alternative to each institution investing in their own resources, and helps strengthen existing resources. The consortium also addresses the recent changes to the NCI Cancer Center Support Grant guidelines, which now encourages collaborative links with other centers as well as demonstrating the impact and the value that these core services add to the research programs at all of these institutions.

  6. Before You Collaborate, You Should Partner with NCI TTC | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey W. Thomas, Contributing Writers As the fall and winter seasons progress, you may be attending more scientific conferences, where you may find a number of opportunities for research collaborations. To assist your lab in reaching its research goals through collaborations, the staff of the National Cancer Institute Technology Transfer Center (NCI TTC) can guide you through a tool box of agreements you may need for protecting your intellectual property (IP) and effectively managing your collaboration. 

  7. NCI at Frederick Employees Sew for Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The R&W Club Frederick hosted a sewing party on Feb. 18 to give employees a chance to help sew pillowcases for children hospitalized for illnesses and cancer treatments. The nonprofit organization ConKerr Cancer provides the pillowcases to children across the country. Melissa Porter, administrative manager, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick, and vice chair of the R&W Club Frederick, said the event went well. While the turnout was lower than expected, 27 pillowcases were completed, she said.

  8. Illustrated Speech Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearer, William M.

    Written for students in the fields of speech correction and audiology, the text deals with the following: structures involved in respiration; the skeleton and the processes of inhalation and exhalation; phonation and pitch, the larynx, and esophageal speech; muscles involved in articulation; muscles involved in resonance; and the anatomy of the…

  9. Anatomy for Biomedical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Stephen W.; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    There is a perceived need for anatomy instruction for graduate students enrolled in a biomedical engineering program. This appeared especially important for students interested in and using medical images. These students typically did not have a strong background in biology. The authors arranged for students to dissect regions of the body that…

  10. The Anatomy Puzzle Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Willis H.; Carter, Robert, III

    This document features review questions, crossword puzzles, and word search puzzles on human anatomy. Topics include: (1) Anatomical Terminology; (2) The Skeletal System and Joints; (3) The Muscular System; (4) The Nervous System; (5) The Eye and Ear; (6) The Circulatory System and Blood; (7) The Respiratory System; (8) The Urinary System; (9) The…

  11. The Anatomy Puzzle Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Willis H.; Carter, Robert, III

    This document features review questions, crossword puzzles, and word search puzzles on human anatomy. Topics include: (1) Anatomical Terminology; (2) The Skeletal System and Joints; (3) The Muscular System; (4) The Nervous System; (5) The Eye and Ear; (6) The Circulatory System and Blood; (7) The Respiratory System; (8) The Urinary System; (9) The

  12. Design and Development of a New Facility for Teaching and Research in Clinical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, John Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses factors in the design, commissioning, project management, and intellectual property protection of developments within a new clinical anatomy facility in the United Kingdom. The project was aimed at creating cost-effective facilities that would address widespread concerns over anatomy teaching, and support other activities

  13. Design and Development of a New Facility for Teaching and Research in Clinical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, John Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses factors in the design, commissioning, project management, and intellectual property protection of developments within a new clinical anatomy facility in the United Kingdom. The project was aimed at creating cost-effective facilities that would address widespread concerns over anatomy teaching, and support other activities…

  14. Integrating constitutive gene expression and chemoactivity: mining the NCI60 anticancer screen.

    PubMed

    Covell, David G

    2012-01-01

    Studies into the genetic origins of tumor cell chemoactivity pose significant challenges to bioinformatic mining efforts. Connections between measures of gene expression and chemoactivity have the potential to identify clinical biomarkers of compound response, cellular pathways important to efficacy and potential toxicities; all vital to anticancer drug development. An investigation has been conducted that jointly explores tumor-cell constitutive NCI60 gene expression profiles and small-molecule NCI60 growth inhibition chemoactivity profiles, viewed from novel applications of self-organizing maps (SOMs) and pathway-centric analyses of gene expressions, to identify subsets of over- and under-expressed pathway genes that discriminate chemo-sensitive and chemo-insensitive tumor cell types. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is used to quantify the accuracy of discriminating genes to predict tumor cell chemoactivity. LDA results find 15% higher prediction accuracies, using ∼30% fewer genes, for pathway-derived discriminating genes when compared to genes derived using conventional gene expression-chemoactivity correlations. The proposed pathway-centric data mining procedure was used to derive discriminating genes for ten well-known compounds. Discriminating genes were further evaluated using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to reveal a cellular genetic landscape, comprised of small numbers of key over and under expressed on- and off-target pathway genes, as important for a compound's tumor cell chemoactivity. Literature-based validations are provided as support for chemo-important pathways derived from this procedure. Qualitatively similar results are found when using gene expression measurements derived from different microarray platforms. The data used in this analysis is available at http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/andhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/geo (GPL96, GSE32474). PMID:23056181

  15. Rep. Delaney Learns about Breast Cancer Research at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Rep. John Delaney (D-Md., 6th District) visited the NCI Campus at Frederick on October 21 to learn more about the research that scientists at NCI at Frederick are doing on breast cancer. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

  16. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... National Cancer Institute (NCI) SmokefreeTXT (Text Message) Program Evaluation (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance... memorandum. This study seeks to assess the efficacy of the SmokefreeTXT program, a text message smoking... text- messaging service and a series of web-based surveys. All web-based survey data will be...

  17. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes. PMID:25704934

  18. [Anatomy of the skull].

    PubMed

    Pásztor, Emil

    2010-01-01

    The anatomy of the human body based on a special teleological system is one of the greatest miracles of the world. The skull's primary function is the defence of the brain, so every alteration or disease of the brain results in some alteration of the skull. This analogy is to be identified even in the human embryo. Proportions of the 22 bones constituting the skull and of sizes of sutures are not only the result of the phylogeny, but those of the ontogeny as well. E.g. the age of the skeletons in archaeological findings could be identified according to these facts. Present paper outlines the ontogeny and development of the tissues of the skull, of the structure of the bone-tissue, of the changes of the size of the skull and of its parts during the different periods of human life, reflecting to the aesthetics of the skull as well. "Only the human scull can give me an impression of beauty. In spite of all genetical colseness, a skull of a chimpanzee cannot impress me aesthetically"--author confesses. In the second part of the treatise those authors are listed, who contributed to the perfection of our knowledge regarding the skull. First of all the great founder of modern anatomy, Andreas Vesalius, then Pierre Paul Broca, Jacob Benignus Winslow are mentioned here. The most important Hungarian contributors were as follow: Sámuel Rácz, Pál Bugát or--the former assistant of Broca--Aurél Török. A widely used tool for measurement of the size of the skull, the craniometer was invented by the latter. The members of the family Lenhossék have had also important results in this field of research, while descriptive anatomy of the skull was completed by microsopical anatomy thanks the activity of Géza Mihálkovits. PMID:21661257

  19. Executions and scientific anatomy.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Antonín; Jelen, Karel; Stajnrtova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    The very word "anatomy" tells us about this branch's connection with dissection. Studies of anatomy have taken place for approximately 2.300 years already. Anatomy's birthplace lies in Greece and Egypt. Knowledge in this specific field of science was necessary during surgical procedures in ophthalmology and obstetrics. Embalming took place without public disapproval just like autopsies and manipulation with relics. Thus, anatomical dissection became part of later forensic sciences. Anatomical studies on humans themselves, which needed to be compared with the knowledge gained through studying procedures performed on animals, elicited public disapprobation and prohibition. When faced with a shortage of cadavers, anatomists resorted to obtaining bodies of the executed and suicide victims - since torture, public display of the mutilated body, (including anatomical autopsy), were perceived as an intensification of the death penalty. Decapitation and hanging were the main execution methods meted out for death sentences. Anatomists preferred intact bodies for dissection; hence, convicts could thus avoid torture. This paper lists examples of how this process was resolved. It concerns the manners of killing, vivisection on people in the antiquity and middle-ages, experiments before the execution and after, vivifying from seeming death, experiments with galvanizing electricity on fresh cadavers, evaluating of sensibility after guillotine execution, and making perfect anatomical preparations and publications during Nazism from fresh bodies of the executed. PMID:26859596

  20. Softball Games Bring NCI and Leidos Biomed Employees Together | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Leidos Biomed employees took to the fields at Nallin Pond for the third annual slow-pitch softball games on August 26. The series attracted 54 employees who were divided into four teams, Red, Blue, Gray, and White, and they were cheered on by about 40 enthusiastic spectators. In the first set of games, the Gray team defeated the Blue team, 15–8, and the White team pulled out a win against the Red team, 17–15. After a brief rest, the two winning teams and the two losing teams faced each other in a second set of games. On Field 1, the “winners” match-up of the Gray and White teams was a nail biter, with a close score throughout the game. Daylight was a factor, however, and the team captains decided to call the game for safety reasons. With a lead of 15 to 13, the Gray team was declared the overall winner.

  1. Comparison of a gross anatomy laboratory to online anatomy software for teaching anatomy.

    PubMed

    Mathiowetz, Virgil; Yu, Chih-Huang; Quake-Rapp, Cindee

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction between occupational therapy students who used a gross anatomy laboratory versus online anatomy software (AnatomyTV) as tools to learn anatomy at a large public university and a satellite campus in the mid-western United States. The goal was to determine if equivalent learning outcomes could be achieved regardless of learning tool used. In addition, it was important to determine why students chose the gross anatomy laboratory over online AnatomyTV. A two group, post-test only design was used with data gathered at the end of the course. Primary outcomes were students' grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction. In addition, a survey was used to collect descriptive data. One cadaver prosection was available for every four students in the gross anatomy laboratory. AnatomyTV was available online through the university library. At the conclusion of the course, the gross anatomy laboratory group had significantly higher grade percentage, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction than the AnatomyTV group. However, the practical significance of the difference is debatable. The significantly greater time spent in gross anatomy laboratory during the laboratory portion of the course may have affected the study outcomes. In addition, some students may find the difference in (B+) versus (A-) grade as not practically significant. Further research needs to be conducted to identify what specific anatomy teaching resources are most effective beyond prosection for students without access to a gross anatomy laboratory. Anat Sci Educ. 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:25903289

  2. Anatomy relevant to conservative mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the nipple and breast skin is fundamental to any surgeon practicing conservative mastectomies. In this paper, the relevant clinical anatomy will be described, mainly focusing on the anatomy of the “oncoplastic plane”, the ducts and the vasculature. We will also cover more briefly the nerve supply and the arrangement of smooth muscle of the nipple. Finally the lymphatic drainage of the nipple and areola will be described. An appreciation of the relevant anatomy, together with meticulous surgical technique may minimise local recurrence and ischaemic complications. PMID:26645002

  3. Anatomy relevant to conservative mastectomy.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Rachel L; Rusby, Jennifer E

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the nipple and breast skin is fundamental to any surgeon practicing conservative mastectomies. In this paper, the relevant clinical anatomy will be described, mainly focusing on the anatomy of the "oncoplastic plane", the ducts and the vasculature. We will also cover more briefly the nerve supply and the arrangement of smooth muscle of the nipple. Finally the lymphatic drainage of the nipple and areola will be described. An appreciation of the relevant anatomy, together with meticulous surgical technique may minimise local recurrence and ischaemic complications. PMID:26645002

  4. Computational Environments and Analysis methods available on the NCI High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Foster, C.; Minchin, S. A.; Pugh, T.; Lewis, A.; Wyborn, L. A.; Evans, B. J.; Uhlherr, A.

    2014-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful in-situ computational environment to enable both high performance computing and data-intensive science across a wide spectrum of national environmental data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress in addressing harmonisation of the underlying data collections for future transdisciplinary research that enable accurate climate projections. NCI makes available 10+ PB major data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the national scientific records), major research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. The data is accessible within an integrated HPC-HPD environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large scale and high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. This computational environment supports a catalogue of integrated reusable software and workflows from earth system and ecosystem modelling, weather research, satellite and other observed data processing and analysis. To enable transdisciplinary research on this scale, data needs to be harmonised so that researchers can readily apply techniques and software across the corpus of data available and not be constrained to work within artificial disciplinary boundaries. Future challenges will involve the further integration and analysis of this data across the social sciences to facilitate the impacts across the societal domain, including timely analysis to more accurately predict and forecast future climate and environmental state.

  5. Who Is Repeating Anatomy? Trends in an Undergraduate Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Audra F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy courses frequently serve as prerequisites or requirements for health sciences programs. Due to the challenging nature of anatomy, each semester there are students remediating the course (enrolled in the course for a second time), attempting to earn a grade competitive for admissions into a program of study. In this retrospective study,…

  6. The anatomy of anatomy: a review for its modernization.

    PubMed

    Sugand, Kapil; Abrahams, Peter; Khurana, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Anatomy has historically been a cornerstone in medical education regardless of nation or specialty. Until recently, dissection and didactic lectures were its sole pedagogy. Teaching methodology has been revolutionized with more reliance on models, imaging, simulation, and the Internet to further consolidate and enhance the learning experience. Moreover, modern medical curricula are giving less importance to anatomy education and to the acknowledged value of dissection. Universities have even abandoned dissection completely in favor of user-friendly multimedia, alternative teaching approaches, and newly defined priorities in clinical practice. Anatomy curriculum is undergoing international reformation but the current framework lacks uniformity among institutions. Optimal learning content can be categorized into the following modalities: (1) dissection/prosection, (2) interactive multimedia, (3) procedural anatomy, (4) surface and clinical anatomy, and (5) imaging. The importance of multimodal teaching, with examples suggested in this article, has been widely recognized and assessed. Nevertheless, there are still ongoing limitations in anatomy teaching. Substantial problems consist of diminished allotted dissection time and the number of qualified anatomy instructors, which will eventually deteriorate the quality of education. Alternative resources and strategies are discussed in an attempt to tackle these genuine concerns. The challenges are to reinstate more effective teaching and learning tools while maintaining the beneficial values of orthodox dissection. The UK has a reputable medical education but its quality could be improved by observing international frameworks. The heavy penalty of not concentrating on sufficient anatomy education will inevitably lead to incompetent anatomists and healthcare professionals, leaving patients to face dire repercussions. PMID:20205265

  7. Who is repeating anatomy? Trends in an undergraduate anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Audra F

    2016-03-01

    Anatomy courses frequently serve as prerequisites or requirements for health sciences programs. Due to the challenging nature of anatomy, each semester there are students remediating the course (enrolled in the course for a second time), attempting to earn a grade competitive for admissions into a program of study. In this retrospective study, remediation rates and trends in an undergraduate anatomy course with over 400 students enrolled each semester at a large Midwestern university were identified. Demographic data was collected from spring 2004 to spring 2010, including students' age, ethnicity, major of study, class standing, college admission tests (ACT and SAT®) scores, anatomy laboratory and lecture examination scores, and final anatomy grades for each semester. Eleven percent of the students repeated the course at least once. Gender, ethnicity, major of study and SAT scores were all shown to be associated with whether or not a student would need to repeat the course. On average, students who repeated anatomy demonstrated significant improvements in lecture and laboratory scores when comparing first and second enrollments in anatomy, and therefore also saw improved final course grades in their second enrollment. These findings will aid future instructors to identify and assist at-risk students to succeed in anatomy. Instructors from other institutions may also find the results to be useful for identifying students at risk for struggling. Anat Sci Educ 9: 171-178. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26179910

  8. Computed tomographic anatomy of the temporal bone

    SciTech Connect

    Virapongse, C.; Rothman, S.L.G.; Kier, E.L.; Sarwar, M.

    1982-10-01

    With the recent development of high-resolution computed tomography (CT), there is a growing need to explore the full potential of this new method in demonstrating the detailed anatomy of the temporal bone. For this purpose, dry skulls with intact ossicles were scanned in axial and coronal projections. The detailed CT anatomy of the temporal bone was documented, complemented by images from live patients. Because of its superior contrast resolution, CT was able to demonstrate numerous structures, such as the tympanic membrane, ossicles, and supporting structures, hitherto never or poorly visualized by any other method. In addition, the ease by which axial sections of the temporal bone could be obtained is of great benefit in displaying several structures previously difficult to evaluate.

  9. Rapid Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with Microvilli of the Polar Human Gastric Epithelial Cell Line NCI-N87

    PubMed Central

    Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Nossol, Constanze; Faber-Zuschratter, Heidi; Zuschratter, Werner; Renner, Lydia; Sokolova, Olga; Naumann, Michael; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef

    2013-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori results often in chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers or even gastric tumor development. Little is known about the initial interaction between gastric epithelial cells and H. pylori. The aim of the present study was to analyze the initial host contact to the bacteria. Monolayers of the human gastric epithelial cell line NCI-N87 grown on porous membranes were used and the apical side of the epithelium was exposed to the H. pylori wild-type strain P1 for 1 hr. Many epithelial cells were colonized by bacteria within the period of 60 min. Using scanning electron microscopy we detected that the bacteria were in close contact with the epithelia via microvilli. Further, transmission electron microscopy of the contact sites revealed no difference in the morphology of the microvilli in comparison to those not attached to the bacteria. The present study demonstrates the importance of microvilli on apical epithelial cells during the initial contact of the host by colonizing H. pylori. Anat Rec, 296:1800–1805, 2013. © 2013 The Authors. The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Association of Anatomists. PMID:24136815

  10. [Pandora's box of anatomy].

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Uri; Reis, Shmuel

    2008-05-01

    Physicians in Nazi Germany were among the first to join the Nazi party and the SS, and were considered passionate and active supporters of the regime. Their actions included development and implementation of the racial theory thus legitimizing the development of the Nazi genocide plan, leadership and execution of the sterilization and euthanasia programs as well as atrocious human experimentation. Nazi law allowed the use of humans and their remains in research institutions. One of the physicians whose involvement in the Nazi regime was particularly significant was Eduard Pernkopf. He was the head of the Anatomy Institute at the University of Vienna, and later became the president of the university. Pernkopf was a member of the Nazi party, promoted the idea of "racial hygiene", and in 1938, "purified" the university from all Jews. In Pernkopfs atlas of anatomy, the illustrators expressed their sympathy to Nazism by adding Nazi symbols to their illustrations. In light of the demand stated by the "Yad Vashem" Institute, the sources of the atlas were investigated. The report, which was published in 1998, determined that Pernkopfs Anatomy Institute received almost 1400 corpses from the Gestapo's execution chambers. Copies of Pernkopfs atlas, accidentally exposed at the Rappaport School of Medicine in the Technion, led to dilemmas concerning similar works with a common background. The books initiated a wide debate in Israel and abroad, regarding ethical aspects of using information originated in Nazi crimes. Moreover, these findings are evidence of the evil to which science and medicine can give rise, when they are captured as an unshakable authority. PMID:18770971

  11. NCI-60 Cell Line Screening: A Radical Departure in its Time.

    PubMed

    Chabner, Bruce A

    2016-05-01

    The year 2015 marked the 30th anniversary of National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) initial effort to establish a human cell line panel as the basis for discovering new cancer drugs. At its inception, the NCI-60 panel was a controversial departure, born of frustration with previous efforts that employed murine tumors and grounded in the hope that the biology of human tumors was diverse and somehow quite different than the murine leukemia used for the previous 30 years. And while the NCI-60 has not revolutionized cancer drug discovery in terms of the new drugs that resulted, it represents a turning point in the philosophy and practice of cancer drug research. PMID:26755050

  12. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to take a 5–4 victory total,” said Denny Dougherty, one of the team captains for Leidos Biomed and a retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick.

  13. Virtual anatomy: an anatomist's playground.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Victor M; Scherzinger, Ann L

    2006-04-01

    Virtual anatomy presents significant advantages over the reality of a cadaver as it can provide different views and perspectives, portability, longevity, standardization, diversity and most importantly the opportunity to learn the anatomy of the living human body instead of the corpse. Virtual anatomy is the life-like appearance of visible anatomy, a good example of which is the evolution of the Visible Human. Racial and statistical diversity is already developing as the population of photographic "Visible Humans" is now at least 10. Virtual anatomy should include additional diversity and therefore, consideration should be given to the preparation of more visible anatomy that will better support the virtual integration of all areas of physiology, kinematics, pathology and pathophysiology, development and evolution. Integration of anatomists with mathematicians, computer scientists, information scientists, physiologists, pathologists and clinicians (and LIST other basic scientist) is needed in order to facilitate this development. As this unfolds it is proposed, or challenged, that anatomists should maintain their position of responsibility for building anatomy as the foundation for all medical and healthcare education. In order to maintain that position they must understand and participate in this development and enjoy the rewards of teaching more visually empowering, functional, and clinical anatomy. The trip is a long one and is only about to begin but the train is leaving. Are you on board? PMID:16565945

  14. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw and label

  15. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw and label…

  16. Curriculum Guidelines for Gross Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' revised guidelines on curricula for gross anatomy suggest percentages of effort and time devoted to curricular areas, offer a rationale for anatomy instruction, note primary educational goals and prerequisites, outline content, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities…

  17. Gardasil® and Cervarix® | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Vaccine for human papilloma virus (HPV) to protect from cancers Key elements of the technology for Gardasil® and Cervarix originated from the HPV research of the laboratory of Drs. Douglas Lowy and John Schiller of the NCI.

  18. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  19. NCI/EPA AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY (AHS): DEVELOPMENT OF THE BIOMARKER QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), ind the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) have planned a long-term prospective epidemiologic study of men, women, and dependent children in agricultural areas to identify and...

  20. NCI and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Sign Statement of Intent

    Cancer.gov

    Today the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Cancer Institute/Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS) signed a statement of intent to share an interest in fostering collaborative biomedical research in oncology and a common goal

  1. NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass

  2. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To Promote Translational Research and Development Opportunities of Nanotechnology-Based Cancer Solutions AGENCY: National Cancer Institute (NCI), Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research (OCNR),...

  3. National Medal of Technology Awarded to NCI Drs. Lowy and Schiller

    Cancer.gov

    President Obama announced that two NCI scientists would be recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation -- the nation's highest honor for technological achievement. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO)

  4. Data mining the NCI60 to predict generalized cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adam C; Shedden, Kerby; Rosania, Gustavo R; Crippen, Gordon M

    2008-07-01

    Elimination of cytotoxic compounds in the early and later stages of drug discovery can help reduce the costs of research and development. Through the application of principal components analysis (PCA), we were able to data mine and prove that approximately 89% of the total log GI 50 variance is due to the nonspecific cytotoxic nature of substances. Furthermore, PCA led to the identification of groups of structurally unrelated substances showing very specific toxicity profiles, such as a set of 45 substances toxic only to the Leukemia_SR cancer cell line. In an effort to predict nonspecific cytotoxicity on the basis of the mean log GI 50, we created a decision tree using MACCS keys that can correctly classify over 83% of the substances as cytotoxic/noncytotoxic in silico, on the basis of the cutoff of mean log GI 50 = -5.0. Finally, we have established a linear model using least-squares in which nine of the 59 available NCI60 cancer cell lines can be used to predict the mean log GI 50. The model has R (2) = 0.99 and a root-mean-square deviation between the observed and calculated mean log GI 50 (RMSE) = 0.09. Our predictive models can be applied to flag generally cytotoxic molecules in virtual and real chemical libraries, thus saving time and effort. PMID:18588283

  5. Data Mining the NCI60 to Predict Generalized Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Adam C.; Shedden, Kerby; Rosania, Gustavo R.; Crippen, Gordon M.

    2008-01-01

    Elimination of cytotoxic compounds in the early and later stages of drug discovery can help reduce the costs of research and development. Through the application of principal components analysis (PCA), we were able to data mine and prove that ?89% of the total log GI50 variance is due to the non-specific cytotoxic nature of substances. Furthermore, PCA led to the identification of groups of structurally unrelated substances showing very specific toxicity profiles, such as a set of 45 substances toxic only to the Leukemia_SR cancer cell line. In an effort to predict non-specific cytotoxicity based on the mean log GI50, we created a decision tree using MACCS keys that can correctly classify over 83% of the substances as cytotoxic/non-cytotoxic in silico, based on the cutoff of mean log GI50 = ?5.0. Finally, we have established a linear model using least squares in which 9 of the 59 available NCI60 cancer cell lines can be used to predict the mean log GI50. The model has R2=0.99 and root mean square deviation between the observed and calculated mean log GI50 (RMSE) = 0.09. Our predictive models can be applied to flag generally cytotoxic molecules in virtual and real chemical libraries, thus saving time and effort. PMID:18588283

  6. NCI at Frederick Team Receives 2014 HHS Green Champions Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A team of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research employees at NCI at Frederick received the Energy and Fleet Management Award, one of the 2014 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champions Awards, for comparing the costs and energy usage of two -80°C freezer technologies. This was the first scientific study to be jointly conducted by Leidos Biomedical Research’s Applied and Developmental Research Directorate (ADRD) and Facilities Maintenance and Engineering Directorate (FME).  

  7. The effect of jet and DBD plasma on NCI-78 blood cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Kaushik, Neha; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-06-01

    In this study we describe the effects of a nonthermal jet and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on the T98G brain cancer cell line. The results of this study reveal that the jet and DBD plasma inhibits NCI-78 blood cancer cells growth efficiently with the loss of metabolic viability of cells. The main goal of this study is to induce cell death in NCI-78 blood cancer cells by the toxic effect of jet and DBD plasma.

  8. [The French lessons of anatomy].

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Alain

    2003-01-01

    The "Lessons of Anatomy" can be considered as a step of Medicine to Art. For several centuries the exhibition of a corpse's dissection was printed on the title-page of published works. Since the seventeenth century, the "Lessons of Anatomy" became a picture on the title-page in order to highlight the well-known names of the european anatomists. The study is limited to the French Lessons of Anatomy found in books or pictures after the invention of printing. PMID:14626253

  9. The painted Amsterdam anatomy lessons: anatomy performances in dissecting rooms?

    PubMed

    Baljet, B

    2000-01-01

    The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp, painted by Rembrandt in 1632, has recently been fully restored. From 02-10-98 to 10-01-99 this painting and some other Amsterdam painted anatomy lessons were exhibited in the Mauritshuis in The Hague, with the title "Rembrandt under the scalpel". The unique Tulp painting is one of those portraits painted in the tradition of the famous group portraits which flourished in 17th-century Holland, a predominantly urban, middle-class society where the main patrons of the arts were the leading citizens of the various towns. Moreover, it is a portrait in the tradition of the anatomy lessons especially painted for the Guild of Surgeons for their Guild Room. Nine such lessons have been painted for the guild and are still to be found in Dutch museums (Mauritshuis and Amsterdam Historical Museum). The anatomy lesson of Prof. Andreas Bonn, dated 1792, as well as some group portraits of the leading persons of the guild also play an important role in the Amsterdam group portraits. In 1925 the Amsterdam anatomist Louis Bolk commissioned Martin Monnickendam to paint another anatomy lesson. The restoration of the painting of Dr. Tulp has provided new information concerning the original composition of Rembrandt and the later additions. However, from an anatomical point of view, it is doubtful whether the Amsterdam anatomy lessons depict a real contemporary anatomical demonstration. They provide, together with archival sources, reliable information about the praelectores anatomiae and the leading persons of the guild, but fail to give much information about the dissecting room, the anatomy theatre or the procedure. The anatomical demonstration procedures of the guild are discussed in relation to the painted anatomy lessons. PMID:10668553

  10. Olfaction: anatomy, physiology and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Benignus, Vernon A.; Prah, James D.

    1982-01-01

    The anatomy, physiology and function of the olfactory system are reviewed, as are the normal effects of olfactory stimulation. It is speculated that olfaction may have important but unobtrusive effects on human behavior. PMID:7084147

  11. OLFACTION: ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The anatomy, physiology and function of the olfactory system are reviewed, as are the normal effects of olfactory stimulation. It is speculated that olfaction may have important but unobtrusive effects on human behavior.

  12. Curricular Guidelines in Gross Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Stanton D.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    An outline of AADS curricular guidelines for gross anatomy in dental education includes primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific course objectives for each section of content, sequencing, faculty requirements, and facility and equipment needs. (MSE)

  13. Surgical Anatomy of the Eyelids.

    PubMed

    Sand, Jordan P; Zhu, Bovey Z; Desai, Shaun C

    2016-05-01

    Slight alterations in the intricate anatomy of the upper and lower eyelid or their underlying structures can have pronounced consequences for ocular esthetics and function. The understanding of periorbital structures and their interrelationships continues to evolve and requires consideration when performing complex eyelid interventions. Maintaining a detailed appreciation of this region is critical to successful cosmetic or reconstructive surgery. This article presents a current review of the anatomy of the upper and lower eyelid with a focus on surgical implications. PMID:27105794

  14. Adding Java and CGI Functionality to an On-Line Atlas of Anatomy for Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, R.P.; Sabbatini, R.M.E.; Cardoso, S.H.; Ortale, J.R.; Rodrigues, E.A.; Kondo, A; Ubiali, G.L.P.

    1998-01-01

    The use of Java applications through applets, HTML facilities and CGI scripts provides useful interactivity to an on-line atlas of topographic anatomy via Internet, based on the Visible Human Project.

  15. Penile embryology and anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yiee, Jenny H; Baskin, Laurence S

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of penile embryology and anatomy is essential to any pediatric urologist in order to fully understand and treat congenital anomalies. Sex differentiation of the external genitalia occurs between the 7th and 17th weeks of gestation. The Y chromosome initiates male differentiation through the SRY gene, which triggers testicular development. Under the influence of androgens produced by the testes, external genitalia then develop into the penis and scrotum. Dorsal nerves supply penile skin sensation and lie within Buck's fascia. These nerves are notably absent at the 12 o'clock position. Perineal nerves supply skin sensation to the ventral shaft skin and frenulum. Cavernosal nerves lie within the corpora cavernosa and are responsible for sexual function. Paired cavernosal, dorsal, and bulbourethral arteries have extensive anastomotic connections. During erection, the cavernosal artery causes engorgement of the cavernosa, while the deep dorsal artery leads to glans enlargement. The majority of venous drainage occurs through a single, deep dorsal vein into which multiple emissary veins from the corpora and circumflex veins from the spongiosum drain. The corpora cavernosa and spongiosum are all made of spongy erectile tissue. Buck's fascia circumferentially envelops all three structures, splitting into two leaves ventrally at the spongiosum. The male urethra is composed of six parts: bladder neck, prostatic, membranous, bulbous, penile, and fossa navicularis. The urethra receives its blood supply from both proximal and distal directions. PMID:20602076

  16. [Dental anatomy of dogs].

    PubMed

    Sarkisian, E G

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate dog teeth anatomy as animal model for study of etiopathogenesis of caries disease and physiological tooth wear in human. After examining the dog's dental system, following conclusions were drawn: the dog has 42 permanent teeth, which are distributed over the dental arches not equally, and so the upper dentition consists of 20, and the lower of 22 teeth. The largest are considered upper fourth premolar and lower first molars, which are called discordant teeth. Between discordant teeth and fangs a dog has an open bite, which is limited to the top and bottom conical crown premolar teeth. Thus, in the closed position of the jaws, behind this occlusion is limited by discordant teeth, just in contact are smaller in size two molars. Only large dog's molars in a valid comparison can be likened to human molars, which allows us to use them in an analog comparison between them with further study of the morphological features ensure durability short-crown teeth and their predisposition to caries. PMID:25617107

  17. The assessment of virtual reality for human anatomy instruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benn, Karen P.

    1994-01-01

    This research project seeks to meet the objective of science training by developing, assessing, and validating virtual reality as a human anatomy training medium. In ideal situations, anatomic models, computer-based instruction, and cadaver dissection are utilized to augment the traditional methods of instruction. At many institutions, lack of financial resources limits anatomy instruction to textbooks and lectures. However, human anatomy is three dimensional, unlike the one dimensional depiction found in textbooks and the two dimensional depiction found on the computer. Virtual reality is a breakthrough technology that allows one to step through the computer screen into a three dimensional world. This technology offers many opportunities to enhance science education. Therefore, a virtual testing environment of the abdominopelvic region of a human cadaver was created to study the placement of body parts within the nine anatomical divisions of the abdominopelvic region and the four abdominal quadrants.

  18. The place of surface anatomy in the medical literature and undergraduate anatomy textbooks.

    PubMed

    Azer, Samy A

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this review were to examine the place of surface anatomy in the medical literature, particularly the methods and approaches used in teaching surface and living anatomy and assess commonly used anatomy textbooks in regard to their surface anatomy contents. PubMed and MEDLINE databases were searched using the following keywords "surface anatomy," "living anatomy," "teaching surface anatomy," "bony landmarks," "peer examination" and "dermatomes". The percentage of pages covering surface anatomy in each textbook was calculated as well as the number of images covering surface anatomy. Clarity, quality and adequacy of surface anatomy contents was also examined. The search identified 22 research papers addressing methods used in teaching surface anatomy, 31 papers that can help in the improvement of surface anatomy curriculum, and 12 anatomy textbooks. These teaching methods included: body painting, peer volunteer surface anatomy, use of a living anatomy model, real time ultrasound, virtual (visible) human dissector (VHD), full body digital x-ray of cadavers (Lodox(®) Statscan(®) images) combined with palpating landmarks on peers and the cadaver, as well as the use of collaborative, contextual and self-directed learning. Nineteen of these studies were published in the period from 2006 to 2013. The 31 papers covered evidence-based and clinically-applied surface anatomy. The percentage of surface anatomy in textbooks' contents ranged from 0 to 6.2 with an average of 3.4%. The number of medical illustrations on surface anatomy varied from 0 to 135. In conclusion, although there has been a progressive increase in publications addressing methods used in teaching surface anatomy over the last six to seven years, most anatomy textbooks do not provide students with adequate information about surface anatomy. Only three textbooks provided a solid explanation and foundation of understanding surface anatomy. PMID:23650274

  19. Student perceptions about learning anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notebaert, Andrew John

    This research study was conducted to examine student perceptions about learning anatomy and to explore how these perceptions shape the learning experience. This study utilized a mixed-methods design in order to better understand how students approach learning anatomy. Two sets of data were collected at two time periods; one at the beginning and one at the end of the academic semester. Data consisted of results from a survey instrument that contained open-ended questions and a questionnaire and individual student interviews. The questionnaire scored students on a surface approach to learning (relying on rote memorization and knowing factual information) scale and a deep approach to learning (understanding concepts and deeper meaning behind the material) scale. Students were asked to volunteer from four different anatomy classes; two entry-level undergraduate courses from two different departments, an upper-level undergraduate course, and a graduate level course. Results indicate that students perceive that they will learn anatomy through memorization regardless of the level of class being taken. This is generally supported by the learning environment and thus students leave the classroom believing that anatomy is about memorizing structures and remembering anatomical terminology. When comparing this class experience to other academic classes, many students believed that anatomy was more reliant on memorization techniques for learning although many indicated that memorization is their primary learning method for most courses. Results from the questionnaire indicate that most students had decreases in both their deep approach and surface approach scores with the exception of students that had no previous anatomy experience. These students had an average increase in surface approach and so relied more on memorization and repetition for learning. The implication of these results is that the learning environment may actually amplify students' perceptions of the anatomy course at all levels and experiences of enrolled students. Instructors wanting to foster deeper approaches to learning may need to apply instructional techniques that both support deeper approaches to learning and strive to change students' perceptions away from believing that anatomy is strictly memorization and thus utilizing surface approaches to learning.

  20. Analysis of hydrogen-bond interaction potentials from the electron density: Integration of NCI regions

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-García, Julia; Yang, Weitao; Johnson, Erin R.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are of crucial relevance to many problems in chemistry biology and materials science. The recently-developed NCI (Non-Covalent Interactions) index enables real-space visualization of both attractive (van der Waals and hydrogen-bonding) and repulsive (steric) interactions based on properties of the electron density It is thus an optimal index to describe the interplay of stabilizing and de-stabilizing contributions that determine stable minima on hydrogen-bonding potential-energy surfaces (PESs). In the framework of density-functional theory energetics are completely determined by the electron density Consequently NCI will be shown to allow quantitative treatment of hydrogen-bond energetics. The evolution of NCI regions along a PES follows a well-behaved pattern which, upon integration of the electron density is capable of mimicking conventional hydrogen-bond interatomic potentials. PMID:21786796

  1. Patient-centered communication in cancer care: the role of the NCI's Cancer Information Service.

    PubMed

    Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Hodorowski, Julie Keany; Williams, Laurie A; Kornfeld, Julie; Davis, Nydia Lassalle; Monroe, Maryann; Bright, Mary Anne

    2011-03-01

    While patient-centered care and the reduction of suffering due to cancer are primary goals of the NCI, improvement in the delivery of patient-centered communication has been identified as a key NCI research priority. As research on patient-centered communication evolves, the potential contributions of programs such as the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Cancer Information Service (CIS) cannot be overlooked. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the six core functions of patient-clinician communication described in the literature (fostering healing relationships, exchanging information, responding to emotions, managing uncertainty, making decisions and enabling patient-self management) are embedded in the work of the CIS. The communication process used by the CIS to extend the patient-centered communication role of the clinician will be discussed. CIS training and quality management systems will be described. Lastly, suggestions for the role of CIS in future health information delivery and research will be explored. PMID:20532726

  2. NIH and NCI grant-related changes during fiscal years 2014 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Rosemary S. L.

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 fiscal year (FY) continued to be a challenging one for all federal agencies despite the many Congressional strategies proposed to address the U.S. budget deficit. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 passed by the House and Senate in December 2013 approved a two-year spending bill which cancelled the FY2014 and FY2015 required sequestration cuts (i.e., 4-5% National Institute of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) budget reduction initiated on March 1, 2013), but extended the sequestration period through FY2023. This bill passage helped minimize any further budget reductions and resulted in a final FY2014 NIH budget of 29.9 billion and a NCI budget of 4.9 billion. Both NIH and NCI worked hard to maintain awarding the same number of NIH/NCI investigator-initiated R01 and exploratory R21 grants funded in FY2014 and similar to the level seen in FY2013 and previous years (see Tables 1 and 2). Since Congress only recently passed the 2015 spending bill in December 16, 2014, the final NIH and NCI budget appropriations for FY2015 remains unknown at this time and most likely will be similar to the FY2014 budget level. The NCI overall success and funding rates for unsolicited investigator-initiated R01 applications remained at 15%, while the success rate for exploratory R21 applications was 12% in FY2014 with similar rates seen in FY2013 (see Tables 1 and 2). The success rate for biomedical research applications in the Photodynamic Therapy and laser research field will be provided for the past few years. NIH provides numerous resources to help inform the extramural biomedical research community of new and current grant applicants about new grant policy changes and the grant submission and review processes.

  3. Cherry Featured in NCIs Spotlight on Scientists Video Series | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    James Cherry, Ph.D., learned at an early age that education is crucial to success. He credits his mentors, some of whom include his grandmother, Shepherd University professor Burton Lidgerding, Ph.D., David Munroe, Ph.D., Frederick National Lab, and Robert J. Hohman, Ph.D., National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for guiding him to the career he has today. Cherry, scientific program director, Office of Scientific Operations (OSO), NCI at Frederick, is one of the scientists featured inNCIs Spotlight on Scientistsvideo series.

  4. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  5. New cancer biomarkers deriving from NCI early detection research.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mukesh; Srivastava, Sudhir

    2003-01-01

    Cancer is not a single disease but an accumulation of several events, genetic and epigenetic, arising in a single cell over a long time interval. A high priority in the cancer field is to identify these events. This can be achieved by characterizing cancer-associated genes and their protein products. Identifying the molecular alterations that distinguish any particular cancer cell from a normal cell will ultimately help to define the nature and predict the pathologic behavior of that cancer cell. It will also indicate the responsiveness to treatment of that particular tumor. Understanding the profile of molecular changes in any particular cancer will be extremely useful as it will become possible to correlate the resulting phenotype of that cancer with molecular events. Achieving these goals and knowledge will provide an opportunity for discovering new biomarkers for early cancer detection and developing prevention approaches. This will also help us identify new targets for therapeutic development. Advancement in technology includes methods and tools that enable research including, but not limited to, instrumentation, techniques, devices, and analysis tools (e.g., computer software). Resources such as databases, reagents, and tissue repositories are different than technologies. The identification and definition of the molecular profiles of cancer will require the development and dissemination of high-throughput molecular analysis technologies, as well as elucidation of all of the molecular species embedded in the genome of cancer and normal cells. The main challenge in cancer control and prevention is to detect the cancer early. This could then enable effective interventions and therapies contributing to reduction in mortality and morbidity. At a specific time, biomarkers serve as molecular signposts of the physiologic state of a cell. These signposts are the result of genes, their products (proteins) and other organic chemicals made by the cell. Biomarkers could prove to be vital for the identification of early cancer and subjects at risk of developing cancer as a normal cell progresses through the complex process of transformation to a cancerous state. This chapter discusses ongoing research in genetic and proteomic approaches to identify molecular signatures such as protein profiles, microsatellite instability, hypermethylation, and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Other topics covered here include the use of genomics and proteomics as high-throughput technology platforms to facilitate biomarker-aided detection of early cancer. Other areas covered include issues surrounding the analysis, validation, and predictive value of biomarkers using such technologies. Recent advances in noninvasive techniques, such as buccal cell isolates serving as viable sources of biomarkers, complementary to traditional sources such as serum or plasma, are also presented. The review also brings attention to the efforts of the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in bringing together scientific expertise from leading national and international institutions, to identify and validate biomarkers for the detection of precancerous and cancerous cells in determining risk for developing cancer. The network's serious determined efforts in linking discovery to process development, resulting in early detection tests and clinical assessment, are also discussed. PMID:12903844

  6. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute Past Issues / Winter ... a cigarette? NCI QuitPal is a free, interactive app for iPhone or iPad that uses proven quit ...

  7. Control del cáncer y salud mundial: noticia del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI)

    Cancer.gov

    En combinación con una reunión de alto nivel de las Naciones Unidas sobre enfermedades no transmisibles en países en vías de desarrollo, el doctor Harold Varmus, director del NCI, y el doctor Ted L. Trimble, del NCI, han publicado un comentario en Science

  8. Anatomy Adventure: A Board Game for Enhancing Understanding of Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyanwu, Emeka G.

    2014-01-01

    Certain negative factors such as fear, loss of concentration and interest in the course, lack of confidence, and undue stress have been associated with the study of anatomy. These are factors most often provoked by the unusually large curriculum, nature of the course, and the psychosocial impact of dissection. As a palliative measure, Anatomy…

  9. The Anatomy of Anatomy: A Review for Its Modernization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugand, Kapil; Abrahams, Peter; Khurana, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Anatomy has historically been a cornerstone in medical education regardless of nation or specialty. Until recently, dissection and didactic lectures were its sole pedagogy. Teaching methodology has been revolutionized with more reliance on models, imaging, simulation, and the Internet to further consolidate and enhance the learning experience.

  10. The Anatomy of Anatomy: A Review for Its Modernization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugand, Kapil; Abrahams, Peter; Khurana, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Anatomy has historically been a cornerstone in medical education regardless of nation or specialty. Until recently, dissection and didactic lectures were its sole pedagogy. Teaching methodology has been revolutionized with more reliance on models, imaging, simulation, and the Internet to further consolidate and enhance the learning experience.…

  11. Anatomy 1. Introduction to Human Anatomy: A Functional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Robert M.

    An introductory human anatomy course designed to provide the basic understanding of human structure necessary for further study in allied health and related fields is described. First, a general course description provides an overview; discusses the courses' place within the science curriculum, noting that it does not meet the general education…

  12. Effects of Training Experienced Teachers in the Use of the One-Minute Preceptor Technique in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Lap Ki; Sharma, Neel

    2014-01-01

    The one-minute preceptor (OMP) is a time-efficient, learner-centered teaching method used in a busy ambulatory care setting. This project evaluated the effects of training experienced anatomy teachers in the use of the OMP in the gross anatomy laboratory on students' perceived learning. Second-year medical students from a five-year,

  13. Effects of Training Experienced Teachers in the Use of the One-Minute Preceptor Technique in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Lap Ki; Sharma, Neel

    2014-01-01

    The one-minute preceptor (OMP) is a time-efficient, learner-centered teaching method used in a busy ambulatory care setting. This project evaluated the effects of training experienced anatomy teachers in the use of the OMP in the gross anatomy laboratory on students' perceived learning. Second-year medical students from a five-year,…

  14. The Use of Limericks to Engage Student Interest and Promote Active Learning in an Undergraduate Course in Functional Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, Jacqueline A.

    2012-01-01

    The study of anatomy is a content-dense discipline with a challenging vocabulary. A mnemonic is a series of letters, a word, a phrase, or a rhyme that students can use when studying to facilitate recall. This project was designed to promote active learning in undergraduate students studying anatomy and physiology by asking them to create limericks…

  15. Curriculum Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curricula in microscopic anatomy offer an overview of the histology curriculum, note primary educational goals, outline specific content for general and oral histology, suggest prerequisites, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities are also suggested.…

  16. On the Anatomy of Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsson, Niklas; Dahlgren, Lars Owe; Hult, Hakan; Josephson, Anna

    2011-01-01

    In search for the nature of understanding of basic science in a clinical context, eight medical students were interviewed, with a focus on their view of the discipline of anatomy, in their fourth year of study. Interviews were semi-structured and took place just after the students had finished their surgery rotations. Phenomenographic analysis was…

  17. Treatment of Prostate Cancer using Anti-androgen Small Molecules | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop and commercialize a new class of small molecules for the treatment of prostate cancer. General information on co-development research collaborations, can be found on our web site (http://ttc.nci.nih.gov/forms).

  18. Novel Diagnostic Marker for Improving Treatment Outcomes of hepatitis C | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) Immunoepidemiology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop a gene-based diagnostic for Hepatitis C virus (HepC, HCV).

  19. 75 FR 70268 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NIH NCI Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Government, business or other for-profits and not-for-profit institutions. Type of Respondents: Respondents... Federal Register on August 16, 2010 (75 FR 49938) and allowed 60-days for public comment. No public... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NIH NCI...

  20. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  1. Reducing Friction: An Update on the NCIP Open Development Initiative - NCI BioMedical Informatics Blog

    Cancer.gov

    NCIP has migrated 132 repositories from the NCI subversion repository to our public NCIP GitHub channel with the goal of facilitating third party contributions to the existing code base. Within the GitHub environment, we are advocating use of the GitHub “fork and pull” model.

  2. Se lanza Red Nacional de Estudios Clínicos del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    El Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI) puso en marcha una nueva red de investigación de estudios clínicos con el objetivo de mejorar el tratamiento de más de 1,6 millones de estadounidenses que reciben un diagnóstico de cáncer cada año.

  3. 75 FR 4827 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Clinical Trials... purpose and safety of clinical trials conducted outside of the United States. An e-mail response was sent on January 6, 2010, acknowledging the commenter's concern. The response noted that the NCI's...

  4. HIV Conference to Be Held on October 21 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program Conference on “Virus Structure: Putting the Pieces Together” will be held at NCI at Frederick on October 21, 2014, from 1:00 to 5:45 p.m. in the Conference Center auditorium, Building 549.

  5. (Update) HIV Conference to Be Held on February 25 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), will hold a conference on “Host Factors and Cofactors in HIV Infection” at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) campus in Frederick, Md., on Feb. 25, from 1:00 to 5:35 p.m.

  6. Anatomy of a Bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-12-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, an international team of astronomers [1] has discovered a stunning rare case of a triple merger of galaxies. This system, which astronomers have dubbed 'The Bird' - albeit it also bears resemblance with a cosmic Tinker Bell - is composed of two massive spiral galaxies and a third irregular galaxy. ESO PR Photo 55a/07 ESO PR Photo 55a/07 The Tinker Bell Triplet The galaxy ESO 593-IG 008, or IRAS 19115-2124, was previously merely known as an interacting pair of galaxies at a distance of 650 million light-years. But surprises were revealed by observations made with the NACO instrument attached to ESO's VLT, which peered through the all-pervasive dust clouds, using adaptive optics to resolve the finest details [2]. Underneath the chaotic appearance of the optical Hubble images - retrieved from the Hubble Space Telescope archive - the NACO images show two unmistakable galaxies, one a barred spiral while the other is more irregular. The surprise lay in the clear identification of a third, clearly separate component, an irregular, yet fairly massive galaxy that seems to be forming stars at a frantic rate. "Examples of mergers of three galaxies of roughly similar sizes are rare," says Petri Väisänen, lead author of the paper reporting the results. "Only the near-infrared VLT observations made it possible to identify the triple merger nature of the system in this case." Because of the resemblance of the system to a bird, the object was dubbed as such, with the 'head' being the third component, and the 'heart' and 'body' making the two major galaxy nuclei in-between of tidal tails, the 'wings'. The latter extend more than 100,000 light-years, or the size of our own Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 55b/07 ESO PR Photo 55b/07 Anatomy of a Bird Subsequent optical spectroscopy with the new Southern African Large Telescope, and archive mid-infrared data from the NASA Spitzer space observatory, confirmed the separate nature of the 'head', but also added further surprises. The 'head' and major parts of the 'Bird' are moving apart at more than 400 km/s (1.4 million km/h!). Observing such high velocities is very rare in merging galaxies. Also, the 'head' appears to be the major source of infrared luminosity in the system, though it is the smallest of the three galaxies. "It seems that NACO has caught the action right at the time of the first high-speed fly-by of the 'head' galaxy through the system consisting of the other two galaxies," says Seppo Mattila, member of the discovery team. "These two galaxies must have met earlier, probably a couple of hundred million years ago." The 'head' is forming stars violently, at a rate of nearly 200 solar masses per year, while the other two galaxies appear to be at a more quiescent epoch of their interaction-induced star formation history. The 'Bird' belongs to the prestigious family of luminous infrared galaxies, with an infrared luminosity nearly one thousand billion times that of the Sun. This family of galaxies has long been thought to signpost important events in galaxy evolution, such as mergers of galaxies, which in turn trigger bursts of star formation, and may eventually lead to the formation of a single elliptical galaxy. The findings presented here are reported in a paper to appear in a future issue of the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society ("Adaptive optics imaging and optical spectroscopy of a multiple merger in a luminous infrared galaxy", by P. Väisänen" et al.). Note [1]: The team is composed of P. Väisänen, A. Kniazev, D. A. H. Buckley, L. Crause, Y. Hashimoto, N. Loaring, E. Romero-Colmenero, and M. Still (SAAO, South Africa), S. Mattila (Tuorla Observatory, Finland), A. Adamo and G. Östlin (Stockholm University, Sweden), A. Efstathiou (Cyprus College, Nicosia, Cyprus), D. Farrah (Cornell University, USA), P. H. Johansson (Universitäts-Sternwarte München, Germany), E. B. Burgh and K. Nordsieck (University of Wisconsin, USA), P. Lira (Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile), A. Zijlstra (University of Manchester, UK ), and S. Ryder (AAO, Australia). [2]: The final resolution was better than a tenth of an arcsecond, that is, the angle sustained by a 2-cm coin seen from a distance of 40 km. This is roughly a factor 600 better than what a keen human eye can distinguish.

  7. Anatomy adventure: a board game for enhancing understanding of anatomy.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, Emeka G

    2014-01-01

    Certain negative factors such as fear, loss of concentration and interest in the course, lack of confidence, and undue stress have been associated with the study of anatomy. These are factors most often provoked by the unusually large curriculum, nature of the course, and the psychosocial impact of dissection. As a palliative measure, Anatomy Adventure, a board game on anatomy was designed to reduce some of these pressures, emphasize student centered and collaborative learning styles, and add fun to the process of learning while promoting understanding and retention of the subject. To assess these objectives, 95 out of over 150 medical and dental students who expressed willingness to be part of the study were recruited and divided into a Game group and a Non-game group. A pretest written examination was given to both groups, participants in the Game group were allowed to play the game for ten days, after which a post-test examination was also given. A 20-item questionnaire rated on a three-point scale to access student's perception of the game was given to the game group. The post-test scores of the game group were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the non-game counterparts. Also the post-test score of the game based group was significantly better (P < 0.05) than their pretest. The students in their feedback noted in very high proportions that the game was interesting, highly informative, encouraged team work, improved their attitude, and perception to gross anatomy. PMID:23878076

  8. NCI Center of Excellence in Integrative Cancer Biology and Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    NIH Director's Challenge Award Program Frank Gonzalez, Ph.D. (Laboratory of Metabolism) and fellow NIH collaborators for their work on "Early Biomarkers of Nephropathy in Type 2 Diabetes" Tom Misteli, Ph.D. and fellow NIH collaborators for their project e

  9. Factors Influencing Patient Pathways for Receipt of Cancer Care at an NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Gage-Bouchard, Elizabeth A.; Rodriguez, Elisa M.; Saad-Harfouche, Frances G.; Miller, Austin; Erwin, Deborah O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the field of oncology, increasing access to high quality care has been identified as a priority to reduce cancer disparities. Previous research reveals that the facilities where patients receive their cancer care have implications for cancer outcomes. However, there is little understanding of how patients decide where to seek cancer care. This study examined the factors that shape patients’ pathways to seek their cancer care at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center (NCI-CCC), and differences in these factors by race, income and education. Methods In-depth interviews and survey questionnaires were administered to a random sample of 124 patients at one NCI-CCC in the Northeast US. In-depth interview data was first analyzed qualitatively to identify themes and patterns in patients’ pathways to receive their cancer care at an NCI-CCC. Logistic Regression was used to examine if these pathways varied by patient race, income, and education. Results Two themes emerged: following the recommendation of a physician and following advice from social network members. Quantitative data analysis shows that patient pathways to care at an NCI-CCC varied by education and income. Patients with lower income and education most commonly sought their cancer care at an NCI-CCC due to the recommendation of a physician. Patients with higher income and education most commonly cited referral by a specialist physician or the advice of a social network member. There were no statistically significant differences in pathways to care by race. Conclusions Our findings show that most patients relied on physician recommendations or advice from a social network member in deciding to seek their cancer care at an NCI-CCC. Due to the role of physicians in shaping patients’ pathways to the NCI-CCC, initiatives that strengthen partnerships between NCI-CCCs and community physicians who serve underserved communities may improve access to NCI-CCCs. PMID:25329653

  10. CRADAs: They're Not Just for NCI Anymore | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey Thomas, Contributing Writers, and Bruce Crise, Guest Writer Advancing scientific discovery is increasingly dependent on diverse and innovative partnerships, and the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is an essential tool for establishing partnerships. CRADAs allow a federal laboratory to enter into collaborative research and development (R&D) projects with outside parties (commercial or nonprofit).

  11. [Functional dental anatomy and amalgam].

    PubMed

    Tavernier, B; Colon, P

    1989-01-01

    Very often, the functional dental anatomy are reflected during the rehabilitation of posterior quadrants. However, the placement, the shaping in correct relation of the different dental components are indispensable conditions to respect, in order to achieve an adequate integration of the restoration within the neuro-muscular system. A clinical protocol is proposed in order to reconcile the anatomical and biological prerequisite and the setting time of modern alloys. PMID:2633261

  12. Anatomy of the infant head

    SciTech Connect

    Bosma, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    This text is mainly an atlas of illustration representing the dissection of the head and upper neck of the infant. It was prepared by the author over a 20-year period. The commentary compares the anatomy of the near-term infant with that of a younger fetus, child, and adult. As the author indicates, the dearth of anatomic information about postnatal anatomic changes represents a considerable handicap to those imaging infants. In part 1 of the book, anatomy is related to physiologic performance involving the pharynx, larynx, and mouth. Sequential topics involve the regional anatomy of the head (excluding the brain), the skeleton of the cranium, the nose, orbit, mouth, larynx, pharynx, and ear. To facilitate use of this text as a reference, the illustrations and text on individual organs are considered separately (i.e., the nose, the orbit, the eye, the mouth, the larynx, the pharynx, and the ear). Each part concerned with a separate organ includes materials from the regional illustrations contained in part 2 and from the skeleton, which is treated in part 3. Also included in a summary of the embryologic and fetal development of the organ.

  13. Orientation lesson in anatomy education.

    PubMed

    Saylam, Canan; Coskunol, H

    2005-03-01

    Dissection of a human body during an anatomy course raises questions about invasion of privacy, cadaver sources, dying and death for medical students. The technical orientation in any medical education process tends to motivate students towards a purely biological view of the human body. An orientation lesson was performed, including technical instructions, with particular emphasis on how to deal with emotions. Two hundred and forty-two second-year students were asked to complete a questionnaire and two State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) self-reports. One hundred and two students participated in an orientation lesson (group A) and 140 students did not (group B). Data were analyzed using SPSS. The t-test and chi-square test were used to evaluate differences between the groups. Group A students showed significantly better performance in both a verbal anatomy examination and multiple-choice test than group B students (p=0.001). There were no differences between group A and B students in the state and trait anxiety levels, willingness to donate their body or organs, belief in life after death, social activity or gender. The goal of including consideration of psychosocial factors in an anatomy course would allow students a thoughtful interpretation of their laboratory experience in the context of their professional development as physicians. PMID:15517261

  14. Hip: Anatomy and US technique.

    PubMed

    Molini, L; Precerutti, M; Gervasio, A; Draghi, F; Bianchi, S

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasound (US) has always had a relatively limited role in the evaluation of the hip due to the deep location of this joint. However, many hip diseases are well detectable at US, but before approaching such a study it is necessary to be thoroughly familiar with the normal anatomy and related US images. The study technique is particularly important as optimization of various parameters is required, such as probe frequency, focalization, positioning of the probe, etc. Also the patient's position is important, as it varies according to the area requiring examination. For the study of the anterior structures, the patient should be in the supine position; for the medial structures, the leg should be abducted and rotated outward with the knee flexed; for the lateral structures, the patient should be in the controlateral decubitus position; for the posterior structures the patient must be in the prone position. US study of the hip includes assessment of the soft tissues, tendons, ligaments and muscles, and also of the bone structures, joint space and serous bursae. The purpose of this article is to review the normal anatomy of the hip as well as the US anatomy of this joint. PMID:23397030

  15. Anatomy of Ursa Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Nasonova, O. G.; Courtois, H. M.

    2013-03-01

    A nearby friable cloud in Ursa Majoris contains 270 galaxies with radial velocities 500 < VLG < 1500 km s-1 inside the area of RA = [11^h. 0, 13^h. 0] and Dec. = [ + 40, +60]. At present, 97 galaxies of them have individual distance estimates. We use these data to clarify the structure and kinematics of the UMa complex. According to Makarov & Karachentsev, most of the UMa galaxies belong to seven bound groups, which have the following median parameters: velocity dispersion of 58 km s-1, harmonic projected radius of 300 kpc, virial mass of 2 1012 M? and virial mass-to-K-band luminosity ratio of 27 M?/L?. Almost a half of the UMa cloud population are gas-rich dwarfs (Ir, Im, BCD) with active star formation seen in the GALEX UV-survey. The UMa groups reside within 15-19 Mpc from us, being just at the same distance as the Virgo cluster. The total virial mass of the UMa groups is 4 1013 M?, yielding the average density of dark matter in the UMa cloud to be ?m = 0.08, i.e. a factor of 3 lower than the cosmic average. This is despite the fact that the UMa cloud resides in a region of the Universe that is an apparent overdensity. A possible explanation for this is that most mass in the Universe lies in the empty space between clusters. Herewith, the mean distances and velocities of the UMa groups follow nearly undisturbed Hubble flow without a sign of the `Z-wave' effect caused by infall towards a massive attractor. This constrains the total amount of dark matter between the UMa groups within the cloud volume.

  16. Methods for Selection of Cancer Patients and Predicting Efficacy of Combination Therapy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Lung Cancer Biomarkers Group of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop methods for selecting cancer patients for combination therapy.

  17. Body-Painting: A Tool Which Can Be Used to Teach Surface Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Nanjundaiah, Komala; Chowdapurkar, Sheshgiri

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The primary method of learning the surface anatomy is by making the students mark structures on mummified bodies. The students feel that learning the surface anatomy on mummified cadavers is not interesting. The present project on learning the surface anatomy through the body painting method was undertaken to evoke interest among the students. Materials and Methods Physiotherapy and dental undergraduate students who volunteered were involved in this study. A few surface anatomy classes were conducted by using the traditional method and a few more by using the body painting exercise. Non toxic body paints of various colours and brushes of different sizes were used for the body painting. Results A feedback was obtained from the students by using a structured questionnaire. The students opined that the body painting method was advantageous to them in learning the human anatomy. They also felt that they could have more practice sessions in any setting other than in the classroom and that they did not need to rely upon the mummified bodies. They described the body painting method as self explanatory, which gave them the feel of live structures. Conclusion This project was successful in achieving its objectives as the students felt that the method was exciting, with lots of fun during the learning. The body painting method was well accepted by the students as an effective method for learning the surface and the clinical anatomy. PMID:23205358

  18. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer: achievement and path forward.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Krzysztof; Farrell, Dorothy; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr; Barker, Anna D

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a 'disruptive technology', which can lead to a generation of new diagnostic and therapeutic products, resulting in dramatically improved cancer outcomes. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) of National Institutes of Health explores innovative approaches to multidisciplinary research allowing for a convergence of molecular biology, oncology, physics, chemistry, and engineering and leading to the development of clinically worthy technological approaches. These initiatives include programmatic efforts to enable nanotechnology as a driver of advances in clinical oncology and cancer research, known collectively as the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer (ANC). Over the last 5 years, ANC has demonstrated that multidisciplinary approach catalyzes scientific developments and advances clinical translation in cancer nanotechnology. The research conducted by ANC members has improved diagnostic assays and imaging agents, leading to the development of point-of-care diagnostics, identification and validation of numerous biomarkers for novel diagnostic assays, and the development of multifunctional agents for imaging and therapy. Numerous nanotechnology-based technologies developed by ANC researchers are entering clinical trials. NCI has re-issued ANC program for next 5 years signaling that it continues to have high expectations for cancer nanotechnology's impact on clinical practice. The goals of the next phase will be to broaden access to cancer nanotechnology research through greater clinical translation and outreach to the patient and clinical communities and to support development of entirely new models of cancer care. PMID:20552623

  19. Identification of two nickel ion-induced genes, NCI16 and PcGST1, in Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Haga, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Ikuo; Nakano, Takanari; Ikeda, Masaaki; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya

    2014-09-01

    Here, we describe the isolation of two nickel-induced genes in Paramecium caudatum, NCI16 and PcGST1, by subtractive hybridization. NCI16 encoded a predicted four-transmembrane domain protein (∼16 kDa) of unknown function, and PcGST1 encoded glutathione S-transferase (GST; ∼25 kDa) with GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Exposing cells to cobalt chloride also caused the moderate upregulation of NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs. Both nickel sulfate and cobalt chloride dose dependently induced NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs, but with different profiles. Nickel treatment caused a continuous increase in PcGST1 and NCI16 mRNA levels for up to 3 and 6 days, respectively, and a notable increase in H₂O₂ concentrations in P. caudatum. NCI16 expression was significantly enhanced by incubating cells with H₂O₂, implying that NCI16 induction in the presence of nickel ions is caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). On the other hand, PcGST1 was highly induced by the antioxidant tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) but not by H2O2, suggesting that different mechanisms mediate the induction of NCI16 and PcGST1. We introduced a luciferase reporter vector with an ∼0.42-kb putative PcGST1 promoter into cells and then exposed the transformants to nickel sulfate. This resulted in significant luciferase upregulation, indicating that the putative PcGST1 promoter contains a nickel-responsive element. Our nickel-inducible system also may be applicable to the efficient expression of proteins that are toxic to host cells or require temporal control. PMID:25001407

  20. Identification of Two Nickel Ion-Induced Genes, NCI16 and PcGST1, in Paramecium caudatum

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Nobuyuki; Nakano, Takanari; Ikeda, Masaaki; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe the isolation of two nickel-induced genes in Paramecium caudatum, NCI16 and PcGST1, by subtractive hybridization. NCI16 encoded a predicted four-transmembrane domain protein (∼16 kDa) of unknown function, and PcGST1 encoded glutathione S-transferase (GST; ∼25 kDa) with GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Exposing cells to cobalt chloride also caused the moderate upregulation of NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs. Both nickel sulfate and cobalt chloride dose dependently induced NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs, but with different profiles. Nickel treatment caused a continuous increase in PcGST1 and NCI16 mRNA levels for up to 3 and 6 days, respectively, and a notable increase in H2O2 concentrations in P. caudatum. NCI16 expression was significantly enhanced by incubating cells with H2O2, implying that NCI16 induction in the presence of nickel ions is caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). On the other hand, PcGST1 was highly induced by the antioxidant tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) but not by H2O2, suggesting that different mechanisms mediate the induction of NCI16 and PcGST1. We introduced a luciferase reporter vector with an ∼0.42-kb putative PcGST1 promoter into cells and then exposed the transformants to nickel sulfate. This resulted in significant luciferase upregulation, indicating that the putative PcGST1 promoter contains a nickel-responsive element. Our nickel-inducible system also may be applicable to the efficient expression of proteins that are toxic to host cells or require temporal control. PMID:25001407

  1. Surface anatomy and anatomical planes in the adult turkish population.

    PubMed

    Uzun, C; Atman, E D; Ustuner, E; Mirjalili, S A; Oztuna, D; Esmer, T S

    2016-03-01

    Surface anatomy and anatomical planes are widely used in education and clinical practice. The planes are largely derived from cadaveric studies and their projections on the skin show discrepancies between and within anatomical reference textbooks. In this study, we reassessed the accuracy of common thoracic and abdominopelvic anatomical planes using computed tomography (CT) imaging in the live adult Turkish population. After patients with distorting pathologies had been excluded, CT images of 150 supine patients at the end tidal inspiration were analyzed. Sternal angle, transpyloric, subcostal, supracristal and pubic crest planes and their relationships to anatomical structures were established by dual consensus. The tracheal bifurcation, azygos vein/superior vena cava (SVC) junction and pulmonary bifurcation were usually below the sternal angle while the concavity of the aortic arch was generally within the plane. The tip of the tenth rib, the superior mesenteric artery and the portal vein were usually within the transpyloric plane while the renal hila and the fundus of the gallbladder were below it. The inferior mesenteric artery was below the subcostal plane and the aortic bifurcation was below the supracristal plane in most adults. Projectional surface anatomy is fundamental to medical education and clinical practice. Modern cross-sectional imaging techniques allow large groups of live patients to be examined. Classic textbook information regarding anatomy needs to be reviewed and updated using the data gathered from these recent studies, taking ethnic differences into consideration. Clin. Anat. 29:183-190, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26403267

  2. The nose and paranasal sinuses physiology and anatomy.

    PubMed

    Jones, N

    2001-09-23

    The paranasal sinuses and nose are much more than two cavities behind a projection on the centre of the face. They humidify, filter, warm, and sense what we breathe. The anatomy and physiology interact forming a dynamic system. The anatomy, airflow, nasal resistance, its turbulence, the nasal cycle - a process by which the turbinates or cushions lining the nose alternatively swell and congest from side to side, can all potentially influence the nasal delivery of drugs. Along with these factors mucus rheology and mucociliary clearance influence the removal of substances delivered to the nose. The health of the nose and its immunological response to what is inhaled, be it pollutants, allergens, drugs or vaccines, all need to be considered. It is a fascinating sensor for the body, not only detecting the potentially harmful substances such as smoke, but its psychosexual aspects have far reaching implications and the olfactory pathway has potential as a pathway for the delivery of drugs. PMID:11516776

  3. Functional anatomy of the nose.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Thomas; Giotakis, Evangelos I; Heppt, Werner

    2011-04-01

    The human nose is a very complex entity with a great amount of variation among and within different human populations. Even though the morphology of the nasal pyramid and its soft tissue coverage is principally known, a standardized nomenclature does not yet exist. The past two decades have witnessed a considerable increase of new studies on the functional morphology of the external nasal anatomy. Detailed anatomic and clinical knowledge about the external nose is a prerequisite for successful rhinosurgery, thus this report deals with the basic structures necessary for functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty. PMID:21404156

  4. Gross anatomy of network security

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siu, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Information security involves many branches of effort, including information assurance, host level security, physical security, and network security. Computer network security methods and implementations are given a top-down description to permit a medically focused audience to anchor this information to their daily practice. The depth of detail of network functionality and security measures, like that of the study of human anatomy, can be highly involved. Presented at the level of major gross anatomical systems, this paper will focus on network backbone implementation and perimeter defenses, then diagnostic tools, and finally the user practices (the human element). Physical security measures, though significant, have been defined as beyond the scope of this presentation.

  5. Shark Attack! Sinking Your Teeth into Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    Presents a real life shark attack story and studies arm reattachment surgery to teach human anatomy. Discusses how knowledge of anatomy can be put to use in the real world and how the arm functions. Includes teaching notes and suggestions for classroom management. (YDS)

  6. Anatomy Education Faces Challenges in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memon, Ismail K.

    2009-01-01

    Anatomy education in Pakistan is facing many of the same challenges as in other parts of the world. Roughly, a decade ago, all medical and dental colleges in Pakistan emphasized anatomy as a core basic discipline within a traditional medical science curriculum. Now institutions are adopting problem based learning (PBL) teaching philosophies, and…

  7. Frank Netter's Legacy: Interprofessional Anatomy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niekrash, Christine E.; Copes, Lynn E.; Gonzalez, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Several medical schools have recently described new innovations in interprofessional interactions in gross anatomy courses. The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, CT has developed and implemented two contrasting interprofessional experiences in first-year medical student gross anatomy dissection laboratories:

  8. Frank Netter's Legacy: Interprofessional Anatomy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niekrash, Christine E.; Copes, Lynn E.; Gonzalez, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Several medical schools have recently described new innovations in interprofessional interactions in gross anatomy courses. The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, CT has developed and implemented two contrasting interprofessional experiences in first-year medical student gross anatomy dissection laboratories:…

  9. [The oldest painting of an anatomy lesson].

    PubMed

    Keeman, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The Amsterdam Historical Museum has a large collection of paintings of anatomy lessons, painted when surgeons followed the popular sixteenth century trend for group portraits. The very first, a painting of an anatomy lesson given by Sebastiaen Egbertsz de Vrij, was painted by Aert Pietersz in 1601-1603. PMID:21291580

  10. The 2008 Anatomy Ceremony: Essays

    PubMed Central

    Elansary, Mei; Goldberg, Ben; Qian, Ting; Rizzolo, Lawrence J.

    2009-01-01

    When asked to relate my experience of anatomy to the first-year medical and physician associate students at Yale before the start of their own first dissection, I found no better words to share than those of my classmates. Why speak with only one tongue, I said, when you can draw on 99 others? Anatomical dissection elicits what our course director, Lawrence Rizzolo, has called a “diversity of experience,” which, in turn, engenders a diversity of expressions. For Yale medical and physician associate students, this diversity is captured each year in a ceremony dedicated to those who donated their bodies for dissection. The service is an opportunity to offer thanks, but because only students and faculty are in attendance, it is also a place to share and address the complicated tensions that arise while examining, invading, and ultimately disassembling another’s body. It is our pleasure to present selected pieces from the ceremony to the Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine readership. — Peter Gayed, Co-editor-in-chief, Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine and Chair of the 2008 Anatomy Ceremony Planning Committee PMID:19325944

  11. The Human Anatomy Teacher-Scholar: Meeting the Expectations of Educational Outcomes Research, Course Content Innovation, and Textbook Innovation for Educational Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckel, Christine Marie

    2009-01-01

    A human anatomy teacher-scholar is a scholar whose area of expertise includes content knowledge of the anatomical sciences (gross anatomy, histology, embryology, and/or neuroanatomy) and whose research interests and focus are centered in medical educational outcomes. The projects described in this dissertation represent endeavors I engaged in to

  12. The Human Anatomy Teacher-Scholar: Meeting the Expectations of Educational Outcomes Research, Course Content Innovation, and Textbook Innovation for Educational Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckel, Christine Marie

    2009-01-01

    A human anatomy teacher-scholar is a scholar whose area of expertise includes content knowledge of the anatomical sciences (gross anatomy, histology, embryology, and/or neuroanatomy) and whose research interests and focus are centered in medical educational outcomes. The projects described in this dissertation represent endeavors I engaged in to…

  13. The history and illustration of anatomy in the Middle Ages.

    PubMed

    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Gurunluoglu, Aslin; Williams, Susan A; Cavdar, Safiye

    2013-11-01

    This article reviews the influence of key figures on the pictorial representation of anatomy and the evolution of anatomical illustration during the Middle Ages until the time of the Renaissance, based on medical history books, journals and ancient medical books. During the early period in the Middle Ages, most illustrations were traditional drawings of emblematic nature, oftentimes unrealistic, not only because the precise knowledge of anatomy was lacking but also because the objective was to elucidate certain principles for teaching purposes. Five figure-series that came down to us through ancient manuscripts and textbooks represent the best examples of such traditional illustrations. With the advent of human dissection in the 13th and 14th centuries, a significant transformation in the depiction of anatomy began to project the practice of human dissection, as we see in the works of Mondino de Luzzi, Henri de Mondeville and Guido de Vigevano. After the invention of book printing in the second half of the 15th century, the reproduction of books was commonly practised and the woodcut made multiplication of pictures easier. Peter of Abano, Hieronymous Brunschwig, Johannes de Ketham, Johannes Peyligk, Gregory Reisch, Magnus Hundt, Laurentius Phryesen and many more included several anatomical illustrations in their treatises that demonstrated the development of anatomical illustration during the later Middle Ages. PMID:24585828

  14. Frank Netter's legacy: Interprofessional anatomy instruction.

    PubMed

    Niekrash, Christine E; Copes, Lynn E; Gonzalez, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Several medical schools have recently described new innovations in interprofessional interactions in gross anatomy courses. The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, CT has developed and implemented two contrasting interprofessional experiences in first-year medical student gross anatomy dissection laboratories: long-term, informal visits by pathologists' assistant students who work with the medical students to identify potential donor pathologies, and a short-term, formal visit by fourth-year dental students who teach craniofacial anatomy during the oral cavity dissection laboratory. A survey of attitudes of participants was analyzed and suggest the interprofessional experiences were mutually beneficial for all involved, and indicate that implementing multiple, contrasting interprofessional interactions with different goals within a single course is feasible. Two multiple regression analyses were conducted to analyze the data. The first analysis examined attitudes of medical students towards a pathologists' assistant role in a health care team. The question addressing a pathologists' assistant involvement in the anatomy laboratory was most significant. The second analysis examined attitudes of medical students towards the importance of a good foundation in craniofacial anatomy for clinical practice. This perceived importance is influenced by the presence of dental students in the anatomy laboratory. In both instances, the peer interprofessional interactions in the anatomy laboratory resulted in an overall positive attitude of medical students towards pathologists' assistant and dental students. The consequences of these interactions led to better understanding, appreciation and respect of the different professionals that contribute to a health care team. PMID:26014811

  15. Microsoft Office 365 Deployment Continues through June at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The latest Microsoft suite, Office 365 (O365), is being deployed to all NCI at Frederick computers during the months of May and June to comply with federal mandates. The suite includes the latest versions of Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Skype for Business, along with cloud-based capabilities. These cloud-based capabilities will help meet the federal mandates that require all Health and Human Services operating divisions to migrate e-mail to the cloud by the end of 2016.

  16. Venous anatomy of the thumb.

    PubMed

    Matloub, H S; Strathy, K M; Sanger, J R; Yousif, N J

    1991-11-01

    The venous anatomy of 20 thumbs (10 pairs) was detailed by latex injection. The thumbs were studied on the dorsal, palmar, radial, and ulnar surfaces. Characteristic patterns were found; these included a dominant longitudinal network, palmar veins within the pulp, oblique veins at the interphalangeal joint on the radial side, and a web space vein. A layered vascular pattern with a superficial fine network overlying a deeper system was noted. Cross sections were taken at the metacarpophalangeal joint and at the proximal and distal phalanges. The distribution of the vessels in cross section reveals consistent dorsal veins at all levels, as well as palmar veins distal to the interphalangeal joint in all thumbs. Palmar veins were present over the length of the proximal phalanx in more than 65% of the thumbs. PMID:1748753

  17. Art, antiquarianism and early anatomy.

    PubMed

    Guest, Clare E L

    2014-12-01

    Discussions of the early relationship between art and anatomy are shaped by Vasari's account of Florentine artists who dissected bodies in order to understand the causes of movement, and the end of movement in action. This account eclipses the role of the study of antiquities in Renaissance anatomical illustration. Beyond techniques of presentation, such as sectioning and analytic illustration, or a preoccupation with the mutilated fragment, antiquarianism offered a reflection on the variant and the role of temperament which could be adapted for anatomical purposes. With its play on ambiguities of life and death, idealisation and damage, antiquarianism also provided a way of negotiating the difficulties of content inherent in anatomical illustration. As such, it goes beyond exclusively historical interest to provoke reflection on the modes, possibilities and humane responsibilities of medical illustration. PMID:24696510

  18. High precision anatomy for MEG☆

    PubMed Central

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bradbury, David; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Precise MEG estimates of neuronal current flow are undermined by uncertain knowledge of the head location with respect to the MEG sensors. This is either due to head movements within the scanning session or systematic errors in co-registration to anatomy. Here we show how such errors can be minimized using subject-specific head-casts produced using 3D printing technology. The casts fit the scalp of the subject internally and the inside of the MEG dewar externally, reducing within session and between session head movements. Systematic errors in matching to MRI coordinate system are also reduced through the use of MRI-visible fiducial markers placed on the same cast. Bootstrap estimates of absolute co-registration error were of the order of 1 mm. Estimates of relative co-registration error were < 1.5 mm between sessions. We corroborated these scalp based estimates by looking at the MEG data recorded over a 6 month period. We found that the between session sensor variability of the subject's evoked response was of the order of the within session noise, showing no appreciable noise due to between-session movement. Simulations suggest that the between-session sensor level amplitude SNR improved by a factor of 5 over conventional strategies. We show that at this level of coregistration accuracy there is strong evidence for anatomical models based on the individual rather than canonical anatomy; but that this advantage disappears for errors of greater than 5 mm. This work paves the way for source reconstruction methods which can exploit very high SNR signals and accurate anatomical models; and also significantly increases the sensitivity of longitudinal studies with MEG. PMID:23911673

  19. Clinical aspects of rodent dental anatomy.

    PubMed

    Crossley, D A

    1995-12-01

    The order Rodentia is vast, encompassing a large number of species with significant anatomical variations developed during natural adaptation to differing habitats. Many veterinarians have little knowledge of the anatomy of species other than the commoner domestic large herbivores and small carnivores. Clinicians require a basic knowledge of the relevant anatomy of species they are likely to be asked to treat. This article provides sufficient working knowledge of the oral and dental anatomy of those rodents commonly kept as pets to enable veterinarians to interpret clinical and radiographic findings when investigating suspected dental disease. PMID:9693638

  20. The development, assessment and validation of virtual reality for human anatomy instruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Karen Benn

    1996-01-01

    This research project seeks to meet the objective of science training by developing, assessing, validating and utilizing VR as a human anatomy training medium. Current anatomy instruction is primarily in the form of lectures and usage of textbooks. In ideal situations, anatomic models, computer-based instruction, and cadaver dissection are utilized to augment traditional methods of instruction. At many institutions, lack of financial resources limits anatomy instruction to textbooks and lectures. However, human anatomy is three-dimensional, unlike the one-dimensional depiction found in textbooks and the two-dimensional depiction found on the computer. Virtual reality allows one to step through the computer screen into a 3-D artificial world. The primary objective of this project is to produce a virtual reality application of the abdominopelvic region of a human cadaver that can be taken back to the classroom. The hypothesis is that an immersive learning environment affords quicker anatomic recognition and orientation and a greater level of retention in human anatomy instruction. The goal is to augment not replace traditional modes of instruction.

  1. Receptor-based virtual screening of EGFR kinase inhibitors from the NCI diversity database.

    PubMed

    Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Sawatdichaikul, Orathai; Songtawee, Napat; Limtrakul, Jumras

    2010-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) abnormalities have been associated with several types of human cancer. The crystal structures of its tyrosine kinase domain (EGFR-TK) complexed with small molecule inhibitors revealed the kinase inhibition modes, prompting us to search for novel anti-cancer drugs. A total of 1,990 compounds from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) diversity set with nonredundant structures have been tested to inhibit cancer cell lines with unknown mechanism. Cancer inhibition through EGFR-TK is one of the mechanisms of these compounds. In this work, we performed receptor-based virtual screening against the NCI diversity database. Using two different docking algorithms, AutoDock and Gold, combined with subsequent post-docking analyses, we found eight candidate compounds with high scoring functions that all bind to the ATP-competitive site of the kinase. None of these compounds belongs to the main group of the currently known EGFR-TK inhibitors. Binding mode analyses revealed that the way these compounds complexed with EGFR-TK differs from quinazoline inhibitor binding and the interaction mainly involves hydrophobic interactions. Also, the common kinase-inhibitor (NH---N and CO---HC) hydrogen bonds between the hinge region and the hit compounds are rarely observed. Our results suggest that these molecules could be developed as novel lead compounds in anti-cancer drug design. PMID:20657425

  2. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures.

    PubMed

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26-27, 2013, entitled "Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research" and "Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems." The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

  3. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

  4. Understanding Colds: Anatomy of the Nose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment Children Complications Special Features References Common Cold Understanding Colds Anatomy of the Nose The nose contains shelf- ... 3/8 inch) per minute. What a Common Cold Is A common cold is an illness caused ...

  5. CPR Instruction in a Human Anatomy Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutton, Lewis M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction can be included in a college anatomy and physiology course. Equipment and instructors are provided locally by the Red Cross or American Heart Association. (MA)

  6. Making gross anatomy relevant to dental students.

    PubMed

    Guttmann, Geoffrey D; Ma, Terence P; MacPherson, Brian R

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes the curriculum design and enhancements of dental gross anatomy courses at three universities in North America. The greatest problem for gross anatomy faculty is making the regions of the body below the neck relevant to dental students for their future clinical education as well as the longer term dental practice. The proposed solutions demonstrated in the three courses range from satisfying the student's grade and test requirements, such as passing the anatomical sciences section of the National Board Dental Examination Part I, to making the material relevant to clinical dentistry. Strategies to increase relevance include incorporating clinical faculty into the gross anatomy course and integrating dental clinical material into the course. Lastly, pedagogical innovations include peer teaching, the use of the Internet and intranet for examination preparation, and the animation of dental procedures to illustrate relevant anatomy to dentistry. PMID:12665065

  7. Curricular Guidelines for Teaching Dental Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okeson, Jeffrey; Buckman, James

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Dental Anatomy and Occlusion of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by individual educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. (MLW)

  8. BOLD Granger Causality Reflects Vascular Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, J. Taylor; Ferguson, Michael A.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Anderson, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have tried to exploit subtle phase differences in BOLD time series to resolve the order of sequential activation of brain regions, or more generally the ability of signal in one region to predict subsequent signal in another region. More recently, such lag-based measures have been applied to investigate directed functional connectivity, although this application has been controversial. We attempted to use large publicly available datasets (FCON 1000, ADHD 200, Human Connectome Project) to determine whether consistent spatial patterns of Granger Causality are observed in typical fMRI data. For BOLD datasets from 1,240 typically developing subjects ages 7–40, we measured Granger causality between time series for every pair of 7,266 spherical ROIs covering the gray matter and 264 seed ROIs at hubs of the brain’s functional network architecture. Granger causality estimates were strongly reproducible for connections in a test and replication sample (n=620 subjects for each group), as well as in data from a single subject scanned repeatedly, both during resting and passive video viewing. The same effect was even stronger in high temporal resolution fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project, and was observed independently in data collected during performance of 7 task paradigms. The spatial distribution of Granger causality reflected vascular anatomy with a progression from Granger causality sources, in Circle of Willis arterial inflow distributions, to sinks, near large venous vascular structures such as dural venous sinuses and at the periphery of the brain. Attempts to resolve BOLD phase differences with Granger causality should consider the possibility of reproducible vascular confounds, a problem that is independent of the known regional variability of the hemodynamic response. PMID:24349569

  9. Variant anatomy of internal jugular vein branching

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, Chris A.; Sarvadnya, Jagadish J.; Sabitha, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of both normal and abnormal anatomy of the veins of the neck is important for clinicians performing catheterization and surgeons operating in the region of the neck. The presence of such anomalous communications may also be important for radiologists performing angiographic and sonographic studies. This study presents three cases of variant anatomy in posterior branching and abnormal branching of internal jugular vein found during our routine neck dissection.

  10. Building a Low-Cost Gross Anatomy Laboratory: A Big Step for a Small University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Evan

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates details of the planning, building, and improvement phases of a cost-efficient, full-dissection gross anatomy laboratory on a campus of an historically design-centric university. Special considerations were given throughout the project to the nature of hosting cadavers in a building shared amongst all undergraduate majors.…

  11. Medical student participation in surface anatomy classes.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, R; Brough, H; Ellis, H

    2006-10-01

    Surface anatomy is an integral part of medical education and enables medical students to learn skills for future medical practice. In the past decade, there has been a decline in the teaching of anatomy in the medical curriculum, and this study seeks to assess the attitudes of medical students to participation in surface anatomy classes. Consequently, all first year medical students at the Guy's, King's and St Thomas's Medical School, London, were asked to fill in an anonymous questionnaire at the end of their last surface anatomy session of the year. A total of 290 medical students completed the questionnaires, resulting in an 81.6% response rate. The students had a mean age of 19.6 years (range 18-32) and 104 (35.9%) of them were male. Seventy-six students (26.2%) were subjects in surface anatomy tutorials (60.5% male). Students generally volunteered because no one else did. Of the volunteers, 38.2% would rather not have been subjects, because of embarrassment, inability to make notes, or to see clearly the material being taught. Female medical students from ethnic minority groups were especially reluctant to volunteer to be subjects. Single-sex classes improved the volunteer rate to some extent, but not dramatically. Students appreciate the importance of surface anatomy to cadaveric study and to future clinical practice. Computer models, lectures, and videos are complementary but cannot be a substitute for peer group models, artists' models being the only alternative. PMID:16302232

  12. Normal distal pulmonary vein anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Klimek-Piotrowska, Wies?awa; Pi?tek, Katarzyna; Koziej, Mateusz; Ho?da, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is well known that the pulmonary veins (PVs), especially their myocardial sleeves play a critical role in the initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation. Understanding the PV anatomy is crucial for the safety and efficacy of all procedures performed on PVs. The aim of this study was to present normal distal PV anatomy and to create a juxtaposition of all PV ostium variants. Methods. A total of 130 randomly selected autopsied adult human hearts (Caucasian) were examined. The number of PVs ostia was evaluated and their diameter was measured. The ostium-to-last-tributary distance and macroscopic presence of myocardial sleeves were also evaluated. Results. Five hundred forty-one PV ostia were identified. Four classical PV ostia patterns (two left and two right PVs) were observed in 70.8% of all cases. The most common variant was the classical pattern with additional middle right PV (19.2%), followed by the common ostium for the left superior and the inferior PVs (4.44%). Mean diameters of PV ostia (for the classical pattern) were: left superior = 13.8 2.9 mm; left inferior = 13.3 3.4 mm; right superior = 14.3 2.9 mm; right inferior = 13.7 3.3 mm. When present, the additional middle right PV ostium had the smallest PV ostium diameter in the heart (8.2 4.1 mm). The mean ostium-to-last-tributary (closest to the atrium) distances were: left superior = 15.1 4.6 mm; left inferior = 13.5 4.0 mm; right superior = 11.8 4.0 mm; right inferior = 11.0 3.7 mm. There were no statistically significant differences between sexes in ostia diameters and ostium-to-last-tributary distances. Conclusion. Only 71% of the cases have four standard pulmonary veins. The middle right pulmonary vein is present in almost 20% of patients. Presented data can provide useful information for the clinicians during interventional procedures or radiologic examinations of PVs. PMID:26793429

  13. Normal distal pulmonary vein anatomy.

    PubMed

    Klimek-Piotrowska, Wies?awa; Ho?da, Mateusz K; Pi?tek, Katarzyna; Koziej, Mateusz; Ho?da, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is well known that the pulmonary veins (PVs), especially their myocardial sleeves play a critical role in the initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation. Understanding the PV anatomy is crucial for the safety and efficacy of all procedures performed on PVs. The aim of this study was to present normal distal PV anatomy and to create a juxtaposition of all PV ostium variants. Methods. A total of 130 randomly selected autopsied adult human hearts (Caucasian) were examined. The number of PVs ostia was evaluated and their diameter was measured. The ostium-to-last-tributary distance and macroscopic presence of myocardial sleeves were also evaluated. Results. Five hundred forty-one PV ostia were identified. Four classical PV ostia patterns (two left and two right PVs) were observed in 70.8% of all cases. The most common variant was the classical pattern with additional middle right PV (19.2%), followed by the common ostium for the left superior and the inferior PVs (4.44%). Mean diameters of PV ostia (for the classical pattern) were: left superior = 13.8 2.9 mm; left inferior = 13.3 3.4 mm; right superior = 14.3 2.9 mm; right inferior = 13.7 3.3 mm. When present, the additional middle right PV ostium had the smallest PV ostium diameter in the heart (8.2 4.1 mm). The mean ostium-to-last-tributary (closest to the atrium) distances were: left superior = 15.1 4.6 mm; left inferior = 13.5 4.0 mm; right superior = 11.8 4.0 mm; right inferior = 11.0 3.7 mm. There were no statistically significant differences between sexes in ostia diameters and ostium-to-last-tributary distances. Conclusion. Only 71% of the cases have four standard pulmonary veins. The middle right pulmonary vein is present in almost 20% of patients. Presented data can provide useful information for the clinicians during interventional procedures or radiologic examinations of PVs. PMID:26793429

  14. Brain anatomy in Diplura (Hexapoda)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the past decade neuroanatomy has proved to be a valuable source of character systems that provide insights into arthropod relationships. Since the most detailed description of dipluran brain anatomy dates back to Hanström (1940) we re-investigated the brains of Campodea augens and Catajapyx aquilonaris with modern neuroanatomical techniques. The analyses are based on antibody staining and 3D reconstruction of the major neuropils and tracts from semi-thin section series. Results Remarkable features of the investigated dipluran brains are a large central body, which is organized in nine columns and three layers, and well developed mushroom bodies with calyces receiving input from spheroidal olfactory glomeruli in the deutocerebrum. Antibody staining against a catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (DC0) was used to further characterize the mushroom bodies. The japygid Catajapyx aquilonaris possesses mushroom bodies which are connected across the midline, a unique condition within hexapods. Conclusions Mushroom body and central body structure shows a high correspondence between japygids and campodeids. Some unique features indicate that neuroanatomy further supports the monophyly of Diplura. In a broader phylogenetic context, however, the polarization of brain characters becomes ambiguous. The mushroom bodies and the central body of Diplura in several aspects resemble those of Dicondylia, suggesting homology. In contrast, Archaeognatha completely lack mushroom bodies and exhibit a central body organization reminiscent of certain malacostracan crustaceans. Several hypotheses of brain evolution at the base of the hexapod tree are discussed. PMID:23050723

  15. Molecular Anatomy of Palate Development

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Andrew S.; Potter, S. Steven

    2015-01-01

    The NIH FACEBASE consortium was established in part to create a central resource for craniofacial researchers. One purpose is to provide a molecular anatomy of craniofacial development. To this end we have used a combination of laser capture microdissection and RNA-Seq to define the gene expression programs driving development of the murine palate. We focused on the E14.5 palate, soon after medial fusion of the two palatal shelves. The palate was divided into multiple compartments, including both medial and lateral, as well as oral and nasal, for both the anterior and posterior domains. A total of 25 RNA-Seq datasets were generated. The results provide a comprehensive view of the region specific expression of all transcription factors, growth factors and receptors. Paracrine interactions can be inferred from flanking compartment growth factor/receptor expression patterns. The results are validated primarily through very high concordance with extensive previously published gene expression data for the developing palate. In addition selected immunostain validations were carried out. In conclusion, this report provides an RNA-Seq based atlas of gene expression patterns driving palate development at microanatomic resolution. This FACEBASE resource is designed to promote discovery by the craniofacial research community. PMID:26168040

  16. The human anatomy teacher-scholar: Meeting the expectations of educational outcomes research, course content innovation, and textbook innovation for educational scholarship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, Christine Marie

    A human anatomy teacher-scholar is a scholar whose area of expertise includes content knowledge of the anatomical sciences (gross anatomy, histology, embryology, and/or neuroanatomy) and whose research interests and focus are centered in medical educational outcomes. The projects described in this dissertation represent endeavors I engaged in to become a human anatomy teacher-scholar. These projects included: (1) prospectively testing a hypothesis, and performing outcomes assessment in a field for which little data (theory) exist (dissection guide educational research project), (2) creating innovative course content that bridged disciplines (cadaver autopsy project), and (3) composing original teaching material for a specific audience (human anatomy laboratory manual). The training of a human anatomy teacher-scholar emphasizes knowledge acquisition in both the basic sciences (particularly gross anatomy) and in educational outcomes research methodology and theory. Therefore, human anatomy teacher-scholars are positioned to create innovative course content and materials and assess the innovations to guide future efforts. These are important skills for faculty members involved in the education of medical students in the U.S. as the medical education system in the U.S. continues to evolve.

  17. Accessing SEER Data: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

    Cancer.gov

    Cover Page: 'Accessing SEER Data: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI)' showing images of people visiting one another, dining, biking, and working at computers. National Cancer Institute; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; National Institutes of Health.

  18. 76 FR 28439 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... was previously published in the Federal Register on March 15, 2011 (76 FR 14034) and allowed 60-days... Genetics Services Directory Web-Based Application Form and Update Mailer Summary: Under the provisions of... Collection: Title: NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-based Application Form and Update Mailer....

  19. (Updated) NCI Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget Proposes $25 Million for Frederick National Lab | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; image by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer The additional funding requested for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) in the Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget was $25 million, or approximately 3.5 percent of the total additional funding request of $715 million.   Officially called the Professional Judgment Budget, the Bypass Budget is a result of the National Cancer Act of 1971, which authorizes NCI to submit a budget directly to the president, to send to Congress. With a focus on NCI’s research priorities and areas of cancer research with potential for investment, the Bypass Budget specifies additional funding, over and above the current budget, that is needed to advance

  20. New NCI-N87-derived human gastric epithelial line after human telomerase catalytic subunit over-expression

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva-Pava, Kathy; Navabi, Nazanin; Skoog, Emma C; Lindén, Sara K; Oleastro, Mónica; Roxo-Rosa, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To establish a cellular model correctly mimicking the gastric epithelium to overcome the limitation in the study of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS: Aiming to overcome this limitation, clones of the heterogenic cancer-derived NCI-N87 cell line were isolated, by stably-transducing it with the human telomerase reverse-transcriptase (hTERT) catalytic subunit gene. The clones were first characterized regarding their cell growth pattern and phenotype. For that we measured the clones’ adherence properties, expression of cell-cell junctions’ markers (ZO-1 and E-cadherin) and ability to generate a sustained transepithelial electrical resistance. The gastric properties of the clones, concerning expression of mucins, zymogens and glycan contents, were then evaluated by haematoxylin and eosin staining, Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) and PAS/Alcian Blue-staining, immunocytochemistry and Western blot. In addition, we assessed the usefulness of the hTERT-expressing gastric cell line for H. pylori research, by performing co-culture assays and measuring the IL-8 secretion, by ELISA, upon infection with two H. pylori strains differing in virulence. RESULTS: Compared with the parental cell line, the most promising NCI-hTERT-derived clones (CL5 and CL6) were composed of cells with homogenous phenotype, presented higher relative telomerase activities, better adhesion properties, ability to be maintained in culture for longer periods after confluency, and were more efficient in PAS-reactive mucins secretion. Both clones were shown to produce high amounts of MUC1, MUC2 and MUC13. NCI-hTERT-CL5 mucins were shown to be decorated with blood group H type 2 (BG-H), Lewis-x (Lex), Ley and Lea and, in a less extent, with BG-A antigens, but the former two antigens were not detected in the NCI-hTERT-CL6. None of the clones exhibited detectable levels of MUC6 nor sialylated Lex and Lea glycans. Entailing good gastric properties, both NCI-hTERT-clones were found to produce pepsinogen-5 and human gastric lipase. The progenitor-like phenotype of NCI-hTERT-CL6 cells was highlighted by large nuclei and by the apical vesicular-like distribution of mucin 5AC and Pg5, supporting the accumulation of mucus-secreting and zymogens-chief mature cells functions. CONCLUSION: These traits, in addition to resistance to microaerobic conditions and good responsiveness to H. pylori co-culture, in a strain virulence-dependent manner, make the NCI-hTERT-CL6 a promising model for future in vitro studies. PMID:26074691

  1. NCI's High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Computing Platform for Environmental and Earth System Data Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Allen, Chris; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Gohar, Kashif; Porter, David; Pugh, Tim; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful and flexible in-situ petascale computational environment to enable both high performance computing and Data-intensive Science across a wide spectrum of national environmental and earth science data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress so far to harmonise the underlying data collections for future interdisciplinary research across these large volume data collections. NCI has established 10+ PBytes of major national and international data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the major Australian national-scale scientific collections), leading research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. New infrastructures created at NCI mean the data collections are now accessible within an integrated High Performance Computing and Data (HPC-HPD) environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large-scale high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. The hardware was designed at inception to ensure that it would allow the layered software environment to flexibly accommodate the advancement of future data science. New approaches to software technology and data models have also had to be developed to enable access to these large and exponentially increasing data volumes at NCI. Traditional HPC and data environments are still made available in a way that flexibly provides the tools, services and supporting software systems on these new petascale infrastructures. But to enable the research to take place at this scale, the data, metadata and software now need to evolve together - creating a new integrated high performance infrastructure. The new infrastructure at NCI currently supports a catalogue of integrated, reusable software and workflows from earth system and ecosystem modelling, weather research, satellite and other observed data processing and analysis. One of the challenges for NCI has been to support existing techniques and methods, while carefully preparing the underlying infrastructure for the transition needed for the next class of Data-intensive Science. In doing so, a flexible range of techniques and software can be made available for application across the corpus of data collections available, and to provide a new infrastructure for future interdisciplinary research.

  2. Stemness and inducing differentiation of small cell lung cancer NCI-H446 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z; Zhou, Y; Qian, H; Shao, G; Lu, X; Chen, Q; Sun, X; Chen, D; Yin, R; Zhu, H; Shao, Q; Xu, W

    2013-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for nearly 15% of human lung cancers and is one of the most aggressive solid tumors. The SCLC cells are thought to derive from self-renewing pulmonary neuroendocrine cells by oncogenic transformation. However, whether the SCLC cells possess stemness and plasticity for differentiation as normal stem cells has not been well understood thus far. In this study, we investigated the expressions of multilineage stem cell markers in the cancer cells of SCLC cell line (NCI-H446) and analyzed their clonogenicity, tumorigenicity, and plasticity for inducing differentiation. It has been found that most cancer cells of the cell line expressed multilineage stem cell markers under the routine culture conditions and generated single-cell clones in anchorage-dependent or -independent conditions. These cancer cells could form subcutaneous xenograft tumors and orthotopic lung xenograft tumors in BALB/C-nude mice. Most cells in xenograft tumors expressed stem cell markers and proliferation cell nuclear antigen Ki67, suggesting that these cancer cells remained stemness and highly proliferative ability in vivo. Intriguingly, the cancer cells could be induced to differentiate into neurons, adipocytes, and osteocytes, respectively, in vitro. During the processes of cellular phenotype-conversions, autophagy and apoptosis were two main metabolic events. There is cross-talking between autophagy and apoptosis in the differentiated cancer cells. In addition, the effects of the inhibitor and agonist for Sirtuin1/2 on the inducing osteogenic differentiation indicated that Sirtuin1/2 had an important role in this process. Taken together, these results indicate that most cancer cells of NCI-H446 cell line possess stemness and plasticity for multilineage differentiation. These findings have potentially some translational applications in treatments of SCLC with inducing differentiation therapy. PMID:23681228

  3. Revisiting the Anatomy of the Living Heart.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E; Anderson, Robert H

    2015-12-25

    An understanding of the complexity of cardiac anatomy is required by all who seek, in the setting of cardiac disease, to interpret the images confronting them. Although the mysteries of cardiac structure have been extensively addressed, significant gaps continue to exist between the descriptions provided by morphologists and by those working in the clinical setting. In part, this reflects the limitations in providing 3D visualization of such a complicated organ. Current 3D imaging technology now permits visualization of the cardiac components using datasets obtained in the living individual. These advances, furthermore, demonstrate the anatomy in the setting of the heart as imaged within the thorax. It has been failure to describe the heart as it lies within the thorax that remains a major deficiency of many morphologists relying on the dissecting room to provide the gold standard. Describing the heart in attitudinally appropriate fashion, a basic rule of clinical anatomy, creates the necessary bridges between anatomists and clinicians. The rapid progression of cardiac interventional techniques, furthermore, emphasizes the need to revisit cardiac anatomy using a multidisciplinary approach. In this review, therefore, we illustrate the advantages of an attitudinally correct approach to cardiac anatomy. We then focus on the morphology of the arterial roots, revealing the accuracy that can now be achieved by clinicians using datasets obtained during life. (Circ J 2016; 80: 24-33). PMID:26673171

  4. Anatomy in a Modern Medical Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Turney, BW

    2007-01-01

    Anatomy in undergraduate education has been in decline for many years. Some suggest that it has fallen below a safe level. Balances between detail and safety, and assimilation and application of anatomy have yet to be established as the methods of teaching undergo another metamorphosis. For doctors, the human body is the focus of investigation and intervention on a daily basis; for this reason, the study of anatomy in some form will continue to be essential to safe medical practice. It is necessary for core knowledge of anatomy to be assimilated by all doctors in order to practice and communicate safely. It may be true that most doctors do not need to dissect a cadaver or study a prosection in order to practice, but if it can improve their understanding of what they do and why they do it, this surely has to be of benefit both for the safety of the patient and satisfaction of the doctor as a professional. Integration of newer teaching modalities and modern technology will encourage interest and retention of anatomical knowledge and its clinical relevance. Anatomy has a promising future in postgraduate specialist and surgical training. Detailed knowledge should be integrated into specialist training when it is clinically relevant allowing specialists of the future to practice safely and accurately and also to provide a strong base for future clinical developments. PMID:17346399

  5. Exploring relationships between personality and anatomy performance.

    PubMed

    Finn, Gabrielle M; Walker, Simon J; Carter, Madeline; Cox, David R; Hewitson, Ruth; Smith, Claire F

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition in medicine of the importance of noncognitive factors, including personality, for performance, and for good medical practice. The personality domain of conscientiousness is a well-established predictor of performance in workplace and academic settings. This study investigates the relationships between the "Big Five" personality domains, the facets of conscientiousness and performance in a practical anatomy examination. First- and second-year undergraduate medical students (n = 85) completed a paper-based questionnaire, which included a 50-item measure of the Big Five personality domains (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness) and a 60-item measure of the six conscientiousness facets (orderliness, dutifulness, achievement-striving, self-discipline, self-efficacy, and cautiousness) from the International Personality Item Pool (IPIP). In addition, routinely-collected academic performance scores from the end of semester anatomy practical examinations (spotters) were obtained. Anatomy examination performance correlated moderately with conscientiousness (r = 0.24, P = 0.03). Of the six facets of conscientiousness, a positive relationship was observed between anatomy examination performance and achievement striving (r = 0.22, P = 0.05). In conclusion, this study found that performance in an anatomy examination was related to higher levels of conscientiousness and, more specifically, to higher levels of achievement striving. The results have implications for selection and assessment in medicine. PMID:25716097

  6. NCI's national environmental research data collection: metadata management built on standards and preparing for the semantic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingbo; Bastrakova, Irina; Evans, Ben; Gohar, Kashif; Santana, Fabiana; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages national environmental research data collections (10+ PB) as part of its specialized high performance data node of the Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI) program. We manage 40+ data collections using NCI's Data Management Plan (DMP), which is compatible with the ISO 19100 metadata standards. We utilize ISO standards to make sure our metadata is transferable and interoperable for sharing and harvesting. The DMP is used along with metadata from the data itself, to create a hierarchy of data collection, dataset and time series catalogues that is then exposed through GeoNetwork for standard discoverability. This hierarchy catalogues are linked using a parent-child relationship. The hierarchical infrastructure of our GeoNetwork catalogues system aims to address both discoverability and in-house administrative use-cases. At NCI, we are currently improving the metadata interoperability in our catalogue by linking with standardized community vocabulary services. These emerging vocabulary services are being established to help harmonise data from different national and international scientific communities. One such vocabulary service is currently being established by the Australian National Data Services (ANDS). Data citation is another important aspect of the NCI data infrastructure, which allows tracking of data usage and infrastructure investment, encourage data sharing, and increasing trust in research that is reliant on these data collections. We incorporate the standard vocabularies into the data citation metadata so that the data citation become machine readable and semantically friendly for web-search purpose as well. By standardizing our metadata structure across our entire data corpus, we are laying the foundation to enable the application of appropriate semantic mechanisms to enhance discovery and analysis of NCI's national environmental research data information. We expect that this will further increase the data discoverability and encourage the data sharing and reuse within the community, increasing the value of the data much further than its current use.

  7. Hypocretin/orexin increases the expression of steroidogenic enzymes in human adrenocortical NCI H295R cells.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Jan; Grabinski, Nicole; Knopp, Cordula A; Dendorfer, Andreas; Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Randeva, Harpal S; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Dominiak, Peter; Jöhren, Olaf

    2009-11-01

    Hypocretins/orexins act through two receptor subtypes: OX(1) and OX(2). Outside the brain, orexin receptors are expressed in adrenal glands, where orexins stimulate the release of glucocorticoids. To further address the regulation of steroidogenesis, we analyzed the effect of orexins on the expression of steroidogenic enzymes in human adrenocortical National Cancer Institute (NCI) H295R cells by qPCR. In NCI H295R cells, OX(2) receptors were highly expressed, as they were in human adrenal glands. After treatment of NCI H295R cells with orexin A for 12-24 h, the cortisol synthesis rate was significantly increased, whereas 30 min of treatment showed no effect. While CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 mRNA levels were increased already at earlier time points, the expression of HSD3B2 and CYP21 mRNA was significantly up-regulated after treatment with orexin A for 12 h. Likewise, orexin B increased CYP21 and HSD3B2 mRNA levels showing, however, a lower potency compared with orexin A. The mRNA levels of CYP11A and CYP17 were unaffected by orexin A. OX(2) receptor mRNA levels were down-regulated after 12 and 24 h of orexin A treatment. Orexin A increased intracellular Ca(2+) but not cAMP concentrations in NCI H295R cells. Furthermore, inhibition of PKC and MAPK kinase/ERK kinase (MEK1/2) prevented the increase of HSD3B2 expression by orexin A. Accordingly, orexin A treatment of NCI H295R cells markedly enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation that was prevented by PKC and, in part, PKA inhibition. In conclusion, orexins may influence adrenal steroidogenesis by differential regulation of the expression of steroidogenic enzymes involving Ca(2+), as well as PKC-ERK1/2 signaling. PMID:19793950

  8. Smooth extrapolation of unknown anatomy via statistical shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupp, R. B.; Chiang, H.; Otake, Y.; Murphy, R. J.; Gordon, C. R.; Armand, M.; Taylor, R. H.

    2015-03-01

    Several methods to perform extrapolation of unknown anatomy were evaluated. The primary application is to enhance surgical procedures that may use partial medical images or medical images of incomplete anatomy. Le Fort-based, face-jaw-teeth transplant is one such procedure. From CT data of 36 skulls and 21 mandibles separate Statistical Shape Models of the anatomical surfaces were created. Using the Statistical Shape Models, incomplete surfaces were projected to obtain complete surface estimates. The surface estimates exhibit non-zero error in regions where the true surface is known; it is desirable to keep the true surface and seamlessly merge the estimated unknown surface. Existing extrapolation techniques produce non-smooth transitions from the true surface to the estimated surface, resulting in additional error and a less aesthetically pleasing result. The three extrapolation techniques evaluated were: copying and pasting of the surface estimate (non-smooth baseline), a feathering between the patient surface and surface estimate, and an estimate generated via a Thin Plate Spline trained from displacements between the surface estimate and corresponding vertices of the known patient surface. Feathering and Thin Plate Spline approaches both yielded smooth transitions. However, feathering corrupted known vertex values. Leave-one-out analyses were conducted, with 5% to 50% of known anatomy removed from the left-out patient and estimated via the proposed approaches. The Thin Plate Spline approach yielded smaller errors than the other two approaches, with an average vertex error improvement of 1.46 mm and 1.38 mm for the skull and mandible respectively, over the baseline approach.

  9. Project TAPS. Progress Report Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desch, S. H.; Stolurow, L. M.

    TRIGEM, a computer-assisted instruction (CAI) course developed as a part of Project TAPS (Teaching Anatomy with Programed Schematics) is designed to teach the anatomy of the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve. This course is currently operational on the Harvard CAI System which uses an IBM S 360/Model 65 as the central processor, either…

  10. Greek anatomist herophilus: the father of anatomy.

    PubMed

    Bay, Noel Si-Yang; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2010-12-01

    One of the most stirring controversies in the history of Anatomy is that Herophilus, an ancient Greek anatomist and his younger contemporary, Erasistratus, were accused of performing vivisections of living humans. However, this does not detract from the fact that Herophilus has made phenomenal anatomical observations of the human body which have contributed significantly towards the understanding of the brain, eye, liver, reproductive organs and nervous system. It is notable that he was the first person to perform systematic dissection of the human body and is widely acknowledged as the Father of Anatomy. He has been hailed as one of the greatest anatomists that ever lived, rivaled only by Andreas Vesalius who is regarded as the founder of modern human anatomy. PMID:21267401

  11. A powerful way of teaching anatomy.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2013-05-01

    I read the article entitled "A plea for the use of drawing in human anatomy teaching", by Clavert et al. with great interest. I was glad to read that, in France, anatomy is initially taught by building each structure or region on a blackboard with colored chalk. I find this method quite efficient for this purpose. I believe that drawing is a powerful way of teaching anatomy and therefore the blackboard deserves its rightful place beside other 'high-tech' media. I agree with the authors that the blackboard and the chalk constitute wonderful and powerful educational media, and that appropriate simplification and transposing (of anatomical information) in daily practice are necessary for a sufficient educational result. Among other 'modern' media, movies of surgical procedures could easily attract the students' attention. PMID:23180394

  12. Anatomy of the ethmoid: CT, endoscopic, and macroscopic

    SciTech Connect

    Terrier, F.; Weber, W.; Ruefenacht, D.; Porcellini, B.

    1985-03-01

    The authors illustrate the normal CT anatomy of the ethmoid region and correlate it with the endoscopic and macroscopic anatomy to define landmarks that can be recognized on CT and during endoscopically controlled transnasal ethmoidectomy.

  13. Anatomy of a Busted Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version (Figure 1)

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope captured the picture on the left of comet Holmes in March 2008, five months after the comet suddenly erupted and brightened a millionfold overnight. The contrast of the picture has been enhanced on the right to show the anatomy of the comet.

    Every six years, comet 17P/Holmes speeds away from Jupiter and heads inward toward the sun, traveling the same route typically without incident. However, twice in the last 116 years, in November 1892 and October 2007, comet Holmes mysteriously exploded as it approached the asteroid belt. Astronomers still do not know the cause of these eruptions.

    Spitzer's infrared picture at left hand side of figure 1, reveals fine dust particles that make up the outer shell, or coma, of the comet. The nucleus of the comet is within the bright whitish spot in the center, while the yellow area shows solid particles that were blown from the comet in the explosion. The comet is headed away from the sun, which lies beyond the right-hand side of figure 1.

    The contrast-enhanced picture on the right shows the comet's outer shell, and strange filaments, or streamers, of dust. The streamers and shell are a yet another mystery surrounding comet Holmes. Scientists had initially suspected that the streamers were small dust particles ejected from fragments of the nucleus, or from hyerpactive jets on the nucleus, during the October 2007 explosion. If so, both the streamers and the shell should have shifted their orientation as the comet followed its orbit around the sun. Radiation pressure from the sun should have swept the material back and away from it. But pictures of comet Holmes taken by Spitzer over time show the streamers and shell in the same configuration, and not pointing away from the sun. The observations have left astronomers stumped.

    The horizontal line seen in the contrast-enhanced picture is a trail of debris that travels along with the comet in its orbit.

    The Spitzer picture was taken with the spacecraft's multiband imaging photometer at an infrared wavelength of 24 microns.

  14. Beyond the traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner-Shires, Alison Marie

    2015-01-01

    Context: The traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga, while systematic, is often ineffective. Methods: A unique approach to teaching anatomy for a Yoga Teacher Training seminar is presented, founded on the principles of Thomas Myers’ Anatomy Trains. Lab activities are detailed and Bloom's Taxonomy is applied to ensure students are engaged in higher level thinking and application. Conclusion: Going beyond the traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga can be extremely rewarding for students and teachers alike. PMID:26170599

  15. Surgical anatomy of the tracheobronchial tree

    PubMed Central

    Drevet, Gabrielle; Conti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Airway surgery is often indicated in the management of benign or malignant pathological processes of the tracheobronchial tree. The surgeon undertaking this type of work has, however, the responsibility of understanding the particular anatomy applicable to these structures and procedures as well as be able to correlate imaging, intraoperative findings and anatomy. These are important considerations if one wants to reduce operative morbidity and improve potential for better long-term results. This paper reviews the most important anatomic features of the tracheobronchial tree putting emphasis on those features that are important to surgeons performing surgical procedures on those organs. PMID:26981262

  16. Anatomy and biomechanics of the craniovertebral junction.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alejandro J; Scheer, Justin K; Leibl, Kayla E; Smith, Zachary A; Dlouhy, Brian J; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2015-04-01

    The craniovertebral junction (CVJ) has unique anatomical structures that separate it from the subaxial cervical spine. In addition to housing vital neural and vascular structures, the majority of cranial flexion, extension, and axial rotation is accomplished at the CVJ. A complex combination of osseous and ligamentous supports allow for stability despite a large degree of motion. An understanding of anatomy and biomechanics is essential to effectively evaluate and address the various pathological processes that may affect this region. Therefore, the authors present an up-to-date narrative review of CVJ anatomy, normal and pathological biomechanics, and fixation techniques. PMID:25828496

  17. Anatomy of an entry vehicle experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eide, D. G.; Wurster, K. E.; Helms, V. T.; Ashby, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    The anatomy and evolution of a simple small-scale unmanned entry vehicle is described that is delivered to orbit by the shuttle and entered into the atmosphere from orbit to acquire flight data to improve our knowledge of boundary-layer behavior and evaluate advanced thermal protection systems. The anatomy of the experiment includes the justification for the experiments, instrumentation, configuration, material, and operational needs, and the translation of these needs into a configuration, weight statement, aerodynamics, program cost, and trajectory. Candidates for new instrumentation development are also identified for nonintrusive measurements of the boundary-layer properties.

  18. Perceptions of Anatomy Education--A Student's View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joslin, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Changes in anatomy education over the last two decades have, in large part, led to less emphasis on gross anatomy in the medical curriculum. This has led many to question whether streamlined anatomy courses truly provide adequate preparation for medical practice. Rather than wondering about the effects of these changes, we should be actively

  19. Learning of Cross-Sectional Anatomy Using Clay Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Kim, Ji-Young; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    We incorporated clay modeling into gross anatomy and neuro-anatomy courses to help students understand cross-sectional anatomy. By making clay models, cutting them and comparing cut surfaces to CT and MR images, students learned how cross-sectional two-dimensional images were created from three-dimensional structure of human organs. Most students

  20. Properties of Publications on Anatomy in Medical Education Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc; Bolhuis, Sanneke; van Kuppeveld, Sascha; Kooloos, Jan; Laan, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Publications on anatomy in medical education appear to be largely anecdotal. To explore this, we investigated the literature on anatomy in medical education, aiming first to evaluate the contribution of the literature on anatomy in medical education to "best evidence medical education" (BEME) and second to evaluate the development of this…

  1. Teaching Anatomy and Physiology Using Computer-Based, Stereoscopic Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Jamie; Kuehn, David; Langlois, Rick

    2007-01-01

    Learning real three-dimensional (3D) anatomy for the first time can be challenging. Two-dimensional drawings and plastic models tend to over-simplify the complexity of anatomy. The approach described uses stereoscopy to create 3D images of the process of cadaver dissection and to demonstrate the underlying anatomy related to the speech mechanisms.

  2. Properties of Publications on Anatomy in Medical Education Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc; Bolhuis, Sanneke; van Kuppeveld, Sascha; Kooloos, Jan; Laan, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Publications on anatomy in medical education appear to be largely anecdotal. To explore this, we investigated the literature on anatomy in medical education, aiming first to evaluate the contribution of the literature on anatomy in medical education to "best evidence medical education" (BEME) and second to evaluate the development of this

  3. Learning of Cross-Sectional Anatomy Using Clay Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Kim, Ji-Young; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    We incorporated clay modeling into gross anatomy and neuro-anatomy courses to help students understand cross-sectional anatomy. By making clay models, cutting them and comparing cut surfaces to CT and MR images, students learned how cross-sectional two-dimensional images were created from three-dimensional structure of human organs. Most students…

  4. Teaching Anatomy and Physiology Using Computer-Based, Stereoscopic Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Jamie; Kuehn, David; Langlois, Rick

    2007-01-01

    Learning real three-dimensional (3D) anatomy for the first time can be challenging. Two-dimensional drawings and plastic models tend to over-simplify the complexity of anatomy. The approach described uses stereoscopy to create 3D images of the process of cadaver dissection and to demonstrate the underlying anatomy related to the speech mechanisms.…

  5. Perceptions of Anatomy Education--A Student's View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joslin, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Changes in anatomy education over the last two decades have, in large part, led to less emphasis on gross anatomy in the medical curriculum. This has led many to question whether streamlined anatomy courses truly provide adequate preparation for medical practice. Rather than wondering about the effects of these changes, we should be actively…

  6. Guidelines for Standard Photography in Gross and Clinical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barut, Cagatay; Ertilav, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Photography has a widespread usage in medicine and anatomy. In this review, authors focused on the usage of photography in gross and clinical anatomy. Photography in gross and clinical anatomy is not only essential for accurate documentation of morphological findings but also important in sharing knowledge and experience. Photographs of cadavers…

  7. Guidelines for Standard Photography in Gross and Clinical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barut, Cagatay; Ertilav, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Photography has a widespread usage in medicine and anatomy. In this review, authors focused on the usage of photography in gross and clinical anatomy. Photography in gross and clinical anatomy is not only essential for accurate documentation of morphological findings but also important in sharing knowledge and experience. Photographs of cadavers

  8. Building virtual models by postprocessing radiology images: A guide for anatomy faculty.

    PubMed

    Tam, Matthew D B S

    2010-01-01

    Radiology and radiologists are recognized as increasingly valuable resources for the teaching and learning of anatomy. State-of-the-art radiology department workstations with industry-standard software applications can provide exquisite demonstrations of anatomy, pathology, and more recently, physiology. Similar advances in personal computers and increasingly available software can allow anatomy departments and their students to build their own three-dimensional virtual models. Appropriate selection of a data-set, followed by processing and presentation are the key steps in creating virtual models. The construction, presentation, clinical application, and educational potential of postprocessed imaging techniques including multiplanar reformats, minimum intensity projections, segmentation, volume-rendering, surface-rendering, fly-throughs, virtual endoscopy, angiography, and cine-loops are reviewed using examples created with only a personal computer and freeware software. Although only static images are presented in this article, further material is available online within the electronic version of this article. Through the use of basic and advanced image reconstruction and also paying attention to optimized presentation and integration, anatomy courses can be strengthened with appropriate radiological material. There are several key advantages for the anatomy department, which is equipped with the ability to produce virtual models using radiology images: (1) Opportunities to present anatomy using state-of-the-art technology as an adjunct to current practices, (2) a means to forge an improved relationship with the local radiology department, and (3) the ability to create material locally, which is integrated with the local curriculum avoiding the problem of information overload when using the internet or other commercially available resources. PMID:20827725

  9. Two-Year Community: Human Anatomy Software Use in Traditional and Online Anatomy Laboratory Classes: Student-Perceived Learning Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuyatt, Brian L.; Baker, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of human anatomy software in face-to-face and online anatomy laboratory classes. Cognitive, affective, and psychomotor perceived learning was measured for students using Pearson Education's Practice Anatomy Laboratory 2.0 software. This study determined that student-perceived learning was significantly

  10. Two-Year Community: Human Anatomy Software Use in Traditional and Online Anatomy Laboratory Classes: Student-Perceived Learning Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuyatt, Brian L.; Baker, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of human anatomy software in face-to-face and online anatomy laboratory classes. Cognitive, affective, and psychomotor perceived learning was measured for students using Pearson Education's Practice Anatomy Laboratory 2.0 software. This study determined that student-perceived learning was significantly…

  11. Anatomy and Physiology. Revised Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Danene; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains 14 units of instruction for a course in anatomy and physiology for surgical technology students. The units cover the following topics: (1) organization of the body; (2) cells, tissues, and membranes; (3) integumentary system; (4) skeletal system; (5) muscular system; (6) nervous system; (7) special sense organs; (8)

  12. Anatomy, Medical Education, and Human Ancestral Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strkalj, Goran; Spocter, Muhammad A.; Wilkinson, A. Tracey

    2011-01-01

    It is argued in this article that the human body both in health and disease cannot be fully understood without adequately accounting for the different levels of human variation. The article focuses on variation due to ancestry, arguing that the inclusion of information pertaining to ancestry in human anatomy teaching materials and courses should…

  13. Teaching Cell Anatomy with a Fabric Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluka, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Middle schoolers are often first introduced to detailed cellular anatomy through one-dimensional drawings in basic life science books, fill-in-the blank handouts accompanied by notes from the teacher, or desktop hard-plastic commercial models that resemble giant lollipops. One of the most important, yet difficult, life science concepts for

  14. Testing to Enhance Retention in Human Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Jessica M.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Marshak, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent work in cognitive psychology has shown that repeatedly testing one's knowledge is a powerful learning aid and provides substantial benefits for retention of the material. To apply this in a human anatomy course for medical students, 39 fill-in-the-blank quizzes of about 50 questions each, one for each region of the body, and four about the

  15. Teaching Cell Anatomy with a Fabric Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluka, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Middle schoolers are often first introduced to detailed cellular anatomy through one-dimensional drawings in basic life science books, fill-in-the blank handouts accompanied by notes from the teacher, or desktop hard-plastic commercial models that resemble giant lollipops. One of the most important, yet difficult, life science concepts for…

  16. Testing to Enhance Retention in Human Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Jessica M.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Marshak, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent work in cognitive psychology has shown that repeatedly testing one's knowledge is a powerful learning aid and provides substantial benefits for retention of the material. To apply this in a human anatomy course for medical students, 39 fill-in-the-blank quizzes of about 50 questions each, one for each region of the body, and four about the…

  17. Professional Storytelling in Clinical Dental Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieser, Jules; Livingstone, Vicki; Meldrum, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to see if storytelling in a clinical dental anatomy course would increase student satisfaction. We enhanced teaching by spontaneous storytelling in problem-based learning, in half of the third-year dentistry class. At the end of the course, we administered an anonymous questionnaire to the students in the class,

  18. Anatomy and Physiology. Revised Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Danene; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains 14 units of instruction for a course in anatomy and physiology for surgical technology students. The units cover the following topics: (1) organization of the body; (2) cells, tissues, and membranes; (3) integumentary system; (4) skeletal system; (5) muscular system; (6) nervous system; (7) special sense organs; (8)…

  19. A Syllabus for Biol 242--Human Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Willis H.

    This document is the fall and spring semester course syllabus of Biology 242--Human Anatomy at Southern University (Louisiana). Sections include: (1) Descriptive Information; (2) Specification of Course Goals and Objectives; (3) Readings; (4) Description of Instructional Procedures; (5) Course Requirements; (6) Course Schedule; (7) Evaluation of…

  20. Professional Storytelling in Clinical Dental Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieser, Jules; Livingstone, Vicki; Meldrum, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to see if storytelling in a clinical dental anatomy course would increase student satisfaction. We enhanced teaching by spontaneous storytelling in problem-based learning, in half of the third-year dentistry class. At the end of the course, we administered an anonymous questionnaire to the students in the class,…

  1. Broca's Area: Nomenclature, Anatomy, Typology and Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Simon S.; Crow, Timothy; Foundas, Anne; Amunts, Katrin; Roberts, Neil

    2009-01-01

    In this review, we (i) describe the nomenclature of Broca's area and show how the circumscribed definition of Broca's area is disassociated from Broca's aphasia, (ii) describe in detail how the gross anatomy of Broca's area varies between people, and how the definitions vary between studies, (iii) attempt to reconcile the findings of structural…

  2. [Computer technologies in teaching pathological anatomy].

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, A B; Fedorov, D N

    2015-01-01

    The paper gives experience with personal computers used at the Academician A.L. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy for more than 20 years. It shows the objective necessity of introducing computer technologies at all stages of acquiring skills in anatomical pathology, including lectures, students' free work, test check, etc. PMID:26027397

  3. Children's Fantasy Literature: Toward an Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooderham, David

    1995-01-01

    States that finding a critical language in which to speak about children's fantasy texts is not as straightforward as might first appear. Discusses ideas held by T. Todorov and J.R.R. Tolkien. Argues that fantasy is a metaphorical mode, and details an anatomy of children's fantasy. Concludes that children's fantasy can be described as a body of…

  4. An Anatomy of Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Malcolm S. M.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a conceptualization of an anatomy of continuing medical education. It is suggested that a body of knowledge developed for continuing medical education may be useful with suitable modifications in the continuing education of health professionals other than physicians. (Available from University of California Press, Berkeley, CA 94720.)…

  5. [The importance of bronchoscopic anatomy for anesthesiologists].

    PubMed

    Hoşten, Tülay; Topçu, Salih

    2011-01-01

    One-lung ventilation (OLV) is a sine qua non of thoracic surgery and requires knowledge and talent. Close familiarity with equipments used for OLV as well as bronchoscopy and respiratory tract anatomy is important for successful OLV. We aim to outline the bronchoscopic anatomy of the tracheobronchial tree and OLV equipment for anesthetists and thoracic surgeons in this review. The recorded preoperative and intraoperative bronchoscopic applications of the patients hospitalized in our Thoracic Surgery clinic for diagnosis and treatment have been evaluated from an anesthetist's perspective. Anatomic landmarks were identified in the bronchoscopic evaluation. Optimal and misplacement images of double-lumen tubes (DLT) and bronchial blockers (BB) used for OLV in our clinic were obtained via fiber optic bronchoscopy. While left lung isolation can be made more safely due to the anatomy of the left main bronchus, placement of both DLTs and BBs to the right main bronchus requires greater care. Success in OLV procedures would increase with anesthetists being well informed about the fiber optic bronchoscopic anatomy of the tracheobronchial tree and in close cooperation with the surgical team. PMID:22233317

  6. Anatomy, Medical Education, and Human Ancestral Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strkalj, Goran; Spocter, Muhammad A.; Wilkinson, A. Tracey

    2011-01-01

    It is argued in this article that the human body both in health and disease cannot be fully understood without adequately accounting for the different levels of human variation. The article focuses on variation due to ancestry, arguing that the inclusion of information pertaining to ancestry in human anatomy teaching materials and courses should

  7. Computerized Grading of Anatomy Laboratory Practical Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krippendorf, Beth B.; Bolender, David L.; Kolesari, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    At the Medical College of Wisconsin, a procedure was developed to allow computerized grading and grade reporting of laboratory practical examinations in the Clinical Human Anatomy course. At the start of the course, first year medical students were given four Lists of Structures. On these lists, numbered items were arranged alphabetically; the…

  8. Anatomy and physiology of genital organs - women.

    PubMed

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Gambini, Dania

    2015-01-01

    "Anatomy is destiny": Sigmund Freud viewed human anatomy as a necessary, although not a sufficient, condition for understanding the complexity of human sexual function with a solid biologic basis. The aim of the chapter is to describe women's genital anatomy and physiology, focusing on women's sexual function with a clinically oriented vision. Key points include: embryology, stressing that the "female" is the anatomic "default" program, differentiated into "male" only in the presence of androgens at physiologic levels for the gestational age; sex determination and sex differentiation, describing the interplay between anatomic and endocrine factors; the "clitoral-urethral-vaginal" complex, the most recent anatomy reading of the corpora cavernosa pattern in women; the controversial G spot; the role of the pelvic floor muscles in modulating vaginal receptivity and intercourse feelings, with hyperactivity leading to introital dyspareunia and contributing to provoked vestibulodynia and recurrent postcoital cystitis, whilst lesions during delivery reduce vaginal sensations, genital arousability, and orgasm; innervation, vessels, bones, ligaments; and the physiology of women's sexual response. Attention to physiologic aging focuses on "low-grade inflammation," genital and systemic, with its impact on women sexual function, especially after the menopause, if the woman does not or cannot use hormone replacement therapy. PMID:26003238

  9. Fostering Improved Anatomy and Physiology Instructor Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattheis, Allison; Jensen, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Despite widespread calls for reform in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education, effecting lasting change in instructor practice is challenging to achieve. This article describes the results of a 2-yr research study that involved efforts to develop the pedagogical expertise of a group of anatomy and physiology…

  10. Dental embryology, anatomy, development, and aging.

    PubMed

    Lowder, M Q; Mueller, P O

    1998-08-01

    Equine practitioners should be knowledgeable of dental anatomy and development to enhance their skill of age estimation of horses. The permanent teeth of horses are continually undergoing changes in shape and appearance. These changes may be used to suggest a reasonable age range for a horse. PMID:9742661

  11. The Anatomy of a Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanter, Hal

    As part of a curriculum development project for gifted students, seventh and tenth grades (N=323) were tested with the Structure of Intellect Learning Abilities Test (SOI-LA) to compare students' scores with norms already collected, investigate differences between the sexes, identify specific types of tasks to promote achievement, and to determine…

  12. Metformin synergistically enhances antiproliferative effects of cisplatin and etoposide in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells*

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Sarah Fernandes; Guimarães, Isabella dos Santos; Madeira, Klesia Pirola; Daltoé, Renata Dalmaschio; Silva, Ian Victor; Rangel, Leticia Batista Azevedo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness of combining conventional antineoplastic drugs (cisplatin and etoposide) with metformin in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in the NCI-H460 cell line, in order to develop new therapeutic options with high efficacy and low toxicity. METHODS: We used the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and calculated the combination index for the drugs studied. RESULTS: We found that the use of metformin as monotherapy reduced the metabolic viability of the cell line studied. Combining metformin with cisplatin or etoposide produced a synergistic effect and was more effective than was the use of cisplatin or etoposide as monotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Metformin, due to its independent effects on liver kinase B1, had antiproliferative effects on the NCI-H460 cell line. When metformin was combined with cisplatin or etoposide, the cell death rate was even higher. PMID:24473757

  13. Unravelling Protein-DNA Interactions at Molecular Level: A DFT and NCI Study.

    PubMed

    González, J; Baños, I; León, I; Contreras-García, J; Cocinero, E J; Lesarri, A; Fernández, J A; Millán, J

    2016-02-01

    Histone-DNA interactions were probed computationally at a molecular level, by characterizing the bimolecular clusters constituted by selected amino acid derivatives with polar (asparagine and glutamine), nonpolar (alanine, valine, and isoleucine), and charged (arginine) side chains and methylated pyrimidinic (1-methylcytosine and 1-methylthymine) and puric (9-methyladenine and 9-methylguanine) DNA bases. The computational approach combined different methodologies: a molecular mechanics (MMFFs forced field) conformational search and structural and vibrational density-functional calculations (M06-2X with double and triple-ζ Pople's basis sets). To dissect the interactions, intermolecular forces were analyzed with the Non-Covalent Interactions (NCI) analysis. The results for the 24 different clusters studied show a noticeable correlation between the calculated binding energies and the propensities for protein-DNA base interactions found in the literature. Such correlation holded even for the interaction of the selected amino acid derivatives with Watson and Crick pairs. Therefore, the balance between hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions (specially stacking) in the control of the final shape of the investigated amino acid-DNA base pairs seems to be well reproduced in dispersion-corrected DFT molecular models, reinforcing the idea that the specificity between the amino acids and the DNA bases play an important role in the regulation of DNA. PMID:26765058

  14. Anticancer activity of newly synthesized azaphenothiazines from NCI's anticancer screening bank.

    PubMed

    Pluta, Krystian; Jeleń, Małgorzata; Morak-Młodawska, Beata; Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta; Kocieba, Maja

    2010-01-01

    The activity of the newly synthesized azaphenothiazines: tricyclic 10-substituted dipyridothiazines 1-9, pentacyclic 6-substituted diquinothiazines 10-22 and hexacyclic diquinothiazinium salt 23 was tested on 55-60 in vitro cell lines. The cell lines included nine types of cancer: leukemia, non-small cell lung cancer, colon cancer, CNS cancer, melanoma, ovarian cancer, renal cancer, prostate cancer and breast cancer (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA). The features of the chemical substituent at the thiazine nitrogen atom confer the anticancer activity of diquinothiazines 10-23. Unexpectedly, the most active of the dipyridothiazines 1-9 was the unsubstituted compound 1 (the substituent is a hydrogen atom). The most cytotoxic compound was the half-mustard derivative 18. The GI(50) value of this compound was -7.06 (corresponding to 40 ng/ml) when tested on the melanoma cell line SK-MEL-5 and -6.0 - -6.62 using cell lines from various cancers including: leukemia (CCRF-CEM), the MOLT-4 cell line, colon cancer (HCT-116), central nervous system cancer (SNB-75 and SF-295), prostate cancer (PC-3), non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460 and HOP-92), ovarian cancer (IGROV1 and OVCAR-4) and breast cancer (MDA-MB-460). The ethylene group in the aminoalkylazaphenothiazines is as a good linker and is similar to the propylene and butylene linkers in aminoalkylphenothiazines. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of significant azaphenothiazine anticancer activity. PMID:20508288

  15. PANCREATITIS - DIABETES - PANCREATIC CANCER: Summary of an NIDDK-NCI Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Dana K.; Andren-Sandberg, Åke; Duell, Eric J.; Goggins, Michael; Korc, Murray; Petersen, Gloria M.; Smith, Jill P.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2013-01-01

    A workshop sponsored by the NIDDK and the NCI on “Pancreatitis-Diabetes-Pancreatic Cancer” focused on the risk factors of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and diabetes mellitus (DM) on the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Sessions were held on a) an overview of the problem of PDAC, b) CP as a risk factor for PDAC, c) DM as a risk factor for PDAC, d) pancreatogenic, or type 3c DM (T3cDM), e) genomic associations of CP, DM, and PDAC, f) surveillance of high-risk populations and early detection of PDAC, and g) effects of DM treatment on PDAC. Recent data and current understandings of the mechanisms of CP- and DM-associated factors on PDAC development were discussed, and a detailed review of the possible risks of DM treatment on the development of PDAC was provided by representatives from academia, industry, and the Food and Drug Administration. The current status of possible biomarkers of PDAC and surveillance strategies for high-risk populations were discussed, and the gaps in knowledge and opportunities for further research were elucidated. A broad spectrum of expertise of the speakers and discussants provided an unusually productive workshop, the highlights of which are summarized in the accompanying article. PMID:24152948

  16. In memoriam: an appreciation for the NCI R25T cancer education and career development program.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shine

    2014-06-01

    On September 7, 2013, the NCI R25T award mechanism ended its final "receipt/review/award cycle" after more than two decades shaping the cancer prevention and control workforce. Created in 1991 to respond to a national shortage of cancer prevention and control researchers, the R25T supported innovative institutional programs with specialized curricula preparing individuals for careers as independent scientists for the field. Required elements ensured developing transdisciplinary sensibilities and skills highly suited to team science, including conducting collaborative research with mentors of complementary expertise. R25Ts provided trainee stipends, research, education, and travel funds at levels far higher than T32 National Service Research Awards to attract individuals from diverse disciplines. Graduates are faculty at all academic ranks, and hold leadership positions such as associate directors of cancer prevention and control. Beyond its trainees, R25Ts also recruited into the field other students exposed through courses in specialized prevention curricula, as well as course instructors and trainee mentors, who did not initially consider their work to be relevant to cancer prevention. Although advances are being achieved, prevention efforts are not yet fully realized, and currently unknown is the impact on the workforce of terminating the R25T, including whether it is another barrier to preventing cancer. PMID:24895444

  17. NCI Funding Trends and Priorities in Physical Activity and Energy Balance Research Among Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Catherine M; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Tesauro, Gina; Perna, Frank; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Elena, Joanne W; Ross, Sharon A; O'Connell, Mary; Bowles, Heather R; Greenberg, Deborah; Nebeling, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a healthy lifestyle consisting of physical activity, healthy diet, and weight control is associated with reduced risk of morbidity and mortality after cancer. However, these behavioral interventions are not widely adopted in practice or community settings. Integrating heath behavior change interventions into standard survivorship care for the growing number of cancer survivors requires an understanding of the current state of the science and a coordinated scientific agenda for the future with focused attention in several priority areas. To facilitate this goal, this paper presents trends over the past decade of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) research portfolio, fiscal year 2004 to 2014, by funding mechanism, research focus, research design and methodology, primary study exposures and outcomes, and study team expertise and composition. These data inform a prioritized research agenda for the next decade focused on demonstrating value and feasibility and creating desire for health behavior change interventions at multiple levels including the survivor, clinician, and healthcare payer to facilitate the development and implementation of appropriately targeted, adaptive, effective, and sustainable programs for all survivors. PMID:26547926

  18. NCI Think Tank Concerning the Identifiability of Biospecimens and “-Omic” Data

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Carol J.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Green, Tiffany; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Nelson, Stefanie A.; Rodriguez, Laura L.; Buccini, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    On June 11 and 12, 2012, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) hosted a think tank concerning the identifiability of biospecimens and “omic” Data in order to explore challenges surrounding this complex and multifaceted topic. The think tank brought together forty-six leaders from several fields, including cancer genomics, bioinformatics, human subject protection, patient advocacy, and commercial genetics. The first day involved presentations regarding the state of the science of re-identification; current and proposed regulatory frameworks for assessing identifiability; developments in law, industry and biotechnology; and the expectations of patients and research participants. The second day was spent by think tank participants in small break-out groups designed to address specific sub-topics under the umbrella issue of identifiability, including considerations for the development of best practices for data sharing and consent, and targeted opportunities for further empirical research. We describe the outcomes of this two day meeting, including two complimentary themes that emerged from moderated discussions following the presentations on Day 1, and ideas presented for further empirical research to discern the preferences and concerns of research participants about data sharing and individual identifiability. PMID:23579437

  19. Highlights of recent developments and trends in cancer nanotechnology research--view from NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hull, L C; Farrell, D; Grodzinski, P

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of cancer and cancer related deaths in the United States has decreased over the past two decades due to improvements in early detection and treatment, cancer still is responsible for a quarter of the deaths in this country. There is much room for improvement on the standard treatments currently available and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recognized the potential for nanotechnology and nanomaterials in this area. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer was formed in 2004 to support multidisciplinary researchers in the application of nanotechnology to cancer diagnosis and treatment. The researchers in the Alliance have been productive in generating innovative solutions to some of the central issues of cancer treatment including how to detect tumors earlier, how to target cancer cells specifically, and how to improve the therapeutic index of existing chemotherapies and radiotherapy treatments. Highly creative ideas are being pursued where novelty in nanomaterial development enables new modalities of detection or therapy. This review highlights some of the innovative materials approaches being pursued by researchers funded by the NCI Alliance. Their discoveries to improve the functionality of nanoparticles for medical applications includes the generation of new platforms, improvements in the manufacturing of nanoparticles and determining the underlying reasons for the movement of nanoparticles in the blood. PMID:23948249

  20. mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of the NCI-60 integrated with drug activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongfang; DAndrade, Petula; Fulmer-Smentek, Stephanie; Lorenzi, Philip; Kohn, Kurt W.; Weinstein, John N.; Pommier, Yves; Reinhold, William C.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Spotlight on Molecular Profiling series, we present here new profiling studies of mRNA and microRNA expression for the 60 cell lines of the NCI DTP drug screen (NCI-60) using the 41,000-probe Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray and the 15,000-feature Agilent Human microRNA Microarray V2. The expression levels of ~21,000 genes and 723 human microRNAs were measured. These profiling studies include quadruplicate technical replicates for six and eight cell lines for mRNA and microRNA, respectively, and duplicates for the remaining cell lines. The resulting data sets are freely available and searchable online in our CellMiner database. The result indicates high reproducibility for both platforms and an essential biological similarity across the various cell types. The mRNA and microRNA expression levels were integrated with our previously published 1,429-compound database of anticancer activity obtained from the NCI DTP drug screen. Large blocks of both mRNAs and microRNAs were identified with predominately unidirectional correlations to ~1,300 drugs including 121 drugs with known mechanisms of action. The data sets presented here will facilitate the identification of groups of mRNAs, microRNAs and drugs that potentially affect and interact with one another. PMID:20442302

  1. Spergularia marina Induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in NCI-H716 Cells Through Bile Acid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong; Lee, Yu Mi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spergularia marina Griseb. (SM) is a halophyte that grows in mud flats. The aerial portions of SM have been eaten as vegetables and traditionally used to prevent chronic diseases in Korea. However, there has been no scientific report that demonstrates the pharmacological effects of SM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is important for the maintenance of glucose and energy homeostasis through acting as a signal in peripheral and neural systems. To discover a functional food for regulating glucose and energy homeostasis, we evaluated the effect of an aqueous ethanolic extract (AEE) of SM on GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. In addition, we explored the Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) agonist activity of AEE-SM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells transiently transfected with human TGR5. As a result, treatment of NCI-H716 cells with AEE-SM increased GLP-1 secretion and intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of NCI-H716 cells with TGR5-specific small interference RNA inhibited AEE-SM-induced GLP-1 secretion and the increase in Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Moreover, AEE-SM showed that the TGR5 agonist activity in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with TGR5. The results suggest that AEE-SM might be a candidate for a functional food to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:25260089

  2. Web-based stereoscopic visualization for the global anatomy classroom.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Mathias; Dech, Fred; Parsad, Nigel M; Silverstein, Jonathan C

    2011-01-01

    Many projects have focused on the improvement of virtual education. We have contributed with the global virtual anatomy course for teaching students in multiple locations with stereoscopic volume rendering, audio/video conferencing and additional materials. This year we focused on further simplifying the deployment of the classroom by using the new collaborative and web-based visualization system CoWebViz, to transfer stereoscopic visualization to the classrooms. Besides the necessary hardware installations for stereoscopy, only a web browser is necessary to view and to interact with the remote 3D stereo visualization. This system proved stable, gave higher quality images and increased ease of deployment. Its success within our classroom at the University of Chicago and Cardiff University has motivated us to continue CoWebViz development. PMID:21335801

  3. Mouse anatomy ontologies: enhancements and tools for exploring and integrating biomedical data.

    PubMed

    Hayamizu, Terry F; Baldock, Richard A; Ringwald, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Mouse anatomy ontologies provide standard nomenclature for describing normal and mutant mouse anatomy, and are essential for the description and integration of data directly related to anatomy such as gene expression patterns. Building on our previous work on anatomical ontologies for the embryonic and adult mouse, we have recently developed a new and substantially revised anatomical ontology covering all life stages of the mouse. Anatomical terms are organized in complex hierarchies enabling multiple relationships between terms. Tissue classification as well as partonomic, developmental, and other types of relationships can be represented. Hierarchies for specific developmental stages can also be derived. The ontology forms the core of the eMouse Atlas Project (EMAP) and is used extensively for annotating and integrating gene expression patterns and other data by the Gene Expression Database (GXD), the eMouse Atlas of Gene Expression (EMAGE) and other database resources. Here we illustrate the evolution of the developmental and adult mouse anatomical ontologies toward one combined system. We report on recent ontology enhancements, describe the current status, and discuss future plans for mouse anatomy ontology development and application in integrating data resources. PMID:26208972

  4. Gross anatomy and ultrasonographic images of the reproductive system of the Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus).

    PubMed

    Lilia, K; Rosnina, Y; Abd Wahid, H; Zahari, Z Z; Abraham, M

    2010-12-01

    The Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus) is the largest among the four tapir species and is listed as an endangered species. Ultrasound examination and description of the external anatomy of the female reproductive system of three adult females were performed, whereas the internal anatomy was investigated in necropsied samples of four adult females and one subadult female. Descriptions of the male external genitalia were conducted on one adult male. Gross examination revealed the presence of a bicornuate uterus. The uterine cervix is firm and muscular with projections towards its lumen, which is also evident on ultrasonography. The elongated and relatively small ovaries, which have a smooth surface, could not be imaged on ultrasonography, due to their anatomical position. The testes are located inside a slightly pendulous scrotum that is sparsely covered with soft, short hairs. The penis has one dorsal and two lateral penile projections just proximal to the glans penis. PMID:20809915

  5. The history of anatomy in Persia.

    PubMed

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2007-04-01

    The study of human anatomy can be found throughout the rich history of Persia. For thousands of years, morphological descriptions derived from this part of the world have contributed to and have helped form our current anatomical knowledge base. In this article we review the major influential Persian periods and the individuals who have contributed to the development of anatomy. We have divided the history of Persia into five eras: (1) the period of the Elamites, Medes, early Persians and Babylonians (10th millennium to 6th century BC); (2) following the establishment of the Persian Empire (6th century BC) to the 7th century AD; (3) after the Islamic conquest of Persia to the ascendency of Baghdad (7th to 13th century AD); (4) from the Mongol invasion of Persia to the foundations of modern anatomy (13th to 18th century AD); and (5) modern Persia/Iran (18th century AD to present). Evidence indicates that human dissection was commonplace in the first era, which led to a disciplined practice of surgery in the centuries leading to the foundation of the Persian Empire. By the emergence of Zoroastrianism in the Persian Empire, the microcosm theory was widely used to understand internal anatomy in relation to the external universe. The world's first cosmopolitan university and hospital were built in Gondishapur, south-western Persia, in the third century AD. Greek and Syriac knowledge influenced the second era. With the gradual ruin of Gondishapur and the foundation of Baghdad following the Islamic conquest of Persia (637-651 AD), a great movement took place, which led to the flourishing of the so-called Middle Age or Islamic Golden Age. Of the influential anatomists of this period, Mesue (777-857 AD), Tabbari (838-870 AD), Rhazes (865-925 AD), Joveini (?-983 AD), Ali ibn Abbas (930-994 AD), Avicenna (980-1037 AD) and Jorjani (1042-1137 AD) all hailed from Persia. There is evidence in the Persian literature as to the direct involvement of these scholars in human dissection. Syro-Indian, Byzantine, Greek, Chinese and Arabic knowledge all influenced the third era. In the fourth period, the first colour illustrated anatomical text (by Mansur, 14th century AD) was compiled. Chinese and Indian anatomical styles were embraced, though there was a strong religious siege of anatomy late in this era. By the 19th century, Persia had entered a new era of modernizing movements and academic contact with the West through the reforms of Mirza Tagi Khan Amir Kabir. Knowledge of anatomy for this region in the 20th century was greatly influenced by Europe and America. PMID:17428200

  6. The history of anatomy in Persia

    PubMed Central

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2007-01-01

    The study of human anatomy can be found throughout the rich history of Persia. For thousands of years, morphological descriptions derived from this part of the world have contributed to and have helped form our current anatomical knowledge base. In this article we review the major influential Persian periods and the individuals who have contributed to the development of anatomy. We have divided the history of Persia into five eras: (1) the period of the Elamites, Medes, early Persians and Babylonians (10th millennium to 6th century BC); (2) following the establishment of the Persian Empire (6th century BC) to the 7th century AD; (3) after the Islamic conquest of Persia to the ascendency of Baghdad (7th to 13th century AD); (4) from the Mongol invasion of Persia to the foundations of modern anatomy (13th to 18th century AD); and (5) modern Persia/Iran (18th century AD to present). Evidence indicates that human dissection was commonplace in the first era, which led to a disciplined practice of surgery in the centuries leading to the foundation of the Persian Empire. By the emergence of Zoroastrianism in the Persian Empire, the microcosm theory was widely used to understand internal anatomy in relation to the external universe. The world's first cosmopolitan university and hospital were built in Gondishapur, south-western Persia, in the third century AD. Greek and Syriac knowledge influenced the second era. With the gradual ruin of Gondishapur and the foundation of Baghdad following the Islamic conquest of Persia (637–651 AD), a great movement took place, which led to the flourishing of the so-called Middle Age or Islamic Golden Age. Of the influential anatomists of this period, Mesue (777–857 AD), Tabbari (838–870 AD), Rhazes (865–925 AD), Joveini (?−983 AD), Ali ibn Abbas (930–994 AD), Avicenna (980–1037 AD) and Jorjani (1042–1137 AD) all hailed from Persia. There is evidence in the Persian literature as to the direct involvement of these scholars in human dissection. Syro-Indian, Byzantine, Greek, Chinese and Arabic knowledge all influenced the third era. In the fourth period, the first colour illustrated anatomical text (by Mansur, 14th century AD) was compiled. Chinese and Indian anatomical styles were embraced, though there was a strong religious siege of anatomy late in this era. By the 19th century, Persia had entered a new era of modernizing movements and academic contact with the West through the reforms of Mirza Tagi Khan Amir Kabir. Knowledge of anatomy for this region in the 20th century was greatly influenced by Europe and America. PMID:17428200

  7. Moving the mountain: analysis of the effort required to transform comparative anatomy into computable anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Dahdul, Wasila; Dececchi, T. Alexander; Ibrahim, Nizar; Lapp, Hilmar; Mabee, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The diverse phenotypes of living organisms have been described for centuries, and though they may be digitized, they are not readily available in a computable form. Using over 100 morphological studies, the Phenoscape project has demonstrated that by annotating characters with community ontology terms, links between novel species anatomy and the genes that may underlie them can be made. But given the enormity of the legacy literature, how can this largely unexploited wealth of descriptive data be rendered amenable to large-scale computation? To identify the bottlenecks, we quantified the time involved in the major aspects of phenotype curation as we annotated characters from the vertebrate phylogenetic systematics literature. This involves attaching fully computable logical expressions consisting of ontology terms to the descriptions in character-by-taxon matrices. The workflow consists of: (i) data preparation, (ii) phenotype annotation, (iii) ontology development and (iv) curation team discussions and software development feedback. Our results showed that the completion of this work required two person-years by a team of two post-docs, a lead data curator, and students. Manual data preparation required close to 13% of the effort. This part in particular could be reduced substantially with better community data practices, such as depositing fully populated matrices in public repositories. Phenotype annotation required ∼40% of the effort. We are working to make this more efficient with Natural Language Processing tools. Ontology development (40%), however, remains a highly manual task requiring domain (anatomical) expertise and use of specialized software. The large overhead required for data preparation and ontology development contributed to a low annotation rate of approximately two characters per hour, compared with 14 characters per hour when activity was restricted to character annotation. Unlocking the potential of the vast stores of morphological descriptions requires better tools for efficiently processing natural language, and better community practices towards a born-digital morphology. Database URL: http://kb.phenoscape.org PMID:25972520

  8. Moving the mountain: analysis of the effort required to transform comparative anatomy into computable anatomy.

    PubMed

    Dahdul, Wasila; Dececchi, T Alexander; Ibrahim, Nizar; Lapp, Hilmar; Mabee, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The diverse phenotypes of living organisms have been described for centuries, and though they may be digitized, they are not readily available in a computable form. Using over 100 morphological studies, the Phenoscape project has demonstrated that by annotating characters with community ontology terms, links between novel species anatomy and the genes that may underlie them can be made. But given the enormity of the legacy literature, how can this largely unexploited wealth of descriptive data be rendered amenable to large-scale computation? To identify the bottlenecks, we quantified the time involved in the major aspects of phenotype curation as we annotated characters from the vertebrate phylogenetic systematics literature. This involves attaching fully computable logical expressions consisting of ontology terms to the descriptions in character-by-taxon matrices. The workflow consists of: (i) data preparation, (ii) phenotype annotation, (iii) ontology development and (iv) curation team discussions and software development feedback. Our results showed that the completion of this work required two person-years by a team of two post-docs, a lead data curator, and students. Manual data preparation required close to 13% of the effort. This part in particular could be reduced substantially with better community data practices, such as depositing fully populated matrices in public repositories. Phenotype annotation required ∼40% of the effort. We are working to make this more efficient with Natural Language Processing tools. Ontology development (40%), however, remains a highly manual task requiring domain (anatomical) expertise and use of specialized software. The large overhead required for data preparation and ontology development contributed to a low annotation rate of approximately two characters per hour, compared with 14 characters per hour when activity was restricted to character annotation. Unlocking the potential of the vast stores of morphological descriptions requires better tools for efficiently processing natural language, and better community practices towards a born-digital morphology. Database URL: http://kb.phenoscape.org PMID:25972520

  9. Fostering improved anatomy and physiology instructor pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Mattheis, Allison; Jensen, Murray

    2014-12-01

    Despite widespread calls for reform in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education, effecting lasting change in instructor practice is challenging to achieve. This article describes the results of a 2-yr research study that involved efforts to develop the pedagogical expertise of a group of anatomy and physiology instructors at the college level. Data were collected through a series of individual interviews that included the use of the Teacher Beliefs Inventory questionnaire (23) along with observations onsite in participants' college classrooms and at process-oriented guided inquiry learning (POGIL) curriculum writing workshops. Findings indicated attitudinal shifts on the part of participants from teacher-centered to more student-centered pedagogy and supported the benefits of long-term professional development for instructors. Here, we documented the successful progress of these professors as they participated in a curriculum development process that emphasized student-centered teaching with the goal of promoting broader change efforts in introductory anatomy and physiology. PMID:25434015

  10. Innovative ventilation system for animal anatomy laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, D.R.; Smith, D.C.

    1997-04-01

    A unique ventilation system was designed and built to reduce formaldehyde fumes in the large animal anatomy lab at the Vet Medical Center at Cornell University. The laboratory includes four rooms totaling 5,500 ft{sup 2}. The main room has 2,300 ft{sup 2} and houses the laboratory where up to 60 students dissect as many as 12 horses at a time. Other rooms are a cold storage locker, an animal preparation room and a smaller lab for specialized instruction. The large animal anatomy laboratory has a history of air quality complaints despite a fairly high ventilation rate of over 10 air changes/hour. The horses are embalmed, creating a voluminous source of formaldehyde and phenol vapors. Budget constraints and increasingly stringent exposure limits for formaldehyde presented a great challenge to design a ventilation system that yields acceptable air quality. The design solution included two innovative elements: air-to-air heat recovery, and focused ventilation.

  11. Patellofemoral anatomy and biomechanics: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    ZAFFAGNINI, STEFANO; DEJOUR, DAVID; GRASSI, ALBERTO; BONANZINGA, TOMMASO; MUCCIOLI, GIULIO MARIA MARCHEGGIANI; COLLE, FRANCESCA; RAGGI, FEDERICO; BENZI, ANDREA; MARCACCI, MAURILIO

    2013-01-01

    The patellofemoral joint, due to its particular bone anatomy and the numerous capsuloligamentous structures and muscles that act dynamically on the patella, is considered one of the most complex joints in the human body from the biomechanical point of view. The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been demonstrated to contribute 60% of the force that opposes lateral displacement of the patella, and MPFL injury results in an approximately 50% reduction in the force needed to dislocate the patella laterally with the knee extended. For this reason, recent years have seen a growing interest in the study of this important anatomical structure, whose aponeurotic nature has thus been demonstrated. The MPFL acts as a restraint during motion, playing an active role under conditions of laterally applied stress, but an only marginal role during natural knee flexion. However, it remains extremely difficult to clearly define the anatomy of the MPFL and its relationships with other anatomical structures. PMID:25606512

  12. Pocket atlas of MRI body anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.; Ehman, R.L.; May, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a guide to the anatomy of extracranial organs as seen in magnetic resonance images. This collection of 96 magnetic resonance images, accompanied by explanatory line drawings, covers all the major organs of the body- shoulder and humerus; elbow and forearm; hand and wrist; chest; abdomen; pelvis; thigh; knee; calf; and ankle. The images are displayed in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes, enabling radiologists to quickly review coronal and sagittal anatomy as it applies to routine MRI practice. Special emphasis is placed on the extremities, where spatial resolution, coronal and sagittal planes, and soft tissue contrast provide important anatomic detail. Each MRI image is carefully labeled - using numbers with legends at the top of the page - to highlight key anatomic features. Where applicable, special parameters and positioning are noted below the images. Accompanying each image is a line drawing demonstrating the level and plane of the image.

  13. Academic Performance in Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes: A 2-Yr Study of Academic Motivation and Grade Expectation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Allen, Deborah; Gatch, Delena Bell; Shankar, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    This project used a nonexperimental design with a convenience sample and studied the relationship between academic motivation, grade expectation, and academic performance in 1,210 students enrolled in undergraduate human anatomy and physiology (HAP) classes over a 2-yr period. A 42-item survey that included 28 items of the adapted academic…

  14. Attitudes and Examination Performance of Female and Male Medical Students in an Active, Case-Based Learning Programme in Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peplow, Philip

    1998-01-01

    An active, case-based project (CBP) learning program in anatomy was evaluated to measure differences between male and female students in perception of the initial discussion sessions as developing deep learning skills, and also in performance on CBP and essay components of the written examination. Females responded more positively to discussion…

  15. Clinical anatomy of the subserous layer: An amalgamation of gross and clinical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Yoshihiko

    2016-05-01

    The 1998 edition of Terminologia Anatomica introduced some currently used clinical anatomical terms for the pelvic connective tissue or subserous layer. These innovations persuaded the present author to consider a format in which the clinical anatomical terms could be reconciled with those of gross anatomy and incorporated into a single anatomical glossary without contradiction or ambiguity. Specific studies on the subserous layer were undertaken on 79 Japanese women who had undergone surgery for uterine cervical cancer, and on 26 female cadavers that were dissected, 17 being formalin-fixed and 9 fresh. The results were as follows: (a) the subserous layer could be segmentalized by surgical dissection in the perpendicular, horizontal and sagittal planes; (b) the segmentalized subserous layer corresponded to 12 cubes, or ligaments, of minimal dimension that enabled the pelvic organs to be extirpated; (c) each ligament had a three-dimensional (3D) structure comprising craniocaudal, mediolateral, and dorsoventral directions vis-á-vis the pelvic axis; (d) these 3D-structured ligaments were encoded morphologically in order of decreasing length; and (e) using these codes, all the surgical procedures for 19th century to present-day radical hysterectomy could be expressed symbolically. The establishment of clinical anatomical terms, represented symbolically through coding as demonstrated in this article, could provide common ground for amalgamating clinical anatomy with gross anatomy. Consequently, terms in clinical anatomy and gross anatomy could be reconciled and compiled into a single anatomical glossary. Clin. Anat. 29:508-515, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26621479

  16. Complementing anatomy education using three-dimensional anatomy mobile software applications on tablet computers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T L; Burnett, B; Tunstall, R G; Abrahams, P H

    2014-04-01

    Anatomy has traditionally been a cornerstone of medical education, which has been taught via dissection and didactic lectures. The rising prevalence of mobile tablet technology means medical software applications ("apps") play an increasingly important role in medical education. The applications highlighted in this article will aid anatomical educators to identify which are the most useful in clinical, academic, and educational environments. These have been systematically identified by downloading all applications with keywords related to anatomy and then carrying out qualitative assessment. Novel anatomy applications from developers such as Visible Body, 3D4Medical, and Pocket Anatomy allow students to visualize and manipulate complex anatomical structures using detailed 3D models. They often contain additional content including clinical correlations and a range of media from instructional videos to interactive quiz functions. The strength of tablet technology lies in its ability to consolidate and present anatomical information to the user in the most appropriate manner for their learning style. The only question mark remains over the level of detail and accuracy of these applications. Innovative medical educators who embrace tablet technology will find that anatomy applications serve as a useful learning tool when used in conjunction with existing teaching setups. PMID:23661327

  17. Anatomy of a Smart house

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, L.

    1988-07-01

    The author describes the Gas Laboratory House in Bowie, MD. It is being built as a SMART HOUSE. This means it will contain a whole-house control system made up of communication chips, computer programs and microprocessor-based controllers. A single cable carries signals from the chips to many different types of appliances. Flexible gas piping forms a ''circulatory system'' that makes the house completely compatible with natural gas appliances. The SMART HOUSE is fully programmable so that appliances can be told when to turn on and off. It can also have a zoned space-conditioning system, allowing sections of the house to be heated or cooled independently. The authors explains how the system works and the project's development schedule.

  18. Facial Nerve and Parotid Gland Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, Amit; Larian, Babak; Azizzadeh, Babak

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of important anatomic and functional anatomy associated with the parotid gland and facial nerve for the practicing otolaryngologist, head and neck surgeon, facial plastic surgeon, and plastic surgeon. The discussion includes the important anatomic relationships and physiology related to the parotid gland and salivary production. A comprehensive description of the path of facial nerve, its branches, and important anatomic landmarks also are provided. PMID:27040583

  19. A gross anatomy ontology for hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Matthew J; Mikó, István; Seltmann, Katja C; Bertone, Matthew A; Deans, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    Hymenoptera is an extraordinarily diverse lineage, both in terms of species numbers and morphotypes, that includes sawflies, bees, wasps, and ants. These organisms serve critical roles as herbivores, predators, parasitoids, and pollinators, with several species functioning as models for agricultural, behavioral, and genomic research. The collective anatomical knowledge of these insects, however, has been described or referred to by labels derived from numerous, partially overlapping lexicons. The resulting corpus of information--millions of statements about hymenopteran phenotypes--remains inaccessible due to language discrepancies. The Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology (HAO) was developed to surmount this challenge and to aid future communication related to hymenopteran anatomy. The HAO was built using newly developed interfaces within mx, a Web-based, open source software package, that enables collaborators to simultaneously contribute to an ontology. Over twenty people contributed to the development of this ontology by adding terms, genus differentia, references, images, relationships, and annotations. The database interface returns an Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) formatted version of the ontology and includes mechanisms for extracting candidate data and for publishing a searchable ontology to the Web. The application tools are subject-agnostic and may be used by others initiating and developing ontologies. The present core HAO data constitute 2,111 concepts, 6,977 terms (labels for concepts), 3,152 relations, 4,361 sensus (links between terms, concepts, and references) and over 6,000 text and graphical annotations. The HAO is rooted with the Common Anatomy Reference Ontology (CARO), in order to facilitate interoperability with and future alignment to other anatomy ontologies, and is available through the OBO Foundry ontology repository and BioPortal. The HAO provides a foundation through which connections between genomic, evolutionary developmental biology, phylogenetic, taxonomic, and morphological research can be actualized. Inherent mechanisms for feedback and content delivery demonstrate the effectiveness of remote, collaborative ontology development and facilitate future refinement of the HAO. PMID:21209921

  20. Exercises in anatomy: the normal heart.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert H; Sarwark, Anne; Spicer, Diane E; Backer, Carl L

    2014-01-01

    In the first of our exercises in anatomy, created for the Multimedia Manual of the European Association of Cardiothoracic Surgery, we emphasized that thorough knowledge of intracardiac anatomy was an essential part of the training for all budding cardiac surgeons, explaining how we had used the archive of congenitally malformed hearts maintained at Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago to prepare a series of videoclips, demonstrating the salient features of tetralogy of Fallot. In this series of videoclips, we extend our analysis of the normal heart, since for our initial exercise we had concentrated exclusively on the structure of the right ventricular outflow tract. We begin our overview of normal anatomy by emphasizing the need, in the current era, to describe the heart in attitudinally appropriate fashion. Increasingly, clinicians are demonstrating the features of the heart as it is located within the body. It is no longer satisfactory, therefore, to describe these components in a 'Valentine' fashion, as continues to be the case in most textbooks of normal or cardiac anatomy. We then emphasize the importance of the so-called morphological method, which states that structures within the heart should be defined on the basis of their own intrinsic morphology, and not according to other parts, which are themselves variable. We continue by using this concept to show how it is the appendages that serve to distinguish between the atrial chambers, while the apical trabecular components provide the features to distinguish the ventricles. We then return to the cardiac chambers, emphasizing features of surgical significance, in particular the locations of the cardiac conduction tissues. We proceed by examining the cardiac valves, and conclude by providing a detailed analysis of the septal structures. PMID:25500767

  1. Quantitative mitral valve anatomy and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative analysis is an important part of the morphological assessment of the diseased mitral valve. It can be used to describe valve anatomy, pathology, function and the mechanisms of disease. Echocardiography is the main source of indirect quantitative data that is comparable with direct anatomic or surgical measurements. Furthermore, it can relate morphology with function. This review provides an account of current mitral valve quantification techniques and clinical applications. PMID:26693344

  2. Quantitative mitral valve anatomy and pathology.

    PubMed

    Garbi, Madalina; Monaghan, Mark J

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative analysis is an important part of the morphological assessment of the diseased mitral valve. It can be used to describe valve anatomy, pathology, function and the mechanisms of disease. Echocardiography is the main source of indirect quantitative data that is comparable with direct anatomic or surgical measurements. Furthermore, it can relate morphology with function. This review provides an account of current mitral valve quantification techniques and clinical applications. PMID:26693344

  3. Dental anatomy portrayed with microscopic volume investigations.

    PubMed

    Baumann, M A; Schwebel, T; Kriete, A

    1993-01-01

    The clinical treatment of the root canal of teeth--called endodontics--assumes a precise idea of the spatial arrangement of the anatomy of teeth and their inner structure. By using computer-assisted data acquisition from filmed sequences of histologic serial sections and a special kind of magnetic resonance microscope--the Stray Field Imaging (STRAFI)--volume investigations were carried out using special functions of a newly developed 3D software. Possible applications and future perspectives are discussed. PMID:8402529

  4. Testing to enhance retention in human anatomy.

    PubMed

    Logan, Jessica M; Thompson, Andrew J; Marshak, David W

    2011-01-01

    Recent work in cognitive psychology has shown that repeatedly testing one's knowledge is a powerful learning aid and provides substantial benefits for retention of the material. To apply this in a human anatomy course for medical students, 39 fill-in-the-blank quizzes of about 50 questions each, one for each region of the body, and four about the nervous system, were developed. The quizzes were optional, and no credit was awarded. They were posted online using Blackboard, which provided feedback, and they were very popular. To determine whether the quizzes had any effect on retention, they were given in a controlled setting to 21 future medical and dental students. The weekly quizzes included questions on regional anatomy and an expanded set of questions on the nervous system. Each question about the nervous system was given three times, in a slightly different form each time. The second quiz was given approximately half an hour after the first one, and the third was given one week after the second to assess retention. The quizzes were unpopular, but students showed robust improvement on the questions about the nervous system. The scores increased by almost 9% on the second quiz, with no intervention except viewing the correct answers. The scores were 29% higher on the third quiz than on the first, and there was also a positive correlation between the grades on the quizzes and the final examination. Thus, repeated testing is an effective strategy for learning and retaining information about human anatomy. PMID:21805688

  5. Supporting cancer survivors participation in peer review: Perspectives from NCIs CARRA program

    PubMed Central

    Gilkey, Melissa B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Including cancer survivors in the peer review of cancer-related research is increasingly valued as a strategy for bringing the patient perspective to discussions of research merit and human subjects protection. Because integrating lay stakeholders into peer review poses challenges, this qualitative study explored the perspectives of experienced patient advocates to identify programmatic supports for survivors participation. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 19 cancer survivors and 6 administrators involved in NCIs Consumer Advocates in Research and Related Activities program. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim, and analyzed via thematic content analysis. Participants were highly educated and included survivors of breast, prostate, and blood-related cancers. Results Interviewees emphasized the importance of adequately preparing survivors to serve as advocates. Given the intellectual challenge of peer review, interviewees noted the need for intensive and ongoing training on how to review proposals, and they identified mock reviews and peer mentoring as effective strategies to complement didactic instruction. Participants also stressed the need to address social challenges inherent in advocate-scientist encounters. In addition to training for both advocates and scientists, participants reported that opportunities for informal social interaction were important for facilitating collaboration. Finally, participants recommended structuring advocates role so as to give them a voice via equal voting privileges and protected opportunities to speak. Conclusions Programs that seek to include cancer survivors in peer review can prepare advocates for the intellectual and social challenges of working with scientists through careful attention to training, networking, and programmatic design. Implications for cancer survivors Cancer survivors have been leaders in developing a role for patient advocates in the peer review of research. As the concept of patient-centered outcomes continues to gain currency, lessons learned from early programs for patient inclusion in peer review can help to inform future efforts aimed at giving patients a voice in shaping agendas for health-related research. PMID:24214497

  6. Recommendations from the iSBTc-SITC/FDA/NCI Workshop on Immunotherapy Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Lisa H.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Britten, Cedrik M.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Håkansson, Leif; Janetzki, Sylvia; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kleen, Thomas-Oliver; Lee, Peter P.; Maccalli, Cristina; Maecker, Holden T.; Maino, Vernon C.; Maio, Michele; Malyguine, Anatoli; Masucci, Giuseppe; Pawelec, Graham; Potter, Douglas M.; Rivoltini, Licia; Salazar, Lupe G.; Schendel, Dolores J.; Slingluff, Craig L.; Song, Wenru; Stroncek, David F.; Tahara, Hideaki; Thurin, Magdalena; Trinchieri, Giorgio; van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wigginton, Jon M.; Marincola, Francesco; Khleif, Samir; Fox, Bernard A.; Disis, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate development of innovative immunotherapy approaches, especially for treatment concepts exploiting the potential benefits of personalized therapy, there is a need to develop and validate tools to identify patients who can benefit from immunotherapy. Despite substantial effort, we do not yet know which parameters of anti-tumor immunity to measure and which assays are optimal for those measurements. Experimental Design The iSBTc-SITC, FDA and NCI partnered to address these issues for immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we review the major challenges, give examples of approaches and solutions and present our recommendations. Results and Conclusions While specific immune parameters and assays are not yet validated, we recommend following standardized (accurate, precise and reproducible) protocols and use of functional assays for the primary immunologic readouts of a trial; consideration of central laboratories for immune monitoring of large, multi-institutional trials; and standardized testing of several phenotypic and functional potential potency assays specific to any cellular product. When reporting results, the full QA/QC performed, selected examples of truly representative raw data and assay performance characteristics should be included. Lastly, to promote broader analysis of multiple aspects of immunity, and gather data on variability, we recommend that in addition to cells and serum, that RNA and DNA samples be banked (under standardized conditions) for later testing. We also recommend that sufficient blood be drawn to allow for planned testing of the primary hypothesis being addressed in the trial, and that additional baseline and post-treatment blood is banked for testing novel hypotheses (or generating new hypotheses) that arise in the field. PMID:21558394

  7. Learning of cross-sectional anatomy using clay models.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Kim, Ji-Young; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    We incorporated clay modeling into gross anatomy and neuro-anatomy courses to help students understand cross-sectional anatomy. By making clay models, cutting them and comparing cut surfaces to CT and MR images, students learned how cross-sectional two-dimensional images were created from three-dimensional structure of human organs. Most students in a clay modeling group responded positively to this approach, and their average score on CT examination was higher than that of a group that did not use clay models. Clay modeling appears to be a useful supplement to conventional anatomy or radiologic anatomy education. It can be applied to any part of human body, and its effectiveness will be greater when a more complicated understanding of cross-sectional anatomy is required. PMID:19588481

  8. Anatomy research under the knife of medical ethics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, W. M. S.; Archana, R.; Prathibha, K. M.; Johnson, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    There is increased awareness and anxiety in conducting research for publication and at the same time ignorance about getting Ethical Committee clearance at least in Anatomy Departments among Basic Medical Sciences. While people are actively presenting papers, collect data, Indian Council for Medical Research guidelines does not cover aspects pertaining to Anatomy oriented research activities. This review article is an eye opener for fraternity in the medical field, especially in anatomy. PMID:26015746

  9. Teaching Anatomy in the XXI Century: New Aspects and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Veronica; Vaccarezza, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy has historically been a cornerstone in medical education regardless of nation, racial background, or medical school system. By learning gross anatomy, medical students get a first “impression” about the structure of the human body which is the basis for understanding pathologic and clinical problems. Although the importance of teaching anatomy to both undergraduate and postgraduate students remains undisputed, there is currently a relevant debate concerning methods of anatomy teaching. In the past century, dissection and lectures were its sole pedagogy worldwide. Recently, the time allocated for anatomy teaching was dramatically reduced to such an extent that some suggest that it has fallen below an adequate standard. Traditional anatomy education based on topographical structural anatomy taught in lectures and gross dissection classes has been replaced by a multiple range of study modules, including problem-based learning, plastic models or computer-assisted learning, and curricula integration. “Does the anatomical theatre still have a place in medical education?” And “what is the problem with anatomic specimens?” We endeavor to answer both of these questions and to contribute to the debate on the current situation in undergraduate and graduate anatomy education. Doctors without anatomy are like moles.They work in the dark and the work of their hands are mounds. Friedrich TiedemannThe foundation of the study of the art of operating must be laid in the dissecting room. Robert Liston PMID:24367240

  10. [Anatomy education in medical and dental schools in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Katsuko; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Sato, Tetsuji; Soji, Tsuyoshi; Shioda, Seiji; Torigoe, Kojun; Matsumura, Jyoji; Hisano, Setsuji; Yasuda, Yoshiko; Suzaki, Etsuko

    2005-06-01

    We studied the anatomy education and the view of anatomy professors on it in medical and dental schools in Japan. In most schools anatomy is taught in the second year. In medical schools, the systematic education separating macroscopic and microscopic anatomy is prevalent. Although the tutorial system has been introduced in 80% of medical schools, its introduction into anatomy education has remained at 30%. The tutorial system is regarded to be more effective by engaged professors than non-engaged. Some kinds of clinical anatomy education have been introduced in half of the medical schools surveyed. In dental schools, on the other hand, macroscopic and microscopic anatomy tend to be taught in combination. One third of the dental schools have introduced clinical anatomy but few schools have a tutorial system. The overwhelming majority of professors are evaluated by students and have regarded the evaluation useful for improving their teaching. They also have thought that the questionnaire and the timing of the evaluation must be considered carefully, and that the evaluation should not be directly used for purposes other than the improvement of education. We have made the proposals for further improvement in anatomy education based upon this study. PMID:16038445

  11. Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    CGAP generated a wide range of genomics data on cancerous cells that are accessible through easy-to-use online tools. Researchers, educators, and students can find "in silico" answers to biological questions through the CGAP website. Request a free copy of the CGAP Website Virtual Tour CD from ocg@mail.nih.gov to learn how to navigate the website.

  12. NCI-60 Whole Exome Sequencing and Pharmacological CellMiner Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Reinhold, William C.; Varma, Sudhir; Sousa, Fabricio; Sunshine, Margot; Abaan, Ogan D.; Davis, Sean R.; Reinhold, Spencer W.; Kohn, Kurt W.; Morris, Joel; Meltzer, Paul S.; Doroshow, James H.; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing provides unprecedented insights into cancer biology and pharmacological response. Here we assess these two parameters for the NCI-60, which is among the richest genomic and pharmacological publicly available cancer cell line databases. Homozygous genetic variants that putatively affect protein function were identified in 1,199 genes (approximately 6% of all genes). Variants that are either enriched or depleted compared to non-cancerous genomes, and thus may be influential in cancer progression and differential drug response were identified for 2,546 genes. Potential gene knockouts are made available. Assessment of cell line response to 19,940 compounds, including 110 FDA-approved drugs, reveals ≈80-fold range in resistance versus sensitivity response across cell lines. 103,422 gene variants were significantly correlated with at least one compound (at p<0.0002). These include genes of known pharmacological importance such as IGF1R, BRAF, RAD52, MTOR, STAT2 and TSC2 as well as a large number of candidate genes such as NOM1, TLL2, and XDH. We introduce two new web-based CellMiner applications that enable exploration of variant-to-compound relationships for a broad range of researchers, especially those without bioinformatics support. The first tool, “Genetic variant versus drug visualization”, provides a visualization of significant correlations between drug activity-gene variant combinations. Examples are given for the known vemurafenib-BRAF, and novel ifosfamide-RAD52 pairings. The second, “Genetic variant summation” allows an assessment of cumulative genetic variations for up to 150 combined genes together; and is designed to identify the variant burden for molecular pathways or functional grouping of genes. An example of its use is provided for the EGFR-ERBB2 pathway gene variant data and the identification of correlated EGFR, ERBB2, MTOR, BRAF, MEK and ERK inhibitors. The new tools are implemented as an updated web-based CellMiner version, for which the present publication serves as a compendium. PMID:25032700

  13. NCI-60 whole exome sequencing and pharmacological CellMiner analyses.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, William C; Varma, Sudhir; Sousa, Fabricio; Sunshine, Margot; Abaan, Ogan D; Davis, Sean R; Reinhold, Spencer W; Kohn, Kurt W; Morris, Joel; Meltzer, Paul S; Doroshow, James H; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing provides unprecedented insights into cancer biology and pharmacological response. Here we assess these two parameters for the NCI-60, which is among the richest genomic and pharmacological publicly available cancer cell line databases. Homozygous genetic variants that putatively affect protein function were identified in 1,199 genes (approximately 6% of all genes). Variants that are either enriched or depleted compared to non-cancerous genomes, and thus may be influential in cancer progression and differential drug response were identified for 2,546 genes. Potential gene knockouts are made available. Assessment of cell line response to 19,940 compounds, including 110 FDA-approved drugs, reveals ?80-fold range in resistance versus sensitivity response across cell lines. 103,422 gene variants were significantly correlated with at least one compound (at p<0.0002). These include genes of known pharmacological importance such as IGF1R, BRAF, RAD52, MTOR, STAT2 and TSC2 as well as a large number of candidate genes such as NOM1, TLL2, and XDH. We introduce two new web-based CellMiner applications that enable exploration of variant-to-compound relationships for a broad range of researchers, especially those without bioinformatics support. The first tool, "Genetic variant versus drug visualization", provides a visualization of significant correlations between drug activity-gene variant combinations. Examples are given for the known vemurafenib-BRAF, and novel ifosfamide-RAD52 pairings. The second, "Genetic variant summation" allows an assessment of cumulative genetic variations for up to 150 combined genes together; and is designed to identify the variant burden for molecular pathways or functional grouping of genes. An example of its use is provided for the EGFR-ERBB2 pathway gene variant data and the identification of correlated EGFR, ERBB2, MTOR, BRAF, MEK and ERK inhibitors. The new tools are implemented as an updated web-based CellMiner version, for which the present publication serves as a compendium. PMID:25032700

  14. FGFR2 Is Amplified in the NCI-H716 Colorectal Cancer Cell Line and Is Required for Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Anjili; Ware, Christopher; Davis, Lenora; Gazdar, Adi; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Lutterbach, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant kinase activation resulting from mutation, amplification, or translocation can drive growth and survival in a subset of human cancer. FGFR2 is amplified in breast and gastric cancer, and we report here the first characterization of FGFR2 gene amplification in colorectal cancer in the NCI-H716 colorectal cancer cell line. FGFR2 is highly expressed and activated in NCI-H716 cells, and FGFR selective small molecule inhibitors or FGFR2 shRNA strongly inhibited cell viability in vitro, indicating “addiction” of NCI-H716 cells to FGFR2. NCI-H716 growth in a xenograft model was also inhibited by an FGFR small molecule inhibitor. FGFR2 was required for activation of multiple downstream signaling proteins including AKT, ERK, S6RP and NFKB. Inhibition of downstream kinases such as AKT or ERK alone had modest effects on proliferation, whereas combined inhibition of AKT and ERK signaling resulted in a loss of viability similar to FGFR2 inhibition. We identified elevated FGFR2 expression in a small subset of primary colorectal cancer, however FGFR2 amplification was not observed. Although FGFR2 amplification is not common in primary colon cancer or lymph node and liver metastases, other subsets of colorectal cancer such as ascites, from which the NCI-H716 cell line was derived, have yet to be tested. These results suggest that emerging FGFR inhibitor therapeutics may have efficacy in a subset of colon cancer driven by FGFR2 amplification. PMID:24968263

  15. The integrated anatomy practical paper: A robust assessment method for anatomy education today.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire F; McManus, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Assessing anatomy in a way that tests higher cognitive domains and clinical application is not always straightforward. The old "spotter" examination has been criticized for only testing low level "identify" knowledge, whereas other assessment modalities such as multiple choice questions do not reflect the three dimensional and application nature of clinical anatomy. Medical curricula are frequently integrated and subject specific examinations do not reflect the case based, spiral, integrative nature of the curricula. The integrated anatomy practical paper (IAPP) is a hybrid of the old "spotter" and an objective structured clinical examination but it demonstrates how higher levels of taxonomy can be assessed, together with clinical features and integrates well with other disciplines. Importantly, the IAPP has shown to be reliable and practical to administer. Data gathered from the Bachelor of Medicine five-year program over two academic years for four IAPP examinations, each being 40 minutes with (K = 60 items) based on 440 students revealed consistently strong reliability coefficients (Cronbach alpha) of up to 0.923. Applying Blooms taxonomy to questions has shown a marked shift resulting in an increase in the complexity level being tested; between 2009 and 2013 a reduction of 26% in the number of low level "remember knowledge" domain questions was noted with up to an increase of 15% in "understanding" domain and 12% increase in the "applying" knowledge domain. Our findings highlight that it is possible to test, based in a laboratory, anatomy knowledge and application that is integrated and fit for practice. PMID:24706567

  16. Stereoscopic Anatomy: Evaluation of a New Teaching System in Human Gross Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, Ernest D.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A stereoscopic slide-based autoinstructional program has been developed as a substitute for dissection in teaching gross anatomy. Evaluation data suggest that this program, while having minor limitations in terms of anatomical orientation, does provide a viable alternative to dissection. (Editor/LBH)

  17. "Digit Anatomy": A New Technique for Learning Anatomy Using Motor Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Won, Hyung-Sun; Kim, Kyong-Jee; Jang, Dong-Su

    2011-01-01

    Gestural motions of the hands and fingers are powerful tools for expressing meanings and concepts, and the nervous system has the capacity to retain multiple long-term motor memories, especially including movements of the hands. We developed many sets of successive movements of both hands, referred to as "digit anatomy," and made students practice

  18. Observations by a University Anatomy Teacher and a Suggestion for Curricular Change: Integrative Anatomy for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darda, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The observation that anatomical course offerings have decreased in undergraduate biology curricula is supported by a survey of undergraduate institutions in the state of Washington. This reduction, due partially to increased emphasis in other areas of the biology curriculum, along with the lack of anatomy prerequisites for admission to most…

  19. The zebrafish anatomy and stage ontologies: representing the anatomy and development of Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Zebrafish Anatomy Ontology (ZFA) is an OBO Foundry ontology that is used in conjunction with the Zebrafish Stage Ontology (ZFS) to describe the gross and cellular anatomy and development of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, from single cell zygote to adult. The zebrafish model organism database (ZFIN) uses the ZFA and ZFS to annotate phenotype and gene expression data from the primary literature and from contributed data sets. Results The ZFA models anatomy and development with a subclass hierarchy, a partonomy, and a developmental hierarchy and with relationships to the ZFS that define the stages during which each anatomical entity exists. The ZFA and ZFS are developed utilizing OBO Foundry principles to ensure orthogonality, accessibility, and interoperability. The ZFA has 2860 classes representing a diversity of anatomical structures from different anatomical systems and from different stages of development. Conclusions The ZFA describes zebrafish anatomy and development semantically for the purposes of annotating gene expression and anatomical phenotypes. The ontology and the data have been used by other resources to perform cross-species queries of gene expression and phenotype data, providing insights into genetic relationships, morphological evolution, and models of human disease. PMID:24568621

  20. "Digit Anatomy": A New Technique for Learning Anatomy Using Motor Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Won, Hyung-Sun; Kim, Kyong-Jee; Jang, Dong-Su

    2011-01-01

    Gestural motions of the hands and fingers are powerful tools for expressing meanings and concepts, and the nervous system has the capacity to retain multiple long-term motor memories, especially including movements of the hands. We developed many sets of successive movements of both hands, referred to as "digit anatomy," and made students practice…

  1. The Virtual Anatomy Laboratory: Usability Testing to Improve an Online Learning Resource for Anatomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doubleday, Eldridge G.; O'Loughlin, Valerie D.; Doubleday, Alison F.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of instructors are seeking to provide students with online anatomy resources. Many researchers have attempted to identify associations between resource use and student learning but few studies discuss the importance of usability testing in resource design and modification. Usability testing provides information about ease of…

  2. Anatomy and physiology of the right ventricle.

    PubMed

    Dell'Italia, Louis J

    2012-05-01

    Under normal baseline conditions the unique anatomy, myocardial ultrastructure, and coronary physiology of the right ventricle (RV) reflect a high-volume low-pressure pump. Early work described the RV as a passive conduit with minimal pumping capability. It is now appreciated that through a mechanism of ventricular interdependence, RV systolic function and diastolic load are extremely important in the prognosis and treatment of congestive heart failure, cardiac transplantation, pulmonary hypertension, congenital heart disease, and left ventricle assist devices. Magnetic resonance imaging with three-dimensional analysis has shown the complex geometry of the RV and the interaction of both ventricles within the pericardium. PMID:22548810

  3. Lumbar vertebral pedicles: radiologic anatomy and pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.P.; Kumar, R.; Kinkhabwala, M.; Wengrover, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    With the advancement of high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scanning the spine has added new knowledge to the various conditions affecting the pedicles. We wish to review the entire spectrum of pedicular lesions: the embryology, normal anatomy, normal variants, pitfalls, congenital anomalies, and pathological conditions are discussed. Different imaging modalities involving CT, isotope bone scanning, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are used to complement plain films of the lumbar spine. This subject review is an excellent source for future reference to lumbar pedicular lesions. 27 references.

  4. Medical Student Perceptions of Radiology Use in Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kevin P.; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E.; Twomey, Maria; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.; Maher, Michael M.; Cryan, John F.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiology in the teaching of anatomy to medical students is gaining in popularity; however, there is wide variation in how and when radiology is introduced into the curriculum. The authors sought to investigate students' perceptions regarding methods used to depict and teach anatomy and effects of integrated radiology instruction on

  5. Assessment Outcomes: Computerized Instruction in a Human Gross Anatomy Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowski, Elaine L.

    2002-01-01

    The first of three successive classes of beginning physical therapy students (n=17) completed traditional cadaver anatomy lecture/lab; the next 17 a self-study computerized anatomy lab, and the next 20 both lectures and computer lab. No differences in study times and course or licensure exam performance appeared. Computerized self-study is a…

  6. YouTube: An Emerging Tool in Anatomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffar, Akram Abood

    2012-01-01

    The use of online social networks in medical education can remodel and enhance anatomy teaching and learning; one such network is the video-sharing site YouTube. Limited research in the literature exists on the use of YouTube as a platform for anatomy education. The aim of this study is to assess student's perceptions and patterns of usage of this

  7. Student Perspectives of Imaging Anatomy in Undergraduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Jorge Americo Dinis; Barbosa, Joselina Maria Pinto; Ferreira, Maria Amelia Duarte

    2013-01-01

    Radiological imaging is gaining relevance in the acquisition of competencies in clinical anatomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of medical students on teaching/learning of imaging anatomy as an integrated part of anatomical education. A questionnaire was designed to evaluate the perceptions of second-year students

  8. Anatomy "Steeplechase" Online: Necessity Sometimes Is the Catalyst for Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inuwa, Ibrahim Muhammad; Al Rawahy, Maimouna; Taranikanti, Varna; Habbal, Omar

    2011-01-01

    In most medical schools, summative practical examination in Anatomy usually takes the format of a "steeplechase" ("spotters" or "bell ringers") conducted in the gross anatomy laboratory using cadaveric material and prosected specimens. Recently, we have started to administer similar examinations online using the quiz facility in WebCT[TM] and…

  9. YouTube: An Emerging Tool in Anatomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffar, Akram Abood

    2012-01-01

    The use of online social networks in medical education can remodel and enhance anatomy teaching and learning; one such network is the video-sharing site YouTube. Limited research in the literature exists on the use of YouTube as a platform for anatomy education. The aim of this study is to assess student's perceptions and patterns of usage of this…

  10. Normal Penile, Scrotal, and Perineal Anatomy with Reconstructive Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Moira E.; Salgado, Christopher J.; Lightner, Deborah J.

    2011-01-01

    A broad overview is provided of the normal anatomy of the male genitalia to offer the best surgical outcomes in cases related to congenital abnormalities, trauma, cancer-related extirpation, and aesthetics. Neural and vascular anatomy is discussed in depth due to its critical role in maintaining function and in assuring tissue viability. PMID:22851909

  11. The Gross Anatomy Course: An Analysis of Its Importance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockers, Anja; Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia; Lamp, Christoph; Brinkmann, Anke; Traue, Harald C.; Bockers, Tobias M.

    2010-01-01

    The gross anatomy dissection course is a cost-intensive piece of undergraduate medical education that students and professionals alike describe as very important within the overall medical curriculum. We sought to understand more explicitly students' valuation of gross anatomy as an "important" course and so developed a quantitative longitudinal

  12. Embryology and Anatomy of the Jaw and Dentition.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Poon, Colin S; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Radiologists should possess working knowledge of the embryological development and anatomy of the jaw and dentition in order to aid in the diagnosis of both simple and complex disorders that affect them. Here, we review the elaborate process of odontogenesis, as well as describe in detail the anatomy of a tooth and its surrounding structures. PMID:26589693

  13. Measuring Change in Professionalism Attitudes during the Gross Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, William G., Jr.; Hoagland, Todd M.

    2010-01-01

    By design or default, anatomy educators are often responsible for introducing students to medical professionalism. Although much has been said about the role of anatomical education, there are no published reports suggesting how to measure change. This study investigated what professionalism attitudes, if any, change during a gross anatomy course.…

  14. The Gross Anatomy Course: An Analysis of Its Importance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockers, Anja; Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia; Lamp, Christoph; Brinkmann, Anke; Traue, Harald C.; Bockers, Tobias M.

    2010-01-01

    The gross anatomy dissection course is a cost-intensive piece of undergraduate medical education that students and professionals alike describe as very important within the overall medical curriculum. We sought to understand more explicitly students' valuation of gross anatomy as an "important" course and so developed a quantitative longitudinal…

  15. Anatomy in Occupational Therapy Program Curriculum: Practitioners' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Katherine Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy education is undergoing significant transformation. It is unknown whether changes are in accordance with occupational therapy (OT) practice needs. The purpose of this pilot study was to survey OT clinicians to determine their perspectives on the value of anatomy in OT curricula, and anatomical knowledge required for practice. In addition

  16. Lecture Notes on Human Anatomy. Part Two, Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrey, Kathleen

    During the process of studying the specific course content of human anatomy, students are being educated to expand their vocabulary, deal successfully with complex tasks, and learn a specific way of thinking. This is the second volume in a set of notes which are designed to accompany a lecture series in human anatomy. This volume includes…

  17. Anatomy Education in Namibia: Balancing Facility Design and Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessels, Quenton; Vorster, Willie; Jacobson, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The anatomy curriculum at Namibia's first, and currently only, medical school is clinically oriented, outcome-based, and includes all of the components of modern anatomical sciences i.e., histology, embryology, neuroanatomy, gross, and clinical anatomy. The design of the facilities and the equipment incorporated into these facilities were directed…

  18. The Anatomy Lecture Then and Now: A Foucauldian Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Norm; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although there are many points of continuity, there are also a number of changes in the pedagogical form of the anatomy lecture over the longue dure, over centuries of epistemic change, rather than over years or decades. The article begins with an analysis of the physical and technical arrangements of the early modern anatomy lecture, showing how

  19. A Minimally Invasive Approach to Undergraduate Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogalniceanu, Petrut; Madani, Hardi; Paraskeva, Paraskevas A.; Darzi, Ara

    2008-01-01

    Anatomy is one of the cornerstones of medical education. Unfortunately, sufficient evidence has accumulated to suggest a worldwide decline in the resources and time allocated to its teaching. Integration of anatomy with clinical medicine has been frequently advocated as the solution to this academic crisis. Consequently, new ways of harnessing

  20. Human Anatomy: Let the Students Tell Us How to Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Christopher R.; Bates, Anthony S.; Ellis, Harold; Roberts, Alice M.

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy teaching methods have evolved as the medical undergraduate curriculum has modernized. Traditional teaching methods of dissection, prosection, tutorials and lectures are now supplemented by anatomical models and e-learning. Despite these changes, the preferences of medical students and anatomy faculty towards both traditional and

  1. Gross Anatomy and Physical Diagnosis: The First 'Hands On' Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theut, Susan K.; Smith, C. Wayne

    1981-01-01

    A patient interaction course designed to provide an introductory experience to the gross anatomy laboratory and to the interview and physical examination settings is described. The patient interaction course is composed of a series of four experiences: anatomy laboratory sessions, interviews, physical examinations, and small group discussions.…

  2. A Minimally Invasive Approach to Undergraduate Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogalniceanu, Petrut; Madani, Hardi; Paraskeva, Paraskevas A.; Darzi, Ara

    2008-01-01

    Anatomy is one of the cornerstones of medical education. Unfortunately, sufficient evidence has accumulated to suggest a worldwide decline in the resources and time allocated to its teaching. Integration of anatomy with clinical medicine has been frequently advocated as the solution to this academic crisis. Consequently, new ways of harnessing…

  3. Peer Assessment among First Year Medical Students in Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spandorfer, John; Puklus, Tanya; Rose, Victoria; Vahedi, Mithaq; Collins, Lauren; Giordano, Carolyn; Schmidt, Richard; Braster, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Peer assessment has been shown to be an effective tool to promote professionalism in medical students. Peer assessment may be particularly useful in anatomy dissection laboratory as the required close collaboration and long hours of anatomy laboratory provide students insights into their peers' work habits and interpersonal skills. The…

  4. Student-Directed Fresh Tissue Anatomy Course for Physician Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Jennifer M.; Drake, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare providers in all areas and levels of education depend on their knowledge of anatomy for daily practice. As educators, we are challenged with teaching the anatomical sciences in creative, integrated ways and often within a condensed time frame. This article describes the organization of a clinical anatomy course with a peer taught…

  5. Measuring Change in Professionalism Attitudes during the Gross Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, William G., Jr.; Hoagland, Todd M.

    2010-01-01

    By design or default, anatomy educators are often responsible for introducing students to medical professionalism. Although much has been said about the role of anatomical education, there are no published reports suggesting how to measure change. This study investigated what professionalism attitudes, if any, change during a gross anatomy course.

  6. Clinical Vignettes Improve Performance in Anatomy Practical Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikah, December S. K.; Finn, Gabrielle M.; Swamy, Meenakshi; White, Pamela M.; McLachlan, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Although medical curricula now adopt an integrated teaching approach, this is not adequately reflected in assessment of anatomy knowledge and skills. In this study, we aimed to explore the impact of the addition of clinical vignette to item stems on students' performance in anatomy practical examinations. In this study, 129 undergraduate medical…

  7. Perceptions of Anatomy: Critical Components in the Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Michelle D.; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Leong, Shou Ling; Kauffman, Gordon L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution in undergraduate medical school curricula has significantly impacted anatomy education. This study investigated the perceived role of clinical anatomy and evaluated perceptions of medical students' ability to apply anatomical knowledge in the clinic. The aim of this study was to develop a framework to enhance anatomical educational…

  8. Medical Student Perceptions of Radiology Use in Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kevin P.; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E.; Twomey, Maria; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.; Maher, Michael M.; Cryan, John F.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiology in the teaching of anatomy to medical students is gaining in popularity; however, there is wide variation in how and when radiology is introduced into the curriculum. The authors sought to investigate students' perceptions regarding methods used to depict and teach anatomy and effects of integrated radiology instruction on…

  9. Anatomy Education for the YouTube Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Denis S.; Marzouk, Fadi; Chulak-Oglu, Kyrylo; Bennett, Deirdre; Tierney, Paul; O'Keeffe, Gerard W.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy remains a cornerstone of medical education despite challenges that have seen a significant reduction in contact hours over recent decades; however, the rise of the "YouTube Generation" or "Generation Connected" (Gen C), offers new possibilities for anatomy education. Gen C, which consists of 80% Millennials, actively…

  10. The Anatomy Lecture Then and Now: A Foucauldian Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Norm; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although there are many points of continuity, there are also a number of changes in the pedagogical form of the anatomy lecture over the longue durée, over centuries of epistemic change, rather than over years or decades. The article begins with an analysis of the physical and technical arrangements of the early modern anatomy lecture, showing how…

  11. Human Anatomy: Let the Students Tell Us How to Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Christopher R.; Bates, Anthony S.; Ellis, Harold; Roberts, Alice M.

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy teaching methods have evolved as the medical undergraduate curriculum has modernized. Traditional teaching methods of dissection, prosection, tutorials and lectures are now supplemented by anatomical models and e-learning. Despite these changes, the preferences of medical students and anatomy faculty towards both traditional and…

  12. Student Perspectives of Imaging Anatomy in Undergraduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Jorge Americo Dinis; Barbosa, Joselina Maria Pinto; Ferreira, Maria Amelia Duarte

    2013-01-01

    Radiological imaging is gaining relevance in the acquisition of competencies in clinical anatomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of medical students on teaching/learning of imaging anatomy as an integrated part of anatomical education. A questionnaire was designed to evaluate the perceptions of second-year students…

  13. Anatomy in Occupational Therapy Program Curriculum: Practitioners' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Katherine Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy education is undergoing significant transformation. It is unknown whether changes are in accordance with occupational therapy (OT) practice needs. The purpose of this pilot study was to survey OT clinicians to determine their perspectives on the value of anatomy in OT curricula, and anatomical knowledge required for practice. In addition…

  14. Should Reproductive Anatomy Be Taught in University Health Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Brent; Fletcher, J. Sue

    2013-01-01

    There has been little research on undergraduate reproductive anatomy education. This pilot study explores knowledge of anatomical reproductive anatomy among university students in a lower division and upper division health course. Using a Qualtrics survey program, a convenience sample of 120 lower division and 157 upper division students for a…

  15. Lecture Notes on Human Anatomy. Part One, Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrey, Kathleen

    During the process of studying the specific course content of human anatomy, students are being educated to expand their vocabulary, deal successfully with complex tasks, and use a specific way of thinking. This is the first volume in a set of notes which are designed to accompany a lecture series in human anatomy. This volume includes discussions…

  16. Using Multimedia and Web3D to Enhance Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenton, Harry; Hernandez, Juan; Bello, Fernando; Strutton, Paul; Purkayastha, Sanjay; Firth, Tony; Darzi, Ara

    2007-01-01

    Anatomy teaching is undergoing significant changes due to time constraints, limited availability of cadavers and technological developments in the areas of three-dimensional modelling and computer-assisted learning. This paper gives an overview of methods used to teach anatomy to undergraduate medical students and discusses the educational

  17. Anatomy Education for the YouTube Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Denis S.; Marzouk, Fadi; Chulak-Oglu, Kyrylo; Bennett, Deirdre; Tierney, Paul; O'Keeffe, Gerard W.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy remains a cornerstone of medical education despite challenges that have seen a significant reduction in contact hours over recent decades; however, the rise of the "YouTube Generation" or "Generation Connected" (Gen C), offers new possibilities for anatomy education. Gen C, which consists of 80% Millennials, actively

  18. Clinical Vignettes Improve Performance in Anatomy Practical Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikah, December S. K.; Finn, Gabrielle M.; Swamy, Meenakshi; White, Pamela M.; McLachlan, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Although medical curricula now adopt an integrated teaching approach, this is not adequately reflected in assessment of anatomy knowledge and skills. In this study, we aimed to explore the impact of the addition of clinical vignette to item stems on students' performance in anatomy practical examinations. In this study, 129 undergraduate medical

  19. Perceptions of Anatomy: Critical Components in the Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Michelle D.; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Leong, Shou Ling; Kauffman, Gordon L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution in undergraduate medical school curricula has significantly impacted anatomy education. This study investigated the perceived role of clinical anatomy and evaluated perceptions of medical students' ability to apply anatomical knowledge in the clinic. The aim of this study was to develop a framework to enhance anatomical educational

  20. Using Multimedia and Web3D to Enhance Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenton, Harry; Hernandez, Juan; Bello, Fernando; Strutton, Paul; Purkayastha, Sanjay; Firth, Tony; Darzi, Ara

    2007-01-01

    Anatomy teaching is undergoing significant changes due to time constraints, limited availability of cadavers and technological developments in the areas of three-dimensional modelling and computer-assisted learning. This paper gives an overview of methods used to teach anatomy to undergraduate medical students and discusses the educational…

  1. Anatomy Education in Namibia: Balancing Facility Design and Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessels, Quenton; Vorster, Willie; Jacobson, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The anatomy curriculum at Namibia's first, and currently only, medical school is clinically oriented, outcome-based, and includes all of the components of modern anatomical sciences i.e., histology, embryology, neuroanatomy, gross, and clinical anatomy. The design of the facilities and the equipment incorporated into these facilities were directed

  2. User Acceptance of a Haptic Interface for Learning Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeom, Soonja; Choi-Lundberg, Derek; Fluck, Andrew; Sale, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Visualizing the structure and relationships in three dimensions (3D) of organs is a challenge for students of anatomy. To provide an alternative way of learning anatomy engaging multiple senses, we are developing a force-feedback (haptic) interface for manipulation of 3D virtual organs, using design research methodology, with iterations of system…

  3. Computer Visualizations: Factors that Influence Spatial Anatomy Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Ngan; Nelson, Andrew J.; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Computer visualizations are increasingly common in education across a range of subject disciplines, including anatomy. Despite optimism about their educational potential, students sometime have difficulty learning from these visualizations. The purpose of this study was to explore a range of factors that influence spatial anatomy comprehension…

  4. Common drugs and treatments for cancer and age-related diseases: revitalizing answers to NCI's provocative questions

    PubMed Central

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has announced 24 provocative questions on cancer. Some of these questions have been already answered in “NCI's provocative questions on cancer: some answers to ignite discussion” (published in Oncotarget, 2011, 2: 1352.) The questions included “Why do many cancer cells die when suddenly deprived of a protein encoded by an oncogene?” “Can we extend patient survival by using approaches that keep tumors static?” “Why are some disseminated cancers cured by chemotherapy alone?” “Can we develop methods to rapidly test interventions for cancer treatment or prevention?” “Can we use our knowledge of aging to enhance prevention or treatment of cancer?” “What is the mechanism by which some drugs commonly and chronically used for other indications protect against cancer?” “How does obesity contribute to cancer risk?” I devoted a single subchapter to each the answer. As expected, the provocative questions were very diverse and numerous. Now I choose and combine, as a single problem, only three last questions, all related to common mechanisms and treatment of age-related diseases including obesity and cancer. Can we use common existing drugs for cancer prevention and treatment? Can we use some targeted “cancer-selective” agents for other diseases and … aging itself. PMID:23565531

  5. Comparison of the ISU, NCI, MSM, and SPADE Methods for Estimating Usual Intake: A Simulation Study of Nutrients Consumed Daily.

    PubMed

    Laureano, Greice H C; Torman, Vanessa B L; Crispim, Sandra P; Dekkers, Arnold L M; Camey, Suzi A

    2016-01-01

    Various methods are available for estimating usual dietary intake distributions. Hence, there is a need for simulation studies to compare them. The methods Iowa State University (ISU), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Multiple Source Method (MSM) and Statistical Program to Assess Dietary Exposure (SPADE) were previously compared in another study, but some results were inconclusive due to the small number of replications used in the simulation. Seeking to overcome this limitation, the present study used 1000 simulated samples for 12 different scenarios to compare the accuracy of estimates yielded by the aforementioned methods. The focus is on scenarios that exhibited the most uncertainty in the conclusions of the mentioned study above, i.e., scenarios with small sample sizes, skewed intake distributions, and large ratios of the between- and within-person variances. Bias was used as a measure of accuracy. For scenarios with small sample sizes (n = 150), the ISU, MSM and SPADE methods generally achieved more accurate estimates than the NCI method, particularly for the 10th and 90th percentiles. The differences between methods became smaller with larger sample sizes (n = 300 and n = 500). With few exceptions, the methods were found to perform similarly. PMID:26999193

  6. Antitumor activity of water extracts from Cordyceps militaris in NCI-H460 cell xenografted nude mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Eun; Kim, Jungsun; Lee, Yeon-Weol; Yoo, Hwa-Seung; Cho, Chong-Kwan

    2009-12-01

    This experimental study investigated the antitumor effect of Cordyceps militaris in NCI-H406 cell transplanted nude mice. After feeding an aqueous solution of C. militaris extracts in NCI-H460 cell xenografted nude mice for 4 weeks, we measured the size of a tumor mass and calculated the inhibition rate. We also estimated survival time and calculated mean survival time and percent increase in lifespan. Results showed that the inhibition rate of water extract of the 150 mg/kg/day C. militaris-administered group was 94.73-75.08% and that of the 300 mg/kg/day C. militaris-administered group was 85.81-73.81%. The tumor weights and volumes decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Mean survival time of the 150 mg/kg/day C. militaris-administered group was extended to 19.43 +/- 2.44 days and 5.42% increased in lifespan (ILS) and that of the 300 mg/kg/day C. militaris-administered group was 21.86 +/- 3.53 days and 18.61% ILS. The relative liver weight was significantly increased in 300 mg/kg/day C. militaris-administered group, but there was no histopathological difference. In conclusion, C. militaris, shrunk tumors and increased mouse lifespan, suggesting that C. militaris was effective in treating tumors in nude mice. PMID:20633505

  7. Functional Categories Associated with Clusters of Genes That Are Co-Expressed across the NCI-60 Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Zeeberg, Barry R.; Reinhold, William; Snajder, René; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Weinstein, John N.; Kohn, Kurt W.; Pommier, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Background The NCI-60 is a panel of 60 diverse human cancer cell lines used by the U.S. National Cancer Institute to screen compounds for anticancer activity. In the current study, gene expression levels from five platforms were integrated to yield a single composite transcriptome profile. The comprehensive and reliable nature of that dataset allows us to study gene co-expression across cancer cell lines. Methodology/Principal Findings Hierarchical clustering revealed numerous clusters of genes in which the genes co-vary across the NCI-60. To determine functional categorization associated with each cluster, we used the Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium database and the GoMiner tool. GO maps genes to hierarchically-organized biological process categories. GoMiner can leverage GO to perform ontological analyses of gene expression studies, generating a list of significant functional categories. Conclusions/Significance GoMiner analysis revealed many clusters of coregulated genes that are associated with functional groupings of GO biological process categories. Notably, those categories arising from coherent co-expression groupings reflect cancer-related themes such as adhesion, cell migration, RNA splicing, immune response and signal transduction. Thus, these clusters demonstrate transcriptional coregulation of functionally-related genes. PMID:22291933

  8. Comparison of the ISU, NCI, MSM, and SPADE Methods for Estimating Usual Intake: A Simulation Study of Nutrients Consumed Daily

    PubMed Central

    Laureano, Greice H. C.; Torman, Vanessa B. L.; Crispim, Sandra P.; Dekkers, Arnold L. M.; Camey, Suzi A.

    2016-01-01

    Various methods are available for estimating usual dietary intake distributions. Hence, there is a need for simulation studies to compare them. The methods Iowa State University (ISU), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Multiple Source Method (MSM) and Statistical Program to Assess Dietary Exposure (SPADE) were previously compared in another study, but some results were inconclusive due to the small number of replications used in the simulation. Seeking to overcome this limitation, the present study used 1000 simulated samples for 12 different scenarios to compare the accuracy of estimates yielded by the aforementioned methods. The focus is on scenarios that exhibited the most uncertainty in the conclusions of the mentioned study above, i.e., scenarios with small sample sizes, skewed intake distributions, and large ratios of the between- and within-person variances. Bias was used as a measure of accuracy. For scenarios with small sample sizes (n=150), the ISU, MSM and SPADE methods generally achieved more accurate estimates than the NCI method, particularly for the 10th and 90th percentiles. The differences between methods became smaller with larger sample sizes (n = 300 and n = 500). With few exceptions, the methods were found to perform similarly. PMID:26999193

  9. Animating functional anatomy for the web.

    PubMed

    Guttmann, G D

    2000-04-15

    The instructor sometimes has a complex task in explaining the concepts of functional anatomy and embryology to health professional students. However, animations can easily illustrate functional anatomy, clinical procedures, or the developing embryo. Web animation increases the accessibility of this information and makes it much more useful for independent student learning. A modified version of the animation can also be used for patient education. This article defines animation, provides a brief history of animation, discusses the principles of animation, illustrates and evaluates some of the video-editing or movie-making computer software programs, and shows examples of two of the author's animations. These two animations are the inferior alveolar nerve block from the mandibular nerve anesthetics unit and normal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function from the muscles of the mastication and the TMJ function unit. The software discussed are the industry leaders and have made the job of producing computer-based animations much easier. The programs are Adobe Premiere, Adobe After Effects, Apple QuickTime and Macromedia Flash . PMID:10815810

  10. Personalized augmented reality for anatomy education.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meng; Fallavollita, Pascal; Seelbach, Ina; Von Der Heide, Anna Maria; Euler, Ekkehard; Waschke, Jens; Navab, Nassir

    2016-05-01

    Anatomy education is a challenging but vital element in forming future medical professionals. In this work, a personalized and interactive augmented reality system is developed to facilitate education. This system behaves as a "magic mirror" which allows personalized in-situ visualization of anatomy on the user's body. Real-time volume visualization of a CT dataset creates the illusion that the user can look inside their body. The system comprises a RGB-D sensor as a real-time tracking device to detect the user moving in front of a display. In addition, the magic mirror system shows text information, medical images, and 3D models of organs that the user can interact with. Through the participation of 7 clinicians and 72 students, two user studies were designed to respectively assess the precision and acceptability of the magic mirror system for education. The results of the first study demonstrated that the average precision of the augmented reality overlay on the user body was 0.96 cm, while the results of the second study indicate 86.1% approval for the educational value of the magic mirror, and 91.7% approval for the augmented reality capability of displaying organs in three dimensions. The usefulness of this unique type of personalized augmented reality technology has been demonstrated in this paper. Clin. Anat. 29:446-453, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26646315

  11. Fruit biomechanics based on anatomy: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiguo; Yang, Hongling; Li, Pingping; Liu, Jizhan; Wang, Jizhang; Xu, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Fruit biomechanics is needed for quality determination, multiscale modelling and engineering design of fruit processes and equipments. However, these determined fruit biomechanics data often have obvious differences for the same fruit or tissue. In order to investigate it, the fruit biomechanics based on anatomy was reviewed in this paper. First, the anatomical characteristics of fruit biomaterials were described at the macroscopic `tissue' level and microscopic `cellular' level. Subsequently, the factors affecting fruit biomechanics based on anatomy and the relationships between fruit biomechanics, texture and mechanical damage were summarised according to the published literature. Fruit biomechanics is mainly affected by size, number and arrangement of cells, quantity and volume of intracellular spaces, structure, thickness, chemical composition and permeability of cell walls, and pectin degradation level and turgor pressure within cells based on microanatomy. Four test methods and partial determined results of fruit biomechanics were listed and reviewed. The determined mechanical properties data of fruit are only approximate values by using the existing four test methods, owing to the fruit biomaterials being non-homogeneous and living. Lastly, further aspects for research on fruit biomechanics were proposed for the future.

  12. Controversial snake relationships supported by reproductive anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Dustin S; Miralles, Aurélien; Aldridge, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Since the advent of molecular character sets in phylogenetic systematics our understanding of the evolutionary history of snakes has changed considerably. In some cases the novel topologies reconstructed from molecular datasets have left researchers puzzled, as no morphological feature seems to support the new relationships found. This is the case for ‘Amerophidia’sensu Vidal et al. (2007; Biology of the Boas and Pythons, Eagle Mountain: Eagle Mountain Publishing; Aniliidae + Tropidophiidae), a grouping of the Red Pipesnakes and Neotropical Dwarf Boas. We contend that in some cases the apparent lack of historical morphological support for the molecular phylogenies is due to our poor understanding of the organisms as a whole, and not the complete lack of morphological support for controversial clades. For example, we found novel evidence from reproductive anatomy that demonstrates a unique association of the oviducts and cloaca in Amerophidia. Whereas in all other female squamates the oviducts communicate directly with the cloaca, the oviducts of Aniliidae and Tropidophiidae communicate with diverticuli of the cloaca. At present this is the only unambiguous synapomorphy for the Amerophidia. We feel that confirmation of controversial molecular relationships will revolve around the investigation of non-traditional morphological characters such as reproductive anatomy. PMID:21323917

  13. Anatomy, biogenesis and regeneration of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Kyle V; Hoffman, Matthew P

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the anatomy and biogenesis of salivary glands is important in order to understand the physiology, functions and disorders associated with saliva. A major disorder of salivary glands is salivary hypofunction and resulting xerostomia, or dry mouth, which affects hundreds of thousands of patients each year who suffer from salivary gland diseases or undergo head and neck cancer treatment. There is currently no curative therapy for these patients. To improve these patients' quality of life, new therapies are being developed based on findings in salivary gland cell and developmental biology. Here we discuss the anatomy and biogenesis of the major human salivary glands and the rodent submandibular gland, which has been used extensively as a research model. We also include a review of recent research on the identification and function of stem cells in salivary glands, and the emerging field of research suggesting that nerves play an instructive role during development and may be essential for adult gland repair and regeneration. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in gland biogenesis provides a template for regenerating, repairing or reengineering diseased or damaged adult human salivary glands. We provide an overview of 3 general approaches currently being developed to regenerate damaged salivary tissue, including gene therapy, stem cell-based therapy and tissue engineering. In the future, it may be that a combination of all three will be used to repair, regenerate and reengineer functional salivary glands in patients to increase the secretion of their saliva, the focus of this monograph. PMID:24862590

  14. Anatomy of A Local Scale Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A. K.; Ines, A. V. M.; Das, N. N.; Khedun, P.

    2014-12-01

    Drought is of global concern for society but it originates as a local problem. It has a significant impact on water quantity and quality and influences food, water, and energy security. The consequences of drought vary in space and time, from the local scale (e.g. county level) to regional scale (e.g. state or country level) to global scale. This study addresses a local-scale agricultural drought anatomy in Story County in Iowa, USA. This complex problem was evaluated using assimilated AMSR-E soil moisture and MODIS-LAI data into a crop model to generate surface and sub-surface drought indices to explore the anatomy of an agricultural drought. It was found that both surface and subsurface droughts have an impact on crop yields, albeit with different magnitudes, however, the total water available in the soil profile seemed to have a greater impact on the yield. We envisaged that the results of this study will enhance our understanding of agricultural droughts in different parts of the world.

  15. Anatomy, biogenesis, and regeneration of salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Kyle V.; Hoffman, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the anatomy and biogenesis of salivary glands is important in order to understand the physiology, functions and disorders associated with saliva. A major disorder of salivary glands is salivary hypofunction and resulting xerostomia, or dry mouth, which affects hundreds of thousands of patients per year who suffer from salivary gland diseases or undergo head and neck cancer treatment. There is currently no curative therapy for these patients. To improve these patients quality of life, new therapies are being developed based on findings in salivary gland cell and developmental biology. Here we discuss the anatomy and biogenesis of the major human salivary glands and the rodent submandibular gland (SMG), which has been used extensively as a research model. We also include a review of recent research on the identification and function of stem cells in salivary glands, and the emerging field of research suggesting nerves play an instructive role during development and may be essential for adult gland repair and regeneration. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in gland biogenesis provides a template for regenerating, repairing or reengineering diseased or damaged adult human salivary glands. We provide an overview of three general approaches currently being developed to regenerate damaged salivary tissue, including gene therapy, stem cell-based therapy, and tissue engineering. In the future, it may be that a combination of all three will be used to repair, regenerate and reengineer functional salivary glands in patients to increase the secretion of their saliva, the focus of this monograph. PMID:24862590

  16. Professional storytelling in clinical dental anatomy teaching.

    PubMed

    Kieser, Jules; Livingstone, Vicki; Meldrum, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to see if storytelling in a clinical dental anatomy course would increase student satisfaction. We enhanced teaching by spontaneous storytelling in problem-based learning, in half of the third-year dentistry class. At the end of the course, we administered an anonymous questionnaire to the students in the class, consisting of 12 questions that students had to answer on a Likert scale of 1-5. An overall satisfaction score was obtained and we used a linear mixed model to compare differences in satisfaction between the two groups, with "group" as the fixed effect. We also conducted an exploratory factor analysis of the responses to investigate whether there were distinct constructs within the data. Overall satisfaction is high, with students "with stories" having higher satisfaction than those "without stories." The former group consistently gives higher satisfaction scores, regardless of which question is being asked. Factor analysis provides evidence that storytelling nurtures reflective learning, while students work on their clinical anatomy problems. PMID:19177386

  17. An anthraquinone derivative from Luffa acutangula induces apoptosis in human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 through p53-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Vanajothi, Ramar; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2016-06-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antiproliferative activity of 1,8-dihydroxy-4-methylanthracene-9,10-dione (DHMA) isolated from the Luffa acutangula against human non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460). Induction of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined through fluorescence microscopic technique. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting analysis was carried out to detect the expression of pro-apoptotic (p53, p21, caspase-3, Bax, GADD45A, and ATM) and anti-apoptotic (NF-κB) proteins in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies also performed to predict the binding mechanism of DHMA with MDM2-p53 protein. The DHMA inhibited the cell viability of NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of about 50 µg/ml. It significantly reduced cell viability correlated with induction of apoptosis, which was associated with ROS generation. The apoptotic cell death was further confirmed through dual staining and DNA fragmentation assay. DHMA significantly increased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein such as p53, p21, Bax, and caspase-3 but downregulated the expression of NF-κB in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies demonstrate that DHMA formed hydrogen bond interaction with key residues Trp26, Phe55 and Lys24 by which it disrupt the binding of p53 with MDM2 receptor. These findings suggested that DHMA induces apoptosis in NCI-H460 via a p53-dependent pathway. This the first study on cytotoxic and apoptosis inducing activity of DHMA from L. acutangula against NCI-H460 cell line. Therefore, DHMA has therapeutic potential for lung cancer treatment. PMID:26585176

  18. Cantharidin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair-associated protein levels in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-09-01

    Cantharidin is one of the major compounds from mylabris and it has cytotoxic effects in many different types of human cancer cells. Previously, we found that cantharidin induced cell death through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells. However, cantharidin-affected DNA damage, repair, and associated protein levels in NCI-H460 cells have not been examined. In this study, we determined whether cantharidin induced DNA damage and condensation and altered levels of proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. Incubation of NCI-H460 cells with 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 μM of cantharidin caused a longer DNA migration smear (comet tail). Cantharidin also increased DNA condensation. These effects were dose-dependent. Cantharidin (5, 10, and 15 μM) treatment of NCI-H460 cells reduced protein levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA-1), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1). Protein translocation of p-p53, p-H2A.X (S140), and MDC1 from cytoplasm to nucleus was induced by cantharidin in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, this study showed that cantharidin caused DNA damage and inhibited levels of DNA repair-associated proteins. These effects may contribute to cantharidin-induced cell death in vitro. PMID:24639390

  19. mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of radioresistant NCI-H520 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GUO, WEI; XIE, LI; ZHAO, LONG; ZHAO, YUEHUAN

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and to identify key molecules conferring radioresistance, the radioresistant subclone NCI-H520/R, derived from the NCI-H520 NSCLC cell line, was established with eight rounds of sublethal irradiation. The radioresistant features were subsequently assessed using a clonogenic assay, analysis of apoptosis and an MTT assay, the gene expression levels were examined using an Agilent Whole Human Genome 4×44 k Oligo microarray and Agilent Human miRCURY™ LNA array, and confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Pathway analysis and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis were performed to determine the biological functions of the subset of differentially expressed genes. miRNA-mRNA correlation analysis between the expression levels of each miRNA and all its predicted target genes was performed to further understand the radioresistance in the NCI-H520 cells. Following eight rounds of sublethal irradiation, a total of 2,862 mRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in the NCI-H520/R cells, including 893 upregulated genes and 1,969 downregulated genes. A total of 162 upregulated miRNAs and 274 downregulated miRNAs were significantly deregulated in the NCI-H520/R cells. Multiple core regulatory processes and signaling pathways were identified as being of likely relevance to radioresistance in NCI-H520/R cells, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and neurotrophin signaling pathway. The expression of genes associated with radioresistance reflects the complex biological processes involved in clinical cancer cell eradication and requires further investigation for future enhancement of therapy. PMID:25873351

  20. Designing Anatomy Program in Modern Medical Curriculum: Matter of Balance

    PubMed Central

    Grković, Ivica; Marinović Guić, Maja; Košta, Vana; Poljičanin, Ana; Čarić, Ana; Vilović, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the structure of the anatomy program in the first year medical curriculum of University of Split School of Medicine by comparing it with the recommendations by the Educational Affairs Committee of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and the Terminologia Anatomica (TA); we also quantitatively evaluated the organization of teaching material in contemporary topographical anatomy textbooks and matched them with the AACA recommendations, TA, and the curriculum of the anatomy course taught at Medical School in Split, Croatia. Methods TA, official recommendations of the AACA, 6 contemporary anatomy textbooks, and the structure of the anatomy course were analyzed for the proportion of the terms or text devoted to standard topographical regions of the body. The findings were correlated using Spearman ρ test. Results The curriculum outline correlated both with the AACA recommendations (Spearman ρ = 0.83, P = 0.015) and TA (Spearman ρ = 0.73, P = 0.046). Textbooks contained 8 distinct sections, 7 allocated to topographic anatomy regions and 1 to general anatomy concepts and principles. The structure of all textbooks correlated significantly with the course curriculum. However, 4 out of 6 textbooks did not correlate with TA and only a single textbook showed significant correlation with the AACA recommendations. Conclusion Anatomy textbooks vary in the amount of text dedicated to different parts of topographical anatomy and are not quite concordant with curriculum recommendations and standard anatomical terminology. Planning the structure of an anatomy course should not be based on a single book or recommendation but on evidence. PMID:19260144

  1. Anatomy and Physiology. Module Set I: Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition. Surgical Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilley, Robert

    This document, which is the first part in a two-part set of modules on anatomy and physiology for future surgical technicians, contains the teacher and student editions of an introduction to anatomy and physiology that consists of modules on the following topics: (1) organization of the human body; (2) biochemistry and microbiology; (3) infection,…

  2. Anatomy Education in a Changing Medical Curriculum in India: Medical Student Feedback on Duration and Emphasis of Gross Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holla, Sunil Jonathan; Ramachandran, Kalpana; Isaac, Bina; Koshy, Shajan

    2009-01-01

    Authors report here a survey of medical student feedback on the effectiveness of two different anatomy curricula at Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. Undergraduate medical students seeking the Bachelor in Medicine and Bachelor in Surgery (M.B.B.S.) degrees were divided into two groups by the duration of their respective anatomy

  3. Virtual Reality Anatomy: Is It Comparable with Traditional Methods in the Teaching of Human Forearm Musculoskeletal Anatomy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Codd, Anthony M.; Choudhury, Bipasha

    2011-01-01

    The use of cadavers to teach anatomy is well established, but limitations with this approach have led to the introduction of alternative teaching methods. One such method is the use of three-dimensional virtual reality computer models. An interactive, three-dimensional computer model of human forearm anterior compartment musculoskeletal anatomy

  4. Anatomy and Physiology. Module Set I: Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition. Surgical Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilley, Robert

    This document, which is the first part in a two-part set of modules on anatomy and physiology for future surgical technicians, contains the teacher and student editions of an introduction to anatomy and physiology that consists of modules on the following topics: (1) organization of the human body; (2) biochemistry and microbiology; (3) infection,

  5. The importance of spatial ability and mental models in learning anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Allison K.

    As a foundational course in medical education, gross anatomy serves to orient medical and veterinary students to the complex three-dimensional nature of the structures within the body. Understanding such spatial relationships is both fundamental and crucial for achievement in gross anatomy courses, and is essential for success as a practicing professional. Many things contribute to learning spatial relationships; this project focuses on a few key elements: (1) the type of multimedia resources, particularly computer-aided instructional (CAI) resources, medical students used to study and learn; (2) the influence of spatial ability on medical and veterinary students' gross anatomy grades and their mental models; and (3) how medical and veterinary students think about anatomy and describe the features of their mental models to represent what they know about anatomical structures. The use of computer-aided instruction (CAI) by gross anatomy students at Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) was assessed through a questionnaire distributed to the regional centers of the IUSM. Students reported using internet browsing, PowerPoint presentation software, and email on a daily bases to study gross anatomy. This study reveals that first-year medical students at the IUSM make limited use of CAI to study gross anatomy. Such studies emphasize the importance of examining students' use of CAI to study gross anatomy prior to development and integration of electronic media into the curriculum and they may be important in future decisions regarding the development of alternative learning resources. In order to determine how students think about anatomical relationships and describe the features of their mental models, personal interviews were conducted with select students based on students' ROT scores. Five typologies of the characteristics of students' mental models were identified and described: spatial thinking, kinesthetic approach, identification of anatomical structures, problem solving strategies, and study methods. Students with different levels of spatial ability visualize and think about anatomy in qualitatively different ways, which is reflected by the features of their mental models. Low spatial ability students thought about and used two-dimensional images from the textbook. They possessed basic two-dimensional models of anatomical structures; they placed emphasis on diagrams and drawings in their studies; and they re-read anatomical problems many times before answering. High spatial ability students thought fully in three-dimensional and imagined rotation and movement of the structures; they made use of many types of images and text as they studied and solved problems. They possessed elaborate three-dimensional models of anatomical structures which they were able to manipulate to solve problems; and they integrated diagrams, drawings, and written text in their studies. Middle spatial ability students were a mix between both low and high spatial ability students. They imagined two-dimensional images popping out of the flat paper to become more three-dimensional, but still relied on drawings and diagrams. Additionally, high spatial ability students used a higher proportion of anatomical terminology than low spatial ability or middle spatial ability students. This provides additional support to the premise that high spatial students' mental models are a complex mixture of imagistic representations and propositional representations that incorporate correct anatomical terminology. Low spatial ability students focused on the function of structures and ways to group information primarily for the purpose of recall. This supports the theory that low spatial students' mental models will be characterized by more on imagistic representations that are general in nature. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. Does tunica anatomy matter in penile implant?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heng-Shuen; Huang, Sheng-Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background Overall prosthesis survival is important in penile implant, which remains the final viable solution to many patients with refractory erectile dysfunction (ED). This paper is to retrospectively study the role of the anatomy of tunica albuginea (TA). Methods From March 1987 to March 1991 while the TA was regarded as a circumferential single layer, 21 organically ED men, aged from 27 to 77, received penile prosthesis implantation and were allocated to conventional group. From August 1992 to March 2013 while the tip of Hegar’s dilator was categorically directed medial-dorsally during corporal dilatation derived from newfound TA as a bi-layered structure with a 360° complete inner circular layer and a 300° incomplete outer longitudinal coat, 196 ED males, aged from 35 to 83, underwent penile implant and were categorized to advanced group. The model of prosthesis was recorded. Prosthesis loss rate and survival time were analyzed and the follow up period ranged from 22.4-26.4 (average 24.3) years and 0.4-20.6 (average 15.8) years to the conventional and advanced group respectively. Results To the conventional and advanced group, the number of inflatable and rigid type prosthesis used were 2, 19 and 15, 181 respectively, whereas the prosthesis loss was encountered in 50.0% (1/2), 15.8% (3/19) and 0.0% (0/15), 0.6% (1/181) respectively. And the prosthesis survival time were 5.1-6.3 (5.7) years, 1.3-26.4 (15.2) years and 6.1-16.2 (11.2) years, 0.4-20.6 (15.3) years to the conventional and advanced group respectively. Statistical significance was noted on prosthesis loss in groups (P=0.01) while the Mentor Acuform stood out in prosthesis survival. Conclusions Anatomy-based managing maneuver appears to deliver better surgery success in penile implant. Tunica anatomy is significant in performing implant surgery. PMID:26816839

  7. Anatomy of the Adductor Magnus Origin

    PubMed Central

    Obey, Mitchel R.; Broski, Stephen M.; Spinner, Robert J.; Collins, Mark S.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adductor magnus (AM) has historically been a potential source of confusion in patients with suspected proximal hamstring avulsion injuries. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic characteristics of the AM, including its osseous origin, anatomic dimensions, and relationship to the proximal hamstring tendons. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Dissection of the AM origin was performed in 11 (8 cadavers) fresh-frozen hip-to-foot cadaveric hemipelvis specimens. The gross anatomy and architecture of the proximal hamstring and AM tendons were studied. After dissecting the hamstring tendons away from their origin, the dimension, shape, and orientation of the tendon footprints on the ischial tuberosity were determined. Results: The AM was identified in all cadaveric specimens. The mean tendon thickness (anterior to posterior [AP]) was 5.7 ± 2.9 mm. The mean tendon width (medial to lateral [ML]) was 7.1 ± 2.2 mm. The mean tendon length was 13.1 ± 8.7 cm. The mean footprint height (AP dimension) was 12.1 ± 2.9 mm, and mean footprint width (ML dimension) was 17.3 ± 7.1 mm. The mean distance between the AM footprint and the most medial aspect of the conjoint tendon footprint was 8.5 ± 4.2 mm. Tendon measurements demonstrated a considerable degree of both intra- and interspecimen variability. Conclusion: The AM tendon is consistently present just medial to the conjoint tendon at the ischial tuberosity, representing the lateral-most portion of the AM muscle. This study found wide variation in the dimensional characteristics of the AM tendon between specimens. Its shape and location can mimic the appearance of an intact hamstring (conjoint or semimembranosus) tendon intraoperatively or on diagnostic imaging, potentially misleading surgeons and radiologists. Therefore, detailed knowledge of the AM tendon anatomy, footprint anatomy, and its relationship to the hamstring muscle complex is paramount when planning surgical approach and technique. Clinical Relevance: The reported data may aid surgeons in more accurate recognition, diagnosis, and repair of proximal hamstring avulsion injuries. PMID:26798764

  8. The root of dental anatomy: a case for naming Eustachius the "father of dental anatomy".

    PubMed

    Bennett, Gregory W

    2009-01-01

    When one considers the names of those whose affect on dentistry reached far beyond their lifetimes, one may think of Fauchard, Wells, Morton and Black. One name that deserves to be called among the pantheon of the greats is Bartholomaeus Eustachius. Eustachius was not the first to study the anatomy of the teeth and jaws, having been preceded by Da Vinci; however, he was the first to publish a treatise devoted entirely to this subject, Libellus de Dentibus, in 1563. As Sir William Osler, the father of modern medicine, stated: "In Science, the credit goes to the man who convinces the world, not to whom the idea first occurs." The purpose of this paper is to show that Eustachius deserves to be named the father of dental anatomy. PMID:19860288

  9. Occurrence and evolutionary inferences about Kranz anatomy in Cyperaceae (Poales).

    PubMed

    Martins, Shirley; Alves, Marccus; Scatena, Vera L

    2015-01-01

    Cyperaceae is an angiosperm family with the greatest diversity of species with Kranz anatomy. Four different types of Kranz anatomy (chlorocyperoid, eleocharoid, fimbristyloid and rhynchosporoid) have been described for this angiosperm family, and the occurrence and structural characteristics of these types are important to trace evolutionary hypotheses. The purpose of this study was to examine the available data on Cyperaceae Kranz anatomy, emphasizing taxonomy, geographic distribution, habitat and anatomy, to infer the potential origin of the Kranz anatomy in this family. The results showed that the four types of Kranz anatomy (associated with C4 photosynthesis) in Cyperaceae emerged numerous times in unrelated phylogenetic groups. However, the convergence of these anatomical types, except rhynchosporoid, was observed in certain groups. Thus, the diverse origin of these species might result from different environmental pressures that promote photorespiration. Greater variation in occurrence of Kranz anatomy and anatomical types was observed in Eleocharis, whose emergence of the C4 pathway was recent compared with other genera in the family, and the species of this genus are located in aquatic environments. PMID:26628020

  10. Anatomy of a Lactococcal Phage Tail†

    PubMed Central

    Mc Grath, Stephen; Neve, Horst; Seegers, Jos F. M. L.; Eijlander, Robyn; Vegge, Christina S.; Brøndsted, Lone; Heller, Knut J.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Vogensen, Finn K.; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2006-01-01

    Bacteriophages of the Siphoviridae family utilize a long noncontractile tail to recognize, adsorb to, and inject DNA into their bacterial host. The tail anatomy of the archetypal Siphoviridae λ has been well studied, in contrast to phages infecting gram-positive bacteria. This report outlines a detailed anatomical description of a typical member of the Siphoviridae infecting a gram-positive bacterium. The tail superstructure of the lactococcal phage Tuc2009 was investigated using N-terminal protein sequencing, Western blotting, and immunogold transmission electron microscopy, allowing a tangible path to be followed from gene sequence through encoded protein to specific architectural structures on the Tuc2009 virion. This phage displays a striking parity with λ with respect to tail structure, which reenforced a model proposed for Tuc2009 tail architecture. Furthermore, comparisons with λ and other lactococcal phages allowed the specification of a number of genetic submodules likely to encode specific tail structures. PMID:16707689

  11. [Anatomy and pathophysiology of deglutition disorders].

    PubMed

    Rabischong, P

    1995-10-01

    In the nervous system there are many automatized functions that require multilevel control. Some of them are more important because of their link with some vital functions. Only two are crucial to survival: respiration and the pumping of the heart. Swallowing is integrated within the respiratory system, explaining the need for great reliability and justifying the complexity of the organization described. The progress of medical imaging techniques has created new conditions for practicing radiologists, who need to know much more anatomy than in the past. Therefore, it is easier to learn anatomical details if there details are understood as part of an intelligent construction. We hope to have been able to demonstrate that swallowing is one good example of the real competency of the constructor of this system. PMID:7501793

  12. Anatomy and physiology of the velopharyngeal mechanism.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jamie L

    2011-05-01

    Understanding the normal anatomy and physiology of the velopharyngeal mechanism is the first step in providing appropriate diagnosis and treatment for children born with cleft lip and palate. The velopharyngeal mechanism consists of a muscular valve that extends from the posterior surface of the hard palate (roof of mouth) to the posterior pharyngeal wall and includes the velum (soft palate), lateral pharyngeal walls (sides of the throat), and the posterior pharyngeal wall (back wall of the throat). The function of the velopharyngeal mechanism is to create a tight seal between the velum and pharyngeal walls to separate the oral and nasal cavities for various purposes, including speech. Velopharyngeal closure is accomplished through the contraction of several velopharyngeal muscles including the levator veli palatini, musculus uvulae, superior pharyngeal constrictor, palatopharyngeus, palatoglossus, and salpingopharyngeus. The tensor veli palatini is thought to be responsible for eustachian tube function. PMID:21948636

  13. Guyon canal: the evolution of clinical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Maroukis, Brianna L; Ogawa, Takeshi; Rehim, Shady A; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-03-01

    Guyon canal refers to the ulnar tunnel at the wrist named for the French surgeon Jean Casimir Félix Guyon, who described this space in 1861. After Guyon's description, clinicians have focused their interest on symptoms caused by compression of structures occupying this canal (later named ulnar tunnel syndrome or Guyon syndrome). However, disagreement and confusion persisted over the correct anatomical boundaries and terminology used to describe the ulnar tunnel. Through anatomical investigation and evolving clinical case studies, the current understanding of the anatomy of the ulnar tunnel was established. This article examines the evolution of the anatomical description of the ulnar tunnel and its relevant clinical associations and casts light on the life and contributions of Guyon. PMID:25446410

  14. [Normal abdominal ultrasound anatomy. Examination procedure].

    PubMed

    Salcedo Joven, I; Segura Grau, A; Rodríguez Lorenzo, A; Segura Cabral, J M

    2014-01-01

    To carry out an abdominal ultrasound examination with the highest degree of accuracy and thoroughness, it is essential to have a good knowledge of the anatomy and the normal measurements of the different organs. In this way, we can determine their normal condition and identify the pathology and its location more easily. It is very important to adopt a correct examination procedure, systematically sweeping the scan in the same direction and not leaving any organ unexamined. We suggest a procedure consisting of longitudinal, cross-sectional and oblique scans to view all the abdominal organs, starting the examination in the epigastric region, scanning first the right upper quadrant, then the left upper quadrant, both iliac fossa, and lastly the hypogastric region. PMID:24746380

  15. Guyon Canal: The Evolution of Clinical Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Maroukis, Brianna L.; Ogawa, Takeshi; Rehim, Shady A.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The eponym “Guyon canal” refers to the ulnar tunnel at the wrist that was named after the French surgeon Jean Casimir Félix Guyon who first described this space in 1861. After Guyon’s discovery, clinicians have focused their interest on symptoms caused by compression of structures occupying this canal (later named ulnar tunnel syndrome, or Guyon syndrome). However disagreement and confusion persisted over the correct anatomical boundaries and terminology used to describe the ulnar tunnel. Through anatomical investigation and evolving clinical case studies, the current understanding of the anatomy of the ulnar tunnel was established. This article examines the evolution of the anatomical description of the ulnar tunnel and its relevant clinical associations, and casts light on the life and contributions of Jean Casimir Félix Guyon. PMID:25446410

  16. Normal equine ocular anatomy and eye examination.

    PubMed

    Cooley, P L

    1992-12-01

    When compared with small domestic animals, the horse has unique ocular characteristics (complete bony orbit, well-developed eyelid muscles, a nasal and temporal gray limbal line, granulae iridica, paurangiotic fundus). Knowledge of normal equine ocular anatomy is essential for ocular lesion interpretation. It is important to obtain a full history and general examination before sedation, nerve blocks, or other diagnostic ophthalmic tests are performed. All ocular examinations should include a systematic evaluation of both the anterior and posterior segments. Selection of other diagnostic tests depends on information obtained from the history, general inspection, and ophthalmic examination. The appropriate order of performing various special diagnostic tests must be considered before beginning the examination. If a diagnosis is elusive, referral to an ophthalmologist for further diagnostics should be considered. PMID:1458322

  17. Comparative petiole anatomy of cassava (Manihot) species.

    PubMed

    Graciano-Ribeiro, D; Hashimoto-Freitas, D Y; Nassar, N M A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we describe the petiole anatomy of six wild cassava (Manihot) species, one hybrid, and two cultivars of Manihot esculenta, in order to identify their dominant anatomical patterns and relate them to possible adaptations to abiotic factors in the Cerrado biome. The median parts of several petiole samples were transversally and longitudinally sectioned and stained. The results include data for the taxonomic classification of the genus, including distinctive anatomical characteristics of hybrid varieties of cassava and wild species, such as the presence/absence of trichomes and a hypodermis, layer type and number in the cortex, number of vascular bundles, cell types in the pith, and type of organization. Morphological analysis revealed differences in length and shape of the petiole insertion. The presence of trichomes, a hypodermis, the amount and type of supporting tissue in the cortex, as well as gelatinous fibers, may be related to drought tolerance. PMID:26909917

  18. [Apropos of the "Lesson in anatomy"].

    PubMed

    Leperchey, F

    2000-09-01

    Some striking features from the famous lesson of Prof. Tulp are presented: the implication of the spectator in the scene, the unity of the action exalted by the "chiaroscuro", the expression of the movement and of Tulp's personality. In addition, the probable scientific and philosophical underlying thoughts of Rembrandt are discussed having respect to historical data concerning Descartes and Constantin Huygens. The indications given by the lesson of Pr. Deyman about Rembrandt's conception of this subject and the evolution of his art, are then presented. Among the "Anatomy lessons" of the Dutch painting which have preceded and followed those by Rembrandt, the three having particular relevance to the Master are discussed, allowing to better appreciate his originality, his audaciousness and his mastery of his art. PMID:11244932

  19. Scapulothoracic Anatomy and Snapping Scapula Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Ramirez, Jose; Chalmers, Peter N.; McCormick, Frank M.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    The scapulothoracic articulation is a sliding junction between the deep aspect of the scapula and thoracic rib cage at the levels of ribs 2 through 7. Motion at this articulation is dynamically stabilized by a variety of muscular attachments, allowing for controlled positioning of the glenoid to assist in glenohumeral joint function. A thorough understanding of the complex anatomic relationships, including the various muscles, and bursa, is critical to the evaluation of patients presenting with scapulothoracic disorders. The snapping scapula syndrome is caused by either osseous lesions or scapulothoracic bursitis and can be difficult to recognize and treat. The purpose of this review is to discuss the anatomy of the scapulothoracic articulation with an emphasis on the pathology associated with snapping scapula syndrome. PMID:24369502

  20. Marcello Malpighi: the father of microscopic anatomy.

    PubMed

    DiDio, L J

    1995-01-01

    Biographical data of Malpighi to justify naming him "the father of microscopic anatomy", as he used the microscope, soon after its invention, to study and discover and accurately describe many biological, particularly anatomical, structures. Although he utilized the microscope as a scientific instrument, his ideas, innovations and discoveries caused such an opposition that the microscope could be considered as Malpighi's weapon to start a scientific revolution. He was a naturalist for whom the "natural world, known and experienced scientifically, was all that existed". He was also a "cardiocentrist", who opposed Galen's "hepatocentrism". Several anatomical structures known eponymically to honor Malpighi are listed followed by their synonyms. Malpighi is another example of a genius as an extraordinary man who stood on the shoulders of giants, such as Galilei, Hans and Zacharias Janssen, Borelli, Harvey, B. Massari, among others. PMID:11322304

  1. Anatomy in occupational therapy program curriculum: practitioners' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Katherine Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy education is undergoing significant transformation. It is unknown whether changes are in accordance with occupational therapy (OT) practice needs. The purpose of this pilot study was to survey OT clinicians to determine their perspectives on the value of anatomy in OT curricula, and anatomical knowledge required for practice. In addition to demographics, the survey asked questions on the value of a standalone anatomy course, integration of anatomical content in other coursework, practice areas requiring anatomy knowledge, course content, teaching media recommendations, and their opinions regarding whether graduates have adequate anatomy knowledge for competent practice. Surveys were distributed to OT practitioners in the state of Arizona (n = 107). Response rate was 51% on electronic surveys, 29% on mailed surveys. All respondents recommended an anatomy course in OT curricula; 97% as a standalone course with integration of course content throughout the curriculum. The most recommended teaching method was cadaver dissection. Content areas identified as important to cover included skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Regions recommended were the upper limb, thorax/trunk, head and neck, and lower limb. Practice areas requiring anatomy knowledge included joint range of motion and strengthening treatment interventions, goniometry, muscle strength testing, assessing muscle tone, wheelchair assessment/prescription, orthotics, physical agent modalities, and activity adaptation. Eighty-one percent felt that entry-level practitioners had adequate knowledge for competent practice. This study supports inclusion of a separate anatomy course in OT curricula, continued use of cadavers, and the importance of including input from practicing clinicians when determining anatomy course content. PMID:23804536

  2. Spatial Abilities in an Elective Course of Applied Anatomy after a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langlois, Jean; Wells, George A.; Lecourtois, Marc; Bergeron, Germain; Yetisir, Elizabeth; Martin, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    A concern on the level of anatomy knowledge reached after a problem-based learning curriculum has been documented in the literature. Spatial anatomy, arguably the highest level in anatomy knowledge, has been related to spatial abilities. Our first objective was to test the hypothesis that residents are interested in a course of applied anatomy

  3. Constructive, Collaborative, Contextual, and Self-Directed Learning in Surface Anatomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Esther M.; Sieben, Judith M.; Smailbegovic, Ida; de Bruin, Anique B. H.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy education often consists of a combination of lectures and laboratory sessions, the latter frequently including surface anatomy. Studying surface anatomy enables students to elaborate on their knowledge of the cadaver's static anatomy by enabling the visualization of structures, especially those of the musculoskeletal system, move and…

  4. Constructive, Collaborative, Contextual, and Self-Directed Learning in Surface Anatomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Esther M.; Sieben, Judith M.; Smailbegovic, Ida; de Bruin, Anique B. H.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy education often consists of a combination of lectures and laboratory sessions, the latter frequently including surface anatomy. Studying surface anatomy enables students to elaborate on their knowledge of the cadaver's static anatomy by enabling the visualization of structures, especially those of the musculoskeletal system, move and

  5. New insights into dinosaur jaw muscle anatomy.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Casey M

    2009-09-01

    Jaw muscles are key components of the head and critical to testing hypotheses of soft-tissue homology, skull function, and evolution. Dinosaurs evolved an extraordinary diversity of cranial forms adapted to a variety of feeding behaviors. However, disparate evolutionary transformations in head shape and function among dinosaurs and their living relatives, birds and crocodylians, impair straightforward reconstructions of muscles, and other important cephalic soft tissues. This study presents the osteological correlates and inferred soft tissue anatomy of the jaw muscles and relevant neurovasculature in the temporal region of the dinosaur head. Hypotheses of jaw muscle homology were tested across a broad range archosaur and sauropsid taxa to more accurately infer muscle attachments in the adductor chambers of non-avian dinosaurs. Many dinosaurs likely possessed m. levator pterygoideus, a trait shared with lepidosaurs but not extant archosaurs. Several major clades of dinosaurs (e.g., Ornithopoda, Ceratopsidae, Sauropoda) eliminated the epipterygoid, thus impacting interpretations of m. pseudotemporalis profundus. M. pseudotemporalis superficialis most likely attached to the caudoventral surface of the laterosphenoid, a trait shared with extant archosaurs. Although mm. adductor mandibulae externus profundus and medialis likely attached to the caudal half of the dorsotemporal fossa and coronoid process, clear osteological correlates separating the individual bellies are rare. Most dinosaur clades possess osteological correlates indicative of a pterygoideus ventralis muscle that attaches to the lateral surface of the mandible, although the muscle may have extended as far as the jugal in some taxa (e.g., hadrosaurs, tyrannosaurs). The cranial and mandibular attachments of mm adductor mandibulae externus superficialis and adductor mandibulae posterior were consistent across all taxa studied. These new data greatly increase the interpretive resolution of head anatomy in dinosaurs and provide the anatomical foundation necessary for future analyses of skull function and evolution in an important vertebrate clade. PMID:19711458

  6. Study on Variant Anatomy of Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    V, Sangeetha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Sciatic Nerve (SN) is the nerve of the posterior compartment of thigh formed in the pelvis from the ventral rami of the L4 to S3 spinal nerves. It leaves the pelvis via the greater sciatic foramen below piriformis and divides into Common Peroneal Nerve (CPN) and Tibial Nerve (TN) at the level of the upper angle of the popliteal fossa. Higher division of the sciatic nerve is the most common variation where the TN and CPN may leave the pelvis through different routes. Such variation may lead to compression of the nerve and lead to Non-discogenic sciatica. Materials and Methods: Fifty lower limbs were used for the study from Department of Anatomy, J.J.M.M.C Davangere, Karnataka, India. Observation and Results: In our study on 25 cadavers (50 lower limbs), we have observed 4 (8 %) lower limbs high division of sciatic nerve was noted. High division of sciatic nerve in the back of thigh was noted in one specimen (2%), while high division within the pelvis was noted in 3 specimens (6%), while in 46 (92%) it occurred outside the pelvis. Conclusion: Knowledge regarding such variation and differences in the course of SN is important for the surgeons to plan for various surgical interventions pertaining to the gluteal region. The variant anatomy of SN may cause piriformis syndrome and failure of SN block. Hence present study is undertaken to know the level of division, exit, course, relationship to piriformis and variations in the branching pattern of SN. PMID:25302181

  7. The anatomy of the hip abductor muscles.

    PubMed

    Flack, N A M S; Nicholson, H D; Woodley, S J

    2014-03-01

    The anatomy of the hip abductors has not been comprehensively examined, yet is important to understanding function and pathology in the gluteal region. For example, pathology of the hip abductor muscle-tendon complexes can cause greater trochanteric pain syndrome, and may be associated with gluteal atrophy and fatty infiltration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed morphology of gluteus medius (GMed), gluteus minimus (GMin), and tensor fascia lata (TFL), and determine whether the muscles comprised anatomical compartments. The gluteal region from 12 cadavers was dissected and data collected on attachment sites, volume, fascicular and tendinous anatomy, and innervation. Three sites of GMed origin were identified (gluteal fossa, gluteal aponeurosis, and posteroinferior edge of the iliac crest) and the distal tendon had lateral and posterior parts. GMed was the largest in volume (27.6 ± 11.6 cm(3); GMin 14.1 ± 11.1 cm(3); TFL 1.8 ± 0.8 cm(3)). Fascicles of GMin originated from the gluteal fossa, inserting onto the deep surface of its distal tendon and the hip joint capsule. TFL was encapsulated in the fascia lata, having no bony attachment. Primary innervation patterns varied for GMed, with three or four branches supplying different regions of muscle. Distinct secondary nerve branches entered four regions of GMin; no differential innervation was observed for TFL. On the basis of architectural parameters and innervation, GMed, and GMin each comprise of four compartments but TFL is a homogenous muscle. It is anticipated that these data will be useful for future clinical and functional studies of the hip abductors. PMID:23625344

  8. 75 FR 79009 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Questionnaire Cognitive Interview and Pretesting (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget... institutions) and possibly, State, Local or Tribal Governments. The table below represents the burden over...

  9. An Aqueous Extract of Tuberaria lignosa Inhibits Cell Growth, Alters the Cell Cycle Profile, and Induces Apoptosis of NCI-H460 Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joana M; Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Xavier, Cristina P R; Lima, M João; Lima, Raquel T; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2016-01-01

    Tuberaria lignosa (Sweet) Samp. is found in European regions, and has antioxidant properties due to its composition in ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds. Given its traditional use and antioxidant properties, the tumor cell growth inhibitory potential of aqueous extracts from T. lignosa (prepared by infusion and decoction) was investigated in three human tumor cell lines: MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer), and HCT-15 (human colorectal adenocarcinoma). Both extracts inhibited the growth of these cell lines; the most potent one being the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion in the NCI-H460 cells (GI50 of approximately 50 μg/mL). Further assays were carried out with this extract in NCI-H460 cells. At 100 μg/mL or 150 μg/mL it caused an increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a decrease of cells in S phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, these concentrations caused an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. In agreement, a decrease in total poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and pro-caspase 3 levels was found. In conclusion, the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion was more potent in NCI-H460 cells, altering the cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis. This work highlights the importance of T. lignosa as a source of bioactive compounds with tumor cell growth inhibitory potential. PMID:27164073

  10. El NCI inicia un estudio para evaluar la utilidad de la secuenciación genética para mejorar los resu

    Cancer.gov

    El Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI) lanzará este mes un estudio clínico piloto denominado M-PACT con la finalidad de evaluar si el tratamiento asignado según mutaciones genéticas específicas puede brindar beneficios a pacientes con tumores sólidos meta

  11. NCI en el congreso de ASCO: Breve reseña de los resultados de investigaciones de cánceres en mujeres

    Cancer.gov

    En el congreso anual de la Sociedad Americana de Oncología Clínica (ASCO) 2014 celebrado en junio en Chicago, se destacaron los resultados de varios estudios clínicos patrocinados por el NCI sobre cánceres en la mujer.

  12. Centro para la Salud Mundial del NCI anuncia becas de investigación para tecnologías portátiles

    Cancer.gov

    El Centro para la Salud Mundial del NCI (CGH) anunció el otorgamiento de subvenciones que apoyarán el desarrollo y la validación de tecnologías portátiles y de bajo costo para mejorar la detección temprana, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento del cáncer.

  13. Estudio del NCI revela que la obesidad extrema puede acortar la esperanza de vida hasta en 14 años

    Cancer.gov

    Los adultos con obesidad extrema tienen mayor riesgo de morir a edad más joven por cáncer y muchas otras causas entre ellas, enfermedades cardíacas, accidentes cerebrovasculares, diabetes y enfermedades del hígado y los riñones, según estudio del NCI.

  14. Lipid-soluble ginseng extract induces apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moo Rim; Kim, Hwan Mook; Kang, Jong Soon; Lee, Kiho; Lee, Sung Dong; Hyun, Dong-Hoon; In, Man-Jin; Park, Song-Kyu; Kim, Dong Chung

    2011-06-01

    This study was performed to elucidate the anticancer mechanism of a lipid-soluble ginseng extract (LSGE) by analyzing induction of apoptosis and arrest of cell cycle progression using the NCI-H460 human lung cancer cell line. Proliferation of NCI-H460 cells was potently inhibited by LSGE in a dose-dependent manner. The cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in NCI-H460 cells was induced by LSGE. The percentage of G0/G1 phase cells significantly increased, while that of S phase cells decreased after treatment with LSGE. The expression levels of cyclin-dependent kinase2 (CDK2), CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D3 and cyclin E related to G0/G1 cells progression were also altered by LSGE. In addition, LSGE-induced cell death occurred through apoptosis, which was accompanied by increasing the activity of caspases including caspase-8, caspase-9 and caspase-3. Consistent with enhancement of caspase activity, LSGE increased protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). These apoptotic effects of LSGE were inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk. These findings indicate that LSGE inhibits NCI-H460 human lung cancer cell growth by cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and induction of caspase-mediated apoptosis. PMID:21611769

  15. It's Difficult to Change the Way We Teach: Lessons from the Integrative Themes in Physiology Curriculum Module Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Thorn, Patti M.; Svinicki, Marilla D.

    2006-01-01

    The Integrative Themes in Physiology (ITIP) project was a National Science Foundation-funded collaboration between the American Physiological Society (APS) and the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS). The project goal was to create instructional resources that emphasized active learning in undergraduate anatomy and physiology classrooms.…

  16. NCI Researchers Discover Exceptionally Potent Antibodies with Potential for Prophylaxis and Therapy of MERS-Coronavirus Infections | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer In a recent article published in the Journal of Virology, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Laboratory of Experimental Immunology (LEI), Cancer and Inflammation Program, NCI Center for Cancer Research, reported the identification of three human monoclonal antibodies (m336, m337, and m338) that target the part of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) that is responsible for binding to its receptor. These antibodies are exceptionally potent inhibitors of MERS-CoV infection and also provide a basis for creating a future MERS-CoV vaccine.

  17. Suppression of FUT1 attenuates cell proliferation in the HER2-overexpressing cancer cell line NCI-N87

    PubMed Central

    KAWAI, SADAYUKI; KATO, SHUNSUKE; IMAI, HIROO; OKADA, YOSHINARI; ISHIOKA, CHIKASHI

    2012-01-01

    Lewis Y (LeY) antigen is an oligosaccharide that is highly expressed at the cell surface in various human cancers. Increased LeY expression activates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and promotes cell proliferation in EGFR-overexpressing cells. However, the effect of downregulation of LeY expression on cell proliferation in HER2-overexpressing cells remains unknown. FUT1 encodes α1,2-fucosyltransferase, a key enzyme for LeY synthesis. We knocked down FUT1 by short interfering RNA (siRNA) in four HER2-overexpressing human cancer cell lines, including NCI-N87, MKN7, SKBr3 and BT474. We investigated whether downregulation of LeY and alteration in the glycosylation status of these cells affect cell proliferation and HER2 activation. Knocking down FUT1 expression markedly inhibited proliferation of NCI-N87, which highly expressed EGFR and was sensitive to EGFR deprivation. Furthermore, FUT1 siRNA downregulated the total amount of HER2 protein, phosphorylation of HER2 and EGFR, and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in this cell line. Moreover, the marked downregulation of phosphorylation of HER2 and ERK was observed following short-time EGF-stimulation. These effects were not observed in the other three cell lines. Our results suggest that knockdown of FUT1 downregulates HER2 signaling via EGFR downregulation. FUT1 may serve as a new molecular target for HER2-overexpressing human cancers with activated EGFR signaling. PMID:23128605

  18. Gene Expression Profiles of the NCI-60 Human Tumor Cell Lines Define Molecular Interaction Networks Governing Cell Migration Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Kurt W.; Zeeberg, Barry R.; Reinhold, William C.; Sunshine, Margot; Luna, Augustin; Pommier, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Although there is extensive information on gene expression and molecular interactions in various cell types, integrating those data in a functionally coherent manner remains challenging. This study explores the premise that genes whose expression at the mRNA level is correlated over diverse cell lines are likely to function together in a network of molecular interactions. We previously derived expression-correlated gene clusters from the database of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines and associated each cluster with function categories of the Gene Ontology (GO) database. From a cluster rich in genes associated with GO categories related to cell migration, we extracted 15 genes that were highly cross-correlated; prominent among them were RRAS, AXL, ADAM9, FN14, and integrin-beta1. We then used those 15 genes as bait to identify other correlated genes in the NCI-60 database. A survey of current literature disclosed, not only that many of the expression-correlated genes engaged in molecular interactions related to migration, invasion, and metastasis, but that highly cross-correlated subsets of those genes engaged in specific cell migration processes. We assembled this information in molecular interaction maps (MIMs) that depict networks governing 3 cell migration processes: degradation of extracellular matrix, production of transient focal complexes at the leading edge of the cell, and retraction of the rear part of the cell. Also depicted are interactions controlling the release and effects of calcium ions, which may regulate migration in a spaciotemporal manner in the cell. The MIMs and associated text comprise a detailed and integrated summary of what is currently known or surmised about the role of the expression cross-correlated genes in molecular networks governing those processes. PMID:22570691

  19. Suppression of FUT1 attenuates cell proliferation in the HER2-overexpressing cancer cell line NCI-N87.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Sadayuki; Kato, Shunsuke; Imai, Hiroo; Okada, Yoshinari; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2013-01-01

    Lewis Y (LeY) antigen is an oligosaccharide that is highly expressed at the cell surface in various human cancers. Increased LeY expression activates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and promotes cell proliferation in EGFR-overexpressing cells. However, the effect of downregulation of LeY expression on cell proliferation in HER2-overexpressing cells remains unknown. FUT1 encodes α1,2-fucosyltransferase, a key enzyme for LeY synthesis. We knocked down FUT1 by short interfering RNA (siRNA) in four HER2-overexpressing human cancer cell lines, including NCI-N87, MKN7, SKBr3 and BT474. We investigated whether downregulation of LeY and alteration in the glycosylation status of these cells affect cell proliferation and HER2 activation. Knocking down FUT1 expression markedly inhibited proliferation of NCI-N87, which highly expressed EGFR and was sensitive to EGFR deprivation. Furthermore, FUT1 siRNA downregulated the total amount of HER2 protein, phosphorylation of HER2 and EGFR, and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in this cell line. Moreover, the marked downregulation of phosphorylation of HER2 and ERK was observed following short-time EGF-stimulation. These effects were not observed in the other three cell lines. Our results suggest that knockdown of FUT1 downregulates HER2 signaling via EGFR downregulation. FUT1 may serve as a new molecular target for HER2-overexpressing human cancers with activated EGFR signaling. PMID:23128605

  20. Alterations of DNA repair genes in the NCI-60 cell lines and their predictive value for anticancer drug activity

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Fabricio G.; Matuo, Renata; Tang, Sai-Wen; Rajapakse, Vinodh N.; Luna, Augustin; Sander, Chris; Varma, Sudhir; Simon, Paul H.G.; Doroshow, James H.; Reinhold, William C.; Pommier, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair (DNAR) genes is associated with genomic instability and cancer predisposition; it also makes cancer cells reliant on a reduced set of DNAR pathways to resist DNA-targeted therapy, which remains the core of the anticancer armamentarium. Because the landscape of DNAR defects across numerous types of cancers and its relation with drug activity have not been systematically examined, we took advantage of the unique drug and genomic databases of the US National Cancer Institute cancer cell lines (the NCI-60) to characterize 260 DNAR genes with respect to deleterious mutations and expression down-regulation; 169 genes exhibited a total of 549 function-affecting alterations, with 39 of them scoring as putative knockouts across 31 cell lines. Those mutations were compared to tumor samples from 12 studies of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). Based on this compendium of alterations, we determined which DNAR genomic alterations predicted drug response for 20,195 compounds present in the NCI-60 drug database. Among 242 DNA damaging agents, 202 showed associations with at least one DNAR genomic signature. In addition to SLFN11, the Fanconi anemia-scaffolding gene SLX4 (FANCP/BTBD12) stood out among the genes most significantly related with DNA synthesis and topoisomerase inhibitors. Depletion and complementation experiments validated the causal relationship between SLX4 defects and sensitivity to raltitrexed and cytarabine in addition to camptothecin. Therefore, we propose new rational uses for existing anticancer drugs based on a comprehensive analysis of DNAR genomic parameters. PMID:25758781