Science.gov

Sample records for anchoring dendritic tips

  1. DEX-1 and DYF-7 establish sensory dendrite length by anchoring dendritic tips during cell migration.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Maxwell G; Shaham, Shai

    2009-04-17

    Cells are devices whose structures delimit function. For example, in the nervous system, neuronal and glial shapes dictate paths of information flow. To understand how cells acquire their shapes, we examined the formation of a sense organ in C. elegans. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that sensory dendrites form by stationary anchoring of dendritic tips during cell-body migration. A genetic screen identified DEX-1 and DYF-7, extracellular proteins required for dendritic tip anchoring, which act cooperatively at the time and place of anchoring. DEX-1 and DYF-7 contain, respectively, zonadhesin and zona pellucida domains, and DYF-7 self-associates into multimers important for anchoring. Thus, unlike other dendrites, amphid dendritic tips are positioned by DEX-1 and DYF-7 without the need for long-range guidance cues. In sequence and function, DEX-1 and DYF-7 resemble tectorins, which anchor stereocilia in the inner ear, suggesting that a sensory dendrite anchor may have evolved into part of a mechanosensor. PMID:19344940

  2. Evidence for tip velocity oscillations in dendritic solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, J. C.; Koss, M. B.; Frei, J. E.; Giummarra, C.; Lupulescu, A. O.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic growth experiments were conducted in the reduced-convection environment aboard the space shuttle Columbia on STS-87. Spectral analysis was performed on 30-frame/s video data during growths of isothermal dendrites. Results indicate that pivalic acid dendrites exhibit a subtle oscillatory behavior of the axial growth velocity near the tip, with a frequency component that is associated with the sidebranch formation process.

  3. Evidence for tip velocity oscillations in dendritic solidification.

    PubMed

    LaCombe, J C; Koss, M B; Frei, J E; Giummarra, C; Lupulescu, A O; Glicksman, M E

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic growth experiments were conducted in the reduced-convection environment aboard the space shuttle Columbia on STS-87. Spectral analysis was performed on 30-frame/s video data during growths of isothermal dendrites. Results indicate that pivalic acid dendrites exhibit a subtle oscillatory behavior of the axial growth velocity near the tip, with a frequency component that is associated with the sidebranch formation process. PMID:11909070

  4. Fundamentals of dendritic solidification. I - Steady-state tip growth. II - Development of sidebranch structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.-C.; Glicksman, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    Systematic measurements of dendrite tip radius and growth velocity in succinonitrile reveal that consideration of dendrite tip stability should be incorporated into the heat transfer theory to determine the steady-state dendritic growth condition. The dendritic stability criterion measured is 2 alpha d0/VR squared = 0.0195, where V is the dendritic growth velocity, R is the dendritic tip radius, alpha is the liquid thermal diffusivity, and d0 is a capillary length defined in the text. Several dendritic stability models are reviewed and discussed in comparison to the present experimental results.

  5. The Role of Anchor-Tipped Larval Hairs in the Organization of Ant Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Penick, Clint A.; Copple, R. Neale; Mendez, Raymond A.; Smith, Adrian A.

    2012-01-01

    The spatial organization within a social insect colony is a key component of colony life. It influences individual interaction rates, resource distribution, and division of labor within the nest. Yet studies of social insect behavior are most often carried out in artificial constructions, which may change worker behavior and colony organization. We observed how workers of the ant Pheidole rhea organized brood in nests with deep chambers and textured walls that were designed to mimic their natural constructions more closely. Instead of clumping larvae into piles on the chamber floor, workers suspended fourth-instar larvae from the vertical walls and ceiling of each chamber while young larvae and pupae were clumped at the base. Fourth-instar larvae possess five rows of anchor-tipped hairs on their dorsal side, and we predicted that these hairs functioned to attach larvae to the nest walls. We gave larvae “haircuts,” where only the anchor-tipped hairs were removed, and then tested their ability to adhere to a textured surface raised to an angle of 90° and then 120° with respect to the horizontal plane. Larvae whose hairs had been clipped came unattached in almost all trials, while larvae whose hairs remained intact stayed attached. This confirmed that anchor-tipped hairs functioned to attach larvae to the walls of the nest. The presence of anchor-tipped hairs is widespread and has been documented in at least 22 genera from the ant subfamily Myrmicinae, including species that occur in a variety of environments and represent a broad range of nesting habits. Based on our results, it is likely that many species exhibit this larval hanging behavior, and this could impact colony characteristics such as spatial organization and the care of developing larvae by nurse workers. PMID:22848539

  6. Dendrite tip growth velocities of settling NH{sub 4}Cl equiaxed crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ramani, A.; Beckermann, C.

    1997-03-15

    Dendritic growth is of great practical importance in solidification of metallic materials. The growth and morphology of dendritic crystals influence the grain structure, microstructure, micro- and macro-segregation, porosity and other defects and properties of cast products. This article reports on experimental free dendrite tip growth velocity data obtained for equiaxed NH{sub 4}Cl crystals settling in an infinite, quiescent, supercooled NH{sub 4}Cl-H{sub 2}O solution. The relative velocity between the crystal and the solution, or U{sub {infinity}}, is equal to the settling speed and is controlled by the density difference between the solid and liquid phases and the drag of the crystal. Preliminary comparisons are made with an available analytical solution for dendrite tip growth in the presence of convection.

  7. Thermal and solutal conditions at the tips of a directional dendritic growth front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. D.; Mccay, Mary H.; Hopkins, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The line-of-sight averaged, time-dependent dendrite tip concentrations for the diffusion dominated vertical directional solidification of a metal model (ammonium chloride and water) were obtained by extrapolating exponentially fit diffusion layer profiles measured using a laser interferometer. The tip concentrations were shown to increase linearly with time throughout the diffusion dominated growth process for an initially stagnant dendritic array. The process was terminated for the cases chosen by convective breakdown suffered when the conditionally stable diffusion layer exceeded the critical Rayleigh criteria. The transient tip concentrations were determined to significantly exceed the values predicted for steady state, thus producing much larger constitutional undercoolings. This has ramifications for growth speeds, arm spacings and the dendritic structure itself.

  8. Effects of Applied Electric Current on the Tip Radius and the Universal Amplitude Coefficient of a Single Growing Dendrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasresfahani, Mohammad Reza; Niroumand, Behzad; Kermanpur, Ahmad; Raeissi, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Modification of solidification structures by applying electric current has been the subject of interest in recent years. However, the exact relationships between the dendrite growth parameters and the current density are not yet clear. The dendrite tip geometry is an important growth parameter which can be characterized using the dendrite tip radius and the universal amplitude coefficient. In this paper, the dendrite tip shape was investigated in the absence and presence of an electric field using a transparent model material, i.e. the succinonitrile-acetone alloy. The results showed that both dendrite tip radius and universal amplitude coefficient increased by increasing the applied current density. The increase in the tip radius was attributed to the Joule heat produced at the solid-liquid interface which reduced the interface undercooling. The increase in the universal amplitude coefficient was postulated to be due to the changes in the distribution coefficient of the alloy system which would result in higher solute concentration in front of the solid-liquid interface. Owing to the increased universal amplitude coefficient, more prominent dendritic fins were observed at dendrites tips under electric current.

  9. Time Dependence of Tip Morphology during Cellular/Dendritic Arrayed Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, H.; Tewari, S. N.

    1996-01-01

    Succinonitrile-1.9 wt pct acetone has been directionally solidified in 0.7 X 0.7-cm-square cross section pyrex ampoules in order to observe the cell/dendrite tip morphologies, not influenced by the 'wall effects', which are present during growth in the generally used thin (about 200 gm) crucibles. The tips do not maintain a steady-state shape, as is generally assumed. Instead, they fluctuate within a shape envelope. The extent of fluctuation increases with decreasing growth speed, as the micro structure changes from the dendritic to cellular. The influence of natural convection has been examined by comparing these morphologies with those grown, without convection, in the thin ampoules.

  10. Tip cells act as dynamic cellular anchors in the morphogenesis of looped renal tubules in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Weavers, Helen; Skaer, Helen

    2013-11-11

    Tissue morphogenesis involves both the sculpting of tissue shape and the positioning of tissues relative to one another in the body. Using the renal tubules of Drosophila, we show that a specific distal tubule cell regulates both tissue architecture and position in the body cavity. Focusing on the anterior tubules, we demonstrate that tip cells make transient contacts with alary muscles at abdominal segment boundaries, moving progressively forward as convergent extension movements lengthen the tubule. Tip cell anchorage antagonizes forward-directed, TGF-β-guided tubule elongation, thereby ensuring the looped morphology characteristic of renal tubules from worms to humans. Distinctive tip cell exploratory behavior, adhesion, and basement membrane clearing underlie target recognition and dynamic interactions. Defects in these features obliterate tip cell anchorage, producing misshapen and misplaced tubules with impaired physiological function. PMID:24229645

  11. The chromatin remodeling factor Bap55 functions through the TIP60 complex to regulate olfactory projection neuron dendrite targeting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Drosophila olfactory system exhibits very precise and stereotyped wiring that is specified predominantly by genetic programming. Dendrites of olfactory projection neurons (PNs) pattern the developing antennal lobe before olfactory receptor neuron axon arrival, indicating an intrinsic wiring mechanism for PN dendrites. These wiring decisions are likely determined through a transcriptional program. Results We find that loss of Brahma associated protein 55 kD (Bap55) results in a highly specific PN mistargeting phenotype. In Bap55 mutants, PNs that normally target to the DL1 glomerulus mistarget to the DA4l glomerulus with 100% penetrance. Loss of Bap55 also causes derepression of a GAL4 whose expression is normally restricted to a small subset of PNs. Bap55 is a member of both the Brahma (BRM) and the Tat interactive protein 60 kD (TIP60) ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes. The Bap55 mutant phenotype is partially recapitulated by Domino and Enhancer of Polycomb mutants, members of the TIP60 complex. However, distinct phenotypes are seen in Brahma and Snf5-related 1 mutants, members of the BRM complex. The Bap55 mutant phenotype can be rescued by postmitotic expression of Bap55, or its human homologs BAF53a and BAF53b. Conclusions Our results suggest that Bap55 functions through the TIP60 chromatin remodeling complex to regulate dendrite wiring specificity in PNs. The specificity of the mutant phenotypes suggests a position for the TIP60 complex at the top of a regulatory hierarchy that orchestrates dendrite targeting decisions. PMID:21284845

  12. Localization of Cacna1s to ON Bipolar Dendritic Tips Requires mGluR6-Related Cascade Elements

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Shanti R.; Neinstein, Adam; Fina, Marie E.; Dhingra, Anuradha; Vardi, Noga

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. L-type voltage gated calcium channels in retina localize primarily at the presynaptic active zones of photoreceptors and bipolar cells where they modulate glutamate release. However, the pore forming subunit Cacna1s of certain L-type channels is also expressed postsynaptically at the tips of ON bipolar cell dendrites where it colocalizes with mGluR6, but has an unknown function. At these dendritic tips, the components of the mGluR6 signaling cascade cluster together in a macromolecular complex, and each one's localization often depends on that of the others. Thus, we explored if Cacna1s is part of the mGluR6 complex. Methods. We determined Cacna1s expression by PCR using an ON bipolar library, by Western blotting, and by standard immunohistochemistry. Results. The PCR amplification confirmed expression of the transcript in ON bipolar cells, and Western blotting showed the expected bands. Immunostaining for Cacna1s was stronger in the dendritic tips of rod bipolar cells than in those of ON cone bipolar cells. This staining severely decreased in mice missing various mGluR6 cascade elements (Grm6−/−, Gnao1−/−, Gnb3−/−, Gng13−/−, and Trpm1−/−). During development, the ratio of the number of Cacna1s puncta to the number of presynaptic ribbons followed a sigmoidal pattern, rising rapidly from P13 to P17. The mGluR6 expression preceded that of Cacna1s and RGS11. Conclusions. Our results show that the localization and stability of Cacna1s depend on the expression of mGluR6 and its cascade components, and they suggest that Cacna1s is part of the mGluR6 complex. We hypothesize that Cacna1s contributes to light adaptation by permeating calcium. PMID:24519419

  13. LRIT3 is essential to localize TRPM1 to the dendritic tips of depolarizing bipolar cells and may play a role in cone synapse formation

    PubMed Central

    Neuillé, Marion; Morgans, Catherine W.; Cao, Yan; Orhan, Elise; Michiels, Christelle; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Duvoisin, Robert M.; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Zeitz, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in LRIT3 lead to complete congenital stationary night blindness (cCSNB). The exact role of LRIT3 in ON-bipolar cell signaling cascade remains to be elucidated. Recently, we have characterized a novel mouse model lacking Lrit3 (no b-wave 6, (Lrit3nob6/nob6)), which displays similar abnormalities as patients with cCSNB with LRIT3 mutations. Here we compare the localization of components of the ON-bipolar cell signaling cascade in wild-type and Lrit3nob6/nob6 retinal sections by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. An anti-LRIT3 antibody was generated. Immunofluorescent staining of LRIT3 in wild-type mice revealed a specific punctate labeling in the outer plexiform layer (OPL), which was absent in Lrit3nob6/nob6 mice. LRIT3 did not colocalize with ribeye or calbindin but colocalized with mGluR6. TRPM1 staining was severely decreased at the dendritic tips of all depolarizing bipolar cells in Lrit3nob6/nob6 mice. mGluR6, GPR179, RGS7, RGS11 and Gβ5 immunofluorescence was absent at the dendritic tips of cone ON-bipolar cells in Lrit3nob6/nob6 mice, while it was present at the dendritic tips of rod bipolar cells. Furthermore, PNA labeling was severely reduced in the OPL in Lrit3nob6/nob6 mice. This study confirmed the localization of LRIT3 at the dendritic tips of depolarizing bipolar cells in mouse retina and demonstrated the dependence of TRPM1 localization on the presence of LRIT3. Since tested components of the ON-bipolar cell signaling cascade and PNA revealed disrupted localization, an additional function of LRIT3 in cone synapse formation is suggested. These results point to a possibly different regulation of the mGluR6 signaling cascade between rod and cone ON-bipolar cells. PMID:25997951

  14. LRIT3 is essential to localize TRPM1 to the dendritic tips of depolarizing bipolar cells and may play a role in cone synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Neuillé, Marion; Morgans, Catherine W; Cao, Yan; Orhan, Elise; Michiels, Christelle; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Duvoisin, Robert M; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Zeitz, Christina

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in LRIT3 lead to complete congenital stationary night blindness (cCSNB). The exact role of LRIT3 in ON-bipolar cell signaling cascade remains to be elucidated. Recently, we have characterized a novel mouse model lacking Lrit3 [no b-wave 6, (Lrit3(nob6/nob6) )], which displays similar abnormalities to patients with cCSNB with LRIT3 mutations. Here we compare the localization of components of the ON-bipolar cell signaling cascade in wild-type and Lrit3(nob6/nob6) retinal sections by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. An anti-LRIT3 antibody was generated. Immunofluorescent staining of LRIT3 in wild-type mice revealed a specific punctate labeling in the outer plexiform layer (OPL), which was absent in Lrit3(nob6/nob6) mice. LRIT3 did not co-localize with ribeye or calbindin but co-localized with mGluR6. TRPM1 staining was severely decreased at the dendritic tips of all depolarizing bipolar cells in Lrit3(nob6/nob6) mice. mGluR6, GPR179, RGS7, RGS11 and Gβ5 immunofluorescence was absent at the dendritic tips of cone ON-bipolar cells in Lrit3(nob6/nob6) mice, while it was present at the dendritic tips of rod bipolar cells. Furthermore, peanut agglutinin (PNA) labeling was severely reduced in the OPL in Lrit3(nob6/nob6) mice. This study confirmed the localization of LRIT3 at the dendritic tips of depolarizing bipolar cells in mouse retina and demonstrated the dependence of TRPM1 localization on the presence of LRIT3. As tested components of the ON-bipolar cell signaling cascade and PNA revealed disrupted localization, an additional function of LRIT3 in cone synapse formation is suggested. These results point to a possibly different regulation of the mGluR6 signaling cascade between rod and cone ON-bipolar cells. PMID:25997951

  15. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - PVA Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  16. Free dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dendritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical 'dendrite problem'. Great strides have been taken in recent years in both the theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status. The development of this field will be sketched, showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) were sufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of 'maximum velocity' was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip. The overall development of cast microstructures, such as equiaxed zone formation, rapidly solidified microstructures, etc., also seems to contain additional non-deterministic features which lie outside the current theories discussed here.

  17. Transport Processes in Dendritic Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dentritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical dendrite problem. The development of theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status is sketched showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) are insufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of maximum velocity was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to be able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip.

  18. Dendrite engineering on xenon crystals.

    PubMed

    Fell, Marco; Bilgram, Jörg

    2007-06-01

    The experimental work presented focuses on transient growth, morphological transitions, and control of xenon dendrites. Dendritic free growth is perturbed by two different mechanisms: Shaking and heating up to the melting temperature. Spontaneous and metastable multitip configurations are stabilized, coarsening is reduced, leading to a denser sidebranch growth, and a periodic tip splitting is found during perturbation by shaking. On the other hand, heating leads to controlled sidebranching and characteristic transitions of the tip shape. A deterministic behavior is found besides the random-noise-driven growth. The existence of a limit cycle is supported by the findings. Together the two perturbation mechanisms allow a "dendrite engineering"--i.e., a reproducible controlling of the crystal shape during its growth. The tip splitting for dendritic free growth is found not to be a splitting of the tip in two; rather, the respective growth velocities of the main tip and the fins change. The latter then surpass the main tip and develop into new tips. The occurrence of three- and four-tip configurations is explained with this mechanism. Finite-element calculations of the heat flow and the convective flow in the growth vessel show that the idea of a single axisymmetric toroidal convection roll across the whole growth vessel has to be dropped. The main effect of convection under Earth's gravity is the compression of the diffusive temperature field around the downward-growing tip. A model to explain the symmetry of dendritic crystals--e.g., snow crystals--is developed, based on the interaction of crystal shape and heat flow in the crystal. PMID:17677269

  19. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  20. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - SCN Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to the crystals that form inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dentrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provid a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. These shadowgraphic images show succinonitrile (SCN) dentrites growing in a melt (liquid). The space-grown crystals also have cleaner, better defined sidebranches. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institude (RPI) and NASA/ Glenn Research Center(GRC). Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo gredit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  1. Dendrite characteristics in directionally solidified Pb-8 pct Au and Pb-3 pct Pd alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    The dendritic microstructure and solute compression profiles for Pb-8 pct Au and Pb-3 pct Pd alloy samples are examined. Two groups of models, the minimum undercooled dendrite tip model of Burden and Hunt (1974) and Laxmanan (1974, 1984) and marginal stability at the dendrite tip models of Trivedi (1980) and Laxmanan (1974) are used to predict growth behavior of the alloy samples. The experimentally observed dendrite tip radius, primary arm spacing, and liquid composition at the dendrite tip are compared with theoretical predictions. It is observed that the modified minimum undercooling dendrite tip model and both of the marginal stability models accurately predict dendritic behavior. It is concluded that quantitative comparison of the primary arm spacing measurements can not form the basis for distinguishing among the various dendrite growth models in a positive temperature gradient.

  2. Ultrasonic/Sonic Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    The ultrasonic/sonic anchor (U/S anchor) is an anchoring device that drills a hole for itself in rock, concrete, or other similar material. The U/S anchor is a recent addition to a series of related devices, the first of which were reported in "Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors"

  3. Microgravity Drill and Anchor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew A.; King, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    microspine toes that independently find holes and ledges on a rock to create an anchor. Once the system is anchored, a linear translation mechanism moves the drill axially into the surface while maintaining the proper WOB. The linear translation mechanism is composed of a ball screw and stepper motor that can translate a carriage with high precision and applied load. The carriage slides along rails using self-aligning linear bearings that correct any axial misalignment caused by bending and torsion. The carriage then compresses a series of springs that simultaneously transmit the load to the drill along the bit axis and act as a suspension that compensates for the vibration caused by percussive drilling. The drill is a compacted, modified version of an off-the-shelf rotary percussive drill, which uses a custom carbide-tipped coring bit. By using rotary percussive drilling, the drill time is greatly reduced. The percussive action fractures the rock debris, which is removed during rotation. The final result is a 0.75-in. (.1.9- cm) diameter hole and a preserved 0.5- in. (.1.3-cm) diameter rock core. This work extends microspine technology, making it applicable to astronaut missions to asteroids and a host of robotic sampling concepts. At the time of this reporting, it is the first instrument to be demonstrated using microspine anchors, and is the first self-contained drill/anchor system to be demonstrated that is capable of drilling in inverted configurations and would be capable of drilling in microgravity.

  4. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator, such as porous polypropylene, adjacent to the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator, such as polytetrafluoroethylene, that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  5. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator such as porous polypropylene adjacent the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator such as polytetrafluoroethylene that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  6. Progress in Modeling Nonlinear Dendritic Evolution in Two and Three Dimensions, and Its Mathematical Justification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, S.; Foster, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    We report progress in three areas of investigation related to dendritic crystal growth. Those items include: 1. Selection of tip features dendritic crystal growth; 2) Investigation of nonlinear evolution for two-sided model; and 3) Rigorous mathematical justification.

  7. Evidence for Eigenfrequencies in Dendritic Growth Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Jeffrey C.; Koss, Matthew B.; Giummarra, Cindie; Frei, Julie E.; Lupulescu, Afina O.; Glicksman, Martin E.

    Microgravity dendritic growth experiments, conducted aboard the space shuttle Columbia, are described. In-situ video images reveal that pivalic acid dendrites growing in the diffusion-controlled environment of low-earth orbit exhibit a range of transient or non-steady-state behaviors. The observed transient features of the growth process are being studied with the objective of understanding the mechanisms responsible for these behaviors. Included in these observations is possible evidence for characteristic frequencies or limit cycles in the growth behavior near the tip of the dendrites. These data, and their interpretations, will be discussed.

  8. Anchors for Education Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alok, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Education reforms, considering their significance, deserve better methods than mere "trial and error." This article conceptualizes a network of six anchors for education reforms: education policy, education system, curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, and teacher education. It establishes the futility to reform anchors in isolation and anticipates…

  9. Dendrite inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for removing dendrites or other crystalline matter from the surface of a liquid in a matter transport process, and an electrolytic cell including such an apparatus. A notch may be provided to allow continuous exposure of the liquid surface, and a bore may be further provided to permit access to the liquid.

  10. Dendrite inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.E.

    1988-06-07

    An apparatus for removing dendrites or other crystalline matter from the surface of a liquid in a matter transport process, and an electrolytic cell including such an apparatus. A notch may be provided to allow continuous exposure of the liquid surface, and a bore may be further provided to permit access to the liquid. 2 figs.

  11. Technology Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Some inexpensive or free ways that enable to capture and use images in work are mentioned. The first tip demonstrates the methods of using some of the built-in capabilities of the Macintosh and Windows-based PC operating systems, and the second tip describes methods to capture and create images using SnagIt.

  12. Anchor Trial Launch

    Cancer.gov

    NCI has launched a multicenter phase III clinical trial called the ANCHOR Study -- Anal Cancer HSIL (High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Outcomes Research Study -- to determine if treatment of HSIL in HIV-infected individuals can prevent anal canc

  13. Dendrite Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Donald Gilles, the Discipline Scientist for Materials Science in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Applications Department, demonstrates to Carl Dohrman a model of dendrites, the branch-like structures found in many metals and alloys. Dohrman was recently selected by the American Society for Metals International as their 1999 ASM International Foundation National Merit Scholar. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign freshman recently toured NASA's materials science facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  14. Structural and Morphological Evolution of Lead Dendrites during Electrochemical Migration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Minghua; Liao, Hong-Gang; Niu, Kaiyang; Zheng, Haimei

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical deposition and dissolution of lead on gold electrodes immersed in an aqueous solution of lead nitrate were studied in situ using a biasing liquid cell by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We investigate in real time the growth mechanisms of lead dendrites as deposited on the electrodes under an applied potential. TEM images reveal that lead dendrites are developed by the fast protrusion of lead branches in the electrolyte and tip splitting. And, the fast growing tip of the dendritic branch is composed of polycrystalline nanograins and it develops into a single crystalline branch eventually. This study demonstrated unique electrochemical growth of single crystal dendrites through nucleation, aggregation, alignment and attachment of randomly oriented small grains. Additionally, we found the lead concentration in the electrolyte drastically influences the morphology of dendritic formation. PMID:24233151

  15. Dendritic Growth in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua; Garg, Shila

    2000-03-01

    The experimental study of the onset of electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) through a dendritic growth is reported. If a magnetic Freedericksz-distorted liquid crystal of negative dielectric anisotropy is subjected to an electric field parallel to the magnetic field, EHC sets in through the nucleation of dendrites [1,2]. Measurements of tip speeds of the dendrites as a function of applied voltage at a fixed magnetic field are made. The goal is to explore the effect of the magnetic and electric fields on the dendritic growth. In addition, pattern dynamics is monitored once the final state of spatio-temporal chaos is reached by the system. [1] J. T. Gleeson, Nature 385, 511 (1997). [2] J. T. Gleeson, Physica A 239, 211 (1997). This research was supported by NSF grants DMR 9704579 and DMR 9619406.

  16. Tipping Point

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... TV falls with about the same force as child falling from the third story of a building. ...

  17. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties.

    PubMed

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás; Mohri, Tetsuo; Gránásy, László

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendritesdendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations. PMID:25903891

  18. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás; Mohri, Tetsuo; Gránásy, László

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendritesdendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  19. Anchoring the Deficit of the Anchor Deficit: Dyslexia or Attention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willburger, Edith; Landerl, Karin

    2010-01-01

    In the anchoring deficit hypothesis of dyslexia ("Trends Cogn. Sci.", 2007; 11: 458-465), it is proposed that perceptual problems arise from the lack of forming a perceptual anchor for repeatedly presented stimuli. A study designed to explicitly test the specificity of the anchoring deficit for dyslexia is presented. Four groups, representing all…

  20. Combined Transabdominal and Transjugular Recanalization of Thrombosed TIPS, Portal and Proximal Splenic Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Bloss, M.F.; Lenz, J.; Gemery, J.

    2003-04-15

    We present a case of TIPS occlusion in which a small caliber transhepatic safety or anchoring wire in combination witha standard transjugular approach were utilized to recanalize the TIPS,portal and splenic veins. This technique may be a useful adjunct to the typical methods used for recanalization of thrombosed TIPS, portal and splenic veins without the need of large caliber transhepatic sheath access.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of dendritic growth kinetics in a Bridgman furnace front tracking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, R. P.; McFadden, S.

    2016-03-01

    A directional solidification experiment of a Ti-Al-Nb-B-C alloy by power down method is simulated using a Bridgman furnace front tracking model. The effect of varying the dendritic growth parameters; C, the columnar dendrite growth coefficient, and n, the undercooling exponent, is investigated. A matrix of growth coefficients and undercooling exponents - at three levels each, based around a growth law for Ti-46wt.%Al - is applied in simulations, and the effect on columnar dendrite tip temperature, tip velocity, and tip temperature gradient is observed. The simulation results show that the dendrite tip velocity and temperature gradient at the tip are practically unaffected by the use of different growth parameters. However, the predicted columnar dendrite tip undercooling did vary to give the required dendrite tip velocity. This finding has implications for the analysis of microstructural transitions, such as the Columnar to Equiaxed Transition (CET). In conclusion, it is suggested that, for transient solidification conditions, a CET prediction criterion based on tip undercooling is preferable to one that uses growth velocity.

  2. Scaling theory of two-phase dendritic growth in undercooled ternary melts.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Silvère; Bottin-Rousseau, Sabine; Faivre, Gabriel; Brener, Efim A

    2014-03-14

    Two-phase dendrites are needlelike crystals with a eutectic internal structure growing during solidification of ternary alloys. We present a scaling theory of these objects based on Ivantsov's theory of dendritic growth and the Jackson-Hunt theory of eutectic growth. The additional introduction of the relationship ρ∼λ (ρ: dendrite tip radius; λ: eutectic interphase spacing) suggested by recent experimental results [S. Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 056101 (2010)] leads to a complete solution of theselection problem and to the scaling rule ρ∼λ -1/2 (v: dendrite tip growth rate). PMID:24679305

  3. Recycling Suture Limbs from Knotless Suture Anchors for Arthroscopic Shoulder Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Timothy S.; DiPompeo, Christine M.; Ismaeli, Zahra C.; Porter, Polly A.; Nicholson, Shannon L.; Johnson, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent shoulder instability often leads to labral abnormality that requires surgical intervention that may require fixation with suture anchors. The proposed surgical technique allows the surgeon to achieve 2 points of fixation around the labrum and/or capsule with a single suture secured to the glenoid with a knotless anchor. Instead of cutting and discarding the residual suture limbs after anchor insertion, this technique uses the residual suture limbs of the knotless anchor for a second suture pass. This technique (1) creates a more cost- and time-efficient surgical procedure than using multiple single-loaded anchors or double-loaded anchors, (2) decreases the known risk of glenoid fracture from the stress riser at the implant tips of multi-anchor repairs by reducing the number of anchors required for stabilization, (3) decreases the surgical time compared with the use of double-loaded anchors through simpler suture management and less knot tying, (4) allows for the secure reapproximation of the labrum to the glenoid while offering a convenient option for capsulorrhaphy without the need to insert another anchor, and (5) yields more points of soft-tissue fixation with fewer anchors drilled into the glenoid. PMID:25126504

  4. Blind-Anchor-Nut-Installation Fixture (BANIF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Norman F., Jr.; Linker, James F.

    1994-01-01

    Blind-anchor-nut-installation fixture, BANIF, developed for replacing or installing anchor nuts in blind holes or other inaccessible places. Attachment of anchor nut to BANIF enables placement of anchor nut on blind side of component.

  5. Technology Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic program for geometry called Cabri Geometry II is used to examine properties of figures like triangles and make connections with other mathematical ideas like ellipse. The technology tip includes directions for creating such a problem with technology and suggestions for exploring it.

  6. TIP list

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, M E

    2006-06-22

    Subcontractors and vendors providing services, including the installation of purchased goods, are required to complete a TIP List. This list does not include every Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) related concern at LLNL. It is intended to highlight major concerns common to most on-site service activities.

  7. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Dendritic Growth of Continuously Cast High Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiling; Luo, Sen; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2015-01-01

    Considering the influence of the latent heat released during the solidification of high carbon liquid steel, a cellular automaton (CA) model coupled with the heat transfer was developed to investigate the growth of equiaxed dendrites which is controlled by the solute diffusion during the continuous casting process. Additionally, the growth of columnar dendrites and primary dendrite arm spacings were predicted and measured. The results show that the CA model is able to describe the growth behavior of equiaxed dendrites, especially at 5 K to 7 K melt undercoolings, and the approach adjusting the cooling medium temperature is reliable to keep the undercooling condition stable for equiaxed dendrites although its hysteresis is reinforced as the pre-set undercooling increases. With the increase of the melt undercooling, the growth of equiaxed dendrites becomes faster, and the thickness of dendritic arms increases slightly, however, the thickness of the diffusion layer in front of dendritic tips keeps constant. The growth of thin and tiny columnar dendrites will be confined due to the competition and absorbed by neighboring strong columnar dendrites, giving rise to the coarsening of columnar dendrites, which is observed both from the experimental observation and the numerical simulation. With the decrease of the cooling intensity, columnar dendrites get sparser, primary dendrite arm spacings increase, and secondary dendritic arms become undeveloped.

  9. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Koss, M. B.; Lupulescu, A. O.; LaCombe, J. C.; Frei, J. E.; Malarik, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) constituted a series of three NASA-supported microgravity experiments, all of which flew aboard the space shuttle, Columbia. This experimental space flight series was designed and operated to grow and record dendrite solidification in the absence of gravity-induced convective heat transfer, and thereby produce a wealth of benchmark-quality data for testing solidification scaling laws. The data and analysis performed on the dendritic growth speed and tip size in Succinontrie (SCN) demonstrates that although the theory yields predictions that are reasonably in agreement with experiment, there are significant discrepancies. However, some of these discrepancies can be explained by accurately describing the diffusion of heat. The key finding involves recognition that the actual three-dimensional shape of dendrites includes time-dependent side-branching and a tip region that is not a paraboloid of revolution. Thus, the role of heat transfer in dendritic growth is validated, with the caveat that a more realistic model of the dendrite then a paraboloid is needed to account for heat flow in an experimentally observed dendrite. We are currently conducting additional analysis to further confirm and demonstrate these conclusions. The data and analyses for the growth selection physics remain much less definitive. From the first flight, the data indicated that the selection parameter, sigma*, is not exactly a constant, but exhibits a slight dependence on the supercooling. Additional data from the second flight are being examined to investigate the selection of a unique dendrite speed, tip size and shape. The IDGE flight series is now complete. We are currently completing analyses and moving towards final data archiving. It is gratifying to see that the IDGE published results and archived data sets are being used actively by other scientists and engineers. In addition, we are also pleased to report that the techniques and IDGE

  10. Knotless anchors with sutures external to the anchor body may be at risk for suture cutting through osteopenic bone

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Y.; Woodmass, J. M.; Nelson, A. A.; Boorman, R. S.; Thornton, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the mechanical performance, under low-load cyclic loading, of two different knotless suture anchor designs: sutures completely internal to the anchor body (SpeedScrew) and sutures external to the anchor body and adjacent to bone (MultiFIX P). Methods Using standard suture loops pulled in-line with the rotator cuff (approximately 60°), anchors were tested in cadaveric bone and foam blocks representing normal to osteopenic bone. Mechanical testing included preloading to 10 N and cyclic loading for 500 cycles from 10 N to 60 N at 60 mm/min. The parameters evaluated were initial displacement, cyclic displacement and number of cycles and load at 3 mm displacement relative to preload. Video recording throughout testing documented the predominant source of suture displacement and the distance of ‘suture cutting through bone’. Results In cadaveric bone and foam blocks, MultiFIX P anchors had significantly greater initial displacement, and lower number of cycles and lower load at 3 mm displacement than SpeedScrew anchors. Video analysis revealed ‘suture cutting through bone’ as the predominant source of suture displacement in cadaveric bone (qualitative) and greater ‘suture cutting through bone’ comparing MultiFIX P with SpeedScrew anchors in foam blocks (quantitative). The greater suture displacement in MultiFIX P anchors was predominantly from suture cutting through bone, which was enhanced in an osteopenic bone model. Conclusions Anchors with sutures external to the anchor body are at risk for suture cutting through bone since the suture eyelet is at the distal tip of the implant and the suture directly abrades against the bone edge during cyclic loading. Suture cutting through bone may be a significant source of fixation failure, particularly in osteopenic bone. Cite this article: Y. Ono, J. M. Woodmass, A. A. Nelson, R. S. Boorman, G. M. Thornton, I. K. Y. Lo. Knotless anchors with sutures external to the anchor body may be

  11. Engineering crystals of dendritic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lukin, Oleg; Schubert, Dirk; Müller, Claudia M.; Schweizer, W. Bernd; Gramlich, Volker; Schneider, Julian; Dolgonos, Grygoriy; Shivanyuk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    A detailed single-crystal X-ray study of conformationally flexible sulfonimide-based dendritic molecules with systematically varied molecular architectures was undertaken. Thirteen crystal structures reported in this work include 9 structures of the second-generation dendritic sulfonimides decorated with different aryl groups, 2 compounds bearing branches of both second and first generation, and 2 representatives of the first generation. Analysis of the packing patterns of 9 compounds bearing second-generation branches shows that despite their lack of strong directive functional groups there is a repeatedly reproduced intermolecular interaction mode consisting in an anchor-type packing of complementary second-generation branches of neighbouring molecules. The observed interaction tolerates a wide range of substituents in meta- and para-positions of the peripheral arylsulfonyl rings. Quantum chemical calculations of the molecule-molecule interaction energies agree at the qualitative level with the packing preferences found in the crystalline state. The calculations can therefore be used as a tool to rationalize and predict molecular structures with commensurate and non-commensurate branches for programming of different packing modes in crystal. PMID:19549870

  12. Engineering crystals of dendritic molecules.

    PubMed

    Lukin, Oleg; Schubert, Dirk; Müller, Claudia M; Schweizer, W Bernd; Gramlich, Volker; Schneider, Julian; Dolgonos, Grygoriy; Shivanyuk, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    A detailed single-crystal X-ray study of conformationally flexible sulfonimide-based dendritic molecules with systematically varied molecular architectures was undertaken. Thirteen crystal structures reported in this work include 9 structures of the second-generation dendritic sulfonimides decorated with different aryl groups, 2 compounds bearing branches of both second and first generation, and 2 representatives of the first generation. Analysis of the packing patterns of 9 compounds bearing second-generation branches shows that despite their lack of strong directive functional groups there is a repeatedly reproduced intermolecular interaction mode consisting in an anchor-type packing of complementary second-generation branches of neighbouring molecules. The observed interaction tolerates a wide range of substituents in meta- and para-positions of the peripheral arylsulfonyl rings. Quantum chemical calculations of the molecule-molecule interaction energies agree at the qualitative level with the packing preferences found in the crystalline state. The calculations can therefore be used as a tool to rationalize and predict molecular structures with commensurate and non-commensurate branches for programming of different packing modes in crystal. PMID:19549870

  13. Quantitative phase-field modeling of dendritic electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogswell, Daniel A.

    2015-07-01

    A thin-interface phase-field model of electrochemical interfaces is developed based on Marcus kinetics for concentrated solutions, and used to simulate dendrite growth during electrodeposition of metals. The model is derived in the grand electrochemical potential to permit the interface to be widened to reach experimental length and time scales, and electroneutrality is formulated to eliminate the Debye length. Quantitative agreement is achieved with zinc Faradaic reaction kinetics, fractal growth dimension, tip velocity, and radius of curvature. Reducing the exchange current density is found to suppress the growth of dendrites, and screening electrolytes by their exchange currents is suggested as a strategy for controlling dendrite growth in batteries.

  14. Quantitative phase-field modeling of dendritic electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Cogswell, Daniel A

    2015-07-01

    A thin-interface phase-field model of electrochemical interfaces is developed based on Marcus kinetics for concentrated solutions, and used to simulate dendrite growth during electrodeposition of metals. The model is derived in the grand electrochemical potential to permit the interface to be widened to reach experimental length and time scales, and electroneutrality is formulated to eliminate the Debye length. Quantitative agreement is achieved with zinc Faradaic reaction kinetics, fractal growth dimension, tip velocity, and radius of curvature. Reducing the exchange current density is found to suppress the growth of dendrites, and screening electrolytes by their exchange currents is suggested as a strategy for controlling dendrite growth in batteries. PMID:26274118

  15. Bellow seal and anchor

    DOEpatents

    Mansure, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    An annular seal is made of a collapsible bellows. The bellows can function as an anchor or a seal and is easily set into position using relative component movement. The bellows folds can be slanted and their outer sealing edges can have different profiles to meet expected conditions. The bellows is expanded for insertion to reduce its outer dimension and sets by compaction as a result of relative movement. The bellows can be straight or tapered and is settable with a minimal axial force.

  16. A multiphase solute diffusion model for dendritic alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Beckermann, C.

    1993-12-01

    A solute diffusion model, aimed at predicting microstructure formation in metal castings, is proposed for dendritic solidification of alloys. The model accounts for the different length scales existing in a dendritic structure. This is accomplished by utilizing a multiphase approach, in which not only the various physical phases but also phases associated with different length scales are considered separately. The macroscopic conservation equations are derived for each phase using the volume averaging technique, with constitutive relations developed for the interfacial transfer terms. It is shown that the multiphase model can rigorously incorporate the growth of dendrite tips and coarsening of dendrite arms. In addition, the distinction of different length scales enables the inclusion of realistic descriptions of the dendrite topology and relations to key metallurgical parameters. Another novel aspect of the model is that a single set of conservation equations for solute diffusion is developed for both equiaxed and columnar dendritic solidification. Finally, illustrative calculations for equiaxed, columnar, and mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification are carried out to provide quantitative comparisons with previous studies, and a variety of fundamental phenomena such as recalescence, dendrite tip undercooling, and columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) are predicted.

  17. Lightness, brightness, and anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Barton L; Whitbread, Michael; de Silva, Chamila

    2014-01-01

    The majority of work in lightness perception has evaluated the perception of lightness using flat, matte, two-dimensional surfaces. In such contexts, the amount of light reaching the eye contains a conflated mixture of the illuminant and surface lightness. A fundamental puzzle of lightness perception is understanding how it is possible to experience achromatic surfaces as specific achromatic shades in the face of this ambiguity. It has been argued that the perception of lightness in such contexts implies that the visual system imposes an "anchoring rule" whereby a specific relative luminance (the highest) serves as a fixed point in the mapping of image luminance onto the lightness scale ("white"). We conducted a series of experiments to explicitly test this assertion in contexts where this mapping seemed most unlikely-namely, low-contrast images viewed in dim illumination. Our results provide evidence that the computational ambiguity in mapping luminance onto lightness is reflected in perceptual experience. The perception of the highest luminance in a two-dimensional Mondrian display varied monotonically with its brightness, ranging from midgray to white. Similar scaling occurred for the lowest luminance and, by implication, all other luminance values. We conclude that the conflation between brightness and lightness in two-dimensional Mondrian displays is reflected in perception and find no support for the claim that any specific relative luminance value acts as a fixed anchor point in this mapping function. PMID:25104828

  18. Granular Simulation of NEO Anchoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazhar, Hammad

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in designing a spacecraft capable of visiting a Near Earth Object (NEO), performing experiments, and then returning safely. Certain periods of this mission will require the spacecraft to remain stationary relative to the NEO. Such situations require an anchoring mechanism that is compact, easy to deploy and upon mission completion, easily removed. The design philosophy used in the project relies on the simulation capability of a multibody dynamics physics engine. On Earth it is difficult to create low gravity conditions and testing in low gravity environments, whether artificial or in space is costly and therefore not feasible. Through simulation, gravity can be controlled with great accuracy, making it ideally suited to analyze the problem at hand. Using Chrono::Engine [1], a simulation package capable of utilizing massively parallel GPU hardware, several validation experiments will be performed. Once there is sufficient confidence, modeling of the NEO regolith interaction will begin after which the anchor tests will be performed and analyzed. The outcome of this task is a study with an analysis of several different anchor designs, along with a recommendation on which anchor is better suited to the task of anchoring. With the anchors tested against a range of parameters relating to soil, environment and anchor penetration angles/velocities on a NEO.

  19. The Evolution of Topologically Complex Structures: Coarsening of Dendritic Mixtures - Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    K. Thornton; Peter W. Voorhees

    2009-10-08

    Dendrites frequently form during solidification into an undercooled melt. These dendrites possess secondary and sometimes even ternary arms. While the tip radius and tip velocity of the dendrite are set by the growth conditions, the side branches behind the tip undergo a coarsening process under nearly isothermal conditions. This coarsening process sets an arm thickness and distances between dendrite arms in the solidified structure that are almost independent of the length-scale given by the dendrite tip. Since there is a close relationship between the size scale of the dendrites and the mechanical properties of the material, the coarsening process in dendritic solid-liquid systems has received much attention. Despite the clear importance of the coarsening process, measurements of the morphology of the two-phase mixture during coarsening that capture the full three-dimensional nature of the structure are in their infancy. In addition, since calculations of the evolution of such topologically complex systems are challenging, existing models of this coarsening process involve significant simplifications of the microstructure. To address these deficiencies in our understanding of the coarsening process, we study the coarsening process in topologically complex systems using three-dimensional reconstructions of the microstructure in concert with phase-field calculations of the local interfacial velocities.

  20. Transition from a planar interface to cellular and dendritic structures during rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laxmanan, V.

    1986-01-01

    The development of theoretical models which characterize the planar-cellular and cell-dendrite transitions is described. The transitions are analyzed in terms of the Chalmers number, the solute Peclet number, and the tip stability parameter, which correlate microstructural features and processing conditions. The planar-cellular transition is examined using the constitutional supercooling theory of Chalmers et al., (1953) and it is observed that the Chalmers number is between 0 and 1 during dendritic and cellular growth. Analysis of cell-dendrite transition data reveal that the transition occurs when the solute Peclet number goes through a minimum, the primary arm spacings go through a maximum, and the Chalmers number is equal to 1/2. The relation between the tip stability parameter and the solute Peclet number is investigated and it is noted that the tip stability parameter is useful for studying dendritic growth in alloys.

  1. Bone cement improves suture anchor fixation.

    PubMed

    Giori, Nicholas J; Sohn, David H; Mirza, Faisal M; Lindsey, Derek P; Lee, Arthur T

    2006-10-01

    Suture anchor fixation failure can occur if the anchor pulls out of bone. We hypothesized that suture anchor fixation can be augmented with polymethylmethacrylate cement, and that polymethylmethacrylate can be used to improve fixation in a stripped anchor hole. Six matched cadaveric proximal humeri were used. On one side, suture anchors were placed and loaded to failure using a ramped cyclic loading protocol. The stripped anchor holes then were injected with approximately 1 cc polymethylmethacrylate, and anchors were replaced and tested again. In the contralateral humerus, polymethylmethacrylate was injected into anchor holes before anchor placement and testing. In unstripped anchors, polymethylmethacrylate increased the number of cycles to failure by 34% and failure load by 71% compared with anchors not augmented with polymethylmethacrylate. Polymethylmethacrylate haugmentation of stripped anchors increased the cycles to failure by 31% and failure load by 111% compared with unstripped uncemented anchors. No difference was found in cycles to failure or failure load between cemented stripped anchors and cemented unstripped anchors. Polymethylmethacrylate can be used to augment fixation, reducing the risk of anchor pull-out failure, regardless whether the suture anchor hole is stripped or unstripped. PMID:16702922

  2. The Three-Dimensional Morphology of Growing Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, J. W.; Mohan, K. A.; Gulsoy, E. B.; Shahani, A. J.; Xiao, X.; Bouman, C. A.; De Graef, M.; Voorhees, P. W.

    2015-01-01

    The processes controlling the morphology of dendrites have been of great interest to a wide range of communities, since they are examples of an out-of-equilibrium pattern forming system, there is a clear connection with battery failure processes, and their morphology sets the properties of many metallic alloys. We determine the three-dimensional morphology of free growing metallic dendrites using a novel X-ray tomographic technique that improves the temporal resolution by more than an order of magnitude compared to conventional techniques. These measurements show that the growth morphology of metallic dendrites is surprisingly different from that seen in model systems, the morphology is not self-similar with distance back from the tip, and that this morphology can have an unexpectedly strong influence on solute segregation in castings. These experiments also provide benchmark data that can be used to validate simulations of free dendritic growth. PMID:26139473

  3. The three-dimensional morphology of growing dendrites

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, J. W.; Mohan, K. A.; Gulsoy, E. B.; Shahani, A. J.; Xiao, X.; Bouman, C. A.; De Graef, M.; Voorhees, P. W.

    2015-07-03

    The processes controlling the morphology of dendrites have been of great interest to a wide range of communities, since they are examples of an out-of-equilibrium pattern forming system, there is a clear connection with battery failure processes, and their morphology sets the properties of many metallic alloys. We determine the three-dimensional morphology of free growing metallic dendrites using a novel X-ray tomographic technique that improves the temporal resolution by more than an order of magnitude compared to conventional techniques. These measurements show that the growth morphology of metallic dendrites is surprisingly different from that seen in model systems, the morphology is not self-similar with distance back from the tip, and that this morphology can have an unexpectedly strong influence on solute segregation in castings. These experiments also provide benchmark data that can be used to validate simulations of free dendritic growth.

  4. The three-dimensional morphology of growing dendrites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gibbs, J. W.; Mohan, K. A.; Gulsoy, E. B.; Shahani, A. J.; Xiao, X.; Bouman, C. A.; De Graef, M.; Voorhees, P. W.

    2015-07-03

    The processes controlling the morphology of dendrites have been of great interest to a wide range of communities, since they are examples of an out-of-equilibrium pattern forming system, there is a clear connection with battery failure processes, and their morphology sets the properties of many metallic alloys. We determine the three-dimensional morphology of free growing metallic dendrites using a novel X-ray tomographic technique that improves the temporal resolution by more than an order of magnitude compared to conventional techniques. These measurements show that the growth morphology of metallic dendrites is surprisingly different from that seen in model systems, the morphologymore » is not self-similar with distance back from the tip, and that this morphology can have an unexpectedly strong influence on solute segregation in castings. These experiments also provide benchmark data that can be used to validate simulations of free dendritic growth.« less

  5. The Three-Dimensional Morphology of Growing Dendrites.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, J W; Mohan, K A; Gulsoy, E B; Shahani, A J; Xiao, X; Bouman, C A; De Graef, M; Voorhees, P W

    2015-01-01

    The processes controlling the morphology of dendrites have been of great interest to a wide range of communities, since they are examples of an out-of-equilibrium pattern forming system, there is a clear connection with battery failure processes, and their morphology sets the properties of many metallic alloys. We determine the three-dimensional morphology of free growing metallic dendrites using a novel X-ray tomographic technique that improves the temporal resolution by more than an order of magnitude compared to conventional techniques. These measurements show that the growth morphology of metallic dendrites is surprisingly different from that seen in model systems, the morphology is not self-similar with distance back from the tip, and that this morphology can have an unexpectedly strong influence on solute segregation in castings. These experiments also provide benchmark data that can be used to validate simulations of free dendritic growth. PMID:26139473

  6. Interfacial wave theory of dendrite growth - Global mode solution and quantum condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1990-01-01

    The signal feedback process at the edge of the dendrite tip is investigated, and the global instability mechanism of the system is derived. A mechanism is developed to describe a discrete set of unstable global modes for the system. Called WEASR, the method considers the wave emission at the turning point and signal reflections between the turning point and the front edge of the tip. It is shown that the method can obtain the asymptotic solutions for the unstable global modes and the quantum condition for the corresponding eigenvalues. A turning point called the pattern formation condition is shown to be crucial in the formation of dendritic structure and the choice of the final tip velocity. The wave emission process is outlined, and the importance of a signal feedback process at the edge of the dendrite tip is demonstrated. Parameters such as stability and surface tension can be analyzed in terms of their effects on WEASR modes.

  7. Conical Gradient Junctions of Dendritic Viologen Arrays on Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Takehiro; Oguchi, Yuki; Nagai, Keiji; Iyoda, Tomokazu

    2015-06-01

    The three-dimensional construction of arrays of functional molecules on an electrode surface, such as organic semiconductors and redox-active molecules, is a considerable challenge in the fabrication of sophisticated junctions for molecular devices. In particular, well-defined organic layers with precise molecular gradients are anticipated to function as novel metal/organic interfaces with specific electrical properties, such as a space charge layer at the metal/semiconductor interface. Here, we report a strategy for the construction of a three-dimensional molecular array with an electrical connection to a metal electrode by exploiting dendritic molecular architecture. Newly designed dendritic molecules consisting of viologens (1,1‧-disubstituted-4,4‧-bipyridilium salts) as the framework and mercapto groups as anchor units form unique self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on a gold surface reflecting the molecular design. The dendritic molecules exhibit a conical shape and closely pack to form cone arrays on the substrate, whereas, in solution, they expand into more flexible conformations. Differences in the introduction position of the anchor units in the dendritic structure result in apical- and basal-type cone arrays in which the spatial concentration of the viologen units can be precisely configured in the cones. The concentration in apical-type SAMs increases away from the substrate, whereas the opposite is true in basal-type SAMs.

  8. Conical Gradient Junctions of Dendritic Viologen Arrays on Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Kawauchi, Takehiro; Oguchi, Yuki; Nagai, Keiji; Iyoda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional construction of arrays of functional molecules on an electrode surface, such as organic semiconductors and redox-active molecules, is a considerable challenge in the fabrication of sophisticated junctions for molecular devices. In particular, well-defined organic layers with precise molecular gradients are anticipated to function as novel metal/organic interfaces with specific electrical properties, such as a space charge layer at the metal/semiconductor interface. Here, we report a strategy for the construction of a three-dimensional molecular array with an electrical connection to a metal electrode by exploiting dendritic molecular architecture. Newly designed dendritic molecules consisting of viologens (1,1′-disubstituted-4,4′-bipyridilium salts) as the framework and mercapto groups as anchor units form unique self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on a gold surface reflecting the molecular design. The dendritic molecules exhibit a conical shape and closely pack to form cone arrays on the substrate, whereas, in solution, they expand into more flexible conformations. Differences in the introduction position of the anchor units in the dendritic structure result in apical- and basal-type cone arrays in which the spatial concentration of the viologen units can be precisely configured in the cones. The concentration in apical-type SAMs increases away from the substrate, whereas the opposite is true in basal-type SAMs. PMID:26057120

  9. Prom Health and Safety Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Occasions Autumn Tips Camping Tips Family Reunions Gardening Tips Halloween Tips Healthy Halloween Prom Tips Spring ... ways to stay active, such as walking, dancing, gardening, swimming, and more. Be active for 60 minutes ...

  10. Anchoring International sets new water depth record

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, H.J.

    1983-07-01

    Santa Barbara Channel has a history steeped in firsts in techniques for the production of offshore oil. Landscaped drilling and production islands, production piers, and directional drilling from land rigs to production under the channel, to name a few. The latest such project was handled by Anchoring International, Inc., a pipe line anchoring company headquartered in Houston, Texas. Contracted by Healy Tibbets Construction Company, prime contractor, Anchoring was commissioned to handle a new deep water record breaking anchoring job. The job was to anchor J-tube extensions in 820 feet of water--the deepest pipe line anchoring job ever undertaken. In most shallow water pipe line anchoring jobs, anchors and anchor installation unit placement over the pipe line is handled from a crane topside with visual assist from divers. However, due to the extreme depth of this project, the installation unit with anchors had to be modified for submersible operator-assisted placement capability. Anchoring International handled the anchor design and installation equipment, and submersible operator assistance was furnished by Oceaneering, International. WASP and JIM atmospheric diving systems were used. All ocean bottom activities were monitored topside with the JERED video-equipped remote controlled vehicle. Since the weight of the anchor sets and power installation unit are minimum, the entire operation was conducted from a small boat sufficient to carry dive equipment and the anchor installation unit power supply. A small pedestal crane was used to lower and retrieve the anchor installation unit.

  11. Length and Speed Selection in Dendritic Growth of Electrohydrodynamic Convection in a Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Nadina; Gleeson, James T.

    2001-04-01

    Dendritic growth of electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) with parallel magnetic field has been already subjected to one important experiment (J. T. Gleeson, Nature, 385, 511 (1997)). Further exploration of this interesting pattern-forming system is presented here. The most important question that we address ourselves is whether there is any selection mechanism operating on the dendrite characteristic lengths and growth speed. Our control parameters are the thickness d of the liquid crystal film, the intensity H of the magnetic field, and the applied voltage V_rms. By systematically varying d and the magnetic coherence length ξ_m, we relate these two imposed lengths to those that characterize the dendrite: the tip radius of curvature ρ, and the interface width w. Histograms of the dendrite speed for fixed d, H, and V_rms are presented and discussed. In contrast with the sharp selection mechanism operating in the case of the crystalline dendrites, these EHC dendrites show only partial selection.

  12. Functionalizing Aluminum Oxide by Ag Dendrite Deposition at the Anode during Simultaneous Electrochemical Oxidation of Al.

    PubMed

    Rafailović, Lidija D; Gammer, Christoph; Rentenberger, Christian; Trišović, Tomislav; Kleber, Christoph; Karnthaler, Hans Peter

    2015-11-01

    A novel synthesis strategy is presented for depositing metallic Ag at the anode during simultaneous electrochemical oxidation of Al. This unexpected result is achieved based on galvanic coupling. Metallic dendritic nanostructures well-anchored in a high surface area supporting matrix are envisioned to open up a new avenue of applications. PMID:26398487

  13. Cellular and dendritic growth in a binary melt - A marginal stability approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laxmanan, V.

    1986-01-01

    A simple model for the constrained growth of an array of cells or dendrites in a binary alloy in the presence of an imposed positive temperature gradient in the liquid is proposed, with the dendritic or cell tip radius calculated using the marginal stability criterion of Langer and Muller-Krumbhaar (1977). This approach, an approach adopting the ad hoc assumption of minimum undercooling at the cell or dendrite tip, and an approach based on the stability criterion of Trivedi (1980) all predict tip radii to within 30 percent of each other, and yield a simple relationship between the tip radius and the growth conditions. Good agreement is found between predictions and data obtained in a succinonitrile-acetone system, and under the present experimental conditions, the dendritic tip stability parameter value is found to be twice that obtained previously, possibly due to a transition in morphology from a cellular structure with just a few side branches, to a more fully developed dendritic structure.

  14. Bone Anchored Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in improving the hearing of people with conduction or mixed hearing loss. The Technology The (BAHA) is a bone conduction hearing device that includes a titanium fixture permanently implanted into the mastoid bone of the skull and an external percutaneous sound processor. The sound processor is attached to the fixture by means of a skin penetrating abutment. Because the device bypasses the middle ear and directly stimulates the cochlea, it has been recommended for individuals with conduction hearing loss or discharging middle ear infection. The titanium implant is expected to last a lifetime while the external sound processor is expected to last 5 years. The total initial device cost is approximately $5,300 and the external sound processor costs approximately $3,500. Review of BAHA by the Medical Advisory Secretariat The Medical Advisory Secretariat’s review is a descriptive synthesis of findings from 36 research articles published between January 1990 and May 2002. Summary of Findings No randomized controlled studies were found. The evidence was derived from level 4 case series with relative small sample sizes (ranging from 30-188). The majority of the studies have follow-up periods of eight years or longer. All except one study were based on monaural BAHA implant on the side with the best bone conduction threshold. Safety Level 4 evidence showed that BAHA has been be implanted safely in adults and children with success rates of 90% or higher in most studies. No mortality or life threatening morbidity has been reported. Revision rates for tissue reduction or resiting were generally under 10% for adults but have been reported to be as high as 25% in pediatric studies. Adverse skin reaction around the skin penetration site was the most common complication reported. Most of these

  15. Nasal Tip Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cerkes, Nazim

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tip deficiency can be congenital or secondary to previous nasal surgeries. Underdeveloped medial crura usually present with underprojected tip and lack of tip definition. Weakness or malposition of lateral crura causes alar rim retraction and lateral nasal wall weakness. Structural grafting of alar cartilages strengthens the tip framework, reinforces the disrupted support mechanisms, and controls the position of the nasal tip. In secondary cases, anatomic reconstruction of the weakened or interrupted alar cartilages and reconstitution of a stable nasal tip tripod must be the goal for a predictable outcome. PMID:26616702

  16. Permanent ground anchors: Nicholson design criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. J.; Uranowski, D. D.; Wycliffe-Jones, P. T.

    1982-09-01

    The methods used by Nicholson Construction Company in the design of permanent ground anchors specifically as related to retaining walls are discussed. Basic soil parameters, design concepts, drilling and grouting methods for ground anchors are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on anchors founded in soil rather than rock formations. Also, soil properties necessary for the proper design of anchored retaining walls are detailed. The second chapter of the report is devoted to a general discussion of retaining wall and anchor design. In addition, a design example of an anchored retaining wall is presented in a step by step manner.

  17. Dendritic Growth Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Representatives of NASA materials science experiments supported the NASA exhibit at the Rernselaer Polytechnic Institute's Space Week activities, April 5 through 11, 1999. From left to right are: Angie Jackman, project manager at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for dendritic growth experiments; Dr. Martin Glicksman of Rennselaer Polytechnic Instutute, Troy, NY, principal investigator on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) that flew three times on the Space Shuttle; and Dr. Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA, a co-investigator on the IDGE and now principal investigator on the Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment being developed for the International Space Station (ISS). The image at far left is a dendrite grown in Glicksman's IDGE tests aboard the Shuttle. Glicksman is also principal investigator for the Evolution of Local Microstructures: Spatial Instabilities of Coarsening Clusters.

  18. Flows with tip leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John

    The flow development within the tip gap and the flow tip leakage, applying Navier-Stokes codes, are discussed. The loss production, the turbine inefficiency and the heat transfer to the blade tip, are considered. The measurements and calculations used demonstrate features of the flow, such as separation and reattachment on the blade tip, shock formation in the tip gap, and formation and dissipation of tip gap secondary kinetic energy. A procedure for calculating turbine blade tip temperatures is included. The results for a centrifugal compressor show the interaction of the tip leakage and passage flows. The radial blackflow near the shroud wall at low off-design flow rates is considered. The calculations demonstrate the potential use of a computational fluid dynamics code for predicting a centrifugal compressor map.

  19. Diet and Exercise Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health News & Publications Annual Meeting Calendar Diet and Exercise Tips Diet and Exercise Tips News media interested in covering the latest ... Health Statistics concludes that 35 percent of adults exercise regularly (more than 6 of 10 don’t), ...

  20. Slender tip laser scalpel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-01-06

    A laser scalpel includes a ribbon optical waveguide extending therethrough and terminating at a slender optical cutting tip. A laser beam is emitted along the height of the cutting tip for cutting tissue therealong.

  1. On the dendrites and dendritic transitions in undercooled germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, C.F.; Kui, H.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-07-01

    Undercooled molten Ge was allowed to solidify at initial bulk undercoolings, [Delta]T, from 10 to 200C under dehydrated boron oxide flux. It turned out that in addition to the (211) twin dendrite found by Billig and the (100) twin-free dendrite discovered by Devaud and Turnbill, there is a third novel twin dendrite, the (110) twin dendrite. The twin planes in a (110) dendrite always appear in multiple numbers and the orientation is (111). These different kinds of dendrites exist at different initial interfacial undercoolings and the transition temperatures for (110) to (211), (211) to (100) are [Delta]T = 61 and 93C, respectively.

  2. Child Transportation Safety Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document presents nine tips regarding safe infant and child transportation, each tip explained in one to two pages. The tips are as follows: (1) quick safety seat checkup; (2) where should your child ride? (3) how to protect your new baby in the car; (4) what safety seat to use for a big baby or toddler? (5) how should preschool and school…

  3. 100 Tips for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    Noting that involved parents can improve their children's chances of succeeding in school, this packet of cards offers 100 tips created to help parents become more involved in their child's education. Following a card of general tips on becoming involved, tips are offered in the following topic areas: helping a child stay alcohol, tobacco, and…

  4. The crooked nasal tip.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jeremy; Adamson, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Successful treatment of the crooked nasal tip includes proper analysis and assessment, employment of the proper techniques, reaching ideal tip dynamics, and close follow-up. Both the caudal septum and the nasal tip cartilages must be addressed. When executed properly, satisfaction should be high for both the patient and the surgeon. PMID:22028009

  5. Macrosegregation During Dendritic Arrayed Growth of Hypoeutectic Pb-Sn Alloys: Influence of Primary Arm Spacing and Mushy Zone Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Shah, R.

    1996-01-01

    Thermosolutal convection in the dendritic mushy zone occurs during directional solidification of hypoeutectic lead tin alloys in a positive thermal gradient, with the melt on the top and the solid below. This results in macrosegregation along the length of the solidified samples. The extent of macrosegregation increases with increasing primary dendrite spacings for constant mushy zone length. For constant primary spacings, the macrosegregation increases with decreasing mushy zone length. Presence of convection reduces the primary dendrite spacings. However, convection in the interdendritic melt has significantly more influence on the spacings as compared with that in the overlying melt, which is caused by the solutal buildup at the dendrite tips.

  6. Arctic climate tipping points.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-02-01

    There is widespread concern that anthropogenic global warming will trigger Arctic climate tipping points. The Arctic has a long history of natural, abrupt climate changes, which together with current observations and model projections, can help us to identify which parts of the Arctic climate system might pass future tipping points. Here the climate tipping points are defined, noting that not all of them involve bifurcations leading to irreversible change. Past abrupt climate changes in the Arctic are briefly reviewed. Then, the current behaviour of a range of Arctic systems is summarised. Looking ahead, a range of potential tipping phenomena are described. This leads to a revised and expanded list of potential Arctic climate tipping elements, whose likelihood is assessed, in terms of how much warming will be required to tip them. Finally, the available responses are considered, especially the prospects for avoiding Arctic climate tipping points. PMID:22270703

  7. Dendritic Growth with Fluid Flow for Pure Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, Jun-Ho; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional, adaptive, parallel finite element code to examine solidification of pure materials under conditions of forced flow. We have examined the effect of undercooling, surface tension anisotropy and imposed flow velocity on the growth. The flow significantly alters the growth process, producing dendrites that grow faster, and with greater tip curvature, into the flow. The selection constant decreases slightly with flow velocity in our calculations. The results of the calculations agree well with the transport solution of Saville and Beaghton at high undercooling and high anisotropy. At low undercooling, significant deviations are found. We attribute this difference to the influence of other parts of the dendrite, removed from the tip, on the flow field.

  8. Shape Parameter for a Non-Axisymmetric Isothermal Dendrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, G. B.; Coriell, S. R.; Sekerka, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    In previous work, we found approximate solutions for paraboloids having perturbations with four-fold axial symmetry in order to model dendritic growth in cubic materials. These solutions provide self-consistent corrections through second order in a shape parameter e to the Peclet number-supercooling relation of the Ivantsov solution. The parameter e is proportional to the amplitude of the four-fold correction to the dendrite shape, as measured from the Ivantsov paraboloid of revolution. We calculate e by comparing the dendrite tip shape to the portion of the equilibrium shape near the growth direction, (001), for anisotropic surface free energy, where the ni are components of the unit normal of the crystal surface. This comparison results in epsilon = -2(epsilon 4), independent of the Peclet number. From the experimental value of epsilon 4, we find epsilon approximately 0.011, in good agreement with the measured value epsilon approximately 0.008 of LaCombe et al.

  9. Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew. MJ

    2009-12-01

    The Distromet disdrometer model RD-80 and NovaLynx tipping bucket rain gauge model 260-2500E-12 are two devices deployed a few meters apart to measure the character and amount of liquid precipitation. The main purpose of the disdrometer is to measure drop size distribution, which it does over 20 size classes from 0.3 mm to 5.4 mm. The data from both instruments can be used to determine rain rate. The disdrometer results can also be used to infer several properties including drop number density, radar reflectivity, liquid water content, and energy flux. Two coefficients, N0 and Λ, from an exponential fit between drop diameter and drop number density, are routinely calculated. Data are collected once a minute. The instruments make completely different kinds of measurements. Rain that falls on the disdrometer sensor moves a plunger on a vertical axis. The disdrometer transforms the plunger motion into electrical impulses whose strength is proportional to drop diameter. The rain gauge is the conventional tipping bucket type. Each tip collects an amount equivalent to 0.01 in. of water, and each tip is counted by a data acquisition system anchored by a Campbell CR1000 data logger.

  10. Molecular Architecture of Synaptic Actin Cytoskeleton in Hippocampal Neurons Reveals a Mechanism of Dendritic Spine Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Korobova, Farida

    2010-01-01

    Excitatory synapses in the brain play key roles in learning and memory. The formation and functions of postsynaptic mushroom-shaped structures, dendritic spines, and possibly of presynaptic terminals, rely on actin cytoskeleton remodeling. However, the cytoskeletal architecture of synapses remains unknown hindering the understanding of synapse morphogenesis. Using platinum replica electron microscopy, we characterized the cytoskeletal organization and molecular composition of dendritic spines, their precursors, dendritic filopodia, and presynaptic boutons. A branched actin filament network containing Arp2/3 complex and capping protein was a dominant feature of spine heads and presynaptic boutons. Surprisingly, the spine necks and bases, as well as dendritic filopodia, also contained a network, rather than a bundle, of branched and linear actin filaments that was immunopositive for Arp2/3 complex, capping protein, and myosin II, but not fascin. Thus, a tight actin filament bundle is not necessary for structural support of elongated filopodia-like protrusions. Dynamically, dendritic filopodia emerged from densities in the dendritic shaft, which by electron microscopy contained branched actin network associated with dendritic microtubules. We propose that dendritic spine morphogenesis begins from an actin patch elongating into a dendritic filopodium, which tip subsequently expands via Arp2/3 complex-dependent nucleation and which length is modulated by myosin II-dependent contractility. PMID:19889835

  11. Thermodynamic-kinetic simulation of constrained dendrite growth in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, J.

    2000-04-01

    A model of constrained dendritic growth for steels, based on thermodynamic and kinetic theory, is presented. The model links thermodynamic chemical potential-equality equations to an existing, approximate treatment of constrained dendritic growth in multicomponent steels, taking into account the deviation from the local thermodynamic equilibrium of the phase interface caused by interface friction, capillarity, and solute trapping. Due to the thermodynamic approach, with a thermodynamic model and recently assessed data, the present treatment yields a more accurate determination of phase stabilities than the earlier methods. Depending on the steel composition and the growth conditions (growth rate and temperature gradient), the model determines the dendrite tip undercooling, the primary solid phase (ferrite or austenite), the stability of that phase, certain dimensions of the microstructure, and the solute accumulation ahead of the dendrite tip. A special optional calculations is that of the equally probable formation of ferrite and austenite in stainless steels. Calculations for testing the model and for validation it with experimental data are presented.

  12. Dendritic Polymers for Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuan; Mou, Quanbing; Wang, Dali; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic polymers are highly branched polymers with controllable structures, which possess a large population of terminal functional groups, low solution or melt viscosity, and good solubility. Their size, degree of branching and functionality can be adjusted and controlled through the synthetic procedures. These tunable structures correspond to application-related properties, such as biodegradability, biocompatibility, stimuli-responsiveness and self-assembly ability, which are the key points for theranostic applications, including chemotherapeutic theranostics, biotherapeutic theranostics, phototherapeutic theranostics, radiotherapeutic theranostics and combined therapeutic theranostics. Up to now, significant progress has been made for the dendritic polymers in solving some of the fundamental and technical questions toward their theranostic applications. In this review, we briefly summarize how to control the structures of dendritic polymers, the theranostics-related properties derived from their structures and their theranostics-related applications. PMID:27217829

  13. AKAP-Anchored PKA Maintains Neuronal L-type Calcium Channel Activity and NFAT Transcriptional Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jonathan G.; Sanderson, Jennifer L.; Gorski, Jessica A.; Scott, John D.; Catterall, William A.; Sather, William A.; Dell’Acqua, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In neurons, Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (LTCC) couples electrical activity to changes in transcription. LTCC activity is elevated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and depressed by the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), with both enzymes localized to the channel by A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) 79/150. AKAP79/150 anchoring of CaN also promotes LTCC activation of transcription through dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT). We report here that genetic disruption of PKA anchoring to AKAP79/150 also interferes with LTCC activation of CaN-NFAT signaling in neurons. Disruption of AKAP-PKA anchoring promoted redistribution of the kinase out of dendritic spines, profound decreases in LTCC phosphorylation and Ca2+ influx, and impaired NFAT movement to the nucleus and activation of transcription. Our findings support a model wherein basal activity of AKAP79/150-anchored PKA opposes CaN to preserve LTCC phosphorylation, thereby sustaining LTCC activation of CaN-NFAT signaling to the neuronal nucleus. PMID:24835999

  14. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious. PMID:26941684

  15. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious. PMID:26941684

  16. Anchor for Fiberglas Guy Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Solution to problem of anchoring fiberglas guy rods to install nut with threads on outer circumference, followed by aluminum sleeve. Sleeve has opening oval at upper and round at bottom end. End of rod is split so fiberglas wedge can be inserted to form V-shaped end. Spread end of rod fits into tapered hole in sleeve and threaded aluminum coupling is put over rod and sleeve.

  17. Independent control of polar and azimuthal anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anquetil-Deck, C; Cleaver, D J; Bramble, J P; Atherton, T J

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation, experiment, and continuum theory are used to examine the anchoring exhibited by a nematic liquid crystal at a patterned substrate comprising a periodic array of rectangles that, respectively, promote vertical and planar alignment. It is shown that the easy axis and effective anchoring energy promoted by such surfaces can be readily controlled by adjusting the design of the pattern. The calculations reveal rich behavior: for strong anchoring, as exhibited by the simulated system, for rectangle ratios ≥2 the nematic aligns in the direction of the long edge of the rectangles, the azimuthal anchoring coefficient changing with pattern shape. In weak anchoring scenarios, however, including our experimental systems, preferential anchoring is degenerate between the two rectangle diagonals. Bistability between diagonally aligned and edge-aligned arrangement is predicted for intermediate combinations of anchoring coefficient and system length scale. PMID:23944468

  18. Electrostatically anchored branched brush layers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Dedinaite, Andra; Rutland, Mark; Thormann, Esben; Visnevskij, Ceslav; Makuska, Ricardas; Claesson, Per M

    2012-11-01

    A novel type of block copolymer has been synthesized. It consists of a linear cationic block and an uncharged bottle-brush block. The nonionic bottle-brush block contains 45 units long poly(ethylene oxide) side chains. This polymer was synthesized with the intention of creating branched brush layers firmly physisorbed to negatively charged surfaces via the cationic block, mimicking the architecture (but not the chemistry) of bottle-brush molecules suggested to be present on the cartilage surface, and contributing to the efficient lubrication of synovial joints. The adsorption properties of the diblock copolymer as well as of the two blocks separately were studied on silica surfaces using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and optical reflectometry. The adsorption kinetics data highlight that the diblock copolymers initially adsorb preferentially parallel to the surface with both the cationic block and the uncharged bottle-brush block in contact with the surface. However, as the adsorption proceeds, a structural change occurs within the layer, and the PEO bottle-brush block extends toward solution, forming a surface-anchored branched brush layer. As the adsorption plateau is reached, the diblock copolymer layer is 46-48 nm thick, and the water content in the layer is above 90 wt %. The combination of strong electrostatic anchoring and highly hydrated branched brush structures provide strong steric repulsion, low friction forces, and high load bearing capacity. The strong electrostatic anchoring also provides high stability of preadsorbed layers under different ionic strength conditions. PMID:23046176

  19. Lithium Dendrite Formation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-06

    Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL team’s electron microscopy could help researchers address long-standing issues related to battery performance and safety. Video shows annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging (ADF STEM) of lithium dendrite nucleation and growth from a glassy carbon working electrode and within a 1.2M LiPF6 EC:DM battery electrolyte.

  20. Stability of dendritic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, James A.; Langer, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    An approximate method for studying steady-state properties and linear stability of the dendritic arrays that are formed in directional solidification of alloys is proposed. This analysis is valid at high growth rates where the primary spacing between dendrites is larger than the velocity-dependent solutal diffusion length. A neutral stability boundary is computed and it is found that, in the situations where the results should be valid, the experimental data of Somboonsuk, et al. (1984) lie in the stable region, well away from the boundary.

  1. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  2. Mussel-inspired dendritic polymers as universal multifunctional coatings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Achazi, Katharina; Liebe, Hendrik; Schulz, Andrea; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Grunwald, Ingo; Haag, Rainer

    2014-10-20

    A rapid and universal approach for multifunctional material coatings was developed based on a mussel-inspired dendritic polymer. This new kind of polymer mimics not only the functional groups of mussel foot proteins (mfps) but also their molecular weight and molecular structure. The large number of catechol and amine groups set the basis for heteromultivalent anchoring and crosslinking. The molecular weight reaches 10 kDa, which is similar to the most adhesive mussel foot protein mfp-5. Also, the dendritic structure exposes its functional groups on the surface like the folded proteins. As a result, a very stable coating can be prepared on virtually any type of material surface within 10 min by a simple dip-coating method, which is as fast as the formation of mussel byssal threads in nature. PMID:25200129

  3. Effects of molecule anchoring and dispersion on nanoscopic friction under electrochemical control.

    PubMed

    de Wijn, A S; Fasolino, A; Filippov, A E; Urbakh, M

    2016-03-16

    The application of electric fields is a promising strategy for in situ control of friction. While there have recently been many experimental studies on friction under the influence of electric fields, theoretical understanding is very limited. Recently, we introduced a simple theoretical model for friction under electrochemical conditions that focused on the interaction of a force microscope tip with adsorbed molecules whose orientation was dependent on the applied electric field. Here we focus on the effects of anchoring of the molecules on friction. We show that anchoring affects the intensity and width of the peak in the friction that occurs near a reorientation transition of adsorbed molecules, and explain this by comparing the strength of molecule-molecule and molecule-tip interactions. We derive a dispersion relation for phonons in the layer of adsorbed molecules and demonstrate that it can be used to understand important features of the frictional response. PMID:26871411

  4. Root hairs aid soil penetration by anchoring the root surface to pore walls.

    PubMed

    Bengough, A Glyn; Loades, Kenneth; McKenzie, Blair M

    2016-02-01

    The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip during soil penetration was examined. Experiments using a hairless maize mutant (Zea mays: rth3-3) and its wild-type counterpart measured the anchorage force between the primary root of maize and the soil to determine whether root hairs enabled seedling roots in artificial biopores to penetrate sandy loam soil (dry bulk density 1.0-1.5g cm(-3)). Time-lapse imaging was used to analyse root and seedling displacements in soil adjacent to a transparent Perspex interface. Peak anchorage forces were up to five times greater (2.5N cf. 0.5N) for wild-type roots than for hairless mutants in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Root hair anchorage enabled better soil penetration for 1.0 or 1.2g cm(-3) soil, but there was no significant advantage of root hairs in the densest soil (1.5g cm(-3)). The anchorage force was insufficient to allow root penetration of the denser soil, probably because of less root hair penetration into pore walls and, consequently, poorer adhesion between the root hairs and the pore walls. Hairless seedlings took 33h to anchor themselves compared with 16h for wild-type roots in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Caryopses were often pushed several millimetres out of the soil before the roots became anchored and hairless roots often never became anchored securely.The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip may be important in loose seed beds above more compact soil layers and may also assist root tips to emerge from biopores and penetrate the bulk soil. PMID:26798027

  5. Root hairs aid soil penetration by anchoring the root surface to pore walls

    PubMed Central

    Bengough, A. Glyn; Loades, Kenneth; McKenzie, Blair M.

    2016-01-01

    The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip during soil penetration was examined. Experiments using a hairless maize mutant (Zea mays: rth3–3) and its wild-type counterpart measured the anchorage force between the primary root of maize and the soil to determine whether root hairs enabled seedling roots in artificial biopores to penetrate sandy loam soil (dry bulk density 1.0–1.5g cm−3). Time-lapse imaging was used to analyse root and seedling displacements in soil adjacent to a transparent Perspex interface. Peak anchorage forces were up to five times greater (2.5N cf. 0.5N) for wild-type roots than for hairless mutants in 1.2g cm−3 soil. Root hair anchorage enabled better soil penetration for 1.0 or 1.2g cm−3 soil, but there was no significant advantage of root hairs in the densest soil (1.5g cm−3). The anchorage force was insufficient to allow root penetration of the denser soil, probably because of less root hair penetration into pore walls and, consequently, poorer adhesion between the root hairs and the pore walls. Hairless seedlings took 33h to anchor themselves compared with 16h for wild-type roots in 1.2g cm−3 soil. Caryopses were often pushed several millimetres out of the soil before the roots became anchored and hairless roots often never became anchored securely.The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip may be important in loose seed beds above more compact soil layers and may also assist root tips to emerge from biopores and penetrate the bulk soil. PMID:26798027

  6. Modification of dendritic development.

    PubMed

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  7. EBSD Characterization of Dendrites in Synthetic and Natural Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J. E.; Tiley, J.; Shiveley, A.; Knox, S.; Viswanathan, G.

    2011-12-01

    Arborescent crystals in igneous rocks are associated with extreme crystallization environments: the protoplanary disk (chondrules), Earth's ultramafic Archean mantle (komatiite), and terrestrial submarine-erupted lavas (pillow basalts), although the role of morphological instabilities in more mundane settings such as magma reservoirs of modern oceanic islands is increasingly appreciated (see Welsch et al., V16). Fundamentals of dendrite formation are presumably well understood: branching morphologies belie crystal growth conditions in which the driving force for solidification produces a kinetic roughening transition, transforming an atomically smooth crystal-liquid interface into a rough, adhesive interface capable of extremely rapid advancement. However, not since photomicrograhic advances made possible close observations of snow crystals (Nakaya 1936), has there been a more promising set of analytical tools to characterize dendrites in natural and synthetic materials in pursuit of new insights. We are investigating clinopyroxene (cpx) in the quenched top of Fe-rich tholeiitic lava (Munro Township, Northeast Ontario; Fig. 1) and a synthetic basalt of similar character (Hammer 2006) with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), 3D reconstruction of optical serial sections, and TEM. Here we report intriguing phenomena observed with EBSD common to both samples. Severe thinning of dendrite trunks and repeated tip splitting destroys the self-similarity associated with classical dendrites and instead presages 'seaweed' morphology. Split tips manifest incremental trajectory deflections, producing gently arched trunks (Fig. 1A) as well as tightly curved (r<10 um) trunks. Crystals progressively rotate clockwise about cpx <010>, producing distinctive misorientation maps and pole figures (Fig. 1C). Parallel branches exhibit similar rotational trajectories, carving parallel arcs in the <010> pole figure. The high incidence of side branching and tip splitting is consistent

  8. Data and Modeling of Dendrites Subject to A Step Change in Pressure (TDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, Matthew B.; LaCombe, J. C.; Glicksman, M. E.; Pines, V.; Chait, A.

    2003-01-01

    There is considerable interest in dendritic solidification because of the influence dendrites have in the determination of microstructure, and thereby in the physical properties of cast metals and alloys. Current theories and models of dendritic growth generally couple diffusion effects in the melt with the physics of the interface. Data and subsequent analysis prior of the tip growth speed and radii of thermal succinonitrile dendrites in the near-convection free, on-orbit, free-fall environment demonstrate that these theories yield predictions that are reasonably in agreement with the results of experiment. However, data and analysis for assessing the interfacial physics component of theory are not sufficiently detailed or definitive. To study fundamental aspects of dendritic interface stability, we are measuring and modeling the kinetics and morphology of dendrites as they evolve from one well-defined steady state at a pre-set supercooling, through a transient stage, to a different well-defined steady state. More specifically, we subject succinonitrile dendrites, growing under steady-state conditions, to a rapid change in pressure. This leads to a rapid change in thermal driving force from the corresponding change in both the equilibrium melting temperature due to the Clapeyron effect, and a change in the far-field temperature due to adiabatic temperature changes in the bulk liquid and solid. Subsequently, we observe transformations from a well-characterized initial state into a new steady-state. Initial data reveal that the dendrite tip velocity changes almost as fast as the pressure charges, while the tip radius changes occur more slowly, taking from 10 60 seconds depending on the size of the step change and the final supercooling. Computer modeling of this process shows both agreements and disagreements with the experimental data. In making these observations and measurements, we are gaining new understandings of interfacial dynamics and state

  9. Ten Tips from George.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Helen C.

    The paper describes a current events lesson based on an editorial which quoted 10 tips from George Washington and suggested that a review of Washington's statements might be useful in making judgments about current national issues. Used in United States history, world history, and government classes, adaptation and revision of the tips lead…

  10. ADHD: Tips to Try

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? ADHD: Tips to Try KidsHealth > For Teens > ADHD: Tips to Try Print A A A Text Size en español TDAH: Consejos que puedes probar ADHD , or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, is a medical ...

  11. Air Travel Health Tips

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Air Travel Health Tips Air Travel Health Tips How can I improve plane travel? Most people don't have any problems when ... and dosages of all of your medicines. The air in airplanes is dry, so drink nonalcoholic, decaffeinated ...

  12. Total Telephone Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Lloyd E.; And Others

    This manual of telephone behavior tips for business and sales professionals offers ways to handle the disgruntled caller and makes suggestions on topics relevant to the telephone. The manual is divided into the following sections and subsections: (1) Common Courtesy (staff tips, answering the telephone, screening calls, transferring calls, taking…

  13. Biophysical Characterization of the Type III Secretion Tip Proteins and the Tip Proteins Attached to Bacterium-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Choudhari, Shyamal P.; Chen, Xiaotong; Kim, Jae Hyun; van Roosmalen, Maarten L.; Greenwood, Jamie C.; Joshi, Sangeeta B.; Picking, William D.; Leenhouts, Kees; Middaugh, C. Russell; Picking, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterium-like particles (BLPs), derived from Lactococcus lactis, offer a self-adjuvanting delivery vehicle for subunit protein vaccines. Proteins can be specifically loaded onto the BLPs via a peptidoglycan anchoring domain (PA). In this study, the tip proteins IpaD, SipD and LcrV belonging to type three secretion systems of Shigella flexneri, Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica, respectively, were fused to the PA and loaded onto the BLPs. Herein, we biophysically characterized these nine samples and condensed the spectroscopic results into three-index empirical phase diagrams (EPDs). The EPDs show distinctions between the IpaD/SipD and LcrV subfamilies of tip proteins, based on their physical stability, even upon addition of the PA. Upon attachment to the BLPs, the BLPs become defining moiety in the spectroscopic measurements, leaving the tip proteins to have a subtle yet modulating effect on the structural integrity of the tip proteins-BLPs binding. In summary, this work provides a comprehensive view of physical stability of the tip proteins and tip protein-BLPs and serves as a baseline for screening of excipients to increase the stability of the tip protein-BLPs for future vaccine formulation. PMID:24916512

  14. A lunar/Martian anchor emplacement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, Dustin; Holt, Andrew; Jantz, Erik; Kaufman, Teresa; Martin, James; Weber, Reed

    On the Moon or Mars, it is necessary to have an anchor, or a stable, fixed point able to support the forces necessary to rescue a stuck vehicle, act as a stake for a tent in a Martian gale, act as a fulcrum in the erection of general construction poles, or support tent-like regolith shields. The anchor emplacement system must be highly autonomous. It must supply the energy and stability for anchor deployment. The goal of the anchor emplacement system project is to design and build a prototype anchor and to design a conceptual anchor emplacement system. Various anchors were tested in a 1.3 cubic meter test bed containing decomposed granite. A simulated lunar soil was created by adjusting the moisture and compaction characteristics of the soil. We conducted tests on emplacement torque, amount of force the anchor could withstand before failure, anchor pull out force at various angles, and soil disturbances caused by placing the anchor. A single helix auger anchor performed best in this test bed based on energy to emplace, and the ultimate holding capacity. The anchor was optimized for ultimate holding capacity, minimum emplacement torque, and minimum soil disturbance in sandy soils yielding the following dimensions: helix diameter (4.45 cm), pitch (1.27 cm), blade thickness (0.15 cm), total length (35.56 cm), shaft diameter (0.78 cm), and a weight of 212.62 g. The experimental results showed that smaller diameter, single-helix augers held more force than larger diameter augers for a given depth. The emplacement system consists of a flywheel and a motor for power, sealed in a protective box supported by four legs. The flywheel system was chosen over a gear system based on its increased reliability in the lunar environment.

  15. A lunar/Martian anchor emplacement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, Dustin; Holt, Andrew; Jantz, Erik; Kaufman, Teresa; Martin, James; Weber, Reed

    1993-01-01

    On the Moon or Mars, it is necessary to have an anchor, or a stable, fixed point able to support the forces necessary to rescue a stuck vehicle, act as a stake for a tent in a Martian gale, act as a fulcrum in the erection of general construction poles, or support tent-like regolith shields. The anchor emplacement system must be highly autonomous. It must supply the energy and stability for anchor deployment. The goal of the anchor emplacement system project is to design and build a prototype anchor and to design a conceptual anchor emplacement system. Various anchors were tested in a 1.3 cubic meter test bed containing decomposed granite. A simulated lunar soil was created by adjusting the moisture and compaction characteristics of the soil. We conducted tests on emplacement torque, amount of force the anchor could withstand before failure, anchor pull out force at various angles, and soil disturbances caused by placing the anchor. A single helix auger anchor performed best in this test bed based on energy to emplace, and the ultimate holding capacity. The anchor was optimized for ultimate holding capacity, minimum emplacement torque, and minimum soil disturbance in sandy soils yielding the following dimensions: helix diameter (4.45 cm), pitch (1.27 cm), blade thickness (0.15 cm), total length (35.56 cm), shaft diameter (0.78 cm), and a weight of 212.62 g. The experimental results showed that smaller diameter, single-helix augers held more force than larger diameter augers for a given depth. The emplacement system consists of a flywheel and a motor for power, sealed in a protective box supported by four legs. The flywheel system was chosen over a gear system based on its increased reliability in the lunar environment.

  16. Anchored Instruction and Anchored Assessment: An Ecological Approach to Measuring Situated Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael F.; Kulikowich, Jonna M.

    Anchored instruction and anchored assessment are described and illustrated through a mathematics problem from the Jasper problem solving series developed at Vanderbilt University in Nashville (Tennessee). Anchored instruction is instruction situated in a context complex enough to provide meaning and reasons for why information is useful. Problems…

  17. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  18. Characterization of Optical Lenses to be Considered for the Imaging of Crystal Dendrite Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, Frank M.

    1999-01-01

    Dynamic fracture is a phenomenon that is extremely sensitive to small perturbations in system parameters. This phenomenon is, in some ways, similar to that of dendritic crystal growth, although it is governed by different physical principles. Crystal dendrite growth patterns are affected by parameters such as temperature, pressure, and gravity. By studying the behavior of crystal dendrites in a controlled, microgravity environment, a greater understanding of dynamic fracture could be revealed. A sealed cubical container contains four stingers, which facilitate the growth of crystal dendrites. The container has five windows and is emersed in a liquid, for thermal isolation. The tip of a dendrite can advance in any direction, therefore three-dimensional images of the process are desired. Furthermore, because of the rapid growth rate, a fast image frame rate is required for accurate tracking of dendrite tip velocity. In addition, optical parameters such as field of view, depth of focus, and resolution are examined, as well as the working distance between a lens and the target of observation.

  19. Web-dendritic ribbon growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, R. B., Jr.; Faust, J. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A web furnace was constructed for pulling dendritic-web samples. The effect of changes in the furnace thermal geometry on the growth of dendritic-web was studied. Several attempts were made to grow primitive dendrites for use as the dendritic seed crystals for web growth and to determine the optimum twin spacing in the dendritic seed crystal for web growth. Mathematical models and computer programs were used to determine the thermal geometries in the susceptor, crucible melt, meniscus, and web. Several geometries were determined for particular furnace geometries and growth conditions. The information obtained was used in conjunction with results from the experimental growth investigations in order to achieve proper conditions for sustained pulling of two dendrite web ribbons. In addition, the facilities for obtaining the following data were constructed: twin spacing, dislocation density, web geometry, resistivity, majority charge carrier type, and minority carrier lifetime.

  20. Tipping the Balancing ACT.

    PubMed

    Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Ruffell, Brian

    2016-09-12

    Adoptive cell transfer therapy has emerged as a powerful treatment for metastatic melanoma, but efficacy is limited by an inhospitable tumor microenvironment. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Marigo et al. demonstrate that therapy requires induced expression of nitric oxide synthase 2 in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. PMID:27622327

  1. IDGE: Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flew on STS-62 to study the microscopic, tree-like structures (dendrites) that form within metals as they solidify from molten materials. The size, shape, and orientation of these dendrites affect the strength and usefulness of metals. Data from this experiment will be used to test and improve the mathematical models that support the industrial production of metals.

  2. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  5. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  6. Anchors of Religious Commitment in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, Emily; Dollahite, David C.; Hardy, Sam A.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores adolescent religious commitment using qualitative data from a religiously diverse (Jewish, Christian, Muslim) sample of 80 adolescents. A new construct, "anchors of religious commitment," grounded in interview data, is proposed to describe what adolescents commit to as a part of their religious identity. Seven anchors of…

  7. 77 FR 65496 - Commercial Acquisition; Anchor Tenancy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... limited conditions, to issue Anchor Tenancy contracts. Anchor Tenancy means ``an arrangement in which the... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A. Background NASA published a proposed rule in the Federal Register at 76 FR 30301... simplified; it is now discussed only in paragraph (a). The final rule identifies what is meant by an...

  8. 33 CFR 401.15 - Stern anchors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stern anchors. 401.15 Section 401.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.15 Stern anchors. (a)...

  9. Signalling by tips.

    PubMed

    Feijó, José A; Costa, Sílvia S; Prado, Ana Margarida; Becker, Jörg D; Certal, Ana Catarina

    2004-10-01

    New molecules, including protein kinases, lipids and molecules that have neurotransmitter activities in animals have emerged as important players in tip-growing cells. Transcriptomics analysis reveals that the largest single class of genes expressed in pollen tubes encode signal transducers, reflecting the necessity to decode complex and diverse pathways that are associated with tip growth. Many of these pathways may use common intracellular second messengers, with ions and reactive oxygen species emerging as two major common denominators in many of the processes involved in tip growth. These second messengers might influence the actin cytoskeleton through known interactions with actin-binding proteins. In turn, changes in the dynamic properties of the cytoskeleton would define the basic polarity events needed to shape and modify tip-growing cells. PMID:15337103

  10. Tips for labor coaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... some tips for getting prepared. Before the big day arrives Labor coaches should go to childbirth classes ... get through her labor and delivery. When the day arrives You might be at the hospital for ...

  11. Technology Tips: A Potpourri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuoco, Albert A.; And Others, Eds.

    1994-01-01

    Contains tips from readers about using technology in the classroom, including notebook computers, classroom sets of calculators, geometry software, LOGO software, publisher discounts, curriculum materials in CD-ROM, and volunteer help in computers and computer networking for schools. (MKR)

  12. Head Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    Head Injury Prevention Tips American Association of Neurological Surgeons 5550 Meadowbrook Drive, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-3852 ... defined as a blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the ...

  13. Insider conference tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Attending an educator conference and its associated exhibit hall can be a rewarding experience for your brain. But if you keep in mind these insider's tips, your feet, arms, stomach, and wallet will also thank you.

  14. Tips for Daily Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Stroke Weight Training After Stroke Tips for Improving Fine Motor Skills Functional Tone Management Arm Training Program Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Emotional & Behavioral Challenges Self-Esteem after Stroke Post-Stroke Mood Disorders One-side ...

  15. Footwear Selection Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foot Health Information Tips for Healthy Feet Footwear & Products Foot Health Awareness Diabetes Awareness What is a Podiatrist? Today's Podiatrist Education & Professional Development Podiatric Education Young Physicians Annual Scientific Meeting Webinars ...

  16. Reliable anchoring groups for single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. Teresa; Leary, Edmund; Evangeli, Charalambos; Arroyo, Carlos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraïit, Nicolás

    2012-02-01

    In the field of molecular electronics, thiols have been extensively used as the most common anchoring groups to bind molecules to gold electrodes. However, other anchoring groups as amines can provide interesting advantages. Recently, C-60 has been also proposed as a possible very efficient binding group. In this talk, I will present our studies on molecular junctions formed by thiol-, amine-, and C-60-terminated molecules. We use a STM (scanning tunneling microscope) break-junction technique to create and characterized single-molecule junctions both in ambient and liquid environment. We compare thiols and amines on the alkane family and an oligo(phenylene ethynylene). Our study of the molecular-junction stretching length allows us to conclude that thiols affect atomic rearrangement at the electrodes significantly more than amines. Using C-60-terminated molecules, we have recently introduced a new technique for controllably wiring one molecule at a time. We first get STM images to located isolated molecules on a gold substrate, which are then specifically targeted and contacted using a STM gold tip. This technique offers a significant improvement over other techniques, as it guaranties that one and only one molecule is contacted at a time between the electrodes.

  17. Ten Tips for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, Robert Lee

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares some tips for teachers. His tips are as follows: (1) a teacher should forget his or her education; (2) a teacher should forget the theory (3) a teacher should remember that he or she is a translator, not an originator; (4) a teacher should respect his or her students; (5) a teacher should be true to his or her…

  18. Ultra-fast in-situ X-ray studies of evolving columnar dendrites in solidifying steel weld pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirihanage, W. U.; Di Michiel, M.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2015-06-01

    High-brilliance polychromatic synchrotron radiation has been used to conduct in-situ studies of the solidification microstructure evolution during simulated welding. The welding simulations were realized by rapidly fusing ∼ 5 mm spot in Fe-Cr-Ni steel. During the solid- liquid-solid phase transformations, a section of the weld pool was placed in an incident 50-150 keV polychromatic synchrotron X-ray beam, in a near-horizontal position at a very low inclination angle. Multiple high-resolution 2D detectors with very high frame rates were utilized to capture time resolved X-ray diffraction data from suitably oriented solid dendrites evolving in the weld pool. Comprehensive analysis of the diffraction data revealed individual and overall dendritic growth characteristics and relevant melt and solid flow dynamics during weld pool solidification, which was completed within 1.5 s. Columnar dendrite tip velocities were estimated from the experimental data and during early stages of solidification were exceeded 4 mm/s. The most remarkable observation revealed through the time-resolved reciprocal space observations are correlated to significant tilting of columnar type dendrites at their root during solidification, presumably caused by convective currents in the weld pool. When the columnar dendrite tilting are transformed to respective metric linear tilting velocities at the dendrite tip; tilting velocities are found to be in the same order of magnitude as the columnar tip growth velocities, suggesting a highly transient nature of growth conditions.

  19. Search for a solute-drag effect in dendritic solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Eckler, K.; Herlach, D.M. ); Aziz, M.J. . Div. of Applied Sciences)

    1994-03-01

    The authors report the results of an indirect experimental test for the solute-drag effect in alloy solidification by fitting the data of Eckler et.al. for Ni-B dendrite tip velocities vs undercooling to models in several ways. The unknown equilibrium partition coefficient, k[sub e], was varied as a fitting parameter. When they combine the dendrite growth model of Boettinger et al. with the Continuous Growth Model (CGM) of Aziz and Kaplan with solute drag, they cannot fit the data for any value of k[sub e]. When they combine dendrite growth theory with the CGM without solute drag, they obtain a reasonable fit to the data for k[sub e] = 4 [times] 10[sup [minus]6]. When they combine dendrite growth theory with a new partial-solute-drag interpolation between the with-solute-drag and the without-solute-drag versions of the CGM, they obtain a still better fit to the data for k[sub e] = 2.8 [times] 10[sup [minus

  20. Drosophila Hook-Related Protein (Girdin) Is Essential for Sensory Dendrite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Andrew; Polyanovsky, Andrey; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer

    2015-01-01

    The dendrite of the sensory neuron is surrounded by support cells and is composed of two specialized compartments: the inner segment and the sensory cilium. How the sensory dendrite is formed and maintained is not well understood. Hook-related proteins (HkRP) like Girdin, DAPLE, and Gipie are actin-binding proteins, implicated in actin organization and in cell motility. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster single member of the Hook-related protein family, Girdin, is essential for sensory dendrite formation and function. Mutations in girdin were identified during a screen for fly mutants with no mechanosensory function. Physiological, morphological, and ultrastructural studies of girdin mutant flies indicate that the mechanosensory neurons innervating external sensory organs (bristles) initially form a ciliated dendrite that degenerates shortly after, followed by the clustering of their cell bodies. Importantly, we observed that Girdin is expressed transiently during dendrite morphogenesis in three previously unidentified actin-based structures surrounding the inner segment tip and the sensory cilium. These actin structures are largely missing in girdin mutant. Defects in cilia are observed in other sensory organs such as those mediating olfaction and taste, suggesting that Girdin has a general role in forming sensory dendrites in Drosophila. These suggest that Girdin functions temporarily within the sensory organ and that this function is essential for the formation of the sensory dendrites via actin structures. PMID:26058848

  1. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  2. Auger anchors produce major cost savings

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, B.C.

    1981-10-01

    To meet specific-gravity standards, a 42-in.-diam, 0.598-in.-wall-thickness pipeline being installed in a glacial area full of potholes, peat swamps, and low-lying sections required 425 lb/ft of anchor hold-down. In spots where the underlying soil had an acceptable shear strength, the crew installed auger anchors (costing only $8/ft of pipeline) instead of the concrete set-on weights (at $80/ft) required in areas where the auger anchors would not hold; the savings amounted to about $380,000/mile of line laid.

  3. Anchoring Revisited: The Role of the Comparative Question

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Ina; Bohner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    When people estimate a numeric value after judging whether it is larger or smaller than a high or low anchor value (comparative question), estimates are biased in the direction of the anchor. One explanation for this anchoring effect is that people selectively access knowledge consistent with the anchor value as part of a positive test strategy. Two studies (total N = 184) supported the alternative explanation that people access knowledge consistent with their own answer to the comparative question. Specifically, anchoring effects emerged when the answer to the comparative question was unexpected (lower than the low anchor or higher than the high anchor). For expected answers (lower than the high anchor or higher than the low anchor), however, anchoring effects were attenuated or reversed. The anchor value itself was almost never reported as an absolute estimate. PMID:24454953

  4. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Achandira M.; Al-Bahri, Maiya; Burney, Ikram A.; Al-Haddabi, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a rare neoplasm with a non-specific and insidious presentation further complicated by the difficult diagnostic and therapeutic assessment. It has a low to intermediate risk of recurrence and metastasis. Unlike other soft tissue sarcomas or histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms, cytogenetic studies are very limited in FDCS cases. Although no specific chromosomal marker has yet been established, complex aberrations and different ploidy types have been documented. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with FDCS who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in February 2013. Ultrastructural, immunophenotypical and histological findings are reported. In addition, karyotypic findings showed deletions of the chromosomes 1p, 3q, 6q, 7q, 8q and 11q. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, these have not been reported previously in this tumour. Techniques such as spectral karyotyping may help to better characterise chromosomal abnormalities in this type of tumour. PMID:26355964

  5. Magnet pole tips

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-11-19

    An improved magnet more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  6. Magnet pole tips

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, Craig E.; Chasman, Chellis; Baltz, Anthony J.

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  7. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A preformed... the platinum group intended to be incorporated into a dental appliance, such as a denture, to...

  8. Behavior of soil anchors under dynamic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Picornell, M.; Olague, B.

    1997-07-01

    Helical anchors placed in a cohesionless soil in a laboratory setting were tested under static and dynamic loads. The dynamic tests were performed after subjecting the anchors to a seating load. The dynamic load had an intensity that changed in sinusoidal fashion and was superimposed to the static seating loads. Although, the anchors have a static pull-out capacity, when the dynamic loads are applied the anchor experiences additional deformations for each load cycle. The deformations per cycle are initially high but then decrease to a nearly constant rate. Eventually, the constant rate increases suddenly accelerating until failure. This failure can take place even at small fractions of the static pull-out capacity. The rate of deformation per load cycle is found to increase for larger seating loads and for larger dynamic pulsating loads. The results of this study shows that the designer can only adjust loads to decrease the deformation rate to suit the design life of the structure.

  9. Development of dendrite polarity in Drosophila neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drosophila neurons have dendrites that contain minus-end-out microtubules. This microtubule arrangement is different from that of cultured mammalian neurons, which have mixed polarity microtubules in dendrites. Results To determine whether Drosophila and mammalian dendrites have a common microtubule organization during development, we analyzed microtubule polarity in Drosophila dendritic arborization neuron dendrites at different stages of outgrowth from the cell body in vivo. As dendrites initially extended, they contained mixed polarity microtubules, like mammalian neurons developing in culture. Over a period of several days this mixed microtubule array gradually matured to a minus-end-out array. To determine whether features characteristic of dendrites were localized before uniform polarity was attained, we analyzed dendritic markers as dendrites developed. In all cases the markers took on their characteristic distribution while dendrites had mixed polarity. An axonal marker was also quite well excluded from dendrites throughout development, although this was perhaps more efficient in mature neurons. To confirm that dendrite character could be acquired in Drosophila while microtubules were mixed, we genetically disrupted uniform dendritic microtubule organization. Dendritic markers also localized correctly in this case. Conclusions We conclude that developing Drosophila dendrites initially have mixed microtubule polarity. Over time they mature to uniform microtubule polarity. Dendrite identity is established before the mature microtubule arrangement is attained, during the period of mixed microtubule polarity. PMID:23111238

  10. Load transfer mechanisms in anchored geosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryciw, Roman D.

    1990-12-01

    Success of an anchored geosynthetic system (AGS) depends on the satisfactory transfer of load between: the surface-deployed geosynthetic and anchors (typically ribbed reinforcing rods) driven into the slope; the geosynthetic and soil; and the anchors and soil. A study was performed to evaluate the load transfer mechanisms at these interfaces in an AGS. A mathematical model was developed for predicting the pullout resistance of plane ribbed inclusions. The model considered the contribution of both frictional and passive resistance components of pullout resistance. Optical observation of sand around the ribs was made to determine the behavior of soil around the moving ribs during pullout. A theoretical study disclosed that the optimum anchor orientation for stabilization of infinite slopes depends on several factors including slope angle and in-situ stresses. It typically ranges from 20 to 30 degree from the normal to the slope with the anchor driven upslope. An experimental study confirmed that the soil-geosynthetic interface friction angle may be correctly predicted from the residual or critical state friction angle of the sand. Equations were developed for load transfer at curved soil-fabric interfaces. An experimental study verified that the increases in soil stress with distance from the anchor may be predicted by the developed equations.

  11. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  12. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  13. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  14. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  15. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  16. The Use of Comics-Based Cases in Anchored Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneller, Matthew F.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to understand how comics fulfill the role of anchor in an anchored instruction learning environment. Anchored instruction addresses the inert knowledge problem through the use of realistic multimedia stories, or "anchors," that embed a problem and the necessary data to solve it within the narrative. In the…

  17. Tips from the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, R. Kay; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Tips for English-as-a-Second-Language classes include collecting passport stamps in an oral skills class (R. Kay Hart); turning process essays into treasure hunts (Margaret Moulton); using icebreakers (Beverly Williams, David Rutledge, Brent Green); and techniques for understanding course syllabi (Ruth Overman Fischer). (LB)

  18. Early Childhood Action Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Nina Sazer

    In response to requests for information from people and organizations all over the United States on how to contribute to the healthy development of young children, the Families and Work Institute has gathered concrete suggestions from leaders in diverse fields into this booklet of action tips. This effort was undertaken to support the "I Am Your…

  19. Tips for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishon, Dee; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This section includes (1) "Time Saver Options" (Dishon and P. W. O'Leary), which outlines ways to teach cooperative skills; (2) "Getting Started--Tips from Teachers," a collection of ideas for all levels; and (3) "Cooperative Mathematics Lesson Plans" for developing problem-solving skills, fractions, word problems, and number concepts. (JD)

  20. EcoTipping Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marten, Gerald G.; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2009-01-01

    Contrary to what we often hear and teach, there is good news to be found on the environmental front. Environmental success stories show us not only that sustainability is possible, but also how people have made it happen. We can make these stories and their lessons accessible to students with help from the EcoTipping Points Project, which has…

  1. Tips for Energy Savers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    According to 1986 U.S. Department of Energy data, 48% of our residential energy is used to heat and cool our homes, 16% goes for heating water, 12% is used to refrigerators and freezers, and the remaining 24% goes into lighting, cooking, and running appliances. This booklet contains tips for saving energy, including sections on: (1) draft-proof…

  2. Tips for Leading Walks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriesberg, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Offers reminders and tips for improving interpretive walks, including having a theme, drawing on basic teaching methods, drawing on all senses rather than just talking, being a role model to show how learning can be fun, using picture books, using tools of the trade to encourage visitors to learn for themselves, and playing games. (PVD)

  3. Health Tips for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  4. Kegel Exercise Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Español Kegel Exercise Tips Page Content What are Kegel exercises? To do Kegel exercises, you just squeeze your ... help with your bladder control. How do you exercise your pelvic muscles? Find the right muscles. Try ...

  5. Propeller Tip Flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebers, Fritz

    1932-01-01

    The present report is limited to a case of tip flutter recognized by experience as being important. It is the case where outside interferences force vibrations upon the propeller. Such interferences may be set up by the engine, or they may be the result of an unsymmetrical field of flow.

  6. TIPs for Technology Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, Susan; Sorge, Dennis H.; Russell, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the role of the teacher in effectively using technology in education based on the Technology Integration Project (TIP). Topics include why use technology; types of computer software; how to select software; software integration strategies; and effectively planning lessons that integrate the chosen software and integration strategy. (LRW)

  7. Dendritic cells in asthma.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Mary J; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2013-12-01

    The lungs are constantly exposed to antigens, most of which are non-pathogenic and do not require the induction of an immune response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are situated at the basolateral site of the lungs and continuously scan the environment to detect the presence of pathogens and subsequently initiate an immune response. They are a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells that exert specific functions. Compelling evidence is now provided that DCs are both sufficient and necessary to induce allergic responses against several inhaled harmless allergens. How various DC subsets exactly contribute to the induction of allergic asthma is currently a subject of intense investigation. We here review the current progress in this field. PMID:24455765

  8. Cellular and dendritic growth in rapidly solidified Al-Fe and Al-Cu alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shu Zu; Hunt, J.D. . Dept. of Materials); Gilgien, P.; Kurz, W. )

    1994-05-01

    A recent numerical model of cellular and dendritic growth has been extended into the high velocity region where the distribution coefficient, liquids slope and diffusion coefficients depend on the growth velocity. The primary spacing selection mechanism is modeled so that no a priori assumptions need be made about a spacing selection condition. The results are compared with experimental primary spacing measurements obtained using rapid laser resolidification and good agreement is found. The numerical results for undercooling and tip radii are compared with those predicted for dendrites using marginal stability arguments, showing the potential and limits of the analytical models. The effect of high velocity on microsegregation is examined and microsegregation profiles are predicted.

  9. Synthesis of platinum dendrites and nanowires via directed electrochemical nanowire assembly.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Jason K; Arnold, Craig B

    2011-02-01

    Directed electrochemical nanowire assembly is a promising high growth rate technique for synthesizing electrically connected nanowires and dendrites at desired locations. Here we demonstrate the directed growth and morphological control of edge-supported platinum nanostructures by applying an alternating electric field across a chloroplatinic acid solution. The dendrite structure is characterized with respect to the driving frequency, amplitude, offset, and salt concentration and is well-explained by classical models. Control over the tip diameter, side branch spacing, and amplitude is demonstrated, opening the door to novel device architectures for sensing and catalytic applications. PMID:21235218

  10. 14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP TOP HOUSE. ID-31-C-12 WOODEN STRUCTURE IS VISIBLE IN TOP LEFT. CABLES VISIBLE LEFT AND CENTER OF TAILINGS. HOUSE IS JUST OVER APEX OF TAILINGS. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  11. Tipping off endothelial tubes: nitric oxide drives tip cells.

    PubMed

    Priya, Mani Krishna; Sahu, Giriraj; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Goldy, Naga; Sundaresan, Abaya Meenakshi; Jadhav, Vivek; Barathkumar, T R; Saran, Uttara; Jaffar Ali, B M; Roberts, David D; Bera, Amal Kanti; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2015-04-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is a complex process that warrants cell migration, proliferation, tip cell formation, ring formation, and finally tube formation. Angiogenesis is initiated by a single leader endothelial cell called "tip cell," followed by vessel elongation by "stalk cells." Tip cells are characterized by their long filopodial extensions and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and endocan. Although nitric oxide (NO) is an important modulator of angiogenesis, its role in angiogenic sprouting and specifically in tip cell formation is poorly understood. The present study tested the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/NO/cyclic GMP (cGMP) signaling in tip cell formation. In primary endothelial cell culture, about 40% of the tip cells showed characteristic sub-cellular localization of eNOS toward the anterior progressive end of the tip cells, and eNOS became phosphorylated at serine 1177. Loss of eNOS suppressed tip cell formation. Live cell NO imaging demonstrated approximately 35% more NO in tip cells compared with stalk cells. Tip cells showed increased level of cGMP relative to stalk cells. Further, the dissection of NO downstream signaling using pharmacological inhibitors and inducers indicates that NO uses the sGC/cGMP pathway in tip cells to lead angiogenesis. Taken together, the present study confirms that eNOS/NO/cGMP signaling defines the direction of tip cell migration and thereby initiates new blood vessel formation. PMID:25510468

  12. Anchors as Semantic Primes in Value Construction: An EEG Study of the Anchoring Effect

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiang; Qiu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous research regarding anchoring effects has demonstrated that human judgments are often assimilated to irrelevant information. Studies have demonstrated that anchors influence the economic valuation of various products and experiences; however, the cognitive explanations of this effect remain controversial, and its neural mechanisms have rarely been explored. In the current study, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG) experiment to investigate the anchoring effect on willingness to accept (WTA) for an aversive hedonic experience and the role of anchors in this judgment heuristic. The behavioral results demonstrated that random numbers affect participants’ WTA for listening to pieces of noise. The participants asked for higher pay after comparing their WTA with higher numbers. The EEG results indicated that anchors also influenced the neural underpinnings of the valuation process. Specifically, when a higher anchor number was drawn, larger P2 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited, reflecting the anticipation of more intensive pain from the subsequent noise. Moreover, higher anchors induced a stronger theta band power increase compared with lower anchors when subjects listened to the noises, indicating that the participants felt more unpleasant during the actual experience of the noise. The levels of unpleasantness during both anticipation and experience were consistent with the semantic information implied by the anchors. Therefore, these data suggest that a semantic priming process underlies the anchoring effect in WTA. This study provides proof for the robustness of the anchoring effect and neural evidence of the semantic priming model. Our findings indicate that activated contextual information, even seemingly irrelevant, can be embedded in the construction of economic value in the brain. PMID:26439926

  13. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/007210.htm Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a procedure to create new connections ...

  14. Can dendritic cells see light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    There are many reports showing that low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) can enhance wound healing, upregulate cell proliferation and has anti-apoptotic effects by activating intracellular protective genes. In the field of immune response study, it is not known with any certainty whether light/laser is proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Increasingly in recent times dendritic cells have been found to play an important role in inflammation and the immunological response. In this study, we try to look at the impact of low level near infrared light (810-nm) on murine bone-marrow derived dendritic cells. Changes in surface markers, including MHC II, CD80 and CD11c and the secretion of interleukins induced by light may provide additional evidence to reveal the mystery of how light affects the maturation of dendritic cells as well how these light-induced mature dendritic cells would affect the activation of adaptive immune response.

  15. Optimal Current Transfer in Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Integration of synaptic currents across an extensive dendritic tree is a prerequisite for computation in the brain. Dendritic tapering away from the soma has been suggested to both equalise contributions from synapses at different locations and maximise the current transfer to the soma. To find out how this is achieved precisely, an analytical solution for the current transfer in dendrites with arbitrary taper is required. We derive here an asymptotic approximation that accurately matches results from numerical simulations. From this we then determine the diameter profile that maximises the current transfer to the soma. We find a simple quadratic form that matches diameters obtained experimentally, indicating a fundamental architectural principle of the brain that links dendritic diameters to signal transmission. PMID:27145441

  16. Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dendritic Solidification Expepriment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dendrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior of widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle missions of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Expepriment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dendrites. Shown here is an exploded view of major elements of TDSE. A similar view is available with labels. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  17. Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dendrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior or widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle missions of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dendrites. Shown here is an exploded view of major elements of the TDSE. A similar view is availble without labels. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  18. Crossed receptive field components and crossed dendrites in cat sacrocaudal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Gladfelter, W E; Millecchia, R J; Pubols, L M; Sonty, R V; Ritz, L A; Covalt-Dunning, D; Culberson, J; Brown, P B

    1993-10-01

    The hypothesis that sacrocaudal dorsal horn neurons with crossed receptive field components on the tail have dendrites which cross to the contralateral dorsal horn was tested in a combined electrophysiological and morphological study. Dorsal horn cells in the sacrocaudal spinal cord of anesthetized cats were penetrated with horseradish peroxidase-filled microelectrodes. After mapping their low threshold mechanoreceptive fields, cells were iontophoretically injected with horseradish peroxidase. A sample of 16 well-stained cells was obtained in laminae III and IV. Cells with receptive fields crossing the dorsal midline of the tail (n = 8) had somata in the lateral ipsilateral dorsal horn, and some of these cells (5/8) had dendrites which crossed to the lateral contralateral dorsal horn. Cells with receptive fields spanning the ventral midline (n = 2) were located near the center of the fused dorsal horn, and one of these had bilateral dendrites in this region. Cells with receptive fields on the lateral tail, crossing neither the dorsal nor the ventral midline (n = 6), had cell bodies in the middle of the ipsilateral dorsal horn; half had only ipsilateral dendrites, and half had crossed dendritic branches. Although the relationship between cell receptive field (RF) location (RF center, expressed as distance from tips of toes) and mediolateral location of the cell body was statistically significant, the correlation between crossed RF components and crossed dendritic branches was not significant. PMID:8254116

  19. Monitoring ground anchor using non-destructive ground anchor integrity test (NDT-GRANIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbany, Z.; Handayani, G.

    2015-09-01

    Monitoring at ground anchor commonly uses a pull out test method, therefor we developing a non-destructive ground anchor integrity testing (NDT-GRANIT). NDT-GRANIT using the principle of seismic waves that have been modified into form of sweep signal, the signal will be demodulated, filtered, and Fourier transformation (inverse discrete Fourier transform) so the data can be interpreted reflected wave from the ground anchor. The method was applied to determine whether the ground anchor still gripped in the subsurface by looking the attenuation of the wave generated sources. From the result we can see that ground anchor does not grip. To validate the results of the comparison method of measurement used pile integrity test.

  20. Monitoring ground anchor using non-destructive ground anchor integrity test (NDT-GRANIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Robbany, Z. Handayani, G.

    2015-09-30

    Monitoring at ground anchor commonly uses a pull out test method, therefor we developing a non-destructive ground anchor integrity testing (NDT-GRANIT). NDT-GRANIT using the principle of seismic waves that have been modified into form of sweep signal, the signal will be demodulated, filtered, and Fourier transformation (inverse discrete Fourier transform) so the data can be interpreted reflected wave from the ground anchor. The method was applied to determine whether the ground anchor still gripped in the subsurface by looking the attenuation of the wave generated sources. From the result we can see that ground anchor does not grip. To validate the results of the comparison method of measurement used pile integrity test.

  1. TIPS: 25 years later.

    PubMed

    Rössle, Martin

    2013-11-01

    In the 25 years since the first TIPS intervention has been performed, technical standards, indications, and contraindications have been set up. The previous considerable problem of shunt failure by thrombosis or intimal proliferation in the stent or in the draining hepatic vein has been reduced considerably by the availability of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents resulting in reduced rebleeding and improved survival. Unfortunately, most clinical studies have been performed prior to the release of the covered stent and, therefore, do not represent the present state of the art. In spite of this, TIPS has gained increasing acceptance in the treatment of the various complications of portal hypertension and vascular diseases of the liver. PMID:23811307

  2. Propeller tip vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Robert T.; Sullivan, John P.

    1990-01-01

    Propeller wakes interacting with aircraft aerodynamic surfaces are a source of noise and vibration. For this reason, flow visualization work on the motion of the helical tip vortex over a wing and through the second stage of a counterrotation propeller (CRP) has been pursued. Initially, work was done on the motion of a propeller helix as it passes over the center of a 9.0 aspect ratio wing. The propeller tip vortex experiences significant spanwise displacements when passing across a lifting wing. A stationary propeller blade or stator was installed behind the rotating propeller to model the blade vortex interaction in a CRP. The resulting vortex interaction was found to depend on the relative vortex strengths and vortex sign.

  3. Writing tips for authors.

    PubMed

    Servodidio, C A

    1998-03-01

    Writing an article for publication may seem intimidating to you at first, but believe it or not, it can be exciting and fun. When you initially accept a writing assignment, research a clinical "gut feeling," or describe a nursing scenario, it may seem like a gargantuan task, but when you break it into small segments or steps you may be surprised how quickly you will complete your project. This article will offer some helpful hints or tips to get you started. Many of the tips will apply specifically for submission of an article to insight; absorb all clues that might be helpful and disregard anything that won't help you. Remember, you can get your article published, and the insight editorial board and peer reviewers only want to facilitate your success! PMID:9866524

  4. Benchmark experiments and numerical modelling of the columnar-equiaxed dendritic growth in the transparent alloy Neopentylglycol-(d)Camphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturz, L.; Wu, M.; Zimmermann, G.; Ludwig, A.; Ahmadein, M.

    2015-06-01

    Solidification benchmark experiments on columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth, as well as the columnar-equiaxed transition have been carried out under diffusion-dominated conditions for heat and mass transfer in a low-gravity environment. The system under investigation is the transparent organic alloy system Neopentylglycol-37.5wt.-%(d)Camphor, processed aboard a TEXUS sounding rocket flight. Solidifications was observed by standard optical methods in addition to measurements of the thermal fields within the sheet like experimental cells of 1 mm thickness. The dendrite tip kinetic, primary dendrite arm spacing, temporal and spatial temperature evolution, columnar tip velocity and the critical parameters at the CET have been analysed. Here we focus on a detailed comparison of the experiment “TRACE” with a 5-phase volume averaging model to validate the numerical model and to give insight into the corresponding physical mechanisms and parameters leading to CET. The results are discussed in terms of sensitivity versus numerical parameters.

  5. Involvement of SARA in Axon and Dendrite Growth

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Cristina Isabel; Siri, Sebastián Omar; Conde, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    SARA (Smad Anchor for Receptor Activation) plays a crucial role in Rab5-mediated endocytosis in cell lines localizing to early endosomes where it regulates morphology and function. Here, we analyzed the role of SARA during neuronal development and tested whether it functions as a regulator of endocytic trafficking of selected axonal and membrane proteins. Suppression of SARA perturbs the appearance of juxtanuclear endocytic recycling compartments and the neurons show long axons with large growth cones. Furthermore, surface distribution of the cell adhesion molecule L1 in axons and the fusion of vesicles containing transferring receptor (TfR) in dendrites were increased in neurons where SARA was silenced. Conversely, SARA overexpression generated large early endosomes and reduced neurite outgrowth. Taken together, our findings suggest a significant contribution of SARA to key aspects of neuronal development, including neurite formation. PMID:26405814

  6. Involvement of SARA in Axon and Dendrite Growth.

    PubMed

    Arias, Cristina Isabel; Siri, Sebastián Omar; Conde, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    SARA (Smad Anchor for Receptor Activation) plays a crucial role in Rab5-mediated endocytosis in cell lines localizing to early endosomes where it regulates morphology and function. Here, we analyzed the role of SARA during neuronal development and tested whether it functions as a regulator of endocytic trafficking of selected axonal and membrane proteins. Suppression of SARA perturbs the appearance of juxtanuclear endocytic recycling compartments and the neurons show long axons with large growth cones. Furthermore, surface distribution of the cell adhesion molecule L1 in axons and the fusion of vesicles containing transferring receptor (TfR) in dendrites were increased in neurons where SARA was silenced. Conversely, SARA overexpression generated large early endosomes and reduced neurite outgrowth. Taken together, our findings suggest a significant contribution of SARA to key aspects of neuronal development, including neurite formation. PMID:26405814

  7. Dendritic growth of single viscous finger under the influence of linear anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Mitsugu; Yamada, Hideaki

    1990-01-01

    As a hydrodynamic analog of dendritic crystal growth, we have performed viscous fingering experiments under the influence of linear anisotropy through a straight groove. A single finger on the groove always tends to grow faster, accompanied by side branches. It is found that (1) the finger tip profile is approximated by a parabola, (2) the finger tip speed v and the radius ρ satisfies the relation vρ 2 = constant for a wide range of v, and (3) the side branch spacing λ is approximately proportional to ρ. The crossover behavior to the constant ρ is also found for larger values of v in the v-ρ relation.

  8. Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes on tips of cantilevers and nanowires

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Eres, Gyula; Wei, Yayi; Greenbaum, Elias; Lee, Ida

    2004-06-29

    A method is described for catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructures on the tips of nanowires, cantilevers, conductive micro/nanometer structures, wafers and the like. The method can be used for production of carbon nanotube-anchored cantilevers that can significantly improve the performance of scaning probe microscopy (AFM, EFM etc). The invention can also be used in many other processes of micro and/or nanofabrication with carbon nanotubes/fibers. Key elements of this invention include: (1) Proper selection of a metal catalyst and programmable pulsed electrolytic deposition of the desired specific catalyst precisely at the tip of a substrate, (2) Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes/fibers at the catalyst-deposited tips, (3) Control of carbon nanotube/fiber growth pattern by manipulation of tip shape and growth conditions, and (4) Automation for mass production.

  9. Prediction of the operating point of dendrites growing under coupled thermosolutal control at high growth velocity.

    PubMed

    Mullis, A M

    2011-06-01

    We use a phase-field model for the growth of dendrites in dilute binary alloys under coupled thermosolutal control to explore the dependence of the dendrite tip velocity and radius of curvature upon undercooling, Lewis number (ratio of thermal to solutal diffusivity), alloy concentration, and equilibrium partition coefficient. Constructed in the quantitatively valid thin-interface limit, the model uses advanced numerical techniques such as mesh adaptivity, multigrid, and implicit time stepping to solve the nonisothermal alloy solidification problem for material parameters that are realistic for metals. From the velocity and curvature data we estimate the dendrite operating point parameter σ*. We find that σ* is nonconstant and, over a wide parameter space, displays first a local minimum followed by a local maximum as the undercooling is increased. This behavior is contrasted with a similar type of behavior to that predicted by simple marginal stability models to occur in the radius of curvature, on the assumption of constant σ*. PMID:21797374

  10. Dendrite characteristics in directionally solidified Pb-8 pct Au and Pb-3 pct Pd alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of Pb-8 pct Au and Pb-3 pct Pd alloy specimens which have been partially directionally solidified and then quenched is performed in order to characterize their dendritic microstructural details and solute composition profiles. A controlled sectioning technique is employed to measure dendrite tip radii. It is found that most of the observed behavior is predicted quite well by a modification of the Burden and Hunt (1974) model proposed by Laxmanan (1984), in addition to the models based on the marginal stability approach. Results indicate that quantitative comparison of the primary arm spacing measurements can not form the basis of distinguishing among the various dendrite growth models in a positive temperature gradient.

  11. Length Selection in Dendritic Growth of Electrohydrodynamic Convection in a Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Nadina; Gleeson, J. T.

    2001-03-01

    Dendritic growth of electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) with parallel magnetic field in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) has been already subjected to one important experiment (J.T.Gleeson, Nature, 385, 511 (1997)). Further exploration of this interesting pattern-forming system is presented here. The most important question is: What sets the length scale for the dendrite? In order to find this, we use two control parameters in our experiment: the thickness d of the liquid crystal film, and the intensity H of the magnetic field. The first one is proportional to the pattern wavelength in the traditional EHC experiment, while the second determines the distance of externally imposed anisotropy, the magnetic coherence length ξ_m. By systematically varying d and ξ_m, we relate these two imposed lengths to those that characterize the dendrite: the tip radius of curvature ρ and the interface width w. An estimate of the critical field HC for the subcritical bifurcation is also provided.

  12. Dendrite-Free Lithium Deposition with Self-Aligned Nanorod Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yaohui; Qian, Jiangfeng; Xu, Wu; Russell, Selena M.; Chen, Xilin; Nasybulin, Eduard; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark H.; Mei, Donghai; Cao, Ruiguo; Ding, Fei; Cresce, Arthur V.; Xu, Kang; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-12-10

    Suppressing lithium (Li) dendrite growth is one of the most critical challenges for the development of Li metal batteries. We recently proposed a novel self-healing electrostatic shield (SHES) mechanism which can fundamentally change the Li deposition behavior and lead to the growth of dendrite-free Li films. Here, we report for the first time that the as-deposited dendrite-free Li films grown with assistance of SHES additive are actually composed of highly-aligned and compacted Li nanorods with hemispherical tips. Both surface and cross sectional morphology evolution of the Li films during repeated Li deposition/stripping processes were systematically investigated. A new model has been established to explain the formation and evolution of the Li nanorods. A fundamental understanding on the internal structure and evolution of Li metal films may lead to new approaches to stabilize the long term cycling stability of Li metal anode.

  13. Follow-on Research Activities for the Rensselaer Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (RIDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaCombe, J. C.; Koss, M. B.; Lupulescu, A. O.; Frei, J. E.; Giummarra, C.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    The RIDGE effort continues the aegis of the earlier, NASA-sponsored, Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) series of experiments through the continued analysis of microgravity data acquired during these earlier space flights. The preliminary observations presented here demonstrate that there are significant differences between SCN and the more anisotropic PVA dendrites. The side branch structure becomes amplified only further behind the tip, and the interface shape is generally wider (i.e. more hyperbolic than parabolic) in PVA than in SCN. These characteristics are seen to affect the process of heat transport. Additionally, the dendrites grown during the fourth United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-4) exhibit time-dependent growth characteristics and may not always have reached steady-state growth during the experiment.

  14. Tipping point leadership.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2003-04-01

    When William Bratton was appointed police commissioner of New York City in 1994, turf wars over jurisdiction and funding were rife and crime was out of control. Yet in less than two years, and without an increase in his budget, Bratton turned New York into the safest large city in the nation. And the NYPD was only the latest of five law-enforcement agencies Bratton had turned around. In each case, he succeeded in record time despite limited resources, a demotivated staff, opposition from powerful vested interests, and an organization wedded to the status quo. Bratton's turnarounds demonstrate what the authors call tipping point leadership. The theory of tipping points hinges on the insight that in any organization, fundamental changes can occur quickly when the beliefs and energies of a critical mass of people create an epidemic movement toward an idea. Bratton begins by overcoming the cognitive hurdles that block organizations from recognizing the need for change. He does this by putting managers face-to-face with operational problems. Next, he manages around limitations on funds, staff, or equipment by concentrating resources on the areas that are most in need of change and that have the biggest payoffs. He meanwhile solves the motivation problem by singling out key influencers--people with disproportionate power due to their connections or persuasive abilities. Finally, he closes off resistance from powerful opponents. Not every CEO has the personality to be a Bill Bratton, but his successes are due to much more than his personality. He relies on a remarkably consistent method that any manager looking to turn around an organization can use to overcome the forces of inertia and reach the tipping point. PMID:12687920

  15. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams’s Kmult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  16. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Khang, Tsung Fei; Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams's K mult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid induces osteocyte dendrite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Karin, Norm J.

    2007-05-25

    A method was developed to measure dendrite formation in bone cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was found to stimulate dendrite outgrowth. It is postulated that LPA plays a role in regulating the osteocyte network in vivo.

  18. 50 CFR 622.432 - Anchoring restriction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anchoring restriction. 622.432 Section 622.432 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Reef...

  19. 50 CFR 622.432 - Anchoring restriction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anchoring restriction. 622.432 Section 622.432 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Reef...

  20. Weighing Anchor in the "Ragged Times"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Tonya B.

    2012-01-01

    In today's middle school classroom, grouping is an essential learning tool that enhances students' ability to collaborate with others and deepen their own thinking. Implementing group work effectively, though, can be a challenge, especially since groups tend to end their work at "ragged" or staggered times. Creating "anchor activities"--respectful…

  1. Finding Chemical Anchors in the Kitchen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haim, Liliana

    2005-01-01

    ''The Chemistry Kitchen'', a unit composed of five activities with kitchen elements for elementary students ages 9-11, introduces the children to the skills and chemical working ideas to be used later as anchors for chemical concepts. These activities include kitchen elements, determining the relative mass and so on.

  2. International Lunar Network (ILN) Anchor Nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the United States' contribution to the International Lunar Network (ILN) project, the Anchor Nodes project. The ILN is an initiative of 9 national space agencies to establish a set of robotic geophysical monitoring stations on the surface of the Moon. The project is aimed at furthering the understanding of the lunar composition, and interior structure.

  3. Expectations of Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rick; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Behaviorally anchored rating scales (BARS) are no better or worse than other methods when assessed on a quantitative basis but have greater potential when assessed on use and qualitative criteria. Suggestions are offered for extending BARS research to process questions and domains other than performance appraisal. (Author)

  4. Simple suture and anchor in rabbit hips

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Filho, Fernando Cal; Guarniero, Roberto; de Godoy Júnior, Rui Maciel; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Matos, Marcos Almeida; Garcia, Lucas Cortizo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Using biomechanical studies, this research aims to compare hip capsulorrhaphy in rabbits, carried out with two different techniques: capsulorrhaphy with simple sutures and with anchors. Method Thirteen New Zealand Albino (Oryctolaguscuniculus) male rabbits, twenty-six hip joints, were used. First, a pilot project was performed with three rabbits (six hip joints). This experiment consisted of ten rabbits divided into two groups: group 1 underwent capsulorrhaphy on both right and left hips with simple suture using polyglycolic acid absorbable thread, and group 2 underwent capsulorrhaphy with titanium anchors. After a four-week postoperative period, the animals were euthanized and the hip joints were frozen. On the same day of the biomechanical studies, after the hip joints were previously unfrozen, the following parameters were evaluated: rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy. Results There was no relevant statistical difference in rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy between the simple suture and anchor groups. Conclusion Through biomechanical analyses, using parameters of rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy, it has been shown that capsulorrhaphy with simple suture and with anchors has similar results in rabbit hip joints. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:24453618

  5. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.401... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative... must require the home to be secured against the wind, as described in this section. The...

  6. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.401... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative... must require the home to be secured against the wind, as described in this section. The...

  7. Anchoring the Panic Disorder Severity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keough, Meghan E.; Porter, Eliora; Kredlow, M. Alexandra; Worthington, John J.; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Pollack, Mark H.; Shear, M. Katherine; Simon, Naomi M.

    2012-01-01

    The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is a clinician-administered measure of panic disorder symptom severity widely used in clinical research. This investigation sought to provide clinically meaningful anchor points for the PDSS both in terms of clinical severity as measured by the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) and to extend…

  8. Mechanisms and Function of Dendritic Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Matthew J.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Dendritic exocytosis is required for a broad array of neuronal functions including retrograde signaling, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and establishment of neuronal morphology. While the details of synaptic vesicle exocytosis from presynaptic terminals have been intensely studied for decades, the mechanisms of dendritic exocytosis are only now emerging. Here we review the molecules and mechanisms of dendritic exocytosis, and discuss how exocytosis from dendrites influences neuronal function and circuit plasticity. PMID:21382547

  9. Dendritic growth in the presence of convection. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaghton, Pantelis John

    1988-01-01

    The motion of the freezing front between a dendritic crystal and a supercooled liquid is studied using an interface evolution equation derived from a boundary integral transformation of the transient convective-diffusion equation. A new steady-state theory is introduced that incorporates the effects of convection in dendritic growth. It is shown that in the absence of capillary effects the shape of the crystal-melt interface is a paraboloid of revolution, similar to that found in situations where diffusion is the sole heat transfer mechanism. A relation between the supercooling, the product of the tip velocity and tip radius, and the strength of the flow is derived which reduces to the well-known Ivantsov theory in the absence of convection. A non-linear interface-tracking algorithm is developed and used to study the temporal and spatial evolution of the dendritic interface. The important role of capillarity and convection on the interface dynamics is established and the response of the interface to finite amplitude disturbances is examined for the first time. Tip splitting is identified as the dominant destabilization mechanism in the limit of zero surface tension. Finite surface tension leads to interface stabilization, irrespective of the magnitude and structure of the external perturbations. Finally, convection significantly decreases the magnitude of the freezing velocity.

  10. Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maines, Brant H.; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2000-11-01

    Cavitation in vortical flows is a problem of practical importance, that is relatively unexplored. Vortical structures of importance range from the eddies occurring randomly in space and time in turbulent flows to the developed vortices that occur at the tips of lifting surfaces and at the hubs of propellers and hydraulic turbines. A variety of secondary flow phenomena such as the horse shoe vortices that form around bridge piers, chute blocks and struts, and the secondary vortices found in the clearance passages of turbomachinery are also important cavitation sites. Tip vortex cavitation can be viewed as a canonical problem that captures many of the essential physics associated with vortex cavitation in general. This paper describes the inception process and focuses on the high levels of tension that can be sustained in the flow, which appears to scale with the blade loading. High speed video visualization indicates that the details of how free stream nuclei are ingested plays a major role in the nucleation and inception process. A new photographic technique was used to obtain high quality images of the bubble growth process at framing rates as high as 40,000 fps. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research

  11. 345. Caltrans, Photographer September 20, 1935 "WEST ANCHOR ARM"; DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    345. Caltrans, Photographer September 20, 1935 "WEST ANCHOR ARM"; DETAIL VIEW OF CANTILEVER TRUSS WEST ANCHOR ARM UNDER CONSTRUCTION. 7-1023 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  13. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  14. 63. ANCHOR WINDLASS ROOM AFT LOOKING FORWARD ON CENTERLINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. ANCHOR WINDLASS ROOM - AFT LOOKING FORWARD ON CENTERLINE SHOWING LINE REELS, MAIN ANCHOR CHAIN, CHAIN STOPPERS, CAPSTAN AND CONTROLS. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  15. 9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSSCOVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSS-COVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR LEFT OF ANCHOR BOLTS) - Nisqually Suspension Bridge, Spanning Nisqually River on Service Road, Longmire, Pierce County, WA

  16. Interpretation of Fracture Toughness and R-Curve Behavior by Direct Observation of Microfracture Process in Ti-Based Dendrite-Containing Amorphous Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Changwoo; Kim, Choongnyun Paul; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2015-04-01

    Fracture properties of Ti-based amorphous alloys containing ductile β dendrites were explained by directly observing microfracture processes. Three Ti-based amorphous alloys were fabricated by adding Ti, Zr, V, Ni, Al, and Be into a Ti-6Al-4V alloy by a vacuum arc melting method. The effective sizes of dendrites varied from 63 to 104 μm, while their volume fractions were almost constant within the range from 74 to 76 pct. The observation of the microfracture of the alloy containing coarse dendrites revealed that a microcrack initiated at the amorphous matrix of the notch tip and propagated along the amorphous matrix. In the alloy containing fine dendrites, the crack propagation was frequently blocked by dendrites, and many deformation bands were formed near or in front of the propagating crack, thereby resulting in a zig-zag fracture path. Crack initiation toughness was almost the same at 35 to 36 MPa√m within error ranges in the three alloys because it was heavily affected by the stress applied to the specimen at the time of crack initiation at the crack tip as well as strength levels of the alloys. According to the R-curve behavior, however, the best overall fracture properties in the alloy containing fine dendrites were explained by mechanisms of blocking of the crack growth and crack blunting and deformation band formation at dendrites.

  17. An Inverse Approach for Elucidating Dendritic Function

    PubMed Central

    Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; Stiefel, Klaus M.

    2010-01-01

    We outline an inverse approach for investigating dendritic function–structure relationships by optimizing dendritic trees for a priori chosen computational functions. The inverse approach can be applied in two different ways. First, we can use it as a “hypothesis generator” in which we optimize dendrites for a function of general interest. The optimization yields an artificial dendrite that is subsequently compared to real neurons. This comparison potentially allows us to propose hypotheses about the function of real neurons. In this way, we investigated dendrites that optimally perform input-order detection. Second, we can use it as a “function confirmation” by optimizing dendrites for functions hypothesized to be performed by classes of neurons. If the optimized, artificial, dendrites resemble the dendrites of real neurons the artificial dendrites corroborate the hypothesized function of the real neuron. Moreover, properties of the artificial dendrites can lead to predictions about yet unmeasured properties. In this way, we investigated wide-field motion integration performed by the VS cells of the fly visual system. In outlining the inverse approach and two applications, we also elaborate on the nature of dendritic function. We furthermore discuss the role of optimality in assigning functions to dendrites and point out interesting future directions. PMID:21258425

  18. Gardening Health and Safety Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health History Parent Information Vaccines & Immunizations Healthy Living Gardening Health and Safety Tips Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gardening can be a great way to enjoy the ...

  19. Gas only nozzle fuel tip

    DOEpatents

    Bechtel, William Theodore; Fitts, David Orus; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne

    2002-01-01

    A diffusion flame nozzle gas tip is provided to convert a dual fuel nozzle to a gas only nozzle. The nozzle tip diverts compressor discharge air from the passage feeding the diffusion nozzle air swirl vanes to a region vacated by removal of the dual fuel components, so that the diverted compressor discharge air can flow to and through effusion holes in the end cap plate of the nozzle tip. In a preferred embodiment, the nozzle gas tip defines a cavity for receiving the compressor discharge air from a peripheral passage of the nozzle for flow through the effusion openings defined in the end cap plate.

  20. AnchorDock: Blind and Flexible Anchor-Driven Peptide Docking.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shimon, Avraham; Niv, Masha Y

    2015-05-01

    The huge conformational space stemming from the inherent flexibility of peptides is among the main obstacles to successful and efficient computational modeling of protein-peptide interactions. Current peptide docking methods typically overcome this challenge using prior knowledge from the structure of the complex. Here we introduce AnchorDock, a peptide docking approach, which automatically targets the docking search to the most relevant parts of the conformational space. This is done by precomputing the free peptide's structure and by computationally identifying anchoring spots on the protein surface. Next, a free peptide conformation undergoes anchor-driven simulated annealing molecular dynamics simulations around the predicted anchoring spots. In the challenging task of a completely blind docking test, AnchorDock produced exceptionally good results (backbone root-mean-square deviation ≤ 2.2Å, rank ≤15) for 10 of 13 unbound cases tested. The impressive performance of AnchorDock supports a molecular recognition pathway that is driven via pre-existing local structural elements. PMID:25914054

  1. Students' Anchoring Predisposition: An Illustration from Spring Training Baseball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-01

    The anchoring tendency results when decision makers anchor on initial values and then make final assessments that are adjusted insufficiently away from the initial values. The professional literature recognizes that auditors often risk falling into the judgment trap of anchoring and adjusting (Ranzilla et al., 2011). Students may also be unaware…

  2. Career Paths, Images and Anchors: A Study with Brazilian Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilimnik, Zelia Miranda; de Oliveira, Luiz Claudio Vieira; Sant'anna, Anderson De Souza; Barros, Delba Teixeira Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses career anchors changes associated to images and professionals trajectories. Its main question: Do anchors careers change through time? We conducted twelve interviews involving professionals from the Administration Area, applying Schein's Career Anchors Inventory (1993). We did the same two years later. In both of them, the…

  3. Growth of tertiary dendritic arms during the transient directional solidification of hypoeutectic Pb-Sb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Emmanuelle S.; Rosa, Daniel M.; Garcia, Amauri; Spinelli, José E.

    2011-12-01

    Despite the importance of a complete characterization of dendritic patterns in castings, the availability of studies on the development of tertiary dendrite arms is scarce in the literature. In the present study, the tip cooling rate, local solidification time, primary and tertiary dendrite arm spacings have been determined in Pb-Sb alloys castings directionally solidified under unsteady-state heat flow conditions. The alloys compositions experimentally examined are widely used in the as-cast condition for the manufacture of positive and negative grids of lead-acid batteries. The initial growth of tertiary dendritic arms from the secondary branches was found to occur only for a Pb-3.5 wt% Sb alloy at cooling rates in the range 0.4-0.2 K/s, with no evidence of this spacing pattern for Pb-Sb alloys having lower solute content. Tertiary dendritic branches have been observed along the entire casting lengths for alloys of the Pb-Sb hypoeutectic range having compositions higher than 4.0 wt% Sb. It is shown that a power function experimental law with a characteristic -0.55 exponent is able to characterize the tertiary spacing evolution with the solidification cooling rate for alloys compositions ≥4.0 wt% Sb. The only exception was the Pb-3.5 wt% Sb alloy for which λ 3 exhibited significant lower values when compared with the experimental values obtained for the other Pb-Sb alloys for a same solidification cooling rate.

  4. Dendrite-Free Lithium Deposition via Self-Healing Electrostatic Shield Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Fei; Xu, Wu; Graff, Gordon L.; Zhang, Jian; Sushko, Maria L.; Chen, Xilin; Shao, Yuyan; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nie, Zimin; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Xingjiang; Sushko, P. V.; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-02-28

    Lithium metal batteries are called the “holy grail” of energy storage systems. However, lithium dendrite growth in these batteries has prevented their practical applications in the last 40 years. Here we show a novel mechanism which can fundamentally change the dendritic morphology of lithium deposition. A low concentration of the second cations (including ions of cesium, rubidium, potassium, and strontium) exhibits an effective reduction potential lower than the standard reduction potential of lithium ions when the chemical activities of these second cations are much lower than that of lithium ions. During lithium deposition, these second cations will form a self-healing electrostatic shield around the initial tip of lithium whenever it is formed. This shield will repel the incoming lithium ions and force them to deposit in the smoother region of the anode so a dendrite-free film is obtained. This mechanism is effective on dendrite prevention in both lithium metal and lithium ion batteries. They may also prevent dendrite growth in other metal batteries and have transformational impact on the smooth deposition in general electrodeposition processes.

  5. Intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xintong; Shen, Kang; Bülow, Hannes E

    2015-01-01

    The complex, branched morphology of dendrites is a cardinal feature of neurons and has been used as a criterion for cell type identification since the beginning of neurobiology. Regulated dendritic outgrowth and branching during development form the basis of receptive fields for neurons and are essential for the wiring of the nervous system. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis have been an intensely studied area. In this review, we summarize the major experimental systems that have contributed to our understandings of dendritic development as well as the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms that instruct the neurons to form cell type-specific dendritic arbors. PMID:25386991

  6. Wiring dendrites in layers and columns.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiangnan; McQueen, Philip G; Shi, Bo; Lee, Chi-Hon; Ting, Chun-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    The most striking structure in the nervous system is the complex yet stereotyped morphology of the neuronal dendritic tree. Dendritic morphologies and the connections they make govern information flow and integration in the brain. The fundamental mechanisms that regulate dendritic outgrowth and branching are subjects of extensive study. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the molecular and cellular mechanisms for routing dendrites in layers and columns, prevalent organizational structures in the brain. We highlight how dendritic patterning influences the formation of synaptic circuits. PMID:27315108

  7. GSK3 and KIF5 regulate activity-dependent sorting of gephyrin between axons and dendrites.

    PubMed

    Rathgeber, Louisa; Gromova, Kira V; Schaefer, Irina; Breiden, Petra; Lohr, Christian; Kneussel, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The kinesin KIF5 transports neuronal cargoes into axons and dendrites. Isolated KIF5 motor domains preferentially move into axons, however KIF5 binding to GRIP1 or gephyrin drives the motor into dendrites, to deliver AMPA receptors (AMPARs) or glycine receptors (GlyRs), respectively. At postsynaptic sites, gephyrin forms a multimeric scaffold to anchor GlyRs and GABAA receptors (GABAARs) in apposition to inhibitory presynaptic terminals. Here, we report the unexpected observation that increased intracellular calcium through chronic activation of AMPARs, steers a newly synthesized gephyrin fusion protein (tomato-gephyrin) to axons and interferes with its normal delivery into dendrites of cultured neurons. Axonal gephyrin clusters were not apposed to presynaptic terminals, but colocalized with GlyRs and neuroligin-2 (NLG2). Notably, functional blockade of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) and KIF5 normalized gephyrin missorting into the axonal compartment. In contrast, mutagenesis of gephyrin S270, a GSK3 target, did not contribute to axo-dendritic sorting. Our data are consistent with previous observations, which report regulation of kinesin motility through GSK3 activity. They suggest that GSK3 regulates the sorting of GlyR/gephyrin and NLG2 complexes in a KIF5-dependent manner. PMID:25701174

  8. Advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop the technology of the silicon dendritic web ribbon growth process is examined. The effort is being concentrated on the area rate and quality requirements necessary to meet the JPL/DOE goals for terrestrial PV applications. Closed loop web growth system development and stress reduction for high area rate growth is considered.

  9. DENDRITIC POLYMERS AS FIRE SUPPRESSANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes an evaluation of the applicability of one of the latest advances in polymer technology (dendritic polymers) to suppressing fires, one of the greatest survivability threats to military personnel and vehicles. Certain types of alkali and transition metal compl...

  10. Dendritic Growth Morphologies in Al-Zn Alloys—Part II: Phase-Field Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantzig, J. A.; Di Napoli, Paolo; Friedli, J.; Rappaz, M.

    2013-12-01

    In Part I of this article, the role of the Zn content in the development of solidification microstructures in Al-Zn alloys was investigated experimentally using X-ray tomographic microscopy. The transition region between dendrites found at low Zn content and dendrites found at high Zn content was characterized by textured seaweed-type structures. This Dendrite Orientation Transition (DOT) was explained by the effect of the Zn content on the weak anisotropy of the solid-liquid interfacial energy of Al. In order to further support this interpretation and to elucidate the growth mechanisms of the complex structures that form in the DOT region, a detailed phase-field study exploring anisotropy parameters' space is presented in this paper. For equiaxed growth, our results essentially recapitulate those of Haxhimali et al.[1] in simulations for pure materials. We find distinct regions of the parameter space associated with and dendrites, separated by a region where hyperbranched dendrites are observed. In simulations of directional solidification, we find similar behavior at the extrema, but in this case, the anisotropy parameters corresponding to the hyperbranched region produce textured seaweeds. As noted in the experimental work reported in Part I, these structures are actually dendrites that prefer to grow misaligned with respect to the thermal gradient direction. We also show that in this region, the dendrites grow with a blunted tip that oscillates and splits, resulting in an oriented trunk that continuously emits side branches in other directions. We conclude by making a correlation between the alloy composition and surface energy anisotropy parameters.

  11. Ten tips to help learning.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Pamela S

    2003-01-01

    Facilitating learning for nurses in the healthcare environment is challenging. These 10 tips are designed to help staff development educators explore ways to enhance learning. The emphasis is on active involvement of the learner, with the educator as facilitator rather than "teacher." Tips are evidence-based, specific, and to the point, with suggestions for implementation. PMID:14581833

  12. The Macro - TIPS Course Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (Scotland). Esmee Fairbairn Economics Research Centre.

    The TIPS (Teaching Information Processing System) Course Package was designed to be used with the Macro-Games Course Package (SO 011 930) in order to train college students to apply the tools of economic analysis to current problems. TIPS is used to provide feedback and individualized assignments to students, as well as information about the…

  13. Brilliant Writing Tips for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copus, Julia

    2010-01-01

    With tips on punctuation, style, grammar and essay structure, this handy guide provides succinct and practical guidance on students most common areas of concern in their written work. Each tip is supplemented by authentic examples of student writing, suggested re-writes, and appropriate self-help exercises. This book contains four parts. Part I:…

  14. Partial credit model and pivot anchoring.

    PubMed

    Bode, R K

    2001-01-01

    This article contains information on the Rasch measurement partial credit model: what it is, how it differs from other Rasch models, when to use it, and how to use it. The calibration of instruments with increasingly complex items is described, starting with dichotomous items and moving on to polychotomous items using a single rating scale, and mixed polychotomous items using multiple rating scales, and instruments in which each item has its own rating scale. It also introduces a procedure for aligning rating scale categories to be used when more than one rating scale is used in a single instrument. Pivot anchoring is defined and an illustration of its use with the mental health scale of the SF-36 that contains positive and negative worded items is provided. It finally describes the effect of pivot anchoring on step calibrations, the item hierarchy, and person measures. PMID:12000858

  15. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  16. Geodesic defect anchoring on nematic shells.

    PubMed

    Mirantsev, Leonid V; Sonnet, André M; Virga, Epifanio G

    2012-08-01

    Nematic shells are colloidal particles coated with nematic liquid crystal molecules, which may freely glide and rotate on the colloid's surface while keeping their long axis on the local tangent plane. Molecular dynamics simulations on a nanoscopic spherical shell indicate that under appropriate adhesion conditions for the molecules on the equator, the equilibrium nematic texture exhibits at each pole a pair of +1/2 defects so close to one another to be treated as one +1 defect. Spirals connect the polar defects, though the continuum limit of the interaction potential would not feature any elastic anisotropy. A molecular averaging justifies an anchoring defect energy that feels the geodesics emanating from the defect. All our observations are explained by such a geodesic anchoring, which vanishes on flat manifolds. PMID:23005713

  17. International Lunar Network (ILN) Anchor Nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews what we know about the interior and surface of the moon and the need to establish a robotic set of geophysical monitoring stations on the surface of the Moon for the purpose of providing significant scientific value to the exploration of the Moon. The ILN Anchor Nodes will provide the backbone of the network in a way that accomplishes new science and allows other nodes to be flexible contributors to the network.

  18. Anchoring in a novel bimanual coordination pattern.

    PubMed

    Maslovat, Dana; Lam, Melanie Y; Brunke, Kirstin M; Chua, Romeo; Franks, Ian M

    2009-02-01

    Anchoring in cyclical movements has been defined as regions of reduced spatial or temporal variability [Beek, P. J. (1989). Juggling dynamics. PhD thesis. Amsterdam: Free University Press] that are typically found at movement reversal points. For in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronizing reversal points with a metronome pulse has resulted in decreased anchor point variability and increased pattern stability [Byblow, W. D., Carson, R. G., & Goodman, D. (1994). Expressions of asymmetries and anchoring in bimanual coordination. Human Movement Science, 13, 3-28; Fink, P. W., Foo, P., Jirsa, V. K., & Kelso, J. A. S. (2000). Local and global stabilization of coordination by sensory information. Experimental Brain Research, 134, 9-20]. The present experiment examined anchoring during acquisition, retention, and transfer of a 90 degrees phase-offset continuous bimanual coordination pattern (whereby the right limb lags the left limb by one quarter cycle), involving horizontal flexion about the elbow. Three metronome synchronization strategies were imposed: participants either synchronized maximal flexion of the right arm (i.e., single metronome), both flexion and extension of the right arm (i.e., double metronome within-limb), or flexion of each arm (i.e., double metronome between-limb) to an auditory metronome. In contrast to simpler in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronization of additional reversal points to the metronome did not reduce reversal point variability or increase pattern stability. Furthermore, practicing under different metronome synchronization strategies did not appear to have a significant effect on the rate of acquisition of the pattern. PMID:18842313

  19. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: tip-related issues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Teng-Xiang; Huang, Sheng-Chao; Li, Mao-Hua; Zeng, Zhi-Cong; Wang, Xiang; Ren, Bin

    2015-11-01

    After over 15 years of development, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is now facing a very important stage in its history. TERS offers high detection sensitivity down to single molecules and a high spatial resolution down to sub-nanometers, which make it an unprecedented nanoscale analytical technique offering molecular fingerprint information. The tip is the core element in TERS, as it is the only source through which to support the enhancement effect and provide the high spatial resolution. However, TERS suffers and will continue to suffer from the limited availability of TERS tips with a high enhancement, good stability, and high reproducibility. This review focuses on the tip-related issues in TERS. We first discuss the parameters that influence the enhancement and spatial resolution of TERS and the possibility to optimize the performance of a TERS system via an in-depth understanding of the enhancement mechanism. We then analyze the methods that have been developed for producing TERS tips, including vacuum-based deposition, electrochemical etching, electrodeposition, electroless deposition, and microfabrication, with discussion on the advantages and weaknesses of some important methods. We also tackle the issue of lifetime and protection protocols of TERS tips which are very important for the stability of a tip. Last, some fundamental problems and challenges are proposed, which should be addressed before this promising nanoscale characterization tool can exert its full potential. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26314483

  20. A cellular automaton model of the steady-state free'' growth of a non-isothermal dendrite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.G.R.; Williams, T.; Spittle, J.A. . Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    A 2D cellular automaton model has been developed to study the steady-state free'' growth of a non-isothermal dendrite. The model incorporates rules to account for heat diffusion, the influence of curvature on the equilibrium freezing temperature and latent heat evolution. The model predicts a V [proportional to] [Delta]T[sup b] growth rate-undercooling relationship for the various dendrite tip growth temperatures selected. The prediction of the values of b accords reasonably with analytical models and reported experimental observations.

  1. Test Score Equating Using a Mini-Version Anchor and a Midi Anchor: A Case Study Using SAT[R] Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jinghua; Sinharay, Sandip; Holland, Paul W.; Curley, Edward; Feigenbaum, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    This study explores an anchor that is different from the traditional miniature anchor in test score equating. In contrast to a traditional "mini" anchor that has the same spread of item difficulties as the tests to be equated, the studied anchor, referred to as a "midi" anchor (Sinharay & Holland), has a smaller spread of item difficulties than…

  2. Short read DNA fragment anchoring algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Peiheng; Liu, Xinchun

    2009-01-01

    Background The emerging next-generation sequencing method based on PCR technology boosts genome sequencing speed considerably, the expense is also get decreased. It has been utilized to address a broad range of bioinformatics problems. Limited by reliable output sequence length of next-generation sequencing technologies, we are confined to study gene fragments with 30~50 bps in general and it is relatively shorter than traditional gene fragment length. Anchoring gene fragments in long reference sequence is an essential and prerequisite step for further assembly and analysis works. Due to the sheer number of fragments produced by next-generation sequencing technologies and the huge size of reference sequences, anchoring would rapidly becoming a computational bottleneck. Results and discussion We compared algorithm efficiency on BLAT, SOAP and EMBF. The efficiency is defined as the count of total output results divided by time consumed to retrieve them. The data show that our algorithm EMBF have 3~4 times efficiency advantage over SOAP, and at least 150 times over BLAT. Moreover, when the reference sequence size is increased, the efficiency of SOAP will get degraded as far as 30%, while EMBF have preferable increasing tendency. Conclusion In conclusion, we deem that EMBF is more suitable for short fragment anchoring problem where result completeness and accuracy is predominant and the reference sequences are relatively large. PMID:19208116

  3. Electropermanent magnetic anchoring for surgery and endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tugwell, Josef; Brennan, Philip; O'Shea, Conor; O'Donoghue, Kilian; Power, Timothy; O'Shea, Michael; Griffiths, James; Cahill, Ronan; Cantillon-Murphy, Padraig

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnets for anchoring of instrumentation in minimally invasive surgery and endoscopy has become of increased interest in recent years. Permanent magnets have significant advantages over electromagnets for these applications; larger anchoring and retraction force for comparable size and volume without the need for any external power supply. However, permanent magnets represent a potential hazard in the operating field where inadvertent attraction to surgical instrumentation is often undesirable. The current work proposes an interesting hybrid approach which marries the high forces of permanent magnets with the control of electromagnetic technology including the ability to turn the magnet OFF when necessary. This is achieved through the use of an electropermanent magnet, which is designed for surgical retraction across the abdominal and gastric walls. Our electropermanent magnet, which is hand-held and does not require continuous power, is designed with a center lumen which may be used for trocar or needle insertion. The device in this application has been demonstrated successfully in the porcine model where coupling between an intraluminal ring magnet and our electropermanent magnet facilitated guided insertion of an 18 Fr Tuohy needle for guidewire placement. Subsequent investigations have demonstrated the ability to control the coupling distance of the system alleviating shortcomings with current methods of magnetic coupling due to variation in transabdominal wall thicknesses. With further refinement, the magnet may find application in the anchoring of endoscopic and surgical instrumentation for minimally invasive interventions in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25361499

  4. Coracoclavicular stabilization using a suture anchor technique.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Darren J; Barron, O Alton; Catalano, Louis; Donahue, Joseph P; Zambetti, George

    2008-06-01

    Multiple fixation options exist for coracoclavicular stabilization, but many are technically demanding and require hardware removal. In the study reported here, we reviewed a specific fixation technique that includes suture anchors moored in the base of the coracoid process. We retrospectively reviewed 24 consecutive cases of patients who underwent coracoclavicular stabilization with a suture anchor for a type III or type V acromioclavicular (AC) joint separation or a group II, type II or type V distal clavicle fracture. Eighteen of the 22 patients had full strength and painless range of motion (ROM) in the affected extremity by 3 months and at final follow-up (minimum, 24 months; mean, 39 months). Two patients were lost to follow-up. Four patients had early complications likely secondary to documented noncompliance. Two of these 4 patients underwent reoperation with a similar procedure and remained asymptomatic at a minimum follow-up of 15 months. One patient underwent osteophyte and knot excision 7 months after surgery and remained asymptomatic at 30 months. Our results suggest that coracoclavicular stabilization using a suture anchor technique is a safe and reliable method of treating acromioclavicular joint separations and certain distal clavicle fractures in the compliant patient. PMID:18716693

  5. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  6. Multivalent anchored and crosslinked hyperbranched polyglycerol monolayers as antifouling coating for titanium oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Krysiak, Stefanie; Achazi, Katharina; Becherer, Tobias; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Paulus, Florian; Liebe, Hendrik; Grunwald, Ingo; Dernedde, Jens; Hartwig, Andreas; Hugel, Thorsten; Haag, Rainer

    2014-10-01

    A set of new catecholic monolayer coatings was developed to improve the antifouling performance of TiO2 surfaces. To solve the problem of the weak charge-transfer interaction between a single catechol anchor and TiO2, multiple catechol groups were combined with hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) which is a distinct dendritic scaffold that exposes its multivalent anchor groups on the surface. Thus, multivalent catecholic hPGs can be easily prepared for surface modification. The immobilization of the compounds was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Surface properties of the coatings were analyzed by water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The antifouling ability and stability were investigated by protein adsorption and cell adhesion. By increasing the number of catechol groups on the hPG scaffold, the stability and surface coverage could be significantly enhanced. Moreover, the inner-layer crosslinking of the coatings by grafting and initiating vinyl groups clearly improved their long-term stability. As a result, hPG with a catecholic functional degree of 10% (hPG-Cat10) and hPG with both catecholic and vinylic functional degree of 5% (hPG-Cat5-V5) were identified as the best catecholic hPGs to prepare bioinert and stable monolayer coatings on TiO2. PMID:25189471

  7. Ligand anchored poly(propyleneimine) dendrimers for brain targeting: Comparative in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hemant K; Gajbhiye, Virendra; Kesharwani, Prashant; Jain, Narendra K

    2016-11-15

    The present investigation was aimed at developing various ligands-anchored dendrimers and comparing their brain targeting potential at one platform. Sialic acid (S), glucosamine (G) and concanavalin A (C) anchored poly(propyleneimine) (PPI) dendritic nanoconjugates were developed and evaluated for delivery of anti-cancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX) to the brain. MTT assay on U373MG human astrocytoma cells indicated IC50 values of 0.40, 0.65, 0.95, 2.00 and 3.50μM for PTX loaded SPPI, GPPI, CPPI, PPI formulations, and free PTX, respectively. The invivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies in rats showed significantly higher accumulation of PTX in brain as compared to free PTX. The order of targeting potential of various ligands under investigation was found as sialic acid>glucosamine>concanavalin A. Thus, it can be concluded that sialic acid, glucosamine and Con A can be used as potential ligands to append PPI dendrimers for enhanced delivery of anticancer drugs to the brain for higher therapeutic outcome. PMID:27501037

  8. Microtubule nucleation and organization in dendrites.

    PubMed

    Delandre, Caroline; Amikura, Reiko; Moore, Adrian W

    2016-07-01

    Dendrite branching is an essential process for building complex nervous systems. It determines the number, distribution and integration of inputs into a neuron, and is regulated to create the diverse dendrite arbor branching patterns characteristic of different neuron types. The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical to provide structure and exert force during dendrite branching. It also supports the functional requirements of dendrites, reflected by differential microtubule architectural organization between neuron types, illustrated here for sensory neurons. Both anterograde and retrograde microtubule polymerization occur within growing dendrites, and recent studies indicate that branching is enhanced by anterograde microtubule polymerization events in nascent branches. The polarities of microtubule polymerization events are regulated by the position and orientation of microtubule nucleation events in the dendrite arbor. Golgi outposts are a primary microtubule nucleation center in dendrites and share common nucleation machinery with the centrosome. In addition, pre-existing dendrite microtubules may act as nucleation sites. We discuss how balancing the activities of distinct nucleation machineries within the growing dendrite can alter microtubule polymerization polarity and dendrite branching, and how regulating this balance can generate neuron type-specific morphologies. PMID:27097122

  9. At the Tipping Point

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2011-02-28

    There comes a time in every field of science when things suddenly change. While it might not be immediately apparent that things are different, a tipping point has occurred. Biology is now at such a point. The reason is the introduction of high-throughput genomics-based technologies. I am not talking about the consequences of the sequencing of the human genome (and every other genome within reach). The change is due to new technologies that generate an enormous amount of data about the molecular composition of cells. These include proteomics, transcriptional profiling by sequencing, and the ability to globally measure microRNAs and post-translational modifications of proteins. These mountains of digital data can be mapped to a common frame of reference: the organism’s genome. With the new high-throughput technologies, we can generate tens of thousands of data points from each sample. Data are now measured in terabytes and the time necessary to analyze data can now require years. Obviously, we can’t wait to interpret the data fully before the next experiment. In fact, we might never be able to even look at all of it, much less understand it. This volume of data requires sophisticated computational and statistical methods for its analysis and is forcing biologists to approach data interpretation as a collaborative venture.

  10. Predictions of the Hunt-Lu array model compared with measurements for the growth undercooling of Al{sub 3}Fe dendrites in Al-Fe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, D.; Jones, H.

    1997-10-01

    Earlier contributions by the authors reported the first measurements of growth temperature as a function of growth velocity V and alloy concentration C{sub 0} for a dendritic intermetallic phase (Al{sub 3}Fe, in Al-rich Al-Fe alloys). Comparison with predictions of the model of Kurz, Giovanola and Trivedi (KGT model) of dendrite growth of a needle gave predicted {Delta}T a factor between 1.1 and 2.5 above the measured values. A subsequent paper presented evidence that the Al{sub 3}Fe dendrite tips were indeed needle-like under the conditions studied, as distinct from the plate-like morphology that develops behind the dendrite tips. The KGT model predicts T{sub G} and {Delta}T on the basis that marginal stability determines the operating condition at the dendrite tip. The present purpose is to compare the measurements with predictions of the more recently developed array model of Hunt and Lu.