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Sample records for ancestry highly correlated

  1. A Continuous Correlated Beta Process Model for Genetic Ancestry in Admixed Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gompert, Zachariah

    2016-01-01

    Admixture and recombination create populations and genomes with genetic ancestry from multiple source populations. Analyses of genetic ancestry in admixed populations are relevant for trait and disease mapping, studies of speciation, and conservation efforts. Consequently, many methods have been developed to infer genome-average ancestry and to deconvolute ancestry into continuous local ancestry blocks or tracts within individuals. Current methods for local ancestry inference perform well when admixture occurred recently or hybridization is ongoing, or when admixture occurred in the distant past such that local ancestry blocks have fixed in the admixed population. However, methods to infer local ancestry frequencies in isolated admixed populations still segregating for ancestry do not exist. In the current paper, I develop and test a continuous correlated beta process model to fill this analytical gap. The method explicitly models autocorrelations in ancestry frequencies at the population-level and uses discriminant analysis of SNP windows to take advantage of ancestry blocks within individuals. Analyses of simulated data sets show that the method is generally accurate such that ancestry frequency estimates exhibited low root-mean-square error and were highly correlated with the true values, particularly when large (±10 or ±20) SNP windows were used. Along these lines, the proposed method outperformed post hoc inference of ancestry frequencies from a traditional hidden Markov model (i.e., the linkage model in structure), particularly when admixture occurred more distantly in the past with little on-going gene flow or was followed by natural selection. The reliability and utility of the method was further assessed by analyzing genetic ancestry in an admixed human population (Uyghur) and three populations from a hybrid zone between Mus domesticus and M. musculus. Considerable variation in ancestry frequencies was detected within and among chromosomes in the Uyghur

  2. Genetically Determined Amerindian Ancestry Correlates with Increased Frequency of Risk Alleles for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, E; Webb, R; Rasmussen, A.; Kelly, J.A; Riba, L.; Kaufman, K.M.; Garcia-de la Torre, I.; Moctezuma, J.F.; Maradiaga-Ceceña, M.A.; Cardiel, M.; Acevedo, E.; Cucho-Venegas, M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gamron, S.; Pons-Estel, B.A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Martin, J.; Tusié-Luna, T.; Harley, J.B.; Richardson, B.; Sawalha, A.H.; Alarcón-Riquelme, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To analyze if genetically determined Amerindian ancestry predicts the increased presence of risk alleles of known susceptibility genes for systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms within 16 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci for SLE were genotyped in a set of 804 Mestizo lupus patients and 667 Mestizo normal healthy controls. In addition, 347 admixture informative markers were genotyped. Individual ancestry proportions were determined using STRUCTURE. Association analysis was performed using PLINK, and correlation of the presence of risk alleles with ancestry was done using linear regression. Results A meta-analysis of the genetic association of the 16 SNPs across populations showed that TNFSF4, STAT4, PDCD1, ITGAM, and IRF5 were associated with lupus in a Hispanic-Mestizo cohort enriched for European and Amerindian ancestry. In addition, two SNPs within the MHC region, previously associated in a genome-wide association study in Europeans, were also associated in Mestizos. Using linear regression we predict an average increase of 2.34 risk alleles when comparing a lupus patient with 100% Amerindian ancestry to an SLE patient with 0% American Indian Ancestry (p<0.0001). SLE patients with 43% more Amerindian ancestry are predicted to carry one additional risk allele. Conclusion Amerindian ancestry increased the number of risk alleles for lupus. PMID:20848568

  3. Blood group genotyping in a population of highly diverse ancestry.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, J; Castilho, L; Rios, M; De Souza, C A

    2001-01-01

    Accurate phenotyping of red blood cells (RBCs) can be difficult in transfusion-dependent patients such as those with thalassemia and sickle cell anemia because of the presence of previously transfused RBCs in the patient's circulation. Recently, the molecular basis associated with the expression of many blood group antigens was established. This allowed the development of a plethora of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based tests for identification of the blood group antigens by testing DNA. The new technologies complement phenotyping and overcome some of the limitations of hemagglutination assays. These molecular assays were developed on the basis of DNA sequences of individuals of Caucasian ancestry. The present study addresses the concern that these genotyping assays may not be applicable to populations of highly diverse ancestry because of variability in intronic regions or because of unrecognized alleles. We determined both phenotype and genotype for RH D, K 1/K 2, JK A/JK B, FY A/ FY B-GATA in 250 normal blood donors using PCR. Phenotype and genotype results agreed in 100% of the cases, indicating that molecular genotyping protocols can be effectively applied to populations with a highly diverse genetic background. However, genotyping for Duffy antigens provided information that could not be obtained by phenotyping. Essentially, 30.5 % of the donors with the FY B gene typed as Fy(b-) because of mutations in the GATA box. This information is very useful for the management of transfusion dependent patients. PMID:11170227

  4. Education of Non-European Ancestry Immigrant Students in Suburban High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shodavaram, Mary P.; Jones, Lisa A.; Weaver, Laurie R.; Marquez, Judith A.; Ensle, Anne L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine suburban high school teachers' beliefs about non-European ancestry immigrant students; more specifically, suburban teachers' beliefs regarding the impact of students' cultural backgrounds on academic performance were examined. Non-European ancestry immigrant students are those students whose ancestral…

  5. Skin pigmentation, biogeographical ancestry and admixture mapping.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Mark D; Parra, Esteban J; Dios, Sonia; Bonilla, Carolina; Norton, Heather; Jovel, Celina; Pfaff, Carrie; Jones, Cecily; Massac, Aisha; Cameron, Neil; Baron, Archie; Jackson, Tabitha; Argyropoulos, George; Jin, Li; Hoggart, Clive J; McKeigue, Paul M; Kittles, Rick A

    2003-04-01

    Ancestry informative markers (AIMs) are genetic loci showing alleles with large frequency differences between populations. AIMs can be used to estimate biogeographical ancestry at the level of the population, subgroup (e.g. cases and controls) and individual. Ancestry estimates at both the subgroup and individual level can be directly instructive regarding the genetics of the phenotypes that differ qualitatively or in frequency between populations. These estimates can provide a compelling foundation for the use of admixture mapping (AM) methods to identify the genes underlying these traits. We present details of a panel of 34 AIMs and demonstrate how such studies can proceed, by using skin pigmentation as a model phenotype. We have genotyped these markers in two population samples with primarily African ancestry, viz. African Americans from Washington D.C. and an African Caribbean sample from Britain, and in a sample of European Americans from Pennsylvania. In the two African population samples, we observed significant correlations between estimates of individual ancestry and skin pigmentation as measured by reflectometry (R(2)=0.21, P<0.0001 for the African-American sample and R(2)=0.16, P<0.0001 for the British African-Caribbean sample). These correlations confirm the validity of the ancestry estimates and also indicate the high level of population structure related to admixture, a level that characterizes these populations and that is detectable by using other tests to identify genetic structure. We have also applied two methods of admixture mapping to test for the effects of three candidate genes (TYR, OCA2, MC1R) on pigmentation. We show that TYR and OCA2 have measurable effects on skin pigmentation differences between the west African and west European parental populations. This work indicates that it is possible to estimate the individual ancestry of a person based on DNA analysis with a reasonable number of well-defined genetic markers. The implications and

  6. Correlates of Bone Mineral Density among Postmenopausal Women of African Caribbean Ancestry: Tobago Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Deanna D.; Cauley, Jane A.; Bunker, Clareann H.; Baker, Carol E.; Patrick, Alan L.; Beckles, Gloria L. A.; Wheeler, Victor W.; Zmuda, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    Population dynamics predict a drastic growth in the number of older minority women, and resultant increases in the number of fractures. Low bone mineral density (BMD) is an important risk factor for fracture. Many studies have identified the lifestyle and health related factors that correlate with BMD in Whites. Few studies have focused on non-Whites. The objective of the current analyses is to examine the lifestyle, anthropometric and health related factors that are correlated with BMD in a population based cohort of Caribbean women of West African ancestry. We enrolled 340 postmenopausal women residing on the Caribbean Island of Tobago. Participants completed a questionnaire and had anthropometric measures taken. Hip BMD was measured by DXA. We estimated volumetric BMD by calculating bone mineral apparent density (BMAD). BMD was 10% and 20% higher across all age groups in Tobagonian women compared to US non-Hispanic Black and White women, respectively. In multiple linear regression models, 35–36% of the variability in femoral neck and total hip BMD respectively was predicted. Each 16 kilogram (one standard deviation (SD)) increase in weight was associated with 7% higher BMD; and weight explained over 10% of the variability of BMD. Each eight year (1 SD) increase in age was associated with 6% lower BMD. Current use of both thiazide diuretics and oral hypoglycemic medication were associated with 4–5% higher BMD. For femoral neck BMAD, 26% of the variability was explained by a multiple linear regression model. Current statin use was associated with 5% higher BMAD and a history of breast feeding or coronary heart disease were associated with 1–1.5% of higher BMAD. In conclusion, African Caribbean women have the highest BMD on a population level reported to date for women. This may reflect low European admixture. Correlates of BMD among Caribbean women of West African ancestry were similar to those reported for U.S. Black and White women. PMID:18448413

  7. African ancestry protects against Alzheimer's disease-related neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, D; Grinberg, L T; Alba, J G; Naslavsky, M S; Licinio, L; Farfel, J M; Suemoto, C K; de Lucena Ferretti, R E; Leite, R E P; de Andrade, M P; dos Santos, A C F; Brentani, H; Pasqualucci, C A; Nitrini, R; Jacob-Filho, W; Zatz, M

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in dementia epidemiology have reported higher Alzheimer's disease rates in African-Americans when compared with White Americans. To determine whether genetically determined African ancestry is associated with neuropathological changes commonly associated with dementia, we analyzed a population-based brain bank in the highly admixed city of São Paulo, Brazil. African ancestry was estimated through the use of previously described ancestry-informative markers. Risk of presence of neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, small vessel disease, brain infarcts and Lewy bodies in subjects with significant African ancestry versus those without was determined. Results were adjusted for multiple environmental risk factors, demographic variables and apolipoprotein E genotype. African ancestry was inversely correlated with neuritic plaques (P=0.03). Subjects with significant African ancestry (n=112, 55.4%) showed lower prevalence of neuritic plaques in the univariate analysis (odds ratio (OR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55–0.95, P=0.01) and when adjusted for age, sex, APOE genotype and environmental risk factors (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21–0.89, P=0.02). There were no significant differences for the presence of other neuropathological alterations. We show for the first time, using genetically determined ancestry, that African ancestry may be highly protective of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, functioning through either genetic variants or unknown environmental factors. Epidemiological studies correlating African-American race/ethnicity with increased Alzheimer's disease rates should not be interpreted as surrogates of genetic ancestry or considered to represent African-derived populations from the developing nations such as Brazil. PMID:22064377

  8. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D.; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with <20% Native American ancestry were 2.5 times more likely to be severely obese compared to those with >80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies. PMID:26501420

  9. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with <20% Native American ancestry were 2.5 times more likely to be severely obese compared to those with >80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies. PMID:26501420

  10. Surname‐Inferred andean ancestry is associated with child stature and limb lengths at high altitude in Peru, but not at sea level

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jonathan C.K.; Stanojevic, Sanja; Miranda, J. Jaime; Moore, Lorna G.; Cole, Tim J.; Stock, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Native Andean ancestry gives partial protection from reduced birthweight at high altitude in the Andes compared with European ancestry. Whether Andean ancestry is also associated with body proportions and greater postnatal body size at altitude is unknown. Therefore, we tested whether a greater proportion of Andean ancestry is associated with stature and body proportions among Peruvian children at high and low altitude. Methods Height, head circumference, head‐trunk height, upper and lower limb lengths, and tibia, ulna, hand and foot lengths, were measured in 133 highland and 169 lowland children aged 6 months to 8.5 years. For highland and lowland groups separately, age‐sex‐adjusted anthropometry z scores were regressed on the number of indigenous parental surnames as a proxy for Andean ancestry, adjusting for potential confounders (maternal age and education, parity, altitude [highlands only]). Results Among highland children, greater Andean ancestry was negatively associated with stature and tibia, ulna, and lower limb lengths, independent of negative associations with greater altitude for these measurements. Relationships were strongest for tibia length: each additional Andean surname or 1,000 m increase at altitude among highland children was associated with 0.18 and 0.65 z score decreases in tibia length, respectively. Anthropometry was not significantly associated with ancestry among lowland children. Conclusions Greater Andean ancestry is associated with shorter stature and limb measurements at high but not low altitude. Gene‐environment interactions between high altitude and Andean ancestry may exacerbate the trade‐off between chest dimensions and stature that was proposed previously, though we could not test this directly. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 27:798–806, 2015. © 2015 The Authors American Journal of Human Biology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25960137

  11. Denisovan Ancestry in East Eurasian and Native American Populations.

    PubMed

    Qin, Pengfei; Stoneking, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Although initial studies suggested that Denisovan ancestry was found only in modern human populations from island Southeast Asia and Oceania, more recent studies have suggested that Denisovan ancestry may be more widespread. However, the geographic extent of Denisovan ancestry has not been determined, and moreover the relationship between the Denisovan ancestry in Oceania and that elsewhere has not been studied. Here we analyze genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism data from 2,493 individuals from 221 worldwide populations, and show that there is a widespread signal of a very low level of Denisovan ancestry across Eastern Eurasian and Native American (EE/NA) populations. We also verify a higher level of Denisovan ancestry in Oceania than that in EE/NA; the Denisovan ancestry in Oceania is correlated with the amount of New Guinea ancestry, but not the amount of Australian ancestry, indicating that recent gene flow from New Guinea likely accounts for signals of Denisovan ancestry across Oceania. However, Denisovan ancestry in EE/NA populations is equally correlated with their New Guinea or their Australian ancestry, suggesting a common source for the Denisovan ancestry in EE/NA and Oceanian populations. Our results suggest that Denisovan ancestry in EE/NA is derived either from common ancestry with, or gene flow from, the common ancestor of New Guineans and Australians, indicating a more complex history involving East Eurasians and Oceanians than previously suspected. PMID:26104010

  12. High interpopulation homogeneity in Central Argentina as assessed by Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs)

    PubMed Central

    García, Angelina; Dermarchi, Darío A.; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Pauro, Maia; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia M.; Salzano, Francisco M.; Hutz, Mara H.

    2015-01-01

    The population of Argentina has already been studied with regard to several genetic markers, but much more data are needed for the appropriate definition of its genetic profile. This study aimed at investigating the admixture patterns and genetic structure in Central Argentina, using biparental markers and comparing the results with those previously obtained by us with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the same samples. A total of 521 healthy unrelated individuals living in 13 villages of the Córdoba and San Luis provinces were tested. The individuals were genotyped for ten autosomal ancestry informative markers (AIMs). Allele frequencies were compared with those of African, European and Native American populations, chosen to represent parental contributions. The AIM estimates indicated a greater influence of the Native American ancestry as compared to previous studies in the same or other Argentinean regions, but smaller than that observed with the mtDNA tests. These differences can be explained, respectively, by different genetic contributions between rural and urban areas, and asymmetric gene flow occurred in the past. But a most unexpected finding was the marked interpopulation genetic homogeneity found in villages located in diverse geographic environments across a wide territory, suggesting considerable gene flow. PMID:26500436

  13. High-altitude ancestry and hypoxia acclimation have distinct effects on exercise capacity and muscle phenotype in deer mice.

    PubMed

    Lui, Mikaela A; Mahalingam, Sajeni; Patel, Paras; Connaty, Alex D; Ivy, Catherine M; Cheviron, Zachary A; Storz, Jay F; McClelland, Grant B; Scott, Graham R

    2015-05-01

    The hypoxic and cold environment at high altitudes requires that small mammals sustain high rates of O2 transport for exercise and thermogenesis while facing a diminished O2 availability. We used laboratory-born and -raised deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) from highland and lowland populations to determine the interactive effects of ancestry and hypoxia acclimation on exercise performance. Maximal O₂consumption (V̇o(2max)) during exercise in hypoxia increased after hypoxia acclimation (equivalent to the hypoxia at ∼4,300 m elevation for 6-8 wk) and was consistently greater in highlanders than in lowlanders. V̇o(2max) during exercise in normoxia was not affected by ancestry or acclimation. Highlanders also had consistently greater capillarity, oxidative fiber density, and maximal activities of oxidative enzymes (cytochrome c oxidase and citrate synthase) in the gastrocnemius muscle, lower lactate dehydrogenase activity in the gastrocnemius, and greater cytochrome c oxidase activity in the diaphragm. Hypoxia acclimation did not affect any of these muscle traits. The unique gastrocnemius phenotype of highlanders was associated with higher mRNA and protein abundances of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA) transcript abundance was lower in highlanders, and hypoxia acclimation reduced the expression of numerous genes that regulate angiogenesis and energy metabolism, in contrast to the observed population differences in muscle phenotype. Lowlanders exhibited greater increases in blood hemoglobin content, hematocrit, and wet lung mass (but not dry lung mass) than highlanders after hypoxia acclimation. Genotypic adaptation to high altitude, therefore, improves exercise performance in hypoxia by mechanisms that are at least partially distinct from those underlying hypoxia acclimation. PMID:25695288

  14. High-altitude ancestry and hypoxia acclimation have distinct effects on exercise capacity and muscle phenotype in deer mice

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Mikaela A.; Mahalingam, Sajeni; Patel, Paras; Connaty, Alex D.; Ivy, Catherine M.; Cheviron, Zachary A.; Storz, Jay F.; McClelland, Grant B.

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxic and cold environment at high altitudes requires that small mammals sustain high rates of O2 transport for exercise and thermogenesis while facing a diminished O2 availability. We used laboratory-born and -raised deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) from highland and lowland populations to determine the interactive effects of ancestry and hypoxia acclimation on exercise performance. Maximal O2 consumption (V̇o2max) during exercise in hypoxia increased after hypoxia acclimation (equivalent to the hypoxia at ∼4,300 m elevation for 6–8 wk) and was consistently greater in highlanders than in lowlanders. V̇o2max during exercise in normoxia was not affected by ancestry or acclimation. Highlanders also had consistently greater capillarity, oxidative fiber density, and maximal activities of oxidative enzymes (cytochrome c oxidase and citrate synthase) in the gastrocnemius muscle, lower lactate dehydrogenase activity in the gastrocnemius, and greater cytochrome c oxidase activity in the diaphragm. Hypoxia acclimation did not affect any of these muscle traits. The unique gastrocnemius phenotype of highlanders was associated with higher mRNA and protein abundances of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA) transcript abundance was lower in highlanders, and hypoxia acclimation reduced the expression of numerous genes that regulate angiogenesis and energy metabolism, in contrast to the observed population differences in muscle phenotype. Lowlanders exhibited greater increases in blood hemoglobin content, hematocrit, and wet lung mass (but not dry lung mass) than highlanders after hypoxia acclimation. Genotypic adaptation to high altitude, therefore, improves exercise performance in hypoxia by mechanisms that are at least partially distinct from those underlying hypoxia acclimation. PMID:25695288

  15. Genetic identification of Theobroma cacao L. trees with high Criollo ancestry in Soconusco, Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Ovando, J A; Molina-Freaner, F; Nuñez-Farfán, J; Ovando-Medina, I; Salvador-Figueroa, M

    2014-01-01

    Criollo-type cacao trees are an important pool of genes with potential to be used in cacao breeding and selection programs. For that reason, we assessed the diversity and population structure of Criollo-type trees (108 cultivars with Criollo phenotypic characteristics and 10 Criollo references) using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Cultivars were selected from 7 demes in the Soconusco region of southern Mexico. SSRs amplified 74 alleles with an average of 3.6 alleles per population. The overall populations showed an average observed heterozygosity of 0.28, indicating heterozygote deficiency (average fixation index F = 0.50). However, moderate allelic diversity was found within populations (Shannon index for all populations I = 0.97). Bayesian method analysis determined 2 genetic clusters (K = 2) within individuals. In concordance, an assignment test grouped 37 multilocus genotypes (including 10 references) into a first cluster (Criollo), 54 into a second (presumably Amelonado), and 27 admixed individuals unassigned at the 90% threshold likely corresponding to the Trinitario genotype. This classification was supported by the principal coordinate analysis and analysis of molecular variance, which showed 12% of variation among populations (FST = 0.123, P < 0.0001). Sampled demes sites (1- 7) in the Soconusco region did not show any evidence of clustering by geographic location, and this was supported by the Mantel test (Rxy = 0.54, P = 0.120). Individuals with high Criollo lineage planted in Soconusco farms could be an important reservoir of genes for future breeding programs searching for fine, taste, flavor, and aroma cocoa. PMID:25511024

  16. A minimum set of ancestry informative markers for determining admixture proportions in a mixed American population: the Brazilian set.

    PubMed

    Santos, Hadassa C; Horimoto, Andréa V R; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; Rodrigues-Soares, Fernanda; Barreto, Mauricio L; Horta, Bernardo L; Lima-Costa, Maria F; Gouveia, Mateus H; Machado, Moara; Silva, Thiago M; Sanches, José M; Esteban, Nubia; Magalhaes, Wagner C S; Rodrigues, Maíra R; Kehdy, Fernanda S G; Pereira, Alexandre C

    2016-05-01

    The Brazilian population is considered to be highly admixed. The main contributing ancestral populations were European and African, with Amerindians contributing to a lesser extent. The aims of this study were to provide a resource for determining and quantifying individual continental ancestry using the smallest number of SNPs possible, thus allowing for a cost- and time-efficient strategy for genomic ancestry determination. We identified and validated a minimum set of 192 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) for the genetic ancestry determination of Brazilian populations. These markers were selected on the basis of their distribution throughout the human genome, and their capacity of being genotyped on widely available commercial platforms. We analyzed genotyping data from 6487 individuals belonging to three Brazilian cohorts. Estimates of individual admixture using this 192 AIM panels were highly correlated with estimates using ~370 000 genome-wide SNPs: 91%, 92%, and 74% of, respectively, African, European, and Native American ancestry components. Besides that, 192 AIMs are well distributed among populations from these ancestral continents, allowing greater freedom in future studies with this panel regarding the choice of reference populations. We also observed that genetic ancestry inferred by AIMs provides similar association results to the one obtained using ancestry inferred by genomic data (370 K SNPs) in a simple regression model with rs1426654, related to skin pigmentation, genotypes as dependent variable. In conclusion, these markers can be used to identify and accurately quantify ancestry of Latin Americans or US Hispanics/Latino individuals, in particular in the context of fine-mapping strategies that require the quantification of continental ancestry in thousands of individuals. PMID:26395555

  17. High-resolution correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. J.

    2007-09-01

    In the basic correlation process a sequence of time-lag-indexed correlation coefficients are computed as the inner or dot product of segments of two signals. The time-lag(s) for which the magnitude of the correlation coefficient sequence is maximized is the estimated relative time delay of the two signals. For discrete sampled signals, the delay estimated in this manner is quantized with the same relative accuracy as the clock used in sampling the signals. In addition, the correlation coefficients are real if the input signals are real. There have been many methods proposed to estimate signal delay to more accuracy than the sample interval of the digitizer clock, with some success. These methods include interpolation of the correlation coefficients, estimation of the signal delay from the group delay function, and beam forming techniques, such as the MUSIC algorithm. For spectral estimation, techniques based on phase differentiation have been popular, but these techniques have apparently not been applied to the correlation problem . We propose a phase based delay estimation method (PBDEM) based on the phase of the correlation function that provides a significant improvement of the accuracy of time delay estimation. In the process, the standard correlation function is first calculated. A time lag error function is then calculated from the correlation phase and is used to interpolate the correlation function. The signal delay is shown to be accurately estimated as the zero crossing of the correlation phase near the index of the peak correlation magnitude. This process is nearly as fast as the conventional correlation function on which it is based. For real valued signals, a simple modification is provided, which results in the same correlation accuracy as is obtained for complex valued signals.

  18. Amerind ancestry, socioeconomic status and the genetics of type 2 diabetes in a Colombian population.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Desmond D; Parra, Maria V; Duque, Constanza; Gallego, Natalia; Franco, Liliana; Tandon, Arti; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Cátira; Villegas, Alberto; Bedoya, Gabriel; McCarthy, Mark I; Price, Alkes; Reich, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    The "thrifty genotype" hypothesis proposes that the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Native Americans and admixed Latin Americans has a genetic basis and reflects an evolutionary adaptation to a past low calorie/high exercise lifestyle. However, identification of the gene variants underpinning this hypothesis remains elusive. Here we assessed the role of Native American ancestry, socioeconomic status (SES) and 21 candidate gene loci in susceptibility to T2D in a sample of 876 T2D cases and 399 controls from Antioquia (Colombia). Although mean Native American ancestry is significantly higher in T2D cases than in controls (32% v 29%), this difference is confounded by the correlation of ancestry with SES, which is a stronger predictor of disease status. Nominally significant association (P<0.05) was observed for markers in: TCF7L2, RBMS1, CDKAL1, ZNF239, KCNQ1 and TCF1 and a significant bias (P<0.05) towards OR>1 was observed for markers selected from previous T2D genome-wide association studies, consistent with a role for Old World variants in susceptibility to T2D in Latin Americans. No association was found to the only known Native American-specific gene variant previously associated with T2D in a Mexican sample (rs9282541 in ABCA1). An admixture mapping scan with 1,536 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) did not identify genome regions with significant deviation of ancestry in Antioquia. Exclusion analysis indicates that this scan rules out ~95% of the genome as harboring loci with ancestry risk ratios >1.22 (at P < 0.05). PMID:22529894

  19. Amerind Ancestry, Socioeconomic Status and the Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes in a Colombian Population

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Desmond D.; Parra, Maria V.; Duque, Constanza; Gallego, Natalia; Franco, Liliana; Tandon, Arti; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Cátira; Villegas, Alberto; Bedoya, Gabriel; McCarthy, Mark I.; Price, Alkes; Reich, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    The “thrifty genotype” hypothesis proposes that the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Native Americans and admixed Latin Americans has a genetic basis and reflects an evolutionary adaptation to a past low calorie/high exercise lifestyle. However, identification of the gene variants underpinning this hypothesis remains elusive. Here we assessed the role of Native American ancestry, socioeconomic status (SES) and 21 candidate gene loci in susceptibility to T2D in a sample of 876 T2D cases and 399 controls from Antioquia (Colombia). Although mean Native American ancestry is significantly higher in T2D cases than in controls (32% v 29%), this difference is confounded by the correlation of ancestry with SES, which is a stronger predictor of disease status. Nominally significant association (P<0.05) was observed for markers in: TCF7L2, RBMS1, CDKAL1, ZNF239, KCNQ1 and TCF1 and a significant bias (P<0.05) towards OR>1 was observed for markers selected from previous T2D genome-wide association studies, consistent with a role for Old World variants in susceptibility to T2D in Latin Americans. No association was found to the only known Native American-specific gene variant previously associated with T2D in a Mexican sample (rs9282541 in ABCA1). An admixture mapping scan with 1,536 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) did not identify genome regions with significant deviation of ancestry in Antioquia. Exclusion analysis indicates that this scan rules out ∼95% of the genome as harboring loci with ancestry risk ratios >1.22 (at P < 0.05). PMID:22529894

  20. African Ancestry Is Associated with Asthma Risk in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Yanes, María; Wade, Michael S.; Pérez-Méndez, Lina; Kittles, Rick A.; Wang, Deli; Papaiahgari, Srinivas; Ford, Jean G.; Kumar, Rajesh; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma is a common complex condition with clear racial and ethnic differences in both prevalence and severity. Asthma consultation rates, mortality, and severe symptoms are greatly increased in African descent populations of developed countries. African ancestry has been associated with asthma, total serum IgE and lower pulmonary function in African-admixed populations. To replicate previous findings, here we aimed to examine whether African ancestry was associated with asthma susceptibility in African Americans. In addition, we examined for the first time whether African ancestry was associated with asthma exacerbations. Methodology/Principal Findings After filtering for self-reported ancestry and genotype data quality, samples from 1,117 self-reported African-American individuals from New York and Baltimore (394 cases, 481 controls), and Chicago (321 cases followed for asthma exacerbations) were analyzed. Genetic ancestry was estimated based on ancestry informative markers (AIMs) selected for being highly divergent among European and West African populations (95 AIMs for New York and Baltimore, and 66 independent AIMs for Chicago). Among case-control samples, the mean African ancestry was significantly higher in asthmatics than in non-asthmatics (82.0±14.0% vs. 77.8±18.1%, mean difference 4.2% [95% confidence interval (CI):2.0–6.4], p<0.0001). This association remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders (odds ratio: 4.55, 95% CI: 1.69–12.29, p = 0.003). African ancestry failed to show an association with asthma exacerbations (p = 0.965) using a model based on longitudinal data of the number of exacerbations followed over 1.5 years. Conclusions/Significance These data replicate previous findings indicating that African ancestry constitutes a risk factor for asthma and suggest that elevated asthma rates in African Americans can be partially attributed to African genetic ancestry. PMID:22235241

  1. Genomic ancestry evaluated by ancestry-informative markers in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, A F; Oliveira, J S; Silva Junior, J C; Barbosa, A A L

    2016-01-01

    The β(s) mutation is responsible for the most aggressive form of sickle cell disease, has a predominantly African origin, and arrived in Brazil through the slave trade. However, the Brazilian population is highly miscegenated, underscoring the importance of ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) for the identification of the genetic structure of a population. In this study, we have estimated the genetic contributions of various ethnicities in individuals with sickle cell disease in the microregion of Jequié, Bahia, in Brazil, by using AIMs, and compared the findings to those from a phenotypic characterization. Eight AIMs were analyzed: AT3 (rs3138521), DRD2 (rs1079598), APO (rs3138522), PV92, Sb19.3 (rs3138524), CKM (rs4884), LPL (rs285), and CCR5Δ32 (rs333). Samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The amplified products were electrophoresed on agarose gels, and the data were statistically analyzed using Genepop, FSTAT 2.9, and Admix3. Phenotypic classification showed a high frequency of mulattos  (85%) in the Brazilian population; however, ancestry-informative markers indicated that 44, 42, and 11% of the population had European, African, and native American ancestries, respectively. The phenotypic classification is justified as a complementary method for the characterization of the genetic ancestry in patients with sickle cell disease, as it confirms the molecular findings regarding ancestry. PMID:27051031

  2. Exploring iris colour prediction and ancestry inference in admixed populations of South America.

    PubMed

    Freire-Aradas, A; Ruiz, Y; Phillips, C; Maroñas, O; Söchtig, J; Tato, A Gómez; Dios, J Álvarez; de Cal, M Casares; Silbiger, V N; Luchessi, A D; Luchessi, A D; Chiurillo, M A; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V

    2014-11-01

    New DNA-based predictive tests for physical characteristics and inference of ancestry are highly informative tools that are being increasingly used in forensic genetic analysis. Two eye colour prediction models: a Bayesian classifier - Snipper and a multinomial logistic regression (MLR) system for the Irisplex assay, have been described for the analysis of unadmixed European populations. Since multiple SNPs in combination contribute in varying degrees to eye colour predictability in Europeans, it is likely that these predictive tests will perform in different ways amongst admixed populations that have European co-ancestry, compared to unadmixed Europeans. In this study we examined 99 individuals from two admixed South American populations comparing eye colour versus ancestry in order to reveal a direct correlation of light eye colour phenotypes with European co-ancestry in admixed individuals. Additionally, eye colour prediction following six prediction models, using varying numbers of SNPs and based on Snipper and MLR, were applied to the study populations. Furthermore, patterns of eye colour prediction have been inferred for a set of publicly available admixed and globally distributed populations from the HGDP-CEPH panel and 1000 Genomes databases with a special emphasis on admixed American populations similar to those of the study samples. PMID:25051225

  3. Genetic ancestries in northwest Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Black, M L; Dufall, K; Wise, C; Sullivan, S; Bittles, A H

    2006-01-01

    A survey of the genetic ancestry of 125 Cambodian children resident in Siem Reap province was undertaken, based on eight Y-chromosome binary polymorphisms and sequencing of the mtDNA HV1 region. The data indicated a largely East Asian paternal ancestry and a local Southeast Asian maternal ancestry. The presence of Y-chromosomes P* and R1al* was suggestive of a small but significant Indo-European male ancestral component, which probably reflects the history of Indian, and later European, influences on Cambodia. PMID:17381059

  4. The common ancestry of life

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is common belief that all cellular life forms on earth have a common origin. This view is supported by the universality of the genetic code and the universal conservation of multiple genes, particularly those that encode key components of the translation system. A remarkable recent study claims to provide a formal, homology independent test of the Universal Common Ancestry hypothesis by comparing the ability of a common-ancestry model and a multiple-ancestry model to predict sequences of universally conserved proteins. Results We devised a computational experiment on a concatenated alignment of universally conserved proteins which shows that the purported demonstration of the universal common ancestry is a trivial consequence of significant sequence similarity between the analyzed proteins. The nature and origin of this similarity are irrelevant for the prediction of "common ancestry" of by the model-comparison approach. Thus, homology (common origin) of the compared proteins remains an inference from sequence similarity rather than an independent property demonstrated by the likelihood analysis. Conclusion A formal demonstration of the Universal Common Ancestry hypothesis has not been achieved and is unlikely to be feasible in principle. Nevertheless, the evidence in support of this hypothesis provided by comparative genomics is overwhelming. Reviewers this article was reviewed by William Martin, Ivan Iossifov (nominated by Andrey Rzhetsky) and Arcady Mushegian. For the complete reviews, see the Reviewers' Report section. PMID:21087490

  5. Biogeographical ancestry and race.

    PubMed

    Gannett, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    The use of racial and ethnic categories in biological and biomedical research is controversial-for example, in the comparison of disease risk in different groups or as a means of making use of or controlling for population structure in the mapping of genes to chromosomes. Biogeographical ancestry (BGA) has been recommended as a more accurate and appropriate category. BGA is a product of the collaboration between biological anthropologist Mark Shriver from Pennsylvania State University and molecular biologist Tony Frudakis from the now-defunct biotechnology start-up company DNAPrint genomics, Inc. Shriver and Frudakis portray BGA as a measure of the 'biological', 'genetic', 'natural', and 'objective' components of race and ethnicity, what philosophers of science would call a natural kind. This paper argues that BGA is not a natural kind that escapes social and political connotations of race and ethnicity, as Shriver and Frudakis and other proponents believe, but a construction that is built upon race-as race has been socially constructed in the European scientific and philosophical traditions. More specifically, BGA is not a global category of biological and anthropological classification but a local category shaped by the U.S. context of its production, especially the forensic aim of being able to predict the race or ethnicity of an unknown suspect based on DNA found at the crime scene. Therefore, caution needs to be exercised in the embrace of BGA as an alternative to the use of racial and ethnic categories in biological and biomedical research. PMID:24989973

  6. Discerning the Ancestry of European Americans in Genetic Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Price, Alkes L; Butler, Johannah; Patterson, Nick; Capelli, Cristian; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Scarnicci, Francesca; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Groop, Leif; Saetta, Angelica A; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Seligsohn, Uri; Waliszewska, Alicja; Schirmer, Christine; Ardlie, Kristin; Ramos, Alexis; Nemesh, James; Arbeitman, Lori; Goldstein, David B

    2008-01-01

    European Americans are often treated as a homogeneous group, but in fact form a structured population due to historical immigration of diverse source populations. Discerning the ancestry of European Americans genotyped in association studies is important in order to prevent false-positive or false-negative associations due to population stratification and to identify genetic variants whose contribution to disease risk differs across European ancestries. Here, we investigate empirical patterns of population structure in European Americans, analyzing 4,198 samples from four genome-wide association studies to show that components roughly corresponding to northwest European, southeast European, and Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry are the main sources of European American population structure. Building on this insight, we constructed a panel of 300 validated markers that are highly informative for distinguishing these ancestries. We demonstrate that this panel of markers can be used to correct for stratification in association studies that do not generate dense genotype data. PMID:18208327

  7. What Ancestry Can Tell Us About the Genetic Origins of Inter-Ethnic Differences in Asthma Expression.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Pacheco, Natalia; Flores, Carlos; Oh, Sam S; Burchard, Esteban G; Pino-Yanes, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Differences in asthma prevalence have been described across different populations, suggesting that genetic ancestry can play an important role in this disease. In fact, several studies have demonstrated an association between African ancestry with increased asthma susceptibility and severity, higher immunoglobulin E levels, and lower lung function. In contrast, Native American ancestry has been shown to have a protective role for this disease. Genome-wide association studies have allowed the identification of population-specific genetic variants with varying allele frequency among populations. Additionally, the correlation of genetic ancestry at the chromosomal level with asthma and related traits by means of admixture mapping has revealed regions of the genome where ancestry is correlated with the disease. In this review, we discuss the evidence supporting the association of genetic ancestry with asthma susceptibility and asthma-related traits, and highlight the regions of the genome harboring ancestry-specific genetic risk factors. PMID:27393700

  8. Ancestry, Temporality, and Potentiality

    PubMed Central

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I examine the variety of ways potential is articulated, entailed, and produced in how the field of cancer genetics is being constituted as a domain of transnational research and an emerging site of health-care intervention in southern Brazil. Drawing on analysis of fieldwork in Brazilian cancer-genetics clinics, I explore how different expressions of potential come to inform dynamically the pursuit of prevention, care, and research as diversely scaled investments for those working and living with cancer-genetics knowledge and technologies. It illustrates how specific temporalities help to constitute and “abductively” frame the meaning of these different potentials particularly as this relates to a focus on ancestry. Colonial histories of migration, the embodied effects of dietary habits, or the moral failings of near and distant ancestors as well as promissory futures and the contingency of lived lives become at different times templates for identifying, materializing, and transforming how the potential of cancer genetics in Brazil is articulated. Potential is also expressed through an idiom of “choice” in different efforts to situate participation in cancer-genetics research as prevention or to negotiate access to basic public health. I explore how these expressions of cancer genetics as potential powerfully yet unevenly work to sustain knowledge practices as well as propel patients and their families into fledgling domains of clinical practice and scientific research. At the same time there is always an “excess of meaning” in these endeavors that make visible lines of fracture and disjuncture in collective efforts to make future histories of and from the pursuit of cancer genetics in southern Brazil. PMID:25018561

  9. Comparison of genome-wide variation between Malawians and African ancestry HapMap populations.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Bonnie R; North, Kari E; Wang, Yunfei; Mwapasa, Victor; Franceschini, Nora; Meshnick, Steven R; Lange, Ethan M

    2010-06-01

    Understanding genetic variation between populations is important because it affects the portability of human genome-wide analytical methods. We compared genetic variation and substructure between Malawians and other African and non-African HapMap populations. Allele frequencies and adjacent linkage disequilibrium (LD) were measured for 617 715 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across subject genomes. Allele frequencies in the Malawian population (N=226) were highly correlated with allele frequencies in HapMap populations of African ancestry (AFA, N=376), namely Yoruban in Ibadan, Nigeria (Spearman's r(2)=0.97), Luhya in Webuye, Kenya (r(2)=0.97), African Americans in the southwest United States (r(2)=0.94) and Maasai in Kinyawa, Kenya (r(2)=0.91). This correlation was much lower between Malawians and other ancestry populations (r(2)<0.52). LD correlations between Malawians and HapMap populations were strongest for the populations of AFA (AFA r(2)>0.82, other ancestries r(2)<0.57). Principal components analyses revealed little population substructure within our Malawi sample but provided clear distinction between Malawians, AFA populations and two European populations. Five SNPs within the lactase gene (LCT) had substantially different allele frequencies between the Malawi population and Maasai in Kenyawa, Kenya (rs3769013, rs730005, rs3769012, rs2304370; P-values <1 x 10(-33)). PMID:20485449

  10. Pairing Correlations at High Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Ping; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Petrache, C. M.; Ragnarsson, I.; Carlsson, B. G.

    The pairing correcting energies at high spins in 161Lu and 138Nd are studied by comparing the results of the cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) and cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov (CNSB) models. It is concluded that the Coriolis effect rather than the rotational alignment effect plays a major role in the reduction of the pairing correlations in the high spin region. Then we proposed an average pairing correction method which not only better reproduces the experimental data comparing with the CNS model but also enables a clean-cut tracing of the configurations thus the full-spin-range discussion on the various rotating bands.

  11. Copy number variation signature to predict human ancestry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Copy number variations (CNVs) are genomic structural variants that are found in healthy populations and have been observed to be associated with disease susceptibility. Existing methods for CNV detection are often performed on a sample-by-sample basis, which is not ideal for large datasets where common CNVs must be estimated by comparing the frequency of CNVs in the individual samples. Here we describe a simple and novel approach to locate genome-wide CNVs common to a specific population, using human ancestry as the phenotype. Results We utilized our previously published Genome Alteration Detection Analysis (GADA) algorithm to identify common ancestry CNVs (caCNVs) and built a caCNV model to predict population structure. We identified a 73 caCNV signature using a training set of 225 healthy individuals from European, Asian, and African ancestry. The signature was validated on an independent test set of 300 individuals with similar ancestral background. The error rate in predicting ancestry in this test set was 2% using the 73 caCNV signature. Among the caCNVs identified, several were previously confirmed experimentally to vary by ancestry. Our signature also contains a caCNV region with a single microRNA (MIR270), which represents the first reported variation of microRNA by ancestry. Conclusions We developed a new methodology to identify common CNVs and demonstrated its performance by building a caCNV signature to predict human ancestry with high accuracy. The utility of our approach could be extended to large case–control studies to identify CNV signatures for other phenotypes such as disease susceptibility and drug response. PMID:23270563

  12. Evidence for common ancestry among viruses isolated from wild birds in Beringia and highly pathogenic intercontinental reassortant H5N1 and H5N2 influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Andrew M; Reeves, Andrew B; TeSlaa, Joshua L; Nashold, Sean; Donnelly, Tyrone; Bahl, Justin; Hall, Jeffrey S

    2016-06-01

    Highly pathogenic clade 2.3.4.4 H5N8, H5N2, and H5N1 influenza A viruses were first detected in wild, captive, and domestic birds in North America in November-December 2014. In this study, we used wild waterbird samples collected in Alaska prior to the initial detection of clade 2.3.4.4 H5 influenza A viruses in North America to assess the evidence for: (1) dispersal of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses from East Asia to North America by migratory birds via Alaska and (2) ancestral origins of clade 2.3.4.4 H5 reassortant viruses in Beringia. Although we did not detect highly pathogenic influenza A viruses in our sample collection from western Alaska, we did identify viruses that contained gene segments sharing recent common ancestry with intercontinental reassortant H5N2 and H5N1 viruses. Results of phylogenetic analyses and estimates for times of most recent common ancestry support migratory birds sampled in Beringia as maintaining viral diversity closely related to novel highly pathogenic influenza A virus genotypes detected in North America. Although our results do not elucidate the route by which highly pathogenic influenza A viruses were introduced into North America, genetic evidence is consistent with the hypothesized trans-Beringian route of introduction via migratory birds. PMID:26944444

  13. Evidence for common ancestry among viruses isolated from wild birds in Beringia and highly pathogenic intercontinental reassortant H5N1 and H5N2 influenza A viruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew; Teslaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Donnelly, Tyrone F.; Bahl, Justin; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic clade 2.3.4.4 H5N8, H5N2, and H5N1 influenza A viruses were first detected in wild, captive, and domestic birds in North America in November–December 2014. In this study, we used wild waterbird samples collected in Alaska prior to the initial detection of clade 2.3.4.4 H5 influenza A viruses in North America to assess the evidence for: (1) dispersal of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses from East Asia to North America by migratory birds via Alaska and (2) ancestral origins of clade 2.3.4.4 H5 reassortant viruses in Beringia. Although we did not detect highly pathogenic influenza A viruses in our sample collection from western Alaska, we did identify viruses that contained gene segments sharing recent common ancestry with intercontinental reassortant H5N2 and H5N1 viruses. Results of phylogenetic analyses and estimates for times of most recent common ancestry support migratory birds sampled in Beringia as maintaining viral diversity closely related to novel highly pathogenic influenza A virus genotypes detected in North America. Although our results do not elucidate the route by which highly pathogenic influenza A viruses were introduced into North America, genetic evidence is consistent with the hypothesized trans-Beringian route of introduction via migratory birds.

  14. The landscape of Neandertal ancestry in present-day humans

    PubMed Central

    Sankararaman, Sriram; Mallick, Swapan; Dannemann, Michael; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of Neandertal genomes have revealed that Neandertals have contributed genetic variants to modern humans1–2. The antiquity of Neandertal gene flow into modern humans means that regions that derive from Neandertals in any one human today are usually less than a hundred kilobases in size. However, Neandertal haplotypes are also distinctive enough that several studies have been able to detect Neandertal ancestry at specific loci1,3–8. Here, we have systematically inferred Neandertal haplotypes in the genomes of 1,004 present-day humans12. Regions that harbor a high frequency of Neandertal alleles in modern humans are enriched for genes affecting keratin filaments suggesting that Neandertal alleles may have helped modern humans adapt to non-African environments. Neandertal alleles also continue to shape human biology, as we identify multiple Neandertal-derived alleles that confer risk for disease. We also identify regions of millions of base pairs that are nearly devoid of Neandertal ancestry and enriched in genes, implying selection to remove genetic material derived from Neandertals. Neandertal ancestry is significantly reduced in genes specifically expressed in testis, and there is an approximately 5-fold reduction of Neandertal ancestry on chromosome X, which is known to harbor a disproportionate fraction of male hybrid sterility genes20–22. These results suggest that part of the reduction in Neandertal ancestry near genes is due to Neandertal alleles that reduced fertility in males when moved to a modern human genetic background. PMID:24476815

  15. Ethnic characterization of a population of children exposed to high doses of arsenic via drinking water and a possible correlation with metabolic processes

    PubMed Central

    Bobillo, Cecilia; Navoni, Julio A; Olmos, Valentina; Merini, Luciano J; Villaamil Lepori, Edda; Corach, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Because the ratio between the two major arsenic metabolites is related to the adverse health effects of arsenic, numerous studies have been performed to establish a relationship between the ability to metabolically detoxify arsenic and other variables, including exposure level, gender, age and ethnicity. Because ethnicity may play a key role and provide relevant information for heterogeneous populations, we characterized a group of 70 children from rural schools in the Argentinean provinces of Chaco and Santiago del Estero who were exposed to high levels of arsenic. We used genetic markers for maternal, paternal and bi-parental ancestry to achieve this goal. Our results demonstrate that the Amerindian maternal linages are present in 100% of the samples, whereas the Amerindian component transmitted through the paternal line is less than 10%. Informative markers for autosomal ancestry show a predominantly European ancestry, in which 37% of the samples contained between 90 and 99% European ancestry. The native American component ranged from 50 to 80% in 15.7% of the samples, and in all but four samples, the African component was less than 10%. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the ethnicity and the ratio of the excreted arsenic metabolites monomethyl arsenic and dimethyl arsenic are not associated, dismissing a relationship between ethnic origin and differential metabolism. PMID:24596592

  16. Uniparental ancestry markers in Chilean populations.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Machado, Camilla Dutra; Tostes, Maluah; Alves, Gabrielle; Nazer, Julio; Martinez, Liliana; Wettig, Elisabeth; Pizarro Rivadeneira, Oscar; Diaz Caamaño, Marcela; Larenas Ascui, Jessica; Pavez, Pedro; Dutra, Maria da Graça; Castilla, Eduardo Enrique; Orioli, Ieda Maria

    2016-08-01

    The presence of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans has led to the development of a multi-ethnic, admixed population in Chile. This study aimed to contribute to the characterization of the uniparental genetic structure of three Chilean regions. Newborns from seven hospitals in Independencia, Providencia, Santiago, Curicó, Cauquenes, Valdívia, and Puerto Montt communes, belonging to the Chilean regions of Santiago, Maule, and Los Lagos, were studied. The presence of Native American mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups and two markers present in the non-recombinant region of the Y chromosome, DYS199 and DYS287, indicative of Native American and African ancestry, respectively, was determined. A high Native American matrilineal contribution and a low Native American and African patrilineal contributions were found in all three studied regions. As previously found in Chilean admixed populations, the Native American matrilineal contribution was lower in Santiago than in the other studied regions. However, there was an unexpectedly higher contribution of Native American ancestry in one of the studied communes in Santiago, probably due to the high rate of immigration from other regions of the country. The population genetic sub-structure we detected in Santiago using few uniparental markers requires further confirmation, owing to possible stratification for autosomal and X-chromosome markers. PMID:27494198

  17. HGDP and HapMap Analysis by Ancestry Mapper Reveals Local and Global Population Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Tiago R.; Casey, Jillian P.; Conroy, Judith; Regan, Regina; Fitzpatrick, Darren J.; Shah, Naisha; Sobral, João; Ennis, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of human origins, migrations, and expansions is greatly enhanced by the availability of large datasets of genetic information from different populations and by the development of bioinformatic tools used to analyze the data. We present Ancestry Mapper, which we believe improves on existing methods, for the assignment of genetic ancestry to an individual and to study the relationships between local and global populations. The principle function of the method, named Ancestry Mapper, is to give each individual analyzed a genetic identifier, made up of just 51 genetic coordinates, that corresponds to its relationship to the HGDP reference population. As a consequence, the Ancestry Mapper Id (AMid) has intrinsic biological meaning and provides a tool to measure similarity between world populations. We applied Ancestry Mapper to a dataset comprised of the HGDP and HapMap data. The results show distinctions at the continental level, while simultaneously giving details at the population level. We clustered AMids of HGDP/HapMap and observe a recapitulation of human migrations: for a small number of clusters, individuals are grouped according to continental origins; for a larger number of clusters, regional and population distinctions are evident. Calculating distances between AMids allows us to infer ancestry. The number of coordinates is expandable, increasing the power of Ancestry Mapper. An R package called Ancestry Mapper is available to apply this method to any high density genomic data set. PMID:23189146

  18. Forensic ancestry analysis with two capillary electrophoresis ancestry informative marker (AIM) panels: Results of a collaborative EDNAP exercise.

    PubMed

    Santos, C; Fondevila, M; Ballard, D; Banemann, R; Bento, A M; Børsting, C; Branicki, W; Brisighelli, F; Burrington, M; Capal, T; Chaitanya, L; Daniel, R; Decroyer, V; England, R; Gettings, K B; Gross, T E; Haas, C; Harteveld, J; Hoff-Olsen, P; Hoffmann, A; Kayser, M; Kohler, P; Linacre, A; Mayr-Eduardoff, M; McGovern, C; Morling, N; O'Donnell, G; Parson, W; Pascali, V L; Porto, M J; Roseth, A; Schneider, P M; Sijen, T; Stenzl, V; Court, D Syndercombe; Templeton, J E; Turanska, M; Vallone, P M; van Oorschot, R A H; Zatkalikova, L; Carracedo, Á; Phillips, C

    2015-11-01

    There is increasing interest in forensic ancestry tests, which are part of a growing number of DNA analyses that can enhance routine profiling by obtaining additional genetic information about unidentified DNA donors. Nearly all ancestry tests use single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), but these currently rely on SNaPshot single base extension chemistry that can fail to detect mixed DNA. Insertion-deletion polymorphism (Indel) tests have been developed using dye-labeled primers that allow direct capillary electrophoresis detection of PCR products (PCR-to-CE). PCR-to-CE maintains the direct relationship between input DNA and signal strength as each marker is detected with a single dye, so mixed DNA is more reliably detected. We report the results of a collaborative inter-laboratory exercise of 19 participants (15 from the EDNAP European DNA Profiling group) that assessed a 34-plex SNP test using SNaPshot and a 46-plex Indel test using PCR-to-CE. Laboratories were asked to type five samples with different ancestries and detect an additional mixed DNA sample. Statistical inference of ancestry was made by participants using the Snipper online Bayes analysis portal plus an optional PCA module that analyzes the genotype data alongside calculation of Bayes likelihood ratios. Exercise results indicated consistent genotyping performance from both tests, reaching a particularly high level of reliability for the Indel test. SNP genotyping gave 93.5% concordance (compared to the organizing laboratory's data) that rose to 97.3% excluding one laboratory with a large number of miscalled genotypes. Indel genotyping gave a higher concordance rate of 99.8% and a reduced no-call rate compared to SNP analysis. All participants detected the mixture from their Indel peak height data and successfully assigned the correct ancestry to the other samples using Snipper, with the exception of one laboratory with SNP miscalls that incorrectly assigned ancestry of two samples and did not obtain

  19. Improved ancestry estimation for both genotyping and sequencing data using projection procrustes analysis and genotype imputation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaolong; Zhan, Xiaowei; Liang, Liming; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Lin, Xihong

    2015-06-01

    Accurate estimation of individual ancestry is important in genetic association studies, especially when a large number of samples are collected from multiple sources. However, existing approaches developed for genome-wide SNP data do not work well with modest amounts of genetic data, such as in targeted sequencing or exome chip genotyping experiments. We propose a statistical framework to estimate individual ancestry in a principal component ancestry map generated by a reference set of individuals. This framework extends and improves upon our previous method for estimating ancestry using low-coverage sequence reads (LASER 1.0) to analyze either genotyping or sequencing data. In particular, we introduce a projection Procrustes analysis approach that uses high-dimensional principal components to estimate ancestry in a low-dimensional reference space. Using extensive simulations and empirical data examples, we show that our new method (LASER 2.0), combined with genotype imputation on the reference individuals, can substantially outperform LASER 1.0 in estimating fine-scale genetic ancestry. Specifically, LASER 2.0 can accurately estimate fine-scale ancestry within Europe using either exome chip genotypes or targeted sequencing data with off-target coverage as low as 0.05×. Under the framework of LASER 2.0, we can estimate individual ancestry in a shared reference space for samples assayed at different loci or by different techniques. Therefore, our ancestry estimation method will accelerate discovery in disease association studies not only by helping model ancestry within individual studies but also by facilitating combined analysis of genetic data from multiple sources. PMID:26027497

  20. Improved Ancestry Estimation for both Genotyping and Sequencing Data using Projection Procrustes Analysis and Genotype Imputation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chaolong; Zhan, Xiaowei; Liang, Liming; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Lin, Xihong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of individual ancestry is important in genetic association studies, especially when a large number of samples are collected from multiple sources. However, existing approaches developed for genome-wide SNP data do not work well with modest amounts of genetic data, such as in targeted sequencing or exome chip genotyping experiments. We propose a statistical framework to estimate individual ancestry in a principal component ancestry map generated by a reference set of individuals. This framework extends and improves upon our previous method for estimating ancestry using low-coverage sequence reads (LASER 1.0) to analyze either genotyping or sequencing data. In particular, we introduce a projection Procrustes analysis approach that uses high-dimensional principal components to estimate ancestry in a low-dimensional reference space. Using extensive simulations and empirical data examples, we show that our new method (LASER 2.0), combined with genotype imputation on the reference individuals, can substantially outperform LASER 1.0 in estimating fine-scale genetic ancestry. Specifically, LASER 2.0 can accurately estimate fine-scale ancestry within Europe using either exome chip genotypes or targeted sequencing data with off-target coverage as low as 0.05×. Under the framework of LASER 2.0, we can estimate individual ancestry in a shared reference space for samples assayed at different loci or by different techniques. Therefore, our ancestry estimation method will accelerate discovery in disease association studies not only by helping model ancestry within individual studies but also by facilitating combined analysis of genetic data from multiple sources. PMID:26027497

  1. Explicit modeling of ancestry improves polygenic risk scores and BLUP prediction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Yen; Han, Jiali; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Price, Alkes L.

    2016-01-01

    Polygenic prediction using genome-wide SNPs can provide high prediction accuracy for complex traits. Here, we investigate the question of how to account for genetic ancestry when conducting polygenic prediction. We show that the accuracy of polygenic prediction in structured populations may be partly due to genetic ancestry. However, we hypothesized that explicitly modeling ancestry could improve polygenic prediction accuracy. We analyzed three GWAS of hair color, tanning ability and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in European Americans (sample size from 7,440 to 9,822) and considered two widely used polygenic prediction approaches: polygenic risk scores (PRS) and Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP). We compared polygenic prediction without correction for ancestry to polygenic prediction with ancestry as a separate component in the model. In 10-fold cross-validation using the PRS approach, the R2 for hair color increased by 66% (0.0456 to 0.0755; p<10−16), the R2 for tanning ability increased by 123% (0.0154 to 0.0344; p<10−16) and the liability-scale R2 for BCC increased by 68% (0.0138 to 0.0232; p<10−16) when explicitly modeling ancestry, which prevents ancestry effects from entering into each SNP effect and being over-weighted. Surprisingly, explicitly modeling ancestry produces a similar improvement when using the BLUP approach, which fits all SNPs simultaneously in a single variance component and causes ancestry to be underweighted. We validate our findings via simulations, which show that the differences in prediction accuracy will increase in magnitude as sample sizes increase. In summary, our results show that explicitly modeling ancestry can be important in both PRS and BLUP prediction. PMID:25995153

  2. Population genetic inference from personal genome data: impact of ancestry and admixture on human genomic variation.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Jeffrey M; Gravel, Simon; Byrnes, Jake; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Musharoff, Shaila; Bryc, Katarzyna; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Brisbin, Abra; Sheth, Vrunda; Chen, Rong; McLaughlin, Stephen F; Peckham, Heather E; Omberg, Larsson; Bormann Chung, Christina A; Stanley, Sarah; Pearlstein, Kevin; Levandowsky, Elizabeth; Acevedo-Acevedo, Suehelay; Auton, Adam; Keinan, Alon; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Eng, Celeste; Burchard, Esteban G; Russell, Archie; Reynolds, Andy; Clark, Andrew G; Reese, Martin G; Lincoln, Stephen E; Butte, Atul J; De La Vega, Francisco M; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2012-10-01

    Full sequencing of individual human genomes has greatly expanded our understanding of human genetic variation and population history. Here, we present a systematic analysis of 50 human genomes from 11 diverse global populations sequenced at high coverage. Our sample includes 12 individuals who have admixed ancestry and who have varying degrees of recent (within the last 500 years) African, Native American, and European ancestry. We found over 21 million single-nucleotide variants that contribute to a 1.75-fold range in nucleotide heterozygosity across diverse human genomes. This heterozygosity ranged from a high of one heterozygous site per kilobase in west African genomes to a low of 0.57 heterozygous sites per kilobase in segments inferred to have diploid Native American ancestry from the genomes of Mexican and Puerto Rican individuals. We show evidence of all three continental ancestries in the genomes of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and African American populations, and the genome-wide statistics are highly consistent across individuals from a population once ancestry proportions have been accounted for. Using a generalized linear model, we identified subtle variations across populations in the proportion of neutral versus deleterious variation and found that genome-wide statistics vary in admixed populations even once ancestry proportions have been factored in. We further infer that multiple periods of gene flow shaped the diversity of admixed populations in the Americas-70% of the European ancestry in today's African Americans dates back to European gene flow happening only 7-8 generations ago. PMID:23040495

  3. Population Genetic Inference from Personal Genome Data: Impact of Ancestry and Admixture on Human Genomic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Gravel, Simon; Byrnes, Jake; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Musharoff, Shaila; Bryc, Katarzyna; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D.; Brisbin, Abra; Sheth, Vrunda; Chen, Rong; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Peckham, Heather E.; Omberg, Larsson; Bormann Chung, Christina A.; Stanley, Sarah; Pearlstein, Kevin; Levandowsky, Elizabeth; Acevedo-Acevedo, Suehelay; Auton, Adam; Keinan, Alon; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Eng, Celeste; Burchard, Esteban G.; Russell, Archie; Reynolds, Andy; Clark, Andrew G.; Reese, Martin G.; Lincoln, Stephen E.; Butte, Atul J.; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2012-01-01

    Full sequencing of individual human genomes has greatly expanded our understanding of human genetic variation and population history. Here, we present a systematic analysis of 50 human genomes from 11 diverse global populations sequenced at high coverage. Our sample includes 12 individuals who have admixed ancestry and who have varying degrees of recent (within the last 500 years) African, Native American, and European ancestry. We found over 21 million single-nucleotide variants that contribute to a 1.75-fold range in nucleotide heterozygosity across diverse human genomes. This heterozygosity ranged from a high of one heterozygous site per kilobase in west African genomes to a low of 0.57 heterozygous sites per kilobase in segments inferred to have diploid Native American ancestry from the genomes of Mexican and Puerto Rican individuals. We show evidence of all three continental ancestries in the genomes of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and African American populations, and the genome-wide statistics are highly consistent across individuals from a population once ancestry proportions have been accounted for. Using a generalized linear model, we identified subtle variations across populations in the proportion of neutral versus deleterious variation and found that genome-wide statistics vary in admixed populations even once ancestry proportions have been factored in. We further infer that multiple periods of gene flow shaped the diversity of admixed populations in the Americas—70% of the European ancestry in today’s African Americans dates back to European gene flow happening only 7–8 generations ago. PMID:23040495

  4. Genomic ancestry as a predictor of haemodynamic profile in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Bernardez-Pereira, Sabrina; Gioli-Pereira, Luciana; Marcondes-Braga, Fabiana G; Santos, Paulo Caleb Junior Lima; Spina, Joceli Mabel Rocha; Horimoto, Andréa Roseli Vançan Russo; Santos, Hadassa Campos; Bacal, Fernando; Fernandes, Fábio; Mansur, Alfredo Jose; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Krieger, José Eduardo; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to assess the association between genetic ancestry, self-declared race and haemodynamic parameters in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Methods Observational, cross-sectional study. Eligible participants were aged between 18 and 80 years; ejection fraction was ≤50%. Patients underwent genetic analysis of ancestry informative markers, echocardiography and impedance cardiography (ICG). Race was determined by self-classification into two groups: white and non-white. Genomic ancestry was estimated using a panel of 101 348 polymorphic markers and three continental reference populations (European, African and Native American). Results Our study included 362 patients with HF between August 2012 and August 2014. 123 patients with HF declared themselves as white and 234 patients declared themselves as non-white. No statistically significant differences were found regarding the ICG parameters according to self-declared race. The Amerindian ancestry was positively correlated with systolic time ratio (r=0.109, p<0.05). The thoracic fluid content index (r=0.124. p<0.05), E wave peak (r=0.127. p<0.05) and E/e′ ratio (r=0.197. p<0.01) were correlated positively with African ancestry. In multiple linear regression, African ancestry remained associated with the E/e′ ratio, even after adjustment to risk factors. Conclusions The African genetic ancestry was associated with worse parameters of diastolic function; the Amerindian ancestry correlated with a worse pattern of ventricular contractility, while self-declared colour was not helpful to infer haemodynamic profiles in HF. Trials registration number NTC02043431. PMID:27547430

  5. Probing QCD at high energy via correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2011-04-26

    A hadron or nucleus at high energy or small x{sub Bj} contains many gluons and may be described as a Color Glass Condensate. Angular and rapidity correlations of two particles produced in high energy hadron-hadron collisions is a sensitive probe of high gluon density regime of QCD. Evolution equations which describe rapidity dependence of these correlation functions are derived from a QCD effective action.

  6. Comparing Genetic Ancestry and Self-Described Race in African Americans Born in the United States and in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yaeger, Rona; Avila-Bront, Alexa; Abdul, Kazeem; Nolan, Patricia C.; Grann, Victor R.; Birchette, Mark G.; Choudhry, Shweta; Burchard, Esteban G.; Beckman, Kenneth B.; Gorroochurn, Prakash; Ziv, Elad; Consedine, Nathan S.; Joe, Andrew K.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic association studies can be used to identify factors that may contribute to disparities in disease evident across different racial and ethnic populations. However, such studies may not account for potential confounding if study populations are genetically heterogeneous. Racial and ethnic classifications have been used as proxies for genetic relatedness. We investigated genetic admixture and developed a questionnaire to explore variables used in constructing racial identity in two cohorts – 50 African Americans (AAs) and 40 Nigerians. Genetic ancestry was determined by genotyping 107 ancestry informative markers. Ancestry estimates calculated with maximum likelihood estimation were compared with population stratification detected with principal component analysis. Ancestry was approximately 95% west African, 4% European, and 1% Native American in the Nigerian cohort and 83% west African, 15% European, and 2% Native American in the AA cohort. Therefore, self-identification as AA agreed well with inferred west African ancestry. However, the cohorts differed significantly in mean percentage west African and European ancestries (P < 0.0001) and in the variance for individual ancestry (P ≤ 0.01). Among AAs, no set of questionnaire items effectively estimated degree of west African ancestry, and self-report of a high degree of African ancestry in a three-generation family tree did not accurately predict degree of African ancestry. Our findings suggest that self-reported race and ancestry can predict ancestral clusters, but do not reveal the extent of admixture. Genetic classifications of ancestry may provide a more objective and accurate method of defining homogenous populations for the investigation of specific population-disease associations. PMID:18559547

  7. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-11-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N{sub c} approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  8. To what extent does genealogical ancestry imply genetic ancestry?

    PubMed

    Matsen, Frederick A; Evans, Steven N

    2008-09-01

    Recent statistical and computational analyses have shown that a genealogical most recent common ancestor (MRCA) may have lived in the recent past [Chang, J.T., 1999. Recent common ancestors of all present-day individuals. Adv. Appl. Probab. 31, 1002-1026. 1027-1038; Rohde, D.L.T., Olson, S., Chang, J.T., 2004. Modelling the recent common ancestry of all living humans. Nature 431, 562-566]. However, coalescent-based approaches show that genetic most recent common ancestors for a given non-recombining locus are typically much more ancient [Kingman, J.F.C., 1982a. The coalescent. Stochastic Process Appl. 13, 235-248; Kingman, J.F.C., 1982b. On the genealogy of large populations. J. Appl. Probab. 19A, 27-43]. It is not immediately clear how these two perspectives interact. This paper investigates relationships between the number of descendant alleles of an ancestor allele and the number of genealogical descendants of the individual who possessed that allele for a simple diploid genetic model extending the genealogical model of [Chang, J.T., 1999. Recent common ancestors of all present-day individuals. Adv. Appl. Probab. 31, 1002-1026. 1027-1038]. PMID:18634815

  9. The Genomic Ancestry of Individuals from Different Geographical Regions of Brazil Is More Uniform Than Expected

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Sérgio D. J.; Di Pietro, Giuliano; Fuchshuber-Moraes, Mateus; Genro, Julia Pasqualini; Hutz, Mara H.; Kehdy, Fernanda de Souza Gomes; Kohlrausch, Fabiana; Magno, Luiz Alexandre Viana; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Moraes, Manoel Odorico; de Moraes, Maria Elisabete Amaral; de Moraes, Milene Raiol; Ojopi, Élida B.; Perini, Jamila A.; Racciopi, Clarice; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea Kely Campos; Rios-Santos, Fabrício; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Sortica, Vinicius A.; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    Based on pre-DNA racial/color methodology, clinical and pharmacological trials have traditionally considered the different geographical regions of Brazil as being very heterogeneous. We wished to ascertain how such diversity of regional color categories correlated with ancestry. Using a panel of 40 validated ancestry-informative insertion-deletion DNA polymorphisms we estimated individually the European, African and Amerindian ancestry components of 934 self-categorized White, Brown or Black Brazilians from the four most populous regions of the Country. We unraveled great ancestral diversity between and within the different regions. Especially, color categories in the northern part of Brazil diverged significantly in their ancestry proportions from their counterparts in the southern part of the Country, indicating that diverse regional semantics were being used in the self-classification as White, Brown or Black. To circumvent these regional subjective differences in color perception, we estimated the general ancestry proportions of each of the four regions in a form independent of color considerations. For that, we multiplied the proportions of a given ancestry in a given color category by the official census information about the proportion of that color category in the specific region, to arrive at a “total ancestry” estimate. Once such a calculation was performed, there emerged a much higher level of uniformity than previously expected. In all regions studied, the European ancestry was predominant, with proportions ranging from 60.6% in the Northeast to 77.7% in the South. We propose that the immigration of six million Europeans to Brazil in the 19th and 20th centuries - a phenomenon described and intended as the “whitening of Brazil” - is in large part responsible for dissipating previous ancestry dissimilarities that reflected region-specific population histories. These findings, of both clinical and sociological importance for Brazil, should also be

  10. Ancestry dependent DNA methylation and influence of maternal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Mozhui, Khyobeni; Smith, Alicia K; Tylavsky, Frances A

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive variation in DNA methylation between individuals and ethnic groups. These differences arise from a combination of genetic and non-genetic influences and potential modifiers include nutritional cues, early life experience, and social and physical environments. Here we compare genome-wide DNA methylation in neonatal cord blood from African American (AA; N = 112) and European American (EA; N = 91) participants of the CANDLE Study (Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood). Our goal is to determine if there are replicable ancestry-specific methylation patterns that may implicate risk factors for diseases that have differential prevalence between populations. To identify the most robust ancestry-specific CpG sites, we replicate our results in lymphoblastoid cell lines from Yoruba African and CEPH European panels of HapMap. We also evaluate the influence of maternal nutrition--specifically, plasma levels of vitamin D and folate during pregnancy--on methylation in newborns. We define stable ancestry-dependent methylation of genes that include tumor suppressors and cell cycle regulators (e.g., APC, BRCA1, MCC). Overall, there is lower global methylation in African ancestral groups. Plasma levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D are also considerably lower among AA mothers and about 60% of AA and 40% of EA mothers have concentrations below 20 ng/ml. Using a weighted correlation analysis, we define a network of CpG sites that is jointly modulated by ancestry and maternal vitamin D. Our results show that differences in DNA methylation patterns are remarkably stable and maternal micronutrients can exert an influence on the child epigenome. PMID:25742137

  11. Facial asymmetry and genetic ancestry in Latin American admixed populations.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Cintas, Celia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio Cesar; Ramallo, Virginia; Castillo, Lucia; Farrera, Arodi; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, Williams; Fuentes, Macarena; Everardo, Paola; de Avila, Francisco; Gomez-Valdés, Jorge; Hünemeier, Tábita; Gibbon, Shara; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rosique, Javier; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; González-José, Rolando

    2015-05-01

    Fluctuating and directional asymmetry are aspects of morphological variation widely used to infer environmental and genetic factors affecting facial phenotypes. However, the genetic basis and environmental determinants of both asymmetry types is far from being completely known. The analysis of facial asymmetries in admixed individuals can be of help to characterize the impact of a genome's heterozygosity on the developmental basis of both fluctuating and directional asymmetries. Here we characterize the association between genetic ancestry and individual asymmetry on a sample of Latin-American admixed populations. To do so, three-dimensional (3D) facial shape attributes were explored on a sample of 4,104 volunteers aged between 18 and 85 years. Individual ancestry and heterozygosity was estimated using more than 730,000 genome-wide markers. Multivariate techniques applied to geometric morphometric data were used to evaluate the magnitude and significance of directional and fluctuating asymmetry (FA), as well as correlations and multiple regressions aimed to estimate the relationship between facial FA scores and heterozygosity and a set of covariates. Results indicate that directional and FA are both significant, the former being the strongest expression of asymmetry in this sample. In addition, our analyses suggest that there are some specific patterns of facial asymmetries characterizing the different ancestry groups. Finally, we find that more heterozygous individuals exhibit lower levels of asymmetry. Our results highlight the importance of including ancestry-admixture estimators, especially when the analyses are aimed to compare levels of asymmetries on groups differing on socioeconomic levels, as a proxy to estimate developmental noise. PMID:25582401

  12. A substantial prehistoric European ancestry amongst Ashkenazi maternal lineages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marta D.; Pereira, Joana B.; Pala, Maria; Fernandes, Verónica; Olivieri, Anna; Achilli, Alessandro; Perego, Ugo A.; Rychkov, Sergei; Naumova, Oksana; Hatina, Jiři; Woodward, Scott R.; Eng, Ken Khong; Macaulay, Vincent; Carr, Martin; Soares, Pedro; Pereira, Luísa; Richards, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    The origins of Ashkenazi Jews remain highly controversial. Like Judaism, mitochondrial DNA is passed along the maternal line. Its variation in the Ashkenazim is highly distinctive, with four major and numerous minor founders. However, due to their rarity in the general population, these founders have been difficult to trace to a source. Here we show that all four major founders, ~40% of Ashkenazi mtDNA variation, have ancestry in prehistoric Europe, rather than the Near East or Caucasus. Furthermore, most of the remaining minor founders share a similar deep European ancestry. Thus the great majority of Ashkenazi maternal lineages were not brought from the Levant, as commonly supposed, nor recruited in the Caucasus, as sometimes suggested, but assimilated within Europe. These results point to a significant role for the conversion of women in the formation of Ashkenazi communities, and provide the foundation for a detailed reconstruction of Ashkenazi genealogical history. PMID:24104924

  13. A substantial prehistoric European ancestry amongst Ashkenazi maternal lineages.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marta D; Pereira, Joana B; Pala, Maria; Fernandes, Verónica; Olivieri, Anna; Achilli, Alessandro; Perego, Ugo A; Rychkov, Sergei; Naumova, Oksana; Hatina, Jiři; Woodward, Scott R; Eng, Ken Khong; Macaulay, Vincent; Carr, Martin; Soares, Pedro; Pereira, Luísa; Richards, Martin B

    2013-01-01

    The origins of Ashkenazi Jews remain highly controversial. Like Judaism, mitochondrial DNA is passed along the maternal line. Its variation in the Ashkenazim is highly distinctive, with four major and numerous minor founders. However, due to their rarity in the general population, these founders have been difficult to trace to a source. Here we show that all four major founders, ~40% of Ashkenazi mtDNA variation, have ancestry in prehistoric Europe, rather than the Near East or Caucasus. Furthermore, most of the remaining minor founders share a similar deep European ancestry. Thus the great majority of Ashkenazi maternal lineages were not brought from the Levant, as commonly supposed, nor recruited in the Caucasus, as sometimes suggested, but assimilated within Europe. These results point to a significant role for the conversion of women in the formation of Ashkenazi communities, and provide the foundation for a detailed reconstruction of Ashkenazi genealogical history. PMID:24104924

  14. The Combined Landscape of Denisovan and Neanderthal Ancestry in Present-Day Humans.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Sriram; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David

    2016-05-01

    Some present-day humans derive up to ∼5% [1] of their ancestry from archaic Denisovans, an even larger proportion than the ∼2% from Neanderthals [2]. We developed methods that can disambiguate the locations of segments of Denisovan and Neanderthal ancestry in present-day humans and applied them to 257 high-coverage genomes from 120 diverse populations, among which were 20 individual Oceanians with high Denisovan ancestry [3]. In Oceanians, the average size of Denisovan fragments is larger than Neanderthal fragments, implying a more recent average date of Denisovan admixture in the history of these populations (p = 0.00004). We document more Denisovan ancestry in South Asia than is expected based on existing models of history, reflecting a previously undocumented mixture related to archaic humans (p = 0.0013). Denisovan ancestry, just like Neanderthal ancestry, has been deleterious on a modern human genetic background, as reflected by its depletion near genes. Finally, the reduction of both archaic ancestries is especially pronounced on chromosome X and near genes more highly expressed in testes than other tissues (p = 1.2 × 10(-7) to 3.2 × 10(-7) for Denisovan and 2.2 × 10(-3) to 2.9 × 10(-3) for Neanderthal ancestry even after controlling for differences in level of selective constraint across gene classes). This suggests that reduced male fertility may be a general feature of mixtures of human populations diverged by >500,000 years. PMID:27032491

  15. On universal common ancestry, sequence similarity, and phylogenetic structure: the sins of P-values and the virtues of Bayesian evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The universal common ancestry (UCA) of all known life is a fundamental component of modern evolutionary theory, supported by a wide range of qualitative molecular evidence. Nevertheless, recently both the status and nature of UCA has been questioned. In earlier work I presented a formal, quantitative test of UCA in which model selection criteria overwhelmingly choose common ancestry over independent ancestry, based on a dataset of universally conserved proteins. These model-based tests are founded in likelihoodist and Bayesian probability theory, in opposition to classical frequentist null hypothesis tests such as Karlin-Altschul E-values for sequence similarity. In a recent comment, Koonin and Wolf (K&W) claim that the model preference for UCA is "a trivial consequence of significant sequence similarity". They support this claim with a computational simulation, derived from universally conserved proteins, which produces similar sequences lacking phylogenetic structure. The model selection tests prefer common ancestry for this artificial data set. Results For the real universal protein sequences, hierarchical phylogenetic structure (induced by genealogical history) is the overriding reason for why the tests choose UCA; sequence similarity is a relatively minor factor. First, for cases of conflicting phylogenetic structure, the tests choose independent ancestry even with highly similar sequences. Second, certain models, like star trees and K&W's profile model (corresponding to their simulation), readily explain sequence similarity yet lack phylogenetic structure. However, these are extremely poor models for the real proteins, even worse than independent ancestry models, though they explain K&W's artificial data well. Finally, K&W's simulation is an implementation of a well-known phylogenetic model, and it produces sequences that mimic homologous proteins. Therefore the model selection tests work appropriately with the artificial data. Conclusions For K

  16. Neither self-reported ethnicity nor declared family origin are reliable indicators of genomic ancestry.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Bruna Ribeiro de Andrade; D'Elia, Maria Paula Barbieri; Amador, Marcos Antônio Trindade; Santos, Ney Pereira Carneiro; Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista; da Cruz Castelli, Erick; Witkin, Steven S; Miot, Hélio Amante; Miot, Luciane Donida Bartoli; da Silva, Márcia Guimarães

    2016-06-01

    Ancestry information can be useful in investigations of diseases with a genetic or infectious background. As the Brazilian population is highly admixed physical traits tend to be poor indicators of ancestry. The assessment of ancestry by ancestry informative markers (AIMs) can exclude the subjectivity of self-declared ethnicity and reported family origin. We aimed to evaluate the reliability of self-reported ethnicity or reported family origin as indicators of genomic ancestry in a female population from the Southeast of Brazil. Two cohorts were included: 404 women asked to self-report their ethnicity (Pop1) and 234 women asked to report their family's origin (Pop2). Identification of AIMs was performed using a panel of 61 markers and results were plotted against parental populations-Amerindian, Western European and Sub-Saharan African-using Structure v2.3.4. In Pop1 57.4 % of women self-reported as white, 34.6 % as brown and 8.0 % as black. Median global European, Amerindian and African contributions were 66.8, 12.6 and 16.6 %. In Pop2, 66.4 % of women declared European origin, 23.9 % African origin and 26.9 % Amerindian. Median global European, Amerindian and African contributions were 80.8, 7.3 and 7.6 %, respectively. Only 31.0 and 21.0 % of the global variation in African and European contributions, respectively, could be explained by self-reported ethnicity and reported family origin only accounted for 20.0 and 5.0 % of the variations observed in African and European ancestries, respectively. Amerindian ancestry did not influence self-reported ethnicity or declared family origin. Neither self-reported ethnicity nor declared family origin are reliable indicators of genomic ancestry in these Brazilian populations. PMID:26984822

  17. The Impact of Ancestry and Common Genetic Variants on QT Interval in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Gustav; Avery, Christy L.; Evans, Daniel S.; Nalls, Michael A.; Meng, Yan A.; Smith, Erin N.; Palmer, Cameron; Tanaka, Toshiko; Mehra, Reena; Butler, Anne M.; Young, Taylor; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Li, Guo; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Magnani, Jared W.; Chen, Wei; Bis, Joshua C.; Curb, J. David; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Rotter, Jerome I.; Liu, Yongmei; Newman, Anne B.; Limacher, Marian C.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Quibrera, P. Miguel; Schork, Nicholas J.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Solomon, Allen J.; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Wallace, Robert; Redline, Susan; Zhang, Zhu-Ming; Post, Wendy S.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Taylor, Herman A.; Murray, Sarah S.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Arking, Dan E.; Evans, Michele K.; Fox, Ervin R.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Heckbert, Susan R.; Whitsel, Eric A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnic differences in cardiac arrhythmia incidence have been reported, with a particularly high incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and low incidence of atrial fibrillation in individuals of African ancestry. We tested the hypotheses that African ancestry and common genetic variants are associated with prolonged duration of cardiac repolarization, a central pathophysiological determinant of arrhythmia, as measured by the electrocardiographic QT interval. Methods and Results First, individual estimates of African and European ancestry were inferred from genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data in seven population-based cohorts of African Americans (n=12 097) and regressed on measured QT interval from electrocardiograms. Second, imputation was performed for 2.8 million SNPs and a genome-wide association (GWA) study of QT interval performed in ten cohorts (n=13 105). There was no evidence of association between genetic ancestry and QT interval (p=0.94). Genome-wide significant associations (p<2.5×10−8) were identified with SNPs at two loci, upstream of the genes NOS1AP (rs12143842, p=2×10−15) and ATP1B1 (rs1320976, p=2×10−10). The most significant SNP in NOS1AP was the same as the strongest SNP previously associated with QT interval in individuals of European ancestry. Low p-values (p<10−5) were observed for SNPs at several other loci previously identified in GWA studies in individuals of European ancestry, including KCNQ1, KCNH2, LITAF and PLN. Conclusions We observed no difference in duration of cardiac repolarization with global genetic indices of African ancestry. In addition, our GWA study extends the association of polymorphisms at several loci associated with repolarization in individuals of European ancestry to include African Americans. PMID:23166209

  18. Dihadron correlations at high pT

    SciTech Connect

    Filimonov, Kirill

    2004-07-24

    Jet quenching in the matter created in high energy nucleus/nucleus collisions provides a tomographic tool to probe the medium properties. Recent experimental results from the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) on characterization of jet production via dihadron correlations at high transverse momentum are reviewed. Expectations from the dihadron measurements for the lower energy {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 GeV RHIC run are discussed.

  19. Maximum-likelihood estimation of recent shared ancestry (ERSA)

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Chad D.; Witherspoon, David J.; Simonson, Tatum S.; Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W. Scott; Zhang, Yuhua; Tuohy, Therese M.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Burt, Randall W.; Guthery, Stephen L.; Woodward, Scott R.; Jorde, Lynn B.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate estimation of recent shared ancestry is important for genetics, evolution, medicine, conservation biology, and forensics. Established methods estimate kinship accurately for first-degree through third-degree relatives. We demonstrate that chromosomal segments shared by two individuals due to identity by descent (IBD) provide much additional information about shared ancestry. We developed a maximum-likelihood method for the estimation of recent shared ancestry (ERSA) from the number and lengths of IBD segments derived from high-density SNP or whole-genome sequence data. We used ERSA to estimate relationships from SNP genotypes in 169 individuals from three large, well-defined human pedigrees. ERSA is accurate to within one degree of relationship for 97% of first-degree through fifth-degree relatives and 80% of sixth-degree and seventh-degree relatives. We demonstrate that ERSA's statistical power approaches the maximum theoretical limit imposed by the fact that distant relatives frequently share no DNA through a common ancestor. ERSA greatly expands the range of relationships that can be estimated from genetic data and is implemented in a freely available software package. PMID:21324875

  20. Analysis of the genetic ancestry of patients with oral clefts from South American admixed populations.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Machado, Camilla D; de Carvalho, Flavia M; Santana da Silva, Luiz C; Dos Santos, Sidney E; Martins, Claudia; Poletta, Fernando A; Mereb, Juan C; Vieira, Alexandre R; Castilla, Eduardo E; Orioli, Iêda M

    2016-08-01

    Increased susceptibility to cleft lip, with or without cleft palate (CL±P) has been observed in South America, as related to Amerindian ancestry, using epidemiological data, uniparental markers, and blood groups. In this study, it was evaluated whether this increased risk remains when Amerindian ancestry is estimated using autosomal markers and considered in the predictive model. Ancestry was estimated through genotyping 62 insertion and deletion (INDEL) markers in sample sets of patients with CL±P, patients with cleft palate (CP), and controls, from Patagonia in southern Argentina and Belém in northern Brazil. The Amerindian ancestry in patients from Patagonia with CL±P was greater than in controls although it did not reach statistical significance. The European ancestry in patients with CL±P from Belém and in patients with CP from Belém and Patagonia was higher than in controls and statistically significant for patients with CP who were from Belém. This high contribution of European genetic ancestry among patients with CP who were from Belém has not been previously observed in American populations. Our results do not corroborate the currently accepted risks for CL±P and CP estimated by epidemiological studies in the North American populations and probably reflect the higher admixture found in South American ethnic groups when compared with the same ethnic groups from the North American populations. PMID:27105611

  1. Morphological assessment of ancestry using cranial macromorphoscopics.

    PubMed

    Klales, Alexandra R; Kenyhercz, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Ancestry estimation is essential for biological profile estimation in forensic anthropology. Hefner (2009) and Osteoware (Smithsonian Institution, 2011) presented 16 macromorphoscopic traits that can be scored for standardized data collection and can also be used within a statistical framework to estimate ancestry. The primary purpose of this research was to examine the utility of these traits for assessing ancestry. Tests of observer agreement and the range of variation in trait expression were evaluated. A sample of 208 American whites and blacks from the Hamann-Todd Collection were scored, and several classification methods were utilized in accordance with Hefner (2009). Correct classifications for the pooled sex analyses ranged from 73.3% to 86.6% and from 46.7% to 64.3% when the sexes were analyzed independently. Interobserver agreement was variable and was found to be lower than that presented in Hefner (2009). Trait expression was variable in both groups and was generally consistent with Hefner's findings. PMID:25047253

  2. Ancestry, admixture and fitness in Colombian genomes

    PubMed Central

    Rishishwar, Lavanya; Conley, Andrew B.; Wigington, Charles H.; Wang, Lu; Valderrama-Aguirre, Augusto; King Jordan, I.

    2015-01-01

    The human dimension of the Columbian Exchange entailed substantial genetic admixture between ancestral source populations from Africa, the Americas and Europe, which had evolved separately for many thousands of years. We sought to address the implications of the creation of admixed American genomes, containing novel allelic combinations, for human health and fitness via analysis of an admixed Colombian population from Medellin. Colombian genomes from Medellin show a wide range of three-way admixture contributions from ancestral source populations. The primary ancestry component for the population is European (average = 74.6%, range = 45.0%–96.7%), followed by Native American (average = 18.1%, range = 2.1%–33.3%) and African (average = 7.3%, range = 0.2%–38.6%). Locus-specific patterns of ancestry were evaluated to search for genomic regions that are enriched across the population for particular ancestry contributions. Adaptive and innate immune system related genes and pathways are particularly over-represented among ancestry-enriched segments, including genes (HLA-B and MAPK10) that are involved in defense against endemic pathogens such as malaria. Genes that encode functions related to skin pigmentation (SCL4A5) and cutaneous glands (EDAR) are also found in regions with anomalous ancestry patterns. These results suggest the possibility that ancestry-specific loci were differentially retained in the modern admixed Colombian population based on their utility in the New World environment. PMID:26197429

  3. Admixture in Latin America: Geographic Structure, Phenotypic Diversity and Self-Perception of Ancestry Based on 7,342 Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Everardo, Paola; de Avila, Francisco; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; León-Mimila, Paola; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Burley, Mari-Wyn; Konca, Esra; de Oliveira, Marcelo Zagonel; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Rubio-Codina, Marta; Attanasio, Orazio; Gibbon, Sahra; Ray, Nicolas; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rosique, Javier; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Balding, David; Gonzalez-José, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    The current genetic makeup of Latin America has been shaped by a history of extensive admixture between Africans, Europeans and Native Americans, a process taking place within the context of extensive geographic and social stratification. We estimated individual ancestry proportions in a sample of 7,342 subjects ascertained in five countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, México and Perú). These individuals were also characterized for a range of physical appearance traits and for self-perception of ancestry. The geographic distribution of admixture proportions in this sample reveals extensive population structure, illustrating the continuing impact of demographic history on the genetic diversity of Latin America. Significant ancestry effects were detected for most phenotypes studied. However, ancestry generally explains only a modest proportion of total phenotypic variation. Genetically estimated and self-perceived ancestry correlate significantly, but certain physical attributes have a strong impact on self-perception and bias self-perception of ancestry relative to genetically estimated ancestry. PMID:25254375

  4. Admixture in Latin America: geographic structure, phenotypic diversity and self-perception of ancestry based on 7,342 individuals.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Everardo, Paola; de Avila, Francisco; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; León-Mimila, Paola; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Burley, Mari-Wyn; Konca, Esra; de Oliveira, Marcelo Zagonel; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Rubio-Codina, Marta; Attanasio, Orazio; Gibbon, Sahra; Ray, Nicolas; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rosique, Javier; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Balding, David; Gonzalez-José, Rolando

    2014-09-01

    The current genetic makeup of Latin America has been shaped by a history of extensive admixture between Africans, Europeans and Native Americans, a process taking place within the context of extensive geographic and social stratification. We estimated individual ancestry proportions in a sample of 7,342 subjects ascertained in five countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, México and Perú). These individuals were also characterized for a range of physical appearance traits and for self-perception of ancestry. The geographic distribution of admixture proportions in this sample reveals extensive population structure, illustrating the continuing impact of demographic history on the genetic diversity of Latin America. Significant ancestry effects were detected for most phenotypes studied. However, ancestry generally explains only a modest proportion of total phenotypic variation. Genetically estimated and self-perceived ancestry correlate significantly, but certain physical attributes have a strong impact on self-perception and bias self-perception of ancestry relative to genetically estimated ancestry. PMID:25254375

  5. Assessment of the Relationship between Self-Declared Ethnicity, Mitochondrial Haplogroups and Genomic Ancestry in Brazilian Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cardena, Mari M. S. G.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea; Santos, Sidney; Mansur, Alfredo J.; Pereira, Alexandre C.; Fridman, Cintia

    2013-01-01

    In populations that have a high degree of admixture, such as in Brazil, the sole use of ethnicity self-declaration information is not a good method for classifying individuals regarding their ethnicity. Here, we evaluate the relationship of self-declared ethnicities with genomic ancestry and mitochondrial haplogroups in 492 individuals from southeastern Brazil. Mitochondrial haplogroups were obtained by analyzing the hypervariable regions of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and the genomic ancestry was obtained using 48 autosomal insertion-deletion ancestry informative markers (AIM). Of the 492 individuals, 74.6% self-declared as White, 13.8% as Brown and 10.4% as Black. Classification of the mtDNA haplogroups showed that 46.3% had African mtDNA, and the genomic ancestry analysis showed that the main contribution was European (57.4%). When we looked at the distribution of mtDNA and genomic ancestry according to the self-declared ethnicities from 367 individuals who self-declared as White, 37.6% showed African mtDNA, and they had a high contribution of European genomic ancestry (63.3%) but also a significant contribution of African ancestry (22.2%). Of the 68 individuals who self-declared as Brown, 25% showed Amerindian mtDNA and similar contribution of European and African genomic ancestries. Of the 51 subjects who self-declared as black, 80.4% had African mtDNA, and the main contribution of genomic ancestry was African (55.6%), but they also had a significant proportion of European ancestry (32.1%). The Brazilian population had a uniform degree of Amerindian genomic ancestry, and it was only with the use of genetic markers (autosomal or mitochondrial) that we were able to capture Amerindian ancestry information. Additionally, it was possible to observe a high degree of heterogeneity in the ancestry for both types of genetic markers, which shows the high genetic admixture that is present in the Brazilian population. We suggest that in epidemiological studies, the use

  6. Revisiting the Genetic Ancestry of Brazilians Using Autosomal AIM-Indels

    PubMed Central

    Saloum de Neves Manta, Fernanda; Pereira, Rui; Vianna, Romulo; Rodolfo Beuttenmüller de Araújo, Alfredo; Leite Góes Gitaí, Daniel; Aparecida da Silva, Dayse; de Vargas Wolfgramm, Eldamária; da Mota Pontes, Isabel; Ivan Aguiar, José; Ozório Moraes, Milton; Fagundes de Carvalho, Elizeu; Gusmão, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    There are many different studies that contribute to the global picture of the ethnic heterogeneity in Brazilian populations. These studies use different types of genetic markers and are focused on the comparison of populations at different levels. In some of them, each geographical region is treated as a single homogeneous population, whereas other studies create different subdivisions: political (e.g., pooling populations by State), demographic (e.g., urban and rural), or ethnic (e.g., culture, self-declaration, or skin colour). In this study, we performed an enhanced reassessment of the genetic ancestry of ~ 1,300 Brazilians characterised for 46 autosomal Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs). In addition, 798 individuals from twelve Brazilian populations representing the five geographical macro-regions of Brazil were newly genotyped, including a Native American community and a rural Amazonian community. Following an increasing North to South gradient, European ancestry was the most prevalent in all urban populations (with values up to 74%). The populations in the North consisted of a significant proportion of Native American ancestry that was about two times higher than the African contribution. Conversely, in the Northeast, Center-West and Southeast, African ancestry was the second most prevalent. At an intrapopulation level, all urban populations were highly admixed, and most of the variation in ancestry proportions was observed between individuals within each population rather than among population. Nevertheless, individuals with a high proportion of Native American ancestry are only found in the samples from Terena and Santa Isabel. Our results allowed us to further refine the genetic landscape of Brazilians while establishing the basis for the effective application of an autosomal AIM panel in forensic casework and clinical association studies within the highly admixed Brazilian populations. PMID:24073242

  7. The Hmong Diaspora: preserved South-East Asian genetic ancestry in French Guianese Asians.

    PubMed

    Brucato, Nicolas; Mazières, Stéphane; Guitard, Evelyne; Giscard, Pierre-Henri; Bois, Etienne; Larrouy, Georges; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    The Hmong Diaspora is one of the widest modern human migrations. Mainly localised in South-East Asia, the United States of America, and metropolitan France, a small community has also settled the Amazonian forest of French Guiana. We have biologically analysed 62 individuals of this unique Guianese population through three complementary genetic markers: mitochondrial DNA (HVS-I/II and coding region SNPs), Y-chromosome (SNPs and STRs), and the Gm allotypic system. All genetic systems showed a high conservation of the Asian gene pool (Asian ancestry: mtDNA=100.0%; NRY=99.1%; Gm=96.6%), without a trace of founder effect. When compared across various Asian populations, the highest correlations were observed with Hmong-Mien groups still living in South-East Asia (Fst<0.05; P-value<0.05). Despite a long history punctuated by exodus, the French Guianese Hmong have maintained their original genetic diversity. PMID:23199638

  8. Analysis of iris surface features in populations of diverse ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Melissa; Cha, David; Krithika, S.; Johnson, Monique; Parra, Esteban J.

    2016-01-01

    There are many textural elements that can be found in the human eye, including Fuchs’ crypts, Wolfflin nodules, pigment spots, contraction furrows and conjunctival melanosis. Although iris surface features have been well-studied in populations of European ancestry, the worldwide distribution of these traits is poorly understood. In this paper, we develop a new method of characterizing iris features from photographs of the iris. We then apply this method to a diverse sample of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. All five iris features showed significant differences in frequency between the three populations, indicating that iris features are largely population dependent. Although none of the features were correlated with each other in the East and South Asian groups, Fuchs’ crypts were significantly correlated with contraction furrows and pigment spots and contraction furrows were significantly associated with pigment spots in the European group. The genetic marker SEMA3A rs10235789 was significantly associated with Fuchs’ crypt grade in the European, East Asian and South Asian samples and a borderline association between TRAF3IP1 rs3739070 and contraction furrow grade was found in the European sample. The study of iris surface features in diverse populations may provide valuable information of forensic, biomedical and ophthalmological interest. PMID:26909168

  9. Analysis of iris surface features in populations of diverse ancestry.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Melissa; Cha, David; Krithika, S; Johnson, Monique; Parra, Esteban J

    2016-01-01

    There are many textural elements that can be found in the human eye, including Fuchs' crypts, Wolfflin nodules, pigment spots, contraction furrows and conjunctival melanosis. Although iris surface features have been well-studied in populations of European ancestry, the worldwide distribution of these traits is poorly understood. In this paper, we develop a new method of characterizing iris features from photographs of the iris. We then apply this method to a diverse sample of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. All five iris features showed significant differences in frequency between the three populations, indicating that iris features are largely population dependent. Although none of the features were correlated with each other in the East and South Asian groups, Fuchs' crypts were significantly correlated with contraction furrows and pigment spots and contraction furrows were significantly associated with pigment spots in the European group. The genetic marker SEMA3A rs10235789 was significantly associated with Fuchs' crypt grade in the European, East Asian and South Asian samples and a borderline association between TRAF3IP1 rs3739070 and contraction furrow grade was found in the European sample. The study of iris surface features in diverse populations may provide valuable information of forensic, biomedical and ophthalmological interest. PMID:26909168

  10. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  11. The role of local ancestry adjustment in association studies using admixed populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqi; Stram, Daniel O

    2014-09-01

    Association analysis using admixed populations imposes challenges and opportunities for disease mapping. By developing some explicit results for the variance of an allele of interest conditional on either local or global ancestry and by simulation of recently admixed genomes we evaluate power and false-positive rates under a variety of scenarios concerning linkage disequilibrium (LD) and the presence of unmeasured variants. Pairwise LD patterns were compared between admixed and nonadmixed populations using the HapMap phase 3 data. Based on the above, we showed that as follows: For causal variants with similar effect size in all populations, power is generally higher in a study using admixed population than using nonadmixed population, especially for highly differentiated SNPs. This gain of power is achieved with adjustment of global ancestry, which completely removes any cross-chromosome inflation of type I error rates, and addresses much of the intrachromosome inflation. If reliably estimated, adjusting for local ancestry precisely recovers the localization that could have been achieved in a stratified analysis of source populations. Improved localization is most evident for highly differentiated SNPs; however, the advantage of higher power is lost on exactly the same differentiated SNPs. In the real admixed populations such as African Americans and Latinos, the expansion of LD is not as dramatic as in our simulation. While adjustment for global ancestry is required prior to announcing a novel association seen in an admixed population, local ancestry adjustment may best be regarded as a localization tool not strictly required for discovery purposes. PMID:25043967

  12. Multiplex genotyping system for efficient inference of matrilineal genetic ancestry with continental resolution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In recent years, phylogeographic studies have produced detailed knowledge on the worldwide distribution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants, linking specific clades of the mtDNA phylogeny with certain geographic areas. However, a multiplex genotyping system for the detection of the mtDNA haplogroups of major continental distribution that would be desirable for efficient DNA-based bio-geographic ancestry testing in various applications is still missing. Results Three multiplex genotyping assays, based on single-base primer extension technology, were developed targeting a total of 36 coding-region mtDNA variants that together differentiate 43 matrilineal haplo-/paragroups. These include the major diagnostic haplogroups for Africa, Western Eurasia, Eastern Eurasia and Native America. The assays show high sensitivity with respect to the amount of template DNA: successful amplification could still be obtained when using as little as 4 pg of genomic DNA and the technology is suitable for medium-throughput analyses. Conclusions We introduce an efficient and sensitive multiplex genotyping system for bio-geographic ancestry inference from mtDNA that provides resolution on the continental level. The method can be applied in forensics, to aid tracing unknown suspects, as well as in population studies, genealogy and personal ancestry testing. For more complete inferences of overall bio-geographic ancestry from DNA, the mtDNA system provided here can be combined with multiplex systems for suitable autosomal and, in the case of males, Y-chromosomal ancestry-sensitive DNA markers. PMID:21429198

  13. The Geography of Recent Genetic Ancestry across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Peter; Coop, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The recent genealogical history of human populations is a complex mosaic formed by individual migration, large-scale population movements, and other demographic events. Population genomics datasets can provide a window into this recent history, as rare traces of recent shared genetic ancestry are detectable due to long segments of shared genomic material. We make use of genomic data for 2,257 Europeans (in the Population Reference Sample [POPRES] dataset) to conduct one of the first surveys of recent genealogical ancestry over the past 3,000 years at a continental scale. We detected 1.9 million shared long genomic segments, and used the lengths of these to infer the distribution of shared ancestors across time and geography. We find that a pair of modern Europeans living in neighboring populations share around 2–12 genetic common ancestors from the last 1,500 years, and upwards of 100 genetic ancestors from the previous 1,000 years. These numbers drop off exponentially with geographic distance, but since these genetic ancestors are a tiny fraction of common genealogical ancestors, individuals from opposite ends of Europe are still expected to share millions of common genealogical ancestors over the last 1,000 years. There is also substantial regional variation in the number of shared genetic ancestors. For example, there are especially high numbers of common ancestors shared between many eastern populations that date roughly to the migration period (which includes the Slavic and Hunnic expansions into that region). Some of the lowest levels of common ancestry are seen in the Italian and Iberian peninsulas, which may indicate different effects of historical population expansions in these areas and/or more stably structured populations. Population genomic datasets have considerable power to uncover recent demographic history, and will allow a much fuller picture of the close genealogical kinship of individuals across the world. PMID:23667324

  14. Intensity correlation of ionizing background at high redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuo, Lin

    1993-01-01

    Intensity correlation of ionizing background at high redshifts is discussed. The intensity correlation function xi(sub j) and the absorption line equivalent width correlation xi(sub 1/W) are discussed.

  15. Archaic human ancestry in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, Pontus; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies of ancient genomes have suggested that gene flow from archaic hominin groups to the ancestors of modern humans occurred on two separate occasions during the modern human expansion out of Africa. At the same time, decreasing levels of human genetic diversity have been found at increasing distance from Africa as a consequence of human expansion out of Africa. We analyzed the signal of archaic ancestry in modern human populations, and we investigated how serial founder models of human expansion affect the signal of archaic ancestry using simulations. For descendants of an archaic admixture event, we show that genetic drift coupled with ascertainment bias for common alleles can cause artificial but largely predictable differences in similarity to archaic genomes. In genotype data from non-Africans, this effect results in a biased genetic similarity to Neandertals with increasing distance from Africa. However, in addition to the previously reported gene flow between Neandertals and non-Africans as well as gene flow between an archaic human population from Siberia ("Denisovans") and Oceanians, we found a significant affinity between East Asians, particularly Southeast Asians, and the Denisova genome--a pattern that is not expected under a model of solely Neandertal admixture in the ancestry of East Asians. These results suggest admixture between Denisovans or a Denisova-related population and the ancestors of East Asians, and that the history of anatomically modern and archaic humans might be more complex than previously proposed. PMID:22042846

  16. Color and genomic ancestry in Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Flavia C.; Amado, Roberto C.; Lambertucci, José R.; Rocha, Jorge; Antunes, Carlos M.; Pena, Sérgio D. J.

    2003-01-01

    This work was undertaken to ascertain to what degree the physical appearance of a Brazilian individual was predictive of genomic African ancestry. Using a panel of 10 population-specific alleles, we assigned to each person an African ancestry index (AAI). The procedure was able to tell apart, with no overlaps, 20 males from northern Portugal from 20 males from São Tomé Island on the west coast of Africa. We also tested 10 Brazilian Amerindians and observed that their AAI values fell in the same range as the Europeans. Finally, we studied two different Brazilian population samples. The first consisted of 173 individuals from a rural Southeastern community, clinically classified according to their Color (white, black, or intermediate) with a multivariate evaluation based on skin pigmentation in the medial part of the arm, hair color and texture, and the shape of the nose and lips. In contrast to the clear-cut results with the African and European samples, our results showed large variances and extensive overlaps among the three Color categories. We next embarked on a study of 200 unrelated Brazilian white males who originated from cosmopolitan centers of the four major geographic regions of the country. The results showed AAI values intermediate between Europeans and Africans, even in southern Brazil, a region predominantly peopled by European immigrants. Our data suggest that in Brazil, at an individual level, color, as determined by physical evaluation, is a poor predictor of genomic African ancestry, estimated by molecular markers. PMID:12509516

  17. Genetic analysis of ancestry, admixture and selection in Bolivian and Totonac populations of the New World

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Populations of the Americas were founded by early migrants from Asia, and some have experienced recent genetic admixture. To better characterize the native and non-native ancestry components in populations from the Americas, we analyzed 815,377 autosomal SNPs, mitochondrial hypervariable segments I and II, and 36 Y-chromosome STRs from 24 Mesoamerican Totonacs and 23 South American Bolivians. Results and Conclusions We analyzed common genomic regions from native Bolivian and Totonac populations to identify 324 highly predictive Native American ancestry informative markers (AIMs). As few as 40–50 of these AIMs perform nearly as well as large panels of random genome-wide SNPs for predicting and estimating Native American ancestry and admixture levels. These AIMs have greater New World vs. Old World specificity than previous AIMs sets. We identify highly-divergent New World SNPs that coincide with high-frequency haplotypes found at similar frequencies in all populations examined, including the HGDP Pima, Maya, Colombian, Karitiana, and Surui American populations. Some of these regions are potential candidates for positive selection. European admixture in the Bolivian sample is approximately 12%, though individual estimates range from 0–48%. We estimate that the admixture occurred ~360–384 years ago. Little evidence of European or African admixture was found in Totonac individuals. Bolivians with pre-Columbian mtDNA and Y-chromosome haplogroups had 5–30% autosomal European ancestry, demonstrating the limitations of Y-chromosome and mtDNA haplogroups and the need for autosomal ancestry informative markers for assessing ancestry in admixed populations. PMID:22606979

  18. Electronic behavior of highly correlated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, A.

    1988-10-01

    This thesis addresses the question of the strongly interacting many-body problem: that is, systems where the interparticle correlations are so strong as to defy perturbative approaches. These subtle correlations occur in narrow band materials, such as the lanthanides and actinides, wherein the f-electrons are so localized that a variety of new phenomena, including intermediate-valence and heavy-fermionic behavior, may occur. As well, one has the alloying problem, where local interactions are paramount in determining the overall behavior. The technique employed in dealing with these systems is the Small Cluster method, wherein the full many-body Hamiltonian for a small grouping of atoms, coupled with periodic boundary conditions, is solved exactly. This is tantamount to solving a bulk crystal at the high points of symmetry in the Brillouin Zone. The mathematical overhead is further reduced by employing the full space group and spin symmetries. By its very nature, the Small Cluster method is well able to handle short-range interactions, as well as the combinatorial complexity of the many-body problem, on an equal footing. The nature of long-range order and phase transition behavior cannot be incorporated, but sometimes clues as to their origin can be discerned. The calculations presented include: a two-band Anderson model for an intermediate-valence system, wherein photoemission and fluctuation behavior is examined; a single-band Hubbard model for a ternary alloy system, such as copper-silver-gold; and a Hubbard model for a heavy- fermion system, wherein Fermi surface, transport, magnetic and superconducting properties are discussed. 148 refs., 31 figs., 24 tabs.

  19. Pacifiplex: an ancestry-informative SNP panel centred on Australia and the Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla; Phillips, Christopher; Fondevila, Manuel; Daniel, Runa; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Burchard, Esteban G; Schanfield, Moses S; Souto, Luis; Uacyisrael, Jolame; Via, Marc; Carracedo, Ángel; Lareu, Maria V

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of human population variation is an area of considerable interest in the forensic, medical genetics and anthropological fields. Several forensic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays provide ancestry-informative genotypes in sensitive tests designed to work with limited DNA samples, including a 34-SNP multiplex differentiating African, European and East Asian ancestries. Although assays capable of differentiating Oceanian ancestry at a global scale have become available, this study describes markers compiled specifically for differentiation of Oceanian populations. A sensitive multiplex assay, termed Pacifiplex, was developed and optimized in a small-scale test applicable to forensic analyses. The Pacifiplex assay comprises 29 ancestry-informative marker SNPs (AIM-SNPs) selected to complement the 34-plex test, that in a combined set distinguish Africans, Europeans, East Asians and Oceanians. Nine Pacific region study populations were genotyped with both SNP assays, then compared to four reference population groups from the HGDP-CEPH human diversity panel. STRUCTURE analyses estimated population cluster membership proportions that aligned with the patterns of variation suggested for each study population's currently inferred demographic histories. Aboriginal Taiwanese and Philippine samples indicated high East Asian ancestry components, Papua New Guinean and Aboriginal Australians samples were predominantly Oceanian, while other populations displayed cluster patterns explained by the distribution of divergence amongst Melanesians, Polynesians and Micronesians. Genotype data from Pacifiplex and 34-plex tests is particularly well suited to analysis of Australian Aboriginal populations and when combined with Y and mitochondrial DNA variation will provide a powerful set of markers for ancestry inference applied to modern Australian demographic profiles. On a broader geographic scale, Pacifiplex adds highly informative data for inferring the ancestry

  20. Inferring ancestry from population genomic data and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Padhukasahasram, Badri

    2014-01-01

    Ancestry inference is a frequently encountered problem and has many applications such as forensic analyses, genetic association studies, and personal genomics. The main goal of ancestry inference is to identify an individual’s population of origin based on our knowledge of natural populations. Because both self-reported ancestry in humans or the sampling location of an organism can be inaccurate for this purpose, the use of genetic markers can facilitate accurate and reliable inference of an individual’s ancestral origins. At a higher level, there are two different paradigms in ancestry inference: global ancestry inference which tries to compute the genome-wide average of the population contributions and local ancestry inference which tries to identify the regional ancestry of a genomic segment. In this mini review, I describe the numerous approaches that are currently available for both kinds of ancestry inference from population genomic datasets. I first describe the general ideas underlying such inference methods and their relationship to one another. Then, I describe practical applications in which inference of ancestry has proven useful. Lastly, I discuss challenges and directions for future research work in this area. PMID:25071832

  1. RECENT ADVANCES OF GENETIC ANCESTRY TESTING IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AND DIRECT TO CONSUMER TESTING

    PubMed Central

    Via, Marc; Ziv, Elad; Burchard, Esteban González

    2010-01-01

    In the post-Human Genome Project era, the debate on the concept of race/ethnicity and its implications for biomedical research are dependent on two critical issues: whether and how to classify individuals and whether biological factors play a role in health disparities. The advent of reliable estimates of genetic (or biogeographic) ancestry has provided this debate with a quantitative and more objective tool. The estimation of genetic ancestry allows investigators to control for population stratification in association studies and helps to detect biological causation behind population-specific differences in disease and drug response. New techniques such as admixture mapping can specifically detect population-specific risk alleles for a disease in admixed populations. However, researchers have to be mindful of the correlation between genetic ancestry and socioeconomic and environmental factors that could underlie these differences. More importantly, researchers must avoid the stigmatization of individuals based on perceived or real genetic risks. The latter point will become increasingly sensitive as several “for profit companies” are offering ancestry and genetic testing directly to consumers and the consequences of the spread of the services of these companies is still unforeseeable. PMID:19793051

  2. High-Fidelity Coding with Correlated Neurons

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira, Rava Azeredo; Berry, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Positive correlations in the activity of neurons are widely observed in the brain. Previous studies have shown these correlations to be detrimental to the fidelity of population codes, or at best marginally favorable compared to independent codes. Here, we show that positive correlations can enhance coding performance by astronomical factors. Specifically, the probability of discrimination error can be suppressed by many orders of magnitude. Likewise, the number of stimuli encoded—the capacity—can be enhanced more than tenfold. These effects do not necessitate unrealistic correlation values, and can occur for populations with a few tens of neurons. We further show that both effects benefit from heterogeneity commonly seen in population activity. Error suppression and capacity enhancement rest upon a pattern of correlation. Tuning of one or several effective parameters can yield a limit of perfect coding: the corresponding pattern of positive correlation leads to a ‘lock-in’ of response probabilities that eliminates variability in the subspace relevant for stimulus discrimination. We discuss the nature of this pattern and we suggest experimental tests to identify it. PMID:25412463

  3. A single-tube 27-plex SNP assay for estimating individual ancestry and admixture from three continents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi-Liang; Wei, Li; Zhao, Lei; Sun, Qi-Fan; Jiang, Li; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Hai-Bo; Chen, Jian-Gang; Ye, Jian; Hu, Lan; Li, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    A single-tube multiplex assay of a small set of ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) for effectively estimating individual ancestry and admixture is an ideal forensic tool to trace the population origin of an unknown DNA sample. We present a newly developed 27-plex single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel with highly robust and balanced differential power to perfectly assign individuals to African, European, and East Asian ancestries. Evaluating 968 previously described intercontinental AIMs from three HapMap population genotyping datasets (Yoruban in Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI); Utah residents with Northern and Western European ancestry from the Centre de'Etude du Polymorphism Humain (CEPH) collection (CEU); and Han Chinese in Beijing, China (CHB)), the best set of markers was selected on the basis of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p > 0.00001), population-specific allele frequency (two of three δ values >0.5), according to linkage disequilibrium (r (2) < 0.2), and capable of being multiplexed in one tube and detected by capillary electrophoresis. The 27-SNP panel was first validated by assigning the ancestry of the 11 populations in the HapMap project. Then, we tested the 27-plex SNP assay with 1164 individuals from 17 additional populations. The results demonstrated that the SNP panel was successful for ancestry inference of individuals with African, European, and East Asian ancestry. Furthermore, the system performed well when inferring the admixture of Eurasians (EUR/EAS) after analyzing admixed populations from Xinjiang (Central Asian) as follows: Tajik (68:27), Uyghur (49:46), Kirgiz (40:57), and Kazak (36:60). For individual analyses, we interpreted each sample with a three-ancestry component percentage and a population match probability sequence. This multiplex assay is a convenient and cost-effective tool to assist in criminal investigations, as well as to correct for the effects of population stratification for case-control studies. PMID:25833170

  4. Wide distribution and altitude correlation of an archaic high-altitude-adaptive EPAS1 haplotype in the Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Hackinger, Sophie; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Xue, Yali; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Asan; van Driem, George; Jobling, Mark A; de Knijff, Peter; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Ayub, Qasim

    2016-04-01

    High-altitude adaptation in Tibetans is influenced by introgression of a 32.7-kb haplotype from the Denisovans, an extinct branch of archaic humans, lying within the endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1), and has also been reported in Sherpa. We genotyped 19 variants in this genomic region in 1507 Eurasian individuals, including 1188 from Bhutan and Nepal residing at altitudes between 86 and 4550 m above sea level. Derived alleles for five SNPs characterizing the core Denisovan haplotype (AGGAA) were present at high frequency not only in Tibetans and Sherpa, but also among many populations from the Himalayas, showing a significant correlation with altitude (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.75, p value 3.9 × 10(-11)). Seven East- and South-Asian 1000 Genomes Project individuals shared the Denisovan haplotype extending beyond the 32-kb region, enabling us to refine the haplotype structure and identify a candidate regulatory variant (rs370299814) that might be interacting in an additive manner with the derived G allele of rs150877473, the variant previously associated with high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. Denisovan-derived alleles were also observed at frequencies of 3-14% in the 1000 Genomes Project African samples. The closest African haplotype is, however, separated from the Asian high-altitude haplotype by 22 mutations whereas only three mutations, including rs150877473, separate the Asians from the Denisovan, consistent with distant shared ancestry for African and Asian haplotypes and Denisovan adaptive introgression. PMID:26883865

  5. Genomic African and Native American Ancestry and Chagas Disease: The Bambui (Brazil) Epigen Cohort Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of genetic ancestry on Trypanosoma cruzi infection and Chagas disease outcomes is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We used 370,539 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) to examine the association between individual proportions of African, European and Native American genomic ancestry with T. cruzi infection and related outcomes in 1,341 participants (aged ≥ 60 years) of the Bambui (Brazil) population-based cohort study of aging. Potential confounding variables included sociodemographic characteristics and an array of health measures. The prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 37.5% and 56.3% of those infected had a major ECG abnormality. Baseline T. cruzi infection was correlated with higher levels of African and Native American ancestry, which in turn were strongly associated with poor socioeconomic circumstances. Cardiomyopathy in infected persons was not significantly associated with African or Native American ancestry levels. Infected persons with a major ECG abnormality were at increased risk of 15-year mortality relative to their counterparts with no such abnormalities (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.80; 95% 1.41, 2.32). African and Native American ancestry levels had no significant effect modifying this association. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that African and Native American ancestry have no influence on the presence of major ECG abnormalities and had no influence on the ability of an ECG abnormality to predict mortality in older people infected with T. cruzi. In contrast, our results revealed a strong and independent association between prevalent T. cruzi infection and higher levels of African and Native American ancestry. Whether this association is a consequence of genetic background or differential exposure to infection remains to be determined. PMID:27182885

  6. Ancestry assessment using random forest modeling.

    PubMed

    Hefner, Joseph T; Spradley, M Kate; Anderson, Bruce

    2014-05-01

    A skeletal assessment of ancestry relies on morphoscopic traits and skeletal measurements. Using a sample of American Black (n = 38), American White (n = 39), and Southwest Hispanics (n = 72), the present study investigates whether these data provide similar biological information and combines both data types into a single classification using a random forest model (RFM). Our results indicate that both data types provide similar information concerning the relationships among population groups. Also, by combining both in an RFM, the correct allocation of ancestry for an unknown cranium increases. The distribution of cross-validated grouped cases correctly classified using discriminant analyses and RFMs ranges between 75.4% (discriminant function analysis, morphoscopic data only) and 89.6% (RFM). Unlike the traditional, experience-based approach using morphoscopic traits, the inclusion of both data types in a single analysis is a quantifiable approach accounting for more variation within and between groups, reducing misclassification rates, and capturing aspects of cranial shape, size, and morphology. PMID:24502438

  7. Charting the ancestry of African Americans.

    PubMed

    Salas, Antonio; Carracedo, Angel; Richards, Martin; Macaulay, Vincent

    2005-10-01

    The Atlantic slave trade promoted by West European empires (15th-19th centuries) forcibly moved at least 11 million people from Africa, including about one-third from west-central Africa, to European and American destinations. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome has retained an imprint of this process, but previous analyses lacked west-central African data. Here, we make use of an African database of 4,860 mtDNAs, which include 948 mtDNA sequences from west-central Africa and a further 154 from the southwest, and compare these for the first time with a publicly available database of 1,148 African Americans from the United States that contains 1,053 mtDNAs of sub-Saharan ancestry. We show that >55% of the U.S. lineages have a West African ancestry, with <41% coming from west-central or southwestern Africa. These results are remarkably similar to the most up-to-date analyses of the historical record. PMID:16175514

  8. Charting the Ancestry of African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Antonio; Carracedo, Ángel; Richards, Martin; Macaulay, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    The Atlantic slave trade promoted by West European empires (15th–19th centuries) forcibly moved at least 11 million people from Africa, including about one-third from west-central Africa, to European and American destinations. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome has retained an imprint of this process, but previous analyses lacked west-central African data. Here, we make use of an African database of 4,860 mtDNAs, which include 948 mtDNA sequences from west-central Africa and a further 154 from the southwest, and compare these for the first time with a publicly available database of 1,148 African Americans from the United States that contains 1,053 mtDNAs of sub-Saharan ancestry. We show that >55% of the U.S. lineages have a West African ancestry, with <41% coming from west-central or southwestern Africa. These results are remarkably similar to the most up-to-date analyses of the historical record. PMID:16175514

  9. Sampling Quantum Nonlocal Correlations with High Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Guillén, C. E.; Jiménez, C. H.; Palazuelos, C.; Villanueva, I.

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that quantum correlations for bipartite dichotomic measurements are those of the form {γ=(< u_i,v_jrangle)_{i,j=1}^n}, where the vectors u i and v j are in the unit ball of a real Hilbert space. In this work we study the probability of the nonlocal nature of these correlations as a function of {α=m/n}, where the previous vectors are sampled according to the Haar measure in the unit sphere of {R^m}. In particular, we prove the existence of an {α_0 > 0} such that if {α≤ α_0}, {γ} is nonlocal with probability tending to 1 as {n→ ∞}, while for {α > 2}, {γ} is local with probability tending to 1 as {n→ ∞}.

  10. Socioeconomic and Nutritional Factors Account for the Association of Gastric Cancer with Amerindian Ancestry in a Latin American Admixed Population

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Latife; Zamudio, Roxana; Soares-Souza, Giordano; Herrera, Phabiola; Cabrera, Lilia; Hooper, Catherine C.; Cok, Jaime; Combe, Juan M.; Vargas, Gloria; Prado, William A.; Schneider, Silvana; Kehdy, Fernanda; Rodrigues, Maira R.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Berg, Douglas E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most lethal types of cancer and its incidence varies worldwide, with the Andean region of South America showing high incidence rates. We evaluated the genetic structure of the population from Lima (Peru) and performed a case-control genetic association study to test the contribution of African, European, or Native American ancestry to risk for gastric cancer, controlling for the effect of non-genetic factors. A wide set of socioeconomic, dietary, and clinic information was collected for each participant in the study and ancestry was estimated based on 103 ancestry informative markers. Although the urban population from Lima is usually considered as mestizo (i.e., admixed from Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans), we observed a high fraction of Native American ancestry (78.4% for the cases and 74.6% for the controls) and a very low African ancestry (<5%). We determined that higher Native American individual ancestry is associated with gastric cancer, but socioeconomic factors associated both with gastric cancer and Native American ethnicity account for this association. Therefore, the high incidence of gastric cancer in Peru does not seem to be related to susceptibility alleles common in this population. Instead, our result suggests a predominant role for ethnic-associated socioeconomic factors and disparities in access to health services. Since Native Americans are a neglected group in genomic studies, we suggest that the population from Lima and other large cities from Western South America with high Native American ancestry background may be convenient targets for epidemiological studies focused on this ethnic group. PMID:22870209

  11. MESON CORRELATION FUNCTIONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES.

    SciTech Connect

    WISSEL, S.; DATTA, S.; KARSCH, F.; LAERMANN, E.; SHCHEREDIN, S.

    2005-07-25

    We present preliminary results for the correlation- and spectral functions of different meson channels on the lattice. The main focus lies on gaining control over cut-off as well as on the finite-volume effects. Extrapolations of screening masses above the deconfining temperature are guided by the result of the free (T = {infinity}) case on the lattice and in the continuum. We study the quenched non-perturbatively improved Wilson-clover fermion as well as the hypercube fermion action which might show less cut-off effects.

  12. European Ancestry Predominates in Neuromyelitis Optica and Multiple Sclerosis Patients from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Antônio Carlos; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio; Rocha, Cristiane Franklin; Brito, Maria Lucia; de Oliveira, Enedina Maria Lobato; Bichuetti, Denis Bernardi; Gabbai, Alberto Alan; Diniz, Denise Sisterolli; Kaimen-Maciel, Damacio Ramon; Comini-Frota, Elizabeth Regina; Vieira Wiezel, Claudia E.; Muniz, Yara Costa Netto; da Silva Costa, Roberta Martins; Mendes-Junior, Celso Teixeira; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Barreira, Amilton Antunes; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    Background Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is considered relatively more common in non-Whites, whereas multiple sclerosis (MS) presents a high prevalence rate, particularly in Whites from Western countries populations. However, no study has used ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to estimate the genetic ancestry contribution to NMO patients. Methods Twelve AIMs were selected based on the large allele frequency differences among European, African, and Amerindian populations, in order to investigate the genetic contribution of each ancestral group in 236 patients with MS and NMO, diagnosed using the McDonald and Wingerchuck criteria, respectively. All 128 MS patients were recruited at the Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto (MS-RP), Southeastern Brazil, as well as 108 healthy bone marrow donors considered as healthy controls. A total of 108 NMO patients were recruited from five Neurology centers from different Brazilian regions, including Ribeirão Preto (NMO-RP). Principal Findings European ancestry contribution was higher in MS-RP than in NMO-RP (78.5% vs. 68.7%) patients. In contrast, African ancestry estimates were higher in NMO-RP than in MS-RP (20.5% vs. 12.5%) patients. Moreover, principal component analyses showed that groups of NMO patients from different Brazilian regions were clustered close to the European ancestral population. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that European genetic contribution predominates in NMO and MS patients from Brazil. PMID:23527051

  13. High-order correlation of chaotic bosons and fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-Chao

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically study the high-order correlation functions of chaotic bosons and fermions. Based on the different parity of the Stirling number, the products of the first-order correlation functions are well classified and employed to represent the high-order correlation function. The correlation of bosons conduces a bunching effect, which will be enhanced as order N increases. Different from bosons, the anticommutation relation of fermions leads to the parity of the Stirling number, which thereby results in a mixture of bunching and antibunching behaviors in high-order correlation. By further investigating third-order ghost diffraction and ghost imaging, the differences between the high-order correlations of bosons and fermions are discussed in detail. A larger N will dramatically improve the ghost image quality for bosons, but a good strategy should be carefully chosen for the fermionic ghost imaging process due to its complex correlation components.

  14. The ‘Stolen Generations' of Mothers and Daughters: Child Apprehension and Enhanced HIV Vulnerabilities for Sex Workers of Aboriginal Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Putu; Bingham, Brittany; Simo, Annick; Jury, Delores; Reading, Charlotte; Shannon, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The number of children in care of the state continues to grow in BC, Canada with a historical legacy of child apprehension among criminalized and marginalized populations, particularly women of Aboriginal ancestry and sex workers. However, there is a paucity of research investigating child apprehension experiences among marginalized mothers. The objective of the current analysis is to examine the prevalence and correlates of child apprehensions among female sex workers in Vancouver, Canada. Methods Analyses were drawn from the AESHA (An Evaluation of Sex Workers Health Access, 2010-present), a prospective cohort of street and off-street SWs, through outreach and semi-annual visits to the research office. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to examine correlates of child apprehension. Results Of a total of 510 SWs, 350 women who had given birth to at least one child were included in the analyses (median age = 37 yrs: IQR: 31–44 yrs). The prevalence of child apprehension among mothers was 38.3%, with 37.4% reporting having been apprehended themselves by child welfare services. In multivariable analysis, servicing clients in outdoor public spaces (versus formal sex work establishments or informal indoor settings) (adjusted odds ratio, (aOR) = 2.73; 95%CI 1.27–5.90), history of injecting drugs (aOR = 2.53; 95%CI 1.42–4.49), Aboriginal ancestry (aOR = 1.66; 95%CI 1.01–2.74) were associated with increased odds of child apprehension. Discussion/Conclusions Child apprehension rates are high, particularly among the most marginalized sex workers, including sex workers who use drugs and sex workers of Aboriginal ancestry. Structural reforms to child protection are urgently needed, that support family-based care address the historical legacy of colonization affecting Aboriginal peoples. PMID:24927324

  15. The astrobiological case for our cosmic ancestry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    2010-04-01

    With steadily mounting evidence that points to a cosmic origin of terrestrial life, a cultural barrier prevails against admitting that such a connection exists. Astronomy continues to reveal the presence of organic molecules and organic dust on a huge cosmic scale, amounting to a third of interstellar carbon tied up in this form. Just as the overwhelming bulk of organics on Earth stored over geological timescales are derived from the degradation of living cells, so it seems likely that interstellar organics in large measure also derive from biology. As we enter a new decade - the year 2010 - a clear pronouncement of our likely alien ancestry and of the existence of extraterrestrial life on a cosmic scale would seem to be overdue.

  16. [The selection of 30 ancestry informative markers and its application in ancestry inference].

    PubMed

    Li, Caixia; Jia, Jing; Wei, Yiliang; Wan, Lihua; Hu, Lan; Ye, Jiang

    2014-08-01

    A panel of ancestry informative markers (AIMs) can be used to describe the genetic components of a population and infer the ancestral origin of a DNA sample. In this study, we selected 30 AIMs from 282 SNPs screened from 30 phenotype-related genes based on the genotyping data of 658 samples from nine populations in the HapMap database. Then,a multiplex assay was developed based on micro-sequencing general chip technologies, and a population allele frequency database was established. This system was utilized to ascertain the origin of subjects from East Asian, European, and African.First, 658 HapMap samples were analyzed using this panel of AIMs, and then 194 unrelated DNA samples from five populations were used for further validation of the system. Finally, population genetic components and individual genetic composition were generated using Structure software, and individual ancestry inferences were made. The 30-AIM assay was well balanced for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.01), and there was no linkage disequilibrium (l < 0.1). Ancestry component analyses for the 658 HapMap samples and 194 recruited samples were consistent with their known origins. The established panel filtered and developed by the 30 AIMs can be applied to analyze the genetic components of Asian, European,and African populations, as well as individual genetic composition. PMID:25143275

  17. Highly noise resistant multiqubit quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskowski, Wiesław; Vértesi, Tamás; Wieśniak, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    We analyze robustness of correlations of the N-qubit GHZ and Dicke states against white noise admixture. For sufficiently large N, the Dicke states (for any number of excitations) lead to more robust violation of local realism than the GHZ states (e.g. for N > 8 for the W state). We also identify states that are the most resistant to white noise. Surprisingly, it turns out that these states are the GHZ states augmented with fully product states. Based on our numerical analysis conducted up to N = 8, and an analytical formula derived for any N parties, we conjecture that the three-qubit GHZ state augmented with a product of (N - 3) pure qubits is the most robust against white noise admixture among any N-qubit state. As a by-product, we derive a single Bell inequality and show that it is violated by all pure entangled states of a given number of parties. This gives an alternative proof of Gisin’s theorem.

  18. Indigenous American ancestry is associated with arsenic methylation efficiency in an admixed population of northwest Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Rubio, Paulina; Klimentidis, Yann C.; Cantu-Soto, Ernesto; Meza-Montenegro, Maria M.; Billheimer, Dean; Lu, Zhenqiang; Chen, Zhao; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies provide evidence relating lower human arsenic (As) methylation efficiency, represented by high % urinary monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), with several arsenic-induced diseases, possibly due to the fact that MMA(V) serves as a proxy for MMA(III), the most toxic arsenic metabolite. Some epidemiological studies have suggested that indigenous Americans (AME) methylate As more efficiently, however data supporting this have been equivocal. The aim of this study was to characterize the association between AME ancestry and arsenic methylation efficiency using a panel of ancestry informative genetic markers to determine individual ancestry proportions in an admixed population (composed of two or more isolated ancestral populations) of 746 individuals environmentally exposed to arsenic in northwest Mexico. Total urinary As (TAs) mean and range were 170.4 and 2.3–1053.5 μg/L, while %AME mean and range were 72.4 and 23–100. Adjusted (gender, age, AS3MT 7388/M287T haplotypes, body mass index (BMI), and TAs) multiple regression model showed that higher AME ancestry is associated with lower %uMMA excretion in this population (p <0.01). The data also showed a significant interaction between BMI and gender indicating negative association between BMI and %uMMA, stronger in women than men (p <0.01). Moreover age and the AS3MT variants 7388 (intronic) and M287T (non-synonymous) were also significantly associated with As methylation efficiency (p = 0.01). This study highlights the importance of BMI and indigenous American ancestry in some of the observed variability in As methylation efficiency, underscoring the need to be considered in epidemiology studies, particularly those carried out in admixed populations. PMID:22047162

  19. Do people from the Jewish community prefer ancestry-based or pan-ethnic expanded carrier screening?

    PubMed Central

    Holtkamp, Kim C A; van Maarle, Merel C; Schouten, Maria J E; Dondorp, Wybo J; Lakeman, Phillis; Henneman, Lidewij

    2016-01-01

    Ancestry-based carrier screening in the Ashkenazi Jewish population entails screening for specific autosomal recessive founder mutations, which are rarer among the general population. As it is now technically feasible to screen for many more diseases, the question arises whether this population prefers a limited ancestry-based offer or a pan-ethnic expanded carrier screening panel that goes beyond the diseases that are frequent in their own population, and is offered regardless of ancestry. An online questionnaire was completed by 145 individuals from the Dutch Jewish community (≥18 years) between April and July 2014. In total, 64.8% were aware of the existence of ancestry-based carrier screening, and respondents were generally positive about screening. About half (53.8%) preferred pan-ethnic expanded carrier screening, whereas 42.8% preferred ancestry-based screening. Reasons for preferring pan-ethnic screening included ‘everyone has a right to be tested', ‘fear of stigmatization when offering ancestry-based panels', and ‘difficulties with identifying risk owing to mixed backgrounds'. ‘Preventing high healthcare costs' was the most important reason against pan-ethnic carrier screening among those in favor of an ancestry-based panel. In conclusion, these findings show that people from the Dutch Jewish community have a positive attitude regarding carrier screening in their community for a wide range of diseases. As costs of expanded carrier screening panels are most likely to drop in the near future, it is expected that these panels will receive more support in the future. PMID:25966636

  20. Genetic Ancestry Influences Asthma Susceptibility and Lung Function Among Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Thakur, Neeta; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Galanter, Joshua M.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Eng, Celeste; Nishimura, Katherine K.; Oh, Sam S.; Vora, Hita; Huntsman, Scott; Nguyen, Elizabeth A.; Hu, Donglei; Drake, Katherine A.; Conti, David V.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Sandoval, Karla; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Borrell, Luisa N.; Lurmann, Fred; Islam, Talat S.; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J.; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro C.; Serebrisky, Denise; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Lenoir, Michael A.; Ford, Jean G.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Thyne, Shannon M.; Sen, Saunak; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Williams, L. Keoki; Gilliland, Frank D.; Gauderman, W. James; Kumar, Rajesh; Torgerson, Dara G.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood asthma prevalence and morbidity varies among Latinos in the United States, with Puerto Ricans having the highest and Mexicans the lowest. Objective To determine whether genetic ancestry is associated with the odds of asthma among Latinos, and secondarily whether genetic ancestry is associated with lung function among Latino children. Methods We analyzed 5,493 Latinos with and without asthma from three independent studies. For each participant we estimated the proportion of African, European, and Native American ancestry using genome-wide data. We tested whether genetic ancestry was associated with the presence of asthma and lung function among subjects with and without asthma. Odds ratios (OR) and effect sizes were assessed for every 20% increase in each ancestry. Results Native American ancestry was associated with lower odds of asthma (OR=0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66–0.78, p=8.0×10−15), while African ancestry was associated with higher odds of asthma (OR=1.40, 95%CI: 1.14–1.72, p=0.001). These associations were robust to adjustment for covariates related to early life exposures, air pollution and socioeconomic status. Among children with asthma, African ancestry was associated with lower lung function, including both pre- and post-bronchodilator measures of forced expiratory volume in the first second (−77±19 ml, p=5.8×10−5 and −83±19 ml, p=1.1×10−5, respectively) and forced vital capacity (−100±21 ml, p=2.7×10−6 and −107±22 ml, p=1.0×10−6, respectively). Conclusion Differences in the proportions of genetic ancestry can partially explain disparities in asthma susceptibility and lung function among Latinos. PMID:25301036

  1. High-speed low-cost correlator for single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsu-Yang; Lin, Hsin-Yu; White, Jonathon D.; Fann, Wunshain

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been extensively applied to study the kinetics and photophysics of molecules as well as interactions between molecules by extracting information from the fluctuation of signals. In particular, single molecule applications of FCS promise the greatest amounts of information. Ideally, one would like to carry out FCS in real-time; however, due to the time-consuming nature of the correlation process, performing the correlation in real-time is totally nontrivial. Generally an expensive hardware correlator or a TCSPC board is required for this purpose. Recently highly-efficient algorithms based on multi-tau method have been proposed to build up a software correlator. In this work, we set forth an innovative algorithm capable of realizing the real-time correlation, without turning to the multi-tau method. This algorithm takes advantage of the low count rate generally existing in the FCS experiments, directly using the time interval between each photon its adjacent photon to efficiently update the correlation function. Based on this efficiency, it is possible to build a low-cost software correlator with just an ordinary counter board. We practically demonstrate the feasibility by setting up this correlator to measure the diffusion motion of rhodamine 6G in water using FCS. The algorithm was validated by duplicating the signal from the photon detector and sending it to both the ordinary counter board with our software correlator and a commercial correlator simultaneously. The perfect coincidence of the correlation curves from these two correlators and the real-time display of the correlation function indicate the validity and practicability of our approach.

  2. Ancestry of African Americans with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Solovieff, Nadia; Hartley, Stephen W.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Klings, Elizabeth S.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Taylor, James G.; Kato, Gregory J.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Steinberg, Martin H.; Sebastiani, Paola

    2011-01-01

    The inheritance of genetic disease depends on ancestry that must be considered when interpreting genetic association studies and can provide insights when comparing traits in a population. We compared the genetic profiles of African Americans with sickle cell disease to those of Black Africans and Caucasian populations of European descent and found that they are less genetically admixed than other African Americans and have an ancestry similar to Yorubans, Mandenkas and Bantu. PMID:21546286

  3. Genetic ancestry inference using support vector machines, and the active emergence of a unique American population.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; McCarty, Catherine A; Payseur, Bret A

    2013-05-01

    We use genotype data from the Marshfield Clinical Research Foundation Personalized Medicine Research Project to investigate genetic similarity and divergence between Europeans and the sampled population of European Americans in Central Wisconsin, USA. To infer recent genetic ancestry of the sampled Wisconsinites, we train support vector machines (SVMs) on the positions of Europeans along top principal components (PCs). Our SVM models partition continent-wide European genetic variance into eight regional classes, which is an improvement over the geographically broader categories of recent ancestry reported by personal genomics companies. After correcting for misclassification error associated with the SVMs (<10%, in all cases), we observe a >14% discrepancy between insular ancestries reported by Wisconsinites and those inferred by SVM. Values of FST as well as Mantel tests for correlation between genetic and European geographic distances indicate minimal divergence between Europe and the local Wisconsin population. However, we find that individuals from the Wisconsin sample show greater dispersion along higher-order PCs than individuals from Europe. Hypothesizing that this pattern is characteristic of nascent divergence, we run computer simulations that mimic the recent peopling of Wisconsin. Simulations corroborate the pattern in higher-order PCs, demonstrate its transient nature, and show that admixture accelerates the rate of divergence between the admixed population and its parental sources relative to drift alone. Together, empirical and simulation results suggest that genetic divergence between European source populations and European Americans in Central Wisconsin is subtle but already under way. PMID:23211701

  4. Inferring parental genomic ancestries using pooled semi-Markov processes

    PubMed Central

    Zou, James Y.; Halperin, Eran; Burchard, Esteban; Sankararaman, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: A basic problem of broad public and scientific interest is to use the DNA of an individual to infer the genomic ancestries of the parents. In particular, we are often interested in the fraction of each parent’s genome that comes from specific ancestries (e.g. European, African, Native American, etc). This has many applications ranging from understanding the inheritance of ancestry-related risks and traits to quantifying human assortative mating patterns. Results: We model the problem of parental genomic ancestry inference as a pooled semi-Markov process. We develop a general mathematical framework for pooled semi-Markov processes and construct efficient inference algorithms for these models. Applying our inference algorithm to genotype data from 231 Mexican trios and 258 Puerto Rican trios where we have the true genomic ancestry of each parent, we demonstrate that our method accurately infers parameters of the semi-Markov processes and parents’ genomic ancestries. We additionally validated the method on simulations. Our model of pooled semi-Markov process and inference algorithms may be of independent interest in other settings in genomics and machine learning. Contact: jazo@microsoft.com PMID:26072482

  5. Analyses of genetic ancestry enable key insights for molecular ecology.

    PubMed

    Gompert, Zachariah; Buerkle, C Alex

    2013-11-01

    Gene flow and recombination in admixed populations produce genomes that are mosaic combinations of chromosome segments inherited from different source populations, that is, chromosome segments with different genetic ancestries. The statistical problem of estimating genetic ancestry from DNA sequence data has been widely studied, and analyses of genetic ancestry have facilitated research in molecular ecology and ecological genetics. In this review, we describe and compare different model-based statistical methods used to infer genetic ancestry. We describe the conceptual and mathematical structure of these models and highlight some of their key differences and shared features. We then discuss recent empirical studies that use estimates of genetic ancestry to analyse population histories, the nature and genetic basis of species boundaries, and the genetic architecture of traits. These diverse studies demonstrate the breadth of applications that rely on genetic ancestry estimates and typify the genomics-enabled research that is becoming increasingly common in molecular ecology. We conclude by identifying key research areas where future studies might further advance this field. PMID:24103088

  6. Accurate inference of local phased ancestry of modern admixed populations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yamin; Zhao, Jian; Wong, Jian-Syuan; Ma, Li; Li, Wenzhi; Fu, Guoxing; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Kui; Kittles, Rick A; Li, Yun; Song, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Population stratification is a growing concern in genetic-association studies. Averaged ancestry at the genome level (global ancestry) is insufficient for detecting the population substructures and correcting population stratifications in association studies. Local and phase stratification are needed for human genetic studies, but current technologies cannot be applied on the entire genome data due to various technical caveats. Here we developed a novel approach (aMAP, ancestry of Modern Admixed Populations) for inferring local phased ancestry. It took about 3 seconds on a desktop computer to finish a local ancestry analysis for each human genome with 1.4-million SNPs. This method also exhibits the scalability to larger datasets with respect to the number of SNPs, the number of samples, and the size of reference panels. It can detect the lack of the proxy of reference panels. The accuracy was 99.4%. The aMAP software has a capacity for analyzing 6-way admixed individuals. As the biomedical community continues to expand its efforts to increase the representation of diverse populations, and as the number of large whole-genome sequence datasets continues to grow rapidly, there is an increasing demand on rapid and accurate local ancestry analysis in genetics, pharmacogenomics, population genetics, and clinical diagnosis. PMID:25052506

  7. PTPN22 association in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with respect to individual ancestry and clinical sub-phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Namjou, Bahram; Kim-Howard, Xana; Sun, Celi; Adler, Adam; Chung, Sharon A; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; Glenn, Stuart B; Guthridge, Joel M; Scofield, Robert H; Kimberly, Robert P; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcón, Graciela S; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jiyoung; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Boackle, Susan A; Freedman, Barry I; Tsao, Betty P; Langefeld, Carl D; Vyse, Timothy J; Jacob, Chaim O; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Niewold, Timothy B; Moser Sivils, Kathy L; Merrill, Joan T; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Gilkeson, Gary S; Gaffney, Patrick M; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Harley, John B; Criswell, Lindsey A; James, Judith A; Nath, Swapan K

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a negative regulator of T-cell activation associated with several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Missense rs2476601 is associated with SLE in individuals with European ancestry. Since the rs2476601 risk allele frequency differs dramatically across ethnicities, we assessed robustness of PTPN22 association with SLE and its clinical sub-phenotypes across four ethnically diverse populations. Ten SNPs were genotyped in 8220 SLE cases and 7369 controls from in European-Americans (EA), African-Americans (AA), Asians (AS), and Hispanics (HS). We performed imputation-based association followed by conditional analysis to identify independent associations. Significantly associated SNPs were tested for association with SLE clinical sub-phenotypes, including autoantibody profiles. Multiple testing was accounted for by using false discovery rate. We successfully imputed and tested allelic association for 107 SNPs within the PTPN22 region and detected evidence of ethnic-specific associations from EA and HS. In EA, the strongest association was at rs2476601 (P = 4.7 × 10(-9), OR = 1.40 (95% CI = 1.25-1.56)). Independent association with rs1217414 was also observed in EA, and both SNPs are correlated with increased European ancestry. For HS imputed intronic SNP, rs3765598, predicted to be a cis-eQTL, was associated (P = 0.007, OR = 0.79 and 95% CI = 0.67-0.94). No significant associations were observed in AA or AS. Case-only analysis using lupus-related clinical criteria revealed differences between EA SLE patients positive for moderate to high titers of IgG anti-cardiolipin (aCL IgG >20) versus negative aCL IgG at rs2476601 (P = 0.012, OR = 1.65). Association was reinforced when these cases were compared to controls (P = 2.7 × 10(-5), OR = 2.11). Our results validate that rs2476601 is the most significantly associated SNP in individuals with European ancestry. Additionally, rs

  8. PTPN22 Association in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with Respect to Individual Ancestry and Clinical Sub-Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Adam; Chung, Sharon A.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Scofield, Robert H.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jiyoung; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Tsao, Betty P.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Niewold, Timothy B.; Moser Sivils, Kathy L.; Merrill, Joan T.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; James, Judith A.; Nath, Swapan K.

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a negative regulator of T-cell activation associated with several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Missense rs2476601 is associated with SLE in individuals with European ancestry. Since the rs2476601 risk allele frequency differs dramatically across ethnicities, we assessed robustness of PTPN22 association with SLE and its clinical sub-phenotypes across four ethnically diverse populations. Ten SNPs were genotyped in 8220 SLE cases and 7369 controls from in European-Americans (EA), African-Americans (AA), Asians (AS), and Hispanics (HS). We performed imputation-based association followed by conditional analysis to identify independent associations. Significantly associated SNPs were tested for association with SLE clinical sub-phenotypes, including autoantibody profiles. Multiple testing was accounted for by using false discovery rate. We successfully imputed and tested allelic association for 107 SNPs within the PTPN22 region and detected evidence of ethnic-specific associations from EA and HS. In EA, the strongest association was at rs2476601 (P = 4.7×10−9, OR = 1.40 (95% CI = 1.25–1.56)). Independent association with rs1217414 was also observed in EA, and both SNPs are correlated with increased European ancestry. For HS imputed intronic SNP, rs3765598, predicted to be a cis-eQTL, was associated (P = 0.007, OR = 0.79 and 95% CI = 0.67–0.94). No significant associations were observed in AA or AS. Case-only analysis using lupus-related clinical criteria revealed differences between EA SLE patients positive for moderate to high titers of IgG anti-cardiolipin (aCL IgG >20) versus negative aCL IgG at rs2476601 (P = 0.012, OR = 1.65). Association was reinforced when these cases were compared to controls (P = 2.7×10−5, OR = 2.11). Our results validate that rs2476601 is the most significantly associated SNP in individuals with

  9. Fast Face-Recognition Optical Parallel Correlator Using High Accuracy Correlation Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Eriko; Kodate, Kashiko

    2005-11-01

    We designed and fabricated a fully automatic fast face recognition optical parallel correlator [E. Watanabe and K. Kodate: Appl. Opt. 44 (2005) 5666] based on the VanderLugt principle. The implementation of an as-yet unattained ultra high-speed system was aided by reconfiguring the system to make it suitable for easier parallel processing, as well as by composing a higher accuracy correlation filter and high-speed ferroelectric liquid crystal-spatial light modulator (FLC-SLM). In running trial experiments using this system (dubbed FARCO), we succeeded in acquiring remarkably low error rates of 1.3% for false match rate (FMR) and 2.6% for false non-match rate (FNMR). Given the results of our experiments, the aim of this paper is to examine methods of designing correlation filters and arranging database image arrays for even faster parallel correlation, underlining the issues of calculation technique, quantization bit rate, pixel size and shift from optical axis. The correlation filter has proved its excellent performance and higher precision than classical correlation and joint transform correlator (JTC). Moreover, arrangement of multi-object reference images leads to 10-channel correlation signals, as sharply marked as those of a single channel. This experiment result demonstrates great potential for achieving the process speed of 10000 face/s.

  10. Dissecting ancestry genomic background in substance dependence genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Polimanti, Renato; Yang, Can; Zhao, Hongyu; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Aims To understand the role of ancestral genomic background in substance dependence (SD) genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed population diversity at genetic loci associated with SD traits and evaluated its effect on GWAS outcomes. Materials & methods We investigated 24 genes with variants associated with SD by GWAS; and 82 loci with putative subordinate roles with respect to SD-associated genes. Results We observed high ancestry-related frequency differences in common functional alleles in GWAS relevant genes and their interactive partners. Common functional alleles with high frequency differences demonstrated significant effects on the GWAS outcomes. Conclusion Population differences in SD GWAS outcomes seem not to be influenced by general variation across the genome, but by ancestry-related local haplotype structures at SD-associated loci. PMID:26267224

  11. Genetic Ancestry, Skin Reflectance and Pigmentation Genotypes in Association with Serum Vitamin D Metabolite Balance

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robin Taylor; Roff, Alanna N.; Dai, P. Jenny; Fortugno, Tracey; Douds, Jonathan; Chen, Gang; Grove, Gary L.; Nikiforova, Sheila Ongeri; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Frudakis, Tony; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Hartman, Terryl J.; Demers, Laurence M.; Shriver, Mark D.; Canfield, Victor A.; Cheng, Keith C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lower serum vitamin D (25(OH)D) among individuals with African ancestry is attributed primarily to skin pigmentation. However, the influence of genetic polymorphisms controlling for skin melanin content has not been investigated. Therefore, we investigated differences in non-summer serum vitamin D metabolites according to self-reported race, genetic ancestry, skin reflectance and key pigmentation genes (SLC45A2 and SLC24A5). Materials and Methods Healthy individuals reporting at least half African American or half European American heritage were frequency matched to one another on age (+/− 2 years) and sex. 176 autosomal ancestry informative markers were used to estimate genetic ancestry. Melanin index was measured by reflectance spectrometry. Serum vitamin D metabolites (25(OH)D3, 25(OH)D2 and 24,25(OH)2D3) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) tandem mass spectrometry. Percent 24,25(OH)2D3 was calculated as a percent of the parent metabolite (25(OH)D3). Stepwise and backward selection regression models were used to identify leading covariates. Results Fifty African Americans and 50 European Americans participated in the study. Compared with SLC24A5 111Thr homozygotes, individuals with the SLC24A5 111Thr/Ala and 111Ala/Ala genotypes had respectively lower levels of 25(OH)D3 (23.0 and 23.8 nmol/L lower, p-dominant=0.007), and percent 24,25(OH)2D3 (4.1 and 5.2 percent lower, p-dominant=0.003), controlling for tanning bed use, vitamin D/fish oil supplement intake, race/ethnicity, and genetic ancestry. Results were similar with melanin index adjustment, and were not confounded by glucocorticoid, oral contraceptive, or statin use. Conclusions The SLC24A5 111Ala allele was associated with lower serum vitamin 25(OH)D3 and lower percent 24,25(OH)2D3, independently from melanin index and West African genetic ancestry. PMID:23525585

  12. Method for high-accuracy multiplicity-correlation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbrandsen, K.; Søgaard, C.

    2016-04-01

    Multiplicity-correlation measurements provide insight into the dynamics of high-energy collisions. Models describing these collisions need these correlation measurements to tune the strengths of the underlying QCD processes which influence all observables. Detectors, however, often possess limited coverage or reduced efficiency that influence correlation measurements in obscure ways. In this paper, the effects of nonuniform detection acceptance and efficiency on the measurement of multiplicity correlations between two distinct detector regions (termed forward-backward correlations) are derived. An analysis method with such effects built in is developed and subsequently verified using different event generators. The resulting method accounts for acceptance and efficiency in a model-independent manner with high accuracy, thereby shedding light on the relative contributions of the underlying processes to particle production.

  13. Enhanced Methods for Local Ancestry Assignment in Sequenced Admixed Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert; Pasaniuc, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Inferring the ancestry at each locus in the genome of recently admixed individuals (e.g., Latino Americans) plays a major role in medical and population genetic inferences, ranging from finding disease-risk loci, to inferring recombination rates, to mapping missing contigs in the human genome. Although many methods for local ancestry inference have been proposed, most are designed for use with genotyping arrays and fail to make use of the full spectrum of data available from sequencing. In addition, current haplotype-based approaches are very computationally demanding, requiring large computational time for moderately large sample sizes. Here we present new methods for local ancestry inference that leverage continent-specific variants (CSVs) to attain increased performance over existing approaches in sequenced admixed genomes. A key feature of our approach is that it incorporates the admixed genomes themselves jointly with public datasets, such as 1000 Genomes, to improve the accuracy of CSV calling. We use simulations to show that our approach attains accuracy similar to widely used computationally intensive haplotype-based approaches with large decreases in runtime. Most importantly, we show that our method recovers comparable local ancestries, as the 1000 Genomes consensus local ancestry calls in the real admixed individuals from the 1000 Genomes Project. We extend our approach to account for low-coverage sequencing and show that accurate local ancestry inference can be attained at low sequencing coverage. Finally, we generalize CSVs to sub-continental population-specific variants (sCSVs) and show that in some cases it is possible to determine the sub-continental ancestry for short chromosomal segments on the basis of sCSVs. PMID:24743331

  14. The Ancestry and Affiliations of Kennewick Man

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Morten; Poznik, G. David; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.; de León, Marcia Ponce; Allentoft, Morten E.; Moltke, Ida; Jónsson, Hákon; Valdiosera, Cristina; Malhi, Ripan S.; Orlando, Ludovic; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Meltzer, David J.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske

    2016-01-01

    Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in 1996 and initially radiocarbon-dated to 8340–9200 calibrated years BP1. His population affinities have been the subject of scientific debate and legal controversy. Based on initial study of cranial morphology it was asserted that Kennewick Man was neither Native American nor closely related to the Claimant Plateau tribes of the Pacific Northwest, who claimed ancestral relationship and requested repatriation under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). The morphological analysis was important to judicial decisions that Kennewick Man was not Native American and that therefore NAGPRA did not apply. Instead of repatriation, additional studies of the remains were permitted2. Subsequent craniometric analysis affirmed Kennewick Man to be more closely related to circumpacific groups such as the Ainu and Polynesians than he is to modern Native Americans2. In order to resolve Kennewick Man’s ancestry and affiliations, we have sequenced his genome to ~1× coverage and compared it to worldwide genomic data including the Ainu and Polynesians. We find that Kennewick Man is closer to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide. Among the Native American groups for whom genome wide data is available for comparison, several appear to be descended from a population closely related to that of Kennewick Man, including the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville), one of the five tribes claiming Kennewick Man. We revisit the cranial analyses and find that, as opposed to genomic-wide comparisons, it is not possible on that basis to affiliate Kennewick Man to specific contemporary groups. We therefore conclude based on genetic comparisons that Kennewick Man shows continuity with Native North Americans over at least the last eight millennia. PMID:26087396

  15. The ancestry and affiliations of Kennewick Man.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten; Sikora, Martin; Albrechtsen, Anders; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Poznik, G David; Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Ponce de León, Marcia S; Allentoft, Morten E; Moltke, Ida; Jónsson, Hákon; Valdiosera, Cristina; Malhi, Ripan S; Orlando, Ludovic; Bustamante, Carlos D; Stafford, Thomas W; Meltzer, David J; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske

    2015-07-23

    Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in 1996 and initially radiocarbon dated to 8,340-9,200 calibrated years before present (BP). His population affinities have been the subject of scientific debate and legal controversy. Based on an initial study of cranial morphology it was asserted that Kennewick Man was neither Native American nor closely related to the claimant Plateau tribes of the Pacific Northwest, who claimed ancestral relationship and requested repatriation under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). The morphological analysis was important to judicial decisions that Kennewick Man was not Native American and that therefore NAGPRA did not apply. Instead of repatriation, additional studies of the remains were permitted. Subsequent craniometric analysis affirmed Kennewick Man to be more closely related to circumpacific groups such as the Ainu and Polynesians than he is to modern Native Americans. In order to resolve Kennewick Man's ancestry and affiliations, we have sequenced his genome to ∼1× coverage and compared it to worldwide genomic data including for the Ainu and Polynesians. We find that Kennewick Man is closer to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide. Among the Native American groups for whom genome-wide data are available for comparison, several seem to be descended from a population closely related to that of Kennewick Man, including the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville), one of the five tribes claiming Kennewick Man. We revisit the cranial analyses and find that, as opposed to genome-wide comparisons, it is not possible on that basis to affiliate Kennewick Man to specific contemporary groups. We therefore conclude based on genetic comparisons that Kennewick Man shows continuity with Native North Americans over at least the last eight millennia. PMID:26087396

  16. Biogeographic Ancestry Is Associated with Higher Total Body Adiposity among African-American Females: The Boston Area Community Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Goonesekera, Sunali D.; Fang, Shona C.; Piccolo, Rebecca S.; Florez, Jose C.; McKinlay, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The prevalence of obesity is disproportionately higher among African-Americans and Hispanics as compared to whites. We investigated the role of biogeographic ancestry (BGA) on adiposity and changes in adiposity in the Boston Area Community Health Survey. Methods We evaluated associations between BGA, assessed via Ancestry Informative Markers, and adiposity (body mass index (BMI), percent body fat (PBF), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR)) and changes in adiposity over 7 years for BMI and WHR and 2.5 years for PBF, per 10% greater proportion of BGA using multivariable linear regression. We also examined effect-modification by demographic and socio-behavioral variables. Results We observed positive associations between West-African ancestry and cross-sectional BMI (percent difference=0.62%; 95% CI: 0.04%, 1.20%), and PBF (β=0.35; 95% CI: 0.11, 0.58). We also observed significant effect-modification of the association between West-African ancestry and BMI by gender (p-interaction: <0.002) with a substantially greater association in women. We observed no main associations between Native-American ancestry and adiposity but observed significant effect-modification of the association with BMI by diet (p-interaction: <0.003) with inverse associations among participants with higher Healthy Eating Scores. No associations were observed between BGA and changes in adiposity over time. Conclusion Findings support that West-African ancestry may contribute to high prevalence of total body adiposity among African-Americans, particularly African-American women. PMID:25875902

  17. Assessment of coyote-wolf-dog admixture using ancestry-informative diagnostic SNPs.

    PubMed

    Monzón, J; Kays, R; Dykhuizen, D E

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary importance of hybridization as a source of new adaptive genetic variation is rapidly gaining recognition. Hybridization between coyotes and wolves may have introduced adaptive alleles into the coyote gene pool that facilitated an expansion in their geographic range and dietary niche. Furthermore, hybridization between coyotes and domestic dogs may facilitate adaptation to human-dominated environments. We genotyped 63 ancestry-informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 427 canids to examine the prevalence, spatial distribution and the ecology of admixture in eastern coyotes. Using multivariate methods and Bayesian clustering analyses, we estimated the relative contributions of western coyotes, western and eastern wolves, and domestic dogs to the admixed ancestry of Ohio and eastern coyotes. We found that eastern coyotes form an extensive hybrid swarm, with all our samples having varying levels of admixture. Ohio coyotes, previously thought to be free of admixture, are also highly admixed with wolves and dogs. Coyotes in areas of high deer density are genetically more wolf-like, suggesting that natural selection for wolf-like traits may result in local adaptation at a fine geographic scale. Our results, in light of other previously published studies of admixture in Canis, revealed a pattern of sex-biased hybridization, presumably generated by male wolves and dogs mating with female coyotes. This study is the most comprehensive genetic survey of admixture in eastern coyotes and demonstrates that the frequency and scope of hybridization can be quantified with relatively few ancestry-informative markers. PMID:24148003

  18. Assessment of coyote-wolf-dog admixture using ancestry-informative diagnostic SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Monzón, J.; Kays, R.; Dykhuizen, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary importance of hybridization as a source of new adaptive genetic variation is rapidly gaining recognition. Hybridization between coyotes and wolves may have introduced adaptive alleles into the coyote gene pool that facilitated an expansion in their geographic range and dietary niche. Furthermore, hybridization between coyotes and domestic dogs may facilitate adaptation to human-dominated environments. We genotyped 63 ancestry-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms in 427 canids in order to examine the prevalence, spatial distribution, and ecology of admixture in eastern coyotes. Using multivariate methods and Bayesian clustering analyses, we estimated the relative contributions of western coyotes, western and eastern wolves, and domestic dogs to the admixed ancestry of Ohio and eastern coyotes. We found that eastern coyotes form an extensive hybrid swarm, with all our samples having varying levels of admixture. Ohio coyotes, previously thought to be free of admixture, are also highly admixed with wolves and dogs. Coyotes in areas of high deer density are genetically more wolf-like, suggesting that natural selection for wolf-like traits may result in local adaptation at a fine geographic scale. Our results, in light of other previously published studies of admixture in Canis, reveal a pattern of sex-biased hybridization, presumably generated by male wolves and dogs mating with female coyotes. This study is the most comprehensive genetic survey of admixture in eastern coyotes and demonstrates that the frequency and scope of hybridization can be quantified with relatively few ancestry-informative markers. PMID:24148003

  19. A Highly Accurate Face Recognition System Using Filtering Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Eriko; Ishikawa, Sayuri; Kodate, Kashiko

    2007-09-01

    The authors previously constructed a highly accurate fast face recognition optical correlator (FARCO) [E. Watanabe and K. Kodate: Opt. Rev. 12 (2005) 460], and subsequently developed an improved, super high-speed FARCO (S-FARCO), which is able to process several hundred thousand frames per second. The principal advantage of our new system is its wide applicability to any correlation scheme. Three different configurations were proposed, each depending on correlation speed. This paper describes and evaluates a software correlation filter. The face recognition function proved highly accurate, seeing that a low-resolution facial image size (64 × 64 pixels) has been successfully implemented. An operation speed of less than 10 ms was achieved using a personal computer with a central processing unit (CPU) of 3 GHz and 2 GB memory. When we applied the software correlation filter to a high-security cellular phone face recognition system, experiments on 30 female students over a period of three months yielded low error rates: 0% false acceptance rate and 2% false rejection rate. Therefore, the filtering correlation works effectively when applied to low resolution images such as web-based images or faces captured by a monitoring camera.

  20. High-speed image matching with coaxial holographic optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Watanabe, Eriko

    2016-09-01

    A computation speed of more than 100 Gbps is experimentally demonstrated using our developed ultrahigh-speed optical correlator. To verify this high computation speed practically, the computation speeds of our optical correlator and conventional digital image matching are quantitatively compared. We use a population count function that achieves the fastest calculation speed when calculating binary matching by a central processing unit (CPU). The calculation speed of the optical correlator is dramatically faster than that using a CPU (2.40 GHz × 4) and 16 GB of random access memory, especially when the calculation data are large-scale.

  1. Adjusting head circumference for covariates in autism: clinical correlates of a highly heritable continuous trait

    PubMed Central

    Chaste, Pauline; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J.; Murtha, Michael T.; Hus, Vanessa; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Yu, Timothy W.; Fombonne, Eric; Geschwind, Daniel; Grice, Dorothy E.; Ledbetter, David H.; Lord, Catherine; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Christa Lese; Martin, Donna M.; Morrow, Eric M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Sutcliffe, James S.; State, Matthew W.; Devlin, Bernie; Cook, Edwin H.; Kim, Soo-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Brain development follows a different trajectory in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) than in typically developing children. A proxy for neurodevelopment could be head circumference (HC), but studies assessing HC and its clinical correlates in ASD have been inconsistent. This study investigates HC and clinical correlates in the Simons Simplex Collection cohort. METHODS We used a mixed linear model to estimate effects of covariates and the deviation from the expected HC given parental HC (genetic deviation). After excluding individuals with incomplete data, 7225 individuals in 1891 families remained for analysis. We examined the relationship between HC/genetic deviation of HC and clinical parameters. RESULTS Gender, age, height, weight, genetic ancestry and ASD status were significant predictors of HC (estimate of the ASD effect=0.2cm). HC was approximately normally distributed in probands and unaffected relatives, with only a few outliers. Genetic deviation of HC was also normally distributed, consistent with a random sampling of parental genes. Whereas larger HC than expected was associated with ASD symptom severity and regression, IQ decreased with the absolute value of the genetic deviation of HC. CONCLUSIONS Measured against expected values derived from covariates of ASD subjects, statistical outliers for HC were uncommon. HC is a strongly heritable trait and population norms for HC would be far more accurate if covariates including genetic ancestry, height and age were taken into account. The association of diminishing IQ with absolute deviation from predicted HC values suggests HC could reflect subtle underlying brain development and warrants further investigation. PMID:23746936

  2. Angular correlations in gluon production at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-02-01

    We present a general, model independent argument demonstrating that gluons produced in high energy hadronic collision are necessarily correlated in rapidity and also in the emission angle. The strength of the correlation depends on the process and on the structure/model of the colliding particles. In particular we argue that it is strongly affected (and underestimated) by factorized approximations frequently used to quantify the effect.

  3. Minimal SNP overlap among multiple panels of ancestry informative markers argues for more international collaboration.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Usha; Yun, Libing; Shi, Meisen; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2016-07-01

    The century-old use of genetic markers to determine population relationships has morphed in modern forensics into use of markers to determine the ancestry of an individual from a DNA sample. Researchers have identified sets of SNPs that have frequency differences among populations and many sets of SNPs have been published for the purpose of inferring ancestry. Such inference also requires reference datasets for the particular set of SNPs selected. We have identified 21 largely independent published panels of ancestry informative SNPs (AISNPs) and examined their union of 1397 SNPs. No SNP occurs in more than 6 panels. The 1397 SNPs in 21 panels yield a largely empty matrix that is inhibiting progress on more refined ability to infer ancestry for a forensic sample. The most common set of reference populations is the HGDP set of 52 small population samples totaling a thousand individuals. Only 46 (3%) of the 1397 SNPs occur in three or more panels. We assembled a new dataset for 44 of those SNPs involving 4,559 individuals from 73 populations. Analyses of this dataset provided clear differentiation of only five biogeographic regions: sub-Saharan Africa, Europe and SW Asia, South Asia, East Asia, and the Americas. This is an inadequate level of biogeographic resolution already exceeded by other panels. We conclude that more such AISNP panels are not needed and that the forensic community must collaborate to develop a common set of highly differentiating AISNPs typed on a very large number of population samples. How that can be accomplished will be the subject of future discussion. PMID:26977931

  4. KIR Genotypic Diversity Can Track Ancestries in Heterogeneous Populations: A Potential Confounder for Disease Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Komal Manpreet; Phung, Yume T.; Kohla, Mohamed S.; Lan, Billy Y-A; Chan, Sharon; Suen, Diana L.; Murad, Sahar; Rheault, Shana; Davidson, Peter; Evans, Jennifer; Singh, Manpreet; Dohil, Sofie; Osorio, Robert W.; Wakil, Adil E.; Page, Kimberly; Feng, Sandy; Cooper, Stewart L.

    2014-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are encoded by highly polymorphic genes that regulate the activation of natural killer (NK) cells and other lymphocyte subsets, and likely play key roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Association studies increasingly implicate KIR in disease predisposition and outcome but could be confounded by unknown KIR genetic structure in heterogeneous populations. To examine this we characterized the diversity of 16 KIR genes in 712 Northern Californians (NC) stratified by selfassigned ethnicities, and compared the profiles of KIR polymorphism with other US and global populations using a reference database. Sixty-eight distinct KIR genotypes were characterized: 58 in 457 Caucasians (NCC); 17 in 47 African Americans (NCAA); 21 in 80 Asians (NCA); 20 in 74 Hispanics (NCH) and 18 in 54 “other” ethnicities (NCO). KIR genotype patterns and frequencies in the 4 defined ethnicities were compared with each other and with 34 global populations by phylogenetic analysis. Although there were no population-specific genotypes, the KIR genotype frequency patterns faithfully traced the ancestry of NCC, NCAA and NCA but not of NCH whose ancestries are known to be more heterogeneous. KIR genotype frequencies can therefore track ethnic ancestries in modern urban populations. Our data emphasize the importance of selecting ethnically matched controls in KIR based studies to avert spurious associations. PMID:21898189

  5. Pregnancy, parturition and preeclampsia in women of African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Nakimuli, Annettee; Chazara, Olympe; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Elliott, Alison M; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Mirembe, Florence; Moffett, Ashley

    2014-06-01

    Maternal and associated neonatal mortality rates in sub-Saharan Africa remain unacceptably high. In Mulago Hospital (Kampala, Uganda), 2 major causes of maternal death are preeclampsia and obstructed labor and their complications, conditions occurring at the extremes of the birthweight spectrum, a situation encapsulated as the obstetric dilemma. We have questioned whether the prevalence of these disorders occurs more frequently in indigenous African women and those with African ancestry elsewhere in the world by reviewing available literature. We conclude that these women are at greater risk of preeclampsia than other racial groups. At least part of this susceptibility seems independent of socioeconomic status and likely is due to biological or genetic factors. Evidence for a genetic contribution to preeclampsia is discussed. We go on to propose that the obstetric dilemma in humans is responsible for this situation and discuss how parturition and birthweight are subject to stabilizing selection. Other data we present also suggest that there are particularly strong evolutionary selective pressures operating during pregnancy and delivery in Africans. There is much greater genetic diversity and less linkage disequilibrium in Africa, and the genes responsible for regulating birthweight and placentation may therefore be easier to define than in non-African cohorts. Inclusion of African women into research on preeclampsia is an essential component in tackling this major disparity of maternal health. PMID:24184340

  6. Resolving the ancestry of Austronesian-speaking populations.

    PubMed

    Soares, Pedro A; Trejaut, Jean A; Rito, Teresa; Cavadas, Bruno; Hill, Catherine; Eng, Ken Khong; Mormina, Maru; Brandão, Andreia; Fraser, Ross M; Wang, Tse-Yi; Loo, Jun-Hun; Snell, Christopher; Ko, Tsang-Ming; Amorim, António; Pala, Maria; Macaulay, Vincent; Bulbeck, David; Wilson, James F; Gusmão, Leonor; Pereira, Luísa; Oppenheimer, Stephen; Lin, Marie; Richards, Martin B

    2016-03-01

    There are two very different interpretations of the prehistory of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA), with genetic evidence invoked in support of both. The "out-of-Taiwan" model proposes a major Late Holocene expansion of Neolithic Austronesian speakers from Taiwan. An alternative, proposing that Late Glacial/postglacial sea-level rises triggered largely autochthonous dispersals, accounts for some otherwise enigmatic genetic patterns, but fails to explain the Austronesian language dispersal. Combining mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome and genome-wide data, we performed the most comprehensive analysis of the region to date, obtaining highly consistent results across all three systems and allowing us to reconcile the models. We infer a primarily common ancestry for Taiwan/ISEA populations established before the Neolithic, but also detected clear signals of two minor Late Holocene migrations, probably representing Neolithic input from both Mainland Southeast Asia and South China, via Taiwan. This latter may therefore have mediated the Austronesian language dispersal, implying small-scale migration and language shift rather than large-scale expansion. PMID:26781090

  7. AncesTrees: ancestry estimation with randomized decision trees.

    PubMed

    Navega, David; Coelho, Catarina; Vicente, Ricardo; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Wasterlain, Sofia; Cunha, Eugénia

    2015-09-01

    In forensic anthropology, ancestry estimation is essential in establishing the individual biological profile. The aim of this study is to present a new program--AncesTrees--developed for assessing ancestry based on metric analysis. AncesTrees relies on a machine learning ensemble algorithm, random forest, to classify the human skull. In the ensemble learning paradigm, several models are generated and co-jointly used to arrive at the final decision. The random forest algorithm creates ensembles of decision trees classifiers, a non-linear and non-parametric classification technique. The database used in AncesTrees is composed by 23 craniometric variables from 1,734 individuals, representative of six major ancestral groups and selected from the Howells' craniometric series. The program was tested in 128 adult crania from the following collections: the African slaves' skeletal collection of Valle da Gafaria; the Medical School Skull Collection and the Identified Skeletal Collection of 21st Century, both curated at the University of Coimbra. The first step of the test analysis was to perform ancestry estimation including all the ancestral groups of the database. The second stage of our test analysis was to conduct ancestry estimation including only the European and the African ancestral groups. In the first test analysis, 75% of the individuals of African ancestry and 79.2% of the individuals of European ancestry were correctly identified. The model involving only African and European ancestral groups had a better performance: 93.8% of all individuals were correctly classified. The obtained results show that AncesTrees can be a valuable tool in forensic anthropology. PMID:25053239

  8. Relationship of Pain and Ancestry in African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, John A.; Qi, Lihong; Garcia, Lorena; Younger, Jarred W.; Seldin, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Background African Americans are reported to be more sensitive to pain than European Americans. Pain sensitivity has been shown to be genetically linked in animal models and is likely to be in humans. Methods 11,239 self-identified African American post menopausal women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative had percentage African ancestry determined by ancestry informative markers, “Pain Construct” measurements and covariate information. They answered 5 questions about specific types and location of pain, such as joint, neck, low back, headache, and urinary. They also answered 2 questions which were used to derive a “Pain Construct”, a measure of general pain scored on a scale of 1 to 100. Associations were tested in linear regression models adjusting for age, self-reported medical conditions, neighborhood socio-economic status, education, and depression. Results In the unadjusted model of the 5 specific types of pain measures, greater pain perception was associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry. However, some of the specific types of pain measures were no longer associated with African ancestry after adjustment for other study covariates. The Pain Construct was statistically significantly associated with African ancestry in both the unadjusted [Beta = −0.132, 95% confidence interval (C I) = −099 – −0.164; r = −0.075, 95% CI −0.056 – −0.093] and the adjusted models (Beta = −0.069 95% CI = −0.04 – 0.10). Conclusions Greater African ancestry was associated with higher levels of self-reported pain although this accounted for only a minor fraction of the overall variation in the Pain Construct. PMID:25752262

  9. Suicidal ideation in Hispanic and mixed-ancestry adolescents.

    PubMed

    Olvera, R L

    2001-01-01

    This survey examined differences in suicidal ideation, depressive symptomatology, acculturation, and coping strategies based on ethnicity. The author gathered data from a self-report questionnaire administered to students in an ethnically diverse middle school (grades 6-8, N= 158). Hispanic (predominantly Mexican American) and mixed-ancestry adolescents displayed significantly higher risk of suicidal ideation compared to Anglo peers, even when socioeconomic status, age, and gender were controlled for. Suicidal ideation was associated with depressive symptoms, family problems, lower levels of acculturation, and various coping strategies. Using multivariate analysis, Hispanic ancestry, depressive symptoms, family problems, and the use of social coping remained in the model. PMID:11775717

  10. Unravelling the hidden ancestry of American admixed populations

    PubMed Central

    Montinaro, Francesco; Busby, George B.J.; Pascali, Vincenzo L.; Myers, Simon; Hellenthal, Garrett; Capelli, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    The movement of people into the Americas has brought different populations into contact, and contemporary American genomes are the product of a range of complex admixture events. Here we apply a haplotype-based ancestry identification approach to a large set of genome-wide SNP data from a variety of American, European and African populations to determine the contributions of different ancestral populations to the Americas. Our results provide a fine-scale characterization of the source populations, identify a series of novel, previously unreported contributions from Africa and Europe and highlight geohistorical structure in the ancestry of American admixed populations. PMID:25803618

  11. Read-only high accuracy volume holographic optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tian; Li, Jingming; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2011-10-01

    A read-only volume holographic correlator (VHC) is proposed. After the recording of all of the correlation database pages by angular multiplexing, a stand-alone read-only high accuracy VHC will be separated from the VHC recording facilities which include the high-power laser and the angular multiplexing system. The stand-alone VHC has its own low power readout laser and very compact and simple structure. Since there are two lasers that are employed for recording and readout, respectively, the optical alignment tolerance of the laser illumination on the SLM is very sensitive. The twodimensional angular tolerance is analyzed based on the theoretical model of the volume holographic correlator. The experimental demonstration of the proposed read-only VHC is introduced and discussed.

  12. WDR1 and CLNK gene polymorphisms correlate with serum glucose and high-density lipoprotein levels in Tibetan gout patients.

    PubMed

    Lan, Bing; Chen, Peng; Jiri, Mutu; He, Na; Feng, Tian; Liu, Kai; Jin, Tianbo; Kang, Longli

    2016-03-01

    Current evidence suggests heredity and metabolic syndrome contributes to gout progression. Specifically, the WDR1 and CLNK genes may play a role in gout progression in European ancestry populations. However, no studies have focused on Chinese populations, especially Tibetan individuals. This study aims to determine whether variations in these two genes correlate with gout-related indices in Chinese-Tibetan gout patients. Eleven single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the WDR1 and CLNK genes were detected in 319 Chinese-Tibetan gout patients and 318 controls. We used one-way analysis of variance to evaluate the polymorphisms' effects on gout based on mean serum levels of metabolism indicators, such as albumin, glucose (GLU), triglycerides, cholesterol, high-density lipoproteins (HDL-C), creatinine, and uric acid, from fasting venous blood samples. All p values were Bonferroni corrected. Polymorphisms of the WDR1 and CLNK genes affected multiple risk factors for gout development. Significant differences in serum GLU levels were detected between different genotypic groups with WDRI polymorphisms rs4604059 (p = 0.005) and rs12498927 (p = 0.005). In addition, significant differences in serum HDL-C levels were detected between different genotypic groups with the CLNK polymorphism rs2041215 (p = 0.001). Polymorphisms of CLNK also affected levels of albumin, triglycerides, and creatinine. This study is the first to investigate and identify positive correlations between WDR1 and CLNK gene polymorphisms in Chinese-Tibetan populations. Our findings provide significant evidence for the effect of genetic polymorphisms on gout-related factors in Chinese-Tibetan populations. PMID:26438387

  13. Alternative High School Students: Prevalence and Correlates of Overweight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubik, Martha Y.; Davey, Cynthia; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Sirard, John; Story, Mary; Arcan, Chrisa

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine prevalence and correlates of overweight among adolescents attending alternative high schools (AHS). Methods: AHS students (n=145) from 6 schools completed surveys and anthropometric measures. Cross-sectional associations were assessed using mixed model multivariate logistic regression. Results: Among students, 42% were…

  14. High Temperature, high pressure equation of state density correlations and viscosity correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Tapriyal, D.; Enick, R.; McHugh, M.; Gamwo, I.; Morreale, B.

    2012-07-31

    Global increase in oil demand and depleting reserves has derived a need to find new oil resources. To find these untapped reservoirs, oil companies are exploring various remote and harsh locations such as deep waters in Gulf of Mexico, remote arctic regions, unexplored deep deserts, etc. Further, the depth of new oil/gas wells being drilled has increased considerably to tap these new resources. With the increase in the well depth, the bottomhole temperature and pressure are also increasing to extreme values (i.e. up to 500 F and 35,000 psi). The density and viscosity of natural gas and crude oil at reservoir conditions are critical fundamental properties required for accurate assessment of the amount of recoverable petroleum within a reservoir and the modeling of the flow of these fluids within the porous media. These properties are also used to design appropriate drilling and production equipment such as blow out preventers, risers, etc. With the present state of art, there is no accurate database for these fluid properties at extreme conditions. As we have begun to expand this experimental database it has become apparent that there are neither equations of state for density or transport models for viscosity that can be used to predict these fundamental properties of multi-component hydrocarbon mixtures over a wide range of temperature and pressure. Presently, oil companies are using correlations based on lower temperature and pressure databases that exhibit an unsatisfactory predictive capability at extreme conditions (e.g. as great as {+-} 50%). From the perspective of these oil companies that are committed to safely producing these resources, accurately predicting flow rates, and assuring the integrity of the flow, the absence of an extensive experimental database at extreme conditions and models capable of predicting these properties over an extremely wide range of temperature and pressure (including extreme conditions) makes their task even more daunting.

  15. The Global AIMs Nano set: A 31-plex SNaPshot assay of ancestry-informative SNPs.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, M; Santos, C; Fondevila, M; Manzo, L; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V; Phillips, C

    2016-05-01

    A 31-plex SNaPshot assay, named 'Global AIMs Nano', has been developed by reassembling the most differentiated markers of the EUROFORGEN Global AIM-SNP set. The SNPs include three tri-allelic loci and were selected with the goal of maintaining a balanced differentiation of: Africans, Europeans, East Asians, Oceanians and Native Americans. The Global AIMs Nano SNP set provides higher divergence between each of the five continental population groups than previous small-scale AIM sets developed for forensic ancestry analysis with SNaPshot. Both of these characteristics minimise potential bias when estimating co-ancestry proportions in individuals with admixed ancestry; more likely to be observed when using markers disproportionately informative for only certain population group comparisons. The optimised multiplex is designed to be easily implemented using standard capillary electrophoresis regimes and has been used to successfully genotype challenging forensic samples from highly degraded material with low level DNA. The ancestry predictive performance of the Global AIMs Nano set has been evaluated by the analysis of samples previously characterised with larger AIM sets. PMID:26881328

  16. Suicidal Ideation in Hispanic and Mixed-Ancestry Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olvera, Rene L.

    2001-01-01

    Examined differences in suicidal ideation, depressive symptomatology, acculturation, and coping strategies based on ethnicity. Hispanic (predominantly Mexican American) and mixed-ancestry adolescents displayed significantly higher risk of suicidal ideation compared to Anglo peers, even when controlling for socioeconomic status, age, and gender.…

  17. Assessing Patterns of Admixture and Ancestry in Canadian Honey Bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canada has a large beekeeping industry comprised of 8483 beekeepers managing 672094 23 colonies. Canadian honey bees, like all honey bees in the New World, originate from centuries of importation of predominately European honey bees, but their precise ancestry remains unknown. There have been no i...

  18. Recent admixture in an Indian population of African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ankita; Jha, Pankaj; Rawat, Vimal; Mukhopadhyay, Arijit; Mukhopadhayay, Arijit; Dash, Debasis; Basu, Analabha; Mukerji, Mitali

    2011-07-15

    Identification and study of genetic variation in recently admixed populations not only provides insight into historical population events but also is a powerful approach for mapping disease loci. We studied a population (OG-W-IP) that is of African-Indian origin and has resided in the western part of India for 500 years; members of this population are believed to be descendants of the Bantu-speaking population of Africa. We have carried out this study by using a set of 18,534 autosomal markers common between Indian, CEPH-HGDP, and HapMap populations. Principal-components analysis clearly revealed that the African-Indian population derives its ancestry from Bantu-speaking west-African as well as Indo-European-speaking north and northwest Indian population(s). STRUCTURE and ADMIXTURE analyses show that, overall, the OG-W-IPs derive 58.7% of their genomic ancestry from their African past and have very little inter-individual ancestry variation (8.4%). The extent of linkage disequilibrium also reveals that the admixture event has been recent. Functional annotation of genes encompassing the ancestry-informative markers that are closer in allele frequency to the Indian ancestral population revealed significant enrichment of biological processes, such as ion-channel activity, and cadherins. We briefly examine the implications of determining the genetic diversity of this population, which could provide opportunities for studies involving admixture mapping. PMID:21737057

  19. The influence of genetic ancestry and ethnicity on breast cancer survival associated with genetic variation in the TGF-β-signaling pathway: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

    PubMed Central

    Lundgreen, Abbie; Stern, Marianna C.; Hines, Lisa; Wolff, Roger K.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; John, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    The TGF-β signaling pathway regulates cellular proliferation and differentiation. We evaluated genetic variation in this pathway, its association with breast cancer survival, and survival differences by genetic ancestry and self-reported ethnicity. The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study includes participants from the 4-Corners Breast Cancer Study (n = 1391 cases) and the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study (n=946 cases) who have been followed for survival. We evaluated 28 genes in the TGF-β signaling pathway using a tagSNP approach. Adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) was used to test the gene and pathway significance by Native American (NA) ancestry and by self-reported ethnicity (non-Hispanic white (NHW) and Hispanic/NA). Genetic variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway was associated with overall breast cancer survival (PARTP = 0.05), especially for women with low NA ancestry (PARTP =0.007) and NHW women (PARTP =0.006). BMP2, BMP4, RUNX1. and TGFBR3 were significantly associated with breast cancer survival overall (PARTP=0.04, 0.02, 0.002, and 0.04 respectively). Among women with low NA ancestry associations were: BMP4 (PARTP = 0.007), BMP6 (PARTP = 0.001), GDF10 (PARTP=0.05), RUNX1 (PARTP=0.002), SMAD1 (PARTP=0.05), and TGFBR2 (PARTP=0.02). A polygenic risk model showed that women with low NA ancestry and high numbers of at-risk alleles had twice the risk of dying from breast cancer as did women with high NA ancestry. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway influences breast cancer survival. Associations were similar when the analyses were stratified by genetic ancestry or by self-reported ethnicity. PMID:24337772

  20. Differences in vaginal microbiome in African American women versus women of European ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Brooks, J. Paul; Serrano, Myrna G.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Girerd, Philippe H.; Edwards, David J.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.

    2014-01-01

    Women of European ancestry are more likely to harbour a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiome, whereas African American women are more likely to exhibit a diverse microbial profile. African American women are also twice as likely to be diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis and are twice as likely to experience preterm birth. The objective of this study was to further characterize and contrast the vaginal microbial profiles in African American versus European ancestry women. Through the Vaginal Human Microbiome Project at Virginia Commonwealth University, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was used to compare the microbiomes of vaginal samples from 1268 African American women and 416 women of European ancestry. The results confirmed significant differences in the vaginal microbiomes of the two groups and identified several taxa relevant to these differences. Major community types were dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis and the uncultivated bacterial vaginosis-associated bacterium-1 (BVAB1) that were common among African Americans. Moreover, the prevalence of multiple bacterial taxa that are associated with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and preterm birth, including Mycoplasma, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Sneathia, differed between the two ethnic groups. We investigated the contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including pregnancy, body mass index, diet, smoking and alcohol use, number of sexual partners, and household income, to vaginal community composition. Ethnicity, pregnancy and alcohol use correlated significantly with the relative abundance of bacterial vaginosis-associated species. Trends between microbial profiles and smoking and number of sexual partners were observed; however, these associations were not statistically significant. These results support and extend previous findings that there are significant differences in the vaginal microbiome related to ethnicity and demonstrate that these differences are pronounced even in healthy women

  1. CARE: Finding Local Linear Correlations in High Dimensional Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Pan, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Finding latent patterns in high dimensional data is an important research problem with numerous applications. Existing approaches can be summarized into 3 categories: feature selection, feature transformation (or feature projection) and projected clustering. Being widely used in many applications, these methods aim to capture global patterns and are typically performed in the full feature space. In many emerging biomedical applications, however, scientists are interested in the local latent patterns held by feature subsets, which may be invisible via any global transformation. In this paper, we investigate the problem of finding local linear correlations in high dimensional data. Our goal is to find the latent pattern structures that may exist only in some subspaces. We formalize this problem as finding strongly correlated feature subsets which are supported by a large portion of the data points. Due to the combinatorial nature of the problem and lack of monotonicity of the correlation measurement, it is prohibitively expensive to exhaustively explore the whole search space. In our algorithm, CARE, we utilize spectrum properties and effective heuristic to prune the search space. Extensive experimental results show that our approach is effective in finding local linear correlations that may not be identified by existing methods. PMID:20419037

  2. Exploring the Y Chromosomal Ancestry of Modern Panamanians

    PubMed Central

    Grugni, Viola; Battaglia, Vincenza; Perego, Ugo Alessandro; Raveane, Alessandro; Lancioni, Hovirag; Olivieri, Anna; Ferretti, Luca; Woodward, Scott R.; Pascale, Juan Miguel; Cooke, Richard; Myres, Natalie; Motta, Jorge; Torroni, Antonio; Achilli, Alessandro; Semino, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    Geologically, Panama belongs to the Central American land-bridge between North and South America crossed by Homo sapiens >14 ka ago. Archaeologically, it belongs to a wider Isthmo-Colombian Area. Today, seven indigenous ethnic groups account for 12.3% of Panama’s population. Five speak Chibchan languages and are characterized by low genetic diversity and a high level of differentiation. In addition, no evidence of differential structuring between maternally and paternally inherited genes has been reported in isthmian Chibchan cultural groups. Recent data have shown that 83% of the Panamanian general population harbour mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of Native American ancestry. Considering differential male/female mortality at European contact and multiple degrees of geographical and genetic isolation over the subsequent five centuries, the Y-chromosome Native American component is expected to vary across different geographic regions and communities in Panama. To address this issue, we investigated Y-chromosome variation in 408 modern males from the nine provinces of Panama and one indigenous territory (the comarca of Kuna Yala). In contrast to mtDNA data, the Y-chromosome Native American component (haplogroup Q) exceeds 50% only in three populations facing the Caribbean Sea: the comarca of Kuna Yala and Bocas del Toro province where Chibchan languages are spoken by the majority, and the province of Colón where many Kuna and people of mixed indigenous-African-and-European descent live. Elsewhere the Old World component is dominant and mostly represented by western Eurasian haplogroups, which signal the strong male genetic impact of invaders. Sub-Saharan African input accounts for 5.9% of male haplotypes. This reflects the consequences of the colonial Atlantic slave trade and more recent influxes of West Indians of African heritage. Overall, our findings reveal a local evolution of the male Native American ancestral gene pool, and a strong but geographically

  3. Exploring the Y Chromosomal Ancestry of Modern Panamanians.

    PubMed

    Grugni, Viola; Battaglia, Vincenza; Perego, Ugo Alessandro; Raveane, Alessandro; Lancioni, Hovirag; Olivieri, Anna; Ferretti, Luca; Woodward, Scott R; Pascale, Juan Miguel; Cooke, Richard; Myres, Natalie; Motta, Jorge; Torroni, Antonio; Achilli, Alessandro; Semino, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    Geologically, Panama belongs to the Central American land-bridge between North and South America crossed by Homo sapiens >14 ka ago. Archaeologically, it belongs to a wider Isthmo-Colombian Area. Today, seven indigenous ethnic groups account for 12.3% of Panama's population. Five speak Chibchan languages and are characterized by low genetic diversity and a high level of differentiation. In addition, no evidence of differential structuring between maternally and paternally inherited genes has been reported in isthmian Chibchan cultural groups. Recent data have shown that 83% of the Panamanian general population harbour mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of Native American ancestry. Considering differential male/female mortality at European contact and multiple degrees of geographical and genetic isolation over the subsequent five centuries, the Y-chromosome Native American component is expected to vary across different geographic regions and communities in Panama. To address this issue, we investigated Y-chromosome variation in 408 modern males from the nine provinces of Panama and one indigenous territory (the comarca of Kuna Yala). In contrast to mtDNA data, the Y-chromosome Native American component (haplogroup Q) exceeds 50% only in three populations facing the Caribbean Sea: the comarca of Kuna Yala and Bocas del Toro province where Chibchan languages are spoken by the majority, and the province of Colón where many Kuna and people of mixed indigenous-African-and-European descent live. Elsewhere the Old World component is dominant and mostly represented by western Eurasian haplogroups, which signal the strong male genetic impact of invaders. Sub-Saharan African input accounts for 5.9% of male haplotypes. This reflects the consequences of the colonial Atlantic slave trade and more recent influxes of West Indians of African heritage. Overall, our findings reveal a local evolution of the male Native American ancestral gene pool, and a strong but geographically

  4. Simultaneous Correlative Scanning Electron and High-NA Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Effting, Andries P. J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Lucas, Miriam S.; Hardwick, James C.; Wepf, Roger A.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM) analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown. PMID:23409024

  5. Dynamics of Coulomb correlations in semiconductors in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fromer, Neil Alan

    2002-05-01

    Current theories have been successful in explaining many nonlinear optical experiments in undoped semiconductors. However, these theories require a ground state which is assumed to be uncorrelated. Strongly correlated systems of current interest, such as a two dimensional electron gas in a high magnetic field, cannot be explained in this manner because the correlations in the ground state and the low energy collective excitations cause a breakdown of the conventional techniques. We perform ultrafast time-resolved four-wave mixing on $n$-modulation doped quantum wells, which contain a quasi-two dimensional electron gas, in a large magnetic field, when only a single Landau level is excited and also when two levels are excited together. We find evidence for memory effects and as strong coupling between the Landau levels induced by the electron gas. We compare our results with simulations based on a new microscopic approach capable of treating the collective effects and correlations of the doped electrons, and find a good qualitative agreement. By looking at the individual contributions to the model, we determine that the unusual correlation effects seen in the experiments are caused by the scattering of photo-excited electron-hole pairs with the electron gas, leading to new excited states which are not present in undoped semiconductors, and also by exciton-exciton interactions mediated by the long-lived collective excitations of the electron gas, inter-Landau level magnetoplasmons.

  6. What are our AIMs? Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Use of Ancestry Estimation in Disease Research

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Janelle S.; Edwards, Karen L.; Fullerton, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ancestry estimation serves as a tool to identify genetic contributions to disease but may contribute to racial discrimination and stigmatization. We sought to understand user perspectives on the benefits and harms of ancestry estimation to inform research practice and contribute to debates about the use of race and ancestry in genetics. Methods Key informant interviews with 22 scientists were conducted to examine scientists’ understandings of the benefits and harms of ancestry estimation. Results Three main perspectives were observed among key informant scientists who use ancestry estimation in genetic epidemiology research. Population geneticists self identified as educators who controlled the meaning and application of ancestry estimation in research. Clinician-researchers were optimistic about the application of ancestry estimation to individualized risk assessment and personalized medicine. Epidemiologists remained ambivalent toward ancestry estimation and suggested a continued role for race in their research. Conclusions We observed an imbalance of control over the meaning and application of ancestry estimation among disciplines that may result in unwarranted or premature translation of ancestry estimation into medicine and public health. Differences in disciplinary perspectives need to be addressed if translational benefits of genetic ancestry estimation are to be realized. PMID:25419472

  7. High mammographic density in women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Percent mammographic density (PMD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer and is known to be approximately 60% heritable. Here we report a finding of an association between genetic ancestry and adjusted PMD. Methods We selected self-identified Caucasian women in the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute Cohort whose screening mammograms placed them in the top or bottom quintiles of age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Our final dataset included 474 women with the highest adjusted PMD and 469 with the lowest genotyped on the Illumina 1 M platform. Principal component analysis (PCA) and identity-by-descent analyses allowed us to infer the women's genetic ancestry and correlate it with adjusted PMD. Results Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, as defined by the first principal component of PCA and identity-by-descent analyses, represented approximately 15% of the sample. Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, defined by the first principal component of PCA, was associated with higher adjusted PMD (P = 0.004). Using multivariate regression to adjust for epidemiologic factors associated with PMD, including age at parity and use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, did not attenuate the association. Conclusions Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, based on genetic analysis, are more likely to have high age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Ashkenazi Jews may have a unique set of genetic variants or environmental risk factors that increase mammographic density. PMID:23668689

  8. A spectroscopic fingerprint of electron correlation in high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gweon, Gey-Hong; Matsuyama, Kazue; Gu, G.-D.; Schneeloch, J.; Zhong, R. D.; Liu, T. S.

    2014-03-01

    The so-called ``strange metal phase'' of high temperature (high Tc) superconductors remains at the heart of the high Tc mystery. Better experimental data and insightful theoretical work would improve our understanding of this enigmatic phase. In particular, the recent advance in angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES), incorporating low photon energies (~ 7 eV), has given a much more refined view of the many body interaction in these materials. Here, we report a new ARPES feature of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ that we demonstrate to have the key ability to distinguish between different classes of theories of the normal state. This feature-the anomaly in the nodal many body density of states (nMBDOS)-is clearly observed in the low energy ARPES data, but also observed in more conventional high energy ARPES data, when a sufficient temperature range is covered. We show that key characteristics of this anomaly are explained by a strong electron correlation model; the electron-hole asymmetry and the momentum dependent self energy emerge as key required ingredients. In particular, we find that, among many theories available for comparison, the phenomenological extremely correlated Fermi liquid (ECFL) model scores the best in terms of explaining the new anomaly feature.

  9. Inter-laboratory evaluation of the EUROFORGEN Global ancestry-informative SNP panel by massively parallel sequencing using the Ion PGM™.

    PubMed

    Eduardoff, M; Gross, T E; Santos, C; de la Puente, M; Ballard, D; Strobl, C; Børsting, C; Morling, N; Fusco, L; Hussing, C; Egyed, B; Souto, L; Uacyisrael, J; Syndercombe Court, D; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V; Schneider, P M; Parson, W; Phillips, C; Parson, W; Phillips, C

    2016-07-01

    The EUROFORGEN Global ancestry-informative SNP (AIM-SNPs) panel is a forensic multiplex of 128 markers designed to differentiate an individual's ancestry from amongst the five continental population groups of Africa, Europe, East Asia, Native America, and Oceania. A custom multiplex of AmpliSeq™ PCR primers was designed for the Global AIM-SNPs to perform massively parallel sequencing using the Ion PGM™ system. This study assessed individual SNP genotyping precision using the Ion PGM™, the forensic sensitivity of the multiplex using dilution series, degraded DNA plus simple mixtures, and the ancestry differentiation power of the final panel design, which required substitution of three original ancestry-informative SNPs with alternatives. Fourteen populations that had not been previously analyzed were genotyped using the custom multiplex and these studies allowed assessment of genotyping performance by comparison of data across five laboratories. Results indicate a low level of genotyping error can still occur from sequence misalignment caused by homopolymeric tracts close to the target SNP, despite careful scrutiny of candidate SNPs at the design stage. Such sequence misalignment required the exclusion of component SNP rs2080161 from the Global AIM-SNPs panel. However, the overall genotyping precision and sensitivity of this custom multiplex indicates the Ion PGM™ assay for the Global AIM-SNPs is highly suitable for forensic ancestry analysis with massively parallel sequencing. PMID:27208666

  10. Statistical classification methods for estimating ancestry using morphoscopic traits.

    PubMed

    Hefner, Joseph T; Ousley, Stephen D

    2014-07-01

    Ancestry assessments using cranial morphoscopic traits currently rely on subjective trait lists and observer experience rather than empirical support. The trait list approach, which is untested, unverified, and in many respects unrefined, is relied upon because of tradition and subjective experience. Our objective was to examine the utility of frequently cited morphoscopic traits and to explore eleven appropriate and novel methods for classifying an unknown cranium into one of several reference groups. Based on these results, artificial neural networks (aNNs), OSSA, support vector machines, and random forest models showed mean classification accuracies of at least 85%. The aNNs had the highest overall classification rate (87.8%), and random forests show the smallest difference between the highest (90.4%) and lowest (76.5%) classification accuracies. The results of this research demonstrate that morphoscopic traits can be successfully used to assess ancestry without relying only on the experience of the observer. PMID:24646108

  11. High intensity positron beam and angular correlation experiments at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.; Fluss, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    A positron beam apparatus that produces a variable energy positron beam with sufficient intensity to perform new positron experiments in an ultrahigh vacuum environment has been installed at the Lawrence Livermore 100 MeV electron linac. We have installed two large area position sensitive gamma-ray detectors to measure angular correlations in two dimensions and a separate highly collimated detector to measure positronium energy distributions by time-of-flight velocity determination. Data from measurements on single crystals of Cu will be described.

  12. A Perturbation Expansion Method to Study Highly Correlated Spins

    SciTech Connect

    Anda, E. V.; Chiappe, G.; Busser, Carlos A; Davidovich, M. A.; Martins, G. B.; Heidrich-Meisner, F.; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical algorithm to study dynamical spin dependent properties of local highly correlated structures. The method consists in diagonalizing a finite cluster containing the many-body terms of the Hamil- tonian and embedding it into the rest of the system, the Em- bedding Cluster Approximation (ECA), combined with Wil- son s ideas of logarithmic discretization of the representa- tion of the Hamiltonian, the Logarithm Discretization Em- bedded Cluster Approximation (LDECA). The physics as- sociated to a dot and a side-coupled double dot connected to leads are discussed in detail.

  13. Ancestry and pharmacogenomics of relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun J; Cheng, Cheng; Devidas, Meenakshi; Cao, Xueyuan; Fan, Yiping; Campana, Dario; Yang, Wenjian; Neale, Geoff; Cox, Nancy J; Scheet, Paul; Borowitz, Michael J; Winick, Naomi J; Martin, Paul L; Willman, Cheryl L; Bowman, W Paul; Camitta, Bruce M; Carroll, Andrew; Reaman, Gregory H; Carroll, William L; Loh, Mignon; Hunger, Stephen P; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2011-03-01

    Although five-year survival rates for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are now over 80% in most industrialized countries, not all children have benefited equally from this progress. Ethnic differences in survival after childhood ALL have been reported in many clinical studies, with poorer survival observed among African Americans or those with Hispanic ethnicity when compared with European Americans or Asians. The causes of ethnic differences remain uncertain, although both genetic and non-genetic factors are likely important. Interrogating genome-wide germline SNP genotypes in an unselected large cohort of children with ALL, we observed that the component of genomic variation that co-segregated with Native American ancestry was associated with risk of relapse (P = 0.0029) even after adjusting for known prognostic factors (P = 0.017). Ancestry-related differences in relapse risk were abrogated by the addition of a single extra phase of chemotherapy, indicating that modifications to therapy can mitigate the ancestry-related risk of relapse. PMID:21297632

  14. High correlations between temperature and nitric oxide in the thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, D. R.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Hunt, L. A.; Tobiska, W. Kent

    2015-07-01

    Obtaining accurate predictions of the neutral density in the thermosphere has been a long-standing problem. During geomagnetic storms the auroral heating in the polar ionospheres quickly raises the temperature of the thermosphere, resulting in higher neutral densities that exert a greater drag force on objects in low Earth orbit. Rapid increases and decreases in the temperature and density may occur within a couple days. A key parameter in the thermosphere is the total amount of nitric oxide (NO). The production of NO is accelerated by the auroral heating, and since NO is an efficient radiator of thermal energy, higher concentrations of this molecule accelerate the rate at which the thermosphere cools. This paper describes an improved technique that calculates changes in the global temperature of the thermosphere. Starting from an empirical model of the Poynting flux into the ionosphere, a set of differential equations derives the minimum, global value of the exospheric temperature, which can be used in a neutral density model to calculate the global values. The relative variations in NO content are used to obtain more accurate cooling rates. Comparisons with the global rate of NO emissions that are measured with the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument show that there is very good agreement with the predicted values. The NO emissions correlate highly with the total auroral heating that has been integrated over time. We also show that the NO emissions are highly correlated with thermospheric temperature, as well as indices of solar extreme ultraviolet radiation.

  15. Spatial Instabilities, Homogeneities and Proximity Effects: Highly Correlated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dynes, Robert C.

    2008-10-31

    We have developed a superconducting scanning tunneling microscope (S-STM) which is a direct and local probe of the pair wave function of superconducting materials via the Josephson effect and quasiparticle spectra via scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The novel feature of this device is a superconducting tip (Pb with an Ag capping layer) in close proximity to a superconducting sample to form a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction. The operation of this S-STM has been verified in the observation of Josephson tunneling between the tip and different sample systems including Pb films and NbSe{sub 2}. This instrument was employed in the study of High T{sub c} superconductors and spatial inhomogeneities. The major accomplishments in the current grant period are observations of c-axis Josephson tunneling between a conventional superconductor (Pb) and variously doped BSSCO samples. These observations are reported: (1) C-axis Josephson couplings between Pb and both OP and OV-BSCCO. This is surprising if BSCCO is strictly a d-wave superconductor; (2) ICRN of the OP sample seemed to be much smaller than those of OV samples; (3) ICRN inhomogeneity is correlated with the gap inhomogeneity on the length scale of ξ in the OV samples; (4) Inverse correlation between ICRN and Δ in OV samples; (5) Degradations of the superconductivity of BSCCO by high current density.

  16. Ancestry informative markers for distinguishing between Thai populations based on genome-wide association datasets.

    PubMed

    Vongpaisarnsin, Kornkiat; Listman, Jennifer Beth; Malison, Robert T; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-07-01

    The main purpose of this work was to identify a set of AIMs that stratify the genetic structure and diversity of the Thai population from a high-throughput autosomal genome-wide association study. In this study, more than one million SNPs from the international HapMap database and the Thai depression genome-wide association study have been examined to identify ancestry informative markers (AIMs) that distinguish between Thai populations. An efficient strategy is proposed to identify and characterize such SNPs and to test high-resolution SNP data from international HapMap populations. The best AIMs are identified to stratify the population and to infer genetic ancestry structure. A total of 124 AIMs were clearly clustered geographically across the continent, whereas only 89 AIMs stratified the Thai population from East Asian populations. Finally, a set of 273 AIMs was able to distinguish northern from southern Thai subpopulations. These markers will be of particular value in identifying the ethnic origins in regions where matching by self-reports is unavailable or unreliable, which usually occurs in real forensic cases. PMID:25759192

  17. Evaluating a subset of ancestry informative SNPs for discriminating among Southwest Asian and circum-Mediterranean populations.

    PubMed

    Bulbul, Ozlem; Cherni, Lotfi; Khodjet-El-Khil, Houssein; Rajeevan, Haseena; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2016-07-01

    Many different published sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and/or insertion-deletion polymorphisms (InDels) can serve as ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to distinguish among continental regions of the world. For a focus on Southwest Asian ancestry we chose to start with the Kidd Lab panel of 55 ancestry-informative SNPs (AISNPs) because it already provided good global reference data (FROG-kb: frog.med.yale.edu) in a set of 73 population samples distinguishing at least 8 biogeographic clusters of populations. This panel serves as a good first tier ancestry panel. We are now interested in identifying region-specific second tier panels for more refined distinction among populations within each of the global regions. We have begun studying the global region centered on Southwest Asia and the region encompassing the Mediterranean Sea. We have incorporated 10 populations from North Africa, Turkey and Iran and included 31 of the original 73 populations and eleven 1000 Genomes Phase3 populations for a total of 3129 individuals from 52 populations, all typed for the 55 AISNPs. We have then identified the subset of the 55 AISNPs that are most informative for this region of the world using Heatmap, Fst, and Informativeness analyses to eliminate those SNPs essentially redundant or providing no information among populations in this region, reducing the number of SNPs to 32. STRUCTURE and PCA analyses show the remaining 32 SNPs identify the North African cluster and appropriately include the Turkish and Iranian samples with the Southwest Asian cluster. These markers provide the basis for building an improved, optimized panel of AISNPs that provides additional information on differences among populations in this part of the world. The data have also allowed an examination of the accuracy of the ancestry inference based on 32 SNPs for the newly studied populations from this region. The likelihood ratio approach to ancestry inference embodied in FROG-kb provides

  18. Genomics assisted ancestry deconvolution in grape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Vitis (the grapevine) is a group of highly diverse, diploid woody perennial vines consisting of approximately 60 species from across the northern hemisphere. It is the world’s most valuable horticultural crop with ~8 million hectares planted, most of which is processed into wine. To gain i...

  19. Academic correlates of Taiwanese senior high school students' happiness.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Yen; Lu, Luo

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relation between academic factors and senior high school students' general happiness using a nationally representative sample of 11,061 11th graders in Taiwan. Pearson correlation analyses indicated that English teacher-perceived academic performance, mathematics teacher-perceived academic performance, teacher academic support, classmate academic support, organizational processes, and school satisfaction were positively related to students' general happiness,while disturbance in class was negatively related. Regression analysis found that objective academic achievement, mathematics teacher-perceived academic achievement, classmate academic support, disturbance in class, organizational processes, and most importantly, students' overall appraisals of their own happiness with school helped predict students' general happiness, account for 18.4% of the total variance. Among these variables, objective academic achievement and disturbance in class were negatively associated with general happiness. Some of the study's findings are consistent with those in the literature and some extend established accounts, while others point to future research directions. PMID:20432611

  20. Molecular Variation in Neuropeptide Y and Bone Mineral Density Among Men of African Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, Louis J.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Miljkovic, Iva; Nestlerode, Cara S.; Kuipers, Allison L.; Bunker, Clareann H.; Patrick, Alan L.; Wheeler, Victor W.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a physiological candidate gene for the regulation of body weight and has more recently been implicated in regulating bone mass. The current study sought to test if inherited variation in NPY might influence BMD in a population of African-ancestry men who have high bone mineral density (BMD). We genotyped 17 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the NPY gene region in 1,113 randomly selected men of African ancestry aged ≥40 years and tested for association with anthropometric characteristics and proximal femur BMD. The homozygous rare genotype of four SNPs was associated with a 0.92–1.59% decrease in stature (corrected P < 0.05). No SNP was associated with body mass index or body weight. Two SNPs in a 5-kb linkage disequilibrium block encompassing exons 3 and 4 were associated with proximal femur BMD, adjusted for age, body weight, and height (corrected P < 0.05). These results suggest that genetic variation at the NPY locus may contribute to bone density, independently of body weight. PMID:19865784

  1. Developmental validation of mitochondrial DNA genotyping assays for adept matrilineal inference of biogeographic ancestry at a continental level.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, Lakshmi; van Oven, Mannis; Weiler, Natalie; Harteveld, Joyce; Wirken, Laura; Sijen, Titia; de Knijff, Peter; Kayser, Manfred

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be used for matrilineal biogeographic ancestry prediction and can thus provide investigative leads towards identifying unknown suspects, when conventional autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) profiling fails to provide a match. Recently, six multiplex genotyping assays targeting 62 ancestry-informative mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphisms (mt-SNPs) were developed. This hierarchical system of assays allows detection of the major haplogroups present in Africa, America, Western Eurasia, Eastern Eurasia, Australia and Oceania, thus revealing the broad geographic region of matrilineal origin of a DNA donor. Here, we provide a forensic developmental validation study of five multiplex assays targeting all the 62 ancestry-informative mt-SNPs following the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) guidelines. We demonstrate that the assays are highly sensitive; being able to produce full profiles at input DNA amounts of as little as 1pg. The assays were shown to be highly robust and efficient in providing information from degraded samples and from simulated casework samples of different substrates such as blood, semen, hair, saliva and trace DNA samples. Reproducible results were successfully achieved from concordance testing across three independent laboratories depicting the ease and reliability of these assays. Overall, our results demonstrate the suitability of these five mt-SNP assays for application to forensic casework and other purposes aiming to establish an individual's matrilineal genetic ancestry. With this validated tool, it is now possible to determine the matrilineal biogeographic origin of unknown individuals on the level of continental resolution from forensic DNA samples to provide investigative leads in criminal and missing person cases where autosomal STR profiling is uninformative. PMID:24631695

  2. Why do hypertensive patients of African ancestry respond better to calcium blockers and diuretics than to ACE inhibitors and β-adrenergic blockers? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinicians are encouraged to take an individualized approach when treating hypertension in patients of African ancestry, but little is known about why the individual patient may respond well to calcium blockers and diuretics, but generally has an attenuated response to drugs inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system and to β-adrenergic blockers. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the factors associated with the differential drug response of patients of African ancestry to antihypertensive drug therapy. Methods Using the methodology of the systematic reviews narrative synthesis approach, we sought for published or unpublished studies that could explain the differential clinical efficacy of antihypertensive drugs in patients of African ancestry. PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, African Index Medicus and the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency databases were searched without language restriction from their inception through June 2012. Results We retrieved 3,763 papers, and included 72 reports that mainly considered the 4 major classes of antihypertensive drugs, calcium blockers, diuretics, drugs that interfere with the renin-angiotensin system and β-adrenergic blockers. Pharmacokinetics, plasma renin and genetic polymorphisms did not well predict the response of patients of African ancestry to antihypertensive drugs. An emerging view that low nitric oxide and high creatine kinase may explain individual responses to antihypertensive drugs unites previous observations, but currently clinical data are very limited. Conclusion Available data are inconclusive regarding why patients of African ancestry display the typical response to antihypertensive drugs. In lieu of biochemical or pharmacogenomic parameters, self-defined African ancestry seems the best available predictor of individual responses to antihypertensive drugs. PMID:23721258

  3. Ancestry Matters: Patrilineage Growth and Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xi; Campbell, Cameron D.; Lee, James Z.

    2016-01-01

    Patrilineality, the organization of kinship, inheritance, and other key social processes based on patrilineal male descent, has been a salient feature of social organization in China and many other societies for centuries. Because continuity or growth of the patrilineage was the central focus of reproductive strategies in such societies, we introduce the number of patrilineal male descendants generations later as a stratification outcome. By reconstructing and analyzing 20,000 patrilineages in two prospective, multi-generational population databases from 18th and 19th century China, we show that patrilineages founded by high status males had higher growth rates for the next 150 years. The elevated growth rate of these patrilineages was due more to their having a lower probability of extinction at each point in time than to surviving patrilineal male descendants having larger numbers of sons on average. As a result, patrilineal male descendants of high status males account for a disproportionately large share of the male population in later generations. In China and elsewhere, patrilineal kin network characteristics influence individuals’ life chances; thus effects of a male founder’s characteristics on patrilineage size many generations later represent an indirect channel of status transmission that has not been considered previously. PMID:27041745

  4. Systematic analytical and numerical studies of highly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shan-Wen

    Strong electron correlations in condensed matter systems give rise to a wide range of striking physical properties, producing phenomena as varied as high temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator transitions and the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects. Quantum critical systems also exhibit strong correlations between a large number of degrees of freedom. In this thesis we study these complicated systems using a combination of analytical and numerical approaches. We perform systematic investigations, which adds to the robustness of our results. We develop a new method, based on the density-matrix renormalization-group (DMRG) algorithm combined with finite-size scaling analysis, to study critical behavior in quantum spin chains and extract critical exponents. Accurate results are obtained for spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic chains and the spin-1 chain at the critical point separating the Haldane and the dimerized phases. Disorder in a system can change its properties drastically. Plateau transitions in the integer quantum Hall effect provide the clearest example of quantum critical behavior in a disordered system. We provide analytical proof that the Chalker-Coddington model, which is used to describe the plateau transitions, is quantum critical. Starting from a field theory based on this model, equivalent to a non-Hermitian supersymmetric spin chain, we prove quantum criticality by a Lieb-Schultz-Mattis type theorem. This approach was motivated by numerical results obtained using the DMRG/finite-size scaling method. Our generalized LSM theorem also applies to the spin quantum Hall effect, which can appear in disordered d-wave superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry. The last part of the thesis is a renormalization-group study of two dimensional interacting electron systems. We obtain results relevant to high-temperature superconductors and also to the family of kappa - (BEDT - TTF)2X organic superconductors. At half filling, the fully nested

  5. Estimating Genetic Ancestry Proportions from Faces

    PubMed Central

    Klimentidis, Yann C.; Shriver, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Ethnicity can be a means by which people identify themselves and others. This type of identification mediates many kinds of social interactions and may reflect adaptations to a long history of group living in humans. Recent admixture in the US between groups from different continents, and the historically strong emphasis on phenotypic differences between members of these groups, presents an opportunity to examine the degree of concordance between estimates of group membership based on genetic markers and on visually-based estimates of facial features. We first measured the degree of Native American, European, African and East Asian genetic admixture in a sample of 14 self-identified Hispanic individuals, chosen to cover a broad range of Native American and European genetic admixture proportions. We showed frontal and side-view photographs of the 14 individuals to 241 subjects living in New Mexico, and asked them to estimate the degree of NA admixture for each individual. We assess the overall concordance for each observer based on an aggregated measure of the difference between the observer and the genetic estimates. We find that observers reach a significantly higher degree of concordance than expected by chance, and that the degree of concordance as well as the direction of the discrepancy in estimates differs based on the ethnicity of the observer, but not on the observers' age or sex. This study highlights the potentially high degree of discordance between physical appearance and genetic measures of ethnicity, as well as how perceptions of ethnic affiliation are context-specific. We compare our findings to those of previous studies and discuss their implications. PMID:19223962

  6. Genetically determined ancestry is more informative than self-reported race in HIV-infected and -exposed children.

    PubMed

    Spector, Stephen A; Brummel, Sean S; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Maihofer, Adam X; Singh, Kumud K; Purswani, Murli U; Williams, Paige L; Hazra, Rohan; Van Dyke, Russell; Seage, George R

    2016-09-01

    The Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS), the largest ongoing longitudinal study of perinatal HIV-infected (PHIV) and HIV-exposed, uninfected (PHEU) children in the United States, comprises the Surveillance Monitoring of Antiretroviral Therapy [ART] Toxicities (SMARTT) Study in PHEU children and the Adolescent Master Protocol (AMP) that includes PHIV and PHEU children ≥7 years. Although race/ethnicity is often used to assess health outcomes, this approach remains controversial and may fail to accurately reflect the backgrounds of ancestry-diverse populations as represented in the PHACS participants.In this study, we compared genetically determined ancestry (GDA) and self-reported race/ethnicity (SRR) in the PHACS cohort. GDA was estimated using a highly discriminative panel of 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms and compared to SRR. Because SRR was similar between the PHIV and PHEU, and between the AMP and SMARTT cohorts, data for all unique 1958 participants were combined.According to SRR, 63% of study participants identified as Black/African-American, 27% White, and 34% Hispanic. Using the highest percentage of ancestry/ethnicity to identify GDA, 9.5% of subjects were placed in the incorrect superpopulation based on SRR. When ≥50% or ≥75% GDA of a given superpopulation was required, 12% and 25%, respectively, of subjects were placed in the incorrect superpopulation based on SRR, and the percent of subjects classified as multiracial increased. Of 126 participants with unidentified SRR, 71% were genetically identified as Eurasian.GDA provides a more robust assessment of race/ethnicity when compared to self-report, and study participants with unidentified SRR could be assigned GDA using genetic markers. In addition, identification of continental ancestry removes the taxonomic identification of race as a variable when identifying risk for clinical outcomes. PMID:27603370

  7. Polymorphisms of Estrogen Metabolism-Related Genes and Prostate Cancer Risk in Two Populations of African Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Emeville, Elise; Ferdinand, Séverine; Punga, Augustin; Lufuma, Simon; Blanchet, Pascal; Romana, Marc; Multigner, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Background Estrogens are thought to play a critical role in prostate carcinogenesis. It has been suggested that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism are risk factors for prostate cancer. However, few studies have been performed on populations of African ancestry, which are known to have a high risk of prostate cancer. Objective We investigated whether functional polymorphisms of CYP17, CYP19, CYP1B1, COMT and UGT1A1 affected the risk of prostate cancer in two different populations of African ancestry. Methods In Guadeloupe (French West Indies), we compared 498 prostate cancer patients and 565 control subjects. In Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo), 162 prostate cancer patients were compared with 144 controls. Gene polymorphisms were determined by the SNaPshot technique or short tandem repeat PCR analysis. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results The AA genotype and the A allele of rs4680 (COMT) appeared to be inversely associated with the risk of prostate cancer in adjusted models for both Afro-Caribbean and native African men. For the A allele, a significant inverse association was observed among cases with low-grade Gleason scores and localized clinical stage, in both populations. Conclusions These preliminary results support the hypothesis that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism may modulate the risk of prostate cancer in populations of African ancestry. PMID:27074016

  8. Empirical testing of a 23-AIMs panel of SNPs for ancestry evaluations in four major US populations.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangpei; Warshauer, David H; King, Jonathan L; Churchill, Jennifer D; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Ancestry informative markers (AIMs) can be used to determine population affiliation of the donors of forensic samples. In order to examine ancestry evaluations of the four major populations in the USA, 23 highly informative AIMs were identified from the International HapMap project. However, the efficacy of these 23 AIMs could not be fully evaluated in silico. In this study, these 23 SNPs were multiplexed to test their actual performance in ancestry evaluations. Genotype data were obtained from 189 individuals collected from four American populations. One SNP (rs12149261) on chromosome 16 was removed from this panel because it was duplicated on chromosome 1. The resultant 22-AIMs panel was able to empirically resolve the four major populations as in the in silico study. Eight individuals were assigned to a different group than indicated on their samples. The assignments of the 22 AIMs for these samples were consistent with AIMs results from the ForenSeq(TM) panel. No departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) were detected for all 22 SNPs in four US populations (after removing the eight problematic samples). The principal component analysis (PCA) results indicated that 181 individuals from these populations were assigned to the expected groups. These 22 SNPs can contribute to the candidate AIMs pool for potential forensic identification purposes in major US populations. PMID:26914801

  9. Admixture dynamics in Hispanics: A shift in the nuclear genetic ancestry of a South American population isolate

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Gabriel; Montoya, Patricia; García, Jenny; Soto, Ivan; Bourgeois, Stephane; Carvajal, Luis; Labuda, Damian; Alvarez, Victor; Ospina, Jorge; Hedrick, Philip W.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2006-01-01

    Although it is well established that Hispanics generally have a mixed Native American, African, and European ancestry, the dynamics of admixture at the foundation of Hispanic populations is heterogeneous and poorly documented. Genetic analyses are potentially very informative for probing the early demographic history of these populations. Here we evaluate the genetic structure and admixture dynamics of a province in northwest Colombia (Antioquia), which prior analyses indicate was founded mostly by Spanish men and native women. We examined surname, Y chromosome, and mtDNA diversity in a geographically structured sample of the region and obtained admixture estimates with highly informative autosomal and X chromosome markers. We found evidence of reduced surname diversity and support for the introduction of several common surnames by single founders, consistent with the isolation of Antioquia after the colonial period. Y chromosome and mtDNA data indicate little population substructure among founder Antioquian municipalities. Interestingly, despite a nearly complete Native American mtDNA background, Antioquia has a markedly predominant European ancestry at the autosomal and X chromosome level, which suggests that, after foundation, continuing admixture with Spanish men (but not with native women) increased the European nuclear ancestry of Antioquia. This scenario is consistent with historical information and with results from population genetics theory. PMID:16648268

  10. The paternal ancestry of Uttarakhand does not imitate the classical caste system of India.

    PubMed

    Negi, Neetu; Tamang, Rakesh; Pande, Veena; Sharma, Amrita; Shah, Anish; Reddy, Alla G; Vishnupriya, Satti; Singh, Lalji; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2016-02-01

    Although, there have been rigorous research on the Indian caste system by several disciplines, it is still one of the most controversial socioscientific topic. Previous genetic studies on the subcontinent have supported a classical hierarchal sharing of genetic component by various castes of India. In the present study, we have used high-resolution mtDNA and Y chromosomal markers to characterize the genetic structuring of the Uttarakhand populations in the context of neighboring regions. Furthermore, we have tested whether the genetic structuring of caste populations at different social levels of this region, follow the classical chaturvarna system. Interestingly, we found that this region showed a high level of variation for East Eurasian ancestry in both maternal and paternal lines of descent. Moreover, the intrapopulation comparison showed a high level of heterogeneity, likely because of different caste hierarchy, interpolated on asymmetric admixture of populations inhabiting on both sides of the Himalayas. PMID:26511066

  11. Effect of Genetic African Ancestry on eGFR and Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Girish N.; Belbin, Gillian; Lotay, Vaneet; Wyatt, Christina; Gottesman, Omri; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Kenny, Eimear E.; Peter, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Self-reported ancestry, genetically determined ancestry, and APOL1 polymorphisms are associated with variation in kidney function and related disease risk, but the relative importance of these factors remains unclear. We estimated the global proportion of African ancestry for 9048 individuals at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan (3189 African Americans, 1721 European Americans, and 4138 Hispanic/Latino Americans by self-report) using genome-wide genotype data. CKD-EPI eGFR and genotypes of three APOL1 coding variants were available. In admixed African Americans and Hispanic/Latino Americans, serum creatinine values increased as African ancestry increased (per 10% increase in African ancestry, creatinine values increased 1% in African Americans and 0.9% in Hispanic/Latino Americans; P≤1x10−7). eGFR was likewise significantly associated with African genetic ancestry in both populations. In contrast, APOL1 risk haplotypes were significantly associated with CKD, eGFR<45 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and ESRD, with effects increasing with worsening disease states and the contribution of genetic African ancestry decreasing in parallel. Using genetic ancestry in the eGFR equation to reclassify patients as black on the basis of ≥50% African ancestry resulted in higher eGFR for 14.7% of Hispanic/Latino Americans and lower eGFR for 4.1% of African Americans, affecting CKD staging in 4.3% and 1% of participants, respectively. Reclassified individuals had electrolyte values consistent with their newly assigned CKD stage. In summary, proportion of African ancestry was significantly associated with normal-range creatinine and eGFR, whereas APOL1 risk haplotypes drove the associations with CKD. Recalculation of eGFR on the basis of genetic ancestry affected CKD staging and warrants additional investigation. PMID:25349204

  12. Overexpression of Eg5 correlates with high grade astrocytic neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liqiong; Liu, Xichun; Mare, Marcus; Dumont, Aaron S; Zhang, Haitao; Yan, Dong; Xiong, Zhenggang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between Eg5 and histopathological grade of astrocytoma, Eg5 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical examination on 88 specimens including 25 cases of glioblastoma (WHO grade IV), 22 cases of anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO grade III), 20 cases of diffuse astrocytoma (WHO grade II), and 21 cases of pilocytic astrocytoma (WHO grade I). The histopathological characteristics and Eg5 expression level of each tumor were assessed and statistically analyzed. Astrocytic tumors exhibited significant correlation of expression of Eg5 with higher WHO histopathological grades (p < 0.001). Eg5 is expressed in 51-98% (mean 76.88%) of neoplastic cells in glioblastoma, 34-57% (mean 43.59%) of neoplastic cells in anaplastic astrocytoma, 6-36% (mean 18.60%) of neoplastic cells in diffuse astrocytoma, and 2-28% (mean 13.48%) of neoplastic cells in pilocytic astrocytoma. In conclusion, overexpression of Eg5 associates with high-grade astrocytic neoplasm, and it may represent an independent diagnostic and prognostic factor in grading astrocytic tumors and predicting prognosis of astrocytic tumor patients. PMID:26456023

  13. Covariance fitting of highly-correlated data in lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Boram; Jang, Yong-Chull; Jung, Chulwoo; Lee, Weonjong

    2013-07-01

    We address a frequently-asked question on the covariance fitting of highly-correlated data such as our B K data based on the SU(2) staggered chiral perturbation theory. Basically, the essence of the problem is that we do not have a fitting function accurate enough to fit extremely precise data. When eigenvalues of the covariance matrix are small, even a tiny error in the fitting function yields a large chi-square value and spoils the fitting procedure. We have applied a number of prescriptions available in the market, such as the cut-off method, modified covariance matrix method, and Bayesian method. We also propose a brand new method, the eigenmode shift (ES) method, which allows a full covariance fitting without modifying the covariance matrix at all. We provide a pedagogical example of data analysis in which the cut-off method manifestly fails in fitting, but the rest work well. In our case of the B K fitting, the diagonal approximation, the cut-off method, the ES method, and the Bayesian method work reasonably well in an engineering sense. However, interpreting the meaning of χ 2 is easier in the case of the ES method and the Bayesian method in a theoretical sense aesthetically. Hence, the ES method can be a useful alternative optional tool to check the systematic error caused by the covariance fitting procedure.

  14. Characterizing Race/Ethnicity and Genetic Ancestry for 100,000 Subjects in the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) Cohort.

    PubMed

    Banda, Yambazi; Kvale, Mark N; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Hesselson, Stephanie E; Ranatunga, Dilrini; Tang, Hua; Sabatti, Chiara; Croen, Lisa A; Dispensa, Brad P; Henderson, Mary; Iribarren, Carlos; Jorgenson, Eric; Kushi, Lawrence H; Ludwig, Dana; Olberg, Diane; Quesenberry, Charles P; Rowell, Sarah; Sadler, Marianne; Sakoda, Lori C; Sciortino, Stanley; Shen, Ling; Smethurst, David; Somkin, Carol P; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Walter, Lawrence; Whitmer, Rachel A; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Schaefer, Catherine; Risch, Neil

    2015-08-01

    Using genome-wide genotypes, we characterized the genetic structure of 103,006 participants in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California multi-ethnic Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging Cohort and analyzed the relationship to self-reported race/ethnicity. Participants endorsed any of 23 race/ethnicity/nationality categories, which were collapsed into seven major race/ethnicity groups. By self-report the cohort is 80.8% white and 19.2% minority; 93.8% endorsed a single race/ethnicity group, while 6.2% endorsed two or more. Principal component (PC) and admixture analyses were generally consistent with prior studies. Approximately 17% of subjects had genetic ancestry from more than one continent, and 12% were genetically admixed, considering only nonadjacent geographical origins. Self-reported whites were spread on a continuum along the first two PCs, indicating extensive mixing among European nationalities. Self-identified East Asian nationalities correlated with genetic clustering, consistent with extensive endogamy. Individuals of mixed East Asian-European genetic ancestry were easily identified; we also observed a modest amount of European genetic ancestry in individuals self-identified as Filipinos. Self-reported African Americans and Latinos showed extensive European and African genetic ancestry, and Native American genetic ancestry for the latter. Among 3741 genetically identified parent-child pairs, 93% were concordant for self-reported race/ethnicity; among 2018 genetically identified full-sib pairs, 96% were concordant; the lower rate for parent-child pairs was largely due to intermarriage. The parent-child pairs revealed a trend toward increasing exogamy over time; the presence in the cohort of individuals endorsing multiple race/ethnicity categories creates interesting challenges and future opportunities for genetic epidemiologic studies. PMID:26092716

  15. Phylogenomic analyses reveal convergent patterns of adaptive evolution in elephant and human ancestries.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Morris; Sterner, Kirstin N; Islam, Munirul; Uddin, Monica; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Lipovich, Leonard; Jia, Hui; Grossman, Lawrence I; Wildman, Derek E

    2009-12-01

    Specific sets of brain-expressed genes, such as aerobic energy metabolism genes, evolved adaptively in the ancestry of humans and may have evolved adaptively in the ancestry of other large-brained mammals. The recent addition of genomes from two afrotherians (elephant and tenrec) to the expanding set of publically available sequenced mammalian genomes provided an opportunity to test this hypothesis. Elephants resemble humans by having large brains and long life spans; tenrecs, in contrast, have small brains and short life spans. Thus, we investigated whether the phylogenomic patterns of adaptive evolution are more similar between elephant and human than between either elephant and tenrec lineages or human and mouse lineages, and whether aerobic energy metabolism genes are especially well represented in the elephant and human patterns. Our analyses encompassed approximately 6,000 genes in each of these lineages with each gene yielding extensive coding sequence matches in interordinal comparisons. Each gene's nonsynonymous and synonymous nucleotide substitution rates and dN/dS ratios were determined. Then, from gene ontology information on genes with the higher dN/dS ratios, we identified the more prevalent sets of genes that belong to specific functional categories and that evolved adaptively. Elephant and human lineages showed much slower nucleotide substitution rates than tenrec and mouse lineages but more adaptively evolved genes. In correlation with absolute brain size and brain oxygen consumption being largest in elephants and next largest in humans, adaptively evolved aerobic energy metabolism genes were most evident in the elephant lineage and next most evident in the human lineage. PMID:19926857

  16. New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events.

    PubMed

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Decker, Jared E; Schnabel, Robert D; Taylor, Jeremy F; Hillis, David M

    2013-04-01

    Previous archeological and genetic research has shown that modern cattle breeds are descended from multiple independent domestication events of the wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) ∼10,000 y ago. Two primary areas of domestication in the Middle East/Europe and the Indian subcontinent resulted in taurine and indicine lines of cattle, respectively. American descendants of cattle brought by European explorers to the New World beginning in 1493 generally have been considered to belong to the taurine lineage. Our analyses of 47,506 single nucleotide polymorphisms show that these New World cattle breeds, as well as many related breeds of cattle in southern Europe, actually exhibit ancestry from both the taurine and indicine lineages. In this study, we show that, although European cattle are largely descended from the taurine lineage, gene flow from African cattle (partially of indicine origin) contributed substantial genomic components to both southern European cattle breeds and their New World descendants. New World cattle breeds, such as Texas Longhorns, provide an opportunity to study global population structure and domestication in cattle. Following their introduction into the Americas in the late 1400s, semiferal herds of cattle underwent between 80 and 200 generations of predominantly natural selection, as opposed to the human-mediated artificial selection of Old World breeding programs. Our analyses of global cattle breed population history show that the hybrid ancestry of New World breeds contributed genetic variation that likely facilitated the adaptation of these breeds to a novel environment. PMID:23530234

  17. New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events

    PubMed Central

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Decker, Jared E.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Hillis, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous archeological and genetic research has shown that modern cattle breeds are descended from multiple independent domestication events of the wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) ∼10,000 y ago. Two primary areas of domestication in the Middle East/Europe and the Indian subcontinent resulted in taurine and indicine lines of cattle, respectively. American descendants of cattle brought by European explorers to the New World beginning in 1493 generally have been considered to belong to the taurine lineage. Our analyses of 47,506 single nucleotide polymorphisms show that these New World cattle breeds, as well as many related breeds of cattle in southern Europe, actually exhibit ancestry from both the taurine and indicine lineages. In this study, we show that, although European cattle are largely descended from the taurine lineage, gene flow from African cattle (partially of indicine origin) contributed substantial genomic components to both southern European cattle breeds and their New World descendants. New World cattle breeds, such as Texas Longhorns, provide an opportunity to study global population structure and domestication in cattle. Following their introduction into the Americas in the late 1400s, semiferal herds of cattle underwent between 80 and 200 generations of predominantly natural selection, as opposed to the human-mediated artificial selection of Old World breeding programs. Our analyses of global cattle breed population history show that the hybrid ancestry of New World breeds contributed genetic variation that likely facilitated the adaptation of these breeds to a novel environment. PMID:23530234

  18. Statistical evidence for common ancestry: Application to primates.

    PubMed

    Baum, David A; Ané, Cécile; Larget, Bret; Solís-Lemus, Claudia; Ho, Lam Si Tung; Boone, Peggy; Drummond, Chloe P; Bontrager, Martin; Hunter, Steven J; Saucier, William

    2016-06-01

    Since Darwin, biologists have come to recognize that the theory of descent from common ancestry (CA) is very well supported by diverse lines of evidence. However, while the qualitative evidence is overwhelming, we also need formal methods for quantifying the evidential support for CA over the alternative hypothesis of separate ancestry (SA). In this article, we explore a diversity of statistical methods using data from the primates. We focus on two alternatives to CA, species SA (the separate origin of each named species) and family SA (the separate origin of each family). We implemented statistical tests based on morphological, molecular, and biogeographic data and developed two new methods: one that tests for phylogenetic autocorrelation while correcting for variation due to confounding ecological traits and a method for examining whether fossil taxa have fewer derived differences than living taxa. We overwhelmingly rejected both species and family SA with infinitesimal P values. We compare these results with those from two companion papers, which also found tremendously strong support for the CA of all primates, and discuss future directions and general philosophical issues that pertain to statistical testing of historical hypotheses such as CA. PMID:27139421

  19. Ancestry variation and footprints of natural selection along the genome in Latin American populations

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lian; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Xu, Shuhua; Wang, Sijia

    2016-01-01

    Latin American populations stem from the admixture of Europeans, Africans and Native Americans, which started over 400 years ago and had lasted for several centuries. Extreme deviation over the genome-wide average in ancestry estimations at certain genomic locations could reflect recent natural selection. We evaluated the distribution of ancestry estimations using 678 genome-wide microsatellite markers in 249 individuals from 13 admixed populations across Latin America. We found significant deviations in ancestry estimations including three locations with more than 3.5 times standard deviations from the genome-wide average: an excess of European ancestry at 1p36 and 14q32, and an excess of African ancestry at 6p22. Using simulations, we could show that at least the deviation at 6p22 was unlikely to result from genetic drift alone. By applying different linguistic groups as well as the most likely ancestral Native American populations as the ancestry, we showed that the choice of Native American ancestry could affect the local ancestry estimation. However, the signal at 6p22 consistently appeared in most of the analyses using various ancestral groups. This study provided important insights for recent natural selection in the context of the unique history of the New World and implications for disease mapping. PMID:26887503

  20. Estimates of Continental Ancestry Vary Widely among Individuals with the Same mtDNA Haplogroup

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Leslie S.; Magnaye, Kevin M.; Bigham, Abigail W.; Akey, Joshua M.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The association between a geographical region and an mtDNA haplogroup(s) has provided the basis for using mtDNA haplogroups to infer an individual’s place of origin and genetic ancestry. Although it is well known that ancestry inferences using mtDNA haplogroups and those using genome-wide markers are frequently discrepant, little empirical information exists on the magnitude and scope of such discrepancies between multiple mtDNA haplogroups and worldwide populations. We compared genetic-ancestry inferences made by mtDNA-haplogroup membership to those made by autosomal SNPs in ∼940 samples of the Human Genome Diversity Panel and recently admixed populations from the 1000 Genomes Project. Continental-ancestry proportions often varied widely among individuals sharing the same mtDNA haplogroup. For only half of mtDNA haplogroups did the highest average continental-ancestry proportion match the highest continental-ancestry proportion of a majority of individuals with that haplogroup. Prediction of an individual’s mtDNA haplogroup from his or her continental-ancestry proportions was often incorrect. Collectively, these results indicate that for most individuals in the worldwide populations sampled, mtDNA-haplogroup membership provides limited information about either continental ancestry or continental region of origin. PMID:25620206

  1. Measurement Uncertainty in Racial and Ethnic Identification among Adolescents of Mixed Ancestry: A Latent Variable Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Allison J.; Erkut, Sumru; Porche, Michelle V.; Kim, Jo; Charmaraman, Linda; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Ceder, Ineke; Garcia, Heidie Vazquez

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we operationalize identification of mixed racial and ethnic ancestry among adolescents as a latent variable to (a) account for measurement uncertainty, and (b) compare alternative wording formats for racial and ethnic self-categorization in surveys. Two latent variable models were fit to multiple mixed-ancestry indicator data from…

  2. Ancestry variation and footprints of natural selection along the genome in Latin American populations.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lian; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Xu, Shuhua; Wang, Sijia

    2016-01-01

    Latin American populations stem from the admixture of Europeans, Africans and Native Americans, which started over 400 years ago and had lasted for several centuries. Extreme deviation over the genome-wide average in ancestry estimations at certain genomic locations could reflect recent natural selection. We evaluated the distribution of ancestry estimations using 678 genome-wide microsatellite markers in 249 individuals from 13 admixed populations across Latin America. We found significant deviations in ancestry estimations including three locations with more than 3.5 times standard deviations from the genome-wide average: an excess of European ancestry at 1p36 and 14q32, and an excess of African ancestry at 6p22. Using simulations, we could show that at least the deviation at 6p22 was unlikely to result from genetic drift alone. By applying different linguistic groups as well as the most likely ancestral Native American populations as the ancestry, we showed that the choice of Native American ancestry could affect the local ancestry estimation. However, the signal at 6p22 consistently appeared in most of the analyses using various ancestral groups. This study provided important insights for recent natural selection in the context of the unique history of the New World and implications for disease mapping. PMID:26887503

  3. Associations Between Genetic Ancestries and Nicotine Metabolism Biomarkers in the Multiethnic Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hansong; Park, Sungshim L; Stram, Daniel O; Haiman, Christopher A; Wilkens, Lynne R; Hecht, Stephen S; Kolonel, Laurence N; Murphy, Sharon E; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2015-12-01

    Differences in internal dose of nicotine and tobacco-derived carcinogens among ethnic/racial groups have been observed. In this study, we explicitly examined the relationships between genetic ancestries (genome-wide average) and 19 tobacco-derived biomarkers in smokers from 3 admixed groups in the Multiethnic Cohort Study (1993-present), namely, African ancestry in African Americans (n = 362), Amerindian ancestry in Latinos (n = 437), and Asian and Native Hawaiian ancestries in Native Hawaiians (n = 300). After multiple comparison adjustment, both African and Asian ancestries were significantly related to a greater level of free cotinine; African ancestry was also significantly related to lower cotinine glucuronidation (P's < 0.00156). The predicted decrease in cotinine glucuronidation was 8.6% (P = 4.5 × 10(-6)) per a 20% increase in African ancestry. Follow-up admixture mapping revealed that African ancestry in a 12-Mb region on chromosome 4q was related to lower cotinine glucuronidation (P's < 2.7 × 10(-7), smallest P = 1.5 × 10(-9)), although this is the same region reported in our previous genome-wide association study. Our results implicate a genetic ancestral component in the observed ethnic/racial variation in nicotine metabolism. Further studies are needed to identify the underlying genetic variation that could potentially be ethnic/racial specific. PMID:26568573

  4. People of Native Ancestry, A Resource Guide for the Primary and Junior Divisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto.

    Basic principles of primary-junior education as they pertain specifically to people of native ancestry in Ontario are elaborated in this resource guide. Intended for both native and non-native teachers, principals, and administrators responsible for curriculum for children of native ancestry and others, its aim is to help in development of a…

  5. Correlations between D and Dbar mesons in high energy photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Erik E Gottschalk

    2002-11-13

    Over 7000 events containing a fully reconstructed D{bar D} pair have been extracted from data recorded by the FOCUS photoproduction experiment at Fermilab. Preliminary results from a study of correlations between D and {bar D} mesons are presented. Correlations are used to study perturbative QCD predictions and investigate non-perturbative effects. We also present a preliminary result on the production of {psi}(3770).

  6. Race and Ancestry in the Age of Inclusion: Technique and Meaning in Post-Genomic Science

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Janet K.; Ackerman, Sara L.; Darling, Katherine Weatherford; Hiatt, Robert A.; Lee, Sandra Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how race and ancestry are taken up in gene-environment interaction (GEI) research on complex diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. Using 54 in-depth interviews of 33 scientists and over 200 hours of observation at scientific conferences, we explore how GEI researchers use and interpret race, ethnicity, and ancestry in their work. We find that the use of self-identified race and ethnicity (SIRE) exists alongside ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to ascertain genetic ancestry. Our participants assess the utility of these two techniques in relative terms, downplaying the accuracy and value of SIRE compared to the precision and necessity of AIMs. In doing so, we argue that post-genomic scientists seeking to understand the interactions of genetic and environmental disease determinants actually undermine their ability to do so, by valorizing precise characterizations of individuals’ genetic ancestry over measurement of the social processes and relations that differentiate social groups. PMID:25378251

  7. Race and ancestry in the age of inclusion: technique and meaning in post-genomic science.

    PubMed

    Shim, Janet K; Ackerman, Sara L; Darling, Katherine Weatherford; Hiatt, Robert A; Lee, Sandra Soo-Jin

    2014-12-01

    This article examines how race and ancestry are taken up in gene-environment interaction (GEI) research on complex diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. Using 54 in-depth interviews of 33 scientists and over 200 hours of observation at scientific conferences, we explore how GEI researchers use and interpret race, ethnicity, and ancestry in their work. We find that the use of self-identified race and ethnicity (SIRE) exists alongside ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to ascertain genetic ancestry. Our participants assess the utility of these two techniques in relative terms, downplaying the accuracy and value of SIRE compared to the precision and necessity of AIMs. In doing so, we argue that post-genomic scientists seeking to understand the interactions of genetic and environmental disease determinants actually undermine their ability to do so by valorizing precise characterizations of individuals' genetic ancestry over measurement of the social processes and relations that differentiate social groups. PMID:25378251

  8. A combined evidence Bayesian method for human ancestry inference applied to Afro-Colombians.

    PubMed

    Rishishwar, Lavanya; Conley, Andrew B; Vidakovic, Brani; Jordan, I King

    2015-12-15

    Uniparental genetic markers, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosomal DNA, are widely used for the inference of human ancestry. However, the resolution of ancestral origins based on mtDNA haplotypes is limited by the fact that such haplotypes are often found to be distributed across wide geographical regions. We have addressed this issue here by combining two sources of ancestry information that have typically been considered separately: historical records regarding population origins and genetic information on mtDNA haplotypes. To combine these distinct data sources, we applied a Bayesian approach that considers historical records, in the form of prior probabilities, together with data on the geographical distribution of mtDNA haplotypes, formulated as likelihoods, to yield ancestry assignments from posterior probabilities. This combined evidence Bayesian approach to ancestry assignment was evaluated for its ability to accurately assign sub-continental African ancestral origins to Afro-Colombians based on their mtDNA haplotypes. We demonstrate that the incorporation of historical prior probabilities via this analytical framework can provide for substantially increased resolution in sub-continental African ancestry assignment for members of this population. In addition, a personalized approach to ancestry assignment that involves the tuning of priors to individual mtDNA haplotypes yields even greater resolution for individual ancestry assignment. Despite the fact that Colombia has a large population of Afro-descendants, the ancestry of this community has been understudied relative to populations with primarily European and Native American ancestry. Thus, the application of the kind of combined evidence approach developed here to the study of ancestry in the Afro-Colombian population has the potential to be impactful. The formal Bayesian analytical framework we propose for combining historical and genetic information also has the potential to be widely applied

  9. Lumbee Native American ancestry and the incidence of aggressive histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chelsea; Roque, Dario; Ehrisman, Jessie A.; DiSanto, Nicola; Broadwater, Gloria; Doll, Kemi M.; Gehrig, Paola A.; Secord, Angeles Alvarez; Havrilesky, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Lumbee Indian tribe is the largest Native American tribe in North Carolina, with about 55,000 enrolled members who mostly reside in southeastern counties. We evaluated whether Lumbee heritage is associated with high-risk histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the available records from IRB-approved endometrial cancer databases at two institutions of patients of Lumbee descent (year of diagnosis range 1980–2014). Each Lumbee case was matched by age, year of diagnosis, and BMI to two non-Lumbee controls. Chi-square test was used to compare categorical associations. Kaplan–Meier methods and log-rank test were used to display and compare disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to adjust for age and BMI while testing cohort as a predictor of DFS and OS. Results Among 108 subjects, 10/35 (29%) Lumbee and 19/72 (26%) non-Lumbee subjects had high-risk (serous/clear cell/carcinosarcoma) histologic types (p = 0.8). 12/35 (34%) Lumbee and 24/72 (33%) non-Lumbee subjects had grade 3 tumors (p = 0.9). 5/33 (15%) Lumbee and 13/72 (18%) non-Lumbee had advanced stage endometrial cancer at diagnosis (p = 0.7). Lumbee ancestry was not associated with worse survival outcomes. OS (p = 0.054) and DFS (p = 0.01) were both worse in Blacks compared to Lumbee and White subjects. Conclusion In this retrospective cohort analysis, Lumbee Native American ancestry was not a significant independent predictor of rates of high-risk histological subtypes of endometrial cancer or poor survival outcomes. PMID:26425722

  10. The Mosaic Ancestry of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel and the D. melanogaster Reference Genome Reveals a Network of Epistatic Fitness Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pool, John E.

    2015-01-01

    North American populations of Drosophila melanogaster derive from both European and African source populations, but despite their importance for genetic research, patterns of ancestry along their genomes are largely undocumented. Here, I infer geographic ancestry along genomes of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and the D. melanogaster reference genome, which may have implications for reference alignment, association mapping, and population genomic studies in Drosophila. Overall, the proportion of African ancestry was estimated to be 20% for the DGRP and 9% for the reference genome. Combining my estimate of admixture timing with historical records, I provide the first estimate of natural generation time for this species (approximately 15 generations per year). Ancestry levels were found to vary strikingly across the genome, with less African introgression on the X chromosome, in regions of high recombination, and at genes involved in specific processes (e.g., circadian rhythm). An important role for natural selection during the admixture process was further supported by evidence that many unlinked pairs of loci showed a deficiency of Africa–Europe allele combinations between them. Numerous epistatic fitness interactions may therefore exist between African and European genotypes, leading to ongoing selection against incompatible variants. By focusing on hubs in this network of fitness interactions, I identified a set of interacting loci that include genes with roles in sensation and neuropeptide/hormone reception. These findings suggest that admixed D. melanogaster samples could become an important study system for the genetics of early-stage isolation between populations. PMID:26354524

  11. Vitamin D status of older adults of diverse ancestry living in the greater Toronto area

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physiological and lifestyle factors put older adults at an increased risk of vitamin D insufficiency and resulting negative health outcomes. Here we explore the vitamin D status in a sample of community dwelling older adults of diverse ancestry living in the Greater Toronto area (GTA). Methods Two hundred and twenty-four (224) adults over 60 years of age were recruited from the Square One Older Adult Centre, in Mississauga, Ontario. Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were measured from dried blood spot cards. Dietary and supplemental intakes of vitamin D were assessed via questionnaires. Skin pigmentation was assessed quantitatively by measuring melanin levels using a reflectometer. Results The mean 25(OH)D concentration in the total sample was 82.4 nmol/L. There were no statistically significant differences in serum 25(OH)D concentrations, supplemental or dietary vitamin D intakes between the three major ancestral groups (East Asians, Europeans and South Asians). Females had significantly higher 25(OH)D concentrations than males (84.5 nmol/L vs. 72.2 nmol/L, p = 0.012). The proportion of participants with 25(OH)D concentrations below 50 nmol/L and 75 nmol/L were 12.1%, and 38.8%, respectively. The mean daily supplemental intake of vitamin D was 917 IU/day. Vitamin D intake from supplements was the major factor determining 25(OH)D concentrations (p < 0.001). Conclusions Mean concentration of 25(OH)D in a sample of older adults of diverse ancestry living in the GTA exceeded 80 nmol/L, and there were no significant differences in 25(OH)D levels between ancestral groups. These results sharply contrast with our recent study focused on young adults of diverse ancestry living in the same geographic area, in which we found substantially lower 25(OH)D concentrations (mean 39.5 nmol/L), low supplemental vitamin D intake (114 IU/day), and significant differences in 25(OH)D levels between ancestral groups. High daily intake

  12. Ancestry inference in complex admixtures via variable-length Markov chain linkage models.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jesse M; Bercovici, Sivan; Elmore, Megan; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2013-03-01

    Inferring the ancestral origin of chromosomal segments in admixed individuals is key for genetic applications, ranging from analyzing population demographics and history, to mapping disease genes. Previous methods addressed ancestry inference by using either weak models of linkage disequilibrium, or large models that make explicit use of ancestral haplotypes. In this paper we introduce ALLOY, an efficient method that incorporates generalized, but highly expressive, linkage disequilibrium models. ALLOY applies a factorial hidden Markov model to capture the parallel process producing the maternal and paternal admixed haplotypes, and models the background linkage disequilibrium in the ancestral populations via an inhomogeneous variable-length Markov chain. We test ALLOY in a broad range of scenarios ranging from recent to ancient admixtures with up to four ancestral populations. We show that ALLOY outperforms the previous state of the art, and is robust to uncertainties in model parameters. PMID:23421795

  13. Ancestry Inference in Complex Admixtures via Variable-length Markov Chain Linkage Models

    PubMed Central

    Bercovici, Sivan; Elmore, Megan; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Inferring the ancestral origin of chromosomal segments in admixed individuals is key for genetic applications, ranging from analyzing population demographics and history, to mapping disease genes. Previous methods addressed ancestry inference by using either weak models of linkage disequilibrium, or large models that make explicit use of ancestral haplotypes. In this paper we introduce ALLOY, an efficient method that incorporates generalized, but highly expressive, linkage disequilibrium models. ALLOY applies a factorial hidden Markov model to capture the parallel process producing the maternal and paternal admixed haplotypes, and models the background linkage disequilibrium in the ancestral populations via an inhomogeneous variable-length Markov chain. We test ALLOY in a broad range of scenarios ranging from recent to ancient admixtures with up to four ancestral populations. We show that ALLOY outperforms the previous state of the art, and is robust to uncertainties in model parameters. PMID:23421795

  14. High Resolution Manometry Correlates of Ineffective Esophageal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinglian; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Kwasny, Mary J.; Roman, Sabine; Lin, Zhiyue; Nicodème, Frédéric; Lu, Chang; Pandolfino, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are currently no criteria for ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) and ineffective swallow (IES) in High Resolution Manometry (HRM) and Esophageal Pressure Topography (EPT). Our aims were to utilize HRM metrics to define IEM within the Chicago Classification and to determine the distal contractile integral (DCI) threshold for IES. Methods The EPT of 150 patients with either dysphagia or reflux symptoms were reviewed for the breaks >2 cm in the proximal, middle and distal esophagus in the 20 mmHg isobaric contour (IBC). Peristaltic function in EPT was defined by the Chicago Classification, the corresponding conventional line tracing (CLT) were reviewed separately for IEM and IES. Generalized linear mixed models were used to find thresholds for DCI corresponding to traditionally determined IES and failed swallows. An external validation sample was used to confirm these thresholds. Results In terms of swallow subtypes, IES in CLT were a mixture of normal, weak and failed peristalsis in EPT. A DCI of 450mmHg-s-cm was determined to be optimal in predicting IES. In the validation sample, the threshold of 450 mmHg-s-cm showed strong agreement with CLT determination of IES (positive percent agreement 83%, negative percent agreement 90%) Thirty-three among 42 IEM patients in CLT had large peristaltic breaks, small peristaltic breaks or ‘frequent failed peristalsis’ in EPT; 87.2% (34/39) of patients classified as normal in CLT had proximal IBC-breaks in EPT. the patient level diagnostic agreement between CLT and EPT was good (78.6% positive percent agreement, 63.9% negative percent agreement), with negative agreement increasing to 92.0% if proximal breaks were excluded. Conclusions The manometric correlate of IEM in EPT is a mixture of failed swallows and IBC break in the middle/ distal troughs. A DCI value<450 mmHg-s-cm can be utilized to predict IES previously defined in CLT. IEM can be defined by >5 swallows with weak /failed peristalsis or with a

  15. Spin correlations in electron-doped high-Tc superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, M.

    2007-11-01

    Spin correlations in the electron-doped Pr1-xLaCexCuO4 have been investigated by neutron-scattering and muon rotation/relaxation measurements. The low-enegy spin correlations were found to be in commensurate with the wide superconducting phase, unlike the incommensurate ones in the hole-doped La2-xSrxCuO4. No enhancement of the magnetic order by impurity-doping and applying magnetic fields was observed, although the superconductivity is effectively suppressed, compared to that in the hole-doped system. Distinct impurity and magnetic field effects between the static spin correlation in the electron-doped system and those in the hole-doped systems suggest the different magnetic ground state in the two systems.

  16. Pauli correlations in heavy-ion collisions at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Nutt, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    We calculate the effects of short-range correlations on the Glauber expansion for nucleus-nucleus collisions using the Fermi gas model for nuclei. When we neglect the Pauli principle for collisions between heavy nuclei, calculation of the optical phase-shift function leads to non-unitary results and we cannot obtain cross sections. When we include Pauli correlations we find important cancellations in the optical phase-shift function, which make possible the calculation of total and differential cross sections for heavy nuclei.

  17. Detection of ancestry informative HLA alleles confirms the admixed origins of Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Mitsunaga, Shigeki; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Shyh-Yuh, Liou; Sawamoto, Taiji; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Suematsu, Koji; Shinagawa, Akira; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are powerful tool for studying human evolutionary processes. We investigated genetic structure of Japanese by using five-locus HLA genotypes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DPB1) of 2,005 individuals from 10 regions of Japan. We found a significant level of population substructure in Japanese; particularly the differentiation between Okinawa Island and mainland Japanese. By using a plot of the principal component scores, we identified ancestry informative alleles associated with the underlying population substructure. We examined extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between pairs of HLA alleles on the haplotypes that were differentiated among regions. The LDs were strong and weak for pairs of HLA alleles characterized by low and high frequencies in Okinawa Island, respectively. The five-locus haplotypes whose alleles exhibit strong LD were unique to Japanese and South Korean, suggesting that these haplotypes had been recently derived from the Korean Peninsula. The alleles characterized by high frequency in Japanese compared to South Korean formed segmented three-locus haplotype that was commonly found in Aleuts, Eskimos, and North- and Meso-Americans but not observed in Korean and Chinese. The serologically equivalent haplotype was found in Orchid Island in Taiwan, Mongol, Siberia, and Arctic regions. It suggests that early Japanese who existed prior to the migration wave from the Korean Peninsula shared ancestry with northern Asian who moved to the New World via the Bering Strait land bridge. These results may support the admixture model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago. PMID:23577161

  18. Detection of Ancestry Informative HLA Alleles Confirms the Admixed Origins of Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Mitsunaga, Shigeki; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Shyh-Yuh, Liou; Sawamoto, Taiji; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Suematsu, Koji; Shinagawa, Akira; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are powerful tool for studying human evolutionary processes. We investigated genetic structure of Japanese by using five-locus HLA genotypes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DPB1) of 2,005 individuals from 10 regions of Japan. We found a significant level of population substructure in Japanese; particularly the differentiation between Okinawa Island and mainland Japanese. By using a plot of the principal component scores, we identified ancestry informative alleles associated with the underlying population substructure. We examined extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between pairs of HLA alleles on the haplotypes that were differentiated among regions. The LDs were strong and weak for pairs of HLA alleles characterized by low and high frequencies in Okinawa Island, respectively. The five-locus haplotypes whose alleles exhibit strong LD were unique to Japanese and South Korean, suggesting that these haplotypes had been recently derived from the Korean Peninsula. The alleles characterized by high frequency in Japanese compared to South Korean formed segmented three-locus haplotype that was commonly found in Aleuts, Eskimos, and North- and Meso-Americans but not observed in Korean and Chinese. The serologically equivalent haplotype was found in Orchid Island in Taiwan, Mongol, Siberia, and Arctic regions. It suggests that early Japanese who existed prior to the migration wave from the Korean Peninsula shared ancestry with northern Asian who moved to the New World via the Bering Strait land bridge. These results may support the admixture model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago. PMID:23577161

  19. High resolution MRI evaluation of meniscal volume and anthropometric correlations.

    PubMed

    Narvy, Steven J; Asami, Danny K; Solomon, Thomas C; Burke, Wendy S; Colletti, Patrick M; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to digitally determine meniscal volumes, and compare them with linear and surface area anthropometric measurements to evaluate these measurements for meniscal allograft sizing. Eighteen subjects (10 male and 8 female; mean age 37.5 years) underwent 3.0 T knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the dominant leg. The following morphometric measurements were evaluated: medial meniscal volume (MMV), lateral meniscal volume (LMV), tibial plateau width (TPW), width of the femoral condyles (WFC), and tibial plateau surface area (TPSA). MMV and LMV were compared to TPW, WFC, and TPSA. Meniscal volume and TPW were correlated to height and body-mass index (BMI) and stratified by gender. Statistical analysis included coefficient of determination (r(2)) between MRI-based MMV, LMV, TPW, TPSA, WFC, height, BMI, and gender. Significance was set at the P = 0.05 level. The mean MMV was 2275 mm(3) and the mean LMV was 2102 mm(3). TPW correlated well with meniscal volumes (r(2) > 0.62). WFC and TPSA correlated with meniscal volumes in the range of 0.40 < r(2) < 0.61. Height, BMI, and gender correlated poorly with total meniscal volume and TPW with values of r(2) < 0.44. Medial and lateral menisci have statistically similar volumes. TPW had the greatest utility for volumetric meniscal sizing. MRI-based TPW can be considered as a statistically accurate measurement for determining meniscal volumes and meniscal size. PMID:26118625

  20. High-Stakes & Assessment Innovation: A Negative Correlation? Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ananda, Sri; Rabinowitz, Stanley

    This paper makes the case that, as implemented so far, there has been an inverse correlation between innovation and accountability in statewide assessment systems. The higher the stakes attached to the assessment results, the more conservative the assessment methodology ultimately used. Case studies of two state assessment programs were carried…

  1. High-Speed Tracking with Kernelized Correlation Filters.

    PubMed

    Henriques, João F; Caseiro, Rui; Martins, Pedro; Batista, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The core component of most modern trackers is a discriminative classifier, tasked with distinguishing between the target and the surrounding environment. To cope with natural image changes, this classifier is typically trained with translated and scaled sample patches. Such sets of samples are riddled with redundancies-any overlapping pixels are constrained to be the same. Based on this simple observation, we propose an analytic model for datasets of thousands of translated patches. By showing that the resulting data matrix is circulant, we can diagonalize it with the discrete Fourier transform, reducing both storage and computation by several orders of magnitude. Interestingly, for linear regression our formulation is equivalent to a correlation filter, used by some of the fastest competitive trackers. For kernel regression, however, we derive a new kernelized correlation filter (KCF), that unlike other kernel algorithms has the exact same complexity as its linear counterpart. Building on it, we also propose a fast multi-channel extension of linear correlation filters, via a linear kernel, which we call dual correlation filter (DCF). Both KCF and DCF outperform top-ranking trackers such as Struck or TLD on a 50 videos benchmark, despite running at hundreds of frames-per-second, and being implemented in a few lines of code (Algorithm 1). To encourage further developments, our tracking framework was made open-source. PMID:26353263

  2. Genetics, Ancestry, and Hypertension: Implications for Targeted Antihypertensive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Arnett, Donna K.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common chronic condition seen by physicians in ambulatory care and a condition for which life-long medications are commonly prescribed. There is evidence for genetic factors influencing blood pressure variation in populations and response to medications. This review summarizes recent genetic discoveries that surround blood pressure, hypertension, and antihypertensive drug response from genome-wide association studies, while highlighting ancestry-specific findings and any potential implication for drug therapy targets. Genome-wide association studies have identified several novel loci for inter-individual variation of blood pressure and hypertension risk in the general population. Evidence from pharmacogenetic studies suggests that genes influence the blood pressure response to antihypertensive drugs, although results are somewhat inconsistent across studies. There is still much work that remains to be done to identify genes both for efficacy and adverse events of antihypertensive medications. PMID:24903233

  3. Reconstruction of Genome Ancestry Blocks in Multiparental Populations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chaozhi; Boer, Martin P; van Eeuwijk, Fred A

    2015-08-01

    We present a general hidden Markov model framework called R: econstructing A: ncestry B: locks BIT: by bit (RABBIT) for reconstructing genome ancestry blocks from single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data, a required step for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. The framework can be applied to a wide range of mapping populations such as the Arabidopsis multiparent advanced generation intercross (MAGIC), the mouse Collaborative Cross (CC), and the diversity outcross (DO) for both autosomes and X chromosomes if they exist. The model underlying RABBIT accounts for the joint pattern of recombination breakpoints between two homologous chromosomes and missing data and allelic typing errors in the genotype data of both sampled individuals and founders. Studies on simulated data of the MAGIC and the CC and real data of the MAGIC, the DO, and the CC demonstrate that RABBIT is more robust and accurate in reconstructing recombination bin maps than some commonly used methods. PMID:26048018

  4. The Ancestry of Brazilian mtDNA Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Silva, Juliana; da Silva Santos, Magda; Guimarães, Pedro E. M.; Ferreira, Alessandro C. S.; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Pena, Sérgio D. J.; Prado, Vania Ferreira

    2000-01-01

    We have analyzed 247 Brazilian mtDNAs for hypervariable segment (HVS)–I and selected restriction fragment-length–polymorphism sites, to assess their ancestry in different continents. The total sample showed nearly equal amounts of Native American, African, and European matrilineal genetic contribution but with regional differences within Brazil. The mtDNA pool of present-day Brazilians clearly reflects the imprints of the early Portuguese colonization process (involving directional mating), as well as the recent immigrant waves (from Europe) of the last century. The subset of 99 mtDNAs from the southeastern region encompasses nearly all mtDNA haplogroups observed in the total Brazilian sample; for this regional subset, HVS-II was analyzed, providing, in particular, some novel details of the African mtDNA phylogeny. PMID:10873790

  5. Spread of pedigree versus genetic ancestry in spatially distributed populations.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, J; Etheridge, A M; Véber, A; Barton, N H

    2016-04-01

    Ancestral processes are fundamental to modern population genetics and spatial structure has been the subject of intense interest for many years. Despite this interest, almost nothing is known about the distribution of the locations of pedigree or genetic ancestors. Using both spatially continuous and stepping-stone models, we show that the distribution of pedigree ancestors approaches a travelling wave, for which we develop two alternative approximations. The speed and width of the wave are sensitive to the local details of the model. After a short time, genetic ancestors spread far more slowly than pedigree ancestors, ultimately diffusing out with radius ∼ t rather than spreading at constant speed. In contrast to the wave of pedigree ancestors, the spread of genetic ancestry is insensitive to the local details of the models. PMID:26546979

  6. Worldwide Patterns of Ancestry, Divergence, and Admixture in Domesticated Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Jared E.; McKay, Stephanie D.; Rolf, Megan M.; Kim, JaeWoo; Molina Alcalá, Antonio; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Hanotte, Olivier; Götherström, Anders; Seabury, Christopher M.; Praharani, Lisa; Babar, Masroor Ellahi; Correia de Almeida Regitano, Luciana; Yildiz, Mehmet Ali; Heaton, Michael P.; Liu, Wan-Sheng; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Reecy, James M.; Saif-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Schnabel, Robert D.; Taylor, Jeremy F.

    2014-01-01

    The domestication and development of cattle has considerably impacted human societies, but the histories of cattle breeds and populations have been poorly understood especially for African, Asian, and American breeds. Using genotypes from 43,043 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 1,543 animals, we evaluate the population structure of 134 domesticated bovid breeds. Regardless of the analytical method or sample subset, the three major groups of Asian indicine, Eurasian taurine, and African taurine were consistently observed. Patterns of geographic dispersal resulting from co-migration with humans and exportation are recognizable in phylogenetic networks. All analytical methods reveal patterns of hybridization which occurred after divergence. Using 19 breeds, we map the cline of indicine introgression into Africa. We infer that African taurine possess a large portion of wild African auroch ancestry, causing their divergence from Eurasian taurine. We detect exportation patterns in Asia and identify a cline of Eurasian taurine/indicine hybridization in Asia. We also identify the influence of species other than Bos taurus taurus and B. t. indicus in the formation of Asian breeds. We detect the pronounced influence of Shorthorn cattle in the formation of European breeds. Iberian and Italian cattle possess introgression from African taurine. American Criollo cattle originate from Iberia, and not directly from Africa with African ancestry inherited via Iberian ancestors. Indicine introgression into American cattle occurred in the Americas, and not Europe. We argue that cattle migration, movement and trading followed by admixture have been important forces in shaping modern bovine genomic variation. PMID:24675901

  7. Assessment of Azorean ancestry by Alu insertion polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Branco, Claudia C; Palla, Raquel; Lino, Sílvia; Pacheco, Paula R; Cabral, Rita; De Fez, Laura; Peixoto, Bernardo R; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of population ancestry from genetic markers is essential, for example, to understand the history of human migration and to carry out admixture and association studies. Here we assess the genome ancestry of the Azorean population through analysis of six Alu polymorphic sites (TPA-25, ACE, APO, B65, PV92, and D1) in 65 Azoreans and 30 Portuguese unrelated blood donors and compare data for the Y-chromosome and mtDNA. Allele frequencies were calculated by direct counting. Statistical analysis was performed using Arlequin 2.0. Nei's genetic distance was calculated with DISPAN software, and trees were constructed by neighbor joining (NJ) using PHYLIP 3.63. The results show that all Alu insertions were polymorphic. APO is the closest to fixation. The less frequent insertions are PV92 and D1 in the Azores and Portugal, respectively. ACE and TPA-25 show the highest values of heterozygosity in both populations. Allele frequencies are very similar to those obtained in European populations. These results are validated by the Y-chromosome and mtDNA data, where the majority of the maternal and paternal lineages are European. Overall, these data are reflected in the phylogenetic tree, in which the Azoreans and the Portuguese branch with Catalans, Andalusians, Moroccans, and Algerians. We conclude that the population of the Azores shows no significant genetic differences from that of mainland Portugal and that it is an outbred population. Moreover, the data validate the use of Alu insertion polymorphisms to assess the origin and history of human populations. PMID:16493635

  8. Multi-particle correlation observables in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, R.

    1981-01-01

    Global features of exclusively measured events, including number correlations and vector correlations, and hybrid analysis of measurements of one or two specific fragments like spectator nuclei, high transverse momentum particles, polarization of one particle, etc., are considered. (GHT)

  9. HIGH PERPENDICULAR CHARGED PARTICLES AZIMUTHAL CORRELATION IN PHENIX.

    SciTech Connect

    RAK,J. FOR THE PHENIX COLLABORATION

    2002-01-13

    A two-particle azimuthal correlation analysis of the PHENIX data taken at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV/c is discussed. A comparison of the magnitude of v{sub 2}(p{perpendicular}) extracted from the correlation analysis with those obtained from a reaction plane analysis by the STAR collaboration, indicate surprisingly small non-flow contributions. A similar comparison obtained from the CERES experiment at {radical}s{sub NN} = 17 GeV/c shows stronger non-flow contributions for a similar p{perpendicular}-range which can be attributed to the presence of mini-jets. It is argued that for the p{perpendicular}-range below 2-3 GeV/c the RHIC results may be indicative of a novel particle production mechanism related to low-x gluon saturation.

  10. The Genetic Ancestry of African Americans, Latinos, and European Americans across the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bryc, Katarzyna; Durand, Eric Y.; Macpherson, J. Michael; Reich, David; Mountain, Joanna L.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 500 years, North America has been the site of ongoing mixing of Native Americans, European settlers, and Africans (brought largely by the trans-Atlantic slave trade), shaping the early history of what became the United States. We studied the genetic ancestry of 5,269 self-described African Americans, 8,663 Latinos, and 148,789 European Americans who are 23andMe customers and show that the legacy of these historical interactions is visible in the genetic ancestry of present-day Americans. We document pervasive mixed ancestry and asymmetrical male and female ancestry contributions in all groups studied. We show that regional ancestry differences reflect historical events, such as early Spanish colonization, waves of immigration from many regions of Europe, and forced relocation of Native Americans within the US. This study sheds light on the fine-scale differences in ancestry within and across the United States and informs our understanding of the relationship between racial and ethnic identities and genetic ancestry. PMID:25529636

  11. The genetic ancestry of African Americans, Latinos, and European Americans across the United States.

    PubMed

    Bryc, Katarzyna; Durand, Eric Y; Macpherson, J Michael; Reich, David; Mountain, Joanna L

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 500 years, North America has been the site of ongoing mixing of Native Americans, European settlers, and Africans (brought largely by the trans-Atlantic slave trade), shaping the early history of what became the United States. We studied the genetic ancestry of 5,269 self-described African Americans, 8,663 Latinos, and 148,789 European Americans who are 23andMe customers and show that the legacy of these historical interactions is visible in the genetic ancestry of present-day Americans. We document pervasive mixed ancestry and asymmetrical male and female ancestry contributions in all groups studied. We show that regional ancestry differences reflect historical events, such as early Spanish colonization, waves of immigration from many regions of Europe, and forced relocation of Native Americans within the US. This study sheds light on the fine-scale differences in ancestry within and across the United States and informs our understanding of the relationship between racial and ethnic identities and genetic ancestry. PMID:25529636

  12. The Genetics of Bene Israel from India Reveals Both Substantial Jewish and Indian Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Natalie R.; Billing-Ross, Paul; Dubrovsky, Maya; Campbell, Christopher L.; Oddoux, Carole; Friedman, Eitan; Atzmon, Gil; Halperin, Eran; Ostrer, Harry; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The Bene Israel Jewish community from West India is a unique population whose history before the 18th century remains largely unknown. Bene Israel members consider themselves as descendants of Jews, yet the identity of Jewish ancestors and their arrival time to India are unknown, with speculations on arrival time varying between the 8th century BCE and the 6th century CE. Here, we characterize the genetic history of Bene Israel by collecting and genotyping 18 Bene Israel individuals. Combining with 486 individuals from 41 other Jewish, Indian and Pakistani populations, and additional individuals from worldwide populations, we conducted comprehensive genome-wide analyses based on FST, principal component analysis, ADMIXTURE, identity-by-descent sharing, admixture linkage disequilibrium decay, haplotype sharing and allele sharing autocorrelation decay, as well as contrasted patterns between the X chromosome and the autosomes. The genetics of Bene Israel individuals resemble local Indian populations, while at the same time constituting a clearly separated and unique population in India. They are unique among Indian and Pakistani populations we analyzed in sharing considerable genetic ancestry with other Jewish populations. Putting together the results from all analyses point to Bene Israel being an admixed population with both Jewish and Indian ancestry, with the genetic contribution of each of these ancestral populations being substantial. The admixture took place in the last millennium, about 19–33 generations ago. It involved Middle-Eastern Jews and was sex-biased, with more male Jewish and local female contribution. It was followed by a population bottleneck and high endogamy, which can lead to increased prevalence of recessive diseases in this population. This study provides an example of how genetic analysis advances our knowledge of human history in cases where other disciplines lack the relevant data to do so. PMID:27010569

  13. Higher levels of neanderthal ancestry in East Asians than in Europeans.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jeffrey D; Yang, Melinda A; Jay, Flora; Kim, Sung K; Durand, Eric Y; Stevison, Laurie S; Gignoux, Christopher; Woerner, August; Hammer, Michael F; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-05-01

    Neanderthals were a group of archaic hominins that occupied most of Europe and parts of Western Asia from ∼30,000 to 300,000 years ago (KYA). They coexisted with modern humans during part of this time. Previous genetic analyses that compared a draft sequence of the Neanderthal genome with genomes of several modern humans concluded that Neanderthals made a small (1-4%) contribution to the gene pools of all non-African populations. This observation was consistent with a single episode of admixture from Neanderthals into the ancestors of all non-Africans when the two groups coexisted in the Middle East 50-80 KYA. We examined the relationship between Neanderthals and modern humans in greater detail by applying two complementary methods to the published draft Neanderthal genome and an expanded set of high-coverage modern human genome sequences. We find that, consistent with the recent finding of Meyer et al. (2012), Neanderthals contributed more DNA to modern East Asians than to modern Europeans. Furthermore we find that the Maasai of East Africa have a small but significant fraction of Neanderthal DNA. Because our analysis is of several genomic samples from each modern human population considered, we are able to document the extent of variation in Neanderthal ancestry within and among populations. Our results combined with those previously published show that a more complex model of admixture between Neanderthals and modern humans is necessary to account for the different levels of Neanderthal ancestry among human populations. In particular, at least some Neanderthal-modern human admixture must postdate the separation of the ancestors of modern European and modern East Asian populations. PMID:23410836

  14. The Genetics of Bene Israel from India Reveals Both Substantial Jewish and Indian Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Yedael Y; Biddanda, Arjun; Davidson, Natalie R; Billing-Ross, Paul; Dubrovsky, Maya; Campbell, Christopher L; Oddoux, Carole; Friedman, Eitan; Atzmon, Gil; Halperin, Eran; Ostrer, Harry; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The Bene Israel Jewish community from West India is a unique population whose history before the 18th century remains largely unknown. Bene Israel members consider themselves as descendants of Jews, yet the identity of Jewish ancestors and their arrival time to India are unknown, with speculations on arrival time varying between the 8th century BCE and the 6th century CE. Here, we characterize the genetic history of Bene Israel by collecting and genotyping 18 Bene Israel individuals. Combining with 486 individuals from 41 other Jewish, Indian and Pakistani populations, and additional individuals from worldwide populations, we conducted comprehensive genome-wide analyses based on FST, principal component analysis, ADMIXTURE, identity-by-descent sharing, admixture linkage disequilibrium decay, haplotype sharing and allele sharing autocorrelation decay, as well as contrasted patterns between the X chromosome and the autosomes. The genetics of Bene Israel individuals resemble local Indian populations, while at the same time constituting a clearly separated and unique population in India. They are unique among Indian and Pakistani populations we analyzed in sharing considerable genetic ancestry with other Jewish populations. Putting together the results from all analyses point to Bene Israel being an admixed population with both Jewish and Indian ancestry, with the genetic contribution of each of these ancestral populations being substantial. The admixture took place in the last millennium, about 19-33 generations ago. It involved Middle-Eastern Jews and was sex-biased, with more male Jewish and local female contribution. It was followed by a population bottleneck and high endogamy, which can lead to increased prevalence of recessive diseases in this population. This study provides an example of how genetic analysis advances our knowledge of human history in cases where other disciplines lack the relevant data to do so. PMID:27010569

  15. European Ancestry as a Risk Factor for Atrial Fibrillation in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Gregory M.; Alonso, Alvaro; Peralta, Carmen A.; Lettre, Guillaume; Vittinghoff, Eric; Lubitz, Steven A.; Fox, Ervin R.; Levitzky, Yamini S.; Mehra, Reena; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Deo, Rajat; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Akylbekova, Meggie; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Paltoo, Dina N.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Heckbert, Susan R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite a higher burden of standard atrial fibrillation (AF) risk factors, African Americans have a lower risk of AF than whites. It is unknown if the higher riskis due to genetic or environmental factors. As African Americans have varying degrees of European ancestry, we sought to test the hypothesis that European ancestry is an independent risk factor for AF. Methods and Results We studied whites (n=4,543) and African Americans (n=822) in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) and whites (n=10,902) and Africa Americans (n=3,517) in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (n=3,517). Percent European ancestry in African Americans was estimated using 1,747 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) from the Illumina custom ITMAT-Broad-CARe (IBC) array. Among African Americans without baseline AF, 120 of 804 CHS participants and 181 of 3,517 ARIC participants developed incident AF. A meta-analysis from the two studies revealed that every 10% increase in European ancestry increased the risk of AF by 13% (HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.03–1.23, p=0.007). After adjusting for potential confounders, European ancestry remained a predictor of incident AF in each cohort alone, with a combined estimated hazard ratio for each 10% increase in European ancestry of 1.17 (95% CI 1.07–1.29, p=0.001). A second analysis using 3,192 AIMs from a genome wide Affymetrix 6.0 array in ARIC African Americans yielded similar results. Conclusion European ancestry predicted risk of incident AF. Our study suggests that investigating genetic variants contributing to differential AF risk in individuals of African versus European ancestry will be informative. PMID:21098467

  16. Modern human ancestry at the peripheries: a test of the replacement theory.

    PubMed

    Wolpoff, M H; Hawks, J; Frayer, D W; Hunley, K

    2001-01-12

    The replacement theory of modern human origins stipulates that populations outside of Africa were replaced by a new African species of modern humans. Here we test the replacement theory in two peripheral areas far from Africa by examining the ancestry of early modern Australians and Central Europeans. Analysis of pairwise differences was used to determine if dual ancestry in local archaic populations and earlier modern populations from the Levant and/or Africa could be rejected. The data imply that both have a dual ancestry. The diversity of recent humans cannot result exclusively from a single Late Pleistocene dispersal. PMID:11209077

  17. Genomewide ancestry and divergence patterns from low-coverage sequencing data reveal a complex history of admixture in wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jeffrey D; Schlebusch, Stephen A; Alberts, Susan C; Cox, Laura A; Snyder-Mackler, Noah; Nevonen, Kimberly A; Carbone, Lucia; Tung, Jenny

    2016-07-01

    Naturally occurring admixture has now been documented in every major primate lineage, suggesting its key role in primate evolutionary history. Active primate hybrid zones can provide valuable insight into this process. Here, we investigate the history of admixture in one of the best-studied natural primate hybrid zones, between yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus) and anubis baboons (Papio anubis) in the Amboseli ecosystem of Kenya. We generated a new genome assembly for yellow baboon and low-coverage genomewide resequencing data from yellow baboons, anubis baboons and known hybrids (n = 44). Using a novel composite likelihood method for estimating local ancestry from low-coverage data, we found high levels of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation between the parent taxa, and excellent agreement between genome-scale ancestry estimates and a priori pedigree, life history and morphology-based estimates (r(2)  = 0.899). However, even putatively unadmixed Amboseli yellow individuals carried a substantial proportion of anubis ancestry, presumably due to historical admixture. Further, the distribution of shared vs. fixed differences between a putatively unadmixed Amboseli yellow baboon and an unadmixed anubis baboon, both sequenced at high coverage, is inconsistent with simple isolation-migration or equilibrium migration models. Our findings suggest a complex process of intermittent contact that has occurred multiple times in baboon evolutionary history, despite no obvious fitness costs to hybrids or major geographic or behavioural barriers. In combination with the extensive phenotypic data available for baboon hybrids, our results provide valuable context for understanding the history of admixture in primates, including in our own lineage. PMID:27145036

  18. Correlation spectrometer having high resolution and multiplexing capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, J. S.; Martonchik, J. V. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A correlation spectrometer permanently incorporates a reference cell and an electro-optical phase modulator (EOPM) in the light path between a sample cell and a detector. The effect of the EOPM is such that its frequency modulates all of the monochromatic component of the incoherent radiation passing through it. The EOPM is adjusted so that when it is ON all of the energy in the monochromatic components is thrown into sidebands differing from the original frequencies by integral multiples of the modulation frequency with the total amount of energy absorbed from the original radiation remaining constant. When there is no coincidence between the constituents in the two cells, the detector's output is the same when the EOPM is ON and when it is OFF. However, when there is coincidence the detector's output changes when the EOPM is switched between its two states. The change in the detector's output is related to the quantity of the constituents in the sample cell.

  19. Human cranial vault thickness in a contemporary sample of 1097 autopsy cases: relation to body weight, stature, age, sex and ancestry.

    PubMed

    De Boer, H H Hans; Van der Merwe, A E Lida; Soerdjbalie-Maikoe, V Vidija

    2016-09-01

    The relation between human cranial vault thickness (CVT) and various elements of the physical anthropological biological profile is subject of ongoing discussion. Some results seem to indicate no correlation between CVT and the biological profile of the individual, whereas other results suggest that CVT measurements might be useful for identification purposes. This study assesses the correlation between CVT and body weight, stature, age, sex, and ancestry by reviewing data of 1097 forensic autopsies performed at the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI). In subadults (younger than 19 years of age at the time of death), all frontal, temporal, and occipital CVT measurements correlated moderately to strongly with indicators of growth (body weight, stature, and age). Neither sex nor ancestry correlated significantly with cranial thickness. In adults, body weight correlated with all CVT measurements. No meaningful correlation was found between CVT and stature or age. Females showed to have thicker frontal bones, and the occipital region was thicker in the Negroid subsample. All correlation in the adult group was weak, with the distribution of cranial thickness overlapping for a great deal between the groups. Based on these results, it was concluded that CVT generally cannot be used as an indicator for any part of the biological profile. PMID:26914798

  20. Genomic Ancestry, Self-Rated Health and Its Association with Mortality in an Admixed Population: 10 Year Follow-Up of the Bambui-Epigen (Brazil) Cohort Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Costa, M. Fernanda; Macinko, James; Mambrini, Juliana Vaz de Melo; Cesar, Cibele C.; Peixoto, Sérgio V.; Magalhães, Wagner C. S.; Horta, Bernardo L.; Barreto, Mauricio; Castro-Costa, Erico; Firmo, Josélia O. A.; Proietti, Fernando A.; Leal, Thiago Peixoto; Rodrigues, Maira R.; Pereira, Alexandre; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-rated health (SRH) has strong predictive value for mortality in different contexts and cultures, but there is inconsistent evidence on ethnoracial disparities in SRH in Latin America, possibly due to the complexity surrounding ethnoracial self-classification. Materials/Methods We used 370,539 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) to examine the association between individual genomic proportions of African, European and Native American ancestry, and ethnoracial self-classification, with baseline and 10-year SRH trajectories in 1,311 community dwelling older Brazilians. We also examined whether genomic ancestry and ethnoracial self-classification affect the predictive value of SRH for subsequent mortality. Results European ancestry predominated among participants, followed by African and Native American (median = 84.0%, 9.6% and 5.3%, respectively); the prevalence of Non-White (Mixed and Black) was 39.8%. Persons at higher levels of African and Native American genomic ancestry, and those self-identified as Non-White, were more likely to report poor health than other groups, even after controlling for socioeconomic conditions and an array of self-reported and objective physical health measures. Increased risks for mortality associated with worse SRH trajectories were strong and remarkably similar (hazard ratio ~3) across all genomic ancestry and ethno-racial groups. Conclusions Our results demonstrated for the first time that higher levels of African and Native American genomic ancestry—and the inverse for European ancestry—were strongly correlated with worse SRH in a Latin American admixed population. Both genomic ancestry and ethnoracial self-classification did not modify the strong association between baseline SRH or SRH trajectory, and subsequent mortality. PMID:26680774

  1. The Use of Femoral Neck Axis Length to Estimate Sex and Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Meeusen, Rebecca A; Christensen, Angi M; Hefner, Joseph T

    2015-09-01

    Having multiple reliable methods of estimating sex and ancestry from various skeletal features increases the likelihood of identifying skeletal remains. Femoral neck axis length (FNAL), as measured in living individuals, has been shown to vary by sex and ancestry. FNAL has not, however, been previously measured directly from skeletonized remains and investigated for its potential use in forensic anthropological applications. This research proposes a method for measuring FNAL from skeletal remains, determines the reliability and repeatability of the measurement, and assesses the validity of FNAL in sex and ancestry estimation. Results showed low interobserver error in the measurement of FNAL (TEM=0.33 mm, R=0.99). Significant differences in FNAL were found between sexes as well as between American Black, American White, and Native American groups. FNAL can correctly classify sex in ~86% of all cases and is considered valuable to sex estimation. The value of FNAL to ancestry estimation, however, is considered limited. PMID:26258403

  2. What role does African ancestry play in how hypertensive patients respond to certain antihypertensive drug therapy?

    PubMed

    Seedat, Yackoob K; Brewster, Lizzy M

    2014-02-01

    This article is a summary of the response of the four commonly used antihypertensive agents in African ancestry patients. They are thiazide like diuretics or indapamide, calcium channel blockers (CCB), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers, and β-adrenergic blockers (ARB). Response was superior in African ancestry patients on a thiazide like diuretic or indapamide and CCB, while the response to β-adrenergic blockers and ACEI are attenuated. Available data are very limited but self-defined ancestry seems to be the best predictor of individual responses to antihypertensive drugs. Knowledge of the factors like economic and social consideration affect the lower rate of detection, treatment and control of hypertension in the African ancestry population of the USA. For regions in which health care resources are particularly scarce, investment in population-based primary prevention strategies may yield the largest benefit. PMID:24215578

  3. Quasiparticles of strongly correlated Fermi liquids at high temperatures and in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shaginyan, V. R.

    2011-08-15

    Strongly correlated Fermi systems are among the most intriguing, best experimentally studied and fundamental systems in physics. There is, however, lack of theoretical understanding in this field of physics. The ideas based on the concepts like Kondo lattice and involving quantum and thermal fluctuations at a quantum critical point have been used to explain the unusual physics. Alas, being suggested to describe one property, these approaches fail to explain the others. This means a real crisis in theory suggesting that there is a hidden fundamental law of nature. It turns out that the hidden fundamental law is well forgotten old one directly related to the Landau-Migdal quasiparticles, while the basic properties and the scaling behavior of the strongly correlated systems can be described within the framework of the fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT). The phase transition comprises the extended quasiparticle paradigm that allows us to explain the non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behavior observed in these systems. In contrast to the Landau paradigm stating that the quasiparticle effective mass is a constant, the effective mass of new quasiparticles strongly depends on temperature, magnetic field, pressure, and other parameters. Our observations are in good agreement with experimental facts and show that FCQPT is responsible for the observed NFL behavior and quasiparticles survive both high temperatures and high magnetic fields.

  4. CoAIMs: A Cost-Effective Panel of Ancestry Informative Markers for Determining Continental Origins

    PubMed Central

    Londin, Eric R.; Keller, Margaret A.; Maista, Cathleen; Smith, Gretchen; Mamounas, Laura A.; Zhang, Ran; Madore, Steven J.; Gwinn, Katrina; Corriveau, Roderick A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Genetic ancestry is known to impact outcomes of genotype-phenotype studies that are designed to identify risk for common diseases in human populations. Failure to control for population stratification due to genetic ancestry can significantly confound results of disease association studies. Moreover, ancestry is a critical factor in assessing lifetime risk of disease, and can play an important role in optimizing treatment. As modern medicine moves towards using personal genetic information for clinical applications, it is important to determine genetic ancestry in an accurate, cost-effective and efficient manner. Self-identified race is a common method used to track and control for population stratification; however, social constructs of race are not necessarily informative for genetic applications. The use of ancestry informative markers (AIMs) is a more accurate method for determining genetic ancestry for the purposes of population stratification. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we introduce a novel panel of 36 microsatellite (MSAT) AIMs that determines continental admixture proportions. This panel, which we have named Continental Ancestry Informative Markers or CoAIMs, consists of MSAT AIMs that were chosen based upon their measure of genetic variance (Fst), allele frequencies and their suitability for efficient genotyping. Genotype analysis using CoAIMs along with a Bayesian clustering method (STRUCTURE) is able to discern continental origins including Europe/Middle East (Caucasians), East Asia, Africa, Native America, and Oceania. In addition to determining continental ancestry for individuals without significant admixture, we applied CoAIMs to ascertain admixture proportions of individuals of self declared race. Conclusion/Significance CoAIMs can be used to efficiently and effectively determine continental admixture proportions in a sample set. The CoAIMs panel is a valuable resource for genetic researchers performing case-control genetic

  5. Genetic ancestry and risk of mortality among U.S. Latinas with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fejerman, Laura; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; John, Esther M.; Stern, Mariana C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Ziv, Elad

    2013-01-01

    Multiple studies have reported that Latina women in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer at more advanced stages and have poorer survival than non-Latina White women. However, Latinas are a heterogeneous group with individuals having different proportions of European, Indigenous American and African genetic ancestry. In this study we evaluated the association between genetic ancestry and survival after breast cancer diagnosis among 899 Latina women from the San Francisco Bay Area. Genetic ancestry was estimated from single nucleotide polymorphisms from an Affymetrix 6.0 array and we used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between genetic ancestry and breast cancer-specific mortality (tests were two-sided). Women were followed for an average of 9 years during which 75 died from breast cancer. Our results showed that Individuals with higher Indigenous American ancestry had increased risk of breast cancer-specific mortality [hazard ratio (HR): 1.57 per 25% increase in Indigenous American ancestry; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08–2.29]. Adjustment for demographic factors, tumor characteristics, and some treatment information did not explain the observed association [HR: 1.75, 95%CI: 1.12–2.74]. In an analysis in which ancestry was dichotomized, the hazard of mortality showed a two-fold increase when comparing women with <50% Indigenous American ancestry to women with ≥50% [HR: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.10–3.24]. This was also reflected by Kaplan-Meier survival estimates (P for Log-Rank test of 0.003). Overall, results suggest that genetic factors and/or unmeasured differences in treatment or access to care should be further explored to understand and reduce ethnic disparities in breast cancer outcomes. PMID:24177181

  6. Neural Correlates of High Performance in Foreign Language Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macedonia, Manuela; Muller, Karsten; Friederici, Angela D.

    2010-01-01

    Learning vocabulary in a foreign language is a laborious task which people perform with varying levels of success. Here, we investigated the neural underpinning of high performance on this task. In a within-subjects paradigm, participants learned 92 vocabulary items under two multimodal conditions: one condition paired novel words with iconic…

  7. Regional differences in awareness and attitudes regarding genetic testing for disease risk and ancestry.

    PubMed

    Jonassaint, Charles R; Santos, Eunice R; Glover, Crystal M; Payne, Perry W; Fasaye, Grace-Ann; Oji-Njideka, Nefertiti; Hooker, Stanley; Hernandez, Wenndy; Foster, Morris W; Kittles, Rick A; Royal, Charmaine D

    2010-09-01

    Little is known about the lay public's awareness and attitudes concerning genetic testing and what factors influence their perspectives. The existing literature focuses mainly on ethnic and socioeconomic differences; however, here we focus on how awareness and attitudes regarding genetic testing differ by geographical regions in the US. We compared awareness and attitudes concerning genetic testing for disease risk and ancestry among 452 adults (41% Black and 67% female) in four major US cities, Norman, OK; Cincinnati, OH; Harlem, NY; and Washington, DC; prior to their participation in genetic ancestry testing. The OK participants reported more detail about their personal ancestries (p = 0.02) and valued ancestry testing over disease testing more than all other sites (p < 0.01). The NY participants were more likely than other sites to seek genetic testing for disease (p = 0.01) and to see benefit in finding out more about one's ancestry (p = 0.02), while the DC participants reported reading and hearing more about genetic testing for African ancestry than all other sites (p < 0.01). These site differences were not better accounted for by sex, age, education, self-reported ethnicity, religion, or previous experience with genetic testing/counseling. Regional differences in awareness and attitudes transcend traditional demographic predictors, such as ethnicity, age and education. Local sociocultural factors, more than ethnicity and socioeconomic status, may influence the public's awareness and belief systems, particularly with respect to genetics. PMID:20549517

  8. A panel of 74 AISNPs: Improved ancestry inference within Eastern Asia.

    PubMed

    Li, Cai-Xia; Pakstis, Andrew J; Jiang, Li; Wei, Yi-Liang; Sun, Qi-Fan; Wu, Hong; Bulbul, Ozlem; Wang, Ping; Kang, Long-Li; Kidd, Judith R; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2016-07-01

    Many ancestry informative SNP (AISNP) panels have been published. Ancestry resolution in them varies from three to eight continental clusters of populations depending on the panel used. However, none of these panels differentiates well among East Asian populations. To meet this need, we have developed a 74 AISNP panel after analyzing a much larger number of SNPs for Fst and allele frequency differences between two geographically close population groups within East Asia. The 74 AISNP panel can now distinguish at least 10 biogeographic groups of populations globally: Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, Europe, Southwest Asia, South Asia, North Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Pacific and Americas. Compared with our previous 55-AISNP panel, Southeast Asia and North Asia are two newly assignable clusters. For individual ancestry assignment, the likelihood ratio and ancestry components were analyzed on a different set of 500 test individuals from 11 populations. All individuals from five of the test populations - Yoruba (YRI), European (CEU), Han Chinese in Henan (CHNH), Rondonian Surui (SUR) and Ticuna (TIC) - were assigned to their appropriate geographical regions unambiguously. For the other test populations, most of the individuals were assigned to their self-identified geographical regions with a certain degree of overlap with adjacent populations. These alternative ancestry components for each individual thus help give a clearer picture of the possible group origins of the individual. We have demonstrated that the new AISNP panel can achieve a deeper resolution of global ancestry. PMID:27077960

  9. Genetic ancestry of the extinct Javan and Bali tigers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hao-Ran; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Driscoll, Carlos A; Han, Yu; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila; Zhuang, Yan; Mazak, Ji H; Macdonald, David W; O'Brien, Stephen J; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The Bali (Panthera tigris balica) and Javan (P. t. sondaica) tigers are recognized as distinct tiger subspecies that went extinct in the 1940s and 1980s, respectively. Yet their genetic ancestry and taxonomic status remain controversial. Following ancient DNA procedures, we generated concatenated 1750bp mtDNA sequences from 23 museum samples including 11 voucher specimens from Java and Bali and compared these to diagnostic mtDNA sequences from 122 specimens of living tiger subspecies and the extinct Caspian tiger. The results revealed a close genetic affinity of the 3 groups from the Sunda Islands (Bali, Javan, and Sumatran tigers P. t. sumatrae). Bali and Javan mtDNA haplotypes differ from Sumatran haplotypes by 1-2 nucleotides, and the 3 island populations define a monophyletic assemblage distinctive and equidistant from other mainland subspecies. Despite this close phylogenetic relationship, no mtDNA haplotype was shared between Sumatran and Javan/Bali tigers, indicating little or no matrilineal gene flow among the islands after they were colonized. The close phylogenetic relationship among Sunda tiger subspecies suggests either recent colonization across the islands, or else a once continuous tiger population that had subsequently isolated into different island subspecies. This supports the hypothesis that the Sumatran tiger is the closest living relative to the extinct Javan and Bali tigers. PMID:25754539

  10. Genetic Ancestry of the Extinct Javan and Bali Tigers

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hao-Ran; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Han, Yu; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila; Zhuang, Yan; Mazak, Ji H.; Macdonald, David W.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    The Bali (Panthera tigris balica) and Javan (P. t. sondaica) tigers are recognized as distinct tiger subspecies that went extinct in the 1940s and 1980s, respectively. Yet their genetic ancestry and taxonomic status remain controversial. Following ancient DNA procedures, we generated concatenated 1750bp mtDNA sequences from 23 museum samples including 11 voucher specimens from Java and Bali and compared these to diagnostic mtDNA sequences from 122 specimens of living tiger subspecies and the extinct Caspian tiger. The results revealed a close genetic affinity of the 3 groups from the Sunda Islands (Bali, Javan, and Sumatran tigers P. t. sumatrae). Bali and Javan mtDNA haplotypes differ from Sumatran haplotypes by 1–2 nucleotides, and the 3 island populations define a monophyletic assemblage distinctive and equidistant from other mainland subspecies. Despite this close phylogenetic relationship, no mtDNA haplotype was shared between Sumatran and Javan/Bali tigers, indicating little or no matrilineal gene flow among the islands after they were colonized. The close phylogenetic relationship among Sunda tiger subspecies suggests either recent colonization across the islands, or else a once continuous tiger population that had subsequently isolated into different island subspecies. This supports the hypothesis that the Sumatran tiger is the closest living relative to the extinct Javan and Bali tigers. PMID:25754539

  11. Race and ancestry in biomedical research: exploring the challenges

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The use of race in biomedical research has, for decades, been a source of social controversy. However, recent events, such as the adoption of racially targeted pharmaceuticals, have raised the profile of the race issue. In addition, we are entering an era in which genomic research is increasingly focused on the nature and extent of human genetic variation, often examined by population, which leads to heightened potential for misunderstandings or misuse of terms concerning genetic variation and race. Here, we draw together the perspectives of participants in a recent interdisciplinary workshop on ancestry and health in medicine in order to explore the use of race in research issue from the vantage point of a variety of disciplines. We review the nature of the race controversy in the context of biomedical research and highlight several challenges to policy action, including restrictions resulting from commercial or regulatory considerations, the difficulty in presenting precise terminology in the media, and drifting or ambiguous definitions of key terms. PMID:19348695

  12. Clines of nuclear DNA markers suggest a largely neolithic ancestry of the European gene pool.

    PubMed

    Chikhi, L; Destro-Bisol, G; Bertorelle, G; Pascali, V; Barbujani, G

    1998-07-21

    Comparisons between archaeological findings and allele frequencies at protein loci suggest that most genes of current Europeans descend from populations that have been expanding in Europe in the last 10, 000 years, in the Neolithic period. Recent mitochondrial data have been interpreted as indicating a much older, Paleolithic ancestry. In a spatial autocorrelation study at seven hypervariable loci in Europe (four microsatellites, two larger, tandem-repeat loci, and a sequence polymorphism) broad clinal patterns of DNA variation were recognized. The observed clines closely match those described at the protein level, in agreement with a possible Near Eastern origin for the ancestral population. Separation times between populations were estimated on the basis of a stepwise mutation model. Even assuming low mutation rates and long generation times, we found no evidence for population splits older than 10,000 years, with the predictable exception of Saami (Lapps). The simplest interpretation of these results is that the current nuclear gene pool largely reflects the westward and northward expansion of a Neolithic group. This conclusion is now supported by purely genetic evidence on the levels and patterns of microsatellite diversity, rather than by correlations of biological and nonbiological data. We argue that many mitochondrial lineages whose origin has been traced back to the Paleolithic period probably reached Europe at a later time. PMID:9671803

  13. Future directions for probing two and three nucleon short-range correlations at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, Leonid; Sargsian, Misak; Strikman, Mark

    2008-10-13

    We summarize recent progress in the studies of the short-rang correlations (SRC) in nuclei in high energy electron and hadron nucleus scattering and suggest directions for the future high energy studies aimed at establishing detailed structure of two-nucleon SRCs, revealing structure of three nucleon SRC correlations and discovering non-nucleonic degrees of freedom in nuclei.

  14. Clinical Risk Prediction by Exploring High-Order Feature Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Hu, Jianying

    2014-01-01

    Clinical risk prediction is one important problem in medical informatics, and logistic regression is one of the most widely used approaches for clinical risk prediction. In many cases, the number of potential risk factors is fairly large and the actual set of factors that contribute to the risk is small. Therefore sparse logistic regression is proposed, which can not only predict the clinical risk but also identify the set of relevant risk factors. The inputs of logistic regression and sparse logistic regression are required to be in vector form. This limits the applicability of these models in the problems when the data cannot be naturally represented vectors (e.g., medical images are two-dimensional matrices). To handle the cases when the data are in the form of multi-dimensional arrays, we propose HOSLR: High-Order Sparse Logistic Regression, which can be viewed as a high order extension of sparse logistic regression. Instead of solving one classification vector as in conventional logistic regression, we solve for K classification vectors in HOSLR (K is the number of modes in the data). A block proximal descent approach is proposed to solve the problem and its convergence is guaranteed. Finally we validate the effectiveness of HOSLR on predicting the onset risk of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and heart failure. PMID:25954428

  15. Weighted network analysis of high-frequency cross-correlation measures.

    PubMed

    Iori, Giulia; Precup, Ovidiu V

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we implement a Fourier method to estimate high-frequency correlation matrices from small data sets. The Fourier estimates are shown to be considerably less noisy than the standard Pearson correlation measures and thus capable of detecting subtle changes in correlation matrices with just a month of data. The evolution of correlation at different time scales is analyzed from the full correlation matrix and its minimum spanning tree representation. The analysis is performed by implementing measures from the theory of random weighted networks. PMID:17500762

  16. Weighted network analysis of high-frequency cross-correlation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iori, Giulia; Precup, Ovidiu V.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we implement a Fourier method to estimate high-frequency correlation matrices from small data sets. The Fourier estimates are shown to be considerably less noisy than the standard Pearson correlation measures and thus capable of detecting subtle changes in correlation matrices with just a month of data. The evolution of correlation at different time scales is analyzed from the full correlation matrix and its minimum spanning tree representation. The analysis is performed by implementing measures from the theory of random weighted networks.

  17. Individual differences and correlates of highly superior autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Patihis, Lawrence

    2016-08-01

    Highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM) is a recently identified ability that has been difficult to explain with existing memory science. The present study measured HSAM participants' and age/gender-matched controls' on a number of behavioural measures to test three main hypotheses: imaginative absorption, emotional arousal, and sleep. HSAM participants were significantly higher than controls on the dispositions absorption and fantasy proneness. These two dispositions also were associated with a measure of HSAM ability within the hyperthymesia participants. The emotional-arousal hypothesis yielded only weak support. The sleep hypothesis was not supported in terms of quantity, but sleep quality may be a small factor worthy of further research. Other individual differences are also documented using a predominantly exploratory analysis. Speculative pathways describing how the tendencies to absorb and fantasise could lead to enhanced autobiographical memory are discussed. PMID:26314991

  18. Admixture and Genetic Diversity Distribution Patterns of Non-Recombining Lineages of Native American Ancestry in Colombian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Catarina; Builes, Juan José; Gomes, Verónica; Ospino, Jose Miguel; Aquino, Juliana; Parson, Walther; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor; Goios, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity of present American populations results from very complex demographic events involving different types and degrees of admixture. Through the analysis of lineage markers such as mtDNA and Y chromosome it is possible to recover the original Native American haplotypes, which remained identical since the admixture events due to the absence of recombination. However, the decrease in the effective population sizes and the consequent genetic drift effects suffered by these populations during the European colonization resulted in the loss or under-representation of a substantial fraction of the Native American lineages. In this study, we aim to clarify how the diversity and distribution of uniparental lineages vary with the different demographic characteristics (size, degree of isolation) and the different levels of admixture of extant Native groups in Colombia. We present new data resulting from the analyses of mtDNA whole control region, Y chromosome SNP haplogroups and STR haplotypes, and autosomal ancestry informative insertion-deletion polymorphisms in Colombian individuals from different ethnic and linguistic groups. The results demonstrate that populations presenting a high proportion of non-Native American ancestry have preserved nevertheless a substantial diversity of Native American lineages, for both mtDNA and Y chromosome. We suggest that, by maintaining the effective population sizes high, admixture allowed for a decrease in the effects of genetic drift due to Native population size reduction and thus resulting in an effective preservation of the Native American non-recombining lineages. PMID:25775361

  19. Circumpulsar Asteroids: Inferences from Nulling Statistics and High Energy Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Cordes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    We have proposed that some classes of radio pulsar variability are associated with the entry of neutral asteroidal material into the pulsar magnetosphere. The region surrounding neutron stars is polluted with supernova fall-back material, which collapses and condenses into an asteroid-bearing disk that is stable for millions of years. Over time, collisional and radiative processes cause the asteroids to migrate inward until they are heated to the point of ionization. For older and cooler pulsars, asteroids ionize within the large magnetospheres and inject a sufficient amount of charged particles to alter the electrodynamics of the gap regions and modulate emission processes. This extrinsic model unifies many observed phenomena of variability that occur on time scales that are disparate with the much shorter time scales associated with pulsars and their magnetospheres. One such type of variability is nulling, in which certain pulsars exhibit episodes of quiescence that for some objects may be as short as a few pulse periods, but, for others, is longer than days. Here, in the context of this model, we examine the nulling phenomenon. We analyze the relationship between in-falling material and the statistics of nulling. In addition, as motivation for further high energy observations, we consider the relationship between the nulling and other magnetospheric processes.

  20. Probing non local order parameters in highly correlated Bose insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Ehud

    2008-03-01

    Ground states of integer spin chains are known since the late 80's to sustain highly non local order described by infinite string operators of the spins. Such states defy the usual Landau theory description and can be considered simple prototypes of topological order. Recently we showed that spinless Bose insulators with nearest neighbor or longer range repulsion in one dimension can exhibit similar string order in terms of the boson density [1]. The tunability of cold atomic systems would allow much more flexibility in probing the non local order than spin systems do. For example the bosons can be tuned across a quantum phase transition between the exotic insulator, which we term Haldane insulator, and the usual Mott insulator. Investigating how the transition responds to external perturbations lends direct access to properties of the string order parameter. I will demonstrate this with several new results obtained from a field theoretic description of the phases and confirmed by numerical calculations using DMRG. Particularly revealing of the unusual character of the string order is the prediction that any external perturbation, which breaks the lattice inversion symmetry, would eliminate the distinction between the Haldane and Mott phases and allow a fully gapped adiabatic connection between them. This is remarkable given that neither phase involves spontaneous breaking of lattice inversion symmetry. We also predict that inter-chain tunneling destroys the direct phase transition between the two insulators by establishing an intermediate superfluid phase. Finally I will discuss how the new phases and phase transitions may be realized and probed in actual experiments with ultra cold atoms or polar molecules. [1] E. G. Dalla Torre, E. Berg and E. Altman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 260401 (2006)

  1. Afro-derived Amazonian populations: inferring continental ancestry and population substructure.

    PubMed

    Lopes Maciel, Luana Gomes; Ribeiro Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins; Carneiro Dos Santos, Ney Pereira; Ribeiro Dos Santos, Ândrea; Guerreiro, João Farias; Santos, Sidney

    2011-10-01

    A panel of Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs) was used to identify population substructure and estimate individual and overall interethnic admixture in 294 individuals from seven African-derived communities of the Brazilian Amazon. A panel of 48 biallelic markers, representing the insertion (IN) or the deletion (DEL) of small DNA fragments, was employed for this purpose. Overall interethnic admixture estimates showed high miscegenation with other ethnic groups in all populations (between 46% and 64%). The proportion of ancestral genes varied significantly among individuals of the sample: the contribution of African genes varied between 12% and 75%; of European genes between 10% and 73%; and of Amerindians genes between 8% and 66%. The obtained data reveal a high contribution of Amerindian genes in these communities, unlike in other African-derived communities of the Northeast and the South of Brazil. In addition, the majority of the Amerindian contribution may result from the preferential inclusion of indigenous women in the African descent groups. High heterogeneity of the proportion of interethnic admixture among analyzed individuals was found when the proportion of ancestral genes of each individual of the sample was estimated. This heterogeneity is reflected in the fact that four populations can be considered as substructured and that the global African descent sample is possibly formed by two subpopulations. PMID:22146065

  2. Race, Genetic Ancestry and Response to Antidepressant Treatment for Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Eleanor; Hou, Liping; Maher, Brion S; Woldehawariat, Girma; Kassem, Layla; Akula, Nirmala; Laje, Gonzalo; McMahon, Francis J

    2013-01-01

    The Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) Study revealed poorer antidepressant treatment response among black compared with white participants. This racial disparity persisted even after socioeconomic and baseline clinical factors were taken into account. Some studies have suggested genetic contributions to this disparity, but none have attempted to disentangle race and genetic ancestry. Here we used genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data to examine independent contributions of race and genetic ancestry to citalopram response. Secondary data analyses included 1877 STAR*D participants who completed an average of 10 weeks of citalopram treatment and provided DNA samples. Participants reported their race as White (n=1464), black (n=299) or other/mixed (n=114). Genetic ancestry was estimated by multidimensional scaling (MDS) analyses of about 500 000 SNPs. Ancestry proportions were estimated by STRUCTURE. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the direct and indirect effects of observed and latent predictors of response, defined as change in the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) score from baseline to exit. Socioeconomic and baseline clinical factors, race, and anxiety significantly predicted response, as previously reported. However, direct effects of race disappeared in all models that included genetic ancestry. Genetic African ancestry predicted lower treatment response in all models. Although socioeconomic and baseline clinical factors drive racial differences in antidepressant response, genetic ancestry, rather than self-reported race, explains a significant fraction of the residual differences. Larger samples would be needed to identify the specific genetic mechanisms that may be involved, but these findings underscore the importance of including more African-American patients in drug trials. PMID:23827886

  3. Is the observed association between dairy intake and fibroids in African Americans explained by genetic ancestry?

    PubMed

    Wise, Lauren A; Palmer, Julie R; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward; Reich, David E; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2013-10-01

    Uterine leiomyomata are a major source of gynecological morbidity and are 2-3 times more prevalent in African Americans than European Americans. In an earlier report, we found that dairy intake was inversely associated with uterine leiomyomata among African Americans. Because African Americans are more likely to have lactose intolerance and avoid dairy products, the observed association might have been confounded by genetic ancestry. This report reevaluates the dairy-uterine leiomyomata association after accounting for genetic ancestry among 1,968 cases and 2,183 noncases from the Black Women's Health Study (1997-2007). Dairy intake was estimated by using food frequency questionnaires in 1995 and 2001. Percent European ancestry was estimated by using a panel of ancestry informative markers. Incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by using Cox regression, with adjustment for potential confounders and percent European ancestry. Incidence rate ratios comparing 1, 2, 3, and ≥4 servings/day with <1 serving/day of dairy products were 0.95 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.85, 1.06), 0.75 (95% CI: 0.61, 0.92), 0.77 (95% CI: 0.57, 1.04), and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.41, 0.86), respectively (Ptrend = 0.0003). These effect estimates were similar to those obtained without control for ancestry. The findings suggest that the observed inverse association between dairy consumption and uterine leiomyomata in African Americans is not explained by percent European ancestry. PMID:23825169

  4. Genomic Insights into the Ancestry and Demographic History of South America.

    PubMed

    Homburger, Julian R; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Gignoux, Christopher R; Nelson, Dominic; Sanchez, Elena; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Acevedo-Vasquez, Eduardo; Miranda, Pedro; Langefeld, Carl D; Gravel, Simon; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2015-12-01

    South America has a complex demographic history shaped by multiple migration and admixture events in pre- and post-colonial times. Settled over 14,000 years ago by Native Americans, South America has experienced migrations of European and African individuals, similar to other regions in the Americas. However, the timing and magnitude of these events resulted in markedly different patterns of admixture throughout Latin America. We use genome-wide SNP data for 437 admixed individuals from 5 countries (Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, and Argentina) to explore the population structure and demographic history of South American Latinos. We combined these data with population reference panels from Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas to perform global ancestry analysis and infer the subcontinental origin of the European and Native American ancestry components of the admixed individuals. By applying ancestry-specific PCA analyses we find that most of the European ancestry in South American Latinos is from the Iberian Peninsula; however, many individuals trace their ancestry back to Italy, especially within Argentina. We find a strong gradient in the Native American ancestry component of South American Latinos associated with country of origin and the geography of local indigenous populations. For example, Native American genomic segments in Peruvians show greater affinities with Andean indigenous peoples like Quechua and Aymara, whereas Native American haplotypes from Colombians tend to cluster with Amazonian and coastal tribes from northern South America. Using ancestry tract length analysis we modeled post-colonial South American migration history as the youngest in Latin America during European colonization (9-14 generations ago), with an additional strong pulse of European migration occurring between 3 and 9 generations ago. These genetic footprints can impact our understanding of population-level differences in biomedical traits and, thus, inform future medical

  5. Genomic Insights into the Ancestry and Demographic History of South America

    PubMed Central

    Homburger, Julian R.; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Nelson, Dominic; Sanchez, Elena; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Acevedo-Vasquez, Eduardo; Miranda, Pedro; Langefeld, Carl D.; Gravel, Simon; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2015-01-01

    South America has a complex demographic history shaped by multiple migration and admixture events in pre- and post-colonial times. Settled over 14,000 years ago by Native Americans, South America has experienced migrations of European and African individuals, similar to other regions in the Americas. However, the timing and magnitude of these events resulted in markedly different patterns of admixture throughout Latin America. We use genome-wide SNP data for 437 admixed individuals from 5 countries (Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, and Argentina) to explore the population structure and demographic history of South American Latinos. We combined these data with population reference panels from Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas to perform global ancestry analysis and infer the subcontinental origin of the European and Native American ancestry components of the admixed individuals. By applying ancestry-specific PCA analyses we find that most of the European ancestry in South American Latinos is from the Iberian Peninsula; however, many individuals trace their ancestry back to Italy, especially within Argentina. We find a strong gradient in the Native American ancestry component of South American Latinos associated with country of origin and the geography of local indigenous populations. For example, Native American genomic segments in Peruvians show greater affinities with Andean indigenous peoples like Quechua and Aymara, whereas Native American haplotypes from Colombians tend to cluster with Amazonian and coastal tribes from northern South America. Using ancestry tract length analysis we modeled post-colonial South American migration history as the youngest in Latin America during European colonization (9–14 generations ago), with an additional strong pulse of European migration occurring between 3 and 9 generations ago. These genetic footprints can impact our understanding of population-level differences in biomedical traits and, thus, inform future medical

  6. Is the Observed Association Between Dairy Intake and Fibroids in African Americans Explained by Genetic Ancestry?

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Lauren A.; Palmer, Julie R.; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward; Reich, David E.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomata are a major source of gynecological morbidity and are 2–3 times more prevalent in African Americans than European Americans. In an earlier report, we found that dairy intake was inversely associated with uterine leiomyomata among African Americans. Because African Americans are more likely to have lactose intolerance and avoid dairy products, the observed association might have been confounded by genetic ancestry. This report reevaluates the dairy-uterine leiomyomata association after accounting for genetic ancestry among 1,968 cases and 2,183 noncases from the Black Women's Health Study (1997–2007). Dairy intake was estimated by using food frequency questionnaires in 1995 and 2001. Percent European ancestry was estimated by using a panel of ancestry informative markers. Incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by using Cox regression, with adjustment for potential confounders and percent European ancestry. Incidence rate ratios comparing 1, 2, 3, and ≥4 servings/day with <1 serving/day of dairy products were 0.95 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.85, 1.06), 0.75 (95% CI: 0.61, 0.92), 0.77 (95% CI: 0.57, 1.04), and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.41, 0.86), respectively (Ptrend = 0.0003). These effect estimates were similar to those obtained without control for ancestry. The findings suggest that the observed inverse association between dairy consumption and uterine leiomyomata in African Americans is not explained by percent European ancestry. PMID:23825169

  7. Associations among ancestry, geography and breast cancer incidence, mortality, and survival in Trinidad and Tobago

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Wayne A; Morrison, Robert L; Lee, Tammy Y; Williams, Tanisha M; Ramnarine, Shelina; Roach, Veronica; Slovacek, Simeon; Maharaj, Ravi; Bascombe, Nigel; Bondy, Melissa L; Ellis, Matthew J; Toriola, Adetunji T; Roach, Allana; Llanos, Adana A M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common newly diagnosed cancer among women in Trinidad and Tobago (TT) and BC mortality rates are among the highest in the world. Globally, racial/ethnic trends in BC incidence, mortality and survival have been reported. However, such investigations have not been conducted in TT, which has been noted for its rich diversity. In this study, we investigated associations among ancestry, geography and BC incidence, mortality and survival in TT. Data on 3767 incident BC cases, reported to the National Cancer Registry of TT, from 1995 to 2007, were analyzed in this study. Women of African ancestry had significantly higher BC incidence and mortality rates (Incidence: 66.96; Mortality: 30.82 per 100,000) compared to women of East Indian (Incidence: 41.04, Mortality: 14.19 per 100,000) or mixed ancestry (Incidence: 36.72, Mortality: 13.80 per 100,000). Geographically, women residing in the North West Regional Health Authority (RHA) catchment area followed by the North Central RHA exhibited the highest incidence and mortality rates. Notable ancestral differences in survival were also observed. Women of East Indian and mixed ancestry experienced significantly longer survival than those of African ancestry. Differences in survival by geography were not observed. In TT, ancestry and geographical residence seem to be strong predictors of BC incidence and mortality rates. Additionally, disparities in survival by ancestry were found. These data should be considered in the design and implementation of strategies to reduce BC incidence and mortality rates in TT. PMID:26338451

  8. Genetic Ancestry and Asthma and Rhinitis Occurrence in Hispanic Children: Findings from the Southern California Children’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Muhammad T.; Avoundjian, Tigran; Knight, Wendy M.; Gilliland, Frank D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma and rhinitis are common childhood health conditions. Being an understudied and rapidly growing population in the US, Hispanic children have a varying risk for these conditions that may result from sociocultural (including acculturative factors), exposure and genetic diversities. Hispanic populations have varying contributions from European, Amerindian and African ancestries. While previous literature separately reported associations between genetic ancestry and acculturation factors with asthma, whether Amerindian ancestry and acculturative factors have independent associations with development of early-life asthma and rhinitis in Hispanic children remains unknown. We hypothesized that genetic ancestry is an important determinant of early-life asthma and rhinitis occurrence in Hispanic children independent of sociodemographic, acculturation and environmental factors. Methods Subjects were Hispanic children (5–7 years) who participated in the southern California Children’s Health Study. Data from birth certificates and questionnaire provided information on acculturation, sociodemographic and environmental factors. Genetic ancestries (Amerindian, European, African and Asian) were estimated based on 233 ancestry informative markers. Asthma was defined by parental report of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Rhinitis was defined by parental report of a history of chronic sneezing or runny or blocked nose without a cold or flu. Sample sizes were 1,719 and 1,788 for investigating the role of genetic ancestry on asthma and rhinitis, respectively. Results Children had major contributions from Amerindian and European ancestries. After accounting for potential confounders, per 25% increase in Amerindian ancestry was associated with 17.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.74–0.99) and 13.6% (95% CI: 0.79–0.98) lower odds of asthma and rhinitis, respectively. Acculturation was not associated with either outcome. Conclusions Earlier work documented that Hispanic

  9. Fast spatial ancestry via flexible allele frequency surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rañola, John Michael; Novembre, John; Lange, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Unique modeling and computational challenges arise in locating the geographic origin of individuals based on their genetic backgrounds. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) vary widely in informativeness, allele frequencies change non-linearly with geography and reliable localization requires evidence to be integrated across a multitude of SNPs. These problems become even more acute for individuals of mixed ancestry. It is hardly surprising that matching genetic models to computational constraints has limited the development of methods for estimating geographic origins. We attack these related problems by borrowing ideas from image processing and optimization theory. Our proposed model divides the region of interest into pixels and operates SNP by SNP. We estimate allele frequencies across the landscape by maximizing a product of binomial likelihoods penalized by nearest neighbor interactions. Penalization smooths allele frequency estimates and promotes estimation at pixels with no data. Maximization is accomplished by a minorize–maximize (MM) algorithm. Once allele frequency surfaces are available, one can apply Bayes’ rule to compute the posterior probability that each pixel is the pixel of origin of a given person. Placement of admixed individuals on the landscape is more complicated and requires estimation of the fractional contribution of each pixel to a person’s genome. This estimation problem also succumbs to a penalized MM algorithm. Results: We applied the model to the Population Reference Sample (POPRES) data. The model gives better localization for both unmixed and admixed individuals than existing methods despite using just a small fraction of the available SNPs. Computing times are comparable with the best competing software. Availability and implementation: Software will be freely available as the OriGen package in R. Contact: ranolaj@uw.edu or klange@ucla.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at

  10. High noise correlation between the functionally connected neurons in emergent V1 microcircuits.

    PubMed

    Bharmauria, Vishal; Bachatene, Lyes; Cattan, Sarah; Chanauria, Nayan; Rouat, Jean; Molotchnikoff, Stéphane

    2016-02-01

    Neural correlations (noise correlations and cross-correlograms) are widely studied to infer functional connectivity between neurons. High noise correlations between neurons have been reported to increase the encoding accuracy of a neuronal population; however, low noise correlations have also been documented to play a critical role in cortical microcircuits. Therefore, the role of noise correlations in neural encoding is highly debated. To this aim, through multi-electrodes, we recorded neuronal ensembles in the primary visual cortex of anaesthetized cats. By computing cross-correlograms, we divulged the functional network (microcircuit) between neurons within an ensemble in relation to a specific orientation. We show that functionally connected neurons systematically exhibit higher noise correlations than functionally unconnected neurons in a microcircuit that is activated in response to a particular orientation. Furthermore, the mean strength of noise correlations for the connected neurons increases steeply than the unconnected neurons as a function of the resolution window used to calculate noise correlations. We suggest that neurons that display high noise correlations in emergent microcircuits feature functional connections which are inevitable for information encoding in the primary visual cortex. PMID:26525713

  11. Identifying Affective Domains That Correlate and Predict Mathematics Performance in High-Performing Students in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have shown that distinct yet highly correlated sub-constructs of three broad mathematics affective variables: (a) motivation, (b) attitudes and (c) anxiety, have varying degree of correlation with mathematics achievement. The sub-constructs of these three affective constructs are as follows: (a) (i) amotivation, (ii) external…

  12. Upper Palaeolithic Siberian genome reveals dual ancestry of Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Maanasa; Skoglund, Pontus; Graf, Kelly E.; Metspalu, Mait; Albrechtsen, Anders; Moltke, Ida; Rasmussen, Simon; Stafford, Thomas W.; Orlando, Ludovic; Metspalu, Ene; Karmin, Monika; Tambets, Kristiina; Rootsi, Siiri; Mägi, Reedik; Campos, Paula F.; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Litvinov, Sergey; Osipova, Ludmila P.; Fedorova, Sardana A.; Voevoda, Mikhail I.; DeGiorgio, Michael; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Demeshchenko, Svetlana; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Nielsen, Rasmus; Jakobsson, Mattias; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-01-01

    The origins of the First Americans remain contentious. Although Native Americans seem to be genetically most closely related to east Asians1–3, there is no consensus with regard to which specific Old World populations they are closest to4–8. Here we sequence the draft genome of an approximately 24,000-year-old individual (MA-1), from Mal’ta in south-central Siberia9, to an average depth of 13. To our knowledge this is the oldest anatomically modern human genome reported to date. The MA-1 mitochondrial genome belongs to haplogroup U, which has also been found at high frequency among Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic European hunter-gatherers10–12, and the Y chromosome of MA-1 is basal to modern-day western Eurasians and near the root of most Native American lineages5. Similarly, we find autosomal evidence that MA-1 is basal to modern-day western Eurasians and genetically closely related to modern-day Native Americans, with no close affinity to east Asians. This suggests that populations related to contemporary western Eurasians had a more north-easterly distribution 24,000 years ago than commonly thought. Furthermore, we estimate that 14 to 38% of Native American ancestry may originate through gene flow from this ancient population. This is likely to have occurred after the divergence of Native American ancestors from east Asian ancestors, but before the diversification of Native American populations in the New World. Gene flow from the MA-1 lineage into Native American ancestors could explain why several crania from the First Americans have been reported as bearing morphological characteristics that do not resemble those of east Asians2,13. Sequencing of another south-central Siberian, Afontova Gora-2 dating to approximately 17,000 years ago14, revealed similar autosomal genetic signatures as MA-1, suggesting that the region was continuously occupied by humans throughout the Last Glacial Maximum. Our findings reveal that western Eurasian genetic signatures

  13. Upper Palaeolithic Siberian genome reveals dual ancestry of Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Maanasa; Skoglund, Pontus; Graf, Kelly E; Metspalu, Mait; Albrechtsen, Anders; Moltke, Ida; Rasmussen, Simon; Stafford, Thomas W; Orlando, Ludovic; Metspalu, Ene; Karmin, Monika; Tambets, Kristiina; Rootsi, Siiri; Mägi, Reedik; Campos, Paula F; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Litvinov, Sergey; Osipova, Ludmila P; Fedorova, Sardana A; Voevoda, Mikhail I; DeGiorgio, Michael; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Demeshchenko, Svetlana; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Nielsen, Rasmus; Jakobsson, Mattias; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-01-01

    The origins of the First Americans remain contentious. Although Native Americans seem to be genetically most closely related to east Asians, there is no consensus with regard to which specific Old World populations they are closest to. Here we sequence the draft genome of an approximately 24,000-year-old individual (MA-1), from Mal'ta in south-central Siberia, to an average depth of 1×. To our knowledge this is the oldest anatomically modern human genome reported to date. The MA-1 mitochondrial genome belongs to haplogroup U, which has also been found at high frequency among Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic European hunter-gatherers, and the Y chromosome of MA-1 is basal to modern-day western Eurasians and near the root of most Native American lineages. Similarly, we find autosomal evidence that MA-1 is basal to modern-day western Eurasians and genetically closely related to modern-day Native Americans, with no close affinity to east Asians. This suggests that populations related to contemporary western Eurasians had a more north-easterly distribution 24,000 years ago than commonly thought. Furthermore, we estimate that 14 to 38% of Native American ancestry may originate through gene flow from this ancient population. This is likely to have occurred after the divergence of Native American ancestors from east Asian ancestors, but before the diversification of Native American populations in the New World. Gene flow from the MA-1 lineage into Native American ancestors could explain why several crania from the First Americans have been reported as bearing morphological characteristics that do not resemble those of east Asians. Sequencing of another south-central Siberian, Afontova Gora-2 dating to approximately 17,000 years ago, revealed similar autosomal genetic signatures as MA-1, suggesting that the region was continuously occupied by humans throughout the Last Glacial Maximum. Our findings reveal that western Eurasian genetic signatures in modern-day Native

  14. Quantification of Maxillary Dental Arcade Curvature and the Estimation of Biological Ancestry in Forensic Anthropology.

    PubMed

    Clark, Melissa A; Guatelli-Steinberg, Debbie; Hubbe, Mark; Stout, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that palate shape is a useful indicator of biological ancestry in human remains. This study evaluates interobserver error in ancestry estimation using palate shape and explores palate shape variation in Gullah (descendants of West Africans) and Seminole (Indigenous American) population samples using geometric morphometric analysis. Ten participants were asked to ascribe biological ancestry and shape to 28 dental casts based on a classification scheme employed in previous studies. The mean correct classification was 42.0%, indicating that the likelihood of assigning the correct ancestry is very poor and not significantly different from random assignment (p = 0.12). The accuracy analysis based on categorical classification of the casts was complemented by geometric morphometric analysis of nine 3D landmarks reflecting palate shape of 158 casts. Principal component analysis results show no difference between populations regarding palate shape, and cross-validated discriminant function analysis correctly classified only 62.0% of the specimens. Combined, these results show that previous methods to estimate ancestry are inaccurate and that this inaccuracy is probably due to a lack of palate shape differences between groups, rather than limitation of the analytical method per se. Therefore, we recommend caution should be used when choosing to apply the analysis of palate shape in forensically relevant contexts. PMID:26259114

  15. Tracing the genomic ancestry of Peruvians reveals a major legacy of pre-Columbian ancestors.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Jose R; Salazar-Granara, Alberto; Acosta, Oscar; Castillo-Herrera, Wilder; Fujita, Ricardo; Pena, Sergio D J; Santos, Fabricio R

    2013-09-01

    In order to investigate the underlying genetic structure and genomic ancestry proportions of Peruvian subpopulations, we analyzed 551 human samples of 25 localities from the Andean, Amazonian, and Coastal regions of Peru with a set of 40 ancestry informative insertion-deletion polymorphisms. Using genotypes of reference populations from different continents for comparison, our analysis indicated that populations from all 25 Peruvian locations had predominantly Amerindian genetic ancestry. Among populations from the Titicaca Lake islands of Taquile, Amantani, Anapia, and Uros, and the Yanque locality from the southern Peruvian Andes, there was no significant proportion of non-autochthonous genomes, indicating that their genetic background is effectively derived from the first settlers of South America. However, the Andean populations from San Marcos, Cajamarca, Characato and Chogo, and coastal populations from Lambayeque and Lima displayed a low but significant European ancestry proportion. Furthermore, Amazonian localities of Pucallpa, Lamas, Chachapoyas, and Andean localities of Ayacucho and Huancayo displayed intermediate levels of non-autochthonous ancestry, mostly from Europe. These results are in close agreement with the documented history of post-Columbian immigrations in Peru and with several reports suggesting a larger effective size of indigenous inhabitants during the formation of the current country's population. PMID:23863748

  16. Sparse principal component analysis for identifying ancestry-informative markers in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seokho; Epstein, Michael P; Duncan, Richard; Lin, Xihong

    2012-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) routinely apply principal component analysis (PCA) to infer population structure within a sample to correct for confounding due to ancestry. GWAS implementation of PCA uses tens of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to infer structure, despite the fact that only a small fraction of such SNPs provides useful information on ancestry. The identification of this reduced set of ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) from a GWAS has practical value; for example, researchers can genotype the AIM set to correct for potential confounding due to ancestry in follow-up studies that utilize custom SNP or sequencing technology. We propose a novel technique to identify AIMs from genome-wide SNP data using sparse PCA. The procedure uses penalized regression methods to identify those SNPs in a genome-wide panel that significantly contribute to the principal components while encouraging SNPs that provide negligible loadings to vanish from the analysis. We found that sparse PCA leads to negligible loss of ancestry information compared to traditional PCA analysis of genome-wide SNP data. We further demonstrate the value of sparse PCA for AIM selection using real data from the International HapMap Project and a genomewide study of inflammatory bowel disease. We have implemented our approach in open-source R software for public use. PMID:22508067

  17. First all-in-one diagnostic tool for DNA intelligence: genome-wide inference of biogeographic ancestry, appearance, relatedness, and sex with the Identitas v1 Forensic Chip.

    PubMed

    Keating, Brendan; Bansal, Aruna T; Walsh, Susan; Millman, Jonathan; Newman, Jonathan; Kidd, Kenneth; Budowle, Bruce; Eisenberg, Arthur; Donfack, Joseph; Gasparini, Paolo; Budimlija, Zoran; Henders, Anjali K; Chandrupatla, Hareesh; Duffy, David L; Gordon, Scott D; Hysi, Pirro; Liu, Fan; Medland, Sarah E; Rubin, Laurence; Martin, Nicholas G; Spector, Timothy D; Kayser, Manfred

    2013-05-01

    When a forensic DNA sample cannot be associated directly with a previously genotyped reference sample by standard short tandem repeat profiling, the investigation required for identifying perpetrators, victims, or missing persons can be both costly and time consuming. Here, we describe the outcome of a collaborative study using the Identitas Version 1 (v1) Forensic Chip, the first commercially available all-in-one tool dedicated to the concept of developing intelligence leads based on DNA. The chip allows parallel interrogation of 201,173 genome-wide autosomal, X-chromosomal, Y-chromosomal, and mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphisms for inference of biogeographic ancestry, appearance, relatedness, and sex. The first assessment of the chip's performance was carried out on 3,196 blinded DNA samples of varying quantities and qualities, covering a wide range of biogeographic origin and eye/hair coloration as well as variation in relatedness and sex. Overall, 95 % of the samples (N = 3,034) passed quality checks with an overall genotype call rate >90 % on variable numbers of available recorded trait information. Predictions of sex, direct match, and first to third degree relatedness were highly accurate. Chip-based predictions of biparental continental ancestry were on average ~94 % correct (further support provided by separately inferred patrilineal and matrilineal ancestry). Predictions of eye color were 85 % correct for brown and 70 % correct for blue eyes, and predictions of hair color were 72 % for brown, 63 % for blond, 58 % for black, and 48 % for red hair. From the 5 % of samples (N = 162) with <90 % call rate, 56 % yielded correct continental ancestry predictions while 7 % yielded sufficient genotypes to allow hair and eye color prediction. Our results demonstrate that the Identitas v1 Forensic Chip holds great promise for a wide range of applications including criminal investigations, missing person investigations, and for national security

  18. Socioeconomic Position, But Not African Genomic Ancestry, Is Associated With Blood Pressure in the Bambui-Epigen (Brazil) Cohort Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Lima-Costa, M Fernanda; Mambrini, Juliana Vaz de Mello; Leite, Maria Lea Corrêa; Peixoto, Sérgio Viana; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo; Loyola Filho, Antônio Ignácio de; Gouveia, Mateus H; Leal, Thiago P; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Macinko, James; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    The study objective is to examine the role of African genome origin on baseline and 11-year blood pressure trajectories in community-based ethnoracially admixed older adults in Brazil. Data come from 1272 participants (aged ≥60 years) of the Bambui cohort study of aging during 11 years of follow-up. Outcome measures were systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and hypertension control. Potential confounding variables were demographic characteristics, socioeconomic position (schooling and household income), and health indicators (smoking, sedentary lifestyle, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, waist circumference, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular diseases), including antihypertensive drug use. We used 370 539 single-nucleotide polymorphisms to estimate each individual's African, European, and Native American trihybrid ancestry proportions. Median African, European, and Native American ancestry were 9.6%, 84.0%, and 5.3%, respectively. Among those with African ancestry, 59.4% came from East and 40.6% from West Africa. Baseline systolic and diastolic blood pressure, controlled hypertension, and their respective trajectories, were not significantly (P>0.05) associated with level (in quintiles) of African genomic ancestry. Similar results were found for West and East African subcontinental origins. Lower schooling level (<4 years versus higher) showed a significant and positive association with systolic blood pressure (Adjusted β=2.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.85-4.99). Lower monthly household income per capita (

  19. Genome-wide Association Analysis of Blood-Pressure Traits in African-Ancestry Individuals Reveals Common Associated Genes in African and Non-African Populations

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Nora; Fox, Ervin; Zhang, Zhaogong; Edwards, Todd L.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Sun, Yan V.; Gottesman, Omri; Adeyemo, Adebawole; Johnson, Andrew D.; Young, J. Hunter; Rice, Ken; Duan, Qing; Chen, Fang; Li, Yun; Tang, Hua; Fornage, Myriam; Keene, Keith L.; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Guangfa, Zhang; Guo, Wei; Liu, Yu; Murray, Sarah S.; Musani, Solomon K.; Srinivasan, Sathanur; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Wang, Heming; Becker, Lewis C.; Bovet, Pascal; Bochud, Murielle; Broeckel, Ulrich; Burnier, Michel; Carty, Cara; Chasman, Daniel I.; Ehret, Georg; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Guanjie; Chen, Wei; Ding, Jingzhong; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Evans, Michele K.; Guo, Xiuqing; Garcia, Melissa E.; Jensen, Rich; Keller, Margaux F.; Lettre, Guillaume; Lotay, Vaneet; Martin, Lisa W.; Moore, Jason H.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Palmas, Walter; Papanicolaou, George; Penman, Alan; Polak, Joseph F.; Ridker, Paul M.; Salako, Babatunde; Singleton, Andrew B.; Shriner, Daniel; Taylor, Kent D.; Vasan, Ramachandran; Wiggins, Kerri; Williams, Scott M.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Zhao, Wei; Zonderman, Alan B.; Becker, Diane M.; Berenson, Gerald; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin; Cushman, Mary; Eaton, Charles; Nyberg, Fredrik; Heiss, Gerardo; Hirschhron, Joel N.; Howard, Virginia J.; Karczewsk, Konrad J.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Liu, Kiang; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth; Margolis, Karen; Snyder, Michael; Go, Min Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jong-Young; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Kim, Sung Soo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Cho, Yoon Shin; Sim, Xueling; Tay, Wan Ting; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Seielstad, Mark; Liu, Jian Jun; Aung, Tin; Wong, Tien Yin; Teo, Yik Ying; Tai, E. Shyong; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Chang, Li-ching; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Kelly, Tanika N.; Gu, Dongfeng; Hixson, James E.; Sung, Yun Ju; He, Jiang; Tabara, Yasuharu; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Miki, Tetsuro; Iwai, Naoharu; Kato, Norihiro; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Nabika, Toru; Sugiyama, Takao; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xuegong; Zhou, Xueya; Jin, Li; Zhu, Dingliang; Psaty, Bruce M.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Sale, Michele M.; Harris, Tamara; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Hunt, Steven C.; Arnett, Donna; Redline, Susan; Cooper, Richard S.; Risch, Neil J.; Rao, D.C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Reiner, Alex P.; Levy, Daniel; Keating, Brendan J.; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) is more prevalent and contributes to more severe manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in African Americans than in any other United States ethnic group. Several small African-ancestry (AA) BP genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been published, but their findings have failed to replicate to date. We report on a large AA BP GWAS meta-analysis that includes 29,378 individuals from 19 discovery cohorts and subsequent replication in additional samples of AA (n = 10,386), European ancestry (EA) (n = 69,395), and East Asian ancestry (n = 19,601). Five loci (EVX1-HOXA, ULK4, RSPO3, PLEKHG1, and SOX6) reached genome-wide significance (p < 1.0 × 10−8) for either systolic or diastolic BP in a transethnic meta-analysis after correction for multiple testing. Three of these BP loci (EVX1-HOXA, RSPO3, and PLEKHG1) lack previous associations with BP. We also identified one independent signal in a known BP locus (SOX6) and provide evidence for fine mapping in four additional validated BP loci. We also demonstrate that validated EA BP GWAS loci, considered jointly, show significant effects in AA samples. Consequently, these findings suggest that BP loci might have universal effects across studied populations, demonstrating that multiethnic samples are an essential component in identifying, fine mapping, and understanding their trait variability. PMID:23972371

  20. Renormalization group evolution of multi-gluon correlators in high energy QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru A.; Venugopalan R.; Jalilian-Marian, J.; Lappi, T.; Schenke, B.

    2011-11-06

    Many-body QCD in leading high energy Regge asymptotics is described by the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy of renormalization group equations for the x evolution of multi-point Wilson line correlators. These correlators are universal and ubiquitous in final states in deeply inelastic scattering and hadronic collisions. For instance, recently measured di-hadron correlations at forward rapidity in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are sensitive to four and six point correlators of Wilson lines in the small x color fields of the dense nuclear target. We evaluate these correlators numerically by solving the functional Langevin equation that describes the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy. We compare the results to mean-field Gaussian and large Nc approximations used in previous phenomenological studies. We comment on the implications of our results for quantitative studies of multi-gluon final states in high energy QCD.

  1. High energy factorization in nucleus-nucleus collisions III. Long range rapidity correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopalan, R.; Gelis, F., Lappi, T.

    2009-10-27

    We obtain a novel result in QCD for long range rapidity correlations between gluons produced in the collision of saturated high energy hadrons or nuclei. This result, obtained in a high energy factorization framework, provides strong justification for the Glasma flux tube picture of coherent strong color fields. Our formalism can be applied to 'near side ridge' events at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and in future studies of long range rapidity correlations at the LHC.

  2. High energy factorization in nucleus-nucleus collisions. III. Long range rapidity correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, Francois

    2009-05-01

    We obtain a novel result in QCD for long range rapidity correlations between gluons produced in the collision of saturated high energy hadrons or nuclei. This result, obtained in a high energy factorization framework, provides strong justification for the Glasma flux tube picture of coherent strong color fields. Our formalism can be applied to 'near side ridge' events at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and in future studies of long range rapidity correlations at the LHC.

  3. East African pigs have a complex Indian, Far Eastern and Western ancestry.

    PubMed

    Noce, A; Amills, M; Manunza, A; Muwanika, V; Muhangi, D; Aliro, T; Mayega, J; Ademun, R; Sànchez, A; Egbhalsaied, S; Mercadé, A; Masembe, C

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we have characterized the mitochondrial diversity of 81 swine from Uganda. Median-joining network analysis of D-loop sequences from these individuals and others characterized in previous studies allowed us to determine that Ugandan pigs cluster with populations from the West (Europe/North Africa), Far East and India. In addition, partial sequencing of the Y-chromosome UTY locus in 18 Ugandan domestic pigs revealed the segregation of a single HY1 lineage that has a cosmopolitan distribution. A Western and Far Eastern ancestry for East African pigs had been already reported, but this is the first study demonstrating an additional contribution from the Indian porcine gene pool. This result is consistent with the high frequency of zebuine alleles in cattle from East Africa. The geographic coordinates of East Africa, at the crossroads of many trading routes that, through the ages, linked Europe, Africa and Asia, might explain the rich and complex genetic heritage of livestock native to this area. PMID:26011180

  4. Genome-wide association study of tanning phenotype in a population of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Nan, Hongmei; Kraft, Peter; Qureshi, Abrar A; Guo, Qun; Chen, Constance; Hankinson, Susan E; Hu, Frank B; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Chanock, Stephen; Hunter, David J; Han, Jiali

    2009-09-01

    We conducted a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of tanning response after exposure to sunlight in over 9,000 men and women of European ancestry who live in the United States. An initial analysis of 528,173 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped on 2,287 women identified LOC401937 (rs966321) on chromosome 1 as a novel locus highly associated with tanning ability, and we confirmed this association in 870 women controls from a skin cancer case-control study with joint P-value=1.6 x 10(-9). We further genotyped this SNP in two subsequent replication studies (one with 3,750 women and the other with 2,405 men). This association was not replicated in either of these two studies. We found that several SNPs reaching the genome-wide significance level are located in or adjacent to the loci previously known as pigmentation genes: MATP, IRF4, TYR, OCA2, and MC1R. Overall, these tanning ability-related loci are similar to the hair color-related loci previously reported in the GWAS of hair color. PMID:19340012

  5. A SNP test to identify Africanized honeybees via proportion of 'African' ancestry.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Nadine C; Harpur, Brock A; Lim, Julianne; Rinderer, Thomas E; Allsopp, Michael H; Zayed, Amro; Oldroyd, Benjamin P

    2015-11-01

    The honeybee, Apis mellifera, is the world's most important pollinator and is ubiquitous in most agricultural ecosystems. Four major evolutionary lineages and at least 24 subspecies are recognized. Commercial populations are mainly derived from subspecies originating in Europe (75-95%). The Africanized honeybee is a New World hybrid of A. m. scutellata from Africa and European subspecies, with the African component making up 50-90% of the genome. Africanized honeybees are considered undesirable for bee-keeping in most countries, due to their extreme defensiveness and poor honey production. The international trade in honeybees is restricted, due in part to bans on the importation of queens (and semen) from countries where Africanized honeybees are extant. Some desirable strains from the United States of America that have been bred for traits such as resistance to the mite Varroa destructor are unfortunately excluded from export to countries such as Australia due to the presence of Africanized honeybees in the USA. This study shows that a panel of 95 single nucleotide polymorphisms, chosen to differentiate between the African, Eastern European and Western European lineages, can detect Africanized honeybees with a high degree of confidence via ancestry assignment. Our panel therefore offers a valuable tool to mitigate the risks of spreading Africanized honeybees across the globe and may enable the resumption of queen and bee semen imports from the Americas. PMID:25846634

  6. Race, Ethnicity and Ancestry in Unrelated Transplant Matching for the National Marrow Donor Program: A Comparison of Multiple Forms of Self-Identification with Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbach, Jill A.; Saperstein, Aliya; Albrecht, Mark; Vierra-Green, Cynthia; Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J.; Maiers, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a nationwide study comparing self-identification to genetic ancestry classifications in a large cohort (n = 1752) from the National Marrow Donor Program. We sought to determine how various measures of self-identification intersect with genetic ancestry, with the aim of improving matching algorithms for unrelated bone marrow transplant. Multiple dimensions of self-identification, including race/ethnicity and geographic ancestry were compared to classifications based on ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, which are required for transplant matching. Nearly 20% of responses were inconsistent between reporting race/ethnicity versus geographic ancestry. Despite strong concordance between AIMs and HLA, no measure of self-identification shows complete correspondence with genetic ancestry. In certain cases geographic ancestry reporting matches genetic ancestry not reflected in race/ethnicity identification, but in other cases geographic ancestries show little correspondence to genetic measures, with important differences by gender. However, when respondents assign ancestry to grandparents, we observe sub-groups of individuals with well- defined genetic ancestries, including important differences in HLA frequencies, with implications for transplant matching. While we advocate for tailored questioning to improve accuracy of ancestry ascertainment, collection of donor grandparents’ information will improve the chances of finding matches for many patients, particularly for mixed-ancestry individuals. PMID:26287376

  7. Ancestry Estimation in Forensic Anthropology: Geometric Morphometric versus Standard and Nonstandard Interlandmark Distances.

    PubMed

    Katherine Spradley, M; Jantz, Richard L

    2016-07-01

    Standard cranial measurements are commonly used for ancestry estimation; however, 3D digitizers have made cranial landmark data collection and geometric morphometric (GM) analyses more popular within forensic anthropology. Yet there has been little focus on which data type works best. The goal of the present research is to test the discrimination ability of standard and nonstandard craniometric measurements and data derived from GM analysis. A total of 31 cranial landmarks were used to generate 465 interlandmark distances, including a subset of 20 commonly used measurements, and to generate principal component scores from procrustes coordinates. All were subjected to discriminant function analysis to ascertain which type of data performed best for ancestry estimation of American Black and White and Hispanic males and females. The nonstandard interlandmark distances generated the highest classification rates for females (90.5%) and males (88.2%). Using nonstandard interlandmark distances over more commonly used measurements leads to better ancestry estimates for our current population structure. PMID:27364267

  8. Translating Population Difference: The Use and Re-Use of Genetic Ancestry in Brazilian Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the past ten years, there has been an expansion of scientific interest in population genetics linked to both understanding histories of human migration and the way that population difference and diversity may account for and/or be implicated in health and disease. In this article, I examine how particular aspects of a globalizing research agenda related to population differences and genetic ancestry are taken up in locally variant ways in the nascent field of Brazilian cancer genetics. Drawing on a broad range of ethnographic data from clinical and nonclinical contexts in the south of Brazil, I examine the ambiguities that attention to genetic ancestry generates, so revealing the disjunctured and diverse ways a global research agenda increasingly orientated to questions of population difference and genetic ancestry is being used and reused. PMID:26452039

  9. Translating Population Difference: The Use and Re-Use of Genetic Ancestry in Brazilian Cancer Genetics.

    PubMed

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2016-01-01

    In the past ten years, there has been an expansion of scientific interest in population genetics linked to both understanding histories of human migration and the way that population difference and diversity may account for and/or be implicated in health and disease. In this article, I examine how particular aspects of a globalizing research agenda related to population differences and genetic ancestry are taken up in locally variant ways in the nascent field of Brazilian cancer genetics. Drawing on a broad range of ethnographic data from clinical and nonclinical contexts in the south of Brazil, I examine the ambiguities that attention to genetic ancestry generates, so revealing the disjunctured and diverse ways a global research agenda increasingly orientated to questions of population difference and genetic ancestry is being used and reused. PMID:26452039

  10. Forensic Applicability of Femur Subtrochanteric Shape to Ancestry Assessment in Thai and White American Males.

    PubMed

    Tallman, Sean D; Winburn, Allysha P

    2015-09-01

    Ancestry assessment from the postcranial skeleton presents a significant challenge to forensic anthropologists. However, metric dimensions of the femur subtrochanteric region are believed to distinguish between individuals of Asian and non-Asian descent. This study tests the discriminatory power of subtrochanteric shape using modern samples of 128 Thai and 77 White American males. Results indicate that the samples' platymeric index distributions are significantly different (p≤0.001), with the Thai platymeric index range generally lower and the White American range generally higher. While the application of ancestry assessment methods developed from Native American subtrochanteric data results in low correct classification rates for the Thai sample (50.8-57.8%), adapting these methods to the current samples leads to better classification. The Thai data may be more useful in forensic analysis than previously published subtrochanteric data derived from Native American samples. Adapting methods to include appropriate geographic and contemporaneous populations increases the accuracy of femur subtrochanteric ancestry methods. PMID:25845441

  11. Calibration of ultra high speed laser engraving processes by correlating influencing variables including correlative evaluation with SEM and CLSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Markus; Vaupel, Matthias; Nirnberger, Robert; Weinberger, Bernhard

    2016-03-01

    Laser engraving is used for decades as a well-established process e. g. for the production of print and embossing forms for many goods in daily life, e. g. decorated cans and printed bank notes. Up to now it is more or less a so-called fire-and-forget process. From the original artist's plan to the digitization, then from the laser source itself (with electronic signals, RF and plasma discharge regarding CO2 lasers) to the behavior of the optical beam delivery — especially if an AOM is used — to the interaction of the laser beam with the material itself is a long process chain. The most recent results using CO2 lasers with AOMs and the research done with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) — as a set for correlative microscopy to evaluate the high speed engraving characteristics — are presented in this paper.

  12. Droplet entrainment correlation for high pressure annular two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Betodano, M.A.; Jan, Cheng-Shiun; Beus, S.G.

    1996-01-01

    The amount of entrainment in annular flow is essential to predict the point of dryout. Most of the entrainment correlations available in the literature are obtained from air-water low pressure data. However many important industrial applications involve high pressure annular flows. There are very few correlations applicable in this range and they are solely based on empirical data fits. Comparing the low pressure entrainment data of Cousins and Hewitt (1968) and the high pressure data of Keeys et. al. (1970) and Wurtz (1978) with existing correlations, the agreement at high pressure is generally poor, except for the empirical correlation of Nigmatulin and Krushenok (1989) which depends on a Weber number that includes the droplet concentration. We propose a new semi-mechanistic entrainment correlation for fully developed annular flow conditions: E = (0.9642)/(1 + (3836/We{sub C})). It is developed based on the droplet continuity equation and the entrainment rate model of Dallman et. al. (1979). This model is then modified to introduce a Weber number that includes the droplet concentration, We{sub C}. This Weber number is shown to scale the available high and low pressure air-water and steam-water data better than the other definitions. Because the new correlation is based on a model of entrainment rate it may be used as a starting point in the development of a correlation for this process applicable to high pressure water-steam annular flows. A correlation is suggested pending validation with high pressure entrainment rate data. 12 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Genomic Ancestry of North Africans Supports Back-to-Africa Migrations

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Simon; Wang, Wei; Brisbin, Abra; Byrnes, Jake K.; Fadhlaoui-Zid, Karima; Zalloua, Pierre A.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Comas, David

    2012-01-01

    North African populations are distinct from sub-Saharan Africans based on cultural, linguistic, and phenotypic attributes; however, the time and the extent of genetic divergence between populations north and south of the Sahara remain poorly understood. Here, we interrogate the multilayered history of North Africa by characterizing the effect of hypothesized migrations from the Near East, Europe, and sub-Saharan Africa on current genetic diversity. We present dense, genome-wide SNP genotyping array data (730,000 sites) from seven North African populations, spanning from Egypt to Morocco, and one Spanish population. We identify a gradient of likely autochthonous Maghrebi ancestry that increases from east to west across northern Africa; this ancestry is likely derived from “back-to-Africa” gene flow more than 12,000 years ago (ya), prior to the Holocene. The indigenous North African ancestry is more frequent in populations with historical Berber ethnicity. In most North African populations we also see substantial shared ancestry with the Near East, and to a lesser extent sub-Saharan Africa and Europe. To estimate the time of migration from sub-Saharan populations into North Africa, we implement a maximum likelihood dating method based on the distribution of migrant tracts. In order to first identify migrant tracts, we assign local ancestry to haplotypes using a novel, principal component-based analysis of three ancestral populations. We estimate that a migration of western African origin into Morocco began about 40 generations ago (approximately 1,200 ya); a migration of individuals with Nilotic ancestry into Egypt occurred about 25 generations ago (approximately 750 ya). Our genomic data reveal an extraordinarily complex history of migrations, involving at least five ancestral populations, into North Africa. PMID:22253600

  14. Genetic ancestry of participants in the National Children’s Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Children’s Study (NCS) is a prospective epidemiological study in the USA tasked with identifying a nationally representative sample of 100,000 children, and following them from their gestation until they are 21 years of age. The objective of the study is to measure environmental and genetic influences on growth, development, and health. Determination of the ancestry of these NCS participants is important for assessing the diversity of study participants and for examining the effect of ancestry on various health outcomes. Results We estimated the genetic ancestry of a convenience sample of 641 parents enrolled at the 7 original NCS Vanguard sites, by analyzing 30,000 markers on exome arrays, using the 1000 Genomes Project superpopulations as reference populations, and compared this with the measures of self-reported ethnicity and race. For 99% of the individuals, self-reported ethnicity and race agreed with the predicted superpopulation. NCS individuals self-reporting as Asian had genetic ancestry of either South Asian or East Asian groups, while those reporting as either Hispanic White or Hispanic Other had similar genetic ancestry. Of the 33 individuals who self-reported as Multiracial or Non-Hispanic Other, 33% matched the South Asian or East Asian groups, while these groups represented only 4.4% of the other reported categories. Conclusions Our data suggest that self-reported ethnicity and race have some limitations in accurately capturing Hispanic and South Asian populations. Overall, however, our data indicate that despite the complexity of the US population, individuals know their ancestral origins, and that self-reported ethnicity and race is a reliable indicator of genetic ancestry. PMID:24490717

  15. Regional differences in awareness and attitudes regarding genetic testing for disease risk and ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Jonassaint, Charles R.; Santos, Eunice R.; Glover, Crystal M.; Payne, Perry W.; Fasaye, Grace-Ann; Oji-Njideka, Nefertiti; Hooker, Stanley; Hernandez, Wenndy; Foster, Morris W.; Kittles, Rick A.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the lay public’s awareness and attitudes concerning genetic testing and what factors influence their perspectives. The existing literature focuses mainly on ethnic and socioeconomic differences; however, here we focus on how awareness and attitudes regarding genetic testing differ by geographical regions in the US. We compared awareness and attitudes concerning genetic testing for disease risk and ancestry among 452 adults (41% Black and 67% female) in four major US cities, Norman, OK; Cincinnati, OH; Harlem, NY; and Washington, DC; prior to their participation in genetic ancestry testing. The OK participants reported more detail about their personal ancestries (p = 0.02) and valued ancestry testing over disease testing more than all other sites (p < 0.01). The NY participants were more likely than other sites to seek genetic testing for disease (p = 0.01) and to see benefit in finding out more about one’s ancestry (p = 0.02), while the DC participants reported reading and hearing more about genetic testing for African ancestry than all other sites (p < 0.01). These site differences were not better accounted for by sex, age, education, self-reported ethnicity, religion, or previous experience with genetic testing/counseling. Regional differences in awareness and attitudes transcend traditional demographic predictors, such as ethnicity, age and education. Local sociocultural factors, more than ethnicity and socioeconomic status, may influence the public’s awareness and belief systems, particularly with respect to genetics. PMID:20549517

  16. The multiethnic ancestry of Bolivians as revealed by the analysis of Y-chromosome markers.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Jorge Mario; Heinz, Tanja; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Taboada-Echalar, Patricia; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Carracedo, Ángel; Salas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the specific male genetic component of 226 Bolivians recruited in five different regions ("departments"), La Paz, Cochabamba, Pando, Beni, and Santa Cruz. To evaluate the effect of geography on the distribution of genetic variability, the samples were also grouped into three main eco-geographical regions, namely, Andean, Sub-Andean, and Llanos. All the individuals were genotyped for 17 Y-STR and 32 Y-SNP markers. The average Y-chromosome Native American component in Bolivians is 28%, and it is mainly represented by haplogroup Q1a3a, while the average Y-chromosome European ancestry is 65%, and it is mainly represented by haplogroup R1b1-P25. The data indicate that there exists significant population sub-division in the country in terms of continental ancestry. Thus, the partition of ancestries in Llanos, Sub-Andean, and Andean regions is as follows (respectively): (i) Native American ancestry: 47%, 7%, and 19%, (ii) European ancestry: 46%, 86%, and 75%, and (iii) African ancestry: 7%, 7%, and 6%. The population sub-structure in the country is also well mirrored when inferred from an AMOVA analysis, indicating that among-population variance in the country reaches 9.74-11.15%. This suggests the convenience of using regional datasets for forensic applications in Bolivia, instead of using a global and single country database. By comparing the Y-chromosome patterns with those previously reported on the same individuals on autosomal SNPs and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), it becomes clear that Bolivians show a strong gender-bias. PMID:25450796

  17. Genetic ancestry is associated with colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas in Latino populations.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Suarez, Gustavo; Sanabria, Maria Carolina; Serrano, Marta; Herran, Oscar F; Perez, Jesus; Plata, Jose L; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Tenesa, Albert

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer rates in Latin American countries are less than half of those observed in the United States. Latin Americans are the resultant of generations of an admixture of Native American, European, and African individuals. The potential role of genetic admixture in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been examined. We evaluate the association of genetic ancestry with colorectal neoplasms in 190 adenocarcinomas, 113 sporadic adenomas and 243 age- and sex-matched controls enrolled in a multicentric case-control study in Colombia. Individual ancestral genetic fractions were estimated using the STRUCTURE software, based on allele frequencies and assuming three distinct population origins. We used the Illumina Cancer Panel to genotype 1,421 sparse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and Northern and Western European ancestry, LWJ and Han Chinese in Beijing, China populations from the HapMap project as references. A total of 678 autosomal SNPs overlapped with the HapMap data set SNPs and were used for ancestry estimations. African mean ancestry fraction was higher in adenomas (0.13, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=0.11-0.15) and cancer cases (0.14, 95% CI=0.12-0.16) compared with controls (0.11, 95% CI=0.10-0.12). Conditional logistic regression analysis, controlling for known risk factors, showed a positive association of African ancestry per 10% increase with both colorectal adenoma (odds ratio (OR)=1.12, 95% CI=0.97-1.30) and adenocarcinoma (OR=1.19, 95% CI=1.05-1.35). In conclusion, increased African ancestry (or variants linked to it) contributes to the increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer in admixed Latin American population. PMID:24518838

  18. Distinct Transcript Isoforms of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) / Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) Gene Are Expressed in Lymphoblasts and Altered Isoform Levels Are Associated with Genetic Ancestry and the Duffy-Null Allele

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melissa B.; Walens, Andrea; Hire, Rupali; Mumin, Kauthar; Brown, Andrea M.; Ford, DeJuana; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Monteil, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atypical ChemoKine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) gene, better known as Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC or Duffy), is responsible for the Duffy Blood Group and plays a major role in regulating the circulating homeostatic levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines. Previous studies have shown that one common variant, the Duffy Null (Fy-) allele that is specific to African Ancestry groups, completely removes expression of the gene on erythrocytes; however, these individuals retain endothelial expression. Additional alleles are associated with a myriad of clinical outcomes related to immune responses and inflammation. In addition to allele variants, there are two distinct transcript isoforms of DARC which are expressed from separate promoters, and very little is known about the distinct transcriptional regulation or the distinct functionality of these protein isoforms. Our objective was to determine if the African specific Fy- allele alters the expression pattern of DARC isoforms and therefore could potentially result in a unique signature of the gene products, commonly referred to as antigens. Our work is the first to establish that there is expression of DARC on lymphoblasts. Our data indicates that people of African ancestry have distinct relative levels of DARC isoforms expressed in these cells. We conclude that the expression of both isoforms in combination with alternate alleles yields multiple Duffy antigens in ancestry groups, depending upon the haplotypes across the gene. Importantly, we hypothesize that DARC isoform expression patterns will translate into ancestry-specific inflammatory responses that are correlated with the axis of pro-inflammatory chemokine levels and distinct isoform-specific interactions with these chemokines. Ultimately, this work will increase knowledge of biological mechanisms underlying disparate clinical outcomes of inflammatory-related diseases among ethnic and geographic ancestry groups. PMID:26473357

  19. Rates of and Risk factors for trabecular and cortical BMD loss in middle-aged and elderly African Ancestry men

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yahtyng; Bunker, Clareann H.; Jonnalagadda, Pallavi; Cvejkus, Ryan K.; Patrick, Allen L.; Wheeler, Victor W.; Gordon, Christopher L.; Zmuda, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Low trabecular (Tb) and cortical (Ct) volumetric BMD (vBMD) are related to increased fracture risk, but little is known about the patterns and correlates of Tb and Ct vBMD loss with aging. We examined the rates of change in total, Tb.vBMD and Ct.vBMD at the radius and tibia, and identified factors associated with vBMD loss among 1,569 men of African descent aged 40 years and older. Quantitative computed tomography was used to measure vBMD 6 years apart. The annualized rate of loss in Tb.vBMD was significant at the radius (−0.047%/yr, p=0.016) but not tibia. At the radius, a significant loss of Tb.vBMD was observed in men aged 40-49 that appeared to be attenuated and not statistically significant among older age men. In contrast, the decline in Ct.vBMD was similar at both skeletal sites (−0.254 to −0.264%/yr, p<0.0001) and was consistent across all age groups. Positive associations were found for vBMD changes with body weight (all but radius Ct.vBMD) and diabetes (Ct.vBMD only), while negative associations were found with hypertension (all but radius Tb.vBMD), smoking (Ct.vBMD only), and androgen deprivation therapy (cortical vBMD only). Trabecular and cortical vBMD loss appears to follow different patterns among middle- and older-aged men of African ancestry. Factors associated with the decline in vBMD also varied by compartment and anatomical site. Additional studies are needed to better understand the physiological mechanisms underlying early BMD loss among African ancestry men. PMID:25213918

  20. Association of Circulating Renin and Aldosterone With Osteocalcin and Bone Mineral Density in African Ancestry Families.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Allison L; Kammerer, Candace M; Pratt, J Howard; Bunker, Clareann H; Wheeler, Victor W; Patrick, Alan L; Zmuda, Joseph M

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension is associated with accelerated bone loss, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is a key regulator of blood pressure. Although components of this system are expressed in human bone cells, studies in humans are sparse. Thus, we studied the association of circulating renin and aldosterone with osteocalcin and bone mineral density. We recruited 373 African ancestry family members without regard to health status from 6 probands (mean family size: 62 and relative pairs: 1687). Participants underwent a clinical examination, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomographic scans. Renin activity, aldosterone concentration, and osteocalcin were measured in fasting blood samples. Aldosterone/renin ratio was calculated as aldosterone concentration/renin activity. All models were analyzed using pedigree-based variance components methods. Full models included adjustment for age, sex, body composition, comorbidities, lifestyle factors, blood pressure, and antihypertensive medication. Higher renin activity was significantly associated with lower total osteocalcin and with higher trabecular bone mineral density (bothP<0.01). There were also significant genetic correlations between renin activity and whole-body bone mineral density. There were no associations with aldosterone concentration in any model and results for aldosterone/renin ratio were similar to those for renin activity. This is the first study to report a significant association between renin activity and a marker of bone turnover and bone mineral density in generally healthy individuals. Also, there is evidence for significant genetic pleiotropy and, thus, there may be a shared biological mechanism underlying both the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and bone metabolism that is independent of hypertension. PMID:26975710

  1. Evaluation of fall Sun Exposure Score in predicting vitamin D status in young Canadian adults, and the influence of ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sham, Lauren; Yeh, E Ann; Magalhaes, Sandra; Parra, Esteban J; Gozdzik, Agnes; Banwell, Brenda; Hanwell, Heather E

    2015-04-01

    Query of sun-related habits or ancestry could help screen for risk of vitamin D insufficiency (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D<75nmol/L). We evaluated the association between Sun Exposure Score (calculated from recall of Time Exposed to Sun and Skin Exposed to Sun in the previous week), demographics and anthropometrics (including self-reported ancestry and skin melanin reflectometry), and serum 25(OH)D levels in healthy young Canadian adults in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA; 43°N) during fall. 310 adults (67% female) of European, East Asian, and South Asian ancestries were evaluated. The median (interquartile range) 25(OH)D level was 49.7nmol/L (36.7-70.3) and 80% of participants were vitamin D insufficient. The vast majority of those of East and South Asian ancestry were vitamin D insufficient (91% and 97%, respectively), as were 55% of those of European ancestry. Sun Exposure Score and 25(OH)D concentrations were not associated after accounting for confounders. A multivariable model showed ancestry, recent summer sun exposure, sex, melanin, vitamin D intake, age and year of study significantly predicted 25(OH)D concentration; ancestry was the strongest independent predictor (adjusted R(2)=43%). Although Sun Exposure Score was not a significant predictor of serum 25(OH)D levels, inquiry of ancestry has potential use in screening for vitamin D insufficiency. PMID:25752862

  2. Blood quantum and perceptions of black-white biracial targets: the black ancestry prototype model of affirmative action.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Diana T; Good, Jessica J; Chavez, George

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the causal role of amount of Black ancestry in targets' perceived fit with Black prototypes and perceivers' categorization of biracial targets. Greater Black ancestry increased the likelihood that perceivers categorized biracial targets as Black and perceived targets as fitting Black prototypes (e.g., experiencing racial discrimination, possessing stereotypic traits). These results persisted, controlling for perceptions of phenotype that stem from ancestry information. Perceivers' beliefs about how society would categorize the biracial targets predicted perceptions of discrimination, whereas perceivers' beliefs about the targets' self-categorization predicted trait perceptions. The results of this study support the Black ancestry prototype model of affirmative action, which reveals the downstream consequences of Black ancestry for the distribution of minority resources (e.g., affirmative action) to biracial targets. PMID:21088283

  3. High-Dynamic-Range Single-Shot Cross-Correlator Based on an Optical Pulse Replicator

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrer, C.; Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2008-09-05

    The operation of a single-shot cross-correlator based on a pulse replicator is described. The correlator uses a discrete sequence of sampling pulses that are nonlinearly mixed with the pulse under test. The combination of a high reflector and partial reflector replicates an optical pulse by multiple internal reflections and generates a sequence of spatially displaced and temporally delayed sampling pulses. This principle is used in a cross-correlator characterizing optical pulses at 1053 nm. A dynamic range higher than 60 dB is obtained over a temporal range larger than 200 ps.

  4. Correlation Function Approach for Estimating Thermal Conductivity in Highly Porous Fibrous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez-Garcia, Jorge; Braginsky, Leonid; Shklover, Valery; Lawson, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Heat transport in highly porous fiber networks is analyzed via two-point correlation functions. Fibers are assumed to be long and thin to allow a large number of crossing points per fiber. The network is characterized by three parameters: the fiber aspect ratio, the porosity and the anisotropy of the structure. We show that the effective thermal conductivity of the system can be estimated from knowledge of the porosity and the correlation lengths of the correlation functions obtained from a fiber structure image. As an application, the effects of the fiber aspect ratio and the network anisotropy on the thermal conductivity is studied.

  5. Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vul, Edward; Harris, Christine; Winkielman, Piotr; Pashler, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies of emotion, personality, and social cognition have drawn much attention in recent years, with high-profile studies frequently reporting extremely high (e.g., > 8) correlations between behavioral and self-report measures of personality or emotion and measures of brain activation. We show that…

  6. Replication and functional genomic analyses of the breast cancer susceptibility locus at 6q25.1 generalize its importance in women of Chinese, Japanese and European ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiuyin; Wen, Wanqing; Qu, Shimian; Li, Guoliang; Egan, Kathleen M.; Chen, Kexin; Deming, Sandra L; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Chen-Yang; Gammon, Marilie D.; Blot, William J.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Haiman, Christopher A.; Khoo, Ui Soon; Iwasaki, Motoki; Santella, Regina M.; Zhang, Lina; Fair, Alecia Malin; Hu, Zhibin; Wu, Pei-Ei; Signorello, Lisa B.; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Tajima, Kazuo; Henderson, Brian E.; Chan, Kelvin Y.K.; Kasuga, Yoshio; Newcomb, Polly A.; Zheng, Hong; Cui, Yong; Wang, Furu; Shieh, Ya-Lan; Iwata, Hiroji; Le Marchand, Loic; Chan, Sum Yin; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Long, Jirong; Li, Chun; Shi, Jiajun; Huang, Bo; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zheng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the generalizability of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2046210 (A/G allele), associated with breast cancer risk that was initially identified at 6q25.1 in a genome-wide association study conducted among Chinese women. In a pooled analysis of over 31,000 women of East-Asian, European, and African ancestry, we found a positive association for rs2046210 and breast cancer risk in Chinese women [ORs (95%CI)=1.30(1.22–1.38) and 1.64(1.50–1.80) for the AG and AA genotypes, respectively, P for trend = 1.54 × 10−30], Japanese women [ORs (95%CI)=1.31(1.13–1.52) and 1.37(1.06–1.76), P for trend = 2.51 × 10−4], and European-ancestry American women [ORs (95%CI)=1.07(0.99–1.16) and 1.18(1.04–1.34), P for trend = 0.0069]. No association with this SNP, however, was observed in African American women [ORs (95%CI)=0.81(0.63–1.06) and 0.85(0.65–1.11) for the AG and AA genotypes, respectively, P for trend = 0.4027). In vitro functional genomic studies identified a putative functional variant, rs6913578. This SNP is 1,440 bp downstream of rs2046210 and is in high LD with rs2046210 in Chinese (r2=0.91) and European-ancestry (r2=0.83) populations, but not in Africans (r2=0.57). SNP rs6913578 was found to be associated with breast cancer risk in Chinese and European-ancestry American women. After adjusting for rs2046210, the association of rs6913578 with breast cancer risk in African Americans approached borderline significance. Results from this large consortium study confirmed the association of rs2046210 with breast cancer risk among women of Chinese, Japanese, and European ancestry. This association may be explained in part by a putatively functional variant (rs6913578) identified in the region. PMID:21303983

  7. Counting the Founders: The Matrilineal Genetic Ancestry of the Jewish Diaspora

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Doron M.; Metspalu, Ene; Kivisild, Toomas; Rosset, Saharon; Tzur, Shay; Hadid, Yarin; Yudkovsky, Guennady; Rosengarten, Dror; Pereira, Luisa; Amorim, Antonio; Kutuev, Ildus; Gurwitz, David; Bonne-Tamir, Batsheva; Villems, Richard; Skorecki, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The history of the Jewish Diaspora dates back to the Assyrian and Babylonian conquests in the Levant, followed by complex demographic and migratory trajectories over the ensuing millennia which pose a serious challenge to unraveling population genetic patterns. Here we ask whether phylogenetic analysis, based on highly resolved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenies can discern among maternal ancestries of the Diaspora. Accordingly, 1,142 samples from 14 different non-Ashkenazi Jewish communities were analyzed. A list of complete mtDNA sequences was established for all variants present at high frequency in the communities studied, along with high-resolution genotyping of all samples. Unlike the previously reported pattern observed among Ashkenazi Jews, the numerically major portion of the non-Ashkenazi Jews, currently estimated at 5 million people and comprised of the Moroccan, Iraqi, Iranian and Iberian Exile Jewish communities showed no evidence for a narrow founder effect, which did however characterize the smaller and more remote Belmonte, Indian and the two Caucasus communities. The Indian and Ethiopian Jewish sample sets suggested local female introgression, while mtDNAs in all other communities studied belong to a well-characterized West Eurasian pool of maternal lineages. Absence of sub-Saharan African mtDNA lineages among the North African Jewish communities suggests negligible or low level of admixture with females of the host populations among whom the African haplogroup (Hg) L0-L3 sub-clades variants are common. In contrast, the North African and Iberian Exile Jewish communities show influence of putative Iberian admixture as documented by mtDNA Hg HV0 variants. These findings highlight striking differences in the demographic history of the widespread Jewish Diaspora. PMID:18446216

  8. High-resolution heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy based on spatial encoding and coherence transfer in inhomogeneous fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaiyu; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been proven to be a powerful technique for chemical, biological, and medical studies. Heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) are two frequently used 2D NMR methods. In combination with spatially encoded techniques, a heteronuclear 2D NMR spectrum can be acquired in several seconds and may be applied to monitoring chemical reactions. However, it is difficult to obtain high-resolution NMR spectra in inhomogeneous fields. Inspired by the idea of tracing the difference of precession frequencies between two different spins to yield high-resolution spectra, we propose a method with correlation acquisition option and J-resolved-like acquisition option to ultrafast obtain high-resolution HSQC/HMBC spectra and heteronuclear J-resolved-like spectra in inhomogeneous fields.

  9. A serach for moderate- and high-energy neturino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker-Szendy, R.; Bratton, C. B.; Breault, J.; Casper, D.; Dye, S. T.; Gajewski, W.; Goldhaber, M.; Haines, T. J.; Halverson, P. G.; Kielczewska, D.

    1995-01-01

    A temporal correlation analysis between moderate- (60 Mev less than or equal to E(sub nu)greater than or equal to 2500 MeV) and high-energy (E(sub nu) greater than or equal to 2000 MeV) neutrino interactions consist of two types: the moderate-energy interactions that are contained within the volume of IMB-3 and the upward-going muons produced by high-energy nu(sub mu) interactions in the rock around the detector. No evidence is found for moderate- or high-energy neutrino emission from GRBs nor for any neutrino/neutrino correlation. The nonobservation of nu/GRB correlations allows upper limits to be placed on the neutrino flux associated with GRBs.

  10. Colloquium paper: phylogenomic evidence of adaptive evolution in the ancestry of humans.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Morris; Sterner, Kirstin N

    2010-05-11

    In Charles Darwin's tree model for life's evolution, natural selection adaptively modifies newly arisen species as they branch apart from their common ancestor. In accord with this Darwinian concept, the phylogenomic approach to elucidating adaptive evolution in genes and genomes in the ancestry of modern humans requires a well supported and well sampled phylogeny that accurately places humans and other primates and mammals with respect to one another. For more than a century, first from the comparative immunological work of Nuttall on blood sera and now from comparative genomic studies, molecular findings have demonstrated the close kinship of humans to chimpanzees. The close genetic correspondence of chimpanzees to humans and the relative shortness of our evolutionary separation suggest that most distinctive features of the modern human phenotype had already evolved during our ancestry with chimpanzees. Thus, a phylogenomic assessment of being human should examine earlier stages of human ancestry as well as later stages. In addition, with the availability of a number of mammalian genomes, similarities in phenotype between distantly related taxa should be explored for evidence of convergent or parallel adaptive evolution. As an example, recent phylogenomic evidence has shown that adaptive evolution of aerobic energy metabolism genes may have helped shape such distinctive modern human features as long life spans and enlarged brains in the ancestries of both humans and elephants. PMID:20445097

  11. Quantitative characterization of highly efficient correlated photon-pair source using biexciton resonance.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasuo; Oohata, Goro; Mizoguchi, Kohji

    2016-03-21

    A high efficiency method for the generation of correlated photon pairs accompanied by reliable means to characterize the efficiency of that process is needed in the study of entangled states, which have important potential applications in quantum information and quantum communication. In this study, we report the first characterization of the efficiency of generation of correlated photon pairs emitted from a CuCl single crystal using the biexciton-resonance hyper-parametric scattering (RHPS) method which is the highly efficient method of generation of correlated photon pairs. In order to characterize the generation efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio of correlated photon pairs using this method, we investigated the pump power dependence on the photon counting rate and coincidence counting rate under resonant excitation. The pump power dependence shows that the power characteristic of the photon counting rates changes from linear to quadratic dependence of the pump power. This behavior represents a superposition of contributions from correlated photon pairs and non-correlated photons. The analysis of the pump power dependence shows that one photon-pair is produced by a pump pulse with 2 x 106 photons. Moreover, the generation efficiency of this method obtained by calculating the number of generated photon pairs per pump power is comparable to that of several methods based on the χ(3) parametric process. PMID:27136797

  12. Detection of Unexpected High Correlations between Balance Calibration Loads and Load Residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, N.; Volden, T.

    2014-01-01

    An algorithm was developed for the assessment of strain-gage balance calibration data that makes it possible to systematically investigate potential sources of unexpected high correlations between calibration load residuals and applied calibration loads. The algorithm investigates correlations on a load series by load series basis. The linear correlation coefficient is used to quantify the correlations. It is computed for all possible pairs of calibration load residuals and applied calibration loads that can be constructed for the given balance calibration data set. An unexpected high correlation between a load residual and a load is detected if three conditions are met: (i) the absolute value of the correlation coefficient of a residual/load pair exceeds 0.95; (ii) the maximum of the absolute values of the residuals of a load series exceeds 0.25 % of the load capacity; (iii) the load component of the load series is intentionally applied. Data from a baseline calibration of a six-component force balance is used to illustrate the application of the detection algorithm to a real-world data set. This analysis also showed that the detection algorithm can identify load alignment errors as long as repeat load series are contained in the balance calibration data set that do not suffer from load alignment problems.

  13. Multielectron Correlation in High-Harmonic Generation: A 2D Model Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sukiasyan, Suren; McDonald, Chris; Destefani, Carlos; Brabec, Thomas; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2009-06-05

    We analyze the role of multielectron dynamics in high-harmonic generation spectroscopy, using an example of a two-electron system. We identify and systematically quantify the importance of correlation and exchange effects. One of the main sources for correlation is identified to be the polarization of the ion by the recombining continuum electron. This effect, which plays an important qualitative and quantitative role, seriously undermines the validity of the standard approaches to high-harmonic generation, which ignore the contribution of excited ionic states to the radiative recombination of the continuum electron.

  14. High-speed holographic correlation system for video identification on the internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Eriko; Ikeda, Kanami; Kodate, Kashiko

    2013-12-01

    Automatic video identification is important for indexing, search purposes, and removing illegal material on the Internet. By combining a high-speed correlation engine and web-scanning technology, we developed the Fast Recognition Correlation system (FReCs), a video identification system for the Internet. FReCs is an application thatsearches through a number of websites with user-generated content (UGC) and detects video content that violates copyright law. In this paper, we describe the FReCs configuration and an approach to investigating UGC websites using FReCs. The paper also illustrates the combination of FReCs with an optical correlation system, which is capable of easily replacing a digital authorization sever in FReCs with optical correlation.

  15. Identification of Noise Sources in High Speed Jets via Correlation Measurements: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James (Technical Monitor); Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Significant advancement has been made in the last few years to identify noise sources in high speed jets via direct correlation measurements. In this technique turbulent fluctuations in the flow are correlated with far field acoustics signatures. In the 1970 s there was a surge of work using mostly intrusive probes, and a few using Laser Doppler Velocimetry, to measure turbulent fluctuations. The later experiments established "shear noise" as the primary source for the shallow angle noise. Various interpretations and criticisms from this time are described in the review. Recent progress in the molecular Rayleigh scattering based technique has provided a completely non-intrusive means of measuring density and velocity fluctuations. This has brought a renewed interest on correlation measurements. We have performed five different sets of experiments in single stream jets of different Mach number, temperature ratio and nozzle configurations. The present paper tries to summarize the correlation data from these works.

  16. Association of Genetic Ancestry with Breast Cancer in Ethnically Diverse Women from Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alem, Umaima; Rauscher, Garth; Shah, Ebony; Batai, Ken; Mahmoud, Abeer; Beisner, Erin; Silva, Abigail; Peterson, Caryn; Kittles, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Non-Hispanic (nH) Black and Hispanic women are disproportionately affected by early onset disease, later stage, and with more aggressive, higher grade and ER/PR negative breast cancers. The purpose of this analysis was to examine whether genetic ancestry could account for these variation in breast cancer characteristics, once data were stratified by self-reported race/ethnicity and adjusted for potential confounding by social and behavioral factors. Methods We used a panel of 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to estimate individual genetic ancestry in 656 women from the “Breast Cancer Care in Chicago” study, a multi-ethnic cohort of breast cancer patients to examine the association between individual genetic ancestry and breast cancer characteristics. In addition we examined the association of individual AIMs and breast cancer to identify genes/regions that may potentially play a role in breast cancer disease disparities. Results As expected, nH Black and Hispanic patients were more likely than nH White patients to be diagnosed at later stages, with higher grade, and with ER/PR negative tumors. Higher European genetic ancestry was protective against later stage at diagnosis (OR 0.7 95%CI: 0.54–0.92) among Hispanic patients, and higher grade (OR 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56–0.95) among nH Black patients. After adjustment for multiple social and behavioral risk factors, the association with later stage remained, while the association with grade was not significant. We also found that the AIM SNP rs10954631 on chromosome 7 was associated with later stage (p = 0.02) and higher grade (p = 0.012) in nH Whites and later stage (p = 0.03) in nH Blacks. Conclusion Non-European genetic ancestry was associated with later stage at diagnosis in ethnic minorities. The relation between genetic ancestry and stage at diagnosis may be due to genetic factors and/or unmeasured environmental factors that are overrepresented within certain racial/ethnic groups

  17. Speckle-correlation imaging through highly scattering turbid media with LED illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Dai, Weijia; Wu, Tengfei; Li, Huijuan; Wang, Lin

    2015-05-01

    We address an optical imaging method that allows imaging, which owing to the "memory-effect" for speckle correlations, through highly scattering turbid media with "Error Reduction - Hybid Input Ouput (ER-HIO)" algorithm. When light propagates through the opaque materials, such as white paint, paper or biological tissues, it will be scattered away due to the inhomogeneity of the refractive index. Multiple scattering of light in highly scattering media forms speckle field, which will greatly reduce the imaging depth and degrade the imaging quality. Some methods have been developed to solve this problem in recent years, including wavefront modulation method (WMM), transmission matrix method (TMM) and speckle correlations method (SCM). A novel approach is proposed to image through a highly scattering turbid medium, which combines speckle correlations method (SCM) with phase retrieval algorithm (PRA). Here, we show that, owing to the "optical memory effect" for speckle correlations, a single frame image of the speckle field, captured with a high performance detector, encodes sufficient information to image through highly scattering turbid media. Theoretical and experimental results show that, neither the light source, nor wave-front shaping is required in this method, and that the imaging can be easily realized here using just a simple optical system with the help of optical memory effect. Our method does not require coherent light source, which can be achieved with LED illumination, unlike previous approaches, and therefore is potentially suitable for more and more areas. Consequently, it will be beneficial to achieve imaging in currently inaccessible scenarios.

  18. African Genetic Ancestry is Associated with Sleep Depth in Older African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Indrani; Matthews, Karen A.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Strollo, Patrick J.; Causer, Victoria; Reis, Steven E.; Hall, Martica H.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The mechanisms that underlie differences in sleep characteristics between European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA) are not fully known. Although social and psychological processes that differ by race are possible mediators, the substantial heritability of sleep characteristics also suggests genetic underpinnings of race differences. We hypothesized that racial differences in sleep phenotypes would show an association with objectively measured individual genetic ancestry in AAs. Design: Cross sectional. Setting: Community-based study. Participants: Seventy AA adults (mean age 59.5 ± 6.7 y; 62% female) and 101 EAs (mean age 60.5 ± 7 y, 39% female). Measurements and Results: Multivariate tests were used to compare the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and in-home polysomnographic measures of sleep duration, sleep efficiency, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and indices of sleep depth including percent visually scored slow wave sleep (SWS) and delta EEG power of EAs and AAs. Sleep duration, efficiency, and sleep depth differed significantly by race. Individual % African ancestry (%AF) was measured in AA subjects using a panel of 1698 ancestry informative genetic markers and ranged from 10% to 88% (mean 67%). Hierarchical linear regression showed that higher %AF was associated with lower percent SWS in AAs (β (standard error) = −4.6 (1.5); P = 0.002), and explained 11% of the variation in SWS after covariate adjustment. A similar association was observed for delta power. No association was observed for sleep duration and efficiency. Conclusion: African genetic ancestry is associated with indices of sleep depth in African Americans. Such an association suggests that part of the racial differences in slow-wave sleep may have genetic underpinnings. Citation: Halder I, Matthews KA, Buysse DJ, Strollo PJ, Causer V, Reis SE, Hall MH. African genetic ancestry is associated with sleep depth in older African Americans. SLEEP 2015;38(8):1185–1193

  19. Neonatal Variables, Altitude of Residence and Aymara Ancestry in Northern Chile

    PubMed Central

    Rothhammer, Francisco; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo; Dittmar, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Studies performed in the Andean plateau, one of the highest inhabited areas in the world, have reported that reduced availability of oxygen is associated to fetal growth retardation and lower birth weight, which are established predictors of morbidity and mortality during the first year of life. To test this hypothesis, perinatal variables of neonates born at the Juan Noé Hospital of Arica, Chile, were analyzed in relation to altitude of residence and Aymara ancestry of their mothers. The study population comprised the offspring of 5,295 mothers born between February 2004 and August 2010. Information included birth weight, height, head circumference, gestational age, altitude of residence and socioeconomic status, and was obtained from medical records. Mother´s ancestry was assessed based on surnames which were linked to percentages of Aymara admixture estimates relying on 40 selected ancestry informative markers. After correcting for the effect of multicollinearity among predictor variables, neonates born to mothers with an increased component of Aymara ancestry showed significantly higher birth weight and height at sea level, a marginally significant (p-value 0.06) decrease of birth weight and a significant decrease of height with altitude in comparison with the offspring of mothers with low Aymara ancestry. Since observed tendencies are suggestive of a possible genetic adaptation to hypoxia of the Chilean Aymara, we discuss briefly preliminary evidence related to fetal oxygen transport, particularly polymorphisms in the promoters of the HBG1 and HBG2 genes that are modulators of HbF synthesis, obtained in this ethnic group. PMID:25885573

  20. Mitochondrial and Y chromosome haplotype motifs as diagnostic markers of Jewish ancestry: a reconsideration

    PubMed Central

    Tofanelli, Sergio; Taglioli, Luca; Bertoncini, Stefania; Francalacci, Paolo; Klyosov, Anatole; Pagani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have proposed haplotype motifs based on site variants at the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) to trace the genealogies of Jewish people. Here, we analyzed their main approaches and test the feasibility of adopting motifs as ancestry markers through construction of a large database of mtDNA and NRY haplotypes from public genetic genealogical repositories. We verified the reliability of Jewish ancestry prediction based on the Cohen and Levite Modal Haplotypes in their “classical” 6 STR marker format or in the “extended” 12 STR format, as well as four founder mtDNA lineages (HVS-I segments) accounting for about 40% of the current population of Ashkenazi Jews. For this purpose we compared haplotype composition in individuals of self-reported Jewish ancestry with the rest of European, African or Middle Eastern samples, to test for non-random association of ethno-geographic groups and haplotypes. Overall, NRY and mtDNA based motifs, previously reported to differentiate between groups, were found to be more represented in Jewish compared to non-Jewish groups. However, this seems to stem from common ancestors of Jewish lineages being rather recent respect to ancestors of non-Jewish lineages with the same “haplotype signatures.” Moreover, the polyphyly of haplotypes which contain the proposed motifs and the misuse of constant mutation rates heavily affected previous attempts to correctly dating the origin of common ancestries. Accordingly, our results stress the limitations of using the above haplotype motifs as reliable Jewish ancestry predictors and show its inadequacy for forensic or genealogical purposes. PMID:25431579

  1. Mitochondrial and Y chromosome haplotype motifs as diagnostic markers of Jewish ancestry: a reconsideration.

    PubMed

    Tofanelli, Sergio; Taglioli, Luca; Bertoncini, Stefania; Francalacci, Paolo; Klyosov, Anatole; Pagani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have proposed haplotype motifs based on site variants at the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) to trace the genealogies of Jewish people. Here, we analyzed their main approaches and test the feasibility of adopting motifs as ancestry markers through construction of a large database of mtDNA and NRY haplotypes from public genetic genealogical repositories. We verified the reliability of Jewish ancestry prediction based on the Cohen and Levite Modal Haplotypes in their "classical" 6 STR marker format or in the "extended" 12 STR format, as well as four founder mtDNA lineages (HVS-I segments) accounting for about 40% of the current population of Ashkenazi Jews. For this purpose we compared haplotype composition in individuals of self-reported Jewish ancestry with the rest of European, African or Middle Eastern samples, to test for non-random association of ethno-geographic groups and haplotypes. Overall, NRY and mtDNA based motifs, previously reported to differentiate between groups, were found to be more represented in Jewish compared to non-Jewish groups. However, this seems to stem from common ancestors of Jewish lineages being rather recent respect to ancestors of non-Jewish lineages with the same "haplotype signatures." Moreover, the polyphyly of haplotypes which contain the proposed motifs and the misuse of constant mutation rates heavily affected previous attempts to correctly dating the origin of common ancestries. Accordingly, our results stress the limitations of using the above haplotype motifs as reliable Jewish ancestry predictors and show its inadequacy for forensic or genealogical purposes. PMID:25431579

  2. Completion of a worldwide reference panel of samples for an ancestry informative Indel assay.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla; Phillips, Christopher; Oldoni, Fabio; Amigo, Jorge; Fondevila, Manuel; Pereira, Rui; Carracedo, Ángel; Lareu, Maria Victoria

    2015-07-01

    The use of ancestry informative markers (AIMs) in forensic analysis is of considerable utility since ancestry inference can progress an investigation when no identification has been made of DNA from the crime-scene. Short-amplicon markers, including insertion deletion polymorphisms, are particularly useful in forensic analysis due to their mutational stability, capacity to amplify degraded samples and straightforward amplification technique. In this study we report the completion of H952 HGDP-CEPH panel genotyping with a set of 46 AIM-Indels. The study adds Central South Asian and Middle Eastern population data, allowing a comparison of patterns of variation in Eurasia for these markers, in order to enhance their use in forensic analyses, particularly when combined with sets of ancestry informative SNPs. Ancestry analysis using principal component analysis and Bayesian methods indicates that a proportion of classification error occurs with European-Middle East population comparisons, but the 46 AIM-Indels have the capability to differentiate six major population groups when European-Central South Asian comparisons are made. These findings have relevance for forensic ancestry analyses in countries where South Asians form much of the demographic profile, including the UK, USA and South Africa. A novel third allele detected in MID-548 was characterized - despite a low frequency in the HGDP-CEPH panel samples, it appears confined to Central South Asian populations, increasing the ability to differentiate this population group. The H952 data set was implemented in a new open access SPSmart frequency browser - forInDel: Forensic Indel browser. PMID:25840342

  3. Effect of partonic "wind" on charm quark correlations in high-energy nuclear collisions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Xu, N; Zhuang, P

    2008-04-18

    In high-energy collisions, massive heavy quarks are produced back to back initially and they are sensitive to early dynamical conditions. The strong collective partonic wind from the fast expanding quark-gluon plasma created in high-energy nuclear collisions modifies the correlation pattern significantly. While the hot and dense medium in collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (sqrt[_s{NN}]=200 GeV) can only smear the initial back-to-back D_D correlation, a clear and strong near side D_D correlation is expected at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (sqrt[_s{NN}]=5500 GeV). This is considered as a signature for the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. PMID:18518098

  4. Determining the effects and challenges of incorporating genetic testing into primary care management of hypertensive patients with African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C R; Abul-Husn, N S; Ellis, S; Ramos, M A; Negron, R; Suprun, M; Zinberg, R E; Sabin, T; Hauser, D; Calman, N; Bagiella, E; Bottinger, E P

    2016-03-01

    People of African ancestry (Blacks) have increased risk of kidney failure due to numerous socioeconomic, environmental, and clinical factors. Two variants in the APOL1 gene are now thought to account for much of the racial disparity associated with hypertensive kidney failure in Blacks. However, this knowledge has not been translated into clinical care to help improve patient outcomes and address disparities. GUARDD is a randomized trial to evaluate the effects and challenges of incorporating genetic risk information into primary care. Hypertensive, non-diabetic, adults with self-reported African ancestry, without kidney dysfunction, are recruited from diverse clinical settings and randomized to undergo APOL1 genetic testing at baseline (intervention) or at one year (waitlist control). Providers are educated about genomics and APOL1. Guided by a genetic counselor, trained staff return APOL1 results to patients and provide low-literacy educational materials. Real-time clinical decision support tools alert clinicians of their patients' APOL1 results and associated risk status at the point of care. Our academic-community-clinical partnership designed a study to generate information about the impact of genetic risk information on patient care (blood pressure and renal surveillance) and on patient and provider knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. GUARDD will help establish the effective implementation of APOL1 risk-informed management of hypertensive patients at high risk of CKD, and will provide a robust framework for future endeavors to implement genomic medicine in diverse clinical practices. It will also add to the important dialog about factors that contribute to and may help eliminate racial disparities in kidney disease. PMID:26747051

  5. Lactase persistence alleles reveal partial East African ancestry of southern African Khoe pastoralists.

    PubMed

    Breton, Gwenna; Schlebusch, Carina M; Lombard, Marlize; Sjödin, Per; Soodyall, Himla; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2014-04-14

    The ability to digest milk into adulthood, lactase persistence (LP), as well as specific genetic variants associated with LP, is heterogeneously distributed in global populations. These variants were most likely targets of selection when some populations converted from hunter-gatherer to pastoralist or farming lifestyles. Specific LP polymorphisms are associated with particular geographic regions and populations; however, they have not been extensively studied in southern Africa. We investigate the LP-regulatory region in 267 individuals from 13 southern African populations (including descendants of hunter-gatherers, pastoralists, and agropastoralists), providing the first comprehensive study of the LP-regulatory region in a large group of southern Africans. The "East African" LP single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (14010G>C) was found at high frequency (>20%) in a strict pastoralist Khoe population, the Nama of Namibia, suggesting a connection to East Africa, whereas the "European" LP SNP (13910C>T) was found in populations of mixed ancestry. Using genome-wide data from various African populations, we identify admixture (13%) in the Nama, from an Afro-Asiatic group dating to >1,300 years ago, with the remaining fraction of their genomes being from San hunter-gatherers. We also find evidence of selection around the LCT gene among Khoe-speaking groups, and the substantial frequency of the 14010C variant among the Nama is best explained by adaptation to digesting milk. These genome-local and genome-wide results support a model in which an East African group brought pastoralist practices to southern Africa and admixed with local hunter-gatherers to form the ancestors of Khoe people. PMID:24704072

  6. Early B-cell differentiation in Merkel cell carcinomas: clues to cellular ancestry.

    PubMed

    Zur Hausen, Axel; Rennspiess, Dorit; Winnepenninckx, Veronique; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Kurz, Anna Kordelia

    2013-08-15

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly malignant neuroendocrine nonmelanoma skin cancer, which is associated with the Merkel cell polyoma virus (MCPyV). Recently, expression of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and the paired box gene 5 (PAX 5) has been consistently reported in the majority of MCCs. We tested 21 MCCs for the expression of MCPyV, TdT, PAX5, IgG, IgM, IgA, kappa, and lambda by immunohistochemistry and assessed IgH and Igk rearrangement in all 21 MCCs. All of the MCCs revealed specific expression of PAX5 and 72.8% of the MCCs expressed TdT. In addition, most of the MCCs revealed specific expression of one or more Ig subclasses and kappa or lambda. One MCC did reveal monoclonal IgH and Igk rearrangement next to two other MCCs showing Igk rearrangement. As coexpression of TdT and PAX5 under physiologic circumstances is restricted to pro/pre- and pre-B cells we propose, on the basis of our results, that the cell of origin of MCCs is a pro/pre- or pre-B cell rather than the postmitotic Merkel cells. MCPyV infection and transformation of pro-/pre-B cells are likely to induce the expression of simple cytokeratins as has been shown for SV40 in other nonepithelial cells. This model of cellular ancestry of MCCs might impact therapy and possibly helps to understand why approximately 20% of MCCs are MCPyV-negative. PMID:23576560

  7. Y-Chromosome Diversity in Modern Bulgarians: New Clues about Their Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Fornarino, Simona; Nesheva, Desislava; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Battaglia, Vincenza; Carossa, Valeria; Yordanov, Yordan; Torroni, Antonio; Galabov, Angel S.; Toncheva, Draga; Semino, Ornella

    2013-01-01

    To better define the structure and origin of the Bulgarian paternal gene pool, we have examined the Y-chromosome variation in 808 Bulgarian males. The analysis was performed by high-resolution genotyping of biallelic markers and by analyzing the STR variation within the most informative haplogroups. We found that the Y-chromosome gene pool in modern Bulgarians is primarily represented by Western Eurasian haplogroups with ∼ 40% belonging to haplogroups E-V13 and I-M423, and 20% to R-M17. Haplogroups common in the Middle East (J and G) and in South Western Asia (R-L23*) occur at frequencies of 19% and 5%, respectively. Haplogroups C, N and Q, distinctive for Altaic and Central Asian Turkic-speaking populations, occur at the negligible frequency of only 1.5%. Principal Component analyses group Bulgarians with European populations, apart from Central Asian Turkic-speaking groups and South Western Asia populations. Within the country, the genetic variation is structured in Western, Central and Eastern Bulgaria indicating that the Balkan Mountains have been permeable to human movements. The lineage analysis provided the following interesting results: (i) R-L23* is present in Eastern Bulgaria since the post glacial period; (ii) haplogroup E-V13 has a Mesolithic age in Bulgaria from where it expanded after the arrival of farming; (iii) haplogroup J-M241 probably reflects the Neolithic westward expansion of farmers from the earliest sites along the Black Sea. On the whole, in light of the most recent historical studies, which indicate a substantial proto-Bulgarian input to the contemporary Bulgarian people, our data suggest that a common paternal ancestry between the proto-Bulgarians and the Altaic and Central Asian Turkic-speaking populations either did not exist or was negligible. PMID:23483890

  8. Y-chromosome diversity in modern Bulgarians: new clues about their ancestry.

    PubMed

    Karachanak, Sena; Grugni, Viola; Fornarino, Simona; Nesheva, Desislava; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Battaglia, Vincenza; Carossa, Valeria; Yordanov, Yordan; Torroni, Antonio; Galabov, Angel S; Toncheva, Draga; Semino, Ornella

    2013-01-01

    To better define the structure and origin of the Bulgarian paternal gene pool, we have examined the Y-chromosome variation in 808 Bulgarian males. The analysis was performed by high-resolution genotyping of biallelic markers and by analyzing the STR variation within the most informative haplogroups. We found that the Y-chromosome gene pool in modern Bulgarians is primarily represented by Western Eurasian haplogroups with ∼ 40% belonging to haplogroups E-V13 and I-M423, and 20% to R-M17. Haplogroups common in the Middle East (J and G) and in South Western Asia (R-L23*) occur at frequencies of 19% and 5%, respectively. Haplogroups C, N and Q, distinctive for Altaic and Central Asian Turkic-speaking populations, occur at the negligible frequency of only 1.5%. Principal Component analyses group Bulgarians with European populations, apart from Central Asian Turkic-speaking groups and South Western Asia populations. Within the country, the genetic variation is structured in Western, Central and Eastern Bulgaria indicating that the Balkan Mountains have been permeable to human movements. The lineage analysis provided the following interesting results: (i) R-L23* is present in Eastern Bulgaria since the post glacial period; (ii) haplogroup E-V13 has a Mesolithic age in Bulgaria from where it expanded after the arrival of farming; (iii) haplogroup J-M241 probably reflects the Neolithic westward expansion of farmers from the earliest sites along the Black Sea. On the whole, in light of the most recent historical studies, which indicate a substantial proto-Bulgarian input to the contemporary Bulgarian people, our data suggest that a common paternal ancestry between the proto-Bulgarians and the Altaic and Central Asian Turkic-speaking populations either did not exist or was negligible. PMID:23483890

  9. Mosaic maternal ancestry in the Great Lakes region of East Africa.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Verónica; Pala, Maria; Salas, Antonio; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Amorim, António; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Carracedo, Ángel; Clarke, Douglas J; Hill, Catherine; Mormina, Maru; Shaw, Marie-Anne; Dunne, David W; Pereira, Rui; Pereira, Vânia; Prata, Maria João; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Rito, Teresa; Soares, Pedro; Gusmão, Leonor; Richards, Martin B

    2015-09-01

    The Great Lakes lie within a region of East Africa with very high human genetic diversity, home of many ethno-linguistic groups usually assumed to be the product of a small number of major dispersals. However, our knowledge of these dispersals relies primarily on the inferences of historical, linguistics and oral traditions, with attempts to match up the archaeological evidence where possible. This is an obvious area to which archaeogenetics can contribute, yet Uganda, at the heart of these developments, has not been studied for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation. Here, we compare mtDNA lineages at this putative genetic crossroads across 409 representatives of the major language groups: Bantu speakers and Eastern and Western Nilotic speakers. We show that Uganda harbours one of the highest mtDNA diversities within and between linguistic groups, with the various groups significantly differentiated from each other. Despite an inferred linguistic origin in South Sudan, the data from the two Nilotic-speaking groups point to a much more complex history, involving not only possible dispersals from Sudan and the Horn but also large-scale assimilation of autochthonous lineages within East Africa and even Uganda itself. The Eastern Nilotic group also carries signals characteristic of West-Central Africa, primarily due to Bantu influence, whereas a much stronger signal in the Western Nilotic group suggests direct West-Central African ancestry. Bantu speakers share lineages with both Nilotic groups, and also harbour East African lineages not found in Western Nilotic speakers, likely due to assimilating indigenous populations since arriving in the region ~3000 years ago. PMID:26188410

  10. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers☆

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  11. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  12. Suppression of back-to-back particle-antiparticle correlations in high-energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, Joern

    2011-04-15

    Analytical formulas are presented which provide quantitative estimates for the suppression of the anticipated back-to-back particle-antiparticle correlations in high-energy nuclear collisions, due to both the finite duration of the transition dynamics and the continuous freeze-out. They show that the effect is unlikely to be observed.

  13. Beyond Correlations: Usefulness of High School GPA and Test Scores in Making College Admissions Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Correlational evidence suggests that high school GPA is better than admission test scores in predicting first-year college GPA, although test scores have incremental predictive validity. The usefulness of a selection variable in making admission decisions depends in part on its predictive validity, but also on institutions' selectivity and…

  14. Long range correlations in high multiplicity hadron collisions: Building bridges with ridges

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopalan, Raju

    2015-01-15

    We discuss the physics of the ridge–azimuthally collimated long range rapidity correlations–in high multiplicity proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions. We outline some of the theoretical discussions in the literature that address the systematics of these ridge correlations.

  15. A Person-Centered Investigation of Academic Motivation and Its Correlates in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wormington, Stephanie V.; Corpus, Jennifer Henderlong; Anderson, Kristen G.

    2012-01-01

    This study used a person-centered approach to identify naturally occurring combinations of intrinsic motivation and controlled forms of extrinsic motivation (i.e., introjected and external regulation) and their correlates in an academic context. 1061 high school students completed measures of academic motivation, performance, and school-related…

  16. Multilabel image classification via high-order label correlation driven active learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bang; Wang, Yang; Chen, Fang

    2014-03-01

    Supervised machine learning techniques have been applied to multilabel image classification problems with tremendous success. Despite disparate learning mechanisms, their performances heavily rely on the quality of training images. However, the acquisition of training images requires significant efforts from human annotators. This hinders the applications of supervised learning techniques to large scale problems. In this paper, we propose a high-order label correlation driven active learning (HoAL) approach that allows the iterative learning algorithm itself to select the informative example-label pairs from which it learns so as to learn an accurate classifier with less annotation efforts. Four crucial issues are considered by the proposed HoAL: 1) unlike binary cases, the selection granularity for multilabel active learning need to be fined from example to example-label pair; 2) different labels are seldom independent, and label correlations provide critical information for efficient learning; 3) in addition to pair-wise label correlations, high-order label correlations are also informative for multilabel active learning; and 4) since the number of label combinations increases exponentially with respect to the number of labels, an efficient mining method is required to discover informative label correlations. The proposed approach is tested on public data sets, and the empirical results demonstrate its effectiveness. PMID:24723538

  17. Spatial correlation of high-energy grain boundaries in two-dimensional simulated polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton DeW. Van Siclen

    2007-02-01

    A polycrystal undergoes microstructural changes to reach a lower energy state. In particular, the system evolves so as to reduce the total grain boundary energy. A simple two-dimensional model of a polycrystal comprised of randomly oriented crystalline grains suggests that energy minimization reduces or eliminates any spatial correlation among high-energy grain boundaries. Thus grain boundary engineering not only reduces the density of high-energy boundaries, but it prevents their organization into a coarse, albeit discontinuous, network.

  18. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng Li; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Zhi Qiang; Zhao, Heng Li; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200) detection, and neurocognitive assessment was performed and total hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and homocysteine was estimated at 500m altitude, 3650m altitude, 3day, 1, and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400m), and 1 month after coming back to the 500m altitude. High altitude increased brain oxygen saturation, prolonged P300 and N200 latencies, injured cognitive functions, and raised plasma hsCRP levels. But they all recovered in varying degrees at 1 and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400m). P300 latencies and hsCRP levels were strongly correlated to cognitive performances. These results suggested that cognitive deterioration occurred during the acute period of exposure to high altitude and may recover probably owning to acclimatization after extended stay at high altitude. Plasma hsCRP is inversely correlated to neurological cognition and it may be a potential biomarker for the prediction of high altitude induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26731740

  19. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sheng Li; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Zhi Qiang; Zhao, Heng Li; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD), stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200) detection, and neurocognitive assessment was performed and total hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and homocysteine was estimated at 500 m altitude, 3650 m altitude, 3 day, 1, and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m), and 1 month after coming back to the 500 m altitude. High altitude increased brain oxygen saturation, prolonged P300 and N200 latencies, injured cognitive functions, and raised plasma hsCRP levels. But they all recovered in varying degrees at 1 and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m). P300 latencies and hsCRP levels were strongly correlated to cognitive performances. These results suggested that cognitive deterioration occurred during the acute period of exposure to high altitude and may recover probably owning to acclimatization after extended stay at high altitude. Plasma hsCRP is inversely correlated to neurological cognition and it may be a potential biomarker for the prediction of high altitude induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26731740

  20. High-pT azimuthal correlations of neutral strange baryons and mesons in STAR at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bielcikova, Jana

    2006-07-11

    We present results on two-particle azimuthal correlations of high-pT neutral strange baryons ({lambda},{lambda}-bar) and mesons (K{sub S}{sup 0}) associated with non-identified charged particles in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV. In particular, we discuss properties of the near-side yield of associated charged particles as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and zT, as well as possible baryon/meson and particle/antiparticle differences. The results are compared to the proton and pion triggered correlations and to fragmentation and recombination models.

  1. Searching for squeezed particle-antiparticle correlations in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Padula, Sandra S.; Socolowski, O. Jr.

    2010-09-15

    Squeezed correlations of particle-antiparticle pairs were predicted to exist if the hadron masses were modified in the hot and dense medium formed in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Although well-established theoretically, they have not yet been observed experimentally. We suggest here a clear method to search for such a signal by analyzing the squeezed correlation functions in terms of measurable quantities. We illustrate this suggestion for simulated {phi}{phi} pairs at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies.

  2. Domain Specific Changes in Cognition at High Altitude and Its Correlation with Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Das, Saroj K.; Dhar, Priyanka; Hota, Kalpana B.; Mahapatra, Bidhu B.; Vashishtha, Vivek; Kumar, Ashish; Hota, Sunil K.; Norboo, Tsering; Srivastava, Ravi B.

    2014-01-01

    Though acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia is reported to impair cognitive performance, the effects of prolonged exposure on different cognitive domains have been less studied. The present study aimed at investigating the time dependent changes in cognitive performance on prolonged stay at high altitude and its correlation with electroencephalogram (EEG) and plasma homocysteine. The study was conducted on 761 male volunteers of 25–35 years age who had never been to high altitude and baseline data pertaining to domain specific cognitive performance, EEG and homocysteine was acquired at altitude ≤240 m mean sea level (MSL). The volunteers were inducted to an altitude of 4200–4600 m MSL and longitudinal follow-ups were conducted at durations of 03, 12 and 18 months. Neuropsychological assessment was performed for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), attention, information processing rate, visuo-spatial cognition and executive functioning. Total homocysteine (tHcy), vitamin B12 and folic acid were estimated. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) showed temporal increase in the percentage prevalence of MCI from 8.17% on 03 months of stay at high altitude to 18.54% on 18 months of stay. Impairment in visuo-spatial executive, attention, delayed recall and procedural memory related cognitive domains were detected following prolonged stay in high altitude. Increase in alpha wave amplitude in the T3, T4 and C3 regions was observed during the follow-ups which was inversely correlated (r = −0.68) to MMSE scores. The tHcy increased proportionately with duration of stay at high altitude and was correlated with MCI. No change in vitamin B12 and folic acid was observed. Our findings suggest that cognitive impairment is progressively associated with duration of stay at high altitude and is correlated with elevated tHcy in the plasma. Moreover, progressive MCI at high altitude occurs despite acclimatization and is independent of vitamin B12 and folic acid. PMID:24988417

  3. High Capsid–Genome Correlation Facilitates Creation of AAV Libraries for Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nonnenmacher, Mathieu; van Bakel, Harm; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Directed evolution of adeno-associated virus (AAV) through successive rounds of phenotypic selection is a powerful method to isolate variants with improved properties from large libraries of capsid mutants. Importantly, AAV libraries used for directed evolution are based on the “natural” AAV genome organization where the capsid proteins are encoded in cis from replicating genomes. This is necessary to allow the recovery of the capsid DNA after each step of phenotypic selection. For directed evolution to be used successfully, it is essential to minimize the random mixing of capsomers and the encapsidation of nonmatching viral genomes during the production of the viral libraries. Here, we demonstrate that multiple AAV capsid variants expressed from Rep/Cap containing viral genomes result in near-homogeneous capsids that display an unexpectedly high capsid–DNA correlation. Next-generation sequencing of AAV progeny generated by bulk transfection of a semi-random peptide library showed a strong counter-selection of capsid variants encoding premature stop codons, which further supports a strong capsid–genome identity correlation. Overall, our observations demonstrate that production of “natural” AAVs results in low capsid mosaicism and high capsid–genome correlation. These unique properties allow the production of highly diverse AAV libraries in a one-step procedure with a minimal loss in phenotype–genotype correlation. PMID:25586687

  4. Low Speed and High Speed Correlation of SMART Active Flap Rotor Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Measured, open loop and closed loop data from the SMART rotor test in the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel are compared with CAMRAD II calculations. One open loop high-speed case and four closed loop cases are considered. The closed loop cases include three high-speed cases and one low-speed case. Two of these high-speed cases include a 2 deg flap deflection at 5P case and a test maximum-airspeed case. This study follows a recent, open loop correlation effort that used a simple correction factor for the airfoil pitching moment Mach number. Compared to the earlier effort, the current open loop study considers more fundamental corrections based on advancing blade aerodynamic conditions. The airfoil tables themselves have been studied. Selected modifications to the HH-06 section flap airfoil pitching moment table are implemented. For the closed loop condition, the effect of the flap actuator is modeled by increased flap hinge stiffness. Overall, the open loop correlation is reasonable, thus confirming the basic correctness of the current semi-empirical modifications; the closed loop correlation is also reasonable considering that the current flap model is a first generation model. Detailed correlation results are given in the paper.

  5. Diffusion velocity correlation for nuclear graphite gasification at high temperature and low Reynolds numbers

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M. S.; Tournier, J. M. P.

    2012-07-01

    The safety analysis of High-Temperature and Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactors requires reliable estimates of nuclear graphite gasification as a function of temperature, among other parameters, in the unlikely event of an air ingress accident. Although the rates of the prevailing chemical reactions increase exponentially with temperature, graphite gasification at high temperatures is limited by the oxygen diffusion through the boundary layer. The effective diffusion velocity depends on the total flow rate and pressure of the bulk air-gas mixture. This paper develops a semi-empirical Sherwood number correlation for calculating the oxygen diffusion velocity. The correlation is based on a compiled database of the results of convective heat transfer experiments with wires and cylinders of different diameters in air, water and paraffin oil at 0.006 {<=} Re {<=} 1,604 and 0.068 {<=} Sc {<=} 35.2, and of mass transfer experiments at 4.8 {<=} Re {<=} 77 and 1,300 {<=} Sc {<=} 2,000. The developed correlation is within {+-} 8% of the compiled database of 567 data points and consistent with reported gasification rate measurements at higher temperatures in experiments using different size specimens of nuclear graphite grades of NBG-18 and NB-25, IG-11, IG-110 and IG-430 in atmospheric air at 0.08 {<=} Re {<=} 30. Unlike the Graetz solution that gives a constant Sh of 3.66 at Re {<=} 1.0, the present correlation shows Sh decreases monotonically to much lower values with decreasing Re. (authors)

  6. On the high correlation between long-term averages of solar wind speed and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Feynman, J.; Gosling, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    Six-month and yearly averages of solar-wind speed from 1962 to 1975 are shown to be highly correlated with geomagnetic activity as measured by averages of the Ap index. On the same time scale the correlation between the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic activity is poor. Previous studies with hourly averages gave opposite results. The better correlation with the southward component on an hourly time scale is explained by its large variation compared with the relatively constant solar-wind speed. However, on a yearly time scale the magnitude of the variations in both parameters are about the same. This problem can be solved by invoking an energy transfer mechanism which is proportional to the first power of the southward component and a higher power of the solar-wind speed.

  7. Correlating the Ancient Maya and Modern European Calendars with High-Precision AMS 14C Dating

    PubMed Central

    Kennett, Douglas J.; Hajdas, Irka; Culleton, Brendan J.; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Martin, Simon; Neff, Hector; Awe, Jaime; Graham, Heather V.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Newsom, Lee; Lentz, David L.; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Robinson, Mark; Marwan, Norbert; Southon, John; Hodell, David A.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2013-01-01

    The reasons for the development and collapse of Maya civilization remain controversial and historical events carved on stone monuments throughout this region provide a remarkable source of data about the rise and fall of these complex polities. Use of these records depends on correlating the Maya and European calendars so that they can be compared with climate and environmental datasets. Correlation constants can vary up to 1000 years and remain controversial. We report a series of high-resolution AMS 14C dates on a wooden lintel collected from the Classic Period city of Tikal bearing Maya calendar dates. The radiocarbon dates were calibrated using a Bayesian statistical model and indicate that the dates were carved on the lintel between AD 658-696. This strongly supports the Goodman-Martínez-Thompson (GMT) correlation and the hypothesis that climate change played an important role in the development and demise of this complex civilization. PMID:23579869

  8. High correlations between Asian dust events and biological productivity in the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Zhang, Jing

    2006-04-01

    The relationship between dust events at 11 meteorological stations in China and sediment-trap fluxes at KNOT (the Kyodo North Pacific Ocean Time-series station) was investigated during the period December 1997 to April 2000. Al flux, as a good proxy of continental dust, has significant correlations (0.66-0.78) with dust events at a water depth of 924 m. It suggests that the Badain Juran Desert region is a primary source of eolian dust to the western North Pacific. High correlations appeared between the dust events and opal flux, and PD (pennate diatoms) also. This suggests that dust events stimulate biological productivity, providing nutrients via processes such as particle floating, adsorption and co-precipitation. In addition, evident correlation existed between opal flux at 924 m and GHA (geopotential height anomalies) at 850 hPa level with about a 10-day time lag. Therefore, it suggests atmospheric cyclone activities might also contribute to ocean productivity.

  9. Scalar rate correlation at a turbulent liquid free surface - A two-regime correlation for high Schmidt numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khoo, Boo-Cheong; Sonin, Ain A.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental correlation is derived for gas absorption at a turbulent, shear-free liquid interface. The correlation is expressed in terms of the liquid-side turbulence intensity, liquid-side macroscale, and the properties of the diffusing gas and solvent. The transfer coefficient increases linearly with rms velocity up to a point where the eddy Reynolds number reaches a critical (Schmidt number dependent) value. At higher velocities, there is a more rapid linear rise. The slope of the lower Reynolds number region is proportional to the square root of the diffusivity; at Reynolds numbers much higher than that of the break point, the slope becomes independent of diffusivity.

  10. Genome at Juncture of Early Human Migration: A Systematic Analysis of Two Whole Genomes and Thirteen Exomes from Kuwaiti Population Subgroup of Inferred Saudi Arabian Tribe Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Alsmadi, Osama; Hebbar, Prashantha; Antony, Dinu; Behbehani, Kazem; Thanaraj, Thangavel Alphonse

    2014-01-01

    Population of the State of Kuwait is composed of three genetic subgroups of inferred Persian, Saudi Arabian tribe and Bedouin ancestry. The Saudi Arabian tribe subgroup traces its origin to the Najd region of Saudi Arabia. By sequencing two whole genomes and thirteen exomes from this subgroup at high coverage (>40X), we identify 4,950,724 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), 515,802 indels and 39,762 structural variations. Of the identified variants, 10,098 (8.3%) exomic SNPs, 139,923 (2.9%) non-exomic SNPs, 5,256 (54.3%) exomic indels, and 374,959 (74.08%) non-exomic indels are ‘novel’. Up to 8,070 (79.9%) of the reported novel biallelic exomic SNPs are seen in low frequency (minor allele frequency <5%). We observe 5,462 known and 1,004 novel potentially deleterious nonsynonymous SNPs. Allele frequencies of common SNPs from the 15 exomes is significantly correlated with those from genotype data of a larger cohort of 48 individuals (Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.91; p <2.2×10−16). A set of 2,485 SNPs show significantly different allele frequencies when compared to populations from other continents. Two notable variants having risk alleles in high frequencies in this subgroup are: a nonsynonymous deleterious SNP (rs2108622 [19:g.15990431C>T] from CYP4F2 gene [MIM:*604426]) associated with warfarin dosage levels [MIM:#122700] required to elicit normal anticoagulant response; and a 3′ UTR SNP (rs6151429 [22:g.51063477T>C]) from ARSA gene [MIM:*607574]) associated with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy [MIM:#250100]. Hemoglobin Riyadh variant (identified for the first time in a Saudi Arabian woman) is observed in the exome data. The mitochondrial haplogroup profiles of the 15 individuals are consistent with the haplogroup diversity seen in Saudi Arabian natives, who are believed to have received substantial gene flow from Africa and eastern provenance. We present the first genome resource imperative for designing future genetic studies in Saudi Arabian

  11. High correlation of Middle East respiratory syndrome spread with Google search and Twitter trends in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Seo, Dong-Woo; An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Kim, Sung-Han; Gwack, Jin; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was exported to Korea in 2015, resulting in a threat to neighboring nations. We evaluated the possibility of using a digital surveillance system based on web searches and social media data to monitor this MERS outbreak. We collected the number of daily laboratory-confirmed MERS cases and quarantined cases from May 11, 2015 to June 26, 2015 using the Korean government MERS portal. The daily trends observed via Google search and Twitter during the same time period were also ascertained using Google Trends and Topsy. Correlations among the data were then examined using Spearman correlation analysis. We found high correlations (>0.7) between Google search and Twitter results and the number of confirmed MERS cases for the previous three days using only four simple keywords: "MERS", " ("MERS (in Korean)"), " ("MERS symptoms (in Korean)"), and " ("MERS hospital (in Korean)"). Additionally, we found high correlations between the Google search and Twitter results and the number of quarantined cases using the above keywords. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a digital surveillance system to monitor the outbreak of MERS. PMID:27595921

  12. High correlation of Middle East respiratory syndrome spread with Google search and Twitter trends in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Seo, Dong-Woo; An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Kim, Sung-Han; Gwack, Jin; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was exported to Korea in 2015, resulting in a threat to neighboring nations. We evaluated the possibility of using a digital surveillance system based on web searches and social media data to monitor this MERS outbreak. We collected the number of daily laboratory-confirmed MERS cases and quarantined cases from May 11, 2015 to June 26, 2015 using the Korean government MERS portal. The daily trends observed via Google search and Twitter during the same time period were also ascertained using Google Trends and Topsy. Correlations among the data were then examined using Spearman correlation analysis. We found high correlations (>0.7) between Google search and Twitter results and the number of confirmed MERS cases for the previous three days using only four simple keywords: “MERS”, “” (“MERS (in Korean)”), “” (“MERS symptoms (in Korean)”), and “” (“MERS hospital (in Korean)”). Additionally, we found high correlations between the Google search and Twitter results and the number of quarantined cases using the above keywords. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a digital surveillance system to monitor the outbreak of MERS. PMID:27595921

  13. Coalescent entanglement and the conditional dependence of the times to common ancestry of mutually exclusive pairs of individuals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Steven; Koelle, Katia; Rodrigo, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The Kingman coalescent is a continuous-time diffusion approximation of the times to common ancestry of a sample of individuals drawn from a Wright-Fisher population. Here, we use the coalescent to answer a simple question: if we know the ancestry of 2 randomly sampled individuals in the population, what does it tell us about the ancestry of 2 other randomly sampled individuals? We show that there is a conditional dependency between the times to common ancestry between pairs of randomly sampled individuals. We call this "coalescent entanglement," and we demonstrate its effects through simulation. The effects of entanglement extend beyond the coalescent to phylogenetic birth-death processes in general. Entanglement also exerts its effects when the pairs of individuals chosen share no common lineages in the paths that connect the individuals in each pair. PMID:23077234

  14. Genetic ancestry of a Moroccan population as inferred from autosomal STRs

    PubMed Central

    Bentayebi, K.; Abada, F.; Ihzmad, H.; Amzazi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Detecting population substructure and ancestry is a critical issue for both association studies of health behaviors and forensic genetics. Determining aspects of a population's genetic history as potential sources of substructure can aid in design of future genetic studies. Within this context, fifteen autosomal short tandem repeat (STR), were used to examine population genetic structure and hypotheses of the origin of the modern Moroccan population from individuals belonging to three different ethnical groups from Morocco (Arab, Berber and Sahrawi), by comparing their autosomal STR variation with that of neighboring and non-neighboring populations in North Africa, Europe and Middle East as well as proposed ancestral populations in Morocco (Berber). We report on the results that the gradient of North African ancestry accounts for previous observations of low levels of sharing with Near East and a substantially increased gene flow especially from Morocco and Spain. PMID:25606427

  15. Pigment phenotype and biogeographical ancestry from ancient skeletal remains: inferences from multiplexed autosomal SNP analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouakaze, Caroline; Keyser, Christine; Crubézy, Eric; Montagnon, Daniel; Ludes, Bertrand

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, a multiplexed genotyping assay for ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within six pigmentation candidate genes was developed on modern biological samples and applied to DNA retrieved from 25 archeological human remains from southern central Siberia dating from the Bronze and Iron Ages. SNP genotyping was successful for the majority of ancient samples and revealed that most probably had typical European pigment features, i.e., blue or green eye color, light hair color and skin type, and were likely of European individual ancestry. To our knowledge, this study reports for the first time the multiplexed typing of autosomal SNPs on aged and degraded DNA. By providing valuable information on pigment traits of an individual and allowing individual biogeographical ancestry estimation, autosomal SNP typing can improve ancient DNA studies and aid human identification in some forensic casework situations when used to complement conventional molecular markers. PMID:19415315

  16. Accuracy of electronic wave functions in quantum Monte Carlo: The effect of high-order correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; Umrigar, C. J.; Nightingale, M. P.

    1997-08-01

    Compact and accurate wave functions can be constructed by quantum Monte Carlo methods. Typically, these wave functions consist of a sum of a small number of Slater determinants multiplied by a Jastrow factor. In this paper we study the importance of including high-order, nucleus-three-electron correlations in the Jastrow factor. An efficient algorithm based on the theory of invariants is used to compute the high-body correlations. We observe significant improvements in the variational Monte Carlo energy and in the fluctuations of the local energies but not in the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo energies. Improvements for the ground states of physical, fermionic atoms are found to be smaller than those for the ground states of fictitious, bosonic atoms, indicating that errors in the nodal surfaces of the fermionic wave functions are a limiting factor.

  17. Study of the skin anatomy with high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasonography and histological correlation*

    PubMed Central

    Barcaui, Elisa de Oliveira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista; Moraes, Heleno

    2015-01-01

    The present essay is aimed at getting the radiologist familiar with the basic histological skin structure, allowing for a better correlation with sonographic findings. A high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasonography apparatus was utilized in the present study. The histological analysis was performed after the skin specimens fixation with formalin, inclusion in paraffin blocks and subsequent staining with hematoxylin-eosin. The authors present a literature review showing the relationship between sonographic and histological findings in normal cutaneous tissue, and discuss the technique for a better performance of the sonographic scan. High-frequency ultrasonography is an excellent tool for the diagnosis of different skin conditions. However, as this method is operator-dependent, it is crucial to understand the normal skin structure as well as the correlation between histological and sonographic findings. PMID:26543285

  18. Galactic Synchrotron Emission and the Far-infrared–Radio Correlation at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, J.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Klessen, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical scenarios, including the turbulent small-scale dynamo, predict that strong magnetic fields already exist in young galaxies. Based on the assumption of energy equipartition between magnetic fields and turbulence, we determine the galactic synchrotron flux as a function of redshift z. Galaxies in the early universe are different from local galaxies, in particular, the former have more intense star formation. To cover a large range of conditions, we consider two different systems: one model galaxy comparable to the Milky Way and one typical high-z starburst galaxy. We include a model of the steady-state cosmic ray spectrum and find that synchrotron emission can be detected up to cosmological redshifts with current and future radio telescopes. The turbulent dynamo theory is in agreement with the origin of the observed correlation between the far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L FIR and the radio luminosity L radio. Our model reproduces this correlation well at z = 0. We extrapolate the FIR–radio correlation to higher redshifts and predict a time evolution with a significant deviation from its present-day appearance already at z≈ 2 for a gas density that increases strongly with z. In particular, we predict a decrease of the radio luminosity with redshift which is caused by the increase of cosmic ray energy losses at high z. The result is an increase of the ratio between L FIR and L radio. Simultaneously, we predict that the slope of the FIR–radio correlation becomes shallower with redshift. This behavior of the correlation could be observed in the near future with ultra-deep radio surveys.

  19. [Correlations of lipoprotein metabolism indicators in persons with low and high cholesterol ester transport activity].

    PubMed

    Tvorogova, M G; Rozhkova, T A; Kukharchuk, V V; Titov, V N

    1999-01-01

    For clarifying the role of plasma cholesterol ester transfer activity (CETA) in forming hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) and determination of high density lipoproteins cholesterol (Ch HDL) level, lipoprotein metabolism indicators were compared for individuals with high and low CETA. 257 subjects were investigated: 195 patients with different forms of hereditary HLP and individuals without HLP: 34 healthy and 28 with coronary heart disease (CHD). Lipids were determined enzymatically, apoproteins content by immunoturbodimetric and immunodiffusion methods. CETA and cholesterol esterification rate (CER) were measured through autological methods. Selected groups of patients with high and low CETA were significantly distinguished only by plasma Ch level (average Ch > 6.2 mmol/l in both groups), free Ch HDL and CER. The groups were not significantly different by men-women ratio (chi 2 = 0.016, p = 0.9) and CHD patients share (chi 2 = 0.126, p = 0.723). The correlation between CETA and Ch levels was significant for healthy individuals only. The data does not correspond to assumption of exclusively atherogenic influence of high CETA: 1) no correlation between CETA and atherogenic parameters of LP metabolism among different HLP forms was found; 2) Ch HDL levels were not distinguished at high and low CETA; 3) no domination of CHD patients among the subjects with high CETA was found. PMID:10547884

  20. High rates of sexual behavior in the general population: correlates and predictors.

    PubMed

    Långström, Niklas; Hanson, R Karl

    2006-02-01

    We studied 2450, 18-60-year-old men and women from a 1996 national survey of sexuality and health in Sweden to identify risk factors and correlates of elevated rates of sexual behavior (hypersexuality) in a representative, non-clinical population. Interviews and questionnaires measured various sexual behaviors, developmental risk factors, behavioral problems, and health indicators. The results suggested that correlates of high rates of intercourse were mostly positive, whereas the correlates of high rates of masturbation and impersonal sex were typically undesirable. For both men and women, high rates of impersonal sex were related to separation from parents during childhood, relationship instability, sexually transmitted disease, tobacco smoking, substance abuse, and dissatisfaction with life in general. The association between hypersexuality and paraphilic sexual interests (exhibitionism, voyeurism, masochism/sadism) was particularly and equally strong for both genders (odds ratios of 4.6-25.6). The results held, with a few exceptions, when controlling for age, being in a stable relationship, living in a major city, and same-sex sexual orientation. We conclude that elevated rates of impersonal sex are associated with a range of negative health indicators in the general population. PMID:16502152

  1. Turkish Population Structure and Genetic Ancestry Reveal Relatedness among Eurasian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hodoğlugil, Uğur; Mahley, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Turkey connects the Middle East, Europe, and Asia and has experienced major population movements. We examined the population structure and genetic relatedness of samples from three regions of Turkey using over 500,000 SNP genotypes. The data were analyzed together with Human Genome Diversity Panel data. To obtain a more representative sampling from Central Asia, Kyrgyz samples (Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan) were genotyped and analyzed. Principal component (PC) analysis reveals a significant overlap between Turks and Middle Easterners and a relationship with Europeans and South and Central Asians; however, the Turkish genetic structure is unique. FRAPPE, STRUCTURE, and phylogenetic analyses support the PC analysis depending upon the number of parental ancestry components chosen. For example, supervised STRUCTURE (K = 3) illustrates a genetic ancestry for the Turks of 45% Middle Eastern (95% CI, 42–49), 40% European (95% CI, 36–44), and 15% Central Asian (95% CI, 13–16), whereas at K = 4 the genetic ancestry of the Turks was 38% European (95% CI, 35–42), 35% Middle Eastern (95% CI, 33–38), 18% South Asian (95% CI, 16–19), and 9% Central Asian (95% CI, 7–11). PC analysis and FRAPPE/STRUCTURE results from three regions in Turkey (Aydin, Istanbul, and Kayseri) were superimposed, without clear subpopulation structure, suggesting the selected samples were rather homogeneous. Thus, this study demonstrates admixture of Turkish people reflecting the population migration patterns. PMID:22332727

  2. A genome-wide association study of breast cancer in women of African ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang; Chen, Gary K.; Stram, Daniel O.; Millikan, Robert C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; John, Esther M.; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Palmer, Julie R.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Rebbeck, Tim R.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V.; Ingles, Sue A.; Press, Michael F.; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A.; Deming, Sandra L.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; DeMichele, Angela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Li, Guoliang; Long, Jirong; Huo, Dezheng; Zheng, Yonglan; Cox, Nancy J.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ogundiran, Temidayo O.; Adebamowo, Clement; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Simon, Michael S.; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, M. Cristina; Ambs, Stefan; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Young, Alicia; Kooperberg, Charles; Peters, Ulrike; Rhie, Suhn K.; Wan, Peggy; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in diverse populations are needed to reveal variants that are more common and/or limited to defined populations. We conducted a GWAS of breast cancer in women of African ancestry, with genotyping of > 1,000,000 SNPs in 3,153 African American cases and 2,831 controls, and replication testing of the top 66 associations in an additional 3,607 breast cancer cases and 11,330 controls of African ancestry. Two of the 66 SNPs replicated (p < 0.05) in stage 2, which reached statistical significance levels of 10−6 and 10−5 in the stage 1 and 2 combined analysis (rs4322600 at chromosome 14q31: OR = 1.18, p = 4.3×10−6; rs10510333 at chromosome 3p26: OR = 1.15, p = 1.5×10−5). These suggestive risk loci have not been identified in previous GWAS in other populations and will need to be examined in additional samples. Identification of novel risk variants for breast cancer in women of African ancestry will demand testing of a substantially larger set of markers from stage 1 in a larger replication sample. PMID:22923054

  3. Genome-Wide Linkage Scan for Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: Influences of Ancestry and Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xuejun; Liu, Yutao; Gibson, Jason R.; Santiago-Turla, Cecilia; Larocque-Abramson, Karen R.; Del Bono, Elizabeth; Challa, Pratap; Herndon, Leon W.; Akafo, Stephen; Wiggs, Janey L.; Schmidt, Silke; Hauser, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma and one of the leading causes of vision loss worldwide. The genetic etiology of POAG is complex and poorly understood. The purpose of this work is to identify genomic regions of interest linked to POAG. This study is the largest genetic linkage study of POAG performed to date: genomic DNA samples from 786 subjects (538 Caucasian ancestry, 248 African ancestry) were genotyped using either the Illumina GoldenGate Linkage 4 Panel or the Illumina Infinium Human Linkage-12 Panel. A total of 5233 SNPs was analyzed in 134 multiplex POAG families (89 Caucasian ancestry, 45 African ancestry). Parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses were performed on the overall dataset and within race-specific datasets (Caucasian ancestry and African ancestry). Ordered subset analysis was used to stratify the data on the basis of age of glaucoma diagnosis. Novel linkage regions were identified on chromosomes 1 and 20, and two previously described loci—GLC1D on chromosome 8 and GLC1I on chromosome 15—were replicated. These data will prove valuable in the context of interpreting results from genome-wide association studies for POAG. PMID:21765929

  4. Evaluating Self-declared Ancestry of U.S. Americans with Autosomal, Y-chromosomal and Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Oscar; Vallone, Peter M; Coble, Michael D; Diegoli, Toni M; van Oven, Mannis; van der Gaag, Kristiaan J; Pijpe, Jeroen; de Knijff, Peter; Kayser, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    The current U.S. population represents an amalgam of individuals originating mainly from four continental regions (Africa, Europe, Asia and America). To study the genetic ancestry and compare with self-declared ancestry we have analyzed paternally, maternally and bi-parentally inherited DNA markers sensitive for indicating continental genetic ancestry in all four major U.S. American groups. We found that self-declared U.S. Hispanics and U.S. African Americans tend to show variable degrees of continental genetic admixture among the three genetic systems, with evidence for a marked sex-biased admixture history. Moreover, for these two groups we observed significant regional variation across the country in genetic admixture. In contrast, self-declared U.S. European and U.S. Asian Americans were genetically more homogeneous at the continental ancestry level. Two autosomal ancestry-sensitive markers located in skin pigmentation candidate genes showed significant differences in self-declared U.S. African Americans or U.S. European Americans, relative to their assumed parental populations from Africa or Europe. This provides genetic support for the importance of skin color in the complex process of ancestry identification. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20886636

  5. On The Origin Of High Energy Correlations in Gamma-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2012-04-03

    I investigate the origin of the observed correlation between a gamma-ray burst's {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectral peak E{sub pk} and its isotropic equivalent energy E{sub iso} through the use of a population synthesis code to model the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRBs. By using prescriptions for the distribution of prompt spectral parameters as well as the population's luminosity function and co-moving rate density, I generate a simulated population of GRBs and examine how bursts of varying spectral properties and redshift would appear to a gamma-ray detector here on Earth. I find that a strong observed correlation can be produced between the source frame Epk and Eiso for the detected population despite the existence of only a weak and broad correlation in the original simulated population. The energy dependance of a gamma-ray detector's flux-limited detection threshold acts to produce a correlation between the source frame E{sub pk} and E{sub iso} for low luminosity GRBs, producing the left boundary of the observed correlation. Conversely, very luminous GRBs are found at higher redshifts than their low luminosity counterparts due to the standard Malquest bias, causing bursts in the low E{sub pk}, high E{sub iso} regime to go undetected because their E{sub pk} values would be redshifted to energies at which most gamma-ray detectors become less sensitive. I argue that it is this previously unexamined effect which produces the right boundary of the observed correlation. Therefore, the origin of the observed correlation is a complex combination of the instrument's detection threshold, the intrinsic cutoff in the GRB luminosity function, and the broad range of redshifts over which GRBs are detected. Although the GRB model presented here is a very simplified representation of the complex nature of GRBs, these simulations serve to demonstrate how selection effects caused by a combination of instrumental sensitivity and the cosmological nature of an astrophysical population

  6. Theory of interparticle correlations in dense, high-temperature plasmas. V - Electric and thermal conductivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichimaru, S.; Tanaka, S.

    1985-01-01

    Ichimaru et al. (1985) have developed a general theory in which the interparticle correlations in dense, high-temperature multicomponent plasmas were formulated systematically over a wide range of plasma parameters. The present paper is concerned with an extension of this theory, taking into account the problems of the electronic transport in such high-density plasmas. It is shown that the resulting theory is capable of describing the transport coefficients accurately over a wide range of the density and temperature parameters. Attention is given to electric and thermal conductivities, generalized Coulomb logarithms, a comparison of the considered theory with other theories, and a comparison of the theory with experimental results.

  7. Mental Health Service Use by Persons of Asian Ancestry With DSM-IV Mental Disorders in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Yeon; Martins, Silvia S.; Keyes, Katherine M.; Lee, Hochang B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study compared the prevalence and odds of mental health service utilization among people of Asian ancestry with lifetime DSM-IV mood, anxiety, alcohol, and drug use disorders with utilization by members of other racial and ethnic groups with similar disorders. Methods Between 2001 and 2002, a total of 43,093 noninstitutionalized individuals were assessed by the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) study of lifetime prevalence of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders and mental health service utilization among various ethnic and racial groups. Results Among individuals with lifetime mood disorders, Asians had significantly lower mental health service utilization compared with whites (odds ratio [OR]=.31, 95% confidence interval [CI]=.21–.46), Hispanics (OR=.49, CI=.33–71), and Native Americans (OR=.27, CI=.15–.48) but similar utilization compared with blacks. There were no statistically significant differences in lifetime mental health service utilization for alcohol and drug use disorders among racial and ethnic groups. Conclusions Asians with lifetime mood disorders underutilized mental health services even after adjustment was made for socioeconomic variables and years of residency in the United States. Future studies of culture-specific attitudes, correlates, and barriers to mental health service utilization are warranted. PMID:21969644

  8. Methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs) are consistently detected across ancestry, developmental stage, and tissue type

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individual genotypes at specific loci can result in different patterns of DNA methylation. These methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs) influence methylation across extended genomic regions and may underlie direct SNP associations or gene-environment interactions. We hypothesized that the detection of meQTLs varies with ancestral population, developmental stage, and tissue type. We explored this by analyzing seven datasets that varied by ancestry (African American vs. Caucasian), developmental stage (neonate vs. adult), and tissue type (blood vs. four regions of postmortem brain) with genome-wide DNA methylation and SNP data. We tested for meQTLs by constructing linear regression models of methylation levels at each CpG site on SNP genotypes within 50 kb under an additive model controlling for multiple tests. Results Most meQTLs mapped to intronic regions, although a limited number appeared to occur in synonymous or nonsynonymous coding SNPs. We saw significant overlap of meQTLs between ancestral groups, developmental stages, and tissue types, with the highest rates of overlap within the four brain regions. Compared with a random group of SNPs with comparable frequencies, meQTLs were more likely to be 1) represented among the most associated SNPs in the WTCCC bipolar disorder results and 2) located in microRNA binding sites. Conclusions These data give us insight into how SNPs impact gene regulation and support the notion that peripheral blood may be a reliable correlate of physiological processes in other tissues. PMID:24555763

  9. Prevalence, Distribution, and Risk Factor Correlates of High Thoracic Periaortic Fat in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Kathryn A.; Pedley, Alison; Massaro, Joseph M.; Corsini, Erin M.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Hoffmann, Udo; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Thoracic periaortic adipose tissue (TAT) is associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and may play a role in obesity‐mediated vascular disease. We sought to determine the prevalence, distribution, and risk factor correlates of high TAT. Methods and Results Participants from the Framingham Heart Study (n=3246, 48% women, mean age 51.1 years) underwent multidetector computed tomography; high TAT and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) were defined on the basis of sex‐specific 90th percentiles in a healthy referent sample. The prevalence of high TAT was 38.1% in women and 35.7% in men. Among individuals without high VAT, 10.1% had high TAT. After adjustment for age and VAT, both women and men with high TAT in the absence of high VAT were older and had a higher prevalence of CVD (P<0.0001) compared with those without high TAT. In addition, men in this group were more likely to be smokers (P=0.02), whereas women were more likely to have low high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.005). Conclusions Individuals in our community‐based sample with high TAT in the absence of high VAT were characterized by an adverse cardiometabolic profile. This adipose tissue phenotype may identify a subset of individuals with distinct metabolic characteristics. PMID:23316328

  10. Phase behaviour and correlations of parallel hard squares: from highly confined to bulk systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Pinto, Miguel; Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; Varga, Szabolcs; Gurin, Peter; Velasco, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    We study a fluid of two-dimensional parallel hard squares in bulk and under confinement in channels, with the aim of evaluating the performance of fundamental-measure theory (FMT). To this purpose, we first analyse the phase behaviour of the bulk system using FMT and Percus–Yevick (PY) theory, and compare the results with molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. In a second step, we study the confined system and check the results against those obtained from the transfer matrix method and from our own Monte Carlo simulations. Squares are confined to channels with parallel walls at angles of 0° or 45° relative to the diagonals of the parallel hard squares, respectively, which allows for an assessment of the effect of the external-potential symmetry on the fluid structural properties. In general FMT overestimates bulk correlations, predicting the existence of a columnar phase (absent in simulations) prior to crystallization. The equation of state predicted by FMT compares well with simulations, although the PY approach with the virial route is better in some range of packing fractions. The FMT is highly accurate for the structure and correlations of the confined fluid due to the dimensional crossover property fulfilled by the theory. Both density profiles and equations of state of the confined system are accurately predicted by the theory. The highly non-uniform pair correlations inside the channel are also very well described by FMT.

  11. Correlations between physiological variables and performance in high level cross country off road cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Impellizzeri, F; Marcora, S; Rampinini, E; Mognoni, P; Sassi, A

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relations between maximal and submaximal indices of aerobic fitness and off road cycling performance in a homogeneous group of high level mountain bikers. Methods: 12 internationally competitive mountain bikers completed the study. Maximum oxygen uptake (V·O2max), peak power output (PPO), power output (PO), and oxygen uptake (V·O2) at first (VT) and second (RCT) ventilatory thresholds were measured in the laboratory, and correlated with race time during a cross country circuit race. Results: The only physiological indices of aerobic fitness correlated with off road cycling performance were PO and V·O2 at RCT when normalised to body mass (r = –0.63 and r = –0.66, respectively; p<0.05). VT, V·O2max, and PPO were not correlated to performance in this homogeneous group of high level mountain bikers. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that submaximal indices of aerobic fitness such as PO and V·O2 at RCT are more important determinants of off road cycling performance than maximal indices such as PPO and V·O2max. This study confirms the importance of body mass for mountain biking performance. As aerobic fitness explained only 40% of the variance, other physiological and technical factors should be investigated, as they may be important determinants of cross country performance among elite mountain bikers. PMID:16183772

  12. Inverse correlation between quasiparticle mass and Tc in a cuprate high-Tc superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Putzke, Carsten; Malone, Liam; Badoux, Sven; Vignolle, Baptiste; Vignolles, David; Tabis, Wojciech; Walmsley, Philip; Bird, Matthew; Hussey, Nigel E.; Proust, Cyril; Carrington, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Close to a zero-temperature transition between ordered and disordered electronic phases, quantum fluctuations can lead to a strong enhancement of electron mass and to the emergence of competing phases such as superconductivity. A correlation between the existence of such a quantum phase transition and superconductivity is quite well established in some heavy fermion and iron-based superconductors, and there have been suggestions that high-temperature superconductivity in copper-oxide materials (cuprates) may also be driven by the same mechanism. Close to optimal doping, where the superconducting transition temperature Tc is maximal in cuprates, two different phases are known to compete with superconductivity: a poorly understood pseudogap phase and a charge-ordered phase. Recent experiments have shown a strong increase in quasiparticle mass m* in the cuprate YBa2Cu3O7-δ as optimal doping is approached, suggesting that quantum fluctuations of the charge-ordered phase may be responsible for the high-Tc superconductivity. We have tested the robustness of this correlation between m* and Tc by performing quantum oscillation studies on the stoichiometric compound YBa2Cu4O8 under hydrostatic pressure. In contrast to the results for YBa2Cu3O7-δ, we find that in YBa2Cu4O8, the mass decreases as Tc increases under pressure. This inverse correlation between m* and Tc suggests that quantum fluctuations of the charge order enhance m* but do not enhance Tc. PMID:27034989

  13. Inverse correlation between quasiparticle mass and T c in a cuprate high-T c superconductor.

    PubMed

    Putzke, Carsten; Malone, Liam; Badoux, Sven; Vignolle, Baptiste; Vignolles, David; Tabis, Wojciech; Walmsley, Philip; Bird, Matthew; Hussey, Nigel E; Proust, Cyril; Carrington, Antony

    2016-03-01

    Close to a zero-temperature transition between ordered and disordered electronic phases, quantum fluctuations can lead to a strong enhancement of electron mass and to the emergence of competing phases such as superconductivity. A correlation between the existence of such a quantum phase transition and superconductivity is quite well established in some heavy fermion and iron-based superconductors, and there have been suggestions that high-temperature superconductivity in copper-oxide materials (cuprates) may also be driven by the same mechanism. Close to optimal doping, where the superconducting transition temperature T c is maximal in cuprates, two different phases are known to compete with superconductivity: a poorly understood pseudogap phase and a charge-ordered phase. Recent experiments have shown a strong increase in quasiparticle mass m* in the cuprate YBa2Cu3O7-δ as optimal doping is approached, suggesting that quantum fluctuations of the charge-ordered phase may be responsible for the high-T c superconductivity. We have tested the robustness of this correlation between m* and T c by performing quantum oscillation studies on the stoichiometric compound YBa2Cu4O8 under hydrostatic pressure. In contrast to the results for YBa2Cu3O7-δ, we find that in YBa2Cu4O8, the mass decreases as T c increases under pressure. This inverse correlation between m* and T c suggests that quantum fluctuations of the charge order enhance m* but do not enhance T c. PMID:27034989

  14. Phase behaviour and correlations of parallel hard squares: from highly confined to bulk systems.

    PubMed

    González-Pinto, Miguel; Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; Varga, Szabolcs; Gurin, Peter; Velasco, Enrique

    2016-06-22

    We study a fluid of two-dimensional parallel hard squares in bulk and under confinement in channels, with the aim of evaluating the performance of fundamental-measure theory (FMT). To this purpose, we first analyse the phase behaviour of the bulk system using FMT and Percus-Yevick (PY) theory, and compare the results with molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. In a second step, we study the confined system and check the results against those obtained from the transfer matrix method and from our own Monte Carlo simulations. Squares are confined to channels with parallel walls at angles of 0° or 45° relative to the diagonals of the parallel hard squares, respectively, which allows for an assessment of the effect of the external-potential symmetry on the fluid structural properties. In general FMT overestimates bulk correlations, predicting the existence of a columnar phase (absent in simulations) prior to crystallization. The equation of state predicted by FMT compares well with simulations, although the PY approach with the virial route is better in some range of packing fractions. The FMT is highly accurate for the structure and correlations of the confined fluid due to the dimensional crossover property fulfilled by the theory. Both density profiles and equations of state of the confined system are accurately predicted by the theory. The highly non-uniform pair correlations inside the channel are also very well described by FMT. PMID:27115832

  15. Velocity, correlation time and diffusivity measurements in highly turbulent gas flow by an MRI method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi; Newling, Ben

    2007-03-01

    We present non-invasive, quantitative MRI wind-tunnel measurements in flowing gas (velocity > 10 m/s) at high Reynolds numbers (Re > 10^5). Our measurement method is three-dimensional and has the potential for saving time over traditional pointwise techniques. The method is suitable for liquids and for gases. We demonstrate the use of the technique on different test sections (bluff obstruction, clark Y-wing and cylinder). The mean velocity of gas flowing past those sections has been measured. We also investigate methods to measure flow correlation times by changing the acquisition interval between excitation of the sample and detection of the signal. This may be accomplished by making separate measurements or by using a multiple-point acquisition method. A measurement of correlation time allows us to map turbulent diffusivity. The MRI data are compared with computational fluid dynamics.

  16. Experimental research of digital image correlation system in high temperature test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Wang, Yonghong; Dan, Xizuo; Xiao, Ying; Yang, Lianxiang

    2016-01-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a full-field technique based on white-light illumination for displacement and strain measurement. But radiation on the specimen surface at high temperature affects the quality of acquired speckle pattern images for traditional DIC measurement. In order to minimize the radiation effect in high temperature measurement, this paper proposes a two-dimensional ultraviolet digital image correlation system (2D UV-DIC) containing UV LED and UV band-pass filter. It is confirmed by experiments that images acquired by this system saturate at higher temperature in comparison with DIC using filtered blue light imaging system. And the UV-DIC remains minimally affected by radiation at the temperature which is nearing the specimen's maximum working temperature (about 1250°C). In addition, considering the heat disturbance that can't be ignored in actual high temperature measurement, this paper also proposes a method using an air controller in combination with image average algorithm, and the method was then used to obtain the thermal expansion coefficient of the Austenitic chromium-nickel stainless steel specimen at different temperatures. By comparing the coefficients with the results calculated by other method, it shows that this comprehensive method has the advantages of strong anti-interference ability and high precision.

  17. Identification of transcription factor genes and their correlation with the high diversity of stramenopiles.

    PubMed

    Buitrago-Flórez, Francisco Javier; Restrepo, Silvia; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    The biological diversity among Stramenopiles is striking; they range from large multicellular seaweeds to tiny unicellular species, they embrace many ecologically important autothrophic (e.g., diatoms, brown algae), and heterotrophic (e.g., oomycetes) groups. Transcription factors (TFs) and other transcription regulators (TRs) regulate spatial and temporal gene expression. A plethora of transcriptional regulatory proteins have been identified and classified into families on the basis of sequence similarity. The purpose of this work is to identify the TF and TR complement in diverse species belonging to Stramenopiles in order to understand how these regulators may contribute to their observed diversity. We identified and classified 63 TF and TR families in 11 species of Stramenopiles. In some species we found gene families with high relative importance. Taking into account the 63 TF and TR families identified, 28 TF and TR families were established to be positively correlated with specific traits like number of predicted proteins, number of flagella and number of cell types during the life cycle. Additionally, we found gains and losses in TF and TR families specific to some species and clades, as well as, two families with high abundance specific to the autotrophic species and three families with high abundance specific to the heterotropic species. For the first time, there is a systematic search of TF and TR families in Stramenopiles. The attempts to uncover relationships between these families and the complexity of this group may be of great impact, considering that there are several important pathogens of plants and animals, as well as, important species involved in carbon cycling. Specific TF and TR families identified in this work appear to be correlated with particular traits in the Stramenopiles group and may be correlated with the high complexity and diversity in Stramenopiles. PMID:25375671

  18. Identification of Transcription Factor Genes and Their Correlation with the High Diversity of Stramenopiles

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Flórez, Francisco Javier; Restrepo, Silvia; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    The biological diversity among Stramenopiles is striking; they range from large multicellular seaweeds to tiny unicellular species, they embrace many ecologically important autothrophic (e.g., diatoms, brown algae), and heterotrophic (e.g., oomycetes) groups. Transcription factors (TFs) and other transcription regulators (TRs) regulate spatial and temporal gene expression. A plethora of transcriptional regulatory proteins have been identified and classified into families on the basis of sequence similarity. The purpose of this work is to identify the TF and TR complement in diverse species belonging to Stramenopiles in order to understand how these regulators may contribute to their observed diversity. We identified and classified 63 TF and TR families in 11 species of Stramenopiles. In some species we found gene families with high relative importance. Taking into account the 63 TF and TR families identified, 28 TF and TR families were established to be positively correlated with specific traits like number of predicted proteins, number of flagella and number of cell types during the life cycle. Additionally, we found gains and losses in TF and TR families specific to some species and clades, as well as, two families with high abundance specific to the autotrophic species and three families with high abundance specific to the heterotropic species. For the first time, there is a systematic search of TF and TR families in Stramenopiles. The attempts to uncover relationships between these families and the complexity of this group may be of great impact, considering that there are several important pathogens of plants and animals, as well as, important species involved in carbon cycling. Specific TF and TR families identified in this work appear to be correlated with particular traits in the Stramenopiles group and may be correlated with the high complexity and diversity in Stramenopiles. PMID:25375671

  19. Effect of Strong Correlations on the High Energy Anomaly in Hole- and Electron-Doped High-Tc Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, B.; Schmitt, F.; Meevasana, W.; Johnston, S.; Motoyama, E.M.; Greven, M.; Lu, D.H.; Kim, C.; Scalettar, R.T.; Shen, Z.-X.; Devereaux, T.P.; /SLAC, SIMES

    2010-02-15

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been used to highlight an anomalously large band renormalization at high binding energies in cuprate superconductors: the high energy 'waterfall' or high energy anomaly (HEA). This paper demonstrates, using a combination of new ARPES measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that the HEA is not simply the byproduct of matrix element effects, but rather represents a cross-over from a quasi-particle band at low binding energies near the Fermi level to valence bands at higher binding energy, assumed to be of strong oxygen character, in both hole- and electron-doped cuprates. While photoemission matrix elements clearly play a role in changing the aesthetic appearance of the band dispersion, i.e. the 'waterfall'-like behavior, they provide an inadequate description for the physics that underlies the strong band renormalization giving rise to the HEA. Model calculations of the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian showcase the role played by correlations in the formation of the HEA and uncover significant differences in the HEA energy scale for hole- and electron-doped cuprates. In addition, this approach properly captures the transfer of spectral weight accompanying both hole and electron doping in a correlated material and provides a unifying description of the HEA across both sides of the cuprate phase diagram.

  20. Reconstruction of correlation-driven electron-hole dynamics by high-harmonic-generation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeuwenburgh, Jonathan; Cooper, Bridgette; Averbukh, Vitali; Marangos, Jonathan P.; Ivanov, Misha

    2014-09-01

    We present detailed analysis of the recently proposed technique of high-order-harmonic generation spectroscopy of correlation-driven electron hole dynamics in atoms and molecules. This novel technique resolves Auger-type processes with attosecond-scale resolution by clocking the decay process with high-harmonic generation. The harmonic generation is driven by an attosecond, XUV pump pulse and a long-duration, infrared pulse. We present the strong-field-approximation-based theory of such an XUV-initiated high-order-harmonic generation process. We detail different ways of recovering the hole survival probability by altering experimental parameters to change the time-energy mapping of the harmonics. The various reconstruction methods are then simulated for M4,5NN Auger decay in krypton and molecular-orbital breakdown dynamics in trans-butadiene and propanal.

  1. On transpolar arc formation correlated with solar wind entry at high latitude magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailyan, B. G.; Shi, Q.; Maggiolo, R.; Zong, Q.; Fu, S.; Zhang, Y.; Yao, Z.; Sun, W.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, Cluster observations revealed the existence of new regions of solar wind plasma entry at the high latitudes of the Earth's magnetosphere, at the lobes tailward of the cusp region, mostly during periods of northward IMF. Such periods of northward IMF are associated with the presence of transpolar arcs. Observations from Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) instrument onboard TIMED spacecraft are used to investigate a possible link between solar wind entry in the high latitude magnetosphere and the formation of transpolar arcs. Data from IMAGE and DMSP spacecraft are also used to investigate the time evolution and particle characteristics of the transpolar arc.We present a case study of a theta aurora correlated with the solar wind entry. The observations show a simultaneous occurrence of aurora activity at the magnetotail and high latitudes, suggesting two-part structure of the apparent continuous band of the transpolar arc.

  2. Herschel-ATLAS: The Angular Correlation Function of Submillimetre Galaxies at High and Low Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, S. J.; Dunne, L.; Rigby, E.; Eales, S.; Cooray, A.; Scott, D.; Peacock, J. A.; Negrello, M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Benford, D.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bonfield, D.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D.; Dariush, A.; deZotti, G.; Dye, S.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Herranz, D.

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular correlation function of galaxies selected from the first field of the H-ATLAS survey. Careful removal of the background from galactic cirrus is essential, and currently dominates the uncertainty in our measurements. For our 250 micrometer-selected sample we detect no significant clustering, consistent with the expectation that the 250 pm-selected sources are mostly normal galaxies at z < or equal to 1. For our 350 micrometer and 500 micrometer-selected samples we detect relatively strong clustering with correlation amplitudes A of 0.2 and 1.2 at 1', but with relatively large uncertainties. For samples which preferentially select high redshift galaxies at z approx. 2-3 we detect significant strong clustering, leading to an estimate of r(0) approx. 7-11/h Mpc. The slope of our clustering measurements is very steep. delta approx. 2. The measurements are consistent with the idea that sub-mm sources consist of a low redshift population of normal galaxies and a high redshift population of highly clustered star-bursting galaxies.

  3. Advances in Neutron Spectroscopy and High Magnetic Field Instrumentation for studies of Correlated Electron Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Granroth, Garrett E

    2011-01-01

    Neutron Spectroscopy has provided critical information on the magnetism in correlated electron systems. Specifically quantum magnets, superconductors, and multi-ferroics are areas of productive research. A discussion of recent measurements on the SEQUOIA spectrometer will provide examples of how novel instrumentation concepts are used on the latest generation of spectrometers to extend our knowledge in such systems. The now ubiquitous function of sample rotation allows for full mapping of volumes of $Q$ and $\\omega$ space. An instrument focused on low angles could extend these maps to cover more of the first Brillioun zone. Innovative chopper cascades allow two unique modes of operation. Multiplexed measurements allow the simultaneous measurement of high and low energy features in an excitation spectrum. Alternatively by limiting the neutron bandwidth incident on the Fermi Chopper, background from subsequent time frames is removed, enabling the observation of weak, large energy transfer features. Finally the implementation of event-based detection for neutron experiments is time correlated experiments. Diffraction studies of the high field spin states in MnWO$_4$ using magnetic fields up to 30 T, provided by a pulsed magnet, illustrate this method. Expanding the high field studies to spectroscopy will require a novel instrument, focused around a world class DC magnet, like Zeemans proposed for the SNS.

  4. Empirical Selection of Informative Microsatellite Markers within Co-ancestry Pig Populations Is Required for Improving the Individual Assignment Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y. H.; Chu, H. P.; Jiang, Y. N.; Lin, C. Y.; Li, S. H.; Li, K. T.; Weng, G. J.; Cheng, C. C.; Lu, D. J.; Ju, Y. T.

    2014-01-01

    The Lanyu is a miniature pig breed indigenous to Lanyu Island, Taiwan. It is distantly related to Asian and European pig breeds. It has been inbred to generate two breeds and crossed with Landrace and Duroc to produce two hybrids for laboratory use. Selecting sets of informative genetic markers to track the genetic qualities of laboratory animals and stud stock is an important function of genetic databases. For more than two decades, Lanyu derived breeds of common ancestry and crossbreeds have been used to examine the effectiveness of genetic marker selection and optimal approaches for individual assignment. In this paper, these pigs and the following breeds: Berkshire, Duroc, Landrace and Yorkshire, Meishan and Taoyuan, TLRI Black Pig No. 1, and Kaohsiung Animal Propagation Station Black pig are studied to build a genetic reference database. Nineteen microsatellite markers (loci) provide information on genetic variation and differentiation among studied breeds. High differentiation index (FST) and Cavalli-Sforza chord distances give genetic differentiation among breeds, including Lanyu’s inbred populations. Inbreeding values (FIS) show that Lanyu and its derived inbred breeds have significant loss of heterozygosity. Individual assignment testing of 352 animals was done with different numbers of microsatellite markers in this study. The testing assigned 99% of the animals successfully into their correct reference populations based on 9 to 14 markers ranking D-scores, allelic number, expected heterozygosity (HE) or FST, respectively. All miss-assigned individuals came from close lineage Lanyu breeds. To improve individual assignment among close lineage breeds, microsatellite markers selected from Lanyu populations with high polymorphic, heterozygosity, FST and D-scores were used. Only 6 to 8 markers ranking HE, FST or allelic number were required to obtain 99% assignment accuracy. This result suggests empirical examination of assignment-error rates is required if

  5. Squeezed K{sup +}K{sup -} correlations in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Danuce M.; Padula, Sandra S.

    2010-09-15

    The hot and dense medium formed in high energy heavy ion collisions may modify some hadronic properties. In particular, if hadron masses are shifted in-medium, it was demonstrated that this could lead to back-to-back squeezed correlations (BBC) of particle-antiparticle pairs. Although well-established theoretically, the squeezed correlations have not yet been discovered experimentally. A method has been suggested for the empirical search of this effect, which was previously illustrated for {phi}{phi} pairs. We apply here the formalism and the suggested method to the case of K{sup +}K{sup -} pairs, since they may be easier to identify experimentally. The time distribution of the emission process plays a crucial role in the survival of the BBC's. We analyze the cases where the emission is supposed to occur suddenly or via a Lorentzian distribution, and compare with the case of a Levy distribution in time. Effects of squeezing on the correlation function of identical particles are also analyzed.

  6. An ISEE 3 high time resolution study of interplanetary parameter correlations with magnetospheric activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.; Bame, S. J.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1983-01-01

    The coupling between the solar wind and the geomagnetic disturbances was examined using data from the ISEE-3 spacecraft at an earth-sun libration point and ground-based data. One minute data were used to avoid aliasing in determining the internal magnetospheric response to solar wind conditions. Attention was given to the cross-correlations between the geomagnetic index (AE), the total energy dissipation rate (UT), and the solar wind parameters, as well as the spatial and temporal scales on which the magnetosphere reacts to the solar wind conditions. It was considered necessary to characterize the physics of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling in order to define the requirements for a spacecraft like the ISEE-3 that could be used as a real time monitoring system for predicting storms and substorms. The correlations among all but one parameter were lower during disturbance intervals; UT was highly correlated with all parameters during the disturbed times. An intrinsic 25-40 min delay was detected between interplanetary activity and magnetospheric response in quite times, diminishing to no more than 15 min during disturbed times.

  7. Concept of coherence aperture and pathways toward white light high-resolution correlation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchal, P.; Bouchal, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Self-interference correlation imaging is a recently discovered method that takes advantage of holographic reconstruction when using a spatially incoherent light. Although the temporal coherence of light significantly influences the resolution of the method, it has not been studied either theoretically or experimentally. We present the first systematic study of the resolution in a broadband correlation imaging based on the concept of coherence-induced diffraction. We show that the physical limits of the resolution are reached in a non-dispersive experiment and their examination can be performed by the coherence aperture whose width depends on the coherence length of light and the optical path difference of interfering waves. As the main result, the optimal configuration of the non-dispersive experimental system is found in which the sub-diffraction image resolution previously demonstrated for monochromatic light can be retained even when the white light is used. Dispersion effects that prevent reaching the physical resolution limits are discussed and the dispersion sensitivity of the currently available experiments examined. The proposed concept of the coherence aperture is verified experimentally and its generalization to the concept of the dispersion-induced aperture suggested. As a challenge for future research, possible methods of dispersion elimination are outlined that allow the design of advanced optical systems enabling implementation of the high-resolution white light correlation imaging.

  8. Dissociating animacy processing in high-functioning autism: neural correlates of stimulus properties and subjective ratings.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanovic, Bojana; Schilbach, Leonhard; Georgescu, Alexandra L; Kockler, Hanna; Santos, Natacha S; Shah, N Jon; Bente, Gary; Fink, Gereon R; Vogeley, Kai

    2014-01-01

    When movements indicate meaningful actions, even nonbiological objects induce the impression of "having a mind" or animacy. This basic social ability was investigated in adults with high-functioning autism (HFA, n = 13, and matched controls, n = 13) by systematically varying motion properties of simple geometric shapes. Critically, trial-by-trial variations of (1) motion complexity of stimuli, and of (2) participants' individual animacy ratings were separately correlated with neural activity to dissociate cognitive strategies relying more closely on stimulus analysis vs. subjective experience. Increasing motion complexity did not yield any significant group differences, and in both groups, it correlated with neural activity in regions involved in perceptual and evaluative processing, including the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), superior temporal gyrus (STG) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). In contrast, although there were no significant behavioral differences between the groups, increasing animacy ratings correlated with neural activity in the insula, STG, amygdala, dorsal mPFC and PCC more strongly in controls than in HFA. These results indicate that in HFA the evaluation of stimulus properties cuing for animacy is intact, while increasing subjective ratings do not seem to be robustly related to social processing, including spontaneous mental state inferences and experience of salience. PMID:24512520

  9. Correlation between high density lipoprotein and monocyte subpopulations among stable coronary atherosclerotic heart disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong-Hai; Liu, Ying-Feng; Wang, Xue-Jun; Liang, Jian-Guang; Liu, Jia-Chao

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) is a structurally and functionally heterogeneous molecular particle whose function is unclear in atherosclerosis at present. Studies show that small HDL functional imbalance may exist in Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CAD) patients. Monocyte is considered to play an important role in atherosclerosis, in accordance with the expression of superficial CD14 and CD16, it can be divided into three subpopulations. The purpose of this study was to explore the relation between HDL and monocyte subpopulations among CAD patients. We report 90 cases of stable CAD patients and define the monocyte subpopulations as classical monocyte (CD14++CD16-; CM), intermediate monocyte (CD14+CD16+; IM), and non-classical monocyte (CD14+CD16++; NCM); HDL group is measured by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results indicated that the small HDL in blood serum has a correlation with proinflammatory NCM in circulation but a negative correction with CM and no relationship with diabetes, saccharify hemoglobin, hypertension, smoking history and taking dose of statins drugs and severity of disease. In conclusion, this study primarily confirms that micromolecule HDL level correlates with the increase of non-classical monocyte subpopulations and decrease of classical monocyte quantity. Thus demonstrates the proinflammatory correlation between micromolecule HDL and internal immunity in the development of stable atherosclerosis. PMID:26629252

  10. Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    The STAR Collaboration at RHIC presents a systematic study of high transverse momentum charged di-hadron correlations at small azimuthal pair separation {Delta}{phi}, in d+Au and central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Significant correlated yield for pairs with large longitudinal separation {Delta}{eta} is observed in central Au+Au, in contrast to d+Au collisions. The associated yield distribution in {Delta}{eta} x {delta}{phi} can be decomposed into a narrow jet-like peak at small angular separation which has a similar shape to that found in d+Au collisions, and a component which is narrow in {Delta}{phi} and depends only weakly on {Delta}{eta}, the 'ridge'. Using two systematically independent analyses, finite ridge yield is found to persist for trigger p{sub t} > 6 GeV/c, indicating that it is correlated with jet production. The transverse momentum spectrum of hadrons comprising the ridge is found to be similar to that of bulk particle production in the measured range (2 < p{sub t} < 4 GeV/c).

  11. High Frequency Sampling of TTL Pulses on a Raspberry Pi for Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy Applications.

    PubMed

    Tivnan, Matthew; Gurjar, Rajan; Wolf, David E; Vishwanath, Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) is a well-established optical technique that has been used for non-invasive measurement of blood flow in tissues. Instrumentation for DCS includes a correlation device that computes the temporal intensity autocorrelation of a coherent laser source after it has undergone diffuse scattering through a turbid medium. Typically, the signal acquisition and its autocorrelation are performed by a correlation board. These boards have dedicated hardware to acquire and compute intensity autocorrelations of rapidly varying input signal and usually are quite expensive. Here we show that a Raspberry Pi minicomputer can acquire and store a rapidly varying time-signal with high fidelity. We show that this signal collected by a Raspberry Pi device can be processed numerically to yield intensity autocorrelations well suited for DCS applications. DCS measurements made using the Raspberry Pi device were compared to those acquired using a commercial hardware autocorrelation board to investigate the stability, performance, and accuracy of the data acquired in controlled experiments. This paper represents a first step toward lowering the instrumentation cost of a DCS system and may offer the potential to make DCS become more widely used in biomedical applications. PMID:26274961

  12. High Frequency Sampling of TTL Pulses on a Raspberry Pi for Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tivnan, Matthew; Gurjar, Rajan; Wolf, David E.; Vishwanath, Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) is a well-established optical technique that has been used for non-invasive measurement of blood flow in tissues. Instrumentation for DCS includes a correlation device that computes the temporal intensity autocorrelation of a coherent laser source after it has undergone diffuse scattering through a turbid medium. Typically, the signal acquisition and its autocorrelation are performed by a correlation board. These boards have dedicated hardware to acquire and compute intensity autocorrelations of rapidly varying input signal and usually are quite expensive. Here we show that a Raspberry Pi minicomputer can acquire and store a rapidly varying time-signal with high fidelity. We show that this signal collected by a Raspberry Pi device can be processed numerically to yield intensity autocorrelations well suited for DCS applications. DCS measurements made using the Raspberry Pi device were compared to those acquired using a commercial hardware autocorrelation board to investigate the stability, performance, and accuracy of the data acquired in controlled experiments. This paper represents a first step toward lowering the instrumentation cost of a DCS system and may offer the potential to make DCS become more widely used in biomedical applications. PMID:26274961

  13. Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2009-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider presents a systematic study of high-transverse-momentum charged-di-hadron correlations at small azimuthal pair separation Δϕ in d+Au and central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. Significant correlated yield for pairs with large longitudinal separation Δη is observed in central Au+Au collisions, in contrast to d+Au collisions. The associated yield distribution in Δη×Δϕ can be decomposed into a narrow jet-like peak at small angular separation which has a similar shape to that found in d+Au collisions, and a component that is narrow in Δϕ and depends only weakly on Δη, the “ridge.” Using two systematically independent determinations of the background normalization and shape, finite ridge yield is found to persist for trigger pt>6 GeV/c, indicating that it is correlated with jet production. The transverse-momentum spectrum of hadrons comprising the ridge is found to be similar to that of bulk particle production in the measured range (2

  14. Study of Isospin Correlation in High Energy Heavy Ion Interactions with the RHIC PHENIX. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.

    2003-06-08

    This report describes the research work performed under the support of the DOE research grant E-FG02-97ER4108. The work is composed of three parts: (1) Visual analysis and quality control of the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) of the PHENIX experiments carried out of Brookhaven National Laboratory. (2) Continuation of the data analysis of the EMU05/09/16 experiments for the study of the inclusive particle production spectra and multi-particle correlation. (3) Exploration of a new statistical means to study very high-multiplicity of nuclear-particle ensembles and its perspectives to apply to the higher energy experiments.

  15. Performance improvement in high-speed random accessibility of Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Yuta; Kishi, Masato; Hotate, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Brillouin Optical Correlation Domain Analysis (BOCDA) offers high speed random accessibility along a sensing fiber, because it can localize stimulated Brillouin scattering at an arbitrary fiber position. By using this function, simultaneous dynamic strain measurement at arbitrary selected multiple points along the fiber was achieved. However, measurement accuracy was restricted due to performance limitation of lock-in-amplifier in the system. This paper reports a new system which uses I/Q demodulator instead of the lock-in-amplifier. Measurement accuracy was improved.

  16. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-15

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  17. Treating jet correlations in high pile-up at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautmann, F.; Jung, H.; Van Haevermaet, H.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments in the high-luminosity runs at the Large Hadron Collider face the challenges of very large pile-up. Primary techniques to deal with this are based on precise vertex and track reconstruction. Outside tracker acceptances, however, lie regions of interest for many aspects of the LHC physics program. We explore complementary approaches to pile-up treatment and propose a data-driven jet-mixing method which can be used outside tracker acceptances without depending on Monte Carlo generators. The method can be applied to treat correlation observables and take into account, besides the jet transverse momentum pedestal, effects of hard jets from pile-up.

  18. High energy factorization in nucleus-nucleus collisions. II. Multigluon correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, Francois; Lappi, Tuomas

    2008-09-01

    We extend previous results from the preceding paper on factorization in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions by computing the inclusive multigluon spectrum to next-to-leading order. The factorization formula is strictly valid for multigluon emission in a slice of rapidity of width {delta}Y{<=}{alpha}{sub s}{sup -1}. Our results shows that often neglected disconnected graphs dominate the inclusive multigluon spectrum, and are crucial in order to achieve factorization for this quantity. These results provide a dynamical framework for the Glasma flux tube picture of the striking ''ridge''-like correlation seen in heavy ion collisions.

  19. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-01

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  20. Pulse-to-pulse jitter measurement by photon correlation in high-β lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lebreton, Armand; Abram, Izo; Belabas, Nadia; Sagnes, Isabelle; Robert-Philip, Isabelle Beveratos, Alexios; Braive, Rémy; Marsili, Francesco; Verma, Varun B.; Nam, Sae Woo; Gerrits, Thomas; Stevens, Martin J.

    2015-01-19

    The turn-on delay jitter in pulsed lasers in which a large fraction (β) of spontaneous emission is channeled into the lasing mode is measured by use of a photon correlation technique. This jitter is found to significantly increase with β, reaching values of the order of the pulse width at threshold. This is due to the increase in the relative value of the discretization noise when the number of photons at threshold becomes small, as is the case in high-β lasers.

  1. High avidity antibodies to full-length VAR2CSA correlate with absence of placental malaria.

    PubMed

    Tutterrow, Yeung Lo; Salanti, Ali; Avril, Marion; Smith, Joseph D; Pagano, Ian S; Ako, Simon; Fogako, Josephine; Leke, Rose G F; Taylor, Diane Wallace

    2012-01-01

    VAR2CSA mediates sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in the placenta, increasing the risk of poor pregnancy outcomes. Naturally acquired antibodies (Ab) to placental parasites at delivery have been associated with improved pregnancy outcomes, but Ab levels and how early in pregnancy Ab must be present in order to eliminate placental parasites before delivery remains unknown. Antibodies to individual Duffy-binding like domains of VAR2CSA have been studied, but the domains lack many of the conformational epitopes present in full-length VAR2CSA (FV2). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe the acquisition of Ab to FV2 in women residing in high and low transmission areas and determine how Ab levels during pregnancy correlate with clearance of placental parasites. Plasma samples collected monthly throughout pregnancy from pregnant women living in high and low transmission areas in Cameroon were evaluated for Ab to FV2 and the proportion of high avidity Ab (i.e., Ab that remain bound in the presence of 3M NH(4)SCN) was assessed. Ab levels and proportion of high avidity Ab were compared between women with placental malaria (PM(+)) and those without (PM(-)) at delivery. Results showed that PM(-) women had significantly higher Ab levels (p = 0.0047) and proportion of high avidity Ab (p = 0.0009) than PM(+) women throughout pregnancy. Specifically, women with moderate to high Ab levels (>5,000 MFI) and those with ≥ 35% high avidity Ab at 5-6 months were found to have 2.3 (95% CI, 1.0-4.9) and 7.6-fold (p = 0.0013, 95% CI: 1.2-50.0) reduced risk of placental malaria, respectively. These data show that high levels of Ab to FV2, particularly those with high avidity for FV2, produced by mid-pregnancy are important in clearing parasites from the placenta. Both high Ab levels and proportion of high avidity Ab to FV2 may serve as correlates of protection for assessing immunity against placental malaria. PMID:22761948

  2. Associations between Common Variants in Iron-Related Genes with Haematological Traits in Populations of African Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiko; Towers, G. Wayne; Verhoef, Hans; Veenemans, Jacobien; Talsma, Elise F.; Harryvan, Jan; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Feskens, Edith J.; Melse-Boonstra, Alida

    2016-01-01

    Background Large genome-wide association (GWA) studies of European ancestry individuals have identified multiple genetic variants influencing iron status. Studies on the generalizability of these associations to African ancestry populations have been limited. These studies are important given interethnic differences in iron status and the disproportionate burden of iron deficiency among African ancestry populations. Methods We tested the associations of 20 previously identified iron status-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 628 Kenyans, 609 Tanzanians, 608 South Africans and 228 African Americans. In each study, we examined the associations present between 20 SNPs with ferritin and haemoglobin, adjusting for age, sex and CRP levels. Results In the meta analysis including all 4 African ancestry cohorts, we replicated previously reported associations with lowered haemoglobin concentrations for rs2413450 (β = -0.19, P = 0.02) and rs4820268 (β = -0.16, P = 0.04) in TMPRSS6. An association with increased ferritin concentrations was also confirmed for rs1867504 in TF (β = 1.04, P = <0.0001) in the meta analysis including the African cohorts only. Conclusions In all meta analyses, we only replicated 4 of the 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms reported to be associated with iron status in large GWA studies of European ancestry individuals. While there is now evidence for the associations of a number of genetic variants with iron status in both European and African ancestry populations, the considerable lack of concordance highlights the importance of continued ancestry-specific studies to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of iron status in ethnically diverse populations. PMID:27332551

  3. Genomic Ancestry, Self-Reported “Color” and Quantitative Measures of Skin Pigmentation in Brazilian Admixed Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Tailce K. M.; Fonseca, Rômulo M. C.; de França, Nanci M.; Parra, Esteban J.; Pereira, Rinaldo W.

    2011-01-01

    A current concern in genetic epidemiology studies in admixed populations is that population stratification can lead to spurious results. The Brazilian census classifies individuals according to self-reported “color”, but several studies have demonstrated that stratifying according to “color” is not a useful strategy to control for population structure, due to the dissociation between self-reported “color” and genomic ancestry. We report the results of a study in a group of Brazilian siblings in which we measured skin pigmentation using a reflectometer, and estimated genomic ancestry using 21 Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs). Self-reported “color”, according to the Brazilian census, was also available for each participant. This made it possible to evaluate the relationship between self-reported “color” and skin pigmentation, self-reported “color” and genomic ancestry, and skin pigmentation and genomic ancestry. We observed that, although there were significant differences between the three “color” groups in genomic ancestry and skin pigmentation, there was considerable dispersion within each group and substantial overlap between groups. We also saw that there was no good agreement between the “color” categories reported by each member of the sibling pair: 30 out of 86 sibling pairs reported different “color”, and in some cases, the sibling reporting the darker “color” category had lighter skin pigmentation. Socioeconomic status was significantly associated with self-reported “color” and genomic ancestry in this sample. This and other studies show that subjective classifications based on self-reported “color”, such as the one that is used in the Brazilian census, are inadequate to describe the population structure present in recently admixed populations. Finally, we observed that one of the AIMs included in the panel (rs1426654), which is located in the known pigmentation gene SLC24A5, was strongly associated with

  4. Fine mapping of breast cancer genome-wide association studies loci in women of African ancestry identifies novel susceptibility markers.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yonglan; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Falusi, Adeyinka G; Nathanson, Katherine L; John, Esther M; Hennis, Anselm J M; Ambs, Stefan; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Simon, Michael S; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, Maria Cristina; Odetunde, Abayomi; Niu, Qun; Zhang, Jing; Afolabi, Chibuzor; Gamazon, Eric R; Cox, Nancy J; Olopade, Christopher O; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Huo, Dezheng

    2013-07-01

    Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer susceptibility have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, these SNPs were primarily discovered and validated in women of European and Asian ancestry. Because linkage disequilibrium is ancestry-dependent and heterogeneous among racial/ethnic populations, we evaluated common genetic variants at 22 GWAS-identified breast cancer susceptibility loci in a pooled sample of 1502 breast cancer cases and 1378 controls of African ancestry. None of the 22 GWAS index SNPs could be validated, challenging the direct generalizability of breast cancer risk variants identified in Caucasians or Asians to other populations. Novel breast cancer risk variants for women of African ancestry were identified in regions including 5p12 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-1.76; P = 0.004), 5q11.2 (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.09-1.36; P = 0.00053) and 10p15.1 (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.08-1.38; P = 0.0015). We also found positive association signals in three regions (6q25.1, 10q26.13 and 16q12.1-q12.2) previously confirmed by fine mapping in women of African ancestry. In addition, polygenic model indicated that eight best markers in this study, compared with 22 GWAS-identified SNPs, could better predict breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry (per-allele OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.16-1.27; P = 9.7 × 10(-16)). Our results demonstrate that fine mapping is a powerful approach to better characterize the breast cancer risk alleles in diverse populations. Future studies and new GWAS in women of African ancestry hold promise to discover additional variants for breast cancer susceptibility with clinical implications throughout the African diaspora. PMID:23475944

  5. The Effects of Socioeconomic Status, Clinical Factors, and Genetic Ancestry on Pulmonary Tuberculosis Disease in Northeastern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Young, Bonnie N.; Rendón, Adrian; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian; Baker, Jack; Healy, Meghan; Gross, Jessica M.; Long, Jeffrey; Burgos, Marcos; Hunley, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse socioeconomic and clinical factors influence susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) disease in Mexico. The role of genetic factors, particularly those that differ between the parental groups that admixed in Mexico, is unclear. The objectives of this study are to identify the socioeconomic and clinical predictors of the transition from latent TB infection (LTBI) to pulmonary TB disease in an urban population in northeastern Mexico, and to examine whether genetic ancestry plays an independent role in this transition. We recruited 97 pulmonary TB disease patients and 97 LTBI individuals from a public hospital in Monterrey, Nuevo León. Socioeconomic and clinical variables were collected from interviews and medical records, and genetic ancestry was estimated for a subset of 142 study participants from 291,917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We examined crude associations between the variables and TB disease status. Significant predictors from crude association tests were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. We also compared genetic ancestry between LTBI individuals and TB disease patients at 1,314 SNPs in 273 genes from the TB biosystem in the NCBI BioSystems database. In crude association tests, 12 socioeconomic and clinical variables were associated with TB disease. Multivariable logistic regression analyses indicated that marital status, diabetes, and smoking were independently associated with TB status. Genetic ancestry was not associated with TB disease in either crude or multivariable analyses. Separate analyses showed that LTBI individuals recruited from hospital staff had significantly higher European genetic ancestry than LTBI individuals recruited from the clinics and waiting rooms. Genetic ancestry differed between individuals with LTBI and TB disease at SNPs located in two genes in the TB biosystem. These results indicate that Monterrey may be structured with respect to genetic ancestry, and that genetic differences in TB

  6. Statistical analysis of the correlation between active galactic nuclei and ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hang Bae; Kim, Jihyun E-mail: jihyunkim@hanyang.ac.kr

    2011-03-01

    We develop the statistical methods for comparing two sets of arrival directions of cosmic rays in which the two-dimensional distribution of arrival directions is reduced to the one-dimensional distributions so that the standard one-dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov test can be applied. Then we apply them to the analysis of correlation between the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above 5.7 × 10{sup 19} eV, observed by Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) and Akeno Giant Air Shower Array (AGASA), and the active galactic nuclei (AGN) within the distance 100 Mpc. For statistical test, we set up the simple AGN model for UHECR sources in which a certain fraction of observed UHECR are originated from AGN within a chosen distance, assuming that all AGN have equal UHECR luminosity and smearing angle, and the remaining fraction are from the isotropic background contribution. For the PAO data, our methods exclude not only a hypothesis that the observed UHECR are simply isotropically distributed but also a hypothesis that they are completely originated from the selected AGN. But, the addition of appropriate amount of isotropic component either through the background contribution or through the large smearing effect improves the correlation greatly and makes the AGN hypothesis for UHECR sources a viable one. We also point out that restricting AGN within the distance bin of 40–60 Mpc happens to yield a good correlation without appreciable isotropic component and large smearing effect. For the AGASA data, we don't find any significant correlation with AGN.

  7. Ancestry and diversity of the HMG box superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Laudet, V; Stehelin, D; Clevers, H

    1993-01-01

    The HMG box is a novel type of DNA-binding domain found in a diverse group of proteins. The HMG box superfamily comprises a.o. the High Mobility Group proteins HMG1 and HMG2, the nucleolar transcription factor UBF, the lymphoid transcription factors TCF-1 and LEF-1, the fungal mating-type genes mat-Mc and MATA1, and the mammalian sex-determining gene SRY. The superfamily dates back to at least 1,000 million years ago, as its members appear in animals, plants and yeast. Alignment of all known HMG boxes defined an unusually loose consensus sequence. We constructed phylogenetic trees connecting the members of the HMG box superfamily in order to understand their evolution. This analysis led us to distinguish two subfamilies: one comprising proteins with a single sequence-specific HMG box, the other encompassing relatively non sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins with multiple HMG boxes. By studying the extent of diversification of the superfamily, we found that the speed of evolution was very different within the various groups of HMG-box containing factors. Comparison of the evolution of the two boxes of ABF2 and of mtTF1 implied different diversification models for these two proteins. Finally, we provide a tree for the highly complex group of SRY-like ('Sox' genes), clustering at least 40 different loci that rapidly diverged in various animal lineages. PMID:8506143

  8. The Impact of the Correlation between the No Child Left Behind Act's High Stakes Testing and the High Drop-Out Rates of Minority Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walden, Lavada M.; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2008-01-01

    The author looks at critical dialogue surrounding the causes for the alarming high numbers of high school dropouts in states that use high stakes standardized testing mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act, and investigates the perceived correlations between high stakes testing and high numbers of high school dropouts of minority students.

  9. Genetic evidence for the Mongolian ancestry of Kalmyks.

    PubMed

    Nasidze, Ivan; Quinque, Dominique; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Cordaux, Richard; Kokshunova, Lyudmila; Stoneking, Mark

    2005-12-01

    The Kalmyks are an ethnic group along the lower Volga River in Russia who are thought to have migrated there from Mongolia about 300 years ago. To investigate their origins, we studied mtDNA and Y-chromosome variation in 99 Kalmyks. Both mtDNA HV1 sequences and Y-chromosome SNP haplogroups indicate a close relationship of Kalmyks with Mongolians. In addition, genetic diversity for both mtDNA and the Y chromosome are comparable in Kalmyks, Mongolians, and other Central Asian groups, indicating that the Kalmyk migration was not associated with a substantial bottleneck. The so-called "Genghis Khan" Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype was found in high frequency (31.3%) among Kalmyks, further supporting a strong genetic connection between Kalmyks and Mongolians. Genetic analyses of even recent, relatively well-documented migrations such as of the Kalmyks can therefore lead to new insights concerning such migrations. PMID:16028228

  10. Ancestry of modern Europeans: contributions of ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Lacan, Marie; Keyser, Christine; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the peopling history of Europe is crucial to comprehend the origins of modern populations. Of course, the analysis of current genetic data offers several explanations about human migration patterns which occurred on this continent, but it fails to explain precisely the impact of each demographic event. In this context, direct access to the DNA of ancient specimens allows the overcoming of recent demographic phenomena, which probably highly modified the constitution of the current European gene pool. In recent years, several DNA studies have been successfully conducted from ancient human remains thanks to the improvement of molecular techniques. They have brought new fundamental information on the peopling of Europe and allowed us to refine our understanding of European prehistory. In this review, we will detail all the ancient DNA studies performed to date on ancient European DNA from the Middle Paleolithic to the beginning of the protohistoric period. PMID:23052219

  11. A high resolution laser ranging system based on time-correlated single-photon counting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yixin; Wang, Huanqin; Huang, Zhe; Cao, Yangyang; Gui, Huaqiao

    2014-12-01

    Laser ranging has become an important method for both distance measurements and acquisition of threedimensional (3D) images. In this paper, a laser ranging system based on Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting technology (TCSPC) is developed. A Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (G-APD), which has the ability of detecting single-photon events, is used to capture the weak light scattered from the long-range target. In order to improve the ranging resolution of TCSPC based measurement system, a high repetition frequency of subnanosecond narrow pulse generator circuit based on the avalanche effect of RF-BJT is designed and applied as the light source. Moreover, some optimized optical light designs have been done to improve the system signal to noise rate (SNR), including using a special aspherical lens as projecting lens, adopting a telephoto camera lens with small view angle and short depth of field before detector. Experimental tests for evaluation of the laser raging system performance are described. As a means of echo signal analysis, three different algorithms have been introduced, in which the cross-correlation algorithm was demonstrated to be the most effective algorithm to determining the round trip time to a target, even based on histograms with a significant amount of background noise photons. It was found that centimeter ranging resolution can be achieved thanks to the use of Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) with picosecond resolution and the Cross-Correlation algorithm. The proposed laser ranging system has advantages of high range resolution, short response time and simple structure, which was potential applications for 3D object recognition, computer vision, reverse engineering and virtual reality.

  12. Morpho morphometrics: Shared ancestry and selection drive the evolution of wing size and shape in Morpho butterflies.

    PubMed

    Chazot, Nicolas; Panara, Stephen; Zilbermann, Nicolas; Blandin, Patrick; Le Poul, Yann; Cornette, Raphaël; Elias, Marianne; Debat, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly wings harbor highly diverse phenotypes and are involved in many functions. Wing size and shape result from interactions between adaptive processes, phylogenetic history, and developmental constraints, which are complex to disentangle. Here, we focus on the genus Morpho (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae, 30 species), which presents a high diversity of sizes, shapes, and color patterns. First, we generate a comprehensive molecular phylogeny of these 30 species. Next, using 911 collection specimens, we quantify the variation of wing size and shape across species, to assess the importance of shared ancestry, microhabitat use, and sexual selection in the evolution of the wings. While accounting for phylogenetic and allometric effects, we detect a significant difference in wing shape but not size among microhabitats. Fore and hindwings covary at the individual and species levels, and the covariation differs among microhabitats. However, the microhabitat structure in covariation disappears when phylogenetic relationships are taken into account. Our results demonstrate that microhabitat has driven wing shape evolution, although it has not strongly affected forewing and hindwing integration. We also found that sexual dimorphism of forewing shape and color pattern are coupled, suggesting a common selective force. PMID:26688277

  13. Genomic study of the Ket: a Paleo-Eskimo-related ethnic group with significant ancient North Eurasian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Flegontov, Pavel; Changmai, Piya; Zidkova, Anastassiya; Logacheva, Maria D.; Altınışık, N. Ezgi; Flegontova, Olga; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Gerasimov, Evgeny S.; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E.; Konovalova, Olga P.; Neretina, Tatiana; Nikolsky, Yuri V.; Starostin, George; Stepanova, Vita V.; Travinsky, Igor V.; Tříska, Martin; Tříska, Petr; Tatarinova, Tatiana V.

    2016-01-01

    The Kets, an ethnic group in the Yenisei River basin, Russia, are considered the last nomadic hunter-gatherers of Siberia, and Ket language has no transparent affiliation with any language family. We investigated connections between the Kets and Siberian and North American populations, with emphasis on the Mal’ta and Paleo-Eskimo ancient genomes, using original data from 46 unrelated samples of Kets and 42 samples of their neighboring ethnic groups (Uralic-speaking Nganasans, Enets, and Selkups). We genotyped over 130,000 autosomal SNPs, identified mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal haplogroups, and performed high-coverage genome sequencing of two Ket individuals. We established that Nganasans, Kets, Selkups, and Yukaghirs form a cluster of populations most closely related to Paleo-Eskimos in Siberia (not considering indigenous populations of Chukotka and Kamchatka). Kets are closely related to modern Selkups and to some Bronze and Iron Age populations of the Altai region, with all these groups sharing a high degree of Mal’ta ancestry. Implications of these findings for the linguistic hypothesis uniting Ket and Na-Dene languages into a language macrofamily are discussed. PMID:26865217

  14. Genomic study of the Ket: a Paleo-Eskimo-related ethnic group with significant ancient North Eurasian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Flegontov, Pavel; Changmai, Piya; Zidkova, Anastassiya; Logacheva, Maria D; Altınışık, N Ezgi; Flegontova, Olga; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Gerasimov, Evgeny S; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Konovalova, Olga P; Neretina, Tatiana; Nikolsky, Yuri V; Starostin, George; Stepanova, Vita V; Travinsky, Igor V; Tříska, Martin; Tříska, Petr; Tatarinova, Tatiana V

    2016-01-01

    The Kets, an ethnic group in the Yenisei River basin, Russia, are considered the last nomadic hunter-gatherers of Siberia, and Ket language has no transparent affiliation with any language family. We investigated connections between the Kets and Siberian and North American populations, with emphasis on the Mal'ta and Paleo-Eskimo ancient genomes, using original data from 46 unrelated samples of Kets and 42 samples of their neighboring ethnic groups (Uralic-speaking Nganasans, Enets, and Selkups). We genotyped over 130,000 autosomal SNPs, identified mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal haplogroups, and performed high-coverage genome sequencing of two Ket individuals. We established that Nganasans, Kets, Selkups, and Yukaghirs form a cluster of populations most closely related to Paleo-Eskimos in Siberia (not considering indigenous populations of Chukotka and Kamchatka). Kets are closely related to modern Selkups and to some Bronze and Iron Age populations of the Altai region, with all these groups sharing a high degree of Mal'ta ancestry. Implications of these findings for the linguistic hypothesis uniting Ket and Na-Dene languages into a language macrofamily are discussed. PMID:26865217

  15. Cascade Error Projection with Low Bit Weight Quantization for High Order Correlation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.; Daud, Taher

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we reinvestigate the solution for chaotic time series prediction problem using neural network approach. The nature of this problem is such that the data sequences are never repeated, but they are rather in chaotic region. However, these data sequences are correlated between past, present, and future data in high order. We use Cascade Error Projection (CEP) learning algorithm to capture the high order correlation between past and present data to predict a future data using limited weight quantization constraints. This will help to predict a future information that will provide us better estimation in time for intelligent control system. In our earlier work, it has been shown that CEP can sufficiently learn 5-8 bit parity problem with 4- or more bits, and color segmentation problem with 7- or more bits of weight quantization. In this paper, we demonstrate that chaotic time series can be learned and generalized well with as low as 4-bit weight quantization using round-off and truncation techniques. The results show that generalization feature will suffer less as more bit weight quantization is available and error surfaces with the round-off technique are more symmetric around zero than error surfaces with the truncation technique. This study suggests that CEP is an implementable learning technique for hardware consideration.

  16. High Blood Pressure Prevalence and Significant Correlates: A Quantitative Analysis from Coastal Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chythra R.; Kamath, Veena G.; Shetty, Avinash; Kamath, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a premier risk factor for cardiovascular disease which can be recognized if sought and treated effectively. Effective management of high blood pressure is possible when the magnitude of the problem is identified. So, a cross-sectional community based survey among 1,239 respondents aged ≥30 years was designed to estimate the prevalence and the sociodemographic correlates of hypertension among adults aged ≥30 years. Data was collected by personal interviews, followed by anthropometric and blood pressure measurements. Analysis was done using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 11.5. The prevalence of hypertension was 43.3%, with the prevalence being more among males (51.6%) as compared to females (38.9%). Of the total prevalence 23.1% (287) were known cases, and 20.2% (250) were newly detected cases. Based on the seventh report of the Joint National Committee (JNC VII) on high blood pressure, prehypertension was noted among 38.7%. Advancing age, male gender, current diabetic status, central obesity, overweight and obesity as defined by body mass index, and family history of hypertension were identified as significant correlates for hypertension by multivariate logistic regression. PMID:24967139

  17. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for themore » analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.« less

  18. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for the analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.

  19. Elongation factor 1 alpha concentration is highly correlated with the lysine content of maize endosperm.

    PubMed Central

    Habben, J E; Moro, G L; Hunter, B G; Hamaker, B R; Larkins, B A

    1995-01-01

    Lysine is the most limiting essential amino acid in cereals, and for many years plant breeders have attempted to increase its concentration to improve the nutritional quality of these grains. The opaque2 mutation in maize doubles the lysine content in the endosperm, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. We show that elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is overexpressed in opaque2 endosperm compared with its normal counterpart and that there is a highly significant correlation between EF-1 alpha concentration and the total lysine content of the endosperm. This relationship is also true for two other cereals, sorghum and barley. It appears that genetic selection for genotypes with a high concentration of EF-1 alpha can significantly improve the nutritional quality of maize and other cereals. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7567989

  20. Spatio-temporal correlation-based fast coding unit depth decision for high efficiency video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengtao; Zhou, Fan; Chen, Yaowu

    2013-10-01

    The exhaustive block partition search process in high efficiency video coding (HEVC) imposes a very high computational complexity on test module of HEVC encoder (HM). A fast coding unit (CU) depth algorithm using the spatio-temporal correlation of the depth information to fasten the search process is proposed. The depth of the coding tree unit (CTU) is predicted first by using the depth information of the spatio-temporal neighbor CTUs. Then, the depth information of the adjacent CU is incorporated to skip some specific depths when encoding the sub-CTU. As compared with the original HM encoder, experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can save more than 20% encoding time on average for intra-only, low-delay, low-delay P slices, and random access cases with almost the same rate-distortion performance.

  1. Development of a new correlation to calculate permeability for flows with high Knudsen number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeil, Dehdashti

    2016-02-01

    Flows with high Knudsen number play a prominent role in many engineering applications. The present study is an effort toward the simulation of flow with high Knudsen number using modified lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) through a porous medium in a channel. The effect of collision between molecules and solid walls, which is required to accurately simulate transition flow regime, is taken into account using a modified relaxation time. Slip velocity on the wall, which is another significant difficulty in simulating transition flow regime, is captured using the slip reflection boundary condition (SRBC). The geometry of porous medium is considered as in-line and staggered. The results are in good agreement with previous works. A new correlation is obtained between permeability, Knudsen number and porosity for flows in transition flow regimes.

  2. Ancestry and evolution of seasonal migration in the Parulidae

    PubMed Central

    Winger, Benjamin M.; Lovette, Irby J.; Winkler, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal migration in birds is known to be highly labile and subject to rapid change in response to selection, such that researchers have hypothesized that phylogenetic relationships should neither predict nor constrain the migratory behaviour of a species. Many theories on the evolution of bird migration assume a framework that extant migratory species have evolved repeatedly and relatively recently from sedentary tropical or subtropical ancestors. We performed ancestral state reconstructions of migratory behaviour using a comprehensive, well-supported phylogeny of the Parulidae (the ‘wood-warblers’), a large family of Neotropical and Nearctic migratory and sedentary songbirds, and examined the rates of gain and loss of migration throughout the Parulidae. Counter to traditional hypotheses, our results suggest that the ancestral wood-warbler was migratory and that losses of migration have been at least as prevalent as gains throughout the history of Parulidae. Therefore, extant sedentary tropical radiations in the Parulidae represent losses of latitudinal migration and colonization of the tropics from temperate regions. We also tested for phylogenetic signal in migratory behaviour, and our results indicate that although migratory behaviour is variable within some wood-warbler species and clades, phylogeny significantly predicts the migratory distance of species in the Parulidae. PMID:21752818

  3. Doping dependence of spin excitations and its correlations with high-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Chenglin; Lu, Xingye; Tan, Guotai; Luo, Huiqian; Song, Yu; Wang, Miaoyin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Goremychkin, E.A.; Perring, T.G.; Maier, T.A.; Yin, Zhiping; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel; Dai, Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides occurs when electrons and holes are doped into their antiferromagnetic parent compounds. Since spin excitations may be responsible for electron pairing and superconductivity, it is important to determine their electron/hole-doping evolution and connection with superconductivity. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to show that while electron doping to the antiferromagnetic BaFe2As2 parent compound modifies the low-energy spin excitations and their correlation with superconductivity (<50 meV) without affecting the high-energy spin excitations (>100 meV), hole-doping suppresses the high-energy spin excitations and shifts the magnetic spectral weight to low-energies. In addition, our absolute spin susceptibility measurements for the optimally hole-doped iron pnictide reveal that the change in magnetic exchange energy below and above Tc can account for the superconducting condensation energy. These results suggest that high-Tc superconductivity in iron pnictides is associated with both the presence of high-energy spin excitations and a coupling between low-energy spin excitations and itinerant electrons. PMID:24301219

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Teneurins: Conserved Features and Premetazoan Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Richard P.; Beckmann, Jan; Leachman, Nathaniel T.; Schöler, Jonas; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Teneurins are type II transmembrane proteins expressed during pattern formation and neurogenesis with an intracellular domain that can be transported to the nucleus and an extracellular domain that can be shed into the extracellular milieu. In Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and mouse the knockdown or knockout of teneurin expression can lead to abnormal patterning, defasciculation, and abnormal pathfinding of neurites, and the disruption of basement membranes. Here, we have identified and analyzed teneurins from a broad range of metazoan genomes for nuclear localization sequences, protein interaction domains, and furin cleavage sites and have cloned and sequenced the intracellular domains of human and avian teneurins to analyze alternative splicing. The basic organization of teneurins is highly conserved in Bilateria: all teneurins have epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeats, a cysteine-rich domain, and a large region identical in organization to the carboxy-half of prokaryotic YD-repeat proteins. Teneurins were not found in the genomes of sponges, cnidarians, or placozoa, but the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis has a gene encoding a predicted teneurin with a transmembrane domain, EGF repeats, a cysteine-rich domain, and a region homologous to YD-repeat proteins. Further examination revealed that most of the extracellular domain of the M. brevicollis teneurin is encoded on a single huge 6,829-bp exon and that the cysteine-rich domain is similar to sequences found in an enzyme expressed by the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. This leads us to suggest that teneurins are complex hybrid fusion proteins that evolved in a choanoflagellate via horizontal gene transfer from both a prokaryotic gene and a diatom or algal gene, perhaps to improve the capacity of the choanoflagellate to bind to its prokaryotic prey. As choanoflagellates are considered to be the closest living relatives of animals, the expression of a primitive teneurin by an ancestral

  5. Ontogenetic evidence for the Paleozoic ancestry of salamanders.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Rainer R; Carroll, Robert L

    2003-01-01

    The phylogenetic positions of frogs, salamanders, and caecilians have been difficult to establish. Data matrices based primarily on Paleozoic taxa support a monophyletic origin of all Lissamphibia but have resulted in widely divergent hypotheses of the nature of their common ancestor. Analysis that concentrates on the character states of the stem taxa of the extant orders, in contrast, suggests a polyphyletic origin from divergent Paleozoic clades. Comparison of patterns of larval development in Paleozoic and modern amphibians provides a means to test previous phylogenies based primarily on adult characteristics. This proves to be highly informative in the case of the origin of salamanders. Putative ancestors of salamanders are recognized from the Permo-Carboniferous boundary of Germany on the basis of ontogenetic changes observed in fossil remains of larval growth series. The entire developmental sequence from hatching to metamorphosis is revealed in an assemblage of over 600 specimens from a single locality, all belonging to the genus Apateon. Apateon forms the most speciose genus of the neotenic temnospondyl family Branchiosauridae. The sequence of ossification of individual bones and the changing configuration of the skull closely parallel those observed in the development of primitive living salamanders. These fossils provide a model of how derived features of the salamander skull may have evolved in the context of feeding specializations that appeared in early larval stages of members of the Branchiosauridae. Larvae of Apateon share many unique derived characters with salamanders of the families Hynobiidae, Salamandridae, and Ambystomatidae, which have not been recognized in any other group of Paleozoic amphibians. PMID:12752770

  6. Accuracy of administratively-assigned ancestry for diverse populations in an electronic medical record-linked biobank.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jacob B; Dumitrescu, Logan; Dilks, Holli H; Crawford, Dana C; Bush, William S

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the development of biobanks linked to electronic medical records has presented new opportunities for genetic and epidemiological research. Studies based on these resources, however, present unique challenges, including the accurate assignment of individual-level population ancestry. In this work we examine the accuracy of administratively-assigned race in diverse populations by comparing assigned races to genetically-defined ancestry estimates. Using 220 ancestry informative markers, we generated principal components for patients in our dataset, which were used to cluster patients into groups based on genetic ancestry. Consistent with other studies, we find a strong overall agreement (Kappa  = 0.872) between genetic ancestry and assigned race, with higher rates of agreement for African-descent and European-descent assignments, and reduced agreement for Hispanic, East Asian-descent, and South Asian-descent assignments. These results suggest caution when selecting study samples of non-African and non-European backgrounds when administratively-assigned race from biobanks is used. PMID:24896101

  7. Population analysis of vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and the role of genetic ancestry in an admixed population

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Tulio C.; Vieira, Rodrigo G.; Grattapaglia, Dario; Pereira, Rinaldo W.

    2011-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is an essential protein related to bone metabolism. Some VDR alleles are differentially distributed among ethnic populations and display variable patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD). In this study, 200 unrelated Brazilians were genotyped using 21 VDR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 28 ancestry informative markers. The patterns of LD and haplotype distribution were compared among Brazilian and the HapMap populations of African (YRI), European (CEU) and Asian (JPT+CHB) origins. Conditional regression and haplotype-specific analysis were performed using estimates of individual genetic ancestry in Brazilians as a quantitative trait. Similar patterns of LD were observed in the 5′ and 3′ gene regions. However, the frequency distribution of haplotype blocks varied among populations. Conditional regression analysis identified haplotypes associated with European and Amerindian ancestry, but not with the proportion of African ancestry. Individual ancestry estimates were associated with VDR haplotypes. These findings reinforce the need to correct for population stratification when performing genetic association studies in admixed populations. PMID:21931507

  8. Global divergence of the human follicle mite Demodex folliculorum: Persistent associations between host ancestry and mite lineages

    PubMed Central

    Palopoli, Michael F.; Fergus, Daniel J.; Minot, Samuel; Pei, Dorothy T.; Simison, W. Brian; Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Thoemmes, Megan S.; Dunn, Robert R.; Trautwein, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic mites of the genus Demodex live within the hair follicles of mammals and are ubiquitous symbionts of humans, but little molecular work has been done to understand their genetic diversity or transmission. Here we sampled mite DNA from 70 human hosts of diverse geographic ancestries and analyzed 241 sequences from the mitochondrial genome of the species Demodex folliculorum. Phylogenetic analyses recovered multiple deep lineages including a globally distributed lineage common among hosts of European ancestry and three lineages that primarily include hosts of Asian, African, and Latin American ancestry. To a great extent, the ancestral geography of hosts predicted the lineages of mites found on them; 27% of the total molecular variance segregated according to the regional ancestries of hosts. We found that D. folliculorum populations are stable on an individual over the course of years and that some Asian and African American hosts maintain specific mite lineages over the course of years or generations outside their geographic region of birth or ancestry. D. folliculorum haplotypes were much more likely to be shared within families and between spouses than between unrelated individuals, indicating that transmission requires close contact. Dating analyses indicated that D. folliculorum origins may predate modern humans. Overall, D. folliculorum evolution reflects ancient human population divergences, is consistent with an out-of-Africa dispersal hypothesis, and presents an excellent model system for further understanding the history of human movement. PMID:26668374

  9. Global divergence of the human follicle mite Demodex folliculorum: Persistent associations between host ancestry and mite lineages.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Michael F; Fergus, Daniel J; Minot, Samuel; Pei, Dorothy T; Simison, W Brian; Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Thoemmes, Megan S; Dunn, Robert R; Trautwein, Michelle

    2015-12-29

    Microscopic mites of the genus Demodex live within the hair follicles of mammals and are ubiquitous symbionts of humans, but little molecular work has been done to understand their genetic diversity or transmission. Here we sampled mite DNA from 70 human hosts of diverse geographic ancestries and analyzed 241 sequences from the mitochondrial genome of the species Demodex folliculorum. Phylogenetic analyses recovered multiple deep lineages including a globally distributed lineage common among hosts of European ancestry and three lineages that primarily include hosts of Asian, African, and Latin American ancestry. To a great extent, the ancestral geography of hosts predicted the lineages of mites found on them; 27% of the total molecular variance segregated according to the regional ancestries of hosts. We found that D. folliculorum populations are stable on an individual over the course of years and that some Asian and African American hosts maintain specific mite lineages over the course of years or generations outside their geographic region of birth or ancestry. D. folliculorum haplotypes were much more likely to be shared within families and between spouses than between unrelated individuals, indicating that transmission requires close contact. Dating analyses indicated that D. folliculorum origins may predate modern humans. Overall, D. folliculorum evolution reflects ancient human population divergences, is consistent with an out-of-Africa dispersal hypothesis, and presents an excellent model system for further understanding the history of human movement. PMID:26668374

  10. Genome-wide genotype and sequence-based reconstruction of the 140,000 year history of modern human ancestry.

    PubMed

    Shriner, Daniel; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    We investigated ancestry of 3,528 modern humans from 163 samples. We identified 19 ancestral components, with 94.4% of individuals showing mixed ancestry. After using whole genome sequences to correct for ascertainment biases in genome-wide genotype data, we dated the oldest divergence event to 140,000 years ago. We detected an Out-of-Africa migration 100,000-87,000 years ago, leading to peoples of the Americas, east and north Asia, and Oceania, followed by another migration 61,000-44,000 years ago, leading to peoples of the Caucasus, Europe, the Middle East, and south Asia. We dated eight divergence events to 33,000-20,000 years ago, coincident with the Last Glacial Maximum. We refined understanding of the ancestry of several ethno-linguistic groups, including African Americans, Ethiopians, the Kalash, Latin Americans, Mozabites, Pygmies, and Uygurs, as well as the CEU sample. Ubiquity of mixed ancestry emphasizes the importance of accounting for ancestry in history, forensics, and health. PMID:25116736

  11. Prostate Cancer Susceptibility in Men of African Ancestry at 8q24.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Rand, Kristin A; Hazelett, Dennis J; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Strom, Sara S; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Nemesure, Barbara; Isaacs, William B; Stanford, Janet L; Zheng, Wei; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Berndt, Sonja I; Wang, Zhaoming; Xu, Jianfeng; Rohland, Nadin; Reich, David; Tandon, Arti; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Allen, Alex; Quinque, Dominique; Mallick, Swapan; Notani, Dimple; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Jayani, Ranveer Singh; Kolb, Suzanne; Gapstur, Susan M; Stevens, Victoria L; Pettaway, Curtis A; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; John, Esther M; Murphy, Adam B; Signorello, Lisa B; Carpten, John; Leske, M Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anslem J M; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S Lilly; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Lubwama, Alex; Pooler, Loreall C; Sheng, Xin; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Cook, Michael B; Chanock, Stephen J; Stram, Daniel O; Watya, Stephen; Blot, William J; Conti, David V; Henderson, Brian E; Haiman, Christopher A

    2016-07-01

    The 8q24 region harbors multiple risk variants for distinct cancers, including >8 for prostate cancer. In this study, we conducted fine mapping of the 8q24 risk region (127.8-128.8Mb) in search of novel associations with common and rare variation in 4853 prostate cancer case patients and 4678 control subjects of African ancestry. All statistical tests were two-sided. We identified three independent associations at P values of less than 5.00×10(-8), all of which were replicated in studies from Ghana and Uganda (combined sample = 5869 case patients, 5615 control subjects; rs114798100: risk allele frequency [RAF] = 0.04, per-allele odds ratio [OR] = 2.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.04 to 2.61, P = 2.38×10(-40); rs72725879: RAF = 0.33, OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.30 to 1.45, P = 3.04×10(-27); and rs111906932: RAF = 0.03, OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.53 to 2.08, P = 1.39×10(-13)). Risk variants rs114798100 and rs111906923 are only found in men of African ancestry, with rs111906923 representing a novel association signal. The three variants are located within or near a number of prostate cancer-associated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), including PRNCR1, PCAT1, and PCAT2. These findings highlight ancestry-specific risk variation and implicate prostate-specific lncRNAs at the 8q24 prostate cancer susceptibility region. PMID:26823525

  12. Genetic Ancestry, Social Classification, and Racial Inequalities in Blood Pressure in Southeastern Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Gravlee, Clarence C.; Non, Amy L.; Mulligan, Connie J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of race in human genetics and biomedical research is among the most contested issues in science. Much debate centers on the relative importance of genetic versus sociocultural factors in explaining racial inequalities in health. However, few studies integrate genetic and sociocultural data to test competing explanations directly. Methodology/Principal Findings We draw on ethnographic, epidemiologic, and genetic data collected in southeastern Puerto Rico to isolate two distinct variables for which race is often used as a proxy: genetic ancestry versus social classification. We show that color, an aspect of social classification based on the culturally defined meaning of race in Puerto Rico, better predicts blood pressure than does a genetic-based estimate of continental ancestry. We also find that incorporating sociocultural variables reveals a new and significant association between a candidate gene polymorphism for hypertension (α2C adrenergic receptor deletion) and blood pressure. Conclusions/Significance This study addresses the recognized need to measure both genetic and sociocultural factors in research on racial inequalities in health. Our preliminary results provide the most direct evidence to date that previously reported associations between genetic ancestry and health may be attributable to sociocultural factors related to race and racism, rather than to functional genetic differences between racially defined groups. Our results also imply that including sociocultural variables in future research may improve our ability to detect significant allele-phenotype associations. Thus, measuring sociocultural factors related to race may both empower future genetic association studies and help to clarify the biological consequences of social inequalities. PMID:19742303

  13. Associations of adiponectin with individual European ancestry in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Bidulescu, Aurelian; Choudhry, Shweta; Musani, Solomon K.; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Liu, Jiankang; Rotimi, Charles N.; Wilson, James G.; Taylor, Herman A.; Gibbons, Gary H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Compared with European Americans, African Americans (AAs) exhibit lower levels of the cardio-metabolically protective adiponectin even after accounting for adiposity measures. Because few studies have examined in AA the association between adiponectin and genetic admixture, a dense panel of ancestry informative markers (AIMs) was used to estimate the individual proportions of European ancestry (PEA) for the AAs enrolled in a large community-based cohort, the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). We tested the hypothesis that plasma adiponectin and PEA are directly associated and assessed the interaction with a series of cardio-metabolic risk factors. Methods: Plasma specimens from 1439 JHS participants were analyzed by ELISA for adiponectin levels. Using pseudo-ancestral population genotype data from the HapMap Consortium, PEA was estimated with a panel of up to 1447 genome-wide preselected AIMs by a maximum likelihood approach. Interaction assessment, stepwise linear and cubic multivariable-adjusted regression models were used to analyze the cross-sectional association between adiponectin and PEA. Results: Among the study participants (62% women; mean age 48 ± 12 years), the median (interquartile range) of PEA was 15.8 (9.3)%. Body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.04) and insulin resistance (p = 0.0001) modified the association between adiponectin and PEA. Adiponectin was directly and linearly associated with PEA (β = 0.62 ± 0.28, p = 0.03) among non-obese (n = 673) and insulin sensitive participants (n = 1141; β = 0.74 ± 0.23, p = 0.001), but not among those obese or with insulin resistance. No threshold point effect was detected for non-obese participants. Conclusions: In a large AA population, the individual proportion of European ancestry was linearly and directly associated with plasma adiponectin among non-obese and non insulin-resistant participants, pointing to the interaction of genetic and metabolic factors influencing adiponectin levels. PMID:24575123

  14. The Missing Link of Jewish European Ancestry: Contrasting the Rhineland and the Khazarian Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Elhaik, Eran

    2013-01-01

    The question of Jewish ancestry has been the subject of controversy for over two centuries and has yet to be resolved. The “Rhineland hypothesis” depicts Eastern European Jews as a “population isolate” that emerged from a small group of German Jews who migrated eastward and expanded rapidly. Alternatively, the “Khazarian hypothesis” suggests that Eastern European Jews descended from the Khazars, an amalgam of Turkic clans that settled the Caucasus in the early centuries CE and converted to Judaism in the 8th century. Mesopotamian and Greco–Roman Jews continuously reinforced the Judaized empire until the 13th century. Following the collapse of their empire, the Judeo–Khazars fled to Eastern Europe. The rise of European Jewry is therefore explained by the contribution of the Judeo–Khazars. Thus far, however, the Khazars’ contribution has been estimated only empirically, as the absence of genome-wide data from Caucasus populations precluded testing the Khazarian hypothesis. Recent sequencing of modern Caucasus populations prompted us to revisit the Khazarian hypothesis and compare it with the Rhineland hypothesis. We applied a wide range of population genetic analyses to compare these two hypotheses. Our findings support the Khazarian hypothesis and portray the European Jewish genome as a mosaic of Near Eastern-Caucasus, European, and Semitic ancestries, thereby consolidating previous contradictory reports of Jewish ancestry. We further describe a major difference among Caucasus populations explained by the early presence of Judeans in the Southern and Central Caucasus. Our results have important implications for the demographic forces that shaped the genetic diversity in the Caucasus and for medical studies. PMID:23241444

  15. Diversity of Wolbachia pipientis Strain wPip in a Genetically Admixtured, Above-Ground Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) Population: Association With Form Molestus Ancestry and Host Selection Patterns

    PubMed Central

    MORNINGSTAR, REBECCA J.; HAMER, GABRIEL L.; GOLDBERG, TONY L.; HUANG, SHAOMING; ANDREADIS, THEODORE G.; WALKER, EDWARD D.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of molecular genetic diversity in nine marker regions of five genes within the bacteriophage WO genomic region revealed high diversity of the Wolbachia pipentis strain wPip in a population of Culex pipiens L. sampled in metropolitan Chicago, IL. From 166 blood fed females, 50 distinct genetic profiles of wPip were identified. Rarefaction analysis suggested a maximum of 110 profiles out of a possible 512 predicted by combinations of the nine markers. A rank-abundance curve showed that few strains were common and most were rare. Multiple regression showed that markers associated with gene Gp2d, encoding a partial putative capsid protein, were significantly associated with ancestry of individuals either to form molestus or form pipiens, as determined by prior microsatellite allele frequency analysis. None of the other eight markers was associated with ancestry to either form, nor to ancestry to Cx. quinquefasciatus Say. Logistic regression of host choice (mammal vs. avian) as determined by bloodmeal analysis revealed that significantly fewer individuals that had fed on mammals had the Gp9a genetic marker (58.5%) compared with avian-fed individuals (88.1%). These data suggest that certain wPip molecular genetic types are associated with genetic admixturing in the Cx. pipiens complex of metropolitan Chicago, IL, and that the association extends to phenotypic variation related to host preference. PMID:22679853

  16. The Matrilineal Ancestry of Ashkenazi Jewry: Portrait of a Recent Founder Event

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Doron M.; Metspalu, Ene; Kivisild, Toomas; Achilli, Alessandro; Hadid, Yarin; Tzur, Shay; Pereira, Luisa; Amorim, Antonio; Quintana-Murci, Lluís; Majamaa, Kari; Herrnstadt, Corinna; Howell, Neil; Balanovsky, Oleg; Kutuev, Ildus; Pshenichnov, Andrey; Gurwitz, David; Bonne-Tamir, Batsheva; Torroni, Antonio; Villems, Richard; Skorecki, Karl

    2006-01-01

    Both the extent and location of the maternal ancestral deme from which the Ashkenazi Jewry arose remain obscure. Here, using complete sequences of the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), we show that close to one-half of Ashkenazi Jews, estimated at 8,000,000 people, can be traced back to only 4 women carrying distinct mtDNAs that are virtually absent in other populations, with the important exception of low frequencies among non-Ashkenazi Jews. We conclude that four founding mtDNAs, likely of Near Eastern ancestry, underwent major expansion(s) in Europe within the past millennium. PMID:16404693

  17. Two ancient human genomes reveal Polynesian ancestry among the indigenous Botocudos of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Lao, Oscar; Schroeder, Hannes; Rasmussen, Morten; Raghavan, Maanasa; Moltke, Ida; Campos, Paula F; Sagredo, Francisca Santana; Rasmussen, Simon; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Albrechtsen, Anders; Allentoft, Morten E; Johnson, Philip L F; Li, Mingkun; Reis, Silvia; Bernardo, Danilo V; DeGiorgio, Michael; Duggan, Ana T; Bastos, Murilo; Wang, Yong; Stenderup, Jesper; Moreno-Mayar, J Victor; Brunak, Søren; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Hodges, Emily; Hannon, Gregory J; Orlando, Ludovic; Price, T Douglas; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Nielsen, Rasmus; Heinemeier, Jan; Olsen, Jesper; Rodrigues-Carvalho, Claudia; Lahr, Marta Mirazón; Neves, Walter A; Kayser, Manfred; Higham, Thomas; Stoneking, Mark; Pena, Sergio D J; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the peopling of the Americas remains an important and challenging question. Here, we present (14)C dates, and morphological, isotopic and genomic sequence data from two human skulls from the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, part of one of the indigenous groups known as 'Botocudos'. We find that their genomic ancestry is Polynesian, with no detectable Native American component. Radiocarbon analysis of the skulls shows that the individuals had died prior to the beginning of the 19th century. Our findings could either represent genomic evidence of Polynesians reaching South America during their Pacific expansion, or European-mediated transport. PMID:25455029

  18. High Ki-67 Immunohistochemical Reactivity Correlates With Poor Prognosis in Bladder Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yihuan; Zhang, Xin; Mo, Meile; Tan, Zhong; Huang, Lanshan; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Chunqin; Wei, Fanglin; Qiu, Xiaohui; He, Rongquan; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    correlated with all 5 clinical outcome in Asian and European-American patients (P < 0.05). For multivariate analysis, however, the pooled results were only significant for DFS, OS, and RFS in Asian patients, for CSS, DFS, PFS, and RFS in European-American patients (P < 0.05). In the subgroup with low cut-off value (<20%), our meta-analysis indicated that high Ki-67 reactivity was significantly correlated with worsened CSS, DFS, OS, PFS, and RFS on univariate analysis (P < 0.05). For multivariate analysis, the meta-analysis of literature with low cut-off value (<20%) demonstrated that high Ki-67 reactivity predicted shorter DFS, PFS, and RFS in BC patients (P < 0.05). In the subgroup analysis of high cut-off value (≥20%), our meta-analysis indicated that high Ki-67 reactivity, in either univariate or multivariate analysis, significantly correlated with all five clinical outcomes in BC patients (P < 0.05). The meta-analysis indicates that high Ki-67 reactivity significantly correlates with deteriorated clinical outcomes in BC patients and that Ki-67 can be considered as an independent indicator for the prognosis by the meta-analyses of multivariate analysis. PMID:27082587

  19. A high performance cost-effective digital complex correlator for an X-band polarimetry survey.

    PubMed

    Bergano, Miguel; Rocha, Armando; Cupido, Luís; Barbosa, Domingos; Villela, Thyrso; Boas, José Vilas; Rocha, Graça; Smoot, George F

    2016-01-01

    The detailed knowledge of the Milky Way radio emission is important to characterize galactic foregrounds masking extragalactic and cosmological signals. The update of the global sky models describing radio emissions over a very large spectral band requires high sensitivity experiments capable of observing large sky areas with long integration times. Here, we present the design of a new 10 GHz (X-band) polarimeter digital back-end to map the polarization components of the galactic synchrotron radiation field of the Northern Hemisphere sky. The design follows the digital processing trends in radio astronomy and implements a large bandwidth (1 GHz) digital complex cross-correlator to extract the Stokes parameters of the incoming synchrotron radiation field. The hardware constraints cover the implemented VLSI hardware description language code and the preliminary results. The implementation is based on the simultaneous digitized acquisition of the Cartesian components of the two linear receiver polarization channels. The design strategy involves a double data rate acquisition of the ADC interleaved parallel bus, and field programmable gate array device programming at the register transfer mode. The digital core of the back-end is capable of processing 32 Gbps and is built around an Altera field programmable gate array clocked at 250 MHz, 1 GSps analog to digital converters and a clock generator. The control of the field programmable gate array internal signal delays and a convenient use of its phase locked loops provide the timing requirements to achieve the target bandwidths and sensitivity. This solution is convenient for radio astronomy experiments requiring large bandwidth, high functionality, high volume availability and low cost. Of particular interest, this correlator was developed for the Galactic Emission Mapping project and is suitable for large sky area polarization continuum surveys. The solutions may also be adapted to be used at signal processing

  20. High Blood Glucose Levels Correlate with Tumor Malignancy in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ge; Zhang, Ting; Ren, Fan; Feng, Wen-Ming; Yao, Yunliang; Cui, Jie; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Shi, Qi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Research shows that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects the risk and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether the clinicopathological features of CRC patients correlate with their blood glucose levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 391 CRC patients hospitalized in our center between 2008 and 2013. Data of their first fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h postprandial glucose (2hPPG) level after admission, their clinicopathological features, and survival were collected. The correlations between blood glucose level and clinicopathological features were analyzed by Pearson chi-square analysis. Patient survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analysis. RESULTS There were 116 out of the 391 CRC patients who had high blood glucose level (H-G group, 29.67%), among which 58 (14.83%), 18 (4.60%), and 40 (10.23%) were diabetes mellitus (DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), respectively, while 275 (70.33%) patients had normal glucose level (N-G group). Compared with the N-G group, patients in the H-G group had larger tumor diameters and lower tumor differentiation (p<0.05). A higher ratio of patients in the H-G group also had more advanced TNM staging and more ulcerative CRC gross type (p<0.05). No significant difference was observed in patient overall survival among different glucose groups. No effect of insulin therapy on CRC development and patient survival was observed. CONCLUSIONS Blood glucose level in CRC patients correlates significantly with local tumor malignancy, but no significant effect on distant metastasis and patient overall survival was observed. PMID:26644185

  1. High Blood Glucose Levels Correlate with Tumor Malignancy in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ge; Zhang, Ting; Ren, Fan; Feng, Wen-Ming; Yao, Yunliang; Cui, Jie; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Shi, Qi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Research shows that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects the risk and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether the clinicopathological features of CRC patients correlate with their blood glucose levels. Material/Methods We enrolled 391 CRC patients hospitalized in our center between 2008 and 2013. Data of their first fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h postprandial glucose (2hPPG) level after admission, their clinicopathological features, and survival were collected. The correlations between blood glucose level and clinicopathological features were analyzed by Pearson chi-square analysis. Patient survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analysis. Results There were 116 out of the 391 CRC patients who had high blood glucose level (H-G group, 29.67%), among which 58 (14.83%), 18 (4.60%), and 40 (10.23%) were diabetes mellitus (DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), respectively, while 275 (70.33%) patients had normal glucose level (N-G group). Compared with the N-G group, patients in the H-G group had larger tumor diameters and lower tumor differentiation (p<0.05). A higher ratio of patients in the H-G group also had more advanced TNM staging and more ulcerative CRC gross type (p<0.05). No significant difference was observed in patient overall survival among different glucose groups. No effect of insulin therapy on CRC development and patient survival was observed. Conclusions Blood glucose level in CRC patients correlates significantly with local tumor malignancy, but no significant effect on distant metastasis and patient overall survival was observed. PMID:26644185

  2. Effect of Intercritical Temperature on the Structure Property Correlation of Multiphase High-C Spheroidized Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monia, S.; Varshney, A.; Gouthama; Sangal, S.; Kundu, S.; Samanta, S.; Mondal, K.

    2016-02-01

    The present investigation deals with the development of multiphase steels combining spheroidal carbides and bainite in a ductile ferrite matrix. An attempt is made to get a promising combination of high strength and ductility through changes of microstructure by heat treatment. A high-carbon (0.61 wt.%) and high-silicon (1.71 wt.%) spring steel (EN45) was annealed to obtain an initial ferrite pearlite microstructure. The samples were given 10% cold working followed by holding at a temperature just below Ac1 for 180 min. Then the samples were held at intercritical temperatures of 770 and 800 °C for different durations varying from 10 to 30 min for partial re-austenitization followed by quenching in a salt bath kept at 350 °C and holding there for 10 min for bainite transformation. The samples were finally water quenched. The heat-treated samples were characterized by optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of intercritical temperature and holding time on the microstructure and mechanical properties were studied. With more bainitic transformation, the strength values went up considerably with a compromised elongation. The best combination of tensile strength (~805 MPa) with high elongation (~28%) was obtained. Finally, structure property correlation was established.

  3. Optimization of thermal ghost imaging: high-order correlations vs. background subtraction.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kam Wai C; O'Sullivan, Malcolm N; Boyd, Robert W

    2010-03-15

    We compare the performance of high-order thermal ghost imaging with that of conventional (that is, lowest-order) thermal ghost imaging for different data processing methods. Particular attention is given to high-order thermal ghost imaging with background normalization and conventional ghost imaging with background subtraction. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the ghost image is used as the figure of merit for the comparison.We find analytically that the CNR of the normalized high-order ghost image is inversely proportional to the square root of the number of transmitting pixels of the object. This scaling law is independent of the exponents used in calculating the high-order correlation and is the same as that of conventional ghost imaging with background subtraction. We find that no data processing procedure performs better than lowest-order ghost imaging with background subtraction. Our results are found to be able to explain the observations of a recent experiment [Chen et al., arXiv:0902.3713v3 [quant-ph

  4. High frequency magnetic fluctuations correlated with the inter-ELM pedestal evolution in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laggner, F. M.; Wolfrum, E.; Cavedon, M.; Mink, F.; Viezzer, E.; Dunne, M. G.; Manz, P.; Doerk, H.; Birkenmeier, G.; Fischer, R.; Fietz, S.; Maraschek, M.; Willensdorfer, M.; Aumayr, F.; the EUROfusion MST1 Team; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms that determine the structure of the high confinement mode (H-mode) pedestal, the evolution of the plasma edge electron density and temperature profiles between edge localised modes (ELMs) is investigated. The onset of radial magnetic fluctuations with frequencies above 200 kHz is found to correlate with the stagnation of the electron temperature pedestal gradient. During the presence of these magnetic fluctuations the gradients of the edge electron density and temperature are clamped and stable against the ELM onset. The detected magnetic fluctuation frequency is analysed for a variety of plasma discharges with different electron pressure pedestals. It is shown that the magnetic fluctuation frequency scales with the neoclassically estimated \\text{E} × \\text{B} velocity at the plasma edge. This points to a location of the underlying instability in the gradient region. Furthermore, the magnetic signature of these fluctuations indicates a global mode structure with toroidal mode numbers of approximately 10. The fluctuations are also observed on the high field side with significant amplitude, indicating a mode structure that is symmetric on the low field side and high field side. The associated fluctuations in the current on the high field side might be attributed to either a strong peeling part or the presence of non-adiabatic electron response.

  5. Genome-wide association of polycystic ovary syndrome implicates alterations in gonadotropin secretion in European ancestry populations.

    PubMed

    Hayes, M Geoffrey; Urbanek, Margrit; Ehrmann, David A; Armstrong, Loren L; Lee, Ji Young; Sisk, Ryan; Karaderi, Tugce; Barber, Thomas M; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Stephen; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Welt, Corrine K; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Panidis, Dimitrios; Goodarzi, Mark O; Azziz, Ricardo; Zhang, Yi; James, Roland G; Olivier, Michael; Kissebah, Ahmed H; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Legro, Richard S; Dunaif, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common, highly heritable complex disorder of unknown aetiology characterized by hyperandrogenism, chronic anovulation and defects in glucose homeostasis. Increased luteinizing hormone relative to follicle-stimulating hormone secretion, insulin resistance and developmental exposure to androgens are hypothesized to play a causal role in PCOS. Here we map common genetic susceptibility loci in European ancestry women for the National Institutes of Health PCOS phenotype, which confers the highest risk for metabolic morbidities, as well as reproductive hormone levels. Three loci reach genome-wide significance in the case-control meta-analysis, two novel loci mapping to chr 8p23.1 [Corrected] and chr 11p14.1, and a chr 9q22.32 locus previously found in Chinese PCOS. The same chr 11p14.1 SNP, rs11031006, in the region of the follicle-stimulating hormone B polypeptide (FSHB) gene strongly associates with PCOS diagnosis and luteinizing hormone levels. These findings implicate neuroendocrine changes in disease pathogenesis. PMID:26284813

  6. The human genome retains relics of its prokaryotic ancestry: human genes of archaebacterial and eubacterial origin exhibit remarkable differences.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ponce, David; McInerney, James O

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotes are generally thought to stem from a fusion event involving an archaebacterium and a eubacterium. As a result of this event, contemporaneous eukaryotic genomes are chimeras of genes inherited from both endosymbiotic partners. These two coexisting gene repertoires have been shown to differ in a number of ways in yeast. Here we combine genomic and functional data in order to determine if and how human genes that have been inherited from both prokaryotic ancestors remain distinguishable. We show that, despite being fewer in number, human genes of archaebacterial origin are more highly and broadly expressed across tissues, are more likely to have lethal mouse orthologs, tend to be involved in informational processes, are more selectively constrained, and encode shorter and more central proteins in the protein-protein interaction network than eubacterium-like genes. Furthermore, consistent with endosymbiotic theory, we show that proteins tend to interact with those encoded by genes of the same ancestry. Most interestingly from a human health perspective, archaebacterial genes are less likely to be involved in heritable human disease. Taken together, these results show that more than 2 billion years after eukaryogenesis, the human genome retains at least two somewhat distinct communities of genes. PMID:21795752

  7. Genome-wide association of polycystic ovary syndrome implicates alterations in gonadotropin secretion in European ancestry populations

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Urbanek, Margrit; Ehrmann, David A.; Armstrong, Loren L.; Lee, Ji Young; Sisk, Ryan; Karaderi, Tugce; Barber, Thomas M.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Franks, Stephen; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Welt, Corrine K.; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Panidis, Dimitrios; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Azziz, Ricardo; Zhang, Yi; James, Roland G.; Olivier, Michael; Kissebah, Ahmed H.; Alvero, Ruben; Barnhart, Huiman X.; Baker, Valerie; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Bates, G. Wright; Brzyski, Robert G.; Carr, Bruce R.; Carson, Sandra A.; Casson, Peter; Cataldo, Nicholas A.; Christman, Gregory; Coutifaris, Christos; Diamond, Michael P.; Eisenberg, Esther; Gosman, Gabriella G.; Giudice, Linda C.; Haisenleder, Daniel J.; Huang, Hao; Krawetz, Stephen A.; Lucidi, Scott; McGovern, Peter G.; Myers, Evan R.; Nestler, John E.; Ohl, Dana; Santoro, Nanette; Schlaff, William D.; Snyder, Peter; Steinkampf, Michael P.; Trussell, J. C.; Usadi, Rebecca; Yan, Qingshang; Zhang, Heping; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Legro, Richard S.; Dunaif, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common, highly heritable complex disorder of unknown aetiology characterized by hyperandrogenism, chronic anovulation and defects in glucose homeostasis. Increased luteinizing hormone relative to follicle-stimulating hormone secretion, insulin resistance and developmental exposure to androgens are hypothesized to play a causal role in PCOS. Here we map common genetic susceptibility loci in European ancestry women for the National Institutes of Health PCOS phenotype, which confers the highest risk for metabolic morbidities, as well as reproductive hormone levels. Three loci reach genome-wide significance in the case–control meta-analysis, two novel loci mapping to chr 8p32.1 and chr 11p14.1, and a chr 9q22.32 locus previously found in Chinese PCOS. The same chr 11p14.1 SNP, rs11031006, in the region of the follicle-stimulating hormone B polypeptide (FSHB) gene strongly associates with PCOS diagnosis and luteinizing hormone levels. These findings implicate neuroendocrine changes in disease pathogenesis. PMID:26284813

  8. Plasma leptin concentrations are highly correlated to emotional states throughout the day.

    PubMed

    Licinio, J; Negrao, A B; Wong, M-L

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has shown that leptin appears to regulate the plasma levels of hormones such as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in humans and that it has antidepressant effects in animals. It is unknown whether fluctuations in circulating leptin levels are correlated to changes in human emotions. This study was conducted to determine whether minute-to-minute fluctuations in the plasma concentrations of human leptin were associated with psychological variables. Leptin was sampled every 7 min throughout the day in 10 healthy subjects (five men and five women) studied in a clinical research center, and visual analog scales were applied every hour. We found highly significant correlations between fluctuations in plasma leptin concentrations and three psychological variables: sadness, carbohydrate craving and social withdrawal. We showed that during the course of the day increases in leptin levels are associated with decreased search for starchy foods, decreased feelings of sadness and increased social withdrawal. Our findings support the hypothesis that during the course of the day as leptin levels increase individuals subjectively feel happier (less sad) and have less inclination to interact socially. Conversely, when leptin levels decrease, we show increases in sadness and social cooperation, which might facilitate the search for food. We suggest that increased human leptin levels may promote positive feelings and that decreased leptin levels might modulate inner states that motivate and facilitate the search for nutrients. PMID:25350298

  9. Prospective study of correlates of vaginal Lactobacillus colonization among high-risk HIV-1 seronegative women

    PubMed Central

    Baeten, Jared M.; Hassan, Wisal M.; Chohan, Vrasha; Richardson, Barbra A.; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah O.; Jaoko, Walter; McClelland, R. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Objective Vaginal colonization with Lactobacillus species is characteristic of normal vaginal ecology. The absence of vaginal lactobacilli, particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing isolates, has been associated with symptomatic bacterial vaginosis (BV) and increased risk for HIV-1 acquisition. Identification of factors associated with vaginal Lactobacillus colonization may suggest interventions to improve vaginal health. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of correlates of vaginal Lactobacillus colonization among Kenyan HIV-1 seronegative female sex workers. At monthly follow-up visits, vaginal Lactobacillus cultures were obtained. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine demographic, behavioral, and medical correlates of Lactobacillus isolation, including isolation of H2O2-producing strains. Results Lactobacillus cultures were obtained from 1020 women who completed a total of 8896 follow-up visits. Vaginal washing, typically with water alone or with soap and water, was associated with an approximately 40% decreased likelihood of Lactobacillus isolation, including isolation of H2O2-producing strains. Recent antibiotic use, excluding metronidazole and treatments for vaginal candidiasis, reduced Lactobacillus isolation by ~30%. H2O2-producing lactobacilli were significantly less common among women with Trichomonas vaginalis infection and those who were seropositive for herpes simplex virus type 2. In contrast, H2O2-producing lactobacilli were significantly more common among women with concurrent vaginal candidiasis. Conclusions Modifiable biologic and behavioral factors are associated with Lactobacillus colonization in African women. Our results suggest intervention strategies to improve vaginal health in women at high risk for HIV-1. PMID:19329442

  10. Electrophysiological Changes Correlated with Temperature Increases Induced by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z.; Kumon, R. E.; Laughner, J. I.; Efimov, I. R.; Deng, C. X.

    2014-01-01

    To gain better understanding of the detailed mechanisms of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for cardiac arrhythmias, we investigated how the cellular electrophysiological (EP) changes were correlated with temperature increases and thermal dose (cumulative equivalent minutes [CEM43]) during HIFU application using Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Employing voltage-sensitive dye di-4-ANEPPS, we measured the EP and temperature during HIFU using simultaneous optical mapping and infrared imaging. Both action potential amplitude (APA) and AP duration at 50% repolarization (APD50) decreased with temperature increases, and APD50 was more thermally sensitive than APA. EP and tissue changes were irreversible when HIFU-induced temperature increased above 52.3 ± 1.4 °C and log10(CEM43) above 2.16 ± 0.51 (n = 5), but were reversible when temperature was below 50.1 ± 0.8 °C and log10(CEM43) below −0.9 ± 0.3 (n = 9). EP and temperature/thermal dose changes were spatially correlated with HIFU induced tissue necrosis surrounded by a transition zone. PMID:25516446

  11. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deitrick, Russell; Gibson, Emily; Razzaghi, Hamid

    2009-10-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL), referred to as the ``good cholesterol'', carries free cholesterol to the liver to be filtered from the bloodstream and is important to our understanding of atherosclerosis. HDL is metabolized in part by the enzyme Endothelial Lipase (EL). With this project we will use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the metabolism of HDL by EL comparing wild type with different genetic mutations. FCS is an advanced microscopy technique in which we record fluctuations in the fluorescence of dye-labeled molecules (in this case, HDL labeled with Nile Red) as they freely diffuse through a small focal volume. This data can be analyzed mathematically using the cross-correlation function, from which we can ultimately ascertain much information. In our case, we are interested in the diffusion coefficient which, via the Stokes-Einstein relation for a sphere, we can determine the size of HDL as it undergoes the process of metabolism. Preliminary results seem to indicate that the metabolic process occurs very quickly, that the final size of HDL depends primarily on the concentration of EL, and that the wild and mutant variants of EL have a similar effectiveness. In following experiments, we hope to investigate these relationships further.

  12. Stochastic computational modelling of highly heterogeneous poroelastic media with long-range correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frias, Diego G.; Murad, Márcio A.; Pereira, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    The compaction of highly heterogeneous poroelastic reservoirs with the geology characterized by long-range correlations displaying fractal character is investigated within the framework of the stochastic computational modelling. The influence of reservoir heterogeneity upon the magnitude of the stresses induced in the porous matrix during fluid withdrawal and rock consolidation is analysed by performing ensemble averages over realizations of a log-normally distributed stationary random hydraulic conductivity field. Considering the statistical distribution of this parameter characterized by a coefficient of variation governing the magnitude of heterogeneity and a correlation function which decays with a power-law scaling behaviour we show that the combination of these two effects result in an increase in the magnitude of effective stresses of the rock during reservoir depletion. Further, within the framework of a perturbation analysis we show that the randomness in the hydraulic conductivity gives rise to non-linear corrections in the upscaled poroelastic equations. These corrections are illustrated by a self-consistent recursive hierarchy of solutions of the stochastic poroelastic equations parametrized by a scale parameter representing the fluctuating log-conductivity standard deviation. A classical example of land subsidence caused by fluid extraction of a weak reservoir is numerically simulated by performing Monte Carlo simulations in conjunction with finite elements discretizations of the poroelastic equations associated with an ensemble of geologies. Numerical results illustrate the effects of the spatial variability and fractal character of the permeability distribution upon the evolution of the Mohr-Coulomb function of the rock. Copyright

  13. Monte Carlo approach for hadron azimuthal correlations in high energy proton and nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Dominguez, Isabel; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Magnin, J.; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2012-09-01

    We use a Monte Carlo approach to study hadron azimuthal angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies at midrapidity. We build a hadron event generator that incorporates the production of 2→2 and 2→3 parton processes and their evolution into hadron states. For nucleus-nucleus collisions we include the effect of parton energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma using a modified fragmentation function approach. In the presence of the medium, for the case when three partons are produced in the hard scattering, we analyze the Monte Carlo sample in parton and hadron momentum bins to reconstruct the angular correlations. We characterize this sample by the number of partons that are able to hadronize by fragmentation within the selected bins. In the nuclear environment the model allows hadronization by fragmentation only for partons with momentum above a threshold pTthresh=2.4 GeV. We argue that one should treat properly the effect of those partons with momentum below the threshold, because their interaction with the medium may lead to showers of low-momentum hadrons along the direction of motion of the original partons as the medium becomes diluted.

  14. Improvements in High Speed, High Resolution Dynamic Digital Image Correlation for Experimental Evaluation of Composite Drive System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, Lee; Ruggeri, Charles; Roberts, Gary; Handshuh, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Composite materials have the potential to reduce the weight of rotating drive system components. However, these components are more complex to design and evaluate than static structural components in part because of limited ability to acquire deformation and failure initiation data during dynamic tests. Digital image correlation (DIC) methods have been developed to provide precise measurements of deformation and failure initiation for material test coupons and for structures under quasi-static loading. Attempts to use the same methods for rotating components (presented at the AHS International 68th Annual Forum in 2012) are limited by high speed camera resolution, image blur, and heating of the structure by high intensity lighting. Several improvements have been made to the system resulting in higher spatial resolution, decreased image noise, and elimination of heating effects. These improvements include the use of a high intensity synchronous microsecond pulsed LED lighting system, different lenses, and changes in camera configuration. With these improvements, deformation measurements can be made during rotating component tests with resolution comparable to that which can be achieved in static tests.

  15. Improvements in High Speed, High Resolution Dynamic Digital Image Correlation for Experimental Evaluation of Composite Drive System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Roberts, Gary D.; Handschuh, Robert Frederick

    2013-01-01

    Composite materials have the potential to reduce the weight of rotating drive system components. However, these components are more complex to design and evaluate than static structural components in part because of limited ability to acquire deformation and failure initiation data during dynamic tests. Digital image correlation (DIC) methods have been developed to provide precise measurements of deformation and failure initiation for material test coupons and for structures under quasi-static loading. Attempts to use the same methods for rotating components (presented at the AHS International 68th Annual Forum in 2012) are limited by high speed camera resolution, image blur, and heating of the structure by high intensity lighting. Several improvements have been made to the system resulting in higher spatial resolution, decreased image noise, and elimination of heating effects. These improvements include the use of a high intensity synchronous microsecond pulsed LED lighting system, different lenses, and changes in camera configuration. With these improvements, deformation measurements can be made during rotating component tests with resolution comparable to that which can be achieved in static tests

  16. Susceptibility loci for heroin and cocaine addiction in the serotonergic and adrenergic pathways in populations of different ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Levran, Orna; Peles, Einat; Randesi, Matthew; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Ott, Jurg; Rotrosen, John; Adelson, Miriam; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug addiction is influenced by genetic factors. Aim To determine if genetic variants in the serotonergic and adrenergic pathways are associated with heroin and/or cocaine addiction. Subjects & methods The study examined 140 polymorphisms in 19 genes in 1855 subjects with predominantly European or African ancestries. Results A total of 38 polymorphisms (13 genes) showed nominal associations, including novel associations in S100A10 (p11) and SLC18A2 (VMAT2). The association of HTR3B SNP rs11606194 with heroin addiction in the European ancestry subgroup remained significant after correction for multiple testing (pcorrected = 0.04). Conclusion The study strengthens our previous findings of association of polymorphisms in HTR3A, HTR3B and ADRA1A. The study suggests partial overlap in genetic susceptibility between populations of different ancestry and between heroin and cocaine addiction. PMID:26227246

  17. Genetic Bio-Ancestry and Social Construction of Racial Classification in Social Surveys in the Contemporary United States

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guang; Fu, Yilan; Lee, Hedwig; Cai, Tianji; Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Li, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Self-reported race is generally considered the basis for racial classification in social surveys, including the U.S. census. Drawing on recent advances in human molecular genetics and social science perspectives of socially constructed race, our study takes into account both genetic bio-ancestry and social context in understanding racial classification. This article accomplishes two objectives. First, our research establishes geographic genetic bio-ancestry as a component of racial classification. Second, it shows how social forces trump biology in racial classification and/or how social context interacts with bio-ancestry in shaping racial classification. The findings were replicated in two racially and ethnically diverse data sets: the College Roommate Study (N = 2,065) and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 2,281). PMID:24019100

  18. Two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with high count rates and low background using dielectric microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Aouani, Heykel; Schön, Peter; Brasselet, Sophie; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence is a powerful technique commonly used for biological imaging. However, the low absorption cross section of this non-linear process is a critical issue for performing biomolecular spectroscopy at the single molecule level. Enhancing the two-photon fluorescence signal would greatly improve the effectiveness of this technique, yet current methods struggle with medium enhancement factors and/or high background noise. Here, we show that the two-photon fluorescence signal from single Alexa Fluor 488 molecules can be enhanced up to 10 times by using a 3 µm diameter latex sphere while adding almost no photoluminescence background. We report a full characterization of the two-photon fluorescence enhancement by a single microsphere using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This opens new routes to enhance non-linear optical signals and extend biophotonic applications. PMID:21258531

  19. Phylogenetic character mapping of proteomic diversity shows high correlation with subspecific phylogenetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Telleria, Jenny; Biron, David G.; Brizard, Jean-Paul; Demettre, Edith; Séveno, Martial; Barnabé, Christian; Ayala, Francisco J.; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2010-01-01

    We performed a phylogenetic character mapping on 26 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible for Chagas disease, and 2 stocks of the sister taxon T. cruzi marinkellei to test for possible associations between T. cruzi–subspecific phylogenetic diversity and levels of protein expression, as examined by proteomic analysis and mass spectrometry. We observed a high level of correlation (P < 10−4) between genetic distance, as established by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and proteomic dissimilarities estimated by proteomic Euclidian distances. Several proteins were found to be specifically associated to T. cruzi phylogenetic subdivisions (discrete typing units). This study explores the previously uncharacterized links between infraspecific phylogenetic diversity and gene expression in a human pathogen. It opens the way to searching for new vaccine and drug targets and for identification of specific biomarkers at the subspecific level of pathogens. PMID:21059959

  20. Phylogenetic character mapping of proteomic diversity shows high correlation with subspecific phylogenetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Telleria, Jenny; Biron, David G; Brizard, Jean-Paul; Demettre, Edith; Séveno, Martial; Barnabé, Christian; Ayala, Francisco J; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2010-11-23

    We performed a phylogenetic character mapping on 26 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible for Chagas disease, and 2 stocks of the sister taxon T. cruzi marinkellei to test for possible associations between T. cruzi-subspecific phylogenetic diversity and levels of protein expression, as examined by proteomic analysis and mass spectrometry. We observed a high level of correlation (P < 10(-4)) between genetic distance, as established by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and proteomic dissimilarities estimated by proteomic Euclidian distances. Several proteins were found to be specifically associated to T. cruzi phylogenetic subdivisions (discrete typing units). This study explores the previously uncharacterized links between infraspecific phylogenetic diversity and gene expression in a human pathogen. It opens the way to searching for new vaccine and drug targets and for identification of specific biomarkers at the subspecific level of pathogens. PMID:21059959

  1. High-Resolution Correlated Fission Product Measurements of 235U (nth , f) with SPIDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Dan; Spider Team

    2015-10-01

    The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) has obtained high-resolution, moderate-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). These data will be some of the first of their kind available to nuclear data evaluations. An overview of the SPIDER detector, analytical method, and preliminary results for 235U (nth , f) will be presented. LA-UR-15-20130 This work benefited from the use of the LANSCE accelerator facility and was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  2. Review of HBT or Bose-Einstein correlations in high energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csörgö, T.

    2006-11-01

    A brief review is given on the discovery and the first five decades of the Hanbury Brown - Twiss effect and its generalized applications in high energy nuclear and particle physics, that includes a meta-review. Interesting and inspiring new directions are also highlighted, including for example source imaging, lepton and photon interferometry, non-Gaussian shape analysis as well as many other new directions. Existing models are compared to two-particle correlation measurements and the so-called RHIC HBT puzzle is resolved. Evidence for a (directional) Hubble flow is presented and the conclusion is confirmed by a successful description of the pseudorapidity dependence of the elliptic flow as measured in Au+Au collisions by the PHOBOS Collaboration.

  3. Color enhancement of highly correlated images. I - Decorrelation and HSI contrast stretches. [hue saturation intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.; Kahle, Anne B.; Walker, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Conventional enhancements for the color display of multispectral images are based on independent contrast modifications or 'stretches' of three input images. This approach is not effective if the image channels are highly correlated or if the image histograms are strongly bimodal or more complex. Any of several procedures that tend to 'stretch' color saturation while leaving hue unchanged may better utilize the full range of colors for the display of image information. Two conceptually different enhancements are discussed: the 'decorrelation stretch', based on principal-component (PC) analysis, and the 'stretch' of 'hue' - 'saturation' - intensity (HSI) transformed data. The PC transformation in scene-dependent, but the HSI transformation is invariant. Examples of images enhanced by conventional linear stretches, decorrelation stretch, and by stretches of HSI transformed data are compared. Schematic variation diagrams or two- and three-dimensional histograms are used to illustrate the 'decorrelation stretch' method and the effect of the different enhancements.

  4. Nuclear quantum and electronic exchange-correlation effects on the high pressure phase diagram of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, Raymond; Morales, Miguel; Bonev, Stanimir

    Lithium at ambient conditions is the simplest alkali metal and exhibits textbook nearly-free electron character. However, increased core/valence electron overlap under compression leads to surprisingly complex behavior. Dense lithium is known to posses a maximum in the melting line, a metal to semiconductor phase transition around 80GPa, reemergent metallicity around 120GPa, and low coordination solid and liquid phases. In addition to its complex electronic structure at high pressure, the atomic mass of lithium is low enough that nuclear quantum effects could have a nontrivial impact on its phase diagram. Through a combination of density functional theory based path-integral and classical molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated the impact of both nuclear quantum effects and anharmonicity on the melting line and solid phase boundaries. Additionally, we have determined the robustness of previously predicted tetrahedral clustering in the dense liquid to the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects and approximate treatment of electronic exchange-correlation effects.

  5. A Correlation Study of Student Attitudes Toward Science in a Southern State High School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barco-Southall, Crystal

    The purpose of this correlational research study was to examine the attitudes toward science of students in Grades 11 and 12 and to investigate if there were differences resulting from gender, grade level, ethnicity, and the level of the curriculum received in average or advanced placement (AP) honors science. The participants of this study consisted of 50 randomly selected male and female high school students who were enrolled in AP and average science classes in an urban Southern state high school. The study used the Test of Science Related Attitudes (TOSRA) instrument to measure students' attitudes toward science in seven categories including (a) Social Implications of Science, (b) Normality of Scientists, (c) Attitude Toward Scientific Inquiry, (d) Adoption of Scientific Attitudes, (e) Enjoyment of Science Lessons, (f) Leisure Interest in Science, and (g) Career Interest in Science. The quantitative component of the study allowed the researcher to determine whether there were gender differences in attitudes toward science based on the seven subscales and measuring different aspects of science attitudes. Statistical treatment of the TOSRA survey involved the use of descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, and multiple and linear regression. Findings did not reveal significant gender differences on the total attitude scores although there were differences on several of the subscales. In addition, there were no significant differences in the mean attitude scores for grade level. However, the study did reveal differences in ethnicity and attitudes toward science. With regard to ethnicity, scores for Native Americans and Whites were higher than scores for Asians, African Americans, and Hispanics indicating that Native Americans and White students showed a more positive attitude toward science. Regarding the level of curriculum received by students who were exposed to advanced level science courses showed more positive attitudes toward science than those students

  6. Live correlative light-electron microscopy to observe molecular dynamics in high resolution.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shouhei; Iwamoto, Masaaki; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy (FM) is a powerful tool for observing specific molecular components in living cells, but its spatial resolution is relatively low. In contrast, electron microscopy (EM) provides high-resolution information about cellular structures, but it cannot provide temporal information in living cells. To achieve molecular selectivity in imaging at high resolution, a method combining EM imaging with live-cell fluorescence imaging, known as live correlative light-EM (CLEM), has been developed. In this method, living cells are first observed by FM, fixed in situ during the live observation and then subjected to EM observation. Various fluorescence techniques and tools can be applied for FM, resulting in the generation of various modified methods that are useful for understanding cellular structure in high resolution. Here, we review the methods of CLEM and live-cell imaging associated with CLEM (live CLEM). Such methods can greatly advance the understanding of the function of cellular structures on a molecular level, and thus are useful for medical fields as well as for basic biology. PMID:27385786

  7. Forward-backward multiplicity correlations caused by centrality fluctuations in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ronghua; Qian, Jing; Huo, Lei

    2016-04-01

    We consider that most of the long-range forward-backward multiplicity (FB) correlations in high energy A -A collisions are caused by the centrality fluctuation, and this phenomenon interferes with the measurement of the dynamical correlations greatly. We investigate the relationship between FB correlation strength and centrality by a Monte Carlo simulation and a derivation which are tested by A MultiPhases Transport (AMPT) model in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. We compare the FB correlation strengths of AMPT model with the results of the derivation at √{sNN} = 7.7 to 200 GeV. A comparison between the default AMPT model and string melting AMPT model with different partonic scattering sections is made. As a result, we consider that the FB correlation strengths may be dominated by the mixing of different centrality events, and the short-range correlation may be overwhelmed for the most central collisions.

  8. Robust Inference of Population Structure for Ancestry Prediction and Correction of Stratification in the Presence of Relatedness

    PubMed Central

    Conomos, Matthew P.; Miller, Mike; Thornton, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Population structure inference with genetic data has been motivated by a variety of applications in population genetics and genetic association studies. Several approaches have been proposed for the identification of genetic ancestry differences in samples where study participants are assumed to be unrelated, including principal components analysis (PCA), multi-dimensional scaling (MDS), and model-based methods for proportional ancestry estimation. Many genetic studies, however, include individuals with some degree of relatedness, and existing methods for inferring genetic ancestry fail in related samples. We present a method, PC-AiR, for robust population structure inference in the presence of known or cryptic relatedness. PC-AiR utilizes genome-screen data and an efficient algorithm to identify a diverse subset of unrelated individuals that is representative of all ancestries in the sample. The PC-AiR method directly performs PCA on the identified ancestry representative subset and then predicts components of variation for all remaining individuals based on genetic similarities. In simulation studies and in applications to real data from Phase III of the HapMap Project, we demonstrate that PC-AiR provides a substantial improvement over existing approaches for population structure inference in related samples. We also demonstrate significant efficiency gains, where a single axis of variation from PC-AiR provides better prediction of ancestry in a variety of structure settings than using ten (or more) components of variation from widely used PCA and MDS approaches. Finally, we illustrate that PC-AiR can provide improved population stratification correction over existing methods in genetic association studies with population structure and relatedness. PMID:25810074

  9. Genetic analysis of Thai cattle reveals a Southeast Asian indicine ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Wangkumhang, Pongsakorn; Wilantho, Alisa; Shaw, Philip J.; Flori, Laurence; Moazami-Goudarzi, Katayoun; Gautier, Mathieu; Duangjinda, Monchai; Assawamakin, Anunchai

    2015-01-01

    Cattle commonly raised in Thailand have characteristics of Bos indicus (zebu). We do not know when or how cattle domestication in Thailand occurred, and so questions remain regarding their origins and relationships to other breeds. We obtained genome-wide SNP genotypic data of 28 bovine individuals sampled from four regions: North (Kho-Khaolampoon), Northeast (Kho-Isaan), Central (Kho-Lan) and South (Kho-Chon) Thailand. These regional varieties have distinctive traits suggestive of breed-like genetic variations. From these data, we confirmed that all four Thai varieties are Bos indicus and that they are distinct from other indicine breeds. Among these Thai cattle, a distinctive ancestry pattern is apparent, which is the purest within Kho-Chon individuals. This ancestral component is only present outside of Thailand among other indicine breeds in Southeast Asia. From this pattern, we conclude that a unique Bos indicus ancestor originated in Southeast Asia, and native Kho-Chon Thai cattle retain the signal of this ancestry with limited admixture of other bovine ancestors. PMID:26528405

  10. Frequencies of HID-ion ampliseq ancestry panel markers among greenlanders.

    PubMed

    Espregueira Themudo, Gonçalo; Smidt Mogensen, Helle; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2016-09-01

    The HID-Ion AmpliSeq Ancestry Panel from Life Techologies includes 123 SNPs from the Seldin panel and 55 SNPs from Kidd panel in a single multiplex assay that helps to determine the continental biogeographic ancestry of individuals. We tested the panel on 104 Greenlanders, divided into a training set of 89 individuals and a test set of 15 individuals. All loci showed genotype distributions consistent with Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium tests indicated that 14 pairs of loci were in association in Greenlanders. Population assignment of the training set to populations included in the HID SNP genotyper plugin placed most individuals in American, Asian, and in a few cases European populations. By including the genotype frequencies of this training set as a possible population of origin, all 15 individuals from the test set were correctly predicted to be Greenlanders using the Seldin SNPs, and nine were classified as Greenlanders using the Kidd SNPs. Population structure analysis indicated that Greenlanders have a genetic profile that is distinguishable from those of populations from America or Asia. PMID:27326551

  11. Ancestry of the Iban Is Predominantly Southeast Asian: Genetic Evidence from Autosomal, Mitochondrial, and Y Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, Tatum S.; Xing, Jinchuan; Jerah, Edward; Loa, Peter; Zhang, Yuhua; Watkins, W. Scott; Witherspoon, David J.; Huff, Chad D.; Woodward, Scott; Mowry, Bryan; Jorde, Lynn B.

    2011-01-01

    Humans reached present-day Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) in one of the first major human migrations out of Africa. Population movements in the millennia following this initial settlement are thought to have greatly influenced the genetic makeup of current inhabitants, yet the extent attributed to different events is not clear. Recent studies suggest that south-to-north gene flow largely influenced present-day patterns of genetic variation in Southeast Asian populations and that late Pleistocene and early Holocene migrations from Southeast Asia are responsible for a substantial proportion of ISEA ancestry. Archaeological and linguistic evidence suggests that the ancestors of present-day inhabitants came mainly from north-to-south migrations from Taiwan and throughout ISEA approximately 4,000 years ago. We report a large-scale genetic analysis of human variation in the Iban population from the Malaysian state of Sarawak in northwestern Borneo, located in the center of ISEA. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers analyzed here suggest that the Iban exhibit greatest genetic similarity to Indonesian and mainland Southeast Asian populations. The most common non-recombining Y (NRY) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA haplogroups present in the Iban are associated with populations of Southeast Asia. We conclude that migrations from Southeast Asia made a large contribution to Iban ancestry, although evidence of potential gene flow from Taiwan is also seen in uniparentally inherited marker data. PMID:21305013

  12. Ancestry of the Iban is predominantly Southeast Asian: genetic evidence from autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Tatum S; Xing, Jinchuan; Barrett, Robert; Jerah, Edward; Loa, Peter; Zhang, Yuhua; Watkins, W Scott; Witherspoon, David J; Huff, Chad D; Woodward, Scott; Mowry, Bryan; Jorde, Lynn B

    2011-01-01

    Humans reached present-day Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) in one of the first major human migrations out of Africa. Population movements in the millennia following this initial settlement are thought to have greatly influenced the genetic makeup of current inhabitants, yet the extent attributed to different events is not clear. Recent studies suggest that south-to-north gene flow largely influenced present-day patterns of genetic variation in Southeast Asian populations and that late Pleistocene and early Holocene migrations from Southeast Asia are responsible for a substantial proportion of ISEA ancestry. Archaeological and linguistic evidence suggests that the ancestors of present-day inhabitants came mainly from north-to-south migrations from Taiwan and throughout ISEA approximately 4,000 years ago. We report a large-scale genetic analysis of human variation in the Iban population from the Malaysian state of Sarawak in northwestern Borneo, located in the center of ISEA. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers analyzed here suggest that the Iban exhibit greatest genetic similarity to Indonesian and mainland Southeast Asian populations. The most common non-recombining Y (NRY) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA haplogroups present in the Iban are associated with populations of Southeast Asia. We conclude that migrations from Southeast Asia made a large contribution to Iban ancestry, although evidence of potential gene flow from Taiwan is also seen in uniparentally inherited marker data. PMID:21305013

  13. Evolutionary ancestry and novel functions of the mammalian glucose transporter (GLUT) family

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In general, sugar porters function by proton-coupled symport or facilitative transport modes. Symporters, coupled to electrochemical energy, transport nutrients against a substrate gradient. Facilitative carriers transport sugars along a concentration gradient, thus transport is dependent upon extracellular nutrient levels. Across bacteria, fungi, unicellular non-vertebrates and plants, proton-coupled hexose symport is a crucial process supplying energy under conditions of nutrient flux. In mammals it has been assumed that evolution of whole body regulatory mechanisms would eliminate this need. To determine whether any isoforms bearing this function might be conserved in mammals, we investigated the relationship between the transporters of animals and the proton-coupled hexose symporters found in other species. Results We took a comparative genomic approach and have performed the first comprehensive and statistically supported phylogenetic analysis of all mammalian glucose transporter (GLUT) isoforms. Our data reveals the mammalian GLUT proteins segregate into five distinct classes. This evolutionary ancestry gives insight to structure, function and transport mechanisms within the groups. Combined with biological assays, we present novel evidence that, in response to changing nutrient availability and environmental pH, proton-coupled, active glucose symport function is maintained in mammalian cells. Conclusions The analyses show the ancestry, evolutionary conservation and biological importance of the GLUT classes. These findings significantly extend our understanding of the evolution of mammalian glucose transport systems. They also reveal that mammals may have conserved an adaptive response to nutrient demand that would have important physiological implications to cell survival and growth. PMID:20487568

  14. Effects of Sample Selection Bias on the Accuracy of Population Structure and Ancestry Inference

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Suyash; Xing, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    Population stratification is an important task in genetic analyses. It provides information about the ancestry of individuals and can be an important confounder in genome-wide association studies. Public genotyping projects have made a large number of datasets available for study. However, practical constraints dictate that of a geographical/ethnic population, only a small number of individuals are genotyped. The resulting data are a sample from the entire population. If the distribution of sample sizes is not representative of the populations being sampled, the accuracy of population stratification analyses of the data could be affected. We attempt to understand the effect of biased sampling on the accuracy of population structure analysis and individual ancestry recovery. We examined two commonly used methods for analyses of such datasets, ADMIXTURE and EIGENSOFT, and found that the accuracy of recovery of population structure is affected to a large extent by the sample used for analysis and how representative it is of the underlying populations. Using simulated data and real genotype data from cattle, we show that sample selection bias can affect the results of population structure analyses. We develop a mathematical framework for sample selection bias in models for population structure and also proposed a correction for sample selection bias using auxiliary information about the sample. We demonstrate that such a correction is effective in practice using simulated and real data. PMID:24637351

  15. Stable Patterns of Gene Expression Regulating Carbohydrate Metabolism Determined by Geographic Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Charles, Peter C.; Parker, Joel S.; Hilliard, Eleanor G.; Mapara, Sabeen; Meredith, Dane; Lineberger, Robert E.; Wu, Samuel S.; Alder, Brian D.; Stouffer, George A.; Patterson, Cam

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals of African descent in the United States suffer disproportionately from diseases with a metabolic etiology (obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes), and from the pathological consequences of these disorders (hypertension and cardiovascular disease). Methodology/Principal Findings Using a combination of genetic/genomic and bioinformatics approaches, we identified a large number of genes that were both differentially expressed between American subjects self-identified to be of either African or European ancestry and that also contained single nucleotide polymorphisms that distinguish distantly related ancestral populations. Several of these genes control the metabolism of simple carbohydrates and are direct targets for the SREBP1, a metabolic transcription factor also differentially expressed between our study populations. Conclusions/Significance These data support the concept of stable patterns of gene transcription unique to a geographic ancestral lineage. Differences in expression of several carbohydrate metabolism genes suggest both genetic and transcriptional mechanisms contribute to these patterns and may play a role in exacerbating the disproportionate levels of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease observed in Americans with African ancestry. PMID:20016837

  16. Common Ancestry Is a Poor Predictor of Competitive Traits in Freshwater Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Narwani, Anita; Alexandrou, Markos A; Herrin, James; Vouaux, Alaina; Zhou, Charles; Oakley, Todd H; Cardinale, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton species traits have been used to successfully predict the outcome of competition, but these traits are notoriously laborious to measure. If these traits display a phylogenetic signal, phylogenetic distance (PD) can be used as a proxy for trait variation. We provide the first investigation of the degree of phylogenetic signal in traits related to competition in freshwater green phytoplankton. We measured 17 traits related to competition and tested whether they displayed a phylogenetic signal across a molecular phylogeny of 59 species of green algae. We also assessed the fit of five models of trait evolution to trait variation across the phylogeny. There was no significant phylogenetic signal for 13 out of 17 ecological traits. For 7 traits, a non-phylogenetic model provided the best fit. For another 7 traits, a phylogenetic model was selected, but parameter values indicated that trait variation evolved recently, diminishing the importance of common ancestry. This study suggests that traits related to competition in freshwater green algae are not generally well-predicted by patterns of common ancestry. We discuss the mechanisms by which the link between phylogenetic distance and phenotypic differentiation may be broken. PMID:26348482

  17. Reconstructing Past Admixture Processes from Local Genomic Ancestry Using Wavelet Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Jean; Sudoyo, Herawati; Karafet, Tatiana M.; Hammer, Michael F.; Cox, Murray P.

    2015-01-01

    Admixture between long-separated populations is a defining feature of the genomes of many species. The mosaic block structure of admixed genomes can provide information about past contact events, including the time and extent of admixture. Here, we describe an improved wavelet-based technique that better characterizes ancestry block structure from observed genomic patterns. principal components analysis is first applied to genomic data to identify the primary population structure, followed by wavelet decomposition to develop a new characterization of local ancestry information along the chromosomes. For testing purposes, this method is applied to human genome-wide genotype data from Indonesia, as well as virtual genetic data generated using genome-scale sequential coalescent simulations under a wide range of admixture scenarios. Time of admixture is inferred using an approximate Bayesian computation framework, providing robust estimates of both admixture times and their associated levels of uncertainty. Crucially, we demonstrate that this revised wavelet approach, which we have released as the R package adwave, provides improved statistical power over existing wavelet-based techniques and can be used to address a broad range of admixture questions. PMID:25852078

  18. Reconstructing Past Admixture Processes from Local Genomic Ancestry Using Wavelet Transformation.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Jean; Sudoyo, Herawati; Karafet, Tatiana M; Hammer, Michael F; Cox, Murray P

    2015-06-01

    Admixture between long-separated populations is a defining feature of the genomes of many species. The mosaic block structure of admixed genomes can provide information about past contact events, including the time and extent of admixture. Here, we describe an improved wavelet-based technique that better characterizes ancestry block structure from observed genomic patterns. principal components analysis is first applied to genomic data to identify the primary population structure, followed by wavelet decomposition to develop a new characterization of local ancestry information along the chromosomes. For testing purposes, this method is applied to human genome-wide genotype data from Indonesia, as well as virtual genetic data generated using genome-scale sequential coalescent simulations under a wide range of admixture scenarios. Time of admixture is inferred using an approximate Bayesian computation framework, providing robust estimates of both admixture times and their associated levels of uncertainty. Crucially, we demonstrate that this revised wavelet approach, which we have released as the R package adwave, provides improved statistical power over existing wavelet-based techniques and can be used to address a broad range of admixture questions. PMID:25852078

  19. Common Ancestry Is a Poor Predictor of Competitive Traits in Freshwater Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Narwani, Anita; Alexandrou, Markos A.; Herrin, James; Vouaux, Alaina; Zhou, Charles; Oakley, Todd H.; Cardinale, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton species traits have been used to successfully predict the outcome of competition, but these traits are notoriously laborious to measure. If these traits display a phylogenetic signal, phylogenetic distance (PD) can be used as a proxy for trait variation. We provide the first investigation of the degree of phylogenetic signal in traits related to competition in freshwater green phytoplankton. We measured 17 traits related to competition and tested whether they displayed a phylogenetic signal across a molecular phylogeny of 59 species of green algae. We also assessed the fit of five models of trait evolution to trait variation across the phylogeny. There was no significant phylogenetic signal for 13 out of 17 ecological traits. For 7 traits, a non-phylogenetic model provided the best fit. For another 7 traits, a phylogenetic model was selected, but parameter values indicated that trait variation evolved recently, diminishing the importance of common ancestry. This study suggests that traits related to competition in freshwater green algae are not generally well-predicted by patterns of common ancestry. We discuss the mechanisms by which the link between phylogenetic distance and phenotypic differentiation may be broken. PMID:26348482

  20. Association between Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, Ancestry and Aggressive Prostate Cancer among African Americans and European Americans in PCaP

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Susan E.; Arab, Lenore; Zhang, Hongmei; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Johnson, Candace S.; Mohler, James L.; Smith, Gary J.; Su, Joseph L.; Trump, Donald L.; Woloszynska-Read, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background African Americans (AAs) have lower circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] concentrations and higher prostate cancer (CaP) aggressiveness than other racial/ethnic groups. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between plasma 25(OH)D3, African ancestry and CaP aggressiveness among AAs and European Americans (EAs). Methods Plasma 25(OH)D3 was measured using LC-MS/MS (Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry) in 537 AA and 663 EA newly-diagnosed CaP patients from the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP) classified as having either ‘high’ or ‘low’ aggressive disease based on clinical stage, Gleason grade and prostate specific antigen at diagnosis. Mean plasma 25(OH)D3 concentrations were compared by proportion of African ancestry. Logistic regression was used to calculate multivariable adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for high aggressive CaP by tertile of plasma 25(OH)D3. Results AAs with highest percent African ancestry (>95%) had the lowest mean plasma 25(OH)D3 concentrations. Overall, plasma 25(OH)D3 was associated positively with aggressiveness among AA men, an association that was modified by calcium intake (ORT3vs.T1: 2.23, 95%CI: 1.26–3.95 among men with low calcium intake, and ORT3vs.T1: 0.19, 95%CI: 0.05–0.70 among men with high calcium intake). Among EAs, the point estimates of the ORs were <1.0 for the upper tertiles with CIs that included the null. Conclusions Among AAs, plasma 25(OH)D3 was associated positively with CaP aggressiveness among men with low calcium intake and inversely among men with high calcium intake. The clinical significance of circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D3 and interactions with calcium intake in the AA population warrants further study. PMID:25919866