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1

Suitability of Palestine salt dome, Anderson Co. , Texas for disposal of high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

The suitability of Palestine salt dome, in Anderson County, Texas, is in serious doubt for a repository to isolate high-level nuclear waste because of abandoned salt brining operations. The random geographic and spatial occurrence of 15 collapse sinks over the dome may prevent safe construction of the necessary surface installations for a repository. The dissolution of salt between the caprock and dome, from at least 15 brine wells up to 500 feet deep, may permit increased rates of salt dissolution long into future geologic time. The subsurface dissolution is occurring at a rate difficult, if not impossible, to assess or to calculate. It cannot be shown that this dissolution rate is insignificant to the integrity of a future repository or to ancillary features. The most recent significant collapse was 36 feet in diameter and took place in 1972. The other collapses ranged from 27 to 105 feet in diameter and from 1.5 to more than 15 feet in depth. ONWI recommends that this dome be removed from consideration as a candidate site.

Patchick, P.F.

1980-01-01

2

Resonance induced by a bound state in the continuum in a two-level nonlinear Fano-Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider the transmission through a nonlinear media in the framework of a two-level nonlinear Fano-Anderson model. The model is realized in photonic crystal waveguide coupled with two off-channel defects with the instantaneous Kerr-type nonlinearity. We reveal a resonance and argue that it is a result of excitement of bound state in the continuum (BSC) by transmitted wave. The resonance induced by BSC is located at the energy of BSC with a width proportional to the amplitude of incident wave. The BSC exists at any distance between energy levels of the two-level nonlinear Fano-Anderson model that is fundamentally different from the linear case.

Bulgakov, Evgeny N.; Sadreev, Almas F.

2009-09-01

3

Materials Balance for Benzene: Level II.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A Level II materials balance was performed on benzene. Data are reported for benzene production from petroleum by four processes (catalytic reformation, toluene dealkylation, toluene disproportionation, and isolation from pyrolysis gasoline) for productio...

F. Montecalvo R. Burger R. L. Hall

1980-01-01

4

CHINESE-MANDARIN, LEVEL II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

DESIGNED FOR USE BY 10TH GRADE STUDENTS AFTER COMPLETION OF THE LEVEL I TEXT, THIS VOLUME ALSO COMPRISES 15 LESSON UNITS PLUS APPENDED INDEXES AND A SECTION ON WRITING NEW CHINESE CHARACTERS. THESE MATERIALS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDING TO THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON CHINESE LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION IN CALIFORNIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS. ACCORDING TO THEIR…

HSU, KAI-YU; AND OTHERS

5

Radiative lifetimes of Fe II levels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiative lifetimes for fourteen levels of the z6D0, z6F0, and z6P0 Fe II terms have been measured by the technique of laser-induced flourescence from sputtered metal vapor extracted from a pulsed hollow cathode. The states under investigation were populated from the ground state with UV dye laser pulses down to 234 nm.

Schade, W.; Mundt, B.; Helbig, V.

1988-08-01

6

30. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

30. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing control transmitter electronic cabinets and control modules. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

7

55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with eighty-eight 1-1/2" diameter copper ion return RF balance tube systems. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

8

Universality and the QCD Anderson transition.  

PubMed

We study the Anderson-type transition previously found in the spectrum of the QCD quark Dirac operator in the high-temperature, quark-gluon plasma phase. Using finite size scaling for the unfolded level spacing distribution, we show that in the thermodynamic limit there is a genuine mobility edge, where the spectral statistics changes from Poisson to Wigner-Dyson statistics in a nonanalytic way. We determine the correlation length critical exponent ? and find that it is compatible with that of the unitary Anderson model. PMID:24679282

Giordano, Matteo; Kovács, Tamás G; Pittler, Ferenc

2014-03-14

9

Anderson-Fabry Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anderson-Fabry disease is a multisystemic lysosomal storage disorder due to a deficiency of ?-galactosidase A resulting in\\u000a an accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids. Due to its rare occurrence the disease is often misdiagnosed or the correct\\u000a diagnose is delayed for many years (Weidemann et al. 2008). Dermatologists except ophthalmologists play the most important role for early diagnosis of this disorder, which

Anna-Christine Hauser

10

Anderson Localization of Solitons  

SciTech Connect

At low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with an attractive interaction forms a bright soliton. When exposed to a weak and smooth external potential, the shape of the soliton is hardly modified, but its center-of-mass motion is affected. We show that in a spatially correlated disordered potential, the quantum motion of a bright soliton displays Anderson localization. The localization length can be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub [Instytut Fizyki imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego and Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Center, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, UPMC, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Mueller, Cord A. [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, UPMC, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, UPMC, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

2009-11-20

11

On the level system of Bi II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spectrum of Bi II was remeasured in the wavelength range 620-74 nm, using different hollow cathode light sources, resulting in 91 new classified lines. We found two even and eight odd new levels. Fine and hyperfine structure analysis has been performed with a many configurations approach. We determined for all levels the Landé gJ-factors and the hfs A-constants, using the wavefunctions calculated. For the first time, radial hyperfine structure parameters were determined for the excited configurations 6s26pnl (l = s, p, d, f, g). We will also discuss the important role of configuration interaction effects on fine and hyperfine structures.

Andrzejewska, M.; Meijer, F. G.; Stachowska, E.

2013-10-01

12

The Anderson Current Loop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four-wire-probe concept applied to electrical-resistance transducers. Anderson current loop is excitation-and-signal-conditioning circuit suitable for use with strain gauges, resistance thermometers, and other electrical-resistance transducers mounted in harsh environments. Used as alternative to Wheatstone bridge. Simplifies signal-conditioning problem, enabling precise measurement of small changes in resistance of transducer. Eliminates some uncertainties in Wheatstone-bridge resistance-change measurements in flight research. Current loop configuration makes effects of lead-wire and contact resistances insignificantly small. Also provides output voltage that varies linearly with change in gauge resistance, and does so at double sensitivity of Wheatstone bridge.

Anderson, Karl F.

1994-01-01

13

America's First Illustrator: Alexander Anderson  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The New York Public Library presents this digital edition of the scrapbooks of 19th-century master illustrator Alexander Anderson. During his 70-year career, Anderson (1775-1870) created wood engravings to illustrate books, periodicals, newspapers, broadsides, and posters, based on his own designs, and the work of other artists. Some of the more prominent works illustrated by Anderson include John Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress", O.L. Holley's "Life of Benjamin Franklin", surveys of architecture, and books intended for teaching school children. This digital collection contains 1,332 of Anderson's engravings that can be browsed or searched by subject. To help interested users determine where images in the scrapbooks may have been published, titles of several major printed catalogs of Anderson's work are listed on the collection guide.

14

Anderson's Orthogonality Catastrophe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We give an upper bound on the modulus of the ground-state overlap of two non-interacting fermionic quantum systems with N particles in a large but finite volume L d of d-dimensional Euclidean space. The underlying one-particle Hamiltonians of the two systems are standard Schrödinger operators that differ by a non-negative compactly supported scalar potential. In the thermodynamic limit, the bound exhibits an asymptotic power-law decay in the system size L, showing that the ground-state overlap vanishes for macroscopic systems. The decay exponent can be interpreted in terms of the total scattering cross section averaged over all incident directions. The result confirms and generalises P. W. Anderson's informal computation (Phys. Rev. Lett. 18:1049-1051, 1967).

Gebert, Martin; Küttler, Heinrich; Müller, Peter

2014-03-01

15

Topological Anderson insulator phenomena  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the nature of the disorder-induced quantized conductance, i.e., the phenomena of topological Anderson insulator (TAI). The disorder effect in several different systems where the anomalous Hall effect exists is numerically studied using the tight-binding Hamiltonian. It is found that the TAI phenomena can also exist in the modified Dirac model where the quadratic corrections k2?z are included and the electron-hole symmetry is kept. These phenomena also occur in the graphene system with the next-nearest-neighbor coupling and the staggered sublattice potential. For the graphene sheet with Rashba spin-orbit interaction as well as an exchange field, a precursor of TAI is observed. A comparison between the localization length of the two-dimensional ribbon and two-dimensional cylinder structures clearly reveals the topological nature of these phenomena. Furthermore, analysis on the local current density in anomalous quantum Hall systems where the TAI phenomena may or may not arise reveals the nature of TAI phenomena. In the presence of small disorders, the conductance is not quantized and the bulk and edge states coexist in the system. As disorder strength increases, the bulk state is quickly destroyed, while the robust edge state may survive. When the edge state is robust enough to sustain the strong disorder that completely kills the bulk state, TAI phenomena arise.

Xing, Yanxia; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Jian

2011-07-01

16

Periodic Anderson model with correlated conduction electrons: Variational and exact diagonalization study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate an extended version of the periodic Anderson model (the so-called periodic Anderson-Hubbard model) with the aim to understand the role of interaction between conduction electrons in the formation of the heavy-fermion and mixed-valence states. Two methods are used: (i) variational calculation with the Gutzwiller wave function optimizing numerically the ground-state energy and (ii) exact diagonalization of the Hamiltonian for short chains. The f-level occupancy and the renormalization factor of the quasiparticles are calculated as a function of the energy of the f orbital for a wide range of the interaction parameters. The results obtained by the two methods are in reasonably good agreement for the periodic Anderson model. The agreement is maintained even when the interaction between band electrons, Ud, is taken into account, except for the half-filled case. This discrepancy can be explained by the difference between the physics of the one- and higher-dimensional models. We find that this interaction shifts and widens the energy range of the bare f level, where heavy-fermion behavior can be observed. For large-enough Ud this range may lie even above the bare conduction band. The Gutzwiller method indicates a robust transition from Kondo insulator to Mott insulator in the half-filled model, while Ud enhances the quasiparticle mass when the filling is close to half filling.

Hagymási, I.; Itai, K.; Sólyom, J.

2012-06-01

17

10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING NORTHEAST (BUILDINGS 131, 130, 129, and 128 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

18

9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING WEST (BUILDINGS 126, 128, 129, 130, and 131 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

19

6. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY NEAR BUILDING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY NEAR BUILDING 132, FACING SOUTHEAST (BUILDINGS 124, 122, 120, and 118 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

20

Environmental Effects on Microphones and Type II Sound Level Meters.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For four different manufacturer's Type II sound level meters numerous experimentally determined data concerning the effects of frequency, temperature, angle of incidence of the sound, and types of ground cover and reflecting surfaces on sound level meter ...

E. B. Magrab

1976-01-01

21

Belle-II High Level Trigger at SuperKEKB  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A next generation B-factory experiment, Belle II, is now being constructed at KEK in Japan. The upgraded accelerator SuperKEKB is designed to have the maximum luminosity of 8 × 1035 cm-2s-1 that is a factor 40 higher than the current world record. As a consequence, the Belle II detector yields a data stream of the event size ~1 MB at a Level 1 rate of 30 kHz. The Belle II High Level Trigger (HLT) is designed to reduce the Level 1 rate to 1/5 by performing the real time full event reconstruction and by applying the physics level event selection as the software trigger. In this paper, the development of the high level trigger system for Belle II and its performance is discussed.

Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Higuchi, T.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Won, E.

2012-12-01

22

M D Anderson Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

This proposal will establish a Small Animal Imaging Research Program (SAIRP) at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The proposed SAIRP will complement the existing institutional facility that provides small animal imaging services to NIH funded investigators. The broad goal of this SAIRP is to develop novel imaging approaches to solve cancer related biological questions and evaluate new cancer therapies.

23

Culture Curriculum for German, Level II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's guide to cultural instruction in a level-2 German course is designed to be used with the text "Deutsch, Erstes Buch, Erster Teil." Instructional observations pertain to the seventh through the 12th lessons and comprise the major portion of this text including: )1) die Eisenbahn, (2) Reisen und Essen in Deutschland, (3) die Familie,…

Oetiker, Rosemary

24

Phase Structure of the Topological Anderson Insulator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the phase structure of disordered HgTe topological Anderson insulator in a 2-D geometry. We use exact diagonalization to calculate the spectrum and eigenstate structure, and recursive green's functions to calculate the conductance. All observables are measured at several system sizes, allowing us to determine phase transitions and two critical points. The quantized-conductance TAI phase contains two phases: TAI-I lying in a bulk band gap, and TAI-II where bulk states exist but are localized. We find that the TAI-II phase persists at disorder strengths where there is no bulk band gap; a bulk band gap is not necessary to obtain conductance quantization. In a previous work the weak-disorder edge of the TAI phase was explained as a transition into the bulk gap (TAI-I), but we find also a direct transition into the ungapped (TAI-II) quantized phase. Effective medium theory (SCBA) predicts well the boundaries and interior of the TAI-I phase, but fails at larger disorders including the interior of the TAI-II phase. When the system size is smaller than the bulk localization length, the quantized TAI region is bounded by either the bulk band edge or the localization length, but when the system size is large it is bounded by a transition of edge states.

Xu, Dongwei; Sacksteder, Vincent E.; Qi, Junjie; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Hua; Xie, X. C.

2012-02-01

25

America's First Illustrator: Alexander Anderson  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

America has produced many notable wood engravers, but Alexander Anderson is one of the first to have name recognition. Born in 1775, he spent his lifetime crafting illustrations for books, periodicals, newspapers, and other commercial ephemera. This delightful digital collection from the New York Public Library brings together sixteen scrapbooks containing almost 10,000 wood engravings by Anderson. Visitors can click on the "Browse Source Titles" area to view the various volumes, and the subjects covered here are quite diverse. Even a cursory search returns dozens of cat engravings, illustrations of slaves, and lottery advertisements. For anyone with an interest in 19th century material culture, this collection is truly wonderful. It is worth making several return trips to get a full sense of the offerings here, and it is one that will bring new rewards upon each visit.

26

Phase Shift of the Asymmetric Friedel-Anderson Impurity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ground state of the asymmetric Friedel-Anderson (aFA) impurity is calculated within the FAIR (Friedel artificially inserted resonance) theory. Its properties are investigated by means of the fidelity with different Friedel impurities and by its Friedel oscillations. Friedel impurities with a specific phase shift ? at the Fermi level possess a finite fidelity with the aFA impurity. This phase shift ? determines other properties of the aFA impurity such as the amplitude and displacement of its Friedel oscillations. One can find the parameters of a Friedel impurity which coincides in its Friedel oscillations almost perfectly with the aFA impurity, thereby avoiding an Anderson orthogonality catastrophe.

Bergmann, Gerd

2013-04-01

27

Anderson testifies on Planet Earth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AGU president Don Anderson joined former astronaut Sally Ride and National Aeronautics and Space Administration official Lennard Fisk March 8 in testifying before the Senate committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. The three had been asked to speak on the future of the Mission to Planet Earth, proposed both in a National Academy of Sciences report and a NASA study.Anderson was chairman of the National Academy of Science's Task Group on Earth Sciences, which prepared the report Mission to Planet Earth as part of the series Space Science in the Twenty-First Century. In his testimony, Anderson highlighted parts of the report and quoted the frontispiece “We now have the technology and the incentive to move boldly forward on a Mission to Planet Earth. We call on the nation to implement an integrated global program using both spaceborne and earth-based instrumentation for fundamental research on the origin, evolution and nature of our planet, its place in our solar system, and its interaction with living things, including mankind.”

Wainger, Lisa A.

28

Legendre transformation in hubbard and anderson models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The previously derived variational-derivative equations for the Hubbard model and for the single-impurity Anderson model after the Legendre transformation are represented in the form of a set of two nonlinear integral equations. The one-particle propagators of the number of particles and of the momentum that are defined by these equations exhibit a regular behavior in three limiting cases. First, for both models in the limit of the zero width of the conduction band ( W/ U = 0) there is obtained a result known as the atomic limit. Second, it has been shown that in the limit of U/ W ? 1 the Pauli principle in the form of an additional coupling equation excludes from the perturbation-theory series some class of diagrams that are present in the standard expansion. Finally, for the case of U = ? and N e = N at - 1 in the framework of the Hubbard model there has been obtained an equation that agrees with the exact Nagaoka statement on the saturated ferromagnetism. A calculation has been performed of the density of impurity electron states in the symmetrical Anderson model in the paramagnetic phase for various values of the parameters of the Coulomb interaction U/?? and temperature T/?, where ? is the width of the localized impurity level. The calculation results are in good agreement with the results obtained by other methods.

Chashchin, N. I.

2011-04-01

29

Phase structure of the topological Anderson insulator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the disordered topological Anderson insulator in a two-dimensional (square not strip) geometry. We first report the phase diagram of finite systems and then study the evolution of phase boundaries when the system size is increased to a very large 1120×1120 area. We establish that conductance quantization can occur without a bulk band gap, and that there are two distinct scaling regions with quantized conductance: TAI-I with a bulk band gap, and TAI-II with localized bulk states. We show that there is no intervening insulating phase between the bulk conduction phase and the TAI-I and TAI-II scaling regions, and that there is no metallic phase at the transition between the quantized and insulating phases. Centered near the quantized-insulating transition there are very broad peaks in the eigenstate size and fractal dimension d2; in a large portion of the conductance plateau eigenstates grow when the disorder strength is increased. The fractal dimension at the peak maximum is d2?1.5. Effective-medium theory (Coherent Potential Approximation, self-consistent Born approximation) predicts well the boundaries and interior of the gapped TAI-I scaling region, but fails to predict all boundaries save one of the ungapped TAI-II scaling region. We report conductance distributions near several phase transitions and compare them with critical conductance distributions for well-known models.

Xu, Dongwei; Qi, Junjie; Liu, Jie; Sacksteder, Vincent, IV; Xie, X. C.; Jiang, Hua

2012-05-01

30

Spectrum and energy levels of singly ionized cesium (Cs II)  

SciTech Connect

The cesium spectrum emitted by a pulsed radio-frequency discharge has been measured in the 1550 A to 4 ..mu..m spectral region using concave grating spectrographs, Fabry-Perot interferometry, and Fourier spectroscopy. The source was adjusted to optimize the excitation of singly ionized cesium, and 1732 lines believed to belong to Cs II were observed. Most of these lines (1677) have been classified as transitions between 118 even and 170 odd energy levels. Of these 288 levels, 236 were located as a result of this experimental work. All of the low-lying Cs II configurations are complete and have been interpreted by least-squares analysis to obtain empirical energy parameters and intermediate-coupling wave functions. Most excited configurations show rather than jK coupling, hence all levels have been assigned designations in the jK coupling notation. The hyperfine structure that is a prominent feature of many Cs II lines has been studied extensively by analyzing hyperfine patterns in high-resolution Fourier spectra. Hyperfine splitting constants have been determined for 167 levels. No attempt has been made to give a theoretical interpretation of the splitting factors, but regularities in the splitting constants which have been used in a phenomenological way to aid in the classification of energy levels have been noted. A number of Rydberg series of levels with as many as 7 to 11 members have been found and used to estimate the Cs II ionization limit by fitting an extended Ritz formula to the observed levels. In addition to Cs II transitions, many lines belonging to Cs I and Cs III were observed. The Cs I data include nearly 100 lines with wavelengths greater than 1 ..mu..m.

Sansonetti, C.J.

1981-01-01

31

Rare Fluctuation Effects in the Anderson Model of Localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two significant advances in the theory of disordered systems in the past three decades have been (i) the development of large disorder Renormalization Group methods, and (ii) a more concerted effort to study of the effects of rare fluctuations or configurations, such as Griffiths' phenomena. A major problem facing the latter in many-body systems has been the enormous numerical resources needed to see these rare phenomena. In this talk, we examine the issue of rare configuration effects in Anderson's original model of localization (1958). In this talk, we examine the issue of rare configuration effects in Anderson's original model of localization. We show that effects due to resonant tunneling among neighboring sites leads not only to anomalous behavior of electronic eigenstates far in the Lifshitz tail, where the density of states is exponentially suppressed, but also leads to singularities in average properties (i.e. the inverse participation ratio) as a function of energy, where the density of states is large. The singular behavior, which separates resonant, Lifshitz-like states from typical, Anderson-localized states, occurs in the insulating phase, and thus is present in all dimensions [1]. Using the analytic solution of a toy model, as well as numerical results of the Anderson model for several different disorder distributions in dimensions d = 1, 2 and 3, we show that this separation of eigenstates due to rare fluctuations is a ubiquitous property of the Anderson model with bounded disorder. This suggests that the half-century-old model, being solvable in polynomial time, is a prime candidate for detailed numerical studies of rare fluctuation effects in disordered systems. [4pt] [1] Sonika Johri and R. N. Bhatt, arXiv1106.1131; and in preparation.

Bhatt, Ravindra

2012-02-01

32

Materials balance for benzene: Level II. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Level II materials balance was performed on benzene. Data are reported for benzene production from petroleum by four processes (catalytic reformation, toluene dealkylation, toluene disproportionation, and isolation from pyrolysis gasoline) for production from coal during coking. Amounts of benzene consumed for the synthesis of eight direct derivatives (ethylbenzene, cumene, cyclohexane, nitrobenzene, maleic anhydride, mono- and dichlorobenzene, alkylbenzenes, and biphenyl)

R. L. Hall; R. Burger; F. Montecalvo

1980-01-01

33

Aligning a reflection cavity by Anderson's method.  

PubMed

The sounding rocket principle of equivalence measurement uses a set of four laser gauges operating in Fabry-Perot cavities to determine the relative acceleration of two test masses that are chemically different. One end of each cavity is a flat mirror on a test mass. Because the test masses are unconstrained and thus expected to rotate slightly during measurement, and because the distance measurements are made at the sub-picometer level, it is essential to have real-time alignment of the beam entering the cavity. However, the cavity must be used in reflection and space is limited. We show that Anderson's alignment method can be used in reflection, but that it requires that the Fabry-Perot cavity have mirrors with significantly unequal reflectivities. PMID:22695543

Reasenberg, Robert D

2012-06-01

34

Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

1988-01-01

35

Anderson localization in nonlocal nonlinear media.  

PubMed

We theoretically and numerically investigate the effect of focusing and defocusing nonlinearities on Anderson localization in highly nonlocal media. A perturbative approach is developed to solve the nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the presence of a random potential, showing that nonlocality stabilizes Anderson states. PMID:22297343

Folli, Viola; Conti, Claudio

2012-02-01

36

MD Anderson study explains high platelets in ovarian cancer patients; survival reduced  

Cancer.gov

Highly elevated platelet levels fuel tumor growth and reduce the survival of ovarian cancer patients, an international team of researchers led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer center reports in the New England Journal of Medicine.

37

Early onset neonatal septicaemia in a level II nursery.  

PubMed

A prospective study of 486 high risk neonates admitted to a level II nursery in a relatively poor and rural area of Malaysia was carried out to determine the incidence, the spectrum of micro-organisms and predisposing factors in relation to early onset septicaemia. The incidence of proven or probable septicaemia was 57.61 per 1000 high risk newborns over 1.5 kg. The case fatality was 10.71 per cent. Coagulase negative staphylococci, Streptococcus Group B and Klebsiella species were the most commonly isolated organisms. Meconium staining of liquor was the most common risk factor for admission to the nursery, and prematurity was the most significant risk factor for early neonatal infection (P < 0.005) followed by small for gestational age (P < 0.04). Although the incidence of septicaemia was quite high in the level II nursery, the mortality rate was comparable to established figures. PMID:8057985

Malik, A S; Pennie, R A

1994-03-01

38

CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD (II) LEVELS AND LEAD (II) NEUROTOXICITY?  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafl...

39

Light focusing in the Anderson regime.  

PubMed

Anderson localization is a regime in which diffusion is inhibited and waves (also electromagnetic waves) get localized. Here we exploit adaptive optics to achieve focusing in disordered optical fibres in the Anderson regime. By wavefront shaping and optimization, we observe the generation of a propagation-invariant beam, where light is trapped transversally by disorder, and show that Anderson localizations can be also excited by extended speckled beams. We demonstrate that disordered fibres allow a more efficient focusing action with respect to standard fibres in a way independent of their length, because of the propagation-invariant features and cooperative action of transverse localizations. PMID:25072204

Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

2014-01-01

40

Subdivision Regulations, City of Anderson, South Carolina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The regulations provide, in accordance with South Carolina law, for the regulation of the subdivision of land within the City of Anderson. Included therewith are procedures for preparing and approving plats; design standards for streets, alleys, or rights...

1968-01-01

41

Dr. Dianne Gates-Anderson (Spanish)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

(Spanish version) Meg A. Mole interview different chemists to learn about their jobs. Dr. Dianne Gates-Anderson is an Environmental Process Engineer at the Department of Energy, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

2012-01-01

42

Astronaut Anderson Works in SPACEHAB  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia STS-107 mission launched January 16, 2003. STS-107 is strictly a multidiscipline microgravity and Earth science research mission involving 80-plus International experiments to be performed during 16-days, many of which will be managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of the research will be conducted in the Shuttle's mid deck, the area directly under the cockpit, and in the new SPACEHAB Research Double Module. This is the first flight for that module, which doubles the volume available for experiments and significantly increases the amount and complexity of research from the last dedicated Shuttle science mission, STS-95, flown in 1998 with a single SPACEHAB module. The pressurized module is carried in Columbia's payload bay and is accessible to the crew via a turnel from the Shuttle's mid deck. Pictured is an interesting view, looking through the adjoining tunnel, of astronaut Michael P. Anderson, mission specialist, performing work in SPACEHAB. The first shuttle mission in 2003, the STS-107 mission marks the 113th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the 28th flight of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia.

2003-01-01

43

Lifetimes of the 7p levels in Hg II  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of the lifetimes for the 5d107p2P1\\/2 and 2P3\\/2 levels in Hg II have been made using beam-foil excitation. The lifetimes were extracted both by exponential curve fitting of the individual decay curves and by joint analysis of the cascade-correlated decay curves using the ANDC method. The results are tau(J=1\\/2)=14.5+\\/-1.0 ns and tau(J=3\\/2)=1.2+\\/-0.2 ns. Theoretical computations are presented indicating that

S. T. Maniak; L. J. Curtis; R. E. Irving; I. Martinson; R. Hellborg

1993-01-01

44

4. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY, FACING SOUTH/SOUTHWEST. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY, FACING SOUTH/SOUTHWEST. (BUILDINGS 126, 124, 122, 120, and 114 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

45

Magnetomechanical Acoustic Emission of Ferromagnetic Materials at High Magnetization Levels (Type II Behavior).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Magnetomechanical acoustic emission (MAE) of Ni, Fe and a number of Fe-Ni alloys has been investigated at high magnetization levels. MAE levels increased in the magnetically saturated samples (Type II behavior). Critical magnetic field levels above which ...

M. M. Kwan K. Ono M. Shibata

1984-01-01

46

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MD Anderson) was established by the Texas State Legislature in 1941. In 1971, after the passage of the National Cancer Act, MD Anderson became one of the nation’s first NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers.

47

Anderson transition in a three-dimensional kicked rotor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate Anderson localization in a three-dimensional (3D) kicked rotor. By a finite-size scaling analysis we identify a mobility edge for a certain value of the kicking strength k=kc . For k>kc dynamical localization does not occur, all eigenstates are delocalized and the spectral correlations are well described by Wigner-Dyson statistics. This can be understood by mapping the kicked rotor problem onto a 3D Anderson model (AM) where a band of metallic states exists for sufficiently weak disorder. Around the critical region k?kc we carry out a detailed study of the level statistics and quantum diffusion. In agreement with the predictions of the one parameter scaling theory (OPT) and with previous numerical simulations, the number variance is linear, level repulsion is still observed, and quantum diffusion is anomalous with ?p2??t2/3 . We note that in the 3D kicked rotor the dynamics is not random but deterministic. In order to estimate the differences between these two situations we have studied a 3D kicked rotor in which the kinetic term of the associated evolution matrix is random. A detailed numerical comparison shows that the differences between the two cases are relatively small. However in the deterministic case only a small set of irrational periods was used. A qualitative analysis of a much larger set suggests that deviations between the random and the deterministic kicked rotor can be important for certain choices of periods. Heuristically it is expected that localization effects will be weaker in a nonrandom potential since destructive interference will be less effective to arrest quantum diffusion. However we have found that certain choices of irrational periods enhance Anderson localization effects.

Wang, Jiao; García-García, Antonio M.

2009-03-01

48

Regulation of angiotensin II receptors levels during rat induced pulpitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A change in the microcirculatory hemodynamic is one of the most important events in inflammation. In the dental pulp, which is a connective tissue surrounded by a mineralized dentine substrate, disturbance in the blood flow as well as plasma extravasation may increase the pulp pressure and cause local ischemia. The octapeptide angiotensin II (AngII) regulates vascular tone and stimulates the

Pedro P. C. Souza; Sandra Y. Fukada; Fernando Q. Cunha; Carlos A. S. Costa; Claudio M. Costa-Neto

2007-01-01

49

Spectrum and energy levels of singly ionized cesium: I. Revision and extension of the Cs II energy levels  

SciTech Connect

The experimental determined energy levels of Cs II have been revised and extended based entirely on recent observations of the spectrum. Most observed lines have been classified as transitions between 118 even and 167 odd energy levels. Of these 285 levels, 233 have not been previously reported. All the levels have been assigned designations in the jK coupling notation based on theoretical interpretation of the structure and empirical factors. Hyperfine splitting constants are given for 167 levels. By fitting polarization and extended Ritz formulas to selected Rydberg series, the Cs II ionization energy has been determined to be 186 777.4(5) cm/sup -1/.

Sansonetti, C.J.; Andrew, K.L.

1986-03-01

50

Electron transport near the Anderson transition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we examined the probability distribution of conductances in three dimensional metals for signatures of the Anderson transition. To that end, we examined the generalized DMPK equation in the insulating state and developed a formalism to perturbatively calculate the solution. From the solution we calculated the probability distribution of the conductance (g), and found excellent agreement with numerical simulations using the Anderson model. We also verified that the variance of lng varies with average of -lng to the two-fifths power, in congruence with earlier numerical studies. Though not definitive, calculations give no evidence of a singularity in the distribution near g = 1, in contrast to the behavior in quasi-one dimension.

Douglas, Andrew

51

Anderson localization in optical waveguide arrays with off-diagonal coupling disorder.  

PubMed

We report on the observation of Anderson wave localization in one-dimensional waveguide arrays with off-diagonal disorder. The waveguide elements are inscribed in silica glass, and a uniform random distribution of coupling parameters is achieved by a precise variation of the relative waveguide positions. In the absence of disorder we observe ballistic transport as expected from discrete diffraction in periodic arrays. When off-diagonal disorder is deliberately introduced into the array we observe Anderson localization. The strength of the localization signature increases with higher levels of disorder. PMID:21747520

Martin, Lane; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Perez-Leija, Armando; Keil, Robert; Dreisow, Felix; Heinrich, Matthias; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander; Abouraddy, Ayman F; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Saleh, Bahaa E A

2011-07-01

52

Anderson-Darling Test based CFAR Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

An Anderson-Darling(A-D) test based CFAR detector feasible for multiple interfering targets and clutter edge scenarios is proposed and referred as AD-CFAR, which exploits K-sample A-D hypothesis test technique to censor clutter blocks needed for power estimation. Thereafter, AD test is employed for distribution test of the resultant homogenous blocks to select the proper detection algorithm from strategy library composed by

Zhang Wei; Zhang Gong; Qian Guoming

2009-01-01

53

Vascular trauma at a military level II trauma center(1).  

PubMed

As members of an American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma-designated level II trauma center, we decided to review our experience with vascular trauma. In addition, we sought to characterize the vascular injuries presented and to compare our outcomes to the general trauma population.A review of all vascular trauma admissions from January 1997 through January 2000 was performed. The William Beaumont Army Medical Center (WBAMC) trauma registry data base was searched for vascular injuries utilizing 3 different search criteria: organ system, operation/procedure, and ICD-9 codes. Injuries were then characterized by age, gender, site of injury, injury severity score (ISS), mechanism, and need for surgery. Mortality rates were computed for both vascular and nonvascular trauma populations. Statistical analysis of the data was determined by Student t test and z score.Between January 1997 and January 2000, there were 1398 patients admitted to the trauma service at WBAMC. Of these, 48 patients (3.4%) had vascular injuries. The mean ISS for all nonvascular traumas was 8.4 +/- 8.9. The mean ISS for those with vascular injuries was 17.9 +/- 12.6 (p < 0.001). Blunt trauma accounted for 90% of all nonvascular admissions. Penetrating trauma accounted for 10% of all nonvascular admissions. In the vascular trauma population, blunt trauma accounted for 56% and penetrating trauma accounted for 39%. Five percent of the vascular injuries identified were iatrogenic. Surgical intervention was required in 85.4% and 44.2% of the vascular and nonvascular trauma populations, respectively. The mortality rate for nonvascular admissions was 4.8% (65/1350). Those with vascular injuries had a mortality rate of 20.8% (10/48). For trauma patients requiring an operation, the mortality rate was 4.5% (27/597). For patients with vascular injuries who required an operation, the mortality rate was 25.7% (9/35) (p = 0.007).Vascular trauma represents a small percentage of all trauma admissions. These patients have a higher ISS on admission and more of them require surgical intervention. The operative and overall mortality rates are higher in patients with vascular injuries than in the general trauma population. PMID:11120308

Galindo; Workman

2000-11-01

54

Universal mechanism for Anderson and weak localization  

PubMed Central

Localization of stationary waves occurs in a large variety of vibrating systems, whether mechanical, acoustical, optical, or quantum. It is induced by the presence of an inhomogeneous medium, a complex geometry, or a quenched disorder. One of its most striking and famous manifestations is Anderson localization, responsible for instance for the metal-insulator transition in disordered alloys. Yet, despite an enormous body of related literature, a clear and unified picture of localization is still to be found, as well as the exact relationship between its many manifestations. In this paper, we demonstrate that both Anderson and weak localizations originate from the same universal mechanism, acting on any type of vibration, in any dimension, and for any domain shape. This mechanism partitions the system into weakly coupled subregions. The boundaries of these subregions correspond to the valleys of a hidden landscape that emerges from the interplay between the wave operator and the system geometry. The height of the landscape along its valleys determines the strength of the coupling between the subregions. The landscape and its impact on localization can be determined rigorously by solving one special boundary problem. This theory allows one to predict the localization properties, the confining regions, and to estimate the energy of the vibrational eigenmodes through the properties of one geometrical object. In particular, Anderson localization can be understood as a special case of weak localization in a very rough landscape.

Filoche, Marcel; Mayboroda, Svitlana

2012-01-01

55

Study led by MD Anderson scientists identifies prostate cancer stem cells among low-PSA cells  

Cancer.gov

Prostate cancer cells that defy treatment and display heightened tumor-generating capacity can be identified by levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) expressed in the tumor cells, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in the May 3 edition of Cell Stem Cell.

56

Reply. [to the comment by Anderson et al. (1993)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

While Hegg et al. (1993) accepts the criticism of Anderson et al. (1994) in principle, this involves the adoption of an aerosol composition model and the model that they propose to reconcile these observations with the assertion of Charlson et al. (1992) does not agree with many observations, particularly those made over the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the use of a gain factor (i.e. the partial derivative of aerosol mass with respect to the sulfate ion), proposed by Anderson et al., may be valid for particular cases where a proposed composition model really reflects the actual aerosol composition, this procedure is considered questionable in general. The use of sulfate as a tracer for nonsulfate aerosol mass is questionable, because in the present authors' data set, sulfate averaged only about 26% of the dry aerosol mass. The ammonium mass associated with sulfate mass is not analogous to that betwen the oxygen mass and sulfur mass in the sulfate ion. Strong chemical bonds are present between sulfur and oxygen in sulfate, whereas ammonium and sulfate in haze droplets are ions in solution that may or may not be associated with one another. Thus, there is no reason to assume that sulfate will act as a reliable tracer of ammonium mass. Hegg et al. expresses the view that their approach used for estimating sulfate light scattering efficiency is appropriate for the current level of understanding of atmospheric aerosols.

Hegg, Dean A.; Ferek, Ronald G.; Hobbs, Peter V.

1994-01-01

57

Effects of modifying topoisomerase II levels on cellular recovery from radiation damage.  

PubMed

Effects of Modifying Topoisomerase II Levels on Cellular Recovery from Radiation Damage. Experiments were performed with the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to test whether DNA topoisomerase II is involved in repair of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. Topoisomerase II was inactivated by use of a temperature-sensitive mutation. Enzyme inactivation increased cellular radiosensitivity, blocked the restitution of broken chromosomes, assayed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and prolonged the induction of a DNA damage-inducible gene (RNR3). Overexpression of the topoisomerase II gene did not alter cellular radiosensitivity. The data support a role for topoisomerase II in the repair of DNA strand breaks. PMID:11023611

Gaffney, D K; Lundquist, M; Warters, R L; Rosley, R

2000-10-01

58

How Nonlinear Interactions Challenge the Three-Dimensional Anderson Transition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In disordered systems, our present understanding of the Anderson transition is hampered by the possible presence of interactions between particles. We demonstrate that in boson gases, even weak interactions deeply alter the very nature of the Anderson transition. While there still exists a critical point in the system, below that point a novel phase appears, displaying a new critical exponent, subdiffusive transport, and a breakdown of the one-parameter scaling description of Anderson localization.

Cherroret, Nicolas; Vermersch, Benoît.; Garreau, Jean Claude; Delande, Dominique

2014-05-01

59

How nonlinear interactions challenge the three-dimensional anderson transition.  

PubMed

In disordered systems, our present understanding of the Anderson transition is hampered by the possible presence of interactions between particles. We demonstrate that in boson gases, even weak interactions deeply alter the very nature of the Anderson transition. While there still exists a critical point in the system, below that point a novel phase appears, displaying a new critical exponent, subdiffusive transport, and a breakdown of the one-parameter scaling description of Anderson localization. PMID:24836228

Cherroret, Nicolas; Vermersch, Benoît; Garreau, Jean Claude; Delande, Dominique

2014-05-01

60

Astronaut Clay Anderson Speaks With S.C. Students  

NASA Video Gallery

From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA astronaut Clay Anderson participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at Crayton Middle School, Columbia,...

61

Universalities: From Anderson Localization To Quantum Chaos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contents1. Introduction 51.1. Impurity States 61.2. Impurity Bands 81.3. Anderson Model 92. Quantum Interference Effects in Disordered Conductors 112.1. Waves in Random Media 122.2. Aharonov-Bohm Oscillations 132.2.1. hc=e 132.2.2. hc=2e 152.3. Variations in Random Potential 162.4. Diffusion 172.5. Thouless Approach 193. Scaling Theory of Localization 204. Perturbation Theory of Disordered Metals 224.1. Green Functions 224.2. Random Potential 234.3. Diagrammatics 244.4....

Boris L. Altshuler; B. D. Simons

1985-01-01

62

A femtogram level competitive immunoassay of mercury(ii) based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.  

PubMed

A femtogram level and specific surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based competitive immunoassay was developed to detect Hg(ii) in aqueous solution for the first time. This novel approach provides an alternative, ultrasensitive and specific analytical method for the detection of Hg(ii). PMID:24986447

Wang, Yuzhen; Chen, Shuai; Wei, Chao; Xu, Minmin; Yao, Jianlin; Li, Yuan; Deng, Anping; Gu, Renao

2014-07-17

63

Random nanolasing in the Anderson localized regime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of nanoscale optical devices for classical and quantum photonics is affected by unavoidable fabrication imperfections that often impose performance limitations. However, disorder may also enable new functionalities, for example in random lasers, where lasing relies on random multiple scattering. The applicability of random lasers has been limited due to multidirectional emission, lack of tunability, and strong mode competition with chaotic fluctuations due to a weak mode confinement. The regime of Anderson localization of light has been proposed for obtaining stable multimode random lasing, and initial work concerned macroscopic one-dimensional layered media. Here, we demonstrate on-chip random nanolasers where the cavity feedback is provided by the intrinsic disorder. The strong confinement achieved by Anderson localization reduces the spatial overlap between lasing modes, thus preventing mode competition and improving stability. This enables highly efficient, stable and broadband wavelength-controlled lasers with very small mode volumes. Furthermore, the complex interplay between gain, dispersion-controlled slow light, and disorder is demonstrated experimentally for a non-conservative random medium. The statistical analysis shows a way towards optimizing random-lasing performance by reducing the localization length, a universal parameter.

Liu, J.; Garcia, P. D.; Ek, S.; Gregersen, N.; Suhr, T.; Schubert, M.; Mørk, J.; Stobbe, S.; Lodahl, P.

2014-04-01

64

Electronic control of optical Anderson localization modes.  

PubMed

Anderson localization of light has been demonstrated in a few different dielectric materials and lithographically fabricated structures. However, such localization is difficult to control, and requires strong magnetic fields or nonlinear optical effects, and electronic control has not been demonstrated. Here, we show control of optical Anderson localization using charge carriers injected into more than 100 submicrometre-scale p-n diodes. The diodes are embedded into the cross-section of the optical waveguide and are fabricated with a technology compatible with the current electronics industry. Large variations in the output signal, exceeding a factor of 100, were measured with 1 V and a control current of 1 mA. The transverse footprint of our device is only 0.125 µm(2), about five orders of magnitude smaller than optical two-dimensional lattices. Whereas all-electronic localization has a narrow usable bandwidth, electronically controlled optical localization can access more than a gigahertz of bandwidth and creates new possibilities for controlling localization at radiofrequencies, which can benefit applications such as random lasers, optical limiters, imagers, quantum optics and measurement devices. PMID:24681777

Mookherjea, Shayan; Ong, Jun Rong; Luo, Xianshu; Guo-Qiang, Lo

2014-05-01

65

Dynamical Localization for Unitary Anderson Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper establishes dynamical localization properties of certain families of unitary random operators on the d-dimensional lattice in various regimes. These operators are generalizations of one-dimensional physical models of quantum transport and draw their name from the analogy with the discrete Anderson model of solid state physics. They consist in a product of a deterministic unitary operator and a random unitary operator. The deterministic operator has a band structure, is absolutely continuous and plays the role of the discrete Laplacian. The random operator is diagonal with elements given by i.i.d. random phases distributed according to some absolutely continuous measure and plays the role of the random potential. In dimension one, these operators belong to the family of CMV-matrices in the theory of orthogonal polynomials on the unit circle. We implement the method of Aizenman-Molchanov to prove exponential decay of the fractional moments of the Green function for the unitary Anderson model in the following three regimes: In any dimension, throughout the spectrum at large disorder and near the band edges at arbitrary disorder and, in dimension one, throughout the spectrum at arbitrary disorder. We also prove that exponential decay of fractional moments of the Green function implies dynamical localization, which in turn implies spectral localization. These results complete the analogy with the self-adjoint case where dynamical localization is known to be true in the same three regimes.

Hamza, Eman; Joye, Alain; Stolz, Günter

2009-11-01

66

Pu 4f XPS spectra analysed in Anderson impurity model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pu metal displays a sequence of phases, ?, ?, ?, ?, which involve changes in the 5f electronic structure. In the sequence, opposite to expectations in conventional band theory, the volume/Pu atom increases and yet the measured valence band 5f width also increases^1. We report an analysis of the systematic changes in the structured 4f core level XPS spectra^2 using an Anderson impurity model for the 5f electrons and discuss the implications for understanding the phase diagram. ^1 L.E. Cox et al, Phys. Rev. B 46, 13571 (1992). ^2 J.W. Allen et al, J. Electron. Spectrosc. Relat. Phenom., to be published. Supported at LANL by the DoE and at UM by the USDOE under Contract No. DE-FG-02-90ER45416 and by the NSF under Grant No. DMR-94-23741.

Allen, J. W.; Cox, L. E.; Peek, J. M.

1996-03-01

67

Microwave-Driven Atoms: From Anderson Localization to Einstein's Photoeffect  

SciTech Connect

We study the counterpart of Anderson localization in driven one-electron Rydberg atoms. By changing the initial Rydberg state at fixed microwave frequency and interaction time, we numerically monitor the crossover from Anderson localization to the photoeffect in the atomic ionization signal.

Schelle, Alexej [Physikalisches Institut der Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4, Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4, Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Buchleitner, Andreas [Physikalisches Institut der Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

2009-05-08

68

Electrodynamic Displacement of Atomic Energy Levels. II. Lamb Shift  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vacuum fluctuations of the photon and pair fields modify the interaction of an electron with an electromagnetic field. The effects on the energy levels are conveniently described in terms of the mass operator and the vacuum polarization potential. An operator calculus for handling the mass operator is used to separate the contribution of low energy quanta, for which the

Robert Karplus; Abraham Klein; Julian Schwinger

1952-01-01

69

Noise source level density due to surf. II. Duck, NC  

Microsoft Academic Search

For pt.I see ibid., vol.22, no.3, p.425-33 (1997). Ambient noise measurements collected off the coast of Duck, NC, were used in conjunction with modeled transmission loss (TL) and estimated ambient noise due to wave-breaking to generate estimates of spectral source level densities (per meter of surf zone) of surf-generated ambient noise. Estimates of both continuous (local) and discrete (distant) components

Josette Paquin Fabre; James H. Wilson

1997-01-01

70

Universal alignment of transition metal impurity levels in III V and II VI compound semiconductors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Existence of a universal energy reference level E HO (Hasegawa-Ohno's hybrid orbital energy level) is pointed out for transition metal (TM) deep levels in tetrahedral semiconductors. When viewed from this reference level, each TM energy level E(TM) in major III-V and II-VI compound semiconductor satisfies a simple universal relation of E( TM) = E HO ± ( m + {1}/{2}) ? E with m = 0, 1, 2, -- and the empirical energy separation quantum ?E = 0.244 eV for II-VI compounds and 0.240 eV for III-V compounds. The so-called vacuum level pinning of TM levels is not generally valid. The band line-up based on the new TM level alignment is in excellent agreement with experiment.

Hasegawa, Hideki

1986-04-01

71

The Role of Contrast in the Perception of Achromatic Transparency: Comment on Singh and Anderson (2002) and Anderson (2003)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

M. Singh and B. L. Anderson proposed a perceptual theory of achromatic transparency in which the perceived transmittance of a perceived transparent filter is determined by the ratio of the Michelson contrast seen in the region of transparency to that of the background seen directly. Subsequently, B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and J. Meng proposed that…

Albert, Marc K.

2008-01-01

72

Kolmogorov turbulence, Anderson localization and KAM integrability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The conditions for emergence of Kolmogorov turbulence, and related weak wave turbulence, in finite size systems are analyzed by analytical methods and numerical simulations of simple models. The analogy between Kolmogorov energy flow from large to small spacial scales and conductivity in disordered solid state systems is proposed. It is argued that the Anderson localization can stop such an energy flow. The effects of nonlinear wave interactions on such a localization are analyzed. The results obtained for finite size system models show the existence of an effective chaos border between the Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) integrability at weak nonlinearity, when energy does not flow to small scales, and developed chaos regime emerging above this border with the Kolmogorov turbulent energy flow from large to small scales.

Shepelyansky, D. L.

2012-06-01

73

Magnetoresistance of an Anderson Insulator of Bosons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the magnetoresistance of two-dimensional bosonic Anderson insulators. We describe the change in spatial decay of localized excitations in response to a magnetic field, which is given by an interference sum over alternative tunneling trajectories. The excitations become more localized with increasing field (in sharp contrast to generic fermionic excitations which get weakly delocalized): the localization length ?(B) is found to change as ?-1(B)-?-1(0)˜B4/5. The quantum interference problem maps onto the classical statistical mechanics of directed polymers in random media (DPRM). We explain the observed scaling using a simplified droplet model which incorporates the nontrivial DPRM exponents. Our results have implications for a variety of experiments on magnetic-field-tuned superconductor-to-insulator transitions observed in disordered films, granular superconductors, and Josephson junction arrays, as well as for cold atoms in artificial gauge fields.

Gangopadhyay, Anirban; Galitski, Victor; Müller, Markus

2013-07-01

74

Relationship between topoisomerase II level and chemosensitivity in human tumor cell lines.  

PubMed

Patients with metastatic testis tumors are generally curable using chemotherapy, whereas those with disseminated bladder carcinomas are not. We have compared levels of the nuclear enzyme topoisomerase II in three testis (SuSa, 833K, and GH) and three bladder (RT4, RT112, and HT1376) cancer cell lines which differ in their sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. The testis cell lines were more sensitive than the bladder lines to three drugs whose cytotoxicity is mediated in part by inhibiting topoisomerase II: amsacrine; Adriamycin; and etoposide (VP16). The frequency of DNA strand breaks induced by amsacrine was higher (1.5- to 13-fold) in the testis cells than in the bladder cells. The level of topoisomerase II-mediated DNA strand breakage in vitro, measured by filter trapping of amsacrine-induced protein:DNA cross-links, was similarly higher in nuclear extracts from the testis than the bladder cells. Western blot analysis showed a generally higher level of topoisomerase II protein in testis than in bladder cell nuclear extracts. Topoisomerase II protein expression broadly correlated with drug-induced strand breakage in both protein extracts and whole cells, but not with population doubling time. However, despite a 2- to 20-fold increased sensitivity to the different topoisomerase II inhibitors, the testis line 833K had a less than 2-fold higher level of topoisomerase II protein than that of the bladder line RT4. These results indicate that the level of expression of topoisomerase II is an important determinant of the relative chemosensitivity of testis and bladder tumor cell lines, but that additional factors must contribute to the extreme chemosensitivity of testis cells. PMID:1660343

Fry, A M; Chresta, C M; Davies, S M; Walker, M C; Harris, A L; Hartley, J A; Masters, J R; Hickson, I D

1991-12-15

75

Topoisomerase II Levels during Granulocytic Maturation in Vitro and in Vivo1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Western blotting, indirect immunolocalization, fio»cytometry, and a functional assay for drug-induced strand breakage were utilized to ex amine topoisomerase (topo) II levels during granulocytic maturation in HL-60 human progranulocytic leukemia cells and in samples of normal human marrow. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed that the intensity of the signal for topo II in unsynchronized log phase HL-60 cells varied widely. Indirect immunolabeling

Scott H. Kaufmann; Sharon J. McLaughlin; Michael B. Kastan; Leroy F. Liu; Judith E. Karp; Philip J. Burke

76

Anderson localization in metamaterials and other complex media (Review Article)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is a review of some recent (mostly ours) results on Anderson localization of light and electron waves in complex disordered systems, including: (i) left-handed metamaterials, (ii) magnetoactive optical structures, (iii) graphene superlattices, and (iv) nonlinear dielectric media. First, we demonstrate that left-handed metamaterials can significantly suppress localization of light and lead to an anomalously enhanced transmission. This suppression is essential at the long-wavelength limit in the case of normal incidence, at specific angles of oblique incidence (Brewster anomaly), and in vicinity of zero-? or zero-? frequencies for dispersive metamaterials. Remarkably, in disordered samples comprised of alternating normal and left-handed metamaterials, the reciprocal Lyapunov exponent and reciprocal transmittance increment can differ from each other. Second, we study magnetoactive multilayered structures, which exhibit nonreciprocal localization of light depending on the direction of propagation and on polarization. At resonant frequencies or realizations such nonreciprocity results in effectively unidirectional transport of light. Third, we discuss the analogy between wave propagation through multilayered samples with metamaterials and charge transport in graphene, which provides a simple physical explanation of unusual conductive properties of disordered graphene superlatices. We predict disorder-induced resonance of the transmission coefficient at oblique incidence of Dirac quasiparticles. Finally, we demonstrate that an interplay of nonlinearity and disorder in dielectric media can lead to bistability of individual localized states excited inside the medium at resonant frequencies. This results in nonreciprocity of wave transmission and unidirectional transport of light.

Gredeskul, Sergey A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Asatryan, Ara A.; Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Bliokh, Yuri P.; Freilikher, Valentin D.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.

2012-07-01

77

Anderson localization and colocalization of spatially entangled photons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explore the propagation of light in a two-photon state in disordered optical systems that induce Anderson localization. We show that entangled-photon pairs demonstrate a surprising behavior that we call Anderson colocalization: While neither photon exhibits Anderson localization, the spatial correlations of the pair remain intact. Furthermore, we show that entangled-photon pairs colocalize faster than classical light localizes in the same system. We also explore the propagation of anticorrelated and partially entangled photon pairs in such systems. The results are developed using a linear systems theory that extends the scope of quantum imaging to incorporate disordered systems.

Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

2012-10-01

78

Simplicity of eigenvalues in Anderson-type models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show almost sure simplicity of eigenvalues for several models of Anderson-type random Schrödinger operators, extending methods introduced by Simon for the discrete Anderson model. These methods work throughout the spectrum and are not restricted to the localization regime. We establish general criteria for the simplicity of eigenvalues which can be interpreted as separately excluding the absence of local and global symmetries, respectively. The criteria are applied to Anderson models with matrix-valued potential as well as with single-site potentials supported on a finite box.

Naboko, Sergey; Nichols, Roger; Stolz, Günter

2013-04-01

79

New electron levels and classified lines in Pr II from hyperfine structure measurements  

SciTech Connect

Classification of 75 spectral lines (hitherto not classified) in singly ionized praseodymium (Pr II) with the use of 31 new electron levels belonging to odd configurations 4f{sup 3}5d and 4f{sup 3}6s and 14 new levels belonging to even configurations is presd. Hyperfine structure constant A and B for each new level were determined by using the method of laser-induced fluorescence in a hollow cathode discharge.

Furmann, B. [Atomic Physics Group, Faculty of Technical Physics, Poznan University of Technology, Nieszawska 13B, 60-965 Poznan (Poland)]. E-mail: furman@phys.put.poznan.pl; Stefanska, D. [Atomic Physics Group, Faculty of Technical Physics, Poznan University of Technology, Nieszawska 13B, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Dembczynski, J. [Atomic Physics Group, Faculty of Technical Physics, Poznan University of Technology, Nieszawska 13B, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Stachowska, E. [Atomic Physics Group, Faculty of Technical Physics, Poznan University of Technology, Nieszawska 13B, 60-965 Poznan (Poland)

2007-01-15

80

Theoretical lifetimes and Landé g values of Cs II 5p5 6p levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lifetimes of Cs II 5p5 6p levels, oscillator strengths to the lower 5p5 5d and 5p5 6s levels, Landé g factors and LS compositions of all these levels are presented. Results are in very good agreement with most available experiment. Large correlation effects are associated with those 5p5 5d and 5p5 6s states, which strongly interact.

Donald R. Beck

1998-01-01

81

Application of the S=1 underscreened Anderson lattice model to Kondo uranium and neptunium compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing the coexistence of the Kondo screening effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the Anderson lattice Hamiltonian with a two-fold degenerate f level in each site, corresponding to 5f2 electronic configuration with S=1 spins. A derivation of the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation is presented and the resulting Hamiltonian has an effective f-band term, in

Christopher Thomas; Acirete S. da Rosa Simões; J. R. Iglesias; C. Lacroix; N. B. Perkins; B. Coqblin

2011-01-01

82

Improved energy levels and wavelengths of Pr II from a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present improved energy values for 227 known levels of singly ionized praseodymium (Pr), improved wavelengths for 441 spectral lines of Pr II and classifications for 36 lines. These results are from a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrum covering the spectral range from 3260 to 11?700 Å. The correction to old levels ranges from -0.051 to 0.194 cm-1. These results will be useful in further analysis of Pr II and in astrophysical studies of stellar spectra to determine Pr abundance values.

Akhtar, N.; Windholz, L.

2012-05-01

83

Hay Lake Specialist's Report: Anderson Mesa Landscape Scale Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Anderson Mesa Landscape Scale Assessment is a comprehensive document that describes the ecosystems structure, processes and functions. The Assessment objectives as outlined in the project initiation letter were as follows: Identify opportunities (proj...

2004-01-01

84

STS-107 M.S Michael Anderson at SPACEHAB  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, STS-107 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson (gloved, in center) gets hands-on experience with equipment. Identified as a research mission, STS-107 is scheduled for launch July 19, 2001

2000-01-01

85

MD Anderson study finds cancer related pain often undertreated  

Cancer.gov

More than one third of patients with invasive cancer are undertreated for their pain, with minorities twice as likely to not receive analgesics, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

86

Anderson-Fabry disease in children.  

PubMed

Although clinical evidence of major organ damage is typical of adulthood, many of the signs and symptoms of Anderson Fabry Disease (AFD) occur frequently in childhood. The clinical phenotype of AFD in pediatric patients has been described in several studies which show a higher incidence and an earlier onset of symptoms in male patients than in females. These include neurological manifestations (acroparaesthesias, chronic neuropathic pain, hypo-anhidrosis, tinnitus, hearing, loss), gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (abdominal pain and diarrhea), angiokeratomas, ocular abnormalities (cornea verticillata, tortuous retinal vessels and subcapsular cataracts). Such manifestations may impair quality of life and, because of their unspecific nature, rarely lead to an early diagnosis. In addition, signs of major organ damage (microalbuminuria or proteinuria, urinary hyperfiltration, impaired heart rate variability, left ventricular hypertrophy, stroke) are encountered in children with AFD. Clinical trials of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with agalsidase alfa and agalsidase beta have been conducted in children, with clinical and pharmacodinamc effects proved by both enzyme formulations, whereas differences in safety profile and administration were found. Although several studies suggest that ERT should be started before irreversible damage in critical organs have occurred, the issue of when to initiate it has not yet been resolved. More controlled trials must be done in order to demonstrate that an early start of ERT could prevent adult complications and to assess the optimal timing of treatment in children with AFD. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding for a better approach of pediatric AFD. PMID:23448455

Sestito, Simona; Ceravolo, Ferdinando; Concolino, Daniela

2013-01-01

87

Observing transverse Anderson localization in random air line based fiber  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept of Anderson localization has been applied to electromagnetic waves for decades and strong photon localization effect has been observed in many two-dimensional systems including optical lattice and optical fibers. Among different types of optical fibers, both fibers with and without air hole were investigated. Air hole based fiber has significant higher refractive index contrast than other fibers which allow much lower filling fraction in order to observe Anderson localization. In a previous research, Anderson localization was observed near the fiber edge with an air fillfraction of 5.5%. At the fiber center region with only 2.2% air fill-fraction, Anderson localization disappeared. However, we observed Anderson localization in fibers with much lower air fill-fraction. In our experiments, random air line fibers with 150, 250 and 350 ?m diameters were fabricated and characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Averaged air line diameters were 177, 247 and 387 nm for the 150, 250 and 350 ?m diameter fibers, respectively. Air fill-fraction was also measured at fiber center, middle and edge regions. Beam profiles were imaged into a charge couple device (CCD) and Anderson localization was observed. Unlike the previous research in which Anderson localization was only observed at the fiber edge due to non-uniform air line distribution, we observed Anderson localization within the fiber area with air fill-fraction significantly lower than the previous investigation. This is because with smaller air line diameter our fiber has higher air lines density than the previous report.

Chen, Minghan; Li, Ming-Jun

2014-02-01

88

Spectrofluorimetric determination of picogram level Pb(II) using a dimercaptothiadiazole fluorophore  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the spectrofluorimetric determination of picogram level Pb(II) using 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (DMT) as a fluorophore. Excitation of DMT at 330 nm shows an emission maximum at 435 nm. The colorless solution of DMT changes into highly emittive yellow color immediately after the addition of 0.5 ?M Pb(II) and nearly 245-fold increase in emission intensity at 435 nm was observed. These changes were attributed to the complex formation between Pb(II). The emission intensity linearly increases in the concentration range of 10-100 nM Pb(II) and DMT. Based on the fluorescence enhancement, the concentration of Pb(II) was determined. Interestingly, the emission intensity was increased even in the presence of 0.1 pM Pb(II). The fluorophore showed an extreme selectivity towards 100 nM Pb(II) even in the presence of 50,000-fold higher concentrations of common metal ions interferences such as Na +, K +, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Fe 2+, Cd 2+, Cr 3+, Mn 2+, Zn 2+, Co 2+, Ni 2+ and 5000-, 100- and 40-fold of Cu 2+, Hg 2+ and Ag + ions, respectively. The lowest detection of 20 pg L -1 Pb(II) was achieved for the first time using DMT. The proposed method was successfully utilized for the determination of Pb(II) in tap water, polluted river water and industrial waste water samples. The results obtained in the present study were validated with both AAS and ICP-AES methods.

Vasimalai, N.; John, S. Abraham

2011-11-01

89

Natural convective behavior of EBR-II following a loss of flow from decay heat levels  

SciTech Connect

Eight loss-of-flow transients were conducted at initial decay heat levels of 0.75 to 1.6% of the rated EBR-II power. The data indicate that the natural convective flow was adequate to remove the decay heat without overheating the reactor core. Good agreement with NATDEMO and HOTCHAN predictions was obtained. (DLC)

Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Betten, P.R.; Planchon, H.P.

1985-01-01

90

World War II Logistic Principles at the Operational Level of War: Are They Valid Today.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Current doctrine for logistic support of joint operations at the operational level of war is used as a means to analyze the historic logistic lessons learned in WW II, both in the Pacific and European Theaters of Operations. The logistic lessons learned d...

J. A. Brown

1993-01-01

91

Identification of an association between HLA class II alleles and low antibody levels after measles immunization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the first large cohort study to report a genetic association between humoral antibody level after measles vaccine and the HLA class II genes. The WHO goal to eradicate measles world-wide magnifies the importance of data relating to the influence of immunogenetics on measles vaccine-induced antibody responses. We present here the analysis of 242 individuals who received one dose

Gregory A. Poland; Inna G. Ovsyannikova; Robert M. Jacobson; Robert A. Vierkant; Steven J. Jacobsen; V. Shane Pankratz; Daniel J. Schaid

2001-01-01

92

Lifetimes of the 4d95p levels in Ag II  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have determined lifetimes of the 12 4d95p fine-structure levels of AgII, using the beam-foil excitation method. The results are compared with various theoretical predictions. Fairly good agreement is found with recent superposition-of-configurations (SOC) calculations which have included relativistic corrections.

R. E. Irving; S. T. Maniak; D. J. Beideck; P. Bengtsson; L. J. Curtis; R. Hellborg; G. Kalus; I. Martinson

1995-01-01

93

Interactive Journaling as a Brief Intervention for Level-II DUI and DWI Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study sought to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a brief alcohol intervention in increasing basic alcohol-related knowledge, and the intention to change high-risk drinking behaviors, among a sample of DUI and DWI offenders. Pre- and post-test data, in addition to program evaluation data, from 872 Level-II DUI and DWI offenders…

Scheck, Amy Mary; Hoffmann, Norman G.; Proctor, Steven L.; Couillou,Ryan J.

2013-01-01

94

Guide for the Training and Qualification of Welding Personnel. Level II - Advanced Welders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is designed to help education and training facilities develop and administer competency-based training programs to qualify and certify trainees in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) requirements for level II (advanced) welders. Presented first are the scope, objectives, and requirements of the AWS…

American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

95

An evaluation of classification methods for level II land-cover categories in Ohio  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research was to evaluate six classifiers applied to Landsat-7 data for accuracy of Level II land-cover categories in Ohio. These methods consist of (1) USGS National Land Cover Data; (2) the spectral angle mapper; (3) the maximum likelihood classifier; (4) the maximum likelihood classifier with texture analysis; (5) a recently introduced hybrid artificial neural network; (6)

Robert C. Frohn; Lin Liu; Richard A. Beck; Navendu Chaudhary; Olimpia Arellano-Neri

2008-01-01

96

Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 2: Locating clouds tops  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comparison is made of the vertical distribution of high-level cloud tops derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements and from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for all Julys and Januarys in 1985 to 1990. The results suggest that ISCCP overestimates the pressure of high-level clouds by up to 50-150 mbar, particularly at low latitudes. This is caused by the frequent presence of clouds with diffuse tops (greater than 50% time when cloudy events are observed). The averaged vertical extent of the diffuse top is about 1.5 km. At midlatitudes where the SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressure agree best, clouds with distinct tops reach a maximum relative proportion of the total level cloud amount (about 30-40%), and diffuse-topped clouds are reduced to their minimum (30-40%). The ISCCP-defined cloud top pressure should be regarded not as the material physical height of the clouds but as the level which emits the same infrared radiance as observed. SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressures agree for clouds with distinct tops. There is also an indication that the cloud top pressures of optically thin clouds not overlying thicker clouds are poorly estimated by ISCCP at middle latitudes. The average vertical extent of these thin clouds is about 2.5 km.

Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

1995-01-01

97

Algebra II: Gatekeeper Course--An Examination of CST Proficiency Levels in California and the Bay Area  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the Algebra II course and California Star Test (CST) proficiency levels in the San Francisco Bay Area and in the State of California. CST proficiency levels are examined by grade level for the State and nine counties of the San Francisco Bay Area region. Algebra II is shown to be one of the more complicated courses in the CSU…

Hailer-O'Keefe, Laurie

2012-01-01

98

[Urinary levels of angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II in patients with severe aortic].  

PubMed

Objective: Strengthen knowledge about the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis. Methods: Urinary levels of angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II were compared between two samples: A) forty five patients with severe aortic stenosis, without systemic arterial hypertension and with normal kidney and normal left ventricular systolic function; B) control group: twenty one persons without cardiovascular disease. Null hypothesis: there would be no difference between urinary levels. Results: The average of angiotensin-(1-7) urinary concentration in severe aortic stenosis patients was 2.102 pmol/mL and 5.591 pmol/mL for the control group. The average of Ang II was 0.704 pmol/mL and 0.185 pmol/mL respectively. Using t-Student test, we determine that the difference in urinary concentration of angiotensin-(1-7) [p = 0.633] and the difference of angiotensin II (p = 0.631), were statistically significant. Conclusion: documented a statistically significant difference in urinary levels angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7) within the group of patients with severe aortic stenosis. PMID:22188883

López-de la Vega, César; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Lomelí-Estrada, Catalina; Pastelín-Hernández, Gustavo; Del Valle-Mondragón, Leonardo

2011-01-01

99

McDonnell Douglas Delta II main liquid oxygen tank bi-level pressurization system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Past McDonnell Douglas Delta launch vehicles have experienced a longitudinal dynamic instability known as 'pogo' shortly before first-stage main engine cut-off (MECO). To prevent the occurrence of this dynamic phenomena, it was necessary to increase the main liquid oxygen (LOX) tank minimum relief pressure from 31.0 psig to 53.0 psig before MECO. A system had to be devised that would increase tank relief pressure at a time during flight when the hydrostatic pressure at the tank bottom was low enough to prevent exceeding tank structural margins. The Delta II main LOX tank bi-level pressurization system was created to meet these requirements. To date, nine Delta II vehicles have flown, and the devised main LOX tank bi-level pressurization system has operated as expected, successfully eliminating MECO pogo.

Rossoni, M. A.

1990-07-01

100

Review of the Constellation Level II Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Documents during Participation in the Constellation Level II SR&QA Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the request of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and the Constellation Program (CxP) Safety, Reliability; and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Director, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) participated in the Cx SR&QA Requirements forum. The Requirements Forum was held June 24-26; 2008, at GRC's Plum Brook Facility. The forums purpose was to gather all stakeholders into a focused meeting to help complete the process of refining the CxP to refine its Level II SR&QA requirements or defining project-specific requirements tailoring. Element prime contractors had raised specific questions about the wording and intent of many requirements in areas they felt were driving costs without adding commensurate value. NESC was asked to provide an independent and thorough review of requirements that contractors believed were driving Program costs, by active participation in the forum. This document contains information from the forum.

Cameron, Kenneth D.; Gentz, Steven J.; Beil, Robert J.; Minute, Stephen A.; Currie, Nancy J.; Scott, Steven S.; Thomas, Walter B., III; Smiles, Michael D.; Schafer, Charles F.; Null, Cynthia H.; Bay, P. Michael

2009-01-01

101

Lifetimes of 5d¹°7p levels in Hg II  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurement of lifetimes of low-lying levels in Hg II have been made using thin foil excitation of a fast ion beam using the University of Toledo 330 kV heavy ion accelerator. The lifetimes were extracted both by exponential curve fitting of the individual decay curves and by joint analysis of the cascade-correlated decay curves using the ANDC method. Some of

S. T. Maniak; L. J. Curtis; R. E. Irving

1993-01-01

102

Reconstructing Northern Hemisphere upper-level fields during World War II  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monthly mean fields of temperature and geopotential height (GPH) from 700 to 100 hPa were statistically reconstructed for the extratropical Northern Hemisphere for the World War II period. The reconstruction was based on several hundred predictor variables, comprising temperature series from meteorological stations and gridded sea level pressure data (1939-1947) as well as a large amount of historical upper-air data

S. Brönnimann; J. Luterbacher

2004-01-01

103

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (NORWTH00120010) Town Highway 012 Bloody Brook, Norwich, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NORWTH00120010 on town highway 12 crossing Bloody Brook, Norwich, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, available from VTAOT files, was compiled prior to conducting the Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 8.98-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the left bank upstream and the left and right banks downstream are forested. The immediate right bank upstream is covered by shrub and brush with pasture on the overbank. Town Highway 12 runs along the valley of Bloody Brook; however, at structure NORWTH00120010 the road crosses Bloody Brook at a 90-degree angle. In the study area, Bloody Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.014 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 41 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 51.0 mm or 0.167 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on October 31, 1994, indicated that the reach was unstable. The town highway 12 crossing of Bloody Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., July 29, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The right abutment is protected by sparse type-2 stone fill (less than 24 inches diameter). The channel is skewed 0 degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

Ayotte, Joseph D.

1996-01-01

104

STS-89 M.S. Michael Anderson suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-89 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson smiles as he completes the donning of his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. A major in the U.S. Air Force, Anderson has a master of science degree in physics from Creighton University. He and six fellow crew members will soon depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour will lift off during a launch window that opens at 9:43 p.m. EST, Jan. 22. STS-89 is the eighth of nine planned missions to dock the Space Shuttle with Russia's Mir space station.

1998-01-01

105

Quantum correlations in two-particle Anderson localization.  

PubMed

We predict quantum correlations between noninteracting particles evolving simultaneously in a disordered medium. While the particle density follows the single-particle dynamics and exhibits Anderson localization, the two-particle correlation develops unique features that depend on the quantum statistics of the particles and their initial separation. On short time scales, the localization of one particle becomes dependent on whether or not the other particle is localized. On long time scales, the localized particles show oscillatory correlations within the localization length. These effects can be observed in Anderson localization of nonclassical light and ultracold atoms. PMID:21230976

Lahini, Yoav; Bromberg, Yaron; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Silberberg, Yaron

2010-10-15

106

SAGE II Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties at Non-Volcanic Levels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 2000, stratospheric aerosol levels have been relatively stable and at the lowest levels observed in the historical record. Given the challenges of making satellite measurements of aerosol properties at these levels, we have performed a study of the sensitivity of the product to the major components of the processing algorithm used in the production of SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements and the retrieval process that produces the operational surface area density (SAD) product. We find that the aerosol extinction measurements, particularly at 1020 nm, remain robust and reliable at the observed aerosol levels. On the other hand, during background periods, the SAD operational product has an uncertainty of at least a factor of 2 during due to the lack of sensitivity to particles with radii less than 100 nm.

Thomason, Larry W.; Burton, Sharon P.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Peter, Thomas

2008-01-01

107

Lifetimes of 5d{sup 10}7p levels in Hg II  

SciTech Connect

Measurement of lifetimes of low-lying levels in Hg II have been made using thin foil excitation of a fast ion beam using the University of Toledo 330 kV heavy ion accelerator. The lifetimes were extracted both by exponential curve fitting of the individual decay curves and by joint analysis of the cascade-correlated decay curves using the ANDC method. Some of these levels possess interesting subtleties that can greatly limit the reliability of ab initio calculations for their specification, and make experimental determination especially important. For example, for the 5d{sup 10}7p lifetimes exhibit anomalous lifetime ratios for the J=1/2 and J=3/2 fine structure levels resulting from the combined influence of a near-lying Cooper minimum and CI-induced decay to the 5d{sup 9}6s{sup 2} levels.

Maniak, S.T.; Curtis, L.J.; Irving, R.E. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)] [and others

1993-05-01

108

The Innocence Project, Marvin AndersonSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interviewee: Marvin Anderson DNAi Location:Applications>Human identification>Innocence>DNA and the Innocence Project On February 28, 2003, Marvin Anderson spoke at a function celebrating the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the structure of DNA.

2008-03-26

109

AMERICAN COLLEGE OF SURGEONS TRAUMA CENTER VERIFICATION VERSUS STATE DESIGNATION: ARE LEVEL II CENTERS SLIPPING THROUGH THE CRACKS?  

PubMed Central

Objectives Single center experience has shown that American College of Surgeons (ACS) trauma verification can improve outcomes. The current objective was to compare mortality between ACS verified and State designated centers in a national sample. Methods Subjects ?16yr from ACS verified or State designated level I and II centers were identified in the NTDB 2007–08. A predictive mortality model was constructed using TQIP methodology. Imputation was used for missing data. Probability of mortality in the model determined expected deaths. Observed to expected (O/E) mortality ratios with 90%CI and outliers (90%CI above or below 1.0) were compared across ACS and State level I and II centers. The mortality model was repeated with ACS vs. State included. Results There were 900,274 subjects. The model had an AUC of 0.92 to predict death. Level I ACS centers had a lower median O/E ratio than State (0.95 [IQR 0.82–1.05] vs 1.02 [0.87–1.15], p<0.01), with no difference in level II centers. Level II State centers had more high O/E outliers (Table). ACS verification was an independent predictor of survival in level II centers (OR 1.26; 95%CI 1.20–1.32, p<0.01), but not in level I centers (p=0.84). Conclusions Level II centers have a disproportionate number of high mortality outliers and ACS verification is a predictor of survival. Level I ACS centers have lower O/E ratios overall but no difference in outliers. ACS verification appears beneficial. This data suggests that level II centers benefit most, and promoting level II ACS verification may be an opportunity for improved outcomes. Level of Evidence: III

Brown, Joshua B.; Watson, Gregory A.; Forsythe, Raquel M.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Bauza, Graciela; Murdock, Alan D.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Sperry, Jason L.

2013-01-01

110

Operator interface for the PEP-II low level RF control system  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on the operational aspects of the low level RF control system being built for the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. Subsystems requiring major operational considerations include displays for monitor and control from UNIX workstations, slow feedback loops and control sequences residing on microprocessors, and various client applications in the existing SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) control system. Since commissioning of PEP-II RF is currently in-progress, only those parts of the control system used during this phase are discussed in detail. Based on past experience with the SLC control system, it is expected that effort expended during commissioning on a solid user interface will result in smoother transition to full reliable 24-hour-a-day operation.

Allison, S.; Claus, R.

1997-05-01

111

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Does Not Suppress Renal Angiotensin II Levels in Angiotensin I-Infused Rats  

PubMed Central

Angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion into rats elevates local angiotensin II levels through an AT1 receptor–dependent pathway in the kidney. We examined whether treatment with an angio-tensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, temocapril, or an AT1-receptor blocker, olmesartan, prevented elevation of Ang II levels in the kidney of angiotensin I (Ang I)-infused rats. Rats were infused with Ang I (100 ng/min) and treated with temocapril (30 mg/kg per day, n = 10) or olmesartan (10 mg/kg per day, n = 9) for 4 weeks. Ang I infusion significantly elevated blood pressure compared with vehicle-infused rats (n = 6). Treatment with temocapril or olmesartan suppressed Ang I–induced hypertension. Temocapril suppressed both plasma and renal ACE activity. Ang I infusion increased Ang II content in the kidney. Interestingly, temocapril failed to reduce the level of Ang II in the kidney, while olmesartan markedly suppressed an increase in renal Ang II levels. These results suggest a limitation of temocapril and a benefit of olmesartan to inhibit the renal renin–angiotensin system and suggest the possible existence of an ACE inhibitor–insensitive pathway that increases Ang II levels in rat kidney.

Ohnishi, Keisuke; Murase, Miki; Nakano, Daisuke; Pelisch, Nicolas; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ohmori, Koji; Kohno, Masakazu; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Nishiyama, Akira

2013-01-01

112

CA-125 Level as a Prognostic Indicator in Type I and Type II Epithelial Ovarian Cancer  

PubMed Central

Objective The majority of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer achieved a complete clinical remission with normal CA-125 will still relapse and die from their disease. The present study was to determine whether CA-125 levels before, during and after primary treatment provided prognostic information for both Type I and Type II ovarian cancer. Methods In this retrospective study, we identified 410 epithelial ovarian cancer patients who had achieved a CCR between 1984 and 2011. A Cox proportional hazards model and log-rank test were used to assess associations between the nadir CA-125, histotype, and prognosis. Results The baseline serum CA-125 concentration was higher in patients with type II ovarian cancer than in those with type I (p < 0.001). The nadir CA-125 was an independent predictor of PFS (p < 0.001) and OS (p = 0.035) duration. The PFS and OS durations were 21.7 and 79.4 months in patients with CA-125 ? 10 U/ml and 13.6 and 64.6 months in those with 11-35 U/ml (p = 0.01 and 0.002, respectively). Histotype was an independent predictor of PFS (p = 0.041): the PFS and OS durations of type I patients were longer than those in type II (p < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions The nadir CA-125 and the histotype are predictive of PFS and OS duration in ovarian cancers experienced a CCR. PFS and OS durations were shorter in patients with CA-125 levels of 11-35 U/ml and type II disease than in those with ? 10 U/ml and type I.

Chen, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Jing; Cheng, Wenjun; Chang, Doo Young; Huang, Jianfei; Wang, Xuan; Jia, Lizhou; Rosen, Daniel G.; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Da; Gershenson, David M.; Sood, Anil K.; Bast, Robert C.; Liu, Jinsong

2013-01-01

113

Effect of Dietary Fiber on the Level of Free Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker in Vitro.  

PubMed

The interaction between angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers (ARBs), such as losartan potassium (LO), candesartan (CA), and telmisartan (TE), and dietary fiber was studied as to the level of free ARB in vitro. When ARB was incubated with soluble (sodium alginate, pectin, and glucomannan) or insoluble (cellulose and chitosan) dietary fiber, the levels of free LO, TE, and CA decreased. This resulted only from mixing the dietary fiber with the ARBs and differed among the types of dietary fiber, and the pH and electrolytes in the mixture. The levels of free LO and TE tended to decrease with a higher concentration of sodium chloride in pH 1.2 fluid. These results suggest that it is important to pay attention to the possible interactions between ARBs and dietary fiber. PMID:24790001

Iwazaki, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Tamezane, Yui; Tanaka, Kenta; Nakagawa, Minami; Imai, Kimie; Nakanishi, Kunio

2014-01-01

114

Interpolation processes in object perception: reply to Anderson (2007).  

PubMed

P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, & T. F. Shipley presented a theory of 3-D interpolation in object perception. Along with results from many researchers, this work supports an emerging picture of how the visual system connects separate visible fragments to form objects. In his commentary, B. L. Anderson challenges parts of that view, especially the idea of a common underlying interpolation component in modal and amodal completion (the identity hypothesis). Here the authors analyze Anderson's evidence and argue that he neither provides any reason to abandon the identity hypothesis nor offers a viable alternative theory. The authors offer demonstrations and analyses indicating that interpolated contours can appear modally despite absence of the luminance relations, occlusion geometry, and surface attachment that Anderson claims to be necessary. The authors elaborate crossing interpolations as key cases in which modal and amodal appearance must be consequences of interpolation. Finally, the authors dispute Anderson's assertion that vision researchers are misguided in using objective performance methods, and they argue that his challenges to relatability fail because contour and surface processes, as well as local and global influences, have been distinguished experimentally. PMID:17500638

Kellman, Philip J; Garrigan, Patrick; Shipley, Thomas F; Keane, Brian P

2007-04-01

115

Markovian Anderson Model: Bounds for the Rate of Propagation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider the Anderson model in with potentials whose values at any site of the lattice are Markovian independent random functions of time. For solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation we show under some conditions that with probability 1 where for d=1,2 and for .

Tcheremchantsev, Serguei

116

Solar Hot Water System Installed at Anderson, South Carolina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total ho...

1978-01-01

117

MD Anderson study finds depression and shortened telomeres increase bladder cancer mortality  

Cancer.gov

The combination of shortened telomeres, a biological marker of aging associated with cancer development, and elevated depression significantly impacted bladder cancer mortality, according to data presented at the 11th Annual AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research. As part of an ongoing, large-scale epidemiologic study of bladder cancer, researchers from the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston collected clinical and mental health information on 464 patients with bladder cancer. They assessed patients' depression levels with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale.

118

Application of the S=1 underscreened Anderson lattice model to Kondo uranium and neptunium compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing the\\u000acoexistence of Kondo screening effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated\\u000awithin the Anderson lattice Hamiltonian with a two-fold degenerate $f$-level in\\u000aeach site, corresponding to $5f^2$ electronic configuration with $S=1$ spins. A\\u000aderivation of the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation is presented and the\\u000aresulting Hamiltonian has an effective $f$-band term, in addition to

Christopher Thomas; Acirete S. da Rosa Simões; J. R. Iglesias; C. Lacroix; N. B. Perkins; B. Coqblin

2010-01-01

119

Anderson Localization for a Multidimensional Model Including Long Range Potentials and Displacements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We give a short summary on how to combine and extend results of Combes and Hislop [2] (short range Anderson model with additional displacements), Kirsch, Stollmann and Stolz [13] and [14] (long range Anderson model without displacements) to get localization in an energy interval above the infimum of the almost sure spectrum for a continuous multidimensional Anderson model including long range potentials and displacements.

Zenk, Heribert

120

High levels of MHC class II allelic diversity in lake trout from Lake Superior  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sequence variation in a 216 bp portion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II B1 domain was examined in 74 individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from different locations in Lake Superior. Forty-three alleles were obtained which encoded 71-72 amino acids of the mature protein. These sequences were compared with previous data obtained from five Pacific salmon species and Atlantic salmon using the same primers. Although all of the lake trout alleles clustered together in the neighbor-joining analysis of amino acid sequences, one amino acid allelic lineage was shared with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species in another genus which probably diverged from Salvelinus more than 10-20 million years ago. As shown previously in other salmonids, the level of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) exceeded the level of synonymous substitution (d(S)). The level of nucleotide diversity at the MHC class II B1 locus was considerably higher in lake trout than in the Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lake trout colonized Lake Superior from more than one refuge following the Wisconsin glaciation. Recent population bottlenecks may have reduced nucleotide diversity in Pacific salmon populations.

Dorschner, M. O.; Duris, T.; Bronte, C. R.; Burnham, Curtis, M. K.; Phillips, R. B.

2000-01-01

121

Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava level II involvement: curative resection and reconstruction of renal veins  

PubMed Central

Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava (IVCL) is a rare retroperitoneal tumor. We report two cases of level II (middle level, renal veins to hepatic veins) IVCL, who underwent en bloc resection with reconstruction of bilateral or left renal venous return using prosthetic grafts. In our cases, IVCL is documented to be occluded preoperatively, therefore, radical resection of tumor and/or right kidney was performed and the distal end of inferior vena cava was resected and without caval reconstruction. None of the patients developed edema or acute renal failure postoperatively. After surgical resection, adjuvant radiation therapy was administrated. The patients have been free of recurrence 2?years and 3?months, 9?months after surgery, respectively, indicating the complete surgical resection and radiotherapy contribute to the better survival. The reconstruction of inferior vena cava was not considered mandatory in level II IVCL, if the retroperitoneal venous collateral pathways have been established. In addition to the curative resection of IVCL, the renal vascular reconstruction minimized the risks of procedure-related acute renal failure, and was more physiologically preferable. This concept was reflected in the treatment of the two patients reported on.

2012-01-01

122

Language Assessment Scales, Level 2, LAS II, for Grades 6 and Up, English/Spanish. Examiner's Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Language Assessment Scales, Level 2 (LAS II) are used to assess the linguistic proficiency of limited-English-speaking or non-English-speaking adolescents. LAS II, like its predecessor, LAS I, provides a picture of oral linguistic proficiency based on a student's performance across four linguistic subsystems: phonemic, lexical, syntactic and…

Duncan, Sharon E.; De Avila, Edward A.

123

Fluorescence lifetime imaging of physiological free Cu(ii) levels in live cells with a Cu(ii)-selective carbonic anhydrase-based biosensor.  

PubMed

Copper is a required trace element that plays key roles in a number of human enzymes, such that copper deficiency or genetic defects in copper transport lead to serious or fatal disease. Rae, et al., had famously predicted that free copper ion levels in the cell cytoplasm were extremely low, typically too low to be observable. We recently developed a variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase II for sensing metal ions that exhibits 25-fold better selectivity for Cu(ii) over Zn(ii) than the wild type protein, enabling us to accurately measure Cu(ii) in the presence of ordinary cellular (picomolar) concentrations of free zinc. We inserted a fluorescent labeled Cu(ii)-specific variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase into PC-12 cells and found that the levels are indeed extremely low (in the femtomolar range). We imaged the free Cu(ii) levels in living cells by means of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy. Implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:24671220

McCranor, Bryan J; Szmacinski, Henryk; Zeng, Hui Hui; Stoddard, Andrea K; Hurst, Tamiika; Fierke, Carol A; Lakowicz, J R; Thompson, Richard B

2014-04-23

124

Effects of Vaginal Delivery and Caesarian Section on Plasma Renin Activity and Angiotensin II Levels in Human Umbilical Cord Blood  

Microsoft Academic Search

High levels of angiotensin II were found in umbilical venous blood of babies delivered vaginally (40.3 pg·ml––1) and vaginally with epidural anaesthesia (66.8 pg·ml––1); low levels of angiotensin II were found in umbilical venous blood of babies delivered by Caesarian section (7.5pg·ml––1) and in the peripheral blood of normal adults (7.92 pg·ml––1). There were no significant differences between these groups

Eugenie R. Lumbers; G. C. Reid

1977-01-01

125

Architecture and Performance of the PEP-II Low-Level RF System  

SciTech Connect

Heavy beam loading in the PEP-II B Factory along with large ring circumferences places unique requirements upon the low-level rf (LLRF) system. RF feedback loops must reduce the impedance observed by the beam while ignoring the cavity transients caused by the ion clearing gap. Special attention must be placed on the cavity tuner loops to allow matching the ion clearing gap transients in the high energy ring and the low energy ring. A wideband fiber optic connection to the longitudinal feedback system allows a rf station to operate as a powerful ''sub-woofer'' to damp residual low order coupled bunch motion. This paper describes the design and performance of the VXI based, EPICS controlled, PEP-II low-level rf system(s). Baseband in-phase and quadrature (IQ) signal processing using both analog and modern digital techniques are used throughout the system. A family of digital down converters provide extremely accurate measurements of many rf signals throughout the system. Each system incorporates a built-in network analyzer and arbitrary rf function generator which interface with Matlab to provide a wide range of functions ranging from automated configuration of each feedback loop to cavity FM processing. EPICS based sequences make the entire system a turn-key operation requiring minimal operator intervention. In the event of a fault, fast history buffers throughout the system write selected rf signals to disk files which can be viewed later to help diagnose problems. Actual data from commissioning runs of PEP-II is presented.

Corredoura, Paul L.

1999-04-14

126

Arc Detection and Interlock Module for the PEP-II Low Level RF System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new arc detection and interlock generating module for the SLAC PEP-II low-level RF VXI-based system has been developed. The system is required to turn off the RF high voltage power supply in the event of arcing in the cavity windows, klystron window, and circulator. Infrared photodiodes receive arc signals through radiation resistant optical fibers. Optical emitters are paired with the detectors to allow continuity and attenuation monitoring of the optical fiber cable. Gain and bandwidth are selectable for each channel to allow tailoring response. The module also responds to interlock requests from other modules in the VXI system and communicates with the industrial controller responsible for much of the low-level RF system's interlock functionality.

Tighe, R.

1997-05-01

127

A Non-invasive Technique for Configuring Low Level RF Feedback Loops in PEP-II  

SciTech Connect

The RF system of the PEP-II collider uses two fast feedback loops around each klystron and set of cavities. These loops reduce the impedance of the fundamental mode of the accelerating cavities seen by the beam, and are necessary to reduce the growth rates of longitudinal modes within the RF system bandwidth. Operation of the accelerator at high beam currents is very sensitive to the configuration of the low-level RF feedback loops. There are 7 loop control parameters that strongly influence the stability of the feedback loops and the achieved level of longitudinal impedance reduction. Diagnostic techniques for the analysis of the RF feedback via closed-loop system transfer function measurements will be presented. The model is fit to the measured closed-loop transfer function data and the extracted parameters are then used to calculate optimal tuning and corrections to the loop control elements in the physical channel. These techniques allow fine-tuning of RF feedback with stored beam as well as diagnosis of misconfigured or malfunctioning elements of the system. Results from PEP-II operation will be presented to illustrate the techniques and their applications.

Teytelman, D; /SLAC

2005-06-22

128

An evaluation of classification methods for level II land-cover categories in Ohio  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this research was to evaluate six classifiers applied to Landsat-7 data for accuracy of Level II land-cover categories in Ohio. These methods consist of (1) USGS National Land Cover Data; (2) the spectral angle mapper; (3) the maximum likelihood classifier; (4) the maximum likelihood classifier with texture analysis; (5) a recently introduced hybrid artificial neural network; (6) and a recently introduced modified image segmentation and object-oriented processing classifier. The segmentation object-oriented processing (SOOP) classifier outperformed all others with an overall accuracy of 93.8% and Kappa Coefficient of 0.93. SOOP was the only classifier to have by-class producer and user accuracies of 90% or higher for all land-cover categories. A modified artificial neural network (ANN) classifier had the second highest overall accuracy of 87.6% and Kappa of 0.85. The four remaining classifiers had overall accuracies less than 85%. The SOOP classifier was applied to Landsat-7 data to perform a level II land-cover classification for the state of Ohio.

Frohn, Robert C.; Liu, Lin; Beck, Richard A.; Chaudhary, Navendu; Arellano-Neri, Olimpia

2008-10-01

129

Level II Milestone Review of LLNL Program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives  

SciTech Connect

This document describes an evaluation of the Level II Milestone achievements of the LLNL program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives on January 14, 2003. ''The Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives Program'' is a mixture of advanced computational methodology and physico-chemical theory applied to understanding deflagration and detonation of plastic-bonded explosives from the nano to the macro scales. At many points, the modeling is tied directly to experiments within the precisions of both. Advances are needed in the experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of detonations. Work reported in this review represents significant, cross-pollinating advances in each area. The team successfully carried out ALE-3D simulations of deflagration in PBX with grain scale effects. (Milestone requirements 1 and 2), interpreted experimental data on flame speed vs. pressure and sensitivity to global kinetics in terms of ALE-3D simulations (Milestone requirement 3), and used the results of these simulations to develop a continuum reactive flow model that captures some of these effects (Milestone requirement 4). By comparing experiments and detonation velocities in small diameter, unconfined explosives, they found non-idealities that remain at intermediate diameters (ca. 1.5 mm) that require further analysis. In all of these areas, the project team has met, indeed exceeded, their Level II Milestone goals.

Nicol, M F; Benson, D J; Yip, S

2003-01-14

130

Direct determination of the timing of sea level change during termination II.  

PubMed

An outcrop within the last interglacial terrace on Barbados contains corals that grew during the penultimate deglaciation, or Termination II. We used combined 230Th and 231Pa dating to determine that they grew 135.8 +/- 0.8 thousand years ago, indicating that sea level was 18 +/- 3 meters below present sea level at the time. This suggests that sea level had risen to within 20% of its peak last-interglacial value by 136 thousand years ago, in conflict with Milankovitch theory predictions. Orbital forcing may have played a role in the deglaciation, as may have isostatic adjustments due to large ice sheets. Other corals in the same outcrop grew during oxygen isotope (delta18O) substage 6e, indicating that sea level was 38 +/- 5 meters below present sea level, about 168.0 thousand years ago. When compared to the delta18O signal in the benthic V19-30/V19-28 record at that time, the coral data extend to the previous glacial cycle the conclusion that deep-water temperatures were colder during glacial periods. PMID:11786639

Gallup, Christina D; Cheng, H; Taylor, F W; Edwards, R L

2002-01-11

131

Relativistic ionized gases: Ohm and Fourier laws from Anderson and Witting model equation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relativistic laws of Ohm and Fourier are determined for binary mixtures of electrons with protons or photons subjected to external electromagnetic fields, by using the Anderson and Witting model equation. General expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities for relativistic degenerate ionized gas mixtures are determined and explicit expressions for the transport coefficients are given for the particular cases: (i) a non-relativistic mixture of protons and non-degenerate electrons; (ii) an ultra-relativistic mixture of photons and non-degenerate electrons; (iii) a non-relativistic mixture of protons and completely degenerate electrons; (iv) an ultra-relativistic mixture of photons and completely degenerate electrons and (v) a mixture of non-relativistic protons and ultra-relativistic completely degenerate electrons.

Kremer, G. M.; Patsko, C. H.

2003-05-01

132

STS-107 Crew Interviews: Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-107 Mission Specialist 3 and Payload Commander Michael Anderson is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting onboard science experiments. He discusses the following instruments and sets of experiments in detail: CM2 (Combustion Module 2), FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enabling Science Technology and Research, MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) and MGM (Mechanics of Granular Materials). Anderson also mentions on-board activities and responsibilities during launch and reentry, mission training, and microgravity research. In addition, he touches on the dual work-shift nature of the mission, the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety during training and the value of international cooperation.

2002-01-01

133

STS-107 Crew Interviews: Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

STS-107 Mission Specialist 3 and Payload Commander Michael Anderson is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting onboard science experiments. He discusses the following instruments and sets of experiments in detail: CM2 (Combustion Module 2), FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enabling Science Technology and Research, MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) and MGM (Mechanics of Granular Materials). Anderson also mentions on-board activities and responsibilities during launch and reentry, mission training, and microgravity research. In addition, he touches on the dual work-shift nature of the mission, the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety during training and the value of international cooperation.

2002-06-01

134

Anderson Localization for Time Quasi Periodic Random Sch\\\\\\  

Microsoft Academic Search

We prove that at large disorder, with large probability and for a set of\\u000aDiophantine frequencies of large measure, Anderson localization in $\\\\Bbb Z^d$\\u000ais {\\\\it stable} under localized time-quasi-periodic perturbations by proving\\u000athat the associated quasi-energy operator has pure point spectrum. The main\\u000atools are the Fr\\\\\\

Jean Bourgain; Wei-Min Wang

2002-01-01

135

Kubo-Anderson Mixing in the Turbulent Boundary Layer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel ab initio analysis of the Reynolds stress is presented in order to model non-local turbulence transport. The theory involves a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. A scaling relation maps the path space onto the boundary layer. Analytical sampling rates are shown to model mixing by exchange. Nonlocal mixing involves a scaling exponent ??0.58 (??? in the diffusion limit). The resulting transport equation represents a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process.

Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Brink, A. Maassen Van Den

136

Ground-state properties of the periodic Anderson model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ground-state energy, hybridization matrix element, local moment, and spin-density correlations of a one-dimensional, finite-chain, periodic, symmetric Anderson model are obtained by numerical simulations and compared with perturbation theory and strong-coupling results. It is found that the local f-electron spins are compensated by correlation with other f-electrons as well as band electrons leading to a nonmagnetic ground state.

Blankenbecler, R.; Fulco, J. R.; Gill, W.; Scalapino, D. J.

1987-01-01

137

STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson suits up for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson completes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

2002-01-01

138

Anderson localization and the theory of dirty superconductors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study is made of the effect of Anderson localization in dirty superconductors. The scale dependence of the diffusion in the vicinity of the mobility edge results in a strong renormalization of the zero-temperature coherence length. This implies the breakdown of the Ginzburg criterion close to the metal-insulator transition and thus the importance of fluctuations in this regime. The upper critical field is calculated, and possible experiments are also discussed.

Kapitulnik, A.; Kotliar, G.

1985-01-01

139

Diagrammatic approach to Anderson localization in the quantum kicked rotator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The phenomenon of Anderson localization in the quantum kicked rotator is analyzed by means of concepts which were originally introduced in condensed matter physics. A diagrammatic language similar to the impurity diagram technique employed in the theory of disordered conductors is developed. The method is applied to a calculation of the quantum return probability and leads to results which coincide (apart from numerical factors) with recent numerical findings.

Altland, Alexander

1993-07-01

140

The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the

C. Thomas; A. S. R. Simões; J. R. Iglesias; C. Lacroix; N. B. Perkins; B. Coqblin

2011-01-01

141

The canonical transformation method in the periodic Anderson model  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate a version of the periodic Anderson model in which both the d- and f-electron subsystems are strongly correlated.\\u000a The one-site hybridization of the electron quantum states in each subsystem and the possibility of the d-electron hopping\\u000a between lattice sites are taken into account. To construct the canonical transformation S-matrix, we use the system of one-site\\u000a orthonormalized functions belonging

V. A. Moskalenko; N. B. Perkins

1999-01-01

142

Categorization of nocturnal drainage flows in the Anderson Creek valley  

SciTech Connect

A network of eight meteorological towers was operated over about a one-year period within the Anderson Creek valley in the Geysers Geothermal Area of northern California. The purpose was to define the noctural wind and temperature structure along the valley's sloped surfaces for use in evaluating the frequency of drainage flows throughout the year and to assess the representativeness of the flows observed during the few nights that intensive studies were undertaken. (ACR)

Gudiksen, P.H.; Walton, J.J.

1981-06-01

143

Superfluidity versus Anderson Localization in a Dilute Bose Gas  

SciTech Connect

We consider the motion of a quasi-one-dimensional beam of Bose-Einstein condensed particles in a disordered region of finite extent. Interaction effects lead to the appearance of two distinct regions of stationary flow. One is subsonic and corresponds to superfluid motion. The other one is supersonic and dissipative and shows Anderson localization. We compute analytically the interaction-dependent localization length. We also explain the disappearance of the supersonic stationary flow for large disordered samples.

Paul, T.; Leboeuf, P.; Pavloff, N. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, CNRS, Universite Paris Sud, UMR8626, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Schlagheck, P. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

2007-05-25

144

Many-body Anderson localization in one-dimensional systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show, using quasi-exact numerical simulations, that Anderson localization in a disordered one-dimensional potential survives in the presence of attractive interaction between particles. The localization length of the particles' center of mass—computed analytically for weak disorder—is in good agreement with the quasi-exact numerical observations using the time evolving block decimation algorithm. Our approach allows for simulation of the entire experiment including the final measurement of all atom positions.

Delande, Dominique; Sacha, Krzysztof; P?odzie?, Marcin; Avazbaev, Sanat K.; Zakrzewski, Jakub

2013-04-01

145

Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

1978-01-01

146

UT MD Anderson scientists discover secret life of chromatin:  

Cancer.gov

Chromatin--the intertwined histone proteins and DNA that make up chromosomes--constantly receives messages that pour in from a cell’s intricate signaling networks... But chromatin also talks back, scientists at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center report today in the journal Cell, issuing orders affecting a protein that has nothing to do with chromatin’s central role in gene transcription--the first step in protein formation.

147

Moment closure of the relativistic Anderson and Witting model equation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is shown that the closure of the model equation of Anderson and Witting by a moment method leads to transport coefficients of a relativistic gas which differ from those obtained by the usual Chapman and Enskog method. The transport coefficients obtained in the two closures coincide in the non-relativistic limiting case but depart from each other in the relativistic and ultra-relativistic regions.

Cercignani, C.; Kremer, G. M.

2001-02-01

148

Evaluation of Phase II glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

A vendor glass formulation study was carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), supporting the Phase I and Phase II melter vendor testing activities for Westinghouse Hanford Company. This study is built upon the LLW glass optimization effort that will be described in a separate report. For Phase I vendor melter testing, six glass formulations were developed at PNL and additional were developed by Phase I vendors. All the doses were characterized in terms of viscosity and chemical durability by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. Twelve Phase II glass formulations (see Tables 3.5 and 3.6) were developed to accommodate 2.5 wt% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 1.0 wt% S0{sub 3} without significant processing problems. These levels of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SO{sub 3} are expected to be the highest possible concentrations from Hanford Site LLW streams at 25 wt% waste loading in glass. The Phase H compositions formulated were 6 to 23 times more durable than the environmental assessment (EA) glass. They melt within the temperature range of 1160{degrees} to 1410{degrees}C to suit different melting technologies. The composition types include boron-free for volatilization sensitive melters; boron-containing glasses for coId-cap melters; Zr-containing, glasses for enhanced Iong-term durability; and Fe-containing glasses for reducing melting temperature and melt volatility while maintaining chemical durability.

Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J. [and others

1996-03-01

149

Influence of the Steady Background Turbulence Level on Second Sound Dynamics in He II  

SciTech Connect

We report measurements on the dependence of the second sound breakpoint energy on the steady background turbulence in He II at 1.7 K. We have determined the breakpoint energy for two pulsed heat flux values (100 and 200 kW/m2) at different steady background levels (up to 2.6 kW/m2). The experiment consists of a 175 mm long channel having a cross section of 242 mm2, which is equipped with a thin film Ni-Cr heater at its bottom end and two superconducting filament thermometers in the path of the heat pulses, respectively 25.4 and 127 mm above the heater. The heater both generates a steady heat flux producing background turbulence in the liquid column and transmits finite amplitude heat pulses by superposing them on the background heat flux. The second sound pulse travels through the He II in the channel and is detected by the thermometers. The breakpoint energy is determined by analyzing the raw pulse signals recorded. We can subsequently obtain the dependence of the breakpoint energy on the background heat flux. This determines the energy limit that second sound pulses can carry under different background turbulence conditions.

Dalban-Canassy, M.; Van Sciver, S. W. [Mechanical Engineering Department, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL, 32310 (United States); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 32310 (United States); Hilton, D. K. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 32310 (United States)

2006-04-27

150

Super-diffusion in optical realizations of Anderson localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss the dynamics of particles in one dimension in potentials that are random in both space and time. The results are applied to recent optics experiments on Anderson localization, in which the transverse spreading of a beam is suppressed by random fluctuations in the refractive index. If the refractive index fluctuates along the direction of the paraxial propagation of the beam, the localization is destroyed. We analyze this broken localization in terms of the spectral decomposition of the potential. When the potential has a discrete spectrum, the spread is controlled by the overlap of Chirikov resonances in phase space. As the number of Fourier components is increased, the resonances merge into a continuum, which is described by a Fokker-Planck equation. We express the diffusion coefficient in terms of the spectral intensity of the potential. For a general class of potentials that are commonly used in optics, the solutions to the Fokker-Planck equation exhibit anomalous diffusion in phase space, implying that when Anderson localization is broken by temporal fluctuations of the potential, the result is transport at a rate similar to a ballistic one or even faster. For a class of potentials which arise in some existing realizations of Anderson localization, atypical behavior is found.

Krivolapov, Yevgeny; Levi, Liad; Fishman, Shmuel; Segev, Mordechai; Wilkinson, Michael

2012-04-01

151

Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

Lv, Shu-Hui; Song, Juntao; Li, Yu-Xian

2013-11-01

152

Commissioning experience with the PEP-II low-level RF system  

SciTech Connect

The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment and supported by EPICS. All signal processing and control is done at baseband using in-phase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. Remotely configurable RF feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to the required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. The system contains a built-in baseband network analyzer which allows remote measurement of the RF feedback loop transfer functions and automated configuration of these loops. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system.

Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

1997-05-01

153

Use of enteral nutritional supplementation: a survey of level II and III neonatal units in England.  

PubMed

Enteral nutritional supplementation is widely used in preterm babies on Neonatal Units (NNUs). There is little published evidence on appraising their long-term efficacy. We evaluated the current practice of enteral nutritional supplementation in 96 level II and III NNUs in England. 96%, 98%, 98% and 56% units use breast milk fortification (BMF), iron, multivitamins and folic acid supplementation respectively. Iron, multivitamins and folic acid supplements are routinely commenced in babies < 35 weeks gestation by 73%, 68% and 39% NNUs respectively. Seventy eight percent NNUs only use BMF for babies that are not gaining weight. Continuing variable practice of enteral nutritional supplementation and current use of anecdotal evidence and best guess recommendations highlights the need for a unified approach and collaborative multinational research to produce standardised guidelines. PMID:24034203

Ahmed, Mansoor; Brent, Julie; Ginn, Emma

2013-09-01

154

Cepheids in open clusters (Anderson+, 2013)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cepheids in open clusters (cluster Cepheids: CCs) are of great importance as zero-point calibrators of the Galactic Cepheid period-luminosity relationship (PLR). We perform an 8-dimensional all-sky census that aims to identify new bona-fide CCs and provide a ranking of membership confidence for known CC candidates according to membership probabilities. The probabilities are computed for combinations of known Galactic open clusters and classical Cepheid candidates, based on spatial, kinematic, and population-specific membership constraints. Data employed in this analysis are taken largely from published literature and supplemented by a year-round observing program on both hemispheres dedicated to determining systemic radial velocities of Cepheids. In total, we find 23 bona-fide CCs, 5 of which are candidates identified for the first time, including an overtone-Cepheid member in NGC 129. We discuss a subset of CC candidates in detail, some of which have been previously mentioned in the literature. Our results indicate unlikely membership for 7 Cepheids that have been previously discussed in terms of cluster membership. We furthermore revisit the Galactic PLR using our bona fide CC sample and obtain a result consistent with the recent calibration by Turner (2010). However, our calibration remains limited mainly by cluster uncertainties and the small number of long-period calibrators. In the near future, Gaia will enable our study to be carried out in much greater detail and accuracy, thanks to data homogeneity and greater levels of completeness. (4 data files).

Anderson, R. I.; Eyer, L.; Mowlavi, N.

2013-07-01

155

Tropomyosin and Myosin-II Cellular Levels Promote Actomyosin Ring Assembly in Fission Yeast  

PubMed Central

Myosin-II (Myo2p) and tropomyosin are essential for contractile ring formation and cytokinesis in fission yeast. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches to understand how these proteins function at contractile rings. We find that ring assembly is delayed in Myo2p motor and tropomyosin mutants, but occurs prematurely in cells engineered to express two copies of myo2. Thus, the timing of ring assembly responds to changes in Myo2p cellular levels and motor activity, and the emergence of tropomyosin-bound actin filaments. Doubling Myo2p levels suppresses defects in ring assembly associated with a tropomyosin mutant, suggesting a role for tropomyosin in maximizing Myo2p function. Correspondingly, tropomyosin increases Myo2p actin affinity and ATPase activity and promotes Myo2p-driven actin filament gliding in motility assays. Tropomyosin achieves this by favoring the strong actin-bound state of Myo2p. This mode of regulation reflects a role for tropomyosin in specifying and stabilizing actomyosin interactions, which facilitates contractile ring assembly in the fission yeast system.

Stark, Benjamin C.; Sladewski, Thomas E.; Pollard, Luther W.

2010-01-01

156

Tropomyosin and myosin-II cellular levels promote actomyosin ring assembly in fission yeast.  

PubMed

Myosin-II (Myo2p) and tropomyosin are essential for contractile ring formation and cytokinesis in fission yeast. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches to understand how these proteins function at contractile rings. We find that ring assembly is delayed in Myo2p motor and tropomyosin mutants, but occurs prematurely in cells engineered to express two copies of myo2. Thus, the timing of ring assembly responds to changes in Myo2p cellular levels and motor activity, and the emergence of tropomyosin-bound actin filaments. Doubling Myo2p levels suppresses defects in ring assembly associated with a tropomyosin mutant, suggesting a role for tropomyosin in maximizing Myo2p function. Correspondingly, tropomyosin increases Myo2p actin affinity and ATPase activity and promotes Myo2p-driven actin filament gliding in motility assays. Tropomyosin achieves this by favoring the strong actin-bound state of Myo2p. This mode of regulation reflects a role for tropomyosin in specifying and stabilizing actomyosin interactions, which facilitates contractile ring assembly in the fission yeast system. PMID:20110347

Stark, Benjamin C; Sladewski, Thomas E; Pollard, Luther W; Lord, Matthew

2010-03-15

157

Genistein reduces glycosaminoglycan levels in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type II  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose: Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are lysosomal storage disorders resulting from a deficit of specific lysosomal enzymes catalysing glycosaminoglycan (GAG) degradation. The typical pathology involves most of the organ systems, including the brain, in its severe forms. The soy isoflavone genistein has recently attracted considerable attention as it can reduce GAG synthesis in vitro. Furthermore, genistein is able to cross the blood–brain barrier in the rat. The present study was undertaken to assess the ability of genistein to reduce urinary and tissue GAG levels in vivo. Experimental approach: We used mice with genetic deletion of iduronate-2-sulphatase (one of the GAG catabolizing enzymes) which provide a model of MPS type II. Two doses of genistein, 5 or 25 mg·kg?1·day?1, were given, in the diet for 10 or 20 weeks. Urinary and tissue GAG content was evaluated by biochemical and histochemical procedures. Key results: Urinary GAG levels were reduced after 10 weeks' treatment with genistein at either 5 or 25 mg·kg?1·day?1. In tissue samples from liver, spleen, kidney and heart, a reduction in GAG content was observed with both dosages, after 10 weeks' treatment. Decreased GAG deposits in brain were observed after genistein treatment in some animals. Conclusions and implications: There was decreased GAG storage in the MPSII mouse model following genistein administration. Our results would support the use of this plant-derived isoflavone in a combined therapeutic protocol for treatment of MPS.

Friso, A; Tomanin, R; Salvalaio, M; Scarpa, M

2010-01-01

158

[Level of knowledge of patients with type II diabetes mellitus in primary care].  

PubMed

A personal interview to 148 patients was carried out with the aim of getting to know the level of information of type II diabetic patients at an Urban Health Center in Santander. A validated questionnaire made up of 14 questions on general aspects of diabetis, dietetic habits and capability to handle complications was used. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of questionnaire was 0.69. The correct answer average was 6.3 (IC = 5.9-6.5). Patients were best informed about general aspects and had much less information with regard to the handling of complications and to their diet. The differences among these three sections of questions were significative (p less than 0.001). The patients under diet treatment obtained worse results than those treated with oral hipoglucemiants and insulin. Our results are worse than those reported by other similar populations at a national level. Also, and due to the differences in knowledge within this group, we believe that the establishment of groups and subgroups when educating diabetic patients is possible and also highly recommended. PMID:1917331

Piñeiro Chonsa, F; Lara Valdivielso, E; Muñoz Cacho, P; Herrera Plaza, T; Rodríguez Cordero, R; Mayo Alastrey, M A

1991-01-01

159

Spectrum and energy levels of singly ionized cesium. II. Interpretation of fine and hyperfine structures  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical interpretation of Cs II has been extended and now includes the 5p/sup 5/ns (n = 6--12), 5p/sup 5/np (n = 6--8), 5p/sup 5/nd (n = 5--11), 5p/sup 5/nf (n = 4--8), 5p/sup 5/ng (n = 5--10), and 5p/sup 5/nh (n = 6--8) configurations. Most levels are well represented in the single-configuration approximation when far configuration interactions are included through effective electrostatic parameters. Explicit interactions of low-lying 5p/sup 5/nd+5p/sup 5/(n+1)s configurations have been determined. For most configurations, good jK coupling is found. Purities of the levels in jK coupling and the LS composition of the eigenvectors are given. The intermediate-coupling eigenvectors have been used to calculate magnetic-dipole hyperfine-splitting factors, and these are compared with 167 experimentally determined values from our earlier work.

Sansonetti, C.J.; Andrew, K.L.; Wyart, J.

1988-10-01

160

Radiative lifetime measurements of some La I and La II levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural radiative lifetimes for 60 excited levels of La I and La II were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-induced plasma. The lifetimes of 40 excited levels of La I, in the energy range from 24 507.87 to 52 030.4 cm-1, and 20 levels of La II, from 26 414.01 to 56 035.70 cm-1, were measured in this work. The results of lifetimes range from 4.2 to 330 ns with the uncertainties within 10 per cent. To our best knowledge, 34 lifetimes of La I and 17 lifetimes of La II are reported for the first time.

Shang, Xue; Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Qian; Fan, Shuang; Bai, Wanshuang; Dai, Zhenwen

2014-07-01

161

Common polymorphism in H19 associated with birthweight and cord blood IGF-II levels in humans  

PubMed Central

Background Common genetic variation at genes that are imprinted and exclusively maternally expressed could explain the apparent maternal-specific inheritance of low birthweight reported in large family pedigrees. We identified ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in H19, and we genotyped three of these SNPs in families from the contemporary ALSPAC UK birth cohort (1,696 children, 822 mothers and 661 fathers) in order to explore associations with size at birth and cord blood IGF-II levels. Results Both offspring's and mother's H19 2992C>T SNP genotypes showed associations with offspring birthweight (P = 0.03 to P = 0.003) and mother's genotype was also associated with cord blood IGF-II levels (P = 0.0003 to P = 0.0001). The offspring genotype association with birthweight was independent of mother's genotype (P = 0.01 to P = 0.007). However, mother's untransmitted H19 2992T allele was also associated with larger birthweight (P = 0.04) and higher cord blood IGF-II levels (P = 0.002), suggesting a direct effect of mother's genotype on placental IGF-II expression and fetal growth. The association between mother's untransmitted allele and cord blood IGF-II levels was more apparent in offspring of first pregnancies than subsequent pregnancies (P-interaction = 0.03). Study of the independent Cambridge birth cohort with available DNA in mothers (N = 646) provided additional support for mother's H19 2992 genotype associations with birthweight (P = 0.04) and with mother's glucose levels (P = 0.01) in first pregnancies. Conclusion The common H19 2992T allele, in the mother or offspring or both, may confer reduced fetal growth restraint, as indicated by associations with larger offspring birth size, higher cord blood IGF-II levels, and lower compensatory early postnatal catch-up weight gain, that are more evident among mother's smaller first-born infants.

Petry, Clive J; Ong, Ken K; Barratt, Bryan J; Wingate, Diane; Cordell, Heather J; Ring, Susan M; Pembrey, Marcus E; Reik, Wolf; Todd, John A; Dunger, David B

2005-01-01

162

Anderson-Fabry disease: a multiorgan disease.  

PubMed

Fabry disease (FD) is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme ?-galactosidase A. FD causes glycolipids, such as globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), to accumulate in the vascular endothelium of several organs (Fig. 2), including the skin, kidneys, nervous system, and heart, thereby triggering inflammation and fibrosis. These processes generally result in organ dysfunction, which is usually the first clinical evidence of FD. Patients with classic FD have various symptoms, eg, acroparesthesias, hypohidrosis, angiokeratomas, corneal opacities, cerebrovascular lesions, cardiac disorders, andrenal dysfunction.However, evolving knowledge about the natural course of disease suggests that it is more appropriate to describe FD as a disease with a wide spectrum of heterogeneously progressive clinical phenotypes. Indeed, most female heterozygotes develop symptoms due to yet undetermined mechanisms and a high percentage of females develops vital organ involvement including the kidneys, heart and/or brain about a decade later than males. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. The principal clinical manifestations in Fabry disease consist of artery associated complications (such as cerebral disease and nephropathy), but the pathophysiology of this specific vasculopathy is unclear. Several studies indicate that the specific vascular lesions that are present in Fabry disease occur as a result of vascular dysfunction with major components being endothelial dysfunction, alterations in cerebral perfusion and a pro-thrombotic phenotype. Fabry cardiac involvement has several clinical manifestations (Table 10): concentric left ventricular hypertrophy without left ventricular dilation and severe loss of left ventricular systolic function, mitral and aortic valvulopathy, disorders of the atrioventricular conduction or repolarization, and compromised diastolic function. The neurological manifestations of Fabry disease include both peripheral nervous system and CNS involvement, with globotriaosylceramide accumulation found in Schwann cells and dorsal root ganglia together with deposits in CNS neurones. The main involvement of the CNS is attributable to cerebrovasculopathy, with an increased incidence of stroke. The abnormal neuronal accumulation of glycosphingolipid appears to have little clinical effect on the natural history of Fabry disease, with the possible exception of some reported mild cognitive abnormalities. The pathogenesis of Fabry vasculopathy remains poorly understood, but probably relates, in part, to abnormal functional control of the vessels, secondary to endothelial dysfunction as a consequence of ?-galactosidase A deficiency. The diagnosis of Fabry disease is made in hemizygous males after the detection of the presence of angiokeratomas (Fig. 19 A, B), irregularities in sweating, edema, scant body hair, painful sensations, and of cardiovascular, intestinal, renal, ophthalmologic, phlebologic, and respiratory involvement. A deficiency of alpha-gal A in serum, leukocytes, tears, tissue specimens, or cultured skin fibroblasts further supports the diagnosis in male patients. Since heterozygous women show angiokeratomas in only about 30% of cases and may have alpha-gal A levels within normal range, genetic analysis is recommended. The resultant storage of undegraded glycolipids leads to the progressive development of potentially life-threatening man

Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Salvatore; Pinto, Antonio; Licata, Giuseppe

2013-01-01

163

Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Si II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energies for the lowest 56 levels, belonging to the 3s2 3p, 3s 3p2, 3p3, 3s2 3d, 3s 3p 3d, 3s2 4? and 3s2 5? configurations of Si II, are calculated using the General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package (GRASP) code. Analogous calculations have also been performed (for up to 175 levels) using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). Furthermore, radiative rates are calculated for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions. Extensive comparisons are made with available theoretical and experimental energy levels, and the accuracy of the present results is assessed to be better than 0.1 Ryd. Similarly, the accuracy for radiative rates (and subsequently lifetimes) is estimated to be better than 20 per cent for most of the (strong) transitions. Electron impact excitation collision strengths are also calculated, with the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC), over a wide energy range up to 13 Ryd. Finally, to determine effective collision strengths, resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. These collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and results listed over a wide range of temperatures, up to 105.5 K. Our data are compared with earlier R-matrix calculations and differences noted, up to a factor of 2, for several transitions. Although scope remains for improvement, the accuracy for our results of collision strengths and effective collision strengths is assessed to be about 20 per cent for a majority of transitions.

Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

2014-07-01

164

Radiative lifetimes, branching fractions, transition probabilities and oscillator strengths of even-parity levels for Eu II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiative lifetimes for 30 even-parity levels in the 4f65d6s, 4f65d2 and 4f8 configurations with the energy range between 34923.43 and 57388.87 cm-1 of Eu II were measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) method. Branching fraction measurements of seven levels for Eu II were performed based on the emission spectrum of a hollow cathode lamp. By combining the measured lifetimes and the branching fractions, absolute transition probabilities and oscillator strengths for 18 transitions were derived. The obtained results were compared with published data, and a basically good agreement was achieved.

Wang, Qian; Shang, Xue; Tian, Yanshan; Fan, Shuang; Dai, Zhenwen

2013-11-01

165

Urotensin-II and endothelin-I levels after contrast media administration in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions  

PubMed Central

Background: Contrast induced kidney injury is an acute renal dysfunction that is secondary to the administration of radio contrast media. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the levels of urotensin-II (UT-II) and endothelin-I (ET-I) after contrast media administration in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. Materials and Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we evaluated 78 patients with coronary artery disease who were scheduled for and ultimately underwent percutaneous coronary interventions. As a contrast material, nonionic contrast media was used in various amounts (70-480 mL). Blood and urine samples were obtained to measure U-II, ET-I just before and at the twenty-fourth hour of percutaneous coronary interventions. Results: Compared to baseline, twenty-fourth hour creatinine levels were significantly increased (P < 0.001). The twenty-fourth hour serum and urine levels of both UT-II and ET-I were also significantly increased compared to baseline (P < 0.001 for all) and 24th hour serum and urine UT-II (r = 0.322, P = 0.004; r = 0.302, P = 0.007 respectively), ET-I (r = 0.511, P < 0.001; r = 0.266, P = 0.019 respectively) levels were significantly correlated with the amount of contrast media. Conclusion: Our study indicates that; increased UT-II and ET-I levels seem to be a consequence of hazardous effects of contrast media on blood vessels and the kidney.

Ulas, Turgay; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan; Dal, Mehmet S.; Kirhan, Idris; Kaya, Zekeriya; Demir, Mehmet E.; Tursun, Irfan; Eren, Mehmet A.; Aydogan, Timucin; Sezen, Yusuf; Aksoy, Nurten

2013-01-01

166

New superconducting state of the Anderson-lattice model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss the possible existence of a new superconducting state, the two-component superconducting (TCSC) state, of the Anderson-lattice model, when the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg exchange energy JH generated by the hybridization between the conduction band and localized orbitals exceeds a constant multiple of the Kondo energy kBTK. In this new state, holes in both the conduction band and localized orbitals exhibit two-particle off-diagonal long-range order, and the condensate wave function is a coherent mixture of both types of singlet pairs. We propose that the TCSC phase is a possible candidate for the superconducting phase in the high-Tc copper oxides.

Lee, D. H.; Zimanyi, G. T.

1989-11-01

167

STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson suits up for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson smiles as he undergoes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

2002-01-01

168

STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment at SPACEHAB  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment during training at SPACEHAB. STS-107 is a research mission. The primary payload is the first flight of the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM). The experiments range from material sciences to life sciences (many rats). Also part of the payload is the Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research (FREESTAR) that incorporates eight high priority secondary attached shuttle experiments. STS-107 is scheduled to launch July 11, 2002

2002-01-01

169

Non-Fermi-liquid behavior in the periodic anderson model.  

PubMed

We study the Mott metal-insulator transition in the periodic Anderson model with dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). Near the quantum transition, we find a non-Fermi-liquid metallic state down to a vanishing temperature scale. We identify the origin of the non-Fermi-liquid behavior as being due to magnetic scattering of the doped carriers by the localized moments. The non-Fermi-liquid state can be tuned by either doping or external magnetic field. Our results show that the coupling to spatial magnetic fluctuations (absent in DMFT) is not a prerequisite to realizing a non-Fermi-liquid scenario for heavy fermion systems. PMID:18851550

Amaricci, A; Sordi, G; Rozenberg, M J

2008-10-01

170

Fractional moment methods for Anderson localization with SAW representation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Green function contains much information about physical systems. Mathematically, the fractional moment method (FMM) developed by Aizenman and Molchanov connects the Green function and the transport of electrons in the Anderson model. Recently, it has been discovered that the Green function on a graph can be represented using self-avoiding walks on a graph, which allows us to connect localization properties in the system and graph properties. We discuss FMM in terms of the self-avoiding walks on a general graph, the only general condition being that the graph has a uniform bound on the vertex degree.

Suzuki, Fumika

2013-03-01

171

Electric dipolar susceptibility of the Anderson-Holstein model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The temperature dependence of the electric dipolar susceptibility ?P is discussed on the basis of the Anderson-Holstein model with the use of a numerical renormalization group (NRG) technique. Note that ? P is related to the phonon Green's function D. In order to obtain a correct temperature dependence for ? P at low temperatures, we propose a method to evaluate ? P through the Dyson equation from the charge susceptibility ? c calculated by using the NRG instead of the direct NRG calculation of D. We find that the irreducible charge susceptibility estimated from ? c agree with the perturbation calculation, suggesting that our method works well.

Fuse, Takahiro; Hotta, Takashi

2013-06-01

172

Bistability of anderson localized States in nonlinear random media.  

PubMed

We study wave transmission through one-dimensional random nonlinear structures and predict a novel effect resulting from an interplay of nonlinearity and disorder. We reveal that, while weak nonlinearity does not change the typical exponentially small transmission in the regime of the Anderson localization, it affects dramatically the disorder-induced localized states excited inside the medium leading to bistable and nonreciprocal resonant transmission. Our numerical modeling shows an excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on the concept of a high-Q resonator associated with each localized state. This offers a new way for all-optical light control employing statistically homogeneous random media without regular cavities. PMID:20366536

Shadrivov, Ilya V; Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Bliokh, Yuri P; Freilikher, Valentin; Kivshar, Yuri S

2010-03-26

173

Quantum Criticality of Quasi-One-Dimensional Topological Anderson Insulators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analytic theory of quantum criticality in the quasi-one-dimensional topological Anderson insulators of class AIII and BDI. We describe the systems in terms of two parameters (g, ?) representing localization and topological properties, respectively. Surfaces of half-integer valued ? define phase boundaries between distinct topological sectors. Upon increasing system size, the two parameters exhibit flow similar to the celebrated two-parameter flow describing the class A quantum Hall insulator. However, unlike the quantum Hall system, an exact analytical description of the entire phase diagram can be given. We check the quantitative validity of our theory by comparison to numerical transfer matrix computations.

Altland, Alexander; Bagrets, Dmitry; Fritz, Lars; Kamenev, Alex; Schmiedt, Hanno

2014-05-01

174

Localization and mobility gap in the topological Anderson insulator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been proposed that disorder may lead to a new type of topological insulator, called the topological Anderson insulator (TAI). Here we examine the physical origin of this phenomenon. We calculate the topological invariants and density of states of the disordered model in a supercell of a two-dimensional HgTe/CdTe quantum well. The topologically nontrivial phase is triggered by a band touching as the disorder strength increases. The TAI is protected by a mobility gap, in contrast to the band gap in conventional quantum spin Hall systems. The mobility gap in the TAI consists of a cluster of nontrivial subgaps separated by almost flat and localized bands.

Zhang, Yan-Yang; Chu, Rui-Lin; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Shen, Shun-Qing

2012-01-01

175

Size effects on transport properties in topological Anderson insulators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the size effects on the transport properties in topological Anderson insulators (TAIs) by means of the Landauer-Büttiker formalism combined with the nonequilibrium Green function method. Conductances calculated for serval different widths of the nanoribbons reveal that there is no longer quantized plateaus for narrow nanoribbons. The local spin-resolved current distribution demonstrates that the edge states on the two sides can be coupled, leading to enhancement of backscattering as the width of the nanoribbon decreases, thus destroying the perfect quantization phenomena in the TAI. We also show that the main contribution to the nonquantized conductance also comes from edge states. Experiment proposals on TAI are discussed finally.

Li, Wei; Zang, Jiadong; Jiang, Yongjin

2011-07-01

176

Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1996 Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This first annual report on DOE`s Price Anderson Amendments Act enforcement program covers the activities, accomplishments, and planning for calendar year 1996. It also includes the infrastructure development activities of 1995. It encompasses the activities of the headquarters` Office of Enforcement in the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) and Investigation and the coordinators and technical advisors in DOE`s Field and Program Offices and other EH Offices. This report includes an overview of the enforcement program; noncompliances, investigations, and enforcement actions; summary of significant enforcement actions; examples where enforcement action was deferred; and changes and improvements to the program.

NONE

1996-01-01

177

High order perturbation theory for nonlinear Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The perturbation expansion for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a random potential that was developed in earlier works by some of us is extended to higher orders. As the order is increased a solution that is valid for longer time can be found. In particular it is found that Anderson localization persists in the fifth and sixth orders for times when perturbation theory is valid. The perturbation expansion is asymptotic and for the value of the nonlinearity parameter used, the fifth order is the optimal order of the perturbation theory. There are indications that for the sixth order perturbation theory may not be valid.

Fleishon, Gal; Fishman, Shmuel; Soffer, Avy

2014-02-01

178

High-level expression of branching enzyme II from maize endosperm in Escherichia coli.  

PubMed

The gene that encodes the mature branching enzyme II (BEII) protein from maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm was amplified by means of a polymerase chain reaction technique and inserted into a T7-based expression vector. Although this has been an efficient expression system of maize BEII in Escherichia coli, an example is presented in this report which allows a greater expression of mBEII protein from the bacterial system by changing only one codon. The key to the level of expression appears to be related to the conversion of the third thymine base in the 285 position codon of the mBEII cDNA to cytosine without altering the encoded mBEII protein product. The crude cell extracts of enzyme prepared from E.coli exhibited seven-fold higher expression of branching enzyme activity compared to expression of the native enzyme. The enzymes from wild-type and the silent mutation genes were purified. The proteins were indistinguishable kinetically and immunologically. Thus, we obtained a significantly improved expression of mBEII protein in the bacterial system. PMID:9758744

Libessart, N; Preiss, J

1998-10-01

179

Diagnostics of diapycnal diffusion in z-level ocean models. Part II: 3-Dimensional OGCM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a robust method for diagnosing total diapycnal diffusivities, i.e. explicitly applied plus numerically induced diffusivities, from tracer release experiments in numerical z-level models. To this extent, numerical experiments differing only in the advection scheme used (CTRD using 2nd order centred differences, UPWIND using the upwind/upstream advection scheme, QUICK using the quicker advection scheme after Farrow and Stevens (1995) and FCT after Gerdes et al. (1991)) are analysed and compared. To obtain regionally resolved estimates of diapycnal diffusivities, individual inert dye tracers are released in dynamically different regions of a North Atlantic model, namely (i) in the interior of the subtropical gyre and (ii) in the western boundary current. Diagnosed diffusivities are robust with respect to changes in temporal and spatial sampling of the simulated dye tracer for both advection schemes and for both regions. The numerically induced diffusivity is generally positive, but can become negative for centred differences advection numerics after several months of simulated tracer dispersion.

Getzlaff, Julia; Nurser, George; Oschlies, Andreas

180

High levels of Nrf2 determine chemoresistance in type II endometrial cancer  

PubMed Central

Type II endometrial cancer, which mainly presents as serous and clear cell types, has proved to be the most malignant and recurrent carcinoma among various female genital malignancies. The transcription factor, Nrf2, was first described as having chemopreventive activity. Activation of the Nrf2-mediated cellular defense response protects cells against the toxic and carcinogenic effects of environmental insults by upregulating an array of genes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS) and restore cellular redox homeostasis. However, the cancer-promoting role of Nrf2 has recently been revealed. Nrf2 is constitutively upregulated in several types of human cancer tissues and cancer cell lines. Furthermore, inhibition of Nrf2 expression sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, the constitutive level of Nrf2 was compared in different types of human endometrial tumors. It was found that Nrf2 was highly expressed in endometrial serous carcinoma (ESC), whereas complex hyperplasia (CH) and endometrial endometrioid carcinoma (EEC) had no or marginal expression of Nrf2. Likewise, the ESC derived SPEC-2 cell line had a higher level of Nrf2 expression and was more resistant to the toxic effects of cisplatin and paclitaxel than that of the Ishikawa cell line, which was generated from EEC. Silencing of Nrf2 rendered SPEC-2 cells more susceptible to chemotherapeutic drugs while it had a limited effect on Ishikawa cells. Inhibition of Nrf2 expression by overexpressing Keap1 sensitized SPEC-2 cells or SPEC-2-derived xenografts to chemotherapeutic treatments using both cell culture and SCID mouse models. Collectively, we provide a molecular basis for the use of Nrf2 inhibitors to increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs and to combat chemoresistance, the biggest obstacle in chemotherapy.

Jiang, Tao; Chen, Ning; Zhao, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Kong, Beihua; Zheng, Wenxin; Zhang, Donna D.

2010-01-01

181

The GLAS editing procedures for the FGGE level II-B data collected during SOP-1 and 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The modifications made to the FGGE Level II-b data are discussed and the FORTRAN program developed to perform the modifications is described. It is suggested that the edited database is the most accurate one available for FGGE SOP-1 and 2.

Baker, W.; Edelmann, D.; Carus, H.

1981-01-01

182

Fire Fighter Level I-II-III [and] Practical Skills Test. Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series. Final Revision.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Practical skills tests are provided for fire fighter trainees in the Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series, Fire Fighter Levels I, II, and III. A course introduction appears first and contains this information: recommended instructional sequence, required facilities, instructional methodology, requirements for certification, course…

Pribyl, Paul F.

183

Combined Arms Operations at Brigade Level, Realistically Achieved Through Simulation II (COBRAS II): Report on Development and Lessons Learned.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the development of the U.S. Army's Force 21 Training Program's Combined Arms Operations at the Brigade Level, Realistically Achieved Through Simulation 2 (COBRAS 2) training program. The COBRAS 2 program extends prior training researc...

C. H. Campbell C. R. Graves D. E. Deter K. A. Quinkart

1998-01-01

184

When should cardiologists suspect Anderson-Fabry disease?  

PubMed

Anderson-Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by ?-galactosidase defects and progressive intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide. The disease can be specifically treated with enzyme replacement therapy. Hemizygous men and heterozygous women can develop cardiac disease. Whereas men experience the most severe clinical phenotype, clinical presentation in women varies from asymptomatic to severely symptomatic. The characteristic cardiac phenotype is left ventricular hypertrophy mimicking sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or hypertensive heart disease. Early or prehypertrophy cardiac involvement may escape detection, unless electrocardiographic clues are present. The cardiac markers that raise suspicion of Anderson-Fabry disease include a short PR interval without a ? wave and a prolonged QRS interval, supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. Extracardiac features include renal failure, corneal deposits, and nervous, gastrointestinal, and cutaneous manifestations. Useful family data include cardiac and extracardiac traits in relatives and absence of male-to-male transmission. Symptoms are subtle, and the interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis may be as long as 20 years. As such, the diagnosis is typically late. Endomyocardial biopsy shows optically empty myocytes on light microscopy and dense osmiophilic bodies constituted of globotriaosylceramide on electron microscopy. Alpha-galactosidase A activity is reduced in hemizygous men but not in heterozygous women. Genetic testing is the gold standard for the diagnosis. In conclusion, a correct and timely diagnosis offers the possibility of disease-specific treatment that leads to sustained clinical benefits for cardiac and noncardiac signs and symptoms. PMID:21059442

Gambarin, Fabiana I; Disabella, Eliana; Narula, Jagat; Diegoli, Marta; Grasso, Maurizia; Serio, Alessandra; Favalli, B M E Valentina; Agozzino, Manuela; Tavazzi, Luigi; Fraser, Alan G; Arbustini, Eloisa

2010-11-15

185

Mean-field theories for disordered electrons: Diffusion pole and Anderson localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss conditions to be put on mean-field-like theories to be able to describe fundamental physical phenomena in disordered electron systems. In particular, we investigate options for a consistent mean-field theory of electron localization and for a reliable description of transport properties. We argue that a mean-field theory for the Anderson localization transition must be electron-hole symmetric and self-consistent at the two-particle (vertex) level. We show that such a theory with local equations can be derived from the asymptotic limit to high spatial dimensions. The weight of the diffusion pole, i.e., the number of diffusive states at the Fermi energy, in this mean-field theory decreases with the increasing disorder strength and vanishes in the localized phase. Consequences of the disclosed behavior for our understanding of vanishing of electron diffusion are discussed.

Janiš, V.; Koloren?, J.

2005-06-01

186

Hubbard physics in the symmetric half-filled periodic anderson-hubbard model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two very different methods — exact diagonalization on finite chains and a variational method — are used to study the possibility of a metal-insulator transition in the symmetric half-filled periodic Anderson-Hubbard model. With this aim we calculate the density of doubly occupied d sites ( gn d ) as a function of various parameters. In the absence of on-site Coulomb interaction ( U f ) between f electrons, the two methods yield similar results. The double occupancy of d levels remains always finite just as in the one-dimensional Hubbard model. Exact diagonalization on finite chains gives the same result for finite U f , while the Gutzwiller method leads to a Brinkman-Rice transition at a critical value ( U {/d c }), which depends on U f and V.

Hagymási, I.; Itai, K.; Sólyom, J.

2013-05-01

187

All-terrain vehicle injuries at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (Level II): epidemiology, risks, and outcome.  

PubMed

The growing popularity of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) has contributed to a rise in the number of injuries and fatalities nationwide. The Consumer Product Safety Commission reported 8,104 fatalities from 1982 to 2006 and over 146,600 emergency room-treated visits in 2006 with children 16 years of age and younger comprising roughly 29 per cent in both categories. To investigate the epidemiology and outcome of ATV-related injuries and to explore variables contributing to morbidity and mortality, we conducted a single-center, retrospective study of ATV-injured patients presenting to trauma emergency between 2003 and 2007 at a Level II trauma center. In summary, we witnessed an upward trend in the incidence of ATV injuries during this 5-year span. With 156 documented cases, adolescents aged 17 to 20 years represented the largest group (19.2%), whereas children 16 years of age and younger contributed to 12.8 per cent. Overall mortality rate was 0.64 per cent. Positive blood alcohol concentration was detected in 21 per cent. Individuals using protective gear were 1.4 and four times less likely to suffer loss of consciousness and Glasgow Coma Scale score 8 or less, respectively, compared with those without protection. Abrasions, concussions, fractures, and other life-threatening solid organ injuries were documented in virtually every organ system. With such poor outcomes, we conclude that riding an ATV is an inherently dangerous activity. To minimize the burden of injury, riders are encouraged to develop competency through training courses, compliance with safety precautions, and modification of high-risk behaviors. PMID:19886154

Thepyasuwan, Nattapaun; Wan, Xiao T; Davis, Vivian J

2009-10-01

188

Analysis of Anderson localization of light in GaN nanocolumns  

Microsoft Academic Search

In disordered materials, the combination of multiple light scattering and optical interference induces the localization of light. This phenomenon is called Anderson localization which is widely observed in electron systems with random potentials. Experimental studies of Anderson localization of light have been performed over the last three decades [I]. However, most of those studies attempted to secure the evidence of

Masaru Sakai; Yuta Inose; Tomi Ohtsuki; Kazuhiro Ema; Akihiko Kikuchi; Katsumi Kishino

2011-01-01

189

Alcohol and Alcohol Safety. Volume II of II. A Curriculum Manual for Elementary Level. A Teacher's Activities Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum manual for the elementary school level is the first in a series on alcohol and alcohol safety and is designed as a teacher's activities guide. Each activity provided is a self-contained learning experience which requires varying numbers of class period and focuses on one or more objectives. Activities are numbered consecutively and…

Finn, Peter; Platt, Judith

190

Mutations in RNA polymerase II and elongation factor SII severely reduce mRNA levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  

PubMed

Elongation factor SII interacts with RNA polymerase II and enables it to transcribe through arrest sites in vitro. The set of genes dependent upon SII function in vivo and the effects on RNA levels of mutations in different components of the elongation machinery are poorly understood. Using yeast lacking SII and bearing a conditional allele of RPB2, the gene encoding the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, we describe a genetic interaction between SII and RPB2. An SII gene disruption or the rpb2-10 mutation, which yields an arrest-prone enzyme in vitro, confers sensitivity to 6-azauracil (6AU), a drug that depresses cellular nucleoside triphosphates. Cells with both mutations had reduced levels of total poly(A)+ RNA and specific mRNAs and displayed a synergistic level of drug hypersensitivity. In cells in which the SII gene was inactivated, rpb2-10 became dominant, as if template-associated mutant RNA polymerase II hindered the ability of wild-type polymerase to transcribe. Interestingly, while 6AU depressed RNA levels in both wild-type and mutant cells, wild-type cells reestablished normal RNA levels, whereas double-mutant cells could not. This work shows the importance of an optimally functioning elongation machinery for in vivo RNA synthesis and identifies an initial set of candidate genes with which SII-dependent transcription can be studied. PMID:9742094

Lennon, J C; Wind, M; Saunders, L; Hock, M B; Reines, D

1998-10-01

191

Apolipoprotein A-II Influences Apolipoprotein E-Linked Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Women with High Levels of HDL Cholesterol and C-Reactive Protein  

PubMed Central

Background In a previous report by our group, high levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) were demonstrated to be associated with risk of incident cardiovascular disease in women with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the setting of both low (designated as HR1 subjects) and high (designated as HR2 subjects) levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). To assess whether apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) plays a role in apoE-associated risk in the two female groups. Methodology/Principal Outcome event mapping, a graphical data exploratory tool; Cox proportional hazards multivariable regression; and curve-fitting modeling were used to examine apoA-II influence on apoE-associated risk focusing on HDL particles with apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) without apoA-II (LpA-I) and HDL particles with both apoA-I and apoA-II (LpA-I:A-II). Results of outcome mappings as a function of apoE levels and the ratio of apoA-II to apoA-I revealed within each of the two populations, a high-risk subgroup characterized in each situation by high levels of apoE and additionally: in HR1, by a low value of the apoA-II/apoA-I ratio; and in HR2, by a moderate value of the apoA-II/apoA-I ratio. Furthermore, derived estimates of LpA-I and LpA-I:A-II levels revealed for high-risk versus remaining subjects: in HR1, higher levels of LpA-I and lower levels of LpA-I:A-II; and in HR2 the reverse, lower levels of LpA-I and higher levels of LpA-I:A-II. Results of multivariable risk modeling as a function of LpA-I and LpA-I:A-II (dichotomized as highest quartile versus combined three lower quartiles) revealed association of risk only for high levels of LpA-I:A-II in the HR2 subgroup (hazard ratio 5.31, 95% CI 1.12–25.17, p?=?0.036). Furthermore, high LpA-I:A-II levels interacted with high apoE levels in establishing subgroup risk. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that apoA-II plays a significant role in apoE-associated risk of incident CVD in women with high levels of HDL-C and CRP.

Corsetti, James P.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Sparks, Charles E.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

2012-01-01

192

Tri-Level Study of the Causes of Traffic Accidents. Volume II: Special Analyses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Volume II presents several special analysis dealing with the following. Driver attributes in relation to accident involvement and causation; Special analyses--human, vehicular, and environmental characteristics and accident causation; Motorcycle accidents...

D. Shinar J. R. Treat N. S. Tumbas R. D. Hume S. T. McDonald

1977-01-01

193

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 20 (IRASTH00080020) on Town Highway 8, crossing the Black River, Irasburg, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure IRASTH00080020 on town highway 8 crossing the Black River, Irasburg, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, available from VTAOT files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland physiographic province of north-central Vermont in the town of Irasburg. The 110-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the left bank surface cover is pasture and row crops and the right bank is covered by shrub and brush and is adjacent to woods. In the study area, the Black River has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.002 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 90 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel and cobbles (D50 is 49.7 mm or 0.163 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 4, 1994, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The town highway 8 crossing of the Black River is a 88-ft-long, one-lane covered bridge consisting of one 80-foot span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls on the upstream and downstream sides of the right abutment. The right abutment has stone fill protection. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

Olson, Scott A.

1996-01-01

194

Reduced levels of topoisomerase II? and II? in a multidrug-resistant lung-cancer cell line  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have previously shown that the doxorubicinselected multidrug-resistant small-cell lung-cancer cell line H69AR is resistant to VP-16-induced single-strand DNA breaks as compared with its parental H69 cell line. Levels of immunoreactive topoisomerase IIa are also reduced in H69AR cells. In the present study, we found that cleaved complex formation in the presence of VP-16 was decreased in H69AR cells as

Cindy D. Evans; Shelagh E. L. Mirski; Mary K. Danks; Susan P. C. Cole

1994-01-01

195

Potentiometric-surface map of the Wyodak-Anderson Coal Bed, Powder River Structural Basin, Wyoming, 1973-84  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Previous water level maps of shallow aquifers in the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming were based on water levels from wells completed in different stratigraphic intervals within thick sequences of sedimentary rocks. A potentiometric surface using water levels from a single aquifer had never been mapped throughout the basin. The sandstone aquifers in the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age and the Wasatch Formation of Eocene age are discontinuous and lenticular, and do not extend even short distances. Coal aquifers are more continuous and the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed, in the Fort Union Formation, has been mapped in much of the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming. Water level altitudes in the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed and other stratigraphically equivalent coal beds were mapped to determine if they represent a continuous potentiometric surface in the Powder River structural basin. The potentiometric surface, except in the vicinity of the Wyodak mine east of Gillette, represents a premining condition as it was based on water level measurements made during 1973-84 that were not significantly affected by mining. The map was prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. (Lantz-PTT)

Daddow, Pamela B.

1986-01-01

196

Theoretical lifetimes and Land{acute e} g values of CsthinspII 5p⁵thinsp6p levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lifetimes of CsthinspII 5p⁵thinsp6p levels, oscillator strengths to the lower 5p⁵thinsp5d and 5p⁵thinsp6s levels, Land{acute e} g factors and LS compositions of all these levels are presented. Results are in very good agreement with most available experiment. Large correlation effects are associated with those 5p⁵thinsp5d and 5p⁵thinsp6s states, which strongly interact. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Beck

1998-01-01

197

Angiotensin II plasma levels are linked to disease severity and predict fatal outcomes in H7N9-infected patients.  

PubMed

A novel influenza A (H7N9) virus of avian origin emerged in eastern China in the spring of 2013. This virus causes severe disease in humans, including acute and often lethal respiratory failure. As of January 2014, 275 cases of H7N9-infected patients had been reported, highlighting the urgency of identifying biomarkers for predicting disease severity and fatal outcomes. Here, we show that plasma levels of angiotensin II, a major regulatory peptide of the renin-angiotensin system, are markedly elevated in H7N9 patients and are associated with disease progression. Moreover, the sustained high levels of angiotensin II in these patients are strongly correlated with mortality. The predictive value of angiotensin II is higher than that of C-reactive protein and some clinical parameters such as the PaO2/FiO2 ratio (partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen). Our findings indicate that angiotensin II is a biomarker for lethality in flu infections. PMID:24800963

Huang, Fengming; Guo, Jing; Zou, Zhen; Liu, Jun; Cao, Bin; Zhang, Shuyang; Li, Hui; Wang, Wei; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Song; Pan, Jingcao; Bao, Changjun; Zeng, Mei; Xiao, Haixia; Qian, Guirong; Hu, Xinjun; Chen, Yuanting; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Huandi; Zhu, Jindong; Gao, Hainv; Yang, Shigui; Liu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Shufa; Yang, Jiezuan; Diao, Hongyan; Cao, Hongcui; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Min; Tan, Shuguang; Guo, Dan; Zhao, Xiliang; Ye, Yicong; Wu, Wei; Xu, Yingchun; Penninger, Josef M; Li, Dangsheng; Gao, George F; Jiang, Chengyu; Li, Lanjuan

2014-01-01

198

Non-conventional Anderson localization in bilayered structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We resolve the problem of non-conventional Anderson localization emerging in bilayered periodic-on-average structures with alternating layers of materials with positive and negative refraction indices. Recently, it was numerically discovered that in such structures with weak fluctuations of refractive indices, the localization length Lloc can be enormously large for small wave frequencies ?. Within a new approach allowing us to go beyond the second order of perturbation theory, we derive the expression for Lloc valid for any ? and small variance of disorder, ?2Lt1. In the limit ??0 one gets a quite specific dependence, L-1loc~?4?8. Our approach allows one to establish the conditions under which this effect occurs.

Torres-Herrera, E. J.; Izrailev, F. M.; Makarov, N. M.

2012-04-01

199

Three-Dimensional Anderson Localization in Variable Scale Disorder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the impact of variable-scale disorder on 3D Anderson localization of a noninteracting ultracold atomic gas. A spin-polarized gas of fermionic atoms is localized by allowing it to expand in an optical speckle potential. Using a sudden quench of the localized density distribution, we verify that the density profile is representative of the underlying single-particle localized states. The geometric mean of the disordering potential correlation lengths is varied by a factor of 4 via adjusting the aperture of the speckle focusing lens. We observe that the root-mean-square size of the localized gas increases approximately linearly with the speckle correlation length, in qualitative agreement with the scaling predicted by weak scattering theory.

McGehee, W. R.; Kondov, S. S.; Xu, W.; Zirbel, J. J.; DeMarco, B.

2013-10-01

200

Anderson Localization: Dynamical Cluster Approximation - Typical Medium Theory Perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mean field theories like the coherent potential approximation (CPA) and its cluster extensions, including the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA), fail to describe the Anderson localization transition in disordered systems. This failure is intrinsic to these theories as the algebraically averaged quantities used in them always favor the metallic state, and hence cannot describe the localization transition. Here we extend the Typical Medium Theory (TMT), which replaces the average quantities with their corresponding typical (geometrically averaged) equivalents, to its cluster form such that non-local correlations can be incorporated systematically. We apply our method to study the localization phenomena in various dimensions. Such an approach opens a new avenue to study localization effect both in model and in real materials.

Ekuma, Chinedu; Meng, Ziyang; Terletska, Hanna; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir

2013-03-01

201

Kondo Destruction and Valence Fluctuations in an Anderson Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unconventional quantum criticality in heavy-fermion systems has been extensively analyzed in terms of a critical destruction of the Kondo effect. Motivated by a recent demonstration of quantum criticality in a mixed-valent heavy-fermion system, ?-YbAlB4, we study a particle-hole-asymmetric Anderson impurity model with a pseudogapped density of states. We demonstrate Kondo destruction at a mixed-valent quantum critical point, where a collapsing Kondo energy scale is accompanied by a singular charge-fluctuation spectrum. Both spin and charge responses scale with energy over temperature (?/T) and magnetic field over temperature (H/T). Implications for unconventional quantum criticality in mixed-valence heavy fermions are discussed.

Pixley, J. H.; Kirchner, Stefan; Ingersent, Kevin; Si, Qimiao

2012-08-01

202

Scaling between periodic Anderson and Kondo lattice models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method combined with dynamical mean field theory is used to calculate both periodic Anderson model (PAM) and Kondo lattice model (KLM). Different parameter sets of both models are connected by the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation. For degeneracy N=2, a special particle-hole symmetric case of PAM at half filling which always fixes one electron per impurity site is compared with the results of the KLM. We find a good mapping between PAM and KLM in the limit of large on-site Hubbard interaction U for different properties like self-energy, quasiparticle residue and susceptibility. This allows us to extract quasiparticle mass renormalizations for the f electrons directly from KLM. The method is further applied to higher degenerate case and to realistic heavy fermion system CeRhIn5 in which the estimate of the Sommerfeld coefficient is proven to be close to the experimental value.

Dong, R.; Otsuki, J.; Savrasov, S. Y.

2013-04-01

203

Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities in the Department of Energy's Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Enforcement Program in calendar year 1997 and highlights improvements planned for 1998. The DOE Enforcement Program involves the Office of Enforcement and Investigation in the DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health, as well as numerous PAAA Coordinators and technical advisors in DOE Field and Program Offices. The DOE Enforcement Program issued 13 Notices of Violation (NOV`s) in 1997 for cases involving significant or potentially significant nuclear safety violations. Six of these included civil penalties totaling $440,000. Highlights of these actions include: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory Radiological Control Violations / Associated Universities, Inc.; (2) Bioassay Program Violations at Mound / EG and G, Inc.; (3) Savannah River Crane Operator Uptake / Westinghouse Savannah River Company; (4) Waste Calciner Worker Uptake / Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company; and (5) Reactor Scram and Records Destruction at Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin).

NONE

1998-01-01

204

The Friedel-Anderson Impurity with Orbital Degeneracy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A recently developed compact solution for the non-degenerate Friedel-Anderson impurity is extended to impurities with orbital degeneracy. The singlet ground state is investigated for two and three orbits (corresponding to four and six d-states). The ground state energy and the multi-d-state occupations are calculated. The magnetic moment (above the Kondo temperature) is obtained in different regions of the parameter space of Vsd (s-d-hopping matrix element), Ed (d-state energy), U and Ux (Coulomb and exchange energies). The average d-state occupation can be adjusted to about one, two or three d-electrons. A comparison between different orbital degeneracy but the same d-state occupation is performed. The role of the Coulomb and the exchange interaction in the magnetic and singlet states is analyzed. The challenges for the treatment of a real d-impurity with five d-orbits is discussed.

Zhang, Liye; Bergmann, Gerd

2008-03-01

205

All-terrain vehicle accidents at a level II trauma center in Indiana: an 8-year retrospective review.  

PubMed

This study profiles the all-terrain vehicle (ATV) accident victims who were admitted at a level II trauma center. We retrospectively reviewed the trauma registry data for 111 patients who were admitted to the Parkview Hospital Level II Trauma Center following ATV crashes between January 1996 and June 2003. Forty-four percent of the patients were < or =16 years of age, and the average age overall was 22.49 years. Most of the 111 victims were men, and only 18.9% of those injured were wearing helmets. Although they only make up 14% of the driver population, children <16 years of age account for almost 40% of all ATV-related injuries and >35% of all ATV-related deaths in the United States. Helmets can reduce the risk of head injury, but only 21 states have helmet laws. Safety legislation should be adopted and would likely save lives and prevent injuries. PMID:20099434

Vegeler, Reid C; Young, William F

2009-01-01

206

New FeII energy levels from stellar spectra (Castelli+, 2010)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

FeII lines in the 3800-8000Å region, produced by transitions to the FeII subconfigurations (3P)4f, (3H)4f, (3F)4f, and (3G)4f are given in Tables 6, 7, 8, and 9, respectively. Only lines with loggf>=-1.5 are listed. Most of these lines can be observed in the UVES spectrum of HR 6000 and have allowed us to identify more than 50% of the previously unidentified lines (Castelli & Hubrig, 2007A&A...475.1041C). (4 data files).

Castelli, F.; Kurucz, R. L.

2010-07-01

207

PRESTO-II computer code for safety assessment on shallow land disposal of low-level wastes  

SciTech Connect

The PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) computer code has been applied for the following sites; Koteyli, Balikesir and Kozakli, Nevsehir in Turkey. This site selection was based partially on the need to consider a variety of hydrologic and climatic situations, and partially on the availability of data. The results obtained for the operational low-level waste disposal site at Barnwell, South Carolina, are presented for comparison. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Uslu, I.; Fields, D.E.; Yalcintas, M.G.

1987-01-01

208

The effect of interaction between Lipoprotein Lipase and ApoVLDL-II genes on fat and serum biochemical levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Body weight, abdominal fat weight and serum biochemical levels were determined from lean and fat chicken breeds at 12 weeks of age. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in apoVLDL-II and lipoprotein lipase genes was screened by PCR-SSCP and detected by direct sequencing. Lipoprotein lipase gene frequency was found to be significantly different (P < 0.01) in lean chicken whereas it was

Hassan Hussein Musa; Guo Hong Chen; Bi Chun Li

2007-01-01

209

Zero-field splittings of phenanthroline-localized 3??* emitting levels in mixed-ligand zinc(II) complexes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Zero-field splittings of the phenanthroline-localized 3??* state in series of mixed-ligand zinc(II) complexes, Zn(X-PhS) 2(phen) (X = F 5, 4-Cl, 4-CH 3) were observed. The results are interpreted in terms of mixing with the nearby lowest ligand—ligand charge-transfer excited triplet level. By employing reasonable assumptions the mixing coefficients were determined.

Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ikeda, Shigeru; Ikeyama, Takeshi; Azumi, Tohru; Crosby, G. A.

1990-11-01

210

The FERRUM project: experimental and theoretical transition rates of forbidden [Sc II] lines and radiative lifetimes of metastable Sc II levels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context: In many plasmas, long-lived metastable atomic levels are depopulated by collisions (quenched) before they decay radiatively. In low-density regions, however, the low collision rate may allow depopulation by electric dipole (E1) forbidden radiative transitions, so-called forbidden lines (mainly M1 and E2 transitions). If the atomic transition data are known, these lines are indicators of physical plasma conditions and used for abundance determination. Aims: Transition rates can be derived by combining relative intensities between the decay channels, so-called branching fractions (BFs), and the radiative lifetime of the common upper level. We use this approach for forbidden [Sc II] lines, along with new calculations. Methods: Neither BFs for forbidden lines, nor lifetimes of metastable levels, are easily measured in a laboratory. Therefore, astrophysical BFs measured in Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra of the strontium filament of Eta Carinae are combined with lifetime measurements using a laser probing technique on a stored ion-beam (CRYRING facility, MSL, Stockholm). These quantities are used to derive the absolute transition rates (A-values). New theoretical transition rates and lifetimes are calulated using the CIV3 code. Results: We report experimental lifetimes of the Sc II levels 3d2 a^3P{0,1,2} with lifetimes 1.28, 1.42, and 1.24 s, respectively, and transition rates for lines from these levels down to 3d4s a^3D in the region 8270-8390 Å. These are the most important forbidden [Sc II] transitions. New calculations for lines and metastable lifetimes are also presented, and are in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Laboratory data is obtained at the CRYRING facility at the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory (MSL), Stockholm University, Sweden.

Hartman, H.; Gurell, J.; Lundin, P.; Schef, P.; Hibbert, A.; Lundberg, H.; Mannervik, S.; Norlin, L.-O.; Royen, P.

2008-03-01

211

The Effect of the Melanocortin Agonist, MT-II, on the Defended Level of Body Adiposity  

Microsoft Academic Search

A wide range of experimental evidence implicates a critical role for melanocortin signaling in the control of food intake and body adiposity. Melanocortin receptor agonists such as MT-II potently reduce food intake and body weight, making such agonists potential therapeutics for obesity. The critical concept addressed by the present experiments is whether the homeostaticeffectsofmelanocortinagonistsdirectlyregulate food intake or whether the effects

Randy J. Seeley; Melissa L. Burklow; Kihmberly A. Wilmer; Colette C. Matthews; Ofer Reizes; Charles C. McOsker; Darren P. Trokhan; Marla C. Gross; Russell J. Sheldon

2005-01-01

212

A NON-INVASIVE TECHNIQUE FOR CONFIGURING LOW LEVEL RF FEEDBACK LOOPS IN PEP-II  

Microsoft Academic Search

The RF system of the PEP-II collider uses two fast feed- back loops around each klystron and set of cavities. These loops reduce the impedance of the fundamental mode of the accelerating cavities seen by the beam, and are nec- essary to reduce the growth rates of longitudinal modes within the RF system bandwidth. Operation of the accel- erator at

D. Teytelmany

213

A Non-Invasive Technique for Configuring Low Level RF Feedback Loops in PEP-II  

Microsoft Academic Search

The RF system of the PEP-II collider uses two fast feedback loops around each klystron and set of cavities. These loops reduce the impedance of the fundamental mode of the accelerating cavities seen by the beam, and are necessary to reduce the growth rates of longitudinal modes within the RF system bandwidth. Operation of the accelerator at high beam currents

D. Teytelman

2005-01-01

214

Mean Lives of Some Excited Levels of Li I and Li II.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A beam of Li(+) ions accelerated to 56 keV by an electromagnetic isotope separator was directed through a thin carbon foil. The emergent ions were in various charge and excitation states, from which 26 spectral lines of Li I and Li II were identified. The...

W. S. Bickel I. Martinson L. Lundin R. Buchta J. Bromander

1969-01-01

215

The Measurement of Apolipoprotein A-I and A-II Levels in Men and Women by Immunoassay  

PubMed Central

To study apolipoprotein A-II, a simple, precise, and accurate immunodiffusion assay was developed and applied in a population sample of industrial employees. Apolipoprotein A-II (A-II) did not increase with age in men (r = ?0.20, n = 172), but showed a slight increase with age in women (0.1 mg/dl per yr, r = 0.20, n = 188). A-II correlated significantly with apolipoprotein A-I (A-I) (r = 0.71) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (men, r = 0.64; women, r = 0.49). The A-I/A-II ratio was significantly related to HDL cholesterol (men, r = 0.29; women, r = 0.44). Women on no medication (n = 92) had A-II levels similar to men (34±5 and 33±5 mg/dl, mean±SD, respectively), whereas women on oral contraceptives or estrogens had significantly higher levels (39±6 mg/dl, n = 75, P < 0.01). The plasma A-I/A-II weight ratio was 3.6±0.4 for men and 3.8±0.5 for women. In the d = 1.10-1.21 subfraction, both males and females had similar A-I, A-II, and HDL cholesterol levels (men: mean, 97, 27, and 32 mg/dl, respectively; women: mean, 104, 28, and 36 mg/dl, respectively). Women had approximately twice the amount of A-I, A-II, and HDL cholesterol than men in the d = 1.063-1.10 fraction (men: mean, 10, 2, and 10 mg/dl, respectively; women: mean, 24, 4, and 19 mg/dl, respectively). The A-I/A-II weight ratio in the d = 1.063-1.10 fraction (men, 5.1±0.7; women, 6.1±1.3) was significantly greater (P < 0.01) than that in the d = 1.10-1.21 fraction (men, 3.7±0.2; women, 3.8±0.2). Furthermore, the weight ratio of cholesterol to total apoprotein A in the d = 1.063-1.10 fraction (men, 0.75±0.09; women, 0.67±0.05) was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than that found in the d = 1.10-1.21 fraction (men, 0.26±0.04, women, 0.28±0.05). Thus, the compositions of HDL hydrated density subclasses are significantly different from each other. These results suggest that the differences in HDL between men and women are due primarily to differences in the relative proportions of HDL subclasses rather than to the intrinsic differences in HDL structure. Images

Cheung, Marian C.; Albers, John J.

1977-01-01

216

The regulation mechanism of HLA class II gene expression at the level of mRNA stability.  

PubMed

The number of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens may be regulated at different levels. Although transcriptional regulation has been studied most intensely, evidence for control mechanisms acting on the stability of MHC class II mRNAs has been reported. We have previously shown, in fact, that the half-life of MHC class II mRNA rapidly decreases in Raji cells upon inhibition of translation by cycloheximide; further data indicated that this effect was not correlated with the inhibition of the synthesis of trans-acting protein(s) required for mRNA stability. In the present work, we developed an in vitro mRNA decay assay system to measure HLA-DRA mRNA stability and used inhibitors of protein synthesis affecting different steps of the process of translation in order to discriminate among possible mechanisms determining controlled MHC class II mRNA hydrolysis. We found that HLA-DRA mRNA associated with polysomes derived from cells treated with either puromycin (which causes dispersion of polysomes and accumulation of monosomes) or cycloheximide (which slows down translation causing ribosome stalling) is more rapidly degraded than in the absence of protein synthesis inhibitors. On the basis of our findings, we suggest that arrest of protein synthesis per se exposes the HLA-DRA mRNA molecules to degradative activities co-sedimenting with the polysomal fraction. PMID:8824157

Del Pozzo, G; Guardiola, J

1996-01-01

217

Influence of type I and type II diabetes mellitus on phenytoin steady-state levels.  

PubMed

Phenytoin kinetics was studied in male type I and type II diabetic patients, ten in each group. Age and sex matched epileptic patients receiving phenytoin alone served as control groups. Steady-state concentration of phenytoin was significantly lower in both types of diabetics compared to respective controls. The Vmax and Vmax/Km of phenytoin were significantly increased in type I diabetics. The Vmax was unaltered in type II diabetics but the Vmax/Km was higher in them. Protein binding of the drug was decreased in both groups. It is concluded that phenytoin kinetics is increased in both types of diabetics which may be responsible for the lower steady-state concentration of the drug. PMID:1743805

Adithan, C; Srinivas, B; Indhiresan, J; Shashindran, C H; Bapna, J S; Thakur, L C; Swaminathan, R P

1991-08-01

218

Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

Ma,H.; Rose, J.

2009-05-04

219

THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II  

SciTech Connect

A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

2011-03-28

220

Glutamate carboxypeptidase II: a polymorphism associated with lower levels of serum folate and hyperhomocysteinemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low blood folate levels result in hyperhomo- cysteinemia, which has been associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, neural tube defects and cognitive deficits. Intake of dietary folates is the chief determinant of blood folate levels. Molecular defects in the intestinal absorption of dietary folates that precipitate low blood folate levels and hyperhomocysteinemia have not been investigated previously. Dietary folates

Angela M. Devlin; E rh-hsin Ling; Janet M. Peerson; Shama Fernando; R obert Clarke; A. David Smith; Charles H. Halsted

2000-01-01

221

The possible influence of upstream upper-level baroclinic processes on the development of the QE II storm  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analysis of the QE II storm of September 9-11, 1978 presents evidence for the existence of upper-level baroclinic processes upstream of the rapidly developing cyclone. The analysis shows that a deepening shortwave trough was located 400 to 500 km upstream of the site of the storm 12 h prior to rapid cyclogenesis. The trough was associated with: (1) a polar jet marked by 65 m/s winds in its core and significant vertical and horizontal wind shear, (2) positive vorticity advection and divergence at the 300 mb level, and (3) an intense frontal zone that extended from 300 mb down to the surface. It also appears that a tropopause fold likely extruded stratospheric air down to the 700-800 mb level, 400-500 km upstream of the surface low and 12 h prior to the explosive development phase of the cyclone. These findings raise questions about Gyakum's (1983) assertion that the QE II storm developed in an area in which the baroclinic support was confined to the lower troposphere and the related assertion by Anthes et al. (1983) that upper-level forcing upstream of the area of rapid cyclogenesis was weak and apparently not important in this case.

Uccellini, L. W.

1986-01-01

222

MD Anderson study finds fetal exposure to radiation increases risk of testicular cancer  

Cancer.gov

Male fetuses of mothers that are exposed to radiation during early pregnancy may have an increased chance of developing testicular cancer, according to a study in mice at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

223

M.D. Anderson scientists identify a specialized regulatory T cell that stifles antibody production centers:  

Cancer.gov

A regulatory T cell that expresses three specific genes shuts down the mass production of antibodies launched by the immune system to attack invaders, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported...

224

MD Anderson studies find proton therapy treatment preserves quality of life for men with prostate cancer  

Cancer.gov

Two studies led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found that proton therapy preserves the quality of life, specifically urinary and bowel function, in men treated with this targeted radiation modality for prostate cancer.

225

MD Anderson researchers find that drug combination acts against aggressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

Cancer.gov

A two-prong approach combining ibrutinib and rituximab (Rituxin) to treat aggressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) produced responses with minor side effects in a Phase 2 clinical trial at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

226

75 FR 34170 - Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TA-W-73,230; TA-W-73,230A] Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Troy...March 18, 2010, applicable to workers of Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC,...

2010-06-16

227

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (HANCTH00010010) on Town Highway 1, crossing the White River, Hancock, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HANCTH00010010 on town highway 1 crossing the White River, Hancock, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province of central Vermont. The 59.8-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is primarily grass with trees and brush on the immediate channel banks. In the study area, the White River has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 104 ft and an average channel depth of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 98.9 mm (0.325 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 15, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 1 crossing of the White River is a 91-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 89-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 26, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 feet. Abutment scour ranged from 13.1 to 17.1 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

1996-01-01

228

Modulatory influence of Brassica compestris Linn var sarson on phase-II carcinogen metabolizing enzymes and glutathione levels in mice.  

PubMed

The present study reports the modulatory influence of 95% ethanolic extract from the seeds of B. compestris on the activity of phase-II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase (GST), DT-diaphorase (DTD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) level in the skin, lung, kidney and forestomach of the mouse. Oral treatment with the seed extract at 800 mg/kg body wt. for 15 days significantly elevated GST in lung and forestomach and DT-diaphorase in forestomach and skin and GSH level in lung, kidney forestomach and skin. The lower dose 400 mg/kg body wt was effective only in inducing GST and DT-diaphorase activity in forestomach and reduced glutathione level in lung. The findings suggest that B. compestris seed extract may block or suppress the events associated with chemical carcinogenesis at least in part, by inducing metabolic detoxification of the carcinogen. PMID:15332504

Qiblawi, Samir; Khan, A K; Rao, A R; Prashar, R; Kumar, Ashok

2003-11-01

229

Anderson Localization for Schrödinger Operators on with Strongly Mixing Potentials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we show that for a.e. x?[ 0,2 ?) the operators defined on as and with Dirichlet condition ?- 1= 0, have pure point spectrum in with exponentially decaying eigenfunctions where ? > 0 and are small. As it is a simple consequence of known techniques that for small ? one has [- 2 +?, 2-?]? spectrum (H(x)) for a.e.x?[ 0, 2 ?), we thus established Anderson localization on the spectrum up to the edges and the center. More general potentials than cosine can be treated, but only those energies with nonzero spectral density are allowed. Finally, we prove the same result for operators on the whole line with potential , where A:?2-->?2 is a hyperbolic toral automorphism, F?C1(?2), ?F= 0, and ? small. The basis for our analysis is an asymptotic formula for the Lyapunov exponent for ?--> 0 by Figotin-Pastur, and generalized by Chulaevski-Spencer. We combine this asymptotic expansion with certain martingale large deviation estimates in order to apply the methods developed by Bourgain and Goldstein in the quasi-periodic case.

Bourgain, Jean; Schlag, Wilhelm

230

Image transport using Anderson localized modes in disordered optical fibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An optical fiber with a transversely disordered yet longitudinally invariant refractive index profile can propagate a beam of light using transverse Anderson localization. A launched beam of light into the disordered optical fiber expands till it reaches its localization radius beyond which it propagates without further expansion. In contrast to a conventional single-core optical fiber in which a propagating beam of light can only couple to and propagate in the core, the beam of light can be coupled to any point at the tip of the disordered fiber. This property originated from the localized highly multimodal property of disordered optical fibers that can be used for high quality optical image transport. We experimentally compare the quality of the transported images in the disordered polymer optical fibers with those transported through the multicore imaging fibers, as well as conventional single core fibers. The impacts of source wavelength and refractive index difference between the disordered sites on the quality of the transported images in the disordered optical fibers is studied numerically. The role of randomness in improving the quality of transported images is investigated by comparing the full vectorial modes of a disordered fiber with those in a periodic multicore fiber.

Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J.; Koch, Karl W.; Hawkins, Thomas; Ballato, John; Mafi, Arash

2014-03-01

231

Anderson localized modes in a disordered glass optical fiber  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A beam of light can propagate in a time-invariant transversely disordered waveguide because of transverse Anderson localization. We developed a disordered glass optical ber from a porous artisan glass (satin quartz). The refractive index pro le of the disordered glass optical ber is composed of a non-uniform distribution of air voids which can be approximated as longitudinally invariant. The ll-fraction of air voids is higher at the regions closer to the boundary compared with the central regions. The experimental results show that the beam radius of a localized beam is smaller at the regions closer to the boundary than the one at the central regions. In order to understand the reason behind these observations, the fully vectorial modes of the disordered glass ber are calculated using the actual scanning electron microscope image of the ber tip. The numerical calculations show that the modes at regions closer to the boundary of the ber are more localized compared with the modes at the central regions. Coupling of an input beam to the less-localized modes with large tails at the central regions of the ber results in a large beam radius. In comparison, a beam of light launched at the regions close to the boundary couples to the highly compact modes of the ber and results in a small localized beam radius.

Karbasi, Salman; Hosseini, Seyedrasoul; Koch, Karl W.; Hawkins, Thomas; Ballato, John; Mafi, Arash

2014-02-01

232

Conductance noise in interacting Anderson insulators driven far from equilibrium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The combination of strong disorder and many-body interactions in Anderson insulators leads to a variety of intriguing nonequilibrium transport phenomena. These include slow relaxation and a variety of memory effects characteristic of glasses. Here we show that when such systems are driven with sufficiently high current and in a liquid-helium bath, a peculiar type of conductance noise can be observed. This noise appears in the conductance versus time traces as downward-going spikes. The characteristic features of the spikes (such as typical width) and the threshold current at which they appear are controlled by the sample parameters. We show that this phenomenon is peculiar to hopping transport and does not exist in the diffusive regime. Observation of conductance spikes hinges also on the sample being in direct contact with the normal phase of liquid helium; when this is not the case, the noise exhibits the usual 1/f characteristics independent of the current drive. A model based on the percolative nature of hopping conductance explains why the onset of the effect is controlled by the current density. It also predicts the dependence on disorder as confirmed by our experiments. To account for the role of the bath, the hopping transport model is augmented by a heuristic assumption involving nucleation of cavities in the liquid helium in which the sample is immersed. The suggested scenario is analogous to the way high-energy particles are detected in a Glaser’s bubble chamber.

Orlyanchik, V.; Ovadyahu, Z.

2005-07-01

233

Anderson localization of one-dimensional hybrid particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We solve the Anderson localization problem on a two-leg ladder by the Fokker-Planck equation approach. The solution is exact in the weak disorder limit at a fixed interchain coupling. The study is motivated by progress in investigating the hybrid particles such as cavity polaritons. This application corresponds to parametrically different intrachain hopping integrals (a “fast” chain coupled to a “slow” chain). We show that the canonical Dorokhov-Mello-Pereyra-Kumar (DMPK) equation is insufficient for this problem. Indeed, the angular variables describing the eigenvectors of the transmission matrix enter into an extended DMPK equation in a nontrivial way, being entangled with the two transmission eigenvalues. This extended DMPK equation is solved analytically and the two Lyapunov exponents are obtained as functions of the parameters of the disordered ladder. The main result of the paper is that near the resonance energy, where the dispersion curves of the two decoupled and disorder-free chains intersect, the localization properties of the ladder are dominated by those of the slow chain. Away from the resonance they are dominated by the fast chain: a local excitation on the slow chain may travel a distance of the order of the localization length of the fast chain.

Xie, Hong-Yi; Kravtsov, V. E.; Müller, M.

2012-07-01

234

Anderson–Fabry disease: Clinical manifestations of disease in female heterozygotes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anderson–Fabry disease is a rare, X-chromosomal lipid storage disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal a-galactosidase A. Clinical manifestations of Anderson–Fabry disease include excruciating pain in the extremities (acroparaesthesia), skin vessel ectasia (angiokeratoma), corneal and lenticular opacity, cardiovascular disease, stroke and renal failure, only renal failure being a frequent cause of death. Heterozygote female carriers have often been reported as

C. Whybra; Chr. Kampmann; I. Willers; J. Davies; B. Winchester; J. Kriegsmann; K. Brühl; A. Gal; S. Bunge; M. Beck

2001-01-01

235

Results of a Nationwide Screening for Anderson-Fabry Disease among Dialysis Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anderson-Fabry disease is possibly underdiagnosed in patients with end-stage renal disease. Nationwide screening was therefore undertaken for Anderson-Fabry disease among dialysis patients in Austria. Screening for -galactosidase A (AGAL) deficiency was performed by a blood spot test. In patients with a positive screening test, AGAL activity in leukocytes was deter- mined. Individuals with decreased leukocyte AGAL activity were subjected to

PETER KOTANKO; REINHARD KRAMAR; DANIJELA DEVRNJA; EDUARD PASCHKE; TILL VOIGTLANDER; MARTIN AUINGER; KLAUS DEMMELBAUER; MATTHIAS LORENZ; ANNA-CHRISTINE HAUSER; HANS-JORG KOFLER; KARL LHOTTA; ULRICH NEYER; WOLFGANG PRONAI; MANFRED WALLNER; CLEMENS WIESER; MARTIN WIESHOLZER; HERBERT ZODL; MANUELA FODINGER; GERE SUNDER-PLASSMANN; Krankenhaus Wels; Krankenhaus Lainz; Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg; Landeskrankenhaus Feldkirch; Landeskrankenhaus Klagenfurt

2004-01-01

236

Effects of steroid hormones on the Zn, Cu and MTI/II levels in the mouse brain.  

PubMed

The effects of some steroid hormones (corticosterone, hydrocortisone, testosterone and estrone) on the Zn, Cu metabolism and metallothioneins levels in the mouse brain were studied. To administrate the hormones, aqueous suspensions and olive oil solutions injected subcutaneously were used alternatively. The quantification of metals and metallothioneins concentrations in brain homogenates revealed significant alterations of both metal ions and protein expression levels, yet the subcutaneous oil injection increased per se the tissue metallothionein expression and metal content. We have also defined by immunohistochemistry the area-specific distribution of metallothioneins isoforms-I/II and of glial fibrillar acid protein. Upon treatment, corpus callosum, mesencephalon, pons, hippocampus and cerebellum were found to be the areas that increase the protein expression levels, whereas all other brain areas were marginally affected or were unaffected in terms of immunopositive metallothionein reaction. The metallothionein-I/II expression was compared with the immunopositivity of glial fibrillar acid protein and the results are discussed within the framework of the physiological role of corticosteroids and the potential therapeutical importance of sexual hormones. PMID:15196976

Beltramini, Mariano; Zambenedetti, Pamela; Wittkowski, Werner; Zatta, Paolo

2004-07-01

237

Biotransformation of PCBs in Arctic seabirds: characterization of phase I and II pathways at transcriptional, translational and activity levels.  

PubMed

Arctic seabirds are exposed to a wide range of halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs). Exposure occurs mainly through food intake, and many pollutants accumulate in lipid-rich tissues. Little is known about how HOCs are biotransformed in arctic seabirds. In this study, we characterized biotransformation enzymes in chicks of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) and black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) from Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway). Phase I and II enzymes were analyzed at the transcriptional, translational and activity levels. For gene expression patterns, quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), using gene-sequence primers, were performed. Protein levels were analyzed using immunochemical assays of western blot with commercially available antibodies. Liver samples were analyzed for phase I and II enzyme activities using a variety of substrates including ethoxyresorufin (cytochrome (CYP)1A1/1A2), pentoxyresorufin (CYP2B), methoxyresorufin (CYP1A), benzyloxyresorufin (CYP3A), testosterone (CYP3A/CYP2B), 1-chloro-2,4-nitrobenzene (CDNB) (glutathione S-transferase (GST)) and 4-nitrophenol (uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT)). In addition, the hydroxylated (OH-) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were analyzed in the blood, liver and brain tissue, whereas the methylsulfone (MeSO(2)-) PCBs were analyzed in liver tissue. Results indicated the presence of phase I (CYP1A4/CYP1A5, CYP2B, and CYP3A) and phase II (GST and UDPGT) enzymes at the activity, protein and/or mRNA level in both species. Northern fulmar chicks had higher enzyme activity than black-legged kittiwake chicks. This in combination with the higher SigmaOH-PCB to parent PCB ratios suggests that northern fulmar chicks have a different biotransformation capacity than black-legged kittiwake chicks. PMID:20176133

Helgason, Lisa B; Arukwe, Augustine; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Harju, Mikael; Hegseth, Marit N; Heimstad, Eldbjørg S; Jørgensen, Even H; Mortensen, Anne S; Wolkers, Johannes

2010-06-01

238

Teaching Games Level Design Using the StarCraft II Editor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Level design is often characterised as "where the rubber hits the road" in game development. It is a core area of games design, alongside design of game rules and narrative. However, there is a lack of literature dedicated to documenting teaching games design, let alone the more specialised topic of level design. Furthermore, there…

Sweetser, Penelope

2013-01-01

239

Septic shock is correlated with asymmetrical dimethyl arginine levels, which may be influenced by a polymorphism in the dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase II gene: a prospective observational study  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Asymmetrical dimethyl arginine (ADMA) is an endogenous non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase that may influence the severity of organ failure and the occurrence of shock secondary to an infectious insult. Levels may be genetically determined by a promoter polymorphism in a regulatory gene encoding dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase II (DDAH II), which functions by metabolising ADMA to citrulline. The aim

Michael J O'Dwyer; Felicity Dempsey; Vivion Crowley; Dermot P Kelleher; Ross McManus; Thomas Ryan

2006-01-01

240

A study of the human immune response to Lolium perenne (rye) pollen and its components, Lol p I and Lol p II (Rye I and Rye II). II. Longitudinal variation of antibody levels in relation to symptomatology and pollen exposure and correction of seasonally elevated antibody levels to basal values.  

PubMed

This study used a standardized, dialyzed, Lolium perenne (ryegrass) pollen extract and two of its well-characterized components, Lol p I (Rye I) and Lol p II (Rye II), to characterize the longitudinal variation of both IgE and IgG antibody (Ab) levels, as well as total serum IgE levels, in 20 grass-allergic subjects followed for 13 months. Ab levels declined toward a basal level just before, and increased just after, the grass-pollination season, returning to the same basal level just before the next grass-pollination season. The least complex allergen, Lol II, demonstrated the most uniform pattern of variation in both IgE and IgG Ab levels. Total serum IgE levels demonstrated the least regular pattern of variation. Grass-pollen counts were strongly correlated with symptom-medication scores for these subjects (rs = 0.87). Initial values were correlated with the rise in total IgE and IgE Ab to Lol II across the grass-pollen season. Skin test results were correlated with initial IgE Ab levels for L. perenne pollen extract and Lol II. Finally, a procedure for correcting IgE Ab levels to basal values was proposed and tested. The correction procedure, for each IgE Ab, was based on the average rise during the grass-pollination season (or average decline after the grass-pollination season) observed for all subjects with that IgE Ab. PMID:3680810

Freidhoff, L R; Ehrlich-Kautzky, E; Meyers, D A; Marsh, D G

1987-11-01

241

BICYCLE II: A Computer Code for Calculating Levelized Life-Cycle Costs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the BICYCLE computer code. BICYCLE was specifically designed to calculate levelized life-cycle costs for plants that produce electricity, heat, gaseous fuels, or liquid fuels. Included are (1) derivations of the equations used by BIC...

R. W. Hardie

1981-01-01

242

Light Quality and Irradiance Level Interaction in the Control of Expression of Light-Harvesting Complex of Photosystem II  

PubMed Central

Effects of red and blue light at irradiances from 1.6 to 28.3 micromolar per square meter per second on chloroplast pigments, light-harvesting pigment-proteins associated with photosystem II, and the corresponding mRNA were evaluated in maize (Zea mays L.) plants (OP Golden Bantum) grown for 14 days under 14 hours light/10 hours dark cycles. Accumulation of pigments, pigment-proteins, and mRNA was less in blue than in red light of equal irradiance. The difference between blue and red light, however, varied as a function of irradiance level, and the pattern of this variation suggests irradiance-controlled activation/deactivation (switching) of blue-light receptor. The maximum reduction in blue light of mRNA and proteins associated with light-harvesting complex occurs at lower irradiance levels than the maximum reduction of chlorophylls a and b. Images Figure 5 Figure 6

Eskins, Kenneth; Westhoff, Peter; Beremand, Phillip D.

1989-01-01

243

A three-level model for alkali metal vapor lasers. Part II: broadband optical pumping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of pump laser spectral bandwidth on the performance of longitudinally pumped diode-pumped alkali lasers is explored by extending the analytic, three-level model using longitudinally averaged number densities. By assuming a statistical distribution between the upper two levels, the limiting solution for the quasi-two level system is achieved. A second limiting solution is identified for strongly bleached conditions where the atom recycle rate, limited by spin-orbit relaxation, fully specifies the output power. Performance in the intermediate regime depends significantly on the pump bandwidth relative to the atomic absorption line width and requires numerical simulation. The ratio of populations for the two excited, 2P3/2,1/2 states completes an analytic solution and depends primarily on pump laser bandwidth, threshold, and alkali concentration. Absorption well into the wings on the atomic profile can be utilized by increasing alkali concentration, but imposes increased pump intensity threshold.

Hager, Gordon D.; Perram, Glen P.

2013-09-01

244

Thermal shifts and broadening of Rydberg levels in Be II ions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of a thermal field on Rydberg states of the nS-, nP- and nD-series in beryllium ions Be+ is investigated. The blackbody radiation-induced depopulation rates caused by transitions to upper (excitations) and lower (decays) bound levels and to the continuum (ionization) are calculated in wide ranges of the principal quantum numbers n and ambient temperatures. Simple and reliable approximations for natural lifetimes and stimulated by thermal radiation depopulation rate components are proposed. The blackbody-radiation-induced shifts of Rydberg levels are also calculated and their qualitative and quantitative properties are analysed.

Glukhov, I. L.; Nikitina, E. A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

2013-11-01

245

Alcohol and Alcohol Safety: A Curriculum Manual for Elementary Level. Volume I of II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual is the first in a series of Alcohol and Alcohol Safety Curriculum Manuals for use by teachers and curriculum developers. Geared to the elementary grade level, the objective of the manual is to promote responsible present and future decisions about alcohol. Emphasis has been placed on driver and pedestrian safety in recognition of the…

Finn, Peter; Platt, Judith

246

Homemade Equipment for the Teaching of Electrochemistry at Advanced Level. Part II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a detailed description for the construction of equipment needed to investigate acid/base equilibria through the measurement of pH and potentiometric titrations. Suggested experiments and calibration techniques are explained. This information helps to solve the problems of inadequate, expensive equipment required for A-level chemistry…

Chan, K. M.

1985-01-01

247

Molecular Beam Investigation of Rotational Transitions. II. The Rotational Levels of KBr and Their Hyperfine Structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

The molecular beam electrical resonance method has been used to study the hyperfine structure of the first rotational state in K39Br79 and K39Br81. The hyperfine structure arises from the splitting of the J=1 state into 10 levels by the quadrupole interactions of potassium and bromine. Molecules in the J=0 rotational state were refocused, and transitions to the J=1 state were

B. P. Fabricand; R. O. Carlson; C. A. Lee; I. I. Rabi

1953-01-01

248

Transition to a Two-Level Linear State Estimator—Part II: Algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

The availability of synchro-phasor data has raised the possibility of a linear state estimator if the inputs are only complex currents and voltages and if there are enough such measurements tomeetobservabilityandredundancyrequirements.Moreover,the new digital substations can perform some of the computation at the substation itself resulting in a more accurate two-level state es- timator. The main contribution in this paper is

Tao Yang; Hongbin Sun; Anjan Bose

2011-01-01

249

Changes in cerebrospinal fluid and blood plasma levels of IGF-II and its binding proteins in Alzheimer's disease: an observational study  

PubMed Central

Background The Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-related system is implicated in neuroregeneration and cell repair, as well as regulating lifespan. IGF-II, one component of this system, has also been found to affect memory functions in a rat model. In this study we explored changes in the IGF-related system in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including changes in IGF-II levels. Methods We measured blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 in 72 healthy controls and 92 patients with AD. Results We found significantly lower blood plasma levels of IGF-II and IGFBP-3 in patients with AD, compared with controls. The levels of IGF-II and IGFBP-2 were significantly elevated in the CSF from patients with AD. We also found correlations between established CSF biomarkers for AD (tau and P-tau) and components of the IGF system. Conclusions CSF and blood plasma levels of IGF-II and some of its binding proteins are changed in patients with AD. Further investigation into this area may unravel important clues to the nature of this disease.

2014-01-01

250

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 29 (HUNTTH00290029) on Town Highway 29, crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00290029 on Town Highway 29 crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 4.16-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream and downstream of the bridge. In the study area, Cobb Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.024 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 53 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 112.0 mm (0.367 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 29 crossing of Cobb Brook is a 36-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 11, 1995) and a wooden deck. The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 27 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway was measured to be 20 degrees. VTAOT records indicate an opening-skew-to-roadway of zero degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed extending from 12 ft upstream of the upstream end of the left abutment to 10 ft under the bridge in the center of the channel during the Level I assessment. Another scour hole approximately 1.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream end of the right abutment during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream end of the right abutment and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the upstream end of the upstream left retaining wall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was computed to be zero ft. Abutment scour ranged from 9.9 to 12.5 ft along the left abutment and from 6.2 to 8.6 ft along the right abutment. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gi

Flynn, Robert H.

1997-01-01

251

Post-processing V&V Level II ASC Milestone (2843) results.  

SciTech Connect

The 9/30/2008 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2843) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include fragment detection from CTH simulation data, fragment characterization and analysis, and fragment sorting and display operations. The capabilities were tested extensively both on sample and actual simulations. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including a comparison between simulated and test data, and the ability to output each fragment as an individual geometric file.

Karelitz, David B.; Ice, Lisa G.; Wilke, Jason; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Attaway, Stephen W.

2008-10-01

252

Two-dimensional Anderson-Hubbard model in the DMFT + {Sigma} approximation  

SciTech Connect

The density of states, the dynamic (optical) conductivity, and the phase diagram of the paramagnetic two-dimensional Anderson-Hubbard model with strong correlations and disorder are analyzed within the generalized dynamical mean field theory (DMFT + {Sigma} approximation). Strong correlations are accounted by the DMFT, while disorder is taken into account via the appropriate generalization of the self-consistent theory of localization. We consider the two-dimensional system with the rectangular 'bare' density of states (DOS). The DMFT effective single-impurity problem is solved by numerical renormalization group (NRG). The 'correlated metal,' Mott insulator, and correlated Anderson insulator phases are identified from the evolution of the density of states, optical conductivity, and localization length, demonstrating both Mott-Hubbard and Anderson metal-insulator transitions in two-dimensional systems of finite size, allowing us to construct the complete zero-temperature phase diagram of the paramagnetic Anderson-Hubbard model. The localization length in our approximation is practically independent of the strength of Hubbard correlations. But the divergence of the localization length in a finite-size two-dimensional system at small disorder signifies the existence of an effective Anderson transition.

Kuchinskii, E. Z., E-mail: kuchinsk@iep.uran.ru; Kuleeva, N. A.; Nekrasov, I. A.; Sadovskii, M. V., E-mail: sadovski@iep.uran.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Electrophysics (Russian Federation)

2010-02-15

253

Vacuum birefringence in strong magnetic fields: (II) Complex refractive index from the lowest Landau level  

SciTech Connect

We compute the refractive indices of a photon propagating in strong magnetic fields on the basis of the analytic representation of the vacuum polarization tensor obtained in our previous paper. When the external magnetic field is strong enough for the fermion one-loop diagram of the polarization tensor to be approximated by the lowest Landau level, the propagating mode in parallel to the magnetic field is subject to modification: The refractive index deviates from unity and can be very large, and when the photon energy is large enough, the refractive index acquires an imaginary part indicating decay of a photon into a fermion–antifermion pair. We study dependences of the refractive index on the propagating angle and the magnetic-field strength. It is also emphasized that a self-consistent treatment of the equation which defines the refractive index is indispensable for accurate description of the refractive index. This self-consistent treatment physically corresponds to consistently including the effects of back reactions of the distorted Dirac sea in response to the incident photon. -- Highlights: •Vacuum birefringence and photon decay are described by the complex refractive index. •Resummed photon vacuum polarization tensor in the lowest Landau level is used. •Back reactions from the distorted Dirac sea are self-consistently taken into account. •Self-consistent treatment drastically changes structure in photon energy dependence. •Dependences on photon propagation angle and magnetic-field strength are presented.

Hattori, Koichi, E-mail: khattori@yonsei.ac.kr [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Itakura, Kazunori, E-mail: kazunori.itakura@kek.jp [Theory Center, IPNS, High energy accelerator research organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan) [Theory Center, IPNS, High energy accelerator research organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Department of Particle and Nuclear Studies, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

2013-07-15

254

Effect of Aloe vera leaves on blood glucose level in type I and type II diabetic rat models.  

PubMed

Aloe vera (L.) Burm. fil. (= A. barbadensis Miller) (Liliaceae) is native to North Africa and also cultivated in Turkey. Aloes have long been used all over the world for their various medicinal properties. In the past 15 years, there have been controversial reports on the hypoglycaemic activity of Aloe species, probably due to differences in the parts of the plant used or to the model of diabetes chosen. In this study, separate experiments on three main groups of rats, namely, non-diabetic (ND), type I (IDDM) and type II (NIDDM) diabetic rats were carried out. A. vera leaf pulp and gel extracts were ineffective on lowering the blood sugar level of ND rats. A. vera leaf pulp extract showed hypoglycaemic activity on IDDM and NIDDM rats, the effectiveness being enhanced for type II diabetes in comparison with glibenclamide. On the contrary, A. vera leaf gel extract showed hyperglycaemic activity on NIDDM rats. It may therefore be concluded that the pulps of Aloe vera leaves devoid of the gel could be useful in the treatment of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus PMID:11268118

Okyar, A; Can, A; Akev, N; Baktir, G; Sütlüpinar, N

2001-03-01

255

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 53 (CAMBTH00750053) on Town Highway 75, crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00750053 on Town Highway 75 crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 4.30-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest, except for the downstream right overbank area which has a barn surrounded by grass and shrubs. In the study area, the Brewster River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.05 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 84.4 mm (0.277 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 75 crossing of the Brewster River is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway as surveyed is 10 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream left wingwall. There was also type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) along the downstream end of the downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.1 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 10.7 to 17.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance duri

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

1997-01-01

256

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (CAMBTH00460028) on Town Highway 46, crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00460028 on Town Highway 46 crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 9.94-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Seymour River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 81 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 62.0 mm (0.204 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of the Seymour River is a 38-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 33-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.6 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 0.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right wingwall and right abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the upstream left road embankment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 4.2 to 4.9 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 8.8 to 9.7 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Rich

Ivanoff, Michael A.

1997-01-01

257

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (BURKTH00070016) on Town Highway 7, crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BURKTH00070016 on Town Highway 7 crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 6.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the left bank upstream which is brushland. In the study area, Dish Mill Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 40 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 94.1 mm (0.309 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 7 crossing of Dish Mill Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 35 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left and right abutments during the Level I assessment. In front of the upstream and downstream left wingwalls the scour depth was only 0.5 ft, while in front of the downstream right wingwall it was 0.75 ft and in front of the upstream right wingwall it was 0.3 ft. The scour countermeasures at the site include type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream end of the right abutment and along the downstream right wingwall. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is along the upstream left bank, the upstream and downstream left wingwalls, and at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.7 to 9.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the left abutment and at the incipient road-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of

Burns, Ronda L.; Severance, Tim

1997-01-01

258

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 5C (CORITH0003005C) on Town Highway 3, crossing Cooksville Brook, Corinth, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CORITH0003005C on Town Highway 3 crossing Cooksville Brook, Corinth, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 20.2-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture with a residence on the upstream right bank near the bridge. The immediate channel banks have some woody vegetation cover. In the study area, Cooksville Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 46 ft and an average channel depth of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranged from sand to cobble and had a median grain size (D50) of 41.0 mm (0.135 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 5, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 3 crossing of Cooksville Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 37-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 17, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls on the left abutment. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measures at the site were type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream and downstream ends of the right abutment and type-4 (less than 60 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank below the residence. Also, there is a wall along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 2.7 to 3.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 7.0 to 19.0 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Severance, Tim

1997-01-01

259

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 48 (FFIETH00300048) on Town Highway 30, crossing Wanzer Brook, Fairfield, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure FFIETH00300048 on Town Highway 30 crossing Wanzer Brook, Fairfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 6.78-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover upstream of the bridge and on the downstream right bank is primarily pasture. The downstream left bank is forested. In the study area, Wanzer Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 65 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material is cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 111 mm (0.364 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 30 crossing of Wanzer Brook is a 31-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 28-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 26 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical stone wall abutments with concrete caps and “kneewall” footings. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 20 degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream left retaining wall (extended concrete footing) during the Level I assessment. It was also observed that the right abutment is undermined with a scour depth of 0.5 ft. The scour protection at the site was limited to four large boulders (type-4, less than 60 inches diameter) along the downstream right retaining wall. The channel under the bridge is a “corduroy” log mat floor composed of 13 logs which are parallel to the bridge face and extend from 5 ft under the bridge to the downstream bridge face. The most downstream log is approximately 0.3 to 0.4 ft higher than the other logs and controls flow at lower flows. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 14.1 to 16.0 ft at the left abutment and from 6.8 to 7.6 ft at the right abutment. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive

Flynn, Robert H.; Boehmler, Erick M.

1997-01-01

260

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 26 (WSTOTH00070026) on Town Highway 7, crossing Greendale Brook, Weston, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WSTOTH00070026 on Town Highway 7 crossing Greendale Brook, Weston, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south central Vermont. The 3.13-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, the Greendale Brook has a sinuous, non-incised, non-alluvial channel with a slope of approximately 0.015 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 38 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 64.8 mm (0.213 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 19, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The channel has moved to the right, however, scour countermeasures are in place along the upstream right bank. The Town Highway 7 crossing of the Greendale Brook is a 52-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 50-foot steel-beam span with a concrete deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, April 07, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 48.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right wingwall and right abutment during the Level I assessment. Scour protection measures at the site include: type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall, along the left bank upstream, at the downstream end of the downstream left wing wall, and along the entire length of the downstream right wing wall; type 4 (less than 60 inches) and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches) along the right bank upstream. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 3.9 to 9.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). The Hire equation (abutment scour)

Striker, Lora K.; Hammond, Robert A.

1997-01-01

261

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 32 (HUNTTH00220032) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220032 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 5.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right overbank which is pasture. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.05 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 58 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 127 mm (0.416 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 36-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 34-foot steel-beam span and a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 12, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 35.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls on the left. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment and downstream left wingwall during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.4 to 10.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopt

Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

262

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 31 (HUNTTH00220031) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220031 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, obtained from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 5.01-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of trees and brush. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.06 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 44 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from boulder to gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 107.0 mm (0.352 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 34-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot steel I-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 31.2 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. The VTAOT computed opening-skewto-roadway is 2 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed at the downstream end of the left abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was computed to be zero ft. Abutment scour ranged from 7.0 to 10.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the left abutment and at the incipient-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical p

Flynn, Robert H.; Degnan, James R.

1997-01-01

263

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 12 (CHESVT01030012) on State Highway 103, crossing the Williams River, Chester, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESVT01030012 on State Route 103 crossing the Williams River, Chester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in eastern Vermont. The 23.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the downstream right and upstream left overbank areas and short grass on the downstream left and upstream right overbank areas. The surface cover along the upstream and downstream immediate banks consists of trees and brush. In the study area, the the Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.0054 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 75 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 52.4 mm (0.172 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 18, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The State Route 103 crossing of the Williams River is a 99-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of three concrete T-beam spans (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The bridge is supported by two piers and vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls and spill-through slopes. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Downstream of the bridge are the remains of a dam which is acting as a drop structure. A scour hole, approximately 3 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth, was observed along the upstream left bank extending from 78 ft upstream of the upstream bridge face to 25 ft downstream of the downstream bridge face during the Level I assessment. Lateral migration of the channel has resulted in flow being directed at an angle to the piers, which has resulted in increased local scour at the bridge. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) under the bridge along the entire base length of the left and right spill-through slopes and extending up to the abutments. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) scour protection was also found along the upstream left bank from the bridge to 46 ft upstream and along the downstream right bank from the bridge to 70 ft downstream. Rock walls were found along the left bank from 88 ft to 200 ft downstream and along the right bank from 124 ft to 224 ft downstream. There are two wood pile drop structures located at 47 ft and 61 ft downstream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharg

Flynn, Robert H.; Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

264

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 1 (JAY-TH00040001) on Town Highway 4, crossing Crook Brook, Jay, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure JAY-TH00040001 on Town Highway 4 crossing Crook Brook, Jay, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northern Vermont. The 20.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is thick woody vegetation and/or forest except for the upstream right bank and overbank which is pasture. In the study area, Crook Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 86 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 48.7 mm (0.160 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 5, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 4 crossing of Crook Brook is a 49-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 45-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 42 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening. The opening-skew-to-roadway is also 5 degrees. Channel scour is present along the left abutment. The scoured area was 1.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth during the Level I assessment. Scour countermeasures include type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on the upstream and downstream sides of the left road embankment and at the upstream end of the left abutment. There is type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the base of the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 2.5 to 3.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour at the left abutment ranged from 15.4 to 18.5 ft. Abutment scour at the right abutment ranged from 12.3 to 15.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for both abutments. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination

Olson, Scott A.

1997-01-01

265

Effect of Age-Related Cartilage Turnover on Serum C-Telopeptide of Collagen Type II and Osteocalcin Levels in Growing Rabbits with and without Surgically Induced Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

This study aims to determine the effect of age-related cartilage turnover on the serum C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and osteocalcin (OC) levels in growing rabbits with and without surgically induced osteoarthritis. Twenty-four New Zealand male 3-month-old rabbits were randomized into three operated groups (n = 6 per group, with surgically induced osteroarthritis in the right knee; after blood sampling, the knees were harvested following euthanization at 2, 3, and 6 months after surgery) and a control group (n = 6, blood samples were obtained monthly between 3 and 15 months). Histomorphologically, the medial femoral condyles, particularly the central parts, harbored the most severe osteoarthritic changes among the operated rabbits. The serum levels of CTX-II and OC decreased in the controls from 3 to 11 months and then remained stable. No significant differences in the serum CTX-II and OC levels between the osteoarthritic rabbits and controls were observed. The osteoarthritic-to-normal ratios (ONRs, the ratios of serum CTX-II or OC levels in osteoarthritic rabbits to those of the controls at same ages) enabled an overall assessment of osteoarthritis and age-related cartilage turnover. Elevated CTX-II ONRs were observed in rabbits with mild to advanced osteoarthritis. However, the OC ONRs were unhelpful in assessing osteoarthritic growing rabbits.

Huang, Chung-Cheng; Lee, Chen-Chang; Wang, Ching-Jen; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Ng, Shu-Hang; Tseng, Chia-Yi; Ko, Sheung-Fat

2014-01-01

266

First participation by the NMISA in a low-level comparison: CCRI(II)-S9 exercise.  

PubMed

The NMISA Radioactivity Standards Laboratory participated in the CCRI(II)-S9 inter-comparison of the measurement of the activity concentration of (137)Cs and (40)K in rice material, piloted by the KRISS. The paper describes the equipment used, the measurement set-up and data analysis. The efficiency of the detector for (137)Cs and (40)K was determined by comparison against a spiked standard solution, and Monte Carlo simulations performed to estimate the difference in ?-ray escape probability between the solution standard and starch (as an approximation for milled rice) due to attenuation disparities. The uncertainty budget was estimated rather conservatively, since these were the first low-level measurements performed by the NMISA using an HPGe detector. PMID:23562433

van Wyngaardt, W M; van Staden, M J; Lubbe, J

2013-11-01

267

Determination of the Activation Barrier to Energy Transfer from 3 pi pi* to Charge Transfer Levels via Steady State and Transient Luminescence Measurements on Bis(4-Chlorothiophenol)(1,10-Phenanthroline)Zinc(II).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recent studies on mixed ligand chelates of M(II)(BS)2(N-N) M(II) = Zn(II), Cd(II); BS = anion of a substituted benzenethiol; N-N = dinitrogen-heterocycle reveal the existence of multiple level emissions originating from different electronic configurations...

R. G. Highland G. A. Crosby

1985-01-01

268

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 24 (MANCUS00070024) on U.S. Route 7, crossing Lye Brook, Manchester, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MANCUS00070024 on U.S. Route 7 crossing Lye Brook, Manchester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Taconic section of the New England physiographic province in southwestern Vermont. The 8.13-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the primary surface cover consists of brush and trees. In the study area, Lye Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 66 ft and an average bank height of 11 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 90.0 mm (0.295 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 6, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. Although, the immediate reach is considered stable, upstream of the bridge the Lye Brook valley is very steep (0.05 ft/ft). Extreme events in a valley this steep may quickly reveal the instability of the channel. In the Flood Insurance Study for the Town of Manchester (Federal Emergency Management Agency, January, 1985), Lye Brook’s overbanks were described as “boulder strewn” after the August 1976 flood. The U.S. Route 7 crossing of Lye Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, September 28, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 55 degrees. At the time of construction, the downstream channel was relocated (written communication, Dan Landry, VTAOT, January 2, 1997). A levee on the downstream right bank was also constructed and is protected by type-4 stone-fill (less than 60 inches diameter) extending from the bridge to more than 300 feet downstream. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) covers the downstream right bank from the bridge to more than 300 feet downstream. Type-2 stone-fill also extends from the bridge to 220 feet upstream on both upstream banks. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is analyzed since it has the potential of being the worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.0 to 1.6 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour computations for the left abutment ranged from 14.5 to 16.1 ft. with the worst-case occurring at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour computations for the right abutment ranged from 6.9 to 10.4 ft. with the worst-case occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and d

Olson, Scott A.

1997-01-01

269

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30 (BRIDTH00330030) on Town Highway 33, crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00330030 on town highway 33 crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 7.51-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Branch has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 45 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 60.7 mm (0.199 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 33 crossing of Dailey Hollow Branch is a 31-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Type-2 stone-fill (less than 36 inches diameter) protection was found at all four wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.5 to 3.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge, which is between the 100- and 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.9 to 14.6 ft. with the worst-case scenario also occurring at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

270

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (HUNTTH00220033) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220033 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 8.65-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right overbank which is pasture. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 42 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 76.7 mm (0.252 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 26, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 40-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 23.5-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 36.9 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. The scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the left and right banks upstream that extended through the bridge and along the downstream banks. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is analyzed since it has the potential of being the worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.5 to 14.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection mea

Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

1997-01-01

271

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 34 (HUNTTH00210034) on Town Highway 21, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00210034 on Town Highway 21 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 6.23-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 90.0 mm (0.295 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 26, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 21 crossing of Brush Brook is a 28-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 26-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 25.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with a wingwall on the upstream right. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening and the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 5 degrees. A tributary enters Brush Brook on the right bank immediately downstream of the bridge. At the confluence, the left bank of Brush Brook is eroded and there is a small void under the downstream end of the left abutment footing which is completely exposed. The right abutment footing is also exposed. The scour countermeasures at the site include type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream banks and in front of the right abutment and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream right wingwall and along the downstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.9 to 10.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogen

Burns, Ronda L.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

1997-01-01

272

Social support and the likelihood of maintaining and improving levels of physical activity: the Whitehall II Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Evidence on the association between social support and leisure time physical activity (LTPA) is scarce and mostly based on cross-sectional data with different types of social support collapsed into a single index. The aim of this study was to investigate whether social support from the closest person was associated with LTPA. Methods: Prospective cohort study of 5395 adults (mean age 55.7 years, 3864 men) participating in the British Whitehall II study. Confiding/emotional support and practical support were assessed at baseline in 1997–99 using the Close Persons Questionnaire. LTPA was assessed at baseline and follow-up in (2002–04). Baseline covariates included socio-demographics, self-rated health, long-standing illnesses, physical functioning and common mental disorders. Results: Among participants who reported recommended levels of LTPA at baseline, those who experienced high confiding/emotional support were more likely to report recommended levels of LTPA at follow-up [odds ratio (OR): 1.39, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12–1.70 in a model adjusted for baseline covariates]. Among those participants who did not meet the recommended target of LTPA at baseline, high confiding/emotional support was not associated with improvement in activity levels. High practical support was associated with both maintaining (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.10–1.63) and improving (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02–1.53) LTPA levels. Conclusion: These findings suggest that emotional and practical support from the closest person may help the individual to maintain the recommended level of LTPA. Practical support also predicted a change towards a more active lifestyle.

De Vogli, Roberto; Stafford, Mai; Shipley, Martin J.; Marmot, Michael G.; Cox, Tom; Vahtera, Jussi; Vaananen, Ari; Heponiemi, Tarja; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Kivimaki, Mika

2012-01-01

273

Algebraic and geometric mean density of states in topological Anderson insulators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Algebraic and geometric mean density of states in disordered systems may reveal properties of electronic localization. In order to understand the topological phases with disorder in two dimensions, we present the calculated density of states for the disordered Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. The topological phase is characterized by a perfectly quantized conducting plateau, carried by helical edge states, in a two-terminal setup. In the presence of disorder, the bulk of the topological phase is either a band insulator or an Anderson insulator. Both of them can protect edge states from backscattering. The topological phases are explicitly distinguished as a topological band insulator or a topological Anderson insulator from the ratio of the algebraic mean density of states to the geometric mean density of states. The calculation reveals that the topological Anderson insulator can be induced by disorders from either a topologically trivial band insulator or a topologically nontrivial band insulator.

Zhang, Yan-Yang; Shen, Shun-Qing

2013-11-01

274

Abrupt physical and chemical changes during 1992-1999, Anderson Springs, SE Geyser Geothermal Field, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Anderson Springs area is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. Patrons drank a variety of cool to hot mineral waters from improved springs, swam in various baths and pools, and hiked in the rugged hills flanking Anderson Creek and its tributaries. In the bluffs to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. By the early 1970s, the higher ridges south and west of Anderson Springs became part of the southeast sector of the greater Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric power plants are built on these ridges, producing energy from a vapor-dominated 240 °C reservoir. Only the main hot spring at Anderson Springs has maintained a recognizable identity since the 1930s. The hot spring is actually a cluster of seeps and springs that issue from a small fault in a ravine southwest of Anderson Creek. Published and unpublished records show that the maximum temperature (Tm) of this cluster fell gradually from 63°C in 1889 to 48°C in 1992. However, Tm of the cluster climbed to 77°C in 1995 and neared boiling (98°C) in 1998. A new cluster of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm = 99.3°C) formed in 1998 about 30 m north of the old spring cluster. Several evergreen trees on steep slopes immediately above these vents apparently were killed by the new activity. Thermal waters at Anderson Hot Springs are mostly composed of near-surface ground waters with some added gases and condensed steam from The Geysers geothermal system. Compared to gas samples from Southeast Geysers wells, the hot spring gases are higher in CO2 and lower in H2S and NH3. As the springs increased in temperature, however, the gas composition became more like the mean composition of steam discharges from the Southeast Geysers. The hot spring waters are low in ions of Cl, B, and Li, but relatively high in HCO3, SO4 and NH4. The stable-isotope compositions (deuterium and oxygen-18) of these waters plot near the global meteoric water line. Geochemical data through time reveal apparent maxima in the concentrations of SO4, Fe, and Mn in 1991 to 1992, before the cluster became hotter. The black-to-gray deposits from the new spring cluster are rich in pyrite and contain anomalous metals. About one-half mile to the east of the hot springs, mineralized water discharges intermittently from an old adit of the Schwartz (Anderson) mine, and enters a tributary of Anderson Creek. This drainage increased substantially in July 1998, and a slurry of mine water and precipitates were transported down the tributary and into Anderson Creek. In December 1998, the adit water was 22°C, and had a chemical composition that was similar to spring waters that once discharged in the ravines surrounding the old Anderson Springs resort. The cause for the abrupt changes that have occurred in thermal features at Anderson Springs is still not resolved. One possibility is that these changes are a response to withdrawal of steam from The Geysers geothermal field over more than 20 years of production. Pressure declines in the geothermal reservoir may have caused a "drying out" of the overlying condensation zone. Induced boiling in this zone and upflow of deep steam to shallower depths would cause heating and vaporization of shallow ground waters. In addition, earthquakes occurring in the vicinity of Anderson Springs have increased significantly after nearby geothermal power plants began operation. These earthquakes may have enhanced surface discharge of thermal fluids along fractures and faults.

Janik, Cathy J.; Goff, Fraser; Walter, Stephen R.; Sorey, Michael L.; Counce, Dale; Colvard, Elizabeth M.

2000-01-01

275

In situ determination of manganese(II) speciation in Deinococcus radiodurans by high magnetic field EPR: detection of high levels of Mn(II) bound to proteins.  

PubMed

High magnetic field high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance techniques were used to measure in situ Mn(II) speciation in Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacteria capable of accumulating high concentrations of Mn(II). It was possible to identify and quantify the evolution of Mn(II) species in intact cells at various stages of growth. Aside from water, 95-GHz high field electron nuclear double resonance showed that the Mn(II) ions are bound to histidines and phosphate groups, mostly from fructose-1,6-bisphosphate but also inorganic phosphates and nucleotides. During stationary growth phase, 285-GHz continuous wave EPR measurements showed that histidine is the most common ligand to Mn(II) and that significant amounts of cellular Mn(II) in D. radiodurans are bound to peptides and proteins. As much as 40% of the total Mn(II) was in manganese superoxide dismutase, and it is this protein and not smaller manganese complexes, as has been suggested recently, that is probably the primary defense against superoxide. PMID:23303180

Tabares, Leandro C; Un, Sun

2013-02-15

276

Angiotensin 1-7 Receptor and Angiotensin II Receptor 2 Blockades Prevent the Increased Serum and Kidney Nitric Oxide Levels in Response to Angiotensin II Administration: Gender-Related Difference  

PubMed Central

Background: The angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor 2 (AT2R) and angiotensin 1-7 receptor (masR) expression in the kidney are gender-related. We attempted to compare the response of nitric oxide (NO) production to Ang II administration, with and without AT2R and masR blockades, using A-779 and PD123319 in male and female rats. Methods: Anesthetized and catheterized male and female Wistar rats were subjected to one-hour continuous infusion of Ang II (~20 ?g/kg/hour), with and without masR and AT2R blockades. The level of the NO metabolite (nitrite) was measured before and after the experiment in rat serum and in the homogenized kidney tissue. Results: The basal data indicated that no sex difference in the serum level of nitrite could be detected before Ang II infusion. However, administration of Ang II in male and female rats caused a gender difference in the nitrite level, which resulted in the serum level of the nitrite significantly increasing in males (P < 0.05) when compared with the females. In addition, masR blockade or co-blockade of masR and AT2R in male rats abolished the gender difference related to the effect of Ang II on nitrite production. In the presence of masR and AT2R, or when masR alone was blocked, the level of nitrite in the kidney, in response to the Ang II infusion was not significantly different between the two sexes. On the contrary, masR and AT2R co-blockades significantly decreased the kidney nitrite concentration response to Ang II administration in both male and female rats (P < 0.05), but no sex difference was detected. Conclusions: The renal vasculature of male rats may provide more response to Ang II administration-induced NO, which is dependent on masR and AT2R. During dual masR + AT2R blockades, the kidney NO formation wasreduced in a non-gender related manner.

Safari, Tahereh; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

2013-01-01

277

KGF Increases SPA and SPD mRNA Levels and Secretion in Cultured Rat Alveolar Type II Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of secretion of surfactant proteins by alveolar type II cells have been limited because the expres- sion of the genes for these proteins decreases rapidly in primary culture. We developed a culture system to investigate the regulation of lipid and protein secretion by alveolar type II cells and the genes involved in these processes. Rat type II cells were

Colorado Denver

278

Experimental Observation of the Anderson Metal-Insulator Transition with Atomic Matter Waves  

SciTech Connect

We realize experimentally an atom-optics quantum-chaotic system, the quasiperiodic kicked rotor, which is equivalent to a 3D disordered system that allows us to demonstrate the Anderson metal-insulator transition. Sensitive measurements of the atomic wave function and the use of finite-size scaling techniques make it possible to extract both the critical parameters and the critical exponent of the transition, the latter being in good agreement with the value obtained in numerical simulations of the 3D Anderson model.

Chabe, Julien; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molecules, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, CNRS, CERLA, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Lemarie, Gabriel; Gremaud, Benoit; Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

2008-12-19

279

Observation of the Anderson metal-insulator transition with atomic matter waves: Theory and experiment  

SciTech Connect

Using a cold atomic gas exposed to laser pulses - a realization of the chaotic quasiperiodic kicked rotor with three incommensurate frequencies - we study experimentally and theoretically the Anderson metal-insulator transition in three dimensions. Sensitive measurements of the atomic wave function and the use of finite-size scaling techniques make it possible to unambiguously demonstrate the existence of a quantum phase transition and to measure its critical exponents. By taking proper account of systematic corrections to one-parameter scaling, we show the universality of the critical exponent {nu}=1.59{+-}0.01, which is found to be equal to the one previously computed for the Anderson model.

Lemarie, Gabriel; Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Chabe, Julien; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude [Laboratoire PhLAM, , Universite de Lille 1, CNRS, CERLA, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Gremaud, Benoit [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

2009-10-15

280

Experimental observation of the Anderson metal-insulator transition with atomic matter waves.  

PubMed

We realize experimentally an atom-optics quantum-chaotic system, the quasiperiodic kicked rotor, which is equivalent to a 3D disordered system that allows us to demonstrate the Anderson metal-insulator transition. Sensitive measurements of the atomic wave function and the use of finite-size scaling techniques make it possible to extract both the critical parameters and the critical exponent of the transition, the latter being in good agreement with the value obtained in numerical simulations of the 3D Anderson model. PMID:19113725

Chabé, Julien; Lemarié, Gabriel; Grémaud, Benoît; Delande, Dominique; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude

2008-12-19

281

Gutzwiller Method for an Extended Periodic Anderson Model with the c--f Coulomb Interaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study an extended periodic Anderson model with the Coulomb interaction Uc\\aku f between conduction and f electrons by the Gutzwiller method. The crossovers between the Kondo, intermediate-valence, and almost empty f-electron regimes become sharper with Uc\\aku f, and for a sufficiently large Uc\\aku f, become first-order phase transitions. In the Kondo regime, a large enhancement in the effective mass occurs as in the ordinary periodic Anderson model without Uc\\aku f. In addition, we find that a large mass enhancement also occurs in the intermediate-valence regime by the effect of Uc\\aku f.

Kubo, Katsunori

2011-11-01

282

Mass enhancement in an extended periodic Anderson model with valence fluctuations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the mass enhancement in an extended periodic Anderson model with the Coulomb interaction Ucf between conduction and f-electrons by the Gutzwiller method. In the Kondo regime, where the number of f electrons nf per site is almost one, the mass enhancement factor becomes large as in the ordinary periodic Anderson model without Ucf. In the intermediate-valence regime, we find that the mass enhancement factor becomes large for a large Ucf. As a result, the effective mass can vary nonmonotonically as a function of nf, which may be relevant to the experimental observations of CeCu2Si2 under pressure.

Kubo, Katsunori

2012-12-01

283

Phase diagram of the anisotropic Anderson transition with the atomic kicked rotor: theory and experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We realize experimentally a cold-atom system, the quasiperiodic kicked rotor, equivalent to the three-dimensional Anderson model of disordered solids where the anisotropy between the x direction and the y-z plane can be controlled by adjusting an experimentally accessible parameter. This allows us to study experimentally the disorder versus anisotropy phase diagram of the Anderson metal-insulator transition. Numerical and experimental data compare very well with each other and a theoretical analysis based on the self-consistent theory of localization correctly describes the observed behavior, illustrating the flexibility of cold-atom experiments for the study of transport phenomena in complex quantum systems.

Lopez, Matthias; Clément, Jean-François; Lemarié, Gabriel; Delande, Dominique; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude

2013-06-01

284

Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Spatial Entanglement in Ordered and Anderson Photonic Lattices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrate quantum walks of a photon pair in a spatially extended Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state coupled into an on-chip multiport photonic lattice. By varying the degree of entanglement we observe Anderson localization for pairs in a separable state and Anderson colocalization for pairs in an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled state. In the former case, each photon localizes independently, while in the latter neither photon localizes, but the pair colocalizes—revealing unexpected survival of the spatial correlations through strong disorder.

Di Giuseppe, G.; Martin, L.; Perez-Leija, A.; Keil, R.; Dreisow, F.; Nolte, S.; Szameit, A.; Abouraddy, A. F.; Christodoulides, D. N.; Saleh, B. E. A.

2013-04-01

285

Quantification of phase I / II metabolizing enzyme gene expression and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct levels in human prostate  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Studies of migrant populations suggest that dietary and/or environmental factors play a crucial role in the aetiology of prostatic adenocarcinoma (CaP). The human prostate consists of the peripheral zone (PZ), transition zone (TZ) and central zone (CZ); CaP occurs most often in the PZ. METHODS To investigate the notion that an underlying differential expression of phase I/II genes, and/or the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts might explain the elevated PZ susceptibility, we examined prostate tissues (matched tissue sets consisting of PZ and TZ) from men undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy for CaP (n=26) or cystoprostatectomy (n=1). Quantitative gene expression analysis was employed for cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and CYP1A2, as well as N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). RESULTS CYP1B1, NAT1 and COMT were expressed in all tissue sets; levels of CYP1B1 and NAT1 were consistently higher in the PZ compared to TZ. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of CYP1B1 (nuclear-associated and primarily in basal epithelial cells) and NAT1. Tissue sections from 23 of these aforementioned 27 matched tissue sets were analyzed for PAH-DNA adduct levels using antiserum elicited against DNA modified with r7, t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]pyrene (BPDE). PAH-DNA adduct levels were highest in glandular epithelial cells, but a comparison of PZ and TZ showed no significant differences. CONCLUSION Although expression of activating and/or detoxifying enzymes may be higher in the PZ, PAH-DNA adduct levels appear to be similar in both zones. Therefore, factors other than PAH-DNA adducts may be responsible for promotion of tumour formation in the human prostate.

John, Kaarthik; Ragavan, Narasimhan; Pratt, M. Margaret; Singh, Paras B.; Al-Buheissi, Salah; Matanhelia, Shyam S.; Phillips, David H.; Poirier, Miriam C.; Martin, Francis L.

2008-01-01

286

Experimental and analytical study of loss-of-flow transients in EBR-II occurring at decay power levels  

SciTech Connect

A series of eight loss-of-flow (LOF) tests have been conducted in EBR-II to study the transition between forced and natural convective flows following a variety of loss-of-primary-pumping power conditions from decay heat levels. Comparisons of measurements and pretest/posttest predictions were made on a selected test. Good agreements between measurements and predictions was found prior to and just after the flow reaching its minimum, but the agreement is not as good after that point. The temperatures are consistent with the flow response and the assumed decay power. The measured results indicate that the flows of driver and the instrumented subassemblies are too much in the analytical model in the natural convective region. Although a parametric study on secondary flow, turbulent-laminar flow transition, heat transfer ability of the intermediate heat exchange at low flow and flow mixing in the primary tank has been performed to determine their effects on the flow, the cause of the discrepancy at very low flow level is still unknown.

Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Betten, P.R.; Planchon, H.P.

1985-01-01

287

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (BETHTH00070038) on Town Highway 007, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The town highway 5 crossing of the Black River is a 70-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 65-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. There is also a retaining wall along the upstream side of the road embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 3.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment. The scour hole was 27 feet long, 15 feet wide, and was 2.5 feet below the abutment footing at the time of the Level I assessment. This right abutment had numerous cracks and had settled. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

288

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 22 (JAY-TH00400022) on Town Highway 40, crossing Jay Branch, Jay, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northern Vermont. The 2.15-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is primarily pasture on the upstream and downstream left overbank while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The downstream right overbank of the bridge is forested. In the study area, Jay Branch Tributary has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 26 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 40.5 mm (0.133 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 40 crossing of Jay Branch Tributary is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel skew and the opening-skew-to-roadway are zero degrees. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the left and right abutments, at the upstream right wingwall, and at the downstream left wingwall. There was also type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream left and downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.7 to 1.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 4.6 to 4.9 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 4.0 to 5.0 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information i

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

1997-01-01

289

Quantitative measurement of m-RNA levels to assess expression of cyclooxygenase-II, inducible nitric oxide synthase and 12-lipoxygenase genes in middle ear cholesteatoma.  

PubMed

To assess expression of three main inflammatory genes, COX-II, ALOX-12 and i-NOS, quantitatively at transcriptional level in cholesteatoma matrix tissue. Ten patients who have chronic otitis media with primary acquired cholesteatoma were included in this study. Tissue samples obtained from cholesteatoma matrix and external ear canal skin (control tissue). Expression of the targeted genes (COX-II, i-NOS and LOX-12) was assessed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. The amount of COX2 mRNA was significantly higher in cholesteatoma matrix at transcriptional level (p = 0.038). There was no statistically significant difference regarding expression of iNOS and LOX12 mRNA levels (p > 0.05). There is a significant overexpression of the mRNA of COX-II in cholesteatoma matrix, which indicates a difference between the normal skin and cholesteatoma matrix at molecular level. COX-II gene overexpression seems to be associated with pathogenesis of cholesteatoma. This molecular change is similar to the molecular abnormalities observed in some benign and malignant neoplasms. Invasive and locally destructive nature of cholesteatoma may be due to COX-II overexpression. Absence of an increase in the gene expressions of i-NOS and LOX-12 in cholesteatoma matrix suggests that these mediators may not be related with the pathogenesis and evolution of cholesteatoma. PMID:23832258

Çatl?, Tolgahan; Bayaz?t, Y?ld?r?m; Y?lmaz, Ak?n; Menev?e, Adnan; Gökdo?an, Ozan; Göksu, Nebil; Özbilen, Suat

2014-06-01

290

Reduction in Hexokinase II Levels Results in Decreased Cardiac Function and Altered Remodeling after Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury  

PubMed Central

Rationale Cardiomyocytes switch substrate utilization from fatty acid to glucose under ischemic conditions, however, it is unknown how perturbations in glycolytic enzymes affect cardiac response to ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Hexokinase (HK) II is a HK isoform that is expressed in the heart and it can bind to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Objective We sought to define how HKII and its binding to mitochondria play a role in cardiac response and remodeling after I/R. Methods and Results We first showed that HKII levels and its binding to mitochondria are reduced 2 days after I/R. We then subjected the hearts of wild type and heterozygote HKII knockout (HKII+/?) mice to I/R by coronary ligation. At baseline, HKII+/? mice have normal cardiac function, however, they display lower systolic function after I/R compared to wild type animals. The mechanism appears to be through an increase in cardiomyocyte death and fibrosis and a reduction in angiogenesis, the latter is through a decrease in HIF-dependent pathway signaling in cardiomyocytes. HKII mitochondrial binding is also critical for cardiomyocyte survival, as its displacement in tissue culture with a synthetic peptide increases cell death. Our results also suggest that HKII may be important for the remodeling of the viable cardiac tissue as its modulation in vitro alters cellular energy levels, O2 consumption and contractility. Conclusions These results suggest that reduction in HKII levels causes altered remodeling of the heart in I/R by increasing cell death and fibrosis and reducing angiogenesis, and that mitochondrial binding is needed for protection of cardiomyocytes.

Wu, Rongxue; Smeele, Kirsten M.; Wyatt, Eugene; Ichikawa, Yoshihiko; Eerbeek, Otto; Sun, Lin; Chawla, Kusum; Hollmann, Markus W.; Nagpal, Varun; Heikkinen, Sami; Laakso, Markku; Jujo, Kentaro; Wasserstrom, J. Andrew; Zuurbier, Coert J.; Ardehali, Hossein

2010-01-01

291

Superconductivity in the generalized periodic Anderson model with strong local attraction  

SciTech Connect

We study a generalized periodic Anderson model with on-site hybridization between wide- and narrow-band electrons and strong and local coupling with the lattice deformation. Provided that the interaction with the lattice is strong enough, the narrow-band electrons will be turned into small polarons which interact attractively with each other over short distances, leading to the formation of local pairs of narrow-band electrons. This leads to a pinning of the Fermi level which is due to the fact that narrow-band electrons exist only in pair states. By means of a generalized Schrieffer-Wolff transformation we eliminate hybridization and obtain an effective Hamiltonian which describes a contact interaction between local pairs and wide-band electrons as well as the direct hopping of local pairs and interparticle Coulomb interactions. In such a system the two types of mechanisms which can lead to superconductivity have been studied. The first one is due to direct local pair hopping and involves exclusively the narrow-band subsystem giving rise to a superconductivity analogous to superfluidity in /sup 4/He. The second one is due to a contact interaction between local pairs and pairs of wide-band electrons. This leads to a superconducting state involving both subsystems where the local pairs of the narrow-band subsystem induce Cooper pairing amongst the electrons of the wide-band subsystem. Consequently, the single-particle spectrum of the wide-band electrons opens up a gap around the position of the narrow band of electrons in pair states.

Robaszkiewicz, S.; Micnas, R.; Ranninger, J.

1987-07-01

292

Politicizing Young Adult Literature: Reading Anderson's "Speak" as a Critical Text.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers how critical texts confront difficult topics. Argues that students need to read, write, and talk about these relevant issues. Suggests that reading literature can be an ethical as well as an intellectual process, and as such it can assist adolescents in coping with their tumultuous lives. Focuses on Laurie Halse Anderson's novel "Speak."…

Alsup, Janet

2003-01-01

293

Nonperturbative spectral-density function for the Anderson model at arbitrary temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using a nonperturbative self-energy solution for the nondegenerate Anderson model, the temperature-dependent spectral-density function is calculated in the symmetric limit. The function is found to give reliable results for all values of the parameter u and inverse temperature beta.

Neal, Henry L.

1991-01-01

294

MD Anderson scientists discover marker to identify, attack breast cancer stem cells  

Cancer.gov

Breast cancer stem cells wear a cell surface protein that is part nametag and part bull’s eye, identifying them as potent tumor-generating cells and flagging their vulnerability to a drug, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report online in Journal of Clinical Investigation.

295

Hopping perturbation treatment of the periodic Anderson model around the atomic limit  

Microsoft Academic Search

The periodic Anderson model with two strongly correlated subsystems of d and f electrons and local on-site hybridization is investigated by considering the hopping of d electrons between lattice sites as perturbation. In zero order without the intersite transfer term, the system of correlated d and f electrons can be treated exactly. The delocalization of electrons and the corresponding renormalization

V. A. Moskalenko; P. Entel; M. Marinaro; N. B. Perkins; C. Holtfort

2001-01-01

296

The Possibility of Forming Coupled Pairs in the Periodic Anderson Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the generalized periodic Anderson model describing two groups of strongly correlated (d- and f-) electrons with local hybridization of states and d-electron hopping between lattice sites from the standpoint of the possible appearance of coupled electron pairs in it. The atomic limit of this model admits an exact solution based on the canonical transformation method. The renormalized energy

D. F. Digor; P. Entel; M. Marinaro; V. A. Moskalenko; N. B. Perkins

2001-01-01

297

M.D. Anderson study finds previously unconnected molecular networks conspire to promote cancer:  

Cancer.gov

An inflammation-promoting protein triggers deactivation of a tumor-suppressor that usually blocks cancer formation via the NOTCH signaling pathway, a team of researchers led by scientists at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center reports today in Molecular Cell.

298

Dystopian Visions of Global Capitalism: Philip Reeve's "Mortal Engines" and M.T Anderson's "Feed"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines Philip Reeve's novel for children, "Mortal Engines", and M.T. Anderson's young adult novel, "Feed", by assessing these dystopias as prototypical texts of what Ulrich Beck calls risk society. Through their visions of a fictional future, the two narratives explore the hazards created by contemporary techno-economic progress,…

Bullen, Elizabeth; Parsons, Elizabeth

2007-01-01

299

Conversations with Three Highly Productive Educational Psychologists: Richard Anderson, Richard Mayer, and Michael Pressley  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article seeks to answer the question, What factors characterize highly productive educational psychologists? Using qualitative research methods, we identified three top scholars in educational psychology—Richard Anderson, Richard Mayer, and Michael Pressley—and examined factors that influence their work. Although each scholar had a distinctive trademark characteristic, they had much in common. Each had an impressive lineage, gravitated to centers of

Kenneth A. Kiewra; John W. Creswell

2000-01-01

300

MD Anderson study finds gene therapy kills breast cancer stem cells, boosts chemotherapy:  

Cancer.gov

Gene therapy delivered directly to a particularly stubborn type of breast cancer cell causes the cells to self-destruct, lowers the chance of recurrence and helps increase the effectiveness of some types of chemotherapy, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported in the Sept. 13 edition of Cancer Cell.

301

MD Anderson study finds inflammatory mediator promotes colorectal cancer by stifling protective genes:  

Cancer.gov

Chronic inflammation combines with DNA methylation, a process that shuts down cancer-fighting genes, to promote development of colorectal cancer, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report today in the advance online publication of the journal Nature Medicine.

302

MD Anderson study finds tamoxifen causes significant side effects in male breast cancer patients:  

Cancer.gov

About half of male breast cancer patients who take the drug tamoxifen to prevent their disease from returning report side effects such as weight gain and sexual dysfunction, which prompts more than 20 percent of them to discontinue treatment, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

303

Absence of diffusion in the Anderson tight binding model for large disorder or low energy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We prove that the Green's function of the Anderson tight binding Hamiltonian decays exponentially fast at long distances on Zv, with probability 1. We must assume that either the disorder is large or the energy is sufficiently low. Our proof is based on perturbation theory about an infinite sequence of block Hamiltonians and is related to KAM methods.

Jürg Fröhlich; Thomas Spencer

1983-01-01

304

MD Anderson study finds that AML patients have high response rate with Vorinostat added to treatment  

Cancer.gov

Adding a drug that activates genes to frontline combination therapy for acute myeloid leukemia resulted in an 85 percent remission rate after initial treatment, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

305

MD Anderson study finds everolimus prolongs progression-free survival for patients with neuroendocrine tumors:  

Cancer.gov

Combination treatment with everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target rapamycin (mTOR), and octreotide has shown to improve progression-free survival for patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors and a history of carcinoid syndrome, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

306

MD Anderson-led preclinical research shows normal gene hinders breast cancer chemotherapy  

Cancer.gov

Presence of normal p53, a tumor suppressor gene, instead of a mutated version, makes breast cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin less effective. The preclinical study led by MD Anderson scientists was published today in the journal Cancer Cell. The research, which challenges the existing paradigm, is another step closer to personalized cancer medicine for breast cancer.

307

MD Anderson researchers find that chemotherapy is as effective before breast cancer surgery as after  

Cancer.gov

Whether chemotherapy is given before or after breast-conserving therapy does not have an impact on long-term local-regional outcomes, suggesting treatment success is due more to biologic factors than chemotherapy timing, according to a study by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

308

UT MD Anderson study finds metabolic protein plays unexpected role in tumor cell formation and growth:  

Cancer.gov

The embryonic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has a well-established role in metabolism and is highly expressed in human cancers. Now, a team led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in advance online publication of the journal Nature that PKM2 has important non-metabolic functions in cancer formation.

309

MD Anderson develops prognostic model for MDS related to prior cancer therapy  

Cancer.gov

A large-scale analysis of patients whose myelodysplastic syndrome is related to earlier cancer treatment overturns the notion that all of them have a poor prognosis, researchers from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

310

On Planetary Evolution and the Evolution of Planetary Science During the Career of Don Anderson  

Microsoft Academic Search

The planets of our solar system have long been viewed by Don Anderson as laboratories for testing general aspects of planetary evolution and as points of comparison to the Earth. I was fortunate to have been a student 39 years ago in a course at Caltech that Don taught with Bob Kovach on the interiors of the Earth and the

S. C. Solomon

2003-01-01

311

MD Anderson study identifies novel therapeutic targets for small cell lung cancer  

Cancer.gov

Newly discovered molecular differences between small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer have revealed PARP1 and EZH2 as potential therapeutic targets for patients with small cell lung cancer, according to the results of a University of Texas MD Anderson study published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

312

MD Anderson study finds ovarian cancer patients survive longer with BRCA2 mutated in tumors:  

Cancer.gov

Women with high-grade ovarian cancer live longer and respond better to platinum-based chemotherapy when their tumors have BRCA2 genetic mutations, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Institute for Systems Biology report in the Oct. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

313

MD Anderson-led study finds two targeted therapies act against Ewing's sarcoma tumors  

Cancer.gov

A pair of targeted therapies shrank tumors in some patients with treatment-resistant Ewing's sarcoma or desmoplastic small-round-cell tumors, according to research led by investigators from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2012.

314

Anderson's disease/chylomicron retention disease in a Japanese patient with uniparental disomy 7 and a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence  

PubMed Central

Background Anderson's Disease (AD)/Chylomicron Retention Disease (CMRD) is a rare hereditary hypocholesterolemic disorder characterized by a malabsorption syndrome with steatorrhea, failure to thrive and the absence of chylomicrons and apolipoprotein B48 post-prandially. All patients studied to date exhibit a mutation in the SAR1B gene, which codes for an essential component of the vesicular coat protein complex II (COPII) necessary for endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. We describe here a patient with AD/CMRD, a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence and maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7). Methods and Results The patient, one of two siblings of a Japanese family, had diarrhea and steatorrhea beginning at five months of age. There was a white duodenal mucosa upon endoscopy. Light and electron microscopy showed that the intestinal villi were normal but that they had lipid laden enterocytes containing accumulations of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm and lipoprotein-size particles in membrane bound structures. Although there were decreased amounts in plasma of total- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoproteins AI and B and vitamin E levels, the triglycerides were normal, typical of AD/CMRD. The presence of low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein B in the plasma, although in decreased amounts, ruled out abetalipoproteinemia. The parents were asymptomatic with normal plasma cholesterol levels suggesting a recessive disorder and ruling out familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. Sequencing of genomic DNA showed that the 8 exons of the SAR1B gene were normal. Whole genome SNP analysis and karyotyping revealed matUPD7 with a normal karyotype. In contrast to other cases of AD/CMRD which have shown catch-up growth following vitamin supplementation and a fat restricted diet, our patient exhibits continued growth delay and other aspects of the matUPD7 and Silver-Russell Syndrome phenotypes. Conclusions This patient with AD/CMRD has a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence which suggests that factors other than the SAR1B protein may be crucial for chylomicron secretion. Further, this patient exhibits matUPD7 with regions of homozygosity which might be useful for elucidating the molecular basis of the defect(s) in this individual. The results provide novel insights into the relation between phenotype and genotype in these diseases and for the mechanisms of secretion in the intestine.

2011-01-01

315

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 7H (HUNTTH0001007H) on Town Highway 1, crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.20-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream of the bridge. Downstream of the bridge is brushland and pasture. In the study area, the Cobb Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 65.5 mm (0.215 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 24, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Cobb Brook is a 23-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 20-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, June 21, 1996). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 2.8 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. Protection measures at the site include type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream right wingwall, type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream right wingwall and the downstream end of the downstream left wingwall, and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.2 to 1.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 4.0 to 8.7 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 10. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson a

Wild, Emily C.

1997-01-01

316

Characterization of MHC class II B polymorphism in bottlenecked New Zealand saddlebacks reveals low levels of genetic diversity.  

PubMed

The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is integral to the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Characterizing diversity at functional MHC genes is invaluable for elucidating patterns of adaptive variation in wild populations, and is particularly interesting in species of conservation concern, which may suffer from reduced genetic diversity and compromised disease resilience. Here, we use next generation sequencing to investigate MHC class II B (MHCIIB) diversity in two sister taxa of New Zealand birds: South Island saddleback (SIS), Philesturnus carunculatus, and North Island saddleback (NIS), Philesturnus rufusater. These two species represent a passerine family outside the more extensively studied Passerida infraorder, and both have experienced historic bottlenecks. We examined exon 2 sequence data from populations that represent the majority of genetic diversity remaining in each species. A high level of locus co-amplification was detected, with from 1 to 4 and 3 to 12 putative alleles per individual for South and North Island birds, respectively. We found strong evidence for historic balancing selection in peptide-binding regions of putative alleles, and we identified a cluster combining non-classical loci and pseudogene sequences from both species, although no sequences were shared between the species. Fewer total alleles and fewer alleles per bird in SIS may be a consequence of their more severe bottleneck history; however, overall nucleotide diversity was similar between the species. Our characterization of MHCIIB diversity in two closely related species of New Zealand saddlebacks provides an important step in understanding the mechanisms shaping MHC diversity in wild, bottlenecked populations. PMID:23686447

Sutton, Jolene T; Robertson, Bruce C; Grueber, Catherine E; Stanton, Jo-Ann L; Jamieson, Ian G

2013-08-01

317

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

Meuleman, G. Allyn

1987-06-01

318

Calculation of the lifetimes of predissociative levels of the c 3II u state in H 2, HD and D 2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Calculations are made of the lifetimes for the allowed predissociation of the II + levels of the c 3II u state of H 2, HD and D 2. The theoretical potential curves of Kolos et al. and the matrix elements given by Kovacs are used for the calculation of the rotational coupling between the c 3II u and the b 3? u+ state. The calculated lifetime for the lowest level of H 2 (? = 0, N = 1) is 6.38 ns, which is in good agreement with the experimental result of de Bruijn et al. From this a new value for the accuracy of the relative positions along the internuclear axis of the theoretical b- and c-state potential curves of 0.005 aois deduced.

Comtet, G.; De Bruijn, D. P.

1985-04-01

319

Experimental evidence of coupling between sheared-flow development and an increase in the level of turbulence in the TJ-II stellarator  

Microsoft Academic Search

The link between the development of sheared flows and the structure of turbulence has been investigated in the plasma boundary region of the TJ-II stellarator. The development of the naturally occurring velocity shear layer requires a minimum plasma density. Near this critical density, the level of edge turbulent transport and the turbulent kinetic energy significantly increases in the plasma edge.

C. Hidalgo; M. A. Pedrosa; L. García; A. Ware

2004-01-01

320

Synthesis of highly fluorescent water-soluble silver nanoparticles for selective detection of Pb(II) at the parts per quadrillion (PPQ) level.  

PubMed

This communication reports for the first time the synthesis of water-soluble glutathione protected highly fluorescence (? = 0.18) silver nanoparticles for the selective and highly sensitive sensing of Pb(ii) at the parts per quadrillion (PPQ) level. PMID:22858581

Singh, Anant Kumar; Kanchanapally, Rajashekhar; Fan, Zhen; Senapati, Dulal; Ray, Paresh Chandra

2012-09-18

321

Telomerase Rescues the Expression Levels of Keratinocyte Growth Factor and Insulin-like Growth Factor-II in Senescent Human Fibroblasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in expression levels of various cytokines, growth factors, and related genes were examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in a normal human fibroblast cell strain, TIG-3, along with in vitro aging. The expression levels of KGF and IGF-II were decreased with proliferative aging but not by growth arrest of young cells. In telomere-elongated cells prepared by transfection with

Yukari Kanzaki; Fumikazu Onoue; Fuyuki Ishikawa; Toshinori Ide

2002-01-01

322

Energy-Level and Wave-Function Statistics in the Anderson Model of Localization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Universal aspects of correlations in the spectra and wave functions of closed, complex quantum systems can be described by\\u000a random-matrix theory (RMT) [1]. On small energy scales, for example, the eigenvalues, eigenfunctions and matrix elements of\\u000a disordered quantum systems in the metallic regime [2] or those of classically chaotic quantum systems [3] exhibit universal\\u000a statistical properties very well described by

Bernhard Mehlig; Michael Schreiber

323

Vitamin K1 levels and K1-dependent coagulation factors II and X in preterm and small-for-date neonates.  

PubMed

In 17 preterm neonates and 7 small-for-date neonates, all formula-fed, vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors II and X remained near 45% of adult values from the moment of birth until 28 days postnatally. Vitamin K1 levels, however, showed a remarkable rise from below the detection limit of 0.022 ng/ml in umbilical cord blood, to serum levels with a range of 0.99-7.29 ng/ml vitamin K1 on day 3, with a further rise on days 7 and 28 postnatally. Vitamin K1 (Konakion) parenterally given to a third group of four preterm neonates as a 1 mg dose resulted in very high serum levels of vitamin K1 (64.08-157.10 ng/ml), but without any significant increase in plasma levels of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors II and X, compared to the group without any extra vitamin K1. It is concluded that in healthy preterm and small-for-date neonates no correlation is seen between serum levels of vitamin K1 and plasma levels of coagulation factors II and X. After administration of 1 mg Konakion no accelerated increase is seen in coagulation factor activities. PMID:2373117

Pietersma-de Bruyn, A L; van der Straaten, P J; van Haard, P M; Kuijpers, J C; Hamulyák, K; Ruys, J H

1990-06-01

324

Association Between Combined Interleukin-6 and C-Reactive Protein Levels and Pulmonary Function in Older Women: Results from the Women's Health and Aging Studies I and II  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES To determine whether combined higher interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are associated with lower pulmonary function levels in older women, accounting for chronic inflammatory diseases, physical function, and other factors associated with inflammation. DESIGN Cross-sectional study using data from two prospective cohorts. SETTING Baltimore, Maryland. PARTICIPANTS Eight hundred forty disabled and 332 higher-functioning community-dwelling women aged 65 and older from the Women’s Health and Aging Studies (WHAS) I and II, respectively. MEASUREMENTS IL-6 and CRP, combined according to their tertile concentrations, and pulmonary function measures, assessed according to forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC). RESULTS In WHAS I and II, similar dose-response trends were observed between combined higher IL-6 and CRP levels and lower pulmonary function levels. In WHAS I (disabled women), the combined highest IL-6 and CRP levels were associated with the lowest levels of FEV1 (mean 137.0 mL, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 128.4–145.7 mL) and FVC (mean 191.7 mL, 95% CI = 180.4–202.9 mL). Similarly, in WHAS II (higher-functioning women), the combined highest IL-6 and CRP levels were associated with the lowest levels of FEV1 (mean 158.3 mL, 95% CI = 146.3–170.4 mL) and FVC (mean 224.2 mL, 95% CI = 209.9–238.5 mL). CONCLUSION Combined elevations in IL-6 and CRP were associated with the lowest pulmonary function levels in older women. These findings suggest that high IL-6 and CRP levels may be an indication of prevalent impaired pulmonary function. Future studies should determine whether measurement of IL-6 and CRP could enhance current methods of monitoring respiratory diseases beyond that provided by pulmonary function measures.

Chang, Sandy S.; Fragoso, Carlos A. Vaz; Van Ness, Peter H.; Fried, Linda P.; Tinetti, Mary E.

2014-01-01

325

A general ocean color atmospheric correction scheme based on principal components analysis: Part II. Level 4 merging capabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ocean Color Estimation by principal component ANalysis (OCEAN) algorithm performs atmospheric correction of satellite ocean-color imagery in the presence of various aerosol contents and types, including absorbing mixtures, and for the full range of water properties (Case 1 and Case 2 waters), retrieving diffuse water reflectance with good theoretical accuracy. It is easy to implement and has several advantages for operational processing lines: (1) It has de-noising abilities, for it is based on principal component analysis and neural networks, (2) it is able to perform atmospheric correction through cirrus and thin clouds, (3) it is able to retrieve water reflectance in the presence of Sun glint until a glint reflectance of 0.2, and more importantly, (4) it is less sensitive to absolute radiometric calibration and directionality than classical ocean-color algorithms. This allows multi-sensor merging (denoted hereafter Level 4 synthesis). These abilities may improve dramatically the daily spatial coverage of ocean color products. In the companion paper (Part I), the theoretical performance of OCEAN in situations of both Case 1 and Case 2 waters is presented for various multispectral radiometers (i.e., POLDER, SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS). In this paper (Part II), the focus is made on OCEAN de-noising and merging properties. The ability of the algorithm to work in situations of Sun glint and cirrus/thin clouds is illustrated using MERIS imagery. Multi-directional merging is demonstrated using POLDER imagery (daily and temporal merging), and multi-sensor merging using SeaWiFS and MODIS imagery (daily merging). The resulting products do not show directional artifacts.

Gross-Colzy, Lydwine; Colzy, Stéphane; Frouin, Robert; Henry, Patrice

2007-10-01

326

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 12 (FFIETH00030012) on Town Highway 3, crossing the Fairfield River, Fairfield, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

downstream left bank. The type-2 stone fill on the left bank downstream changes to type-1 about 55 feet downstream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.6 to 3.0 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 3.2 to 4.0 ft. at the left abutment and 9.7 to 11.7 feet at the right abutment. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the incipient over-topping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a hom

Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

1997-01-01

327

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (WFIETH00170010) on Town Highway 17, crossing Taft Brook, Westfield, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the ends of each wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 0.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour at the left abutment ranged from 6.1 to 7.7 ft. Abutment scour at the right abutment ranged from 4.3 to 5.4 ft.The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for both abutments. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour)

Olson, Scott A.

1997-01-01

328

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 1 (BLOOTH00020001) on Town Highway 2, crossing Mill Brook, Bloomfield, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term aggradation or degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to reduction in flow area caused by a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute scour depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0 to 1.0 feet and the worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 7.3 to 10.1 feet and the worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

Ayotte, Joseph D.; Medalie, Laura

1996-01-01

329

Critical level statistics for weakly disordered graphene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In two dimensions chaotic level statistics with the Wigner spacing distribution P(S) is expected for massless fermions in the Dirac region. The obtained P(S) for weakly disordered finite graphene samples with zigzag edges turns out, however, to be neither chaotic (Wigner) nor localized (Poisson). It is similar to the intermediate statistics at the critical point of the Anderson metal-insulator transition. The quantum transport of finite graphene for weak disorder, with critical level statistics can occur via edge states as in topological insulators, and for strong disorder, graphene behaves as an ordinary Anderson insulator with Poisson statistics.

Amanatidis, E.; Kleftogiannis, I.; Katsanos, D. E.; Evangelou, S. N.

2014-04-01

330

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 45 (CHELTH00440045) on Town Highway 44, crossing first Branch White River, Chelsea, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

bridge consisting of one 27-foot clear-span concrete-encased steel beam deck superstructure (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 5 degrees. Both abutment footings were reported as exposed and the left abutment was reported to be undermined by 0.5 ft at the time of the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left abutment which was reported as failed. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.4 to 5.1 ft. with the worst-case occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 9.9 to 20.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly ass

Ayotte, Joseph D.; Hammond, Robert E.

1996-01-01

331

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 39 (LOWETH00080039) on Town Highway 8, crossing Potter Brook, Lowell, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A scour hole 2.0 feet deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. There were no scour protection measures evident at the site. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 1.8 to 5.5 feet. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT m

Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

1997-01-01

332

Theoretical lifetimes and Land{acute e} g values of CsthinspII 5p{sup 5}thinsp6p levels  

SciTech Connect

Lifetimes of CsthinspII 5p{sup 5}thinsp6p levels, oscillator strengths to the lower 5p{sup 5}thinsp5d and 5p{sup 5}thinsp6s levels, Land{acute e} g factors and LS compositions of all these levels are presented. Results are in very good agreement with most available experiment. Large correlation effects are associated with those 5p{sup 5}thinsp5d and 5p{sup 5}thinsp6s states, which strongly interact. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Beck, D.R. [Physics Department, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States)] [Physics Department, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States)

1998-06-01

333

NX-PVKA levels before and after hepatectomy of hepatocellular carcinoma as predictors of patient survival: a preliminary evaluation of an improved assay for PIVKA-II.  

PubMed

Although the protein-induced vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) is used as a prognostic marker in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a newly-improved assay, NX-PVKA (PIVKA-II measured using P-11 and P-16 antibodies) and NX-PVKA-R (ratio of PIVKA-II and NX-PVKA), are more accurate markers of PIVKA-II. We conducted a prospectively preliminary analysis of the relationship between NX-PVKA-R and clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in 22 patients with HCC who underwent hepatectomy and measured changes of this marker's levels after treatment. Median value of PIVKA-II (80 mAU/ml), NX-PVKA (60 mAU/ml), NX-PVKA-R (1.5) and NX-PVKA-D (difference of markers, 15 mAU/ml) were determined. Tumor relapse was observed in six patients, and the one year relapse-free survival rate was 88%. Correlation between PIVKA-II or alpha-fetoprotein levels and NX-PVKA, NX-PVKA-R or -D levels was significant (p<0.001). NX-PVKA-R was significantly correlated with tumor size (p<0.05). In patients who underwent pre-treatment before hepatectomy, PIVKA-II, NX-PVKA and NX-PVKA-R tended to be higher than in patients without pre-treatment, but this difference was not significant (p>0.10). For macroscopic findings, NX-PVKA-R for the confluent-nodular type was significantly higher than that for the simple-nodular type (p<0.05). The tumor-free survival rate in the group with a high NX-PVKA-R was significantly lower than that in the group with a low NX-PVKA-R group (p<0.05). In patients with tumor recurrence, postoperative NX-PVKA-R increased again. We conclude that a high value of NX-PVKA-R after hepatectomy for HCC reflects malignant potential and predicts early recurrence in patients with HCC. PMID:23749928

Nanashima, Atsushi; Abo, Takafumi; Taura, Naota; Shibata, Hideki; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Takagi, Katsunori; Arai, Junichi; Oyama, Shousaburou; Nagayasu, Takeshi

2013-06-01

334

March 17 - 19, 2004: Low-level processing of proteomics spectra, Kevin Coombes  

Cancer.gov

Low-level processing of proteomics spectra Kevin Coombes Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics UT M.D.Anderson Cancer Center Overview z Background and motivation z Description of data set for methodology development and testing z Wavelet

335

The inducement of meaningful work: a response to Anderson and Weijer.  

PubMed

James A. Anderson and Charles Weijer take the wage payment model proposed by Neil Dickert and Christine Grady and extend the analogy of research participation to unskilled wage labor to include just working conditions. Although noble in its intentions, this moral extension generates unsavory outcomes. Most notably, Anderson and Weijer distinguish between two types of research subjects: occasional and professional. The latter, in this case, receives benefits beyond the moral minima in the form of "the right to meaningful work." The problem is that meaningful work can itself be a form of inducement, and consequently, may in fact increase the incidence of inducement contrary to the intentions of the wage payment model. PMID:16245007

McEachern, Terrence P

2005-01-01

336

Mott-Anderson transition in disordered charge-transfer model: Insights from typical medium theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mott-Anderson transition in the disordered charge-transfer model displays several new features in comparison to what is found in the disordered single-band Hubbard model, as recently demonstrated by large-scale computational (statistical dynamical mean-field theory) studies. Here we show that a much simpler typical medium theory approach (TMT-DMFT) to the same model is able to capture most qualitative and even quantitative aspects of the phase diagram, the emergence of an intermediate electronic Griffiths phase, and the critical behavior close to the metal-insulator transition. The conceptual and mathematical simplicity of the TMT-DMFT formulation thus makes it possible to gain useful new insight into the mechanism of the Mott-Anderson transition in these models.

Oliveira, W. S.; Aguiar, M. C. O.; Dobrosavljevi?, V.

2014-04-01

337

77 FR 72906 - Chessie Logistics Co., LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FD 35700] Chessie Logistics Co., LLC--Acquisition and...Anderson & Son, Inc. Chessie Logistics Co., LLC (Chessie), a noncarrier...Erbacher, Legal Counsel, Chessie Logistics Co., LLC, 1001 Green Bay Rd., Unit 204,...

2012-12-06

338

Increased levels of apo-transcobalamins I and II in amniotic fluid from pregnant women with previous neural tube defect offspring.  

PubMed

In an attempt to identify biochemical components of the genetic predisposition to neural tube defects (NTDs), levels of folate, cobalamin, apo-transcobalamins I and II and alpha-fetoprotein were studied in midtrimester amniotic fluid from 24 pregnant women who had previously had a child with NTD. The control group consisted of 76 mothers, subjected to amniocentesis for reasons other than risk of NTD in offspring. Only pregnancies with normal outcome were included. No differences were found between groups for levels of folate, cobalamin or alpha-fetoprotein. Folate intake or metabolism did not appear to differ between groups. In contrast, the level of apo-transcobalamin I was doubled and the level of apo-transcobalamin II tripled in amniotic fluid from women who had had a child with NTD compared with the control group. Since the variation in apo-transcobalamin II in adults is to a high degree genetically determined, the present results may suggest that the genetic predisposition to NTD is associated with variation in this protein. Further studies are needed to substantiate or reject this possibility. PMID:2430743

Magnus, P; Magnus, E M; Berg, K

1986-09-01

339

Underscreened Kondo lattice model versus underscreened Anderson lattice model: Application to uranium compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present here two theoretical models, the underscreened Kondo lattice (UKL) model and the underscreened Anderson lattice (UAL) model, which are appropriate models for a description of the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order experimentally observed in various uranium compounds. First we discuss a Kondo-ferromagnetic diagram (KFD), obtained in the framework of the UKL model with S=1 [N.B. Perkins,

B. Coqblin; J. R. Iglesias; N. B. Perkins; Acirete S. Da R. Simoes; Christopher Thomas

2009-01-01

340

The Anderson localization problem, the Fermi–Pasta–Ulam paradox and the generalized diffusion approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this paper is twofold. First, based on the interpretation of a quantum tight-binding model in terms of a classical Hamiltonian map, we consider the Anderson localization (AL) problem as the Fermi–Pasta–Ulam (FPU) effect in a modified dynamical system containing both stable and unstable (inverted) modes. Delocalized states in the AL are analogous to the stable quasi-periodic motion

V N Kuzovkov

2011-01-01

341

The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam paradox, Anderson Localization problem and the generalized diffusion approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this paper is two-fold. First, based on the interpretation of a quantum tight-binding model in terms of a classical Hamiltonian map, we consider the Anderson localization (AL) problem as the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) effect in a modified dynamical system containing both stable and unstable (inverted) modes. Delocalized states in the AL are analogous to the stable quasi-periodic motion

V. N. Kuzovkov

2008-01-01

342

On Mott's formula for the ac-conductivity in the Anderson model  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the ac-conductivity in linear response theory in the general framework of ergodic magnetic Schrodinger operators. For the Anderson model, if the Fermi energy lies in the localization regime, we prove that the ac-conductivity is bounded by C?2(log 1 ?) d+2 at small frequencies ?. This is to be compared to Mott's formula, which predicts the leading term to

Abel Klein; Olivier Lenoble; Peter M

2006-01-01

343

Greek M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory: Validation and Utility in Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) is a brief assessment of the severity and impact of cancer-related symptoms. The purpose of this study was the translation and validation of the questionnaire in Greek (G-MDASI). Methods: The translation and validation of the assessment took place at a Pain Relief and Palliative Care Unit. The final validation sample included 150 cancer

Kyriaki Mystakidou; Charles Cleeland; Eleni Tsilika; Emmanuela Katsouda; Aphrodite Primikiri; Efi Parpa; Lambros Vlahos; Tito Mendoza

2004-01-01

344

Ferromagnetic instability in a mean-field slave-boson approach for the Anderson lattice  

SciTech Connect

We consider a stoichiometric metallic Anderson lattice with orbital degeneracy in the [ital U][r arrow][infinity] limit. A Gutzwiller type of mean-field approximation is formulated in terms of three slave bosons per site in analogy to Kotliar and Ruckenstein's approach for the Hubbard model. In the orbitally nondegenerate case the paramagnetic solution becomes unstable towards ferromagnetism if the valence is smaller than a critical one. This instability is suppressed with increasing orbital degeneracy.

Dorin, V.; Schlottmann, P. (Department of Physics and Center for Materials Research and Technology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States))

1993-05-15

345

MD Anderson study shows new approach connecting smokers to quit lines increases smoking cessation treatment enrollment  

Cancer.gov

Self-identified smokers directly connected to a tobacco cessation quit line are 13 times more likely to enroll in a treatment program as compared to smokers who are handed a quit line referral card and encouraged to call on their own, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and published online in JAMA Internal Medicine.

346

Many electron variational ground state of the two dimensional Anderson lattice  

SciTech Connect

A variational upper bound of the ground state energy of two dimensional finite Anderson lattices is determined as a function of lattice size (up to 16 x 16). Two different sets of many-electron basis vectors are used to determine the ground state for all values of the coulomb integral U. This variational scheme has been successfully tested for one dimensional models and should give good estimates in two dimensions.

Zhou, Y.; Bowen, S.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials Science Div.; Mancini, J.D. [Fordham Univ., Bronx, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

1991-02-01

347

Observation of Migrating Transverse Anderson Localizations of Light in Nonlocal Media  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the experimental observation of the interaction and attraction of many localized modes in a two-dimensional system realized by a disordered optical fiber supporting transverse Anderson localization. We show that a nonlocal optically nonlinear response of thermal origin alters the localization length by an amount determined by the optical power and also induces an action at a distance between the localized modes and their spatial migration. Evidence of a collective and strongly interacting regime is given.

Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

2014-05-01

348

Observation of migrating transverse anderson localizations of light in nonlocal media.  

PubMed

We report the experimental observation of the interaction and attraction of many localized modes in a two-dimensional system realized by a disordered optical fiber supporting transverse Anderson localization. We show that a nonlocal optically nonlinear response of thermal origin alters the localization length by an amount determined by the optical power and also induces an action at a distance between the localized modes and their spatial migration. Evidence of a collective and strongly interacting regime is given. PMID:24877941

Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

2014-05-16

349

The relativistic Burnett equations from a moment closure of the Anderson and Witting model equation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Burnett constitutive equations for the dynamic pressure, heat flux and pressure deviator of a relativistic gas are calculated from a moment closure of the Anderson and Witting model equation. The transport coefficients obtained are compared with those that follow by the use of the full Boltzmann equation. The comparison shows that all transport coefficients have the same behavior in the ultra-relativistic and in the relativistic regime up to ?= mc2/( kT)?0.5.

Samojeden, L. L.; Kremer, G. M.

2002-05-01

350

Variational theory of valence fluctuations: Ground states and quasiparticle excitations of the Anderson lattice model  

SciTech Connect

A variational study of ground states of the orbitally nondegenerate Anderson lattice model, using a wave function with one variational parameter per Bloch state k, has been extended to deal with essentially metallic systems having a nonintegral number of electrons per site. Quasiparticle excitations are obtained by direct appeal to Landau's original definition for interacting Fermi liquids, scrE/sub qp/(k,sigma) = deltaE/sub total//deltan qp(k,sigma).

Brandow, B.H.

1986-01-01

351

MD Anderson study finds qigong improves quality of life for breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy  

Cancer.gov

Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found qigong, an ancient mind-body practice, reduces depressive symptoms and improves quality of life in women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. The study, published in the journal Cancer, is the first to examine qigong in patients actively receiving radiation therapy and includes a follow-up period to assess benefits over time.

352

Central nervous system involvement in Anderson-Fabry disease: a clinical and MRI retrospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. Central nervous system (CNS) manifestations consist mainly of cerebrovascular events. Brain MRI results are often abnormal. Purpose: The aim of the study was to describe CNS involvement in a group of Italian patients with AFD. Methods: Clinical and brain MRI data of 43 patients

S Buechner; M Moretti; A P Burlina; G Cei; R Manara; R Ricci; R Mignani; R Parini; R Di Vito; G P Giordano; P Simonelli; G Siciliano; W Borsini

2008-01-01

353

Anderson-Fabry disease with cerebrovascular complications in two Italian families  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   We describe four patients with cerebrovascular complications from two unrelated Italian families with Anderson-Fabry disease.\\u000a Clinical examination, neuroimaging (MRI), biochemical and genetic analyses were carried out in all the patients. ?-Galactosidase\\u000a A activity was detected by fluorimetric assay and genetic analysis was performed by DNA sequencing. Family 1. A male patient presented recurrent strokes when he was 34 years

W. Borsini; G. Giuliacci; F. Torricelli; E. Pelo; F. Martinelli; M. R. Scordo

2002-01-01

354

Hydrothermal synthesis of two Anderson POM-supported transition metal organic-inorganic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two isostructural compounds based on Anderson polyoxoanions, [Cu(phen)] 2[CrMo 6H 5O 24] ( 1) and [Cu(phen)] 2[AlMo 6H 5O 24] ( 2) (phen = 1,10-phenaanthroline), have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by IR, XPS, EPR spectra, TG analyses, magnetic susceptibility, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compounds crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/ n with a = 5.66710(10) Å, b = 21.3723(5) Å, c = 14.7092(3) Å, ? = 98.10(10)°, V = 1763.79(6) Å 3, R1 = 0.0240, Z = 2 and GOF = 1.140 for 1, and in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/ n with a = 5.6641(3) Å, b = 21.3346(13) Å, c = 14.6909(9) Å, ? = 97.9120(10)°, V = 1758.37(18) Å 3, R1 = 0.0529, Z = 2 and GOF = 0.0994 for 2. Single crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that the compounds 1 and 2 are both built up of Anderson polyoxoanions and copper-phen complexes. The structural feature of 1 and 2 is that the Anderson polyoxoanions act as multidentate ligands linking copper-phen complex to form 1D chains. Compounds 1 and 2 not only represent new Anderson-type POM-supported transition metal organic-inorganic hybrid compounds with extend structure, but also verify the feasibility of constructing these compounds through hydrothermal methods.

Ma, Hui-yuan; Wu, Li-zhou; Pang, Hai-jun; Meng, Xin; Peng, Jun

2010-04-01

355

Density Matrix Renormalization Group Study of the One-Dimensional Anderson Lattice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the ground state and low energy excitations of the one-dimensional Anderson lattice using the density matrix renormalization group technique. We first look at the half-filled case, with the purpose of modeling Kondo insulators. We calculate the charge gap, spin gap and quasiparticle gap as a function of the repulsive interaction U using open boundary conditions for lattices as large as 24 sites. We find that the charge gap is larger than the spin gap for all U for both the symmetric and asymmetric cases. RKKY interactions are evident in the f-spin-f-spin correlation functions at large U in the symmetric case, but are suppressed in the asymmetric case as the f-level approaches the Fermi energy. This suppression can also be seen in the staggered susceptibility chi(q=2k _{f}), and it is consistent with neutron scattering measurements of chi(q) in CeNiSn. We investigate the effect of a small dispersion in the f-band. We find that in the strong coupling limit the quasiparticle gap remains almost unaffected by the hopping of the f-electrons. However, the spin gap is strongly suppressed. We also consider the system away from half-filling (metallic case). We map out the phase diagram by studying the ground state magnetization as a function of band filling using the density matrix renormalization group technique. For strong coupling, we find that the quarter-filled system has an S=0 ground state with strong antiferromagnetic correlations. As additional electrons are added, we find first a ferromagnetic phase, as reported by Moller and Wolfle, and then a phase in which the ground state has total spin S = 0. Within this S = 0 phase, we find RKKY oscillations in the spin-spin correlation functions. In addition, we study the case of a magnetic impurity in a semiconducting host. We compare the behavior of this system with the case of an impurity in a metal.

Guerrero, Mariana

1995-01-01

356

Approximation of modified Anderson-Darling test statistics for extreme value distributions with unknown shape parameter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies of the goodness-of-fit test, which describes how well a model fits a set of observations with an assumed distribution, have long been the subject of statistical research. The selection of an appropriate probability distribution is generally based on goodness-of-fit tests. This test is an effective means of examining how well a sample data set agrees with an assumed probability distribution that represents its population. However, the empirical distribution function test gives equal weight to the differences between the empirical and theoretical distribution functions corresponding to all observations. The modified Anderson-Darling test, suggested by Ahmad et al. (1988), uses a weight function that emphasizes the tail deviations at the upper or lower tails. In this study, we derive new regression equation forms of the critical values for the modified Anderson-Darling test statistics considering the effect of unknown shape parameters. The regression equations are derived using simulation experiments for extreme value distributions such as the log-Gumbel, generalized Pareto, GEV, and generalized logistic models. In addition, power test and at-site frequency analyses are performed to evaluate the performance and to explain the applicability of the modified Anderson-Darling test.

Heo, Jun-Haeng; Shin, Hongjoon; Nam, Woosung; Om, Juseong; Jeong, Changsam

2013-08-01

357

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (BRIDTH00050046) on Town Highway 05, crossing North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

bridge consisting of a 34-ft steel-beam span, supported by vertical abutments with no wingwalls (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The left abutment is stone; the right abutment is log cribwork with type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along its base. Type-2 stone fill has also been placed on the upstream and downstream sides of the road embankments, except the upstream left which has type-3 (less than 48 inches diameter). The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees; the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of these computed results follow. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 5.7 ft to 7.7 ft. with the worst-case abutment scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the computed scour at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 22). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

358

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BETHTH00190035) on Town Highway 19, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream wingwalls, left abutment, and upstream right road embankment; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is at the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 2.1 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 3.9 to 9.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

359

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 4 (ARLITH00010004) on Town Highway 1, crossing Warm Brook, Arlington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

channel in the upstream reach within 30 ft of the bridge. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left bank approach to the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.3 to 11.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTA

Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

1997-01-01

360

Multifractality and quantum-to-classical crossover in the Coulomb anomaly at the Mott-Anderson metal-insulator transition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the interaction-driven localization transition, which a recent experiment (Richardella et al 2010 Science 327 665) in Ga1-xMnxAs has shown to come along with the multifractal behavior of the local density of states (LDoS) and the intriguing persistence of critical correlations close to the Fermi level. We show that the bulk of these phenomena can be understood within a Hartree-Fock (HF) treatment of disordered, Coulomb-interacting spinless fermions. A scaling analysis of the LDoS correlation demonstrates multifractality with the correlation dimension d2 ? 1.57, which is significantly larger than at a non-interacting Anderson transition and is compatible with the experimental value dexp2 = 1.8 ± 0.3. At the interaction-driven transition, the states at the Fermi level become critical, while the bulk of the spectrum remains delocalized up to substantially stronger interactions. The mobility edge stays close to the Fermi energy in a wide range of disorder strength, as the interaction strength is further increased. The localization transition is concomitant with the quantum-to-classical crossover in the shape of the pseudo-gap in the tunneling density of states, and with the proliferation of metastable HF solutions that suggest the onset of a glassy regime with poor screening properties.

Amini, M.; Kravtsov, V. E.; Müller, M.

2014-01-01

361

Telomerase rescues the expression levels of keratinocyte growth factor and insulin-like growth factor-II in senescent human fibroblasts.  

PubMed

Changes in expression levels of various cytokines, growth factors, and related genes were examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in a normal human fibroblast cell strain, TIG-3, along with in vitro aging. The expression levels of KGF and IGF-II were decreased with proliferative aging but not by growth arrest of young cells. In telomere-elongated cells prepared by transfection with human telomerase reverse transcriptase cDNA, high expression levels of these two genes were maintained, suggesting a causal relation between telomere shortening and reduced expression of KGF and IGF-II. The expression level of HGF was high in both growing and growth-arrested young cells but low in both senescent and telomere-elongated cells. The expression levels of follistatin and HB-EGF were high in both young growing and telomere-elongated cells but low in both senescent and growth-arrested young cells, indicating a growth-dependent expression. Expression levels of FGF-1, FGF-2, VEGF, BMP-3, and amphiregulin did not change with proliferative aging, growth arrest of young cells, or telomere elongation and life-span extension. PMID:12243757

Kanzaki, Yukari; Onoue, Fumikazu; Ishikawa, Fuyuki; Ide, Toshinori

2002-10-01

362

Separation of Radionuclides of Silver and Antimony from Low?Level Liquid Waste of Research Reactor by Using Iron(II) Hydrous Oxide Coprecipitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

After upgrading the Pakistan Research Reactor?1 from 5 MW (Th) to 10 MW (Th), increased inventory of Ag and Sb in the waste stream demanded some sort of treatment to bring the radioactivity levels within the disposal limits. A chemical treatment, making use of scavenging precipitation of the radionuclides with hydrous oxides of iron, was studied. Fe(II) hydrous oxide coprecipitation by using

Farooq Jan; M. Aslam; S. D. Orfi; M. Hussain

2005-01-01

363

An assessment of global and regional sea level for years 1993-2007 in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We provide an assessment of sea level simulated in a suite of global ocean-sea ice models using the interannual CORE atmospheric state to determine surface ocean boundary buoyancy and momentum fluxes. These CORE-II simulations are compared amongst themselves as well as to observation-based estimates. We focus on the final 15 years of the simulations (1993-2007), as this is a period where the CORE-II atmospheric state is well sampled, and it allows us to compare sea level related fields to both satellite and in situ analyses. The ensemble mean of the CORE-II simulations broadly agree with various global and regional observation-based analyses during this period, though with the global mean thermosteric sea level rise biased low relative to observation-based analyses. The simulations reveal a positive trend in dynamic sea level in the west Pacific and negative trend in the east, with this trend arising from wind shifts and regional changes in upper 700 m ocean heat content. The models also exhibit a thermosteric sea level rise in the subpolar North Atlantic associated with a transition around 1995/1996 of the North Atlantic Oscillation to its negative phase, and the advection of warm subtropical waters into the subpolar gyre. Sea level trends are predominantly associated with steric trends, with thermosteric effects generally far larger than halosteric effects, except in the Arctic and North Atlantic. There is a general anti-correlation between thermosteric and halosteric effects for much of the World Ocean, associated with density compensated changes.

Griffies, Stephen M.; Yin, Jianjun; Durack, Paul J.; Goddard, Paul; Bates, Susan C.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus W.; Bozec, Alexandra; Chassignet, Eric; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Domingues, Catia M.; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Holland, David M.; Ilicak, Mehmet; Large, William G.; Lorbacher, Katja; Lu, Jianhua; Marsland, Simon J.; Mishra, Akhilesh; George Nurser, A. J.; Salas y Mélia, David; Palter, Jaime B.; Samuels, Bonita L.; Schröter, Jens; Schwarzkopf, Franziska U.; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Treguier, Anne Marie; Tseng, Yu-heng; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Winton, Michael; Zhang, Xuebin

2014-06-01

364

Intrasynovial levels of sulphated glycosaminoglycans and autoantibodies to type II collagen in rheumatoid arthritis: a correlative analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is uncertain whether the autoantibodies to type II collagen that occur frequently in the serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but rarely in other articular diseases, are primary or secondary to cartilage damage. Hence, we measured antibodies in synovial fluid from patients with RA and other articular disease and related these to the concentration of

C. Karopoulos; M. J. Rowley; C. J. Handley

1993-01-01

365

Femtomole level photoelectrochemical aptasensing for mercury ions using quercetin-copper(II) complex as the DNA intercalator.  

PubMed

An ultrasensitive and selective photoelectrochemical (PEC) aptasensor for mercury ions was first fabricated based on perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic acid/graphene oxide (PTCA/GO) heterojunction using quercetin-copper(II) complex intercalated into the poly(dT)-poly(dA) duplexes. Both the PTCA/GO heterojunction and the quercetin-copper(II) complex are in favor of the sensitivity for the fabricated PEC aptasensor due to band alignment and strong reduction capability, respectively. And they efficiently promote the separation of photoexcited carriers and enhance the photocurrent. The formation of thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine coordination chemistry resulted in the dehybridization of poly(dT)-poly(dA) duplexes and then the intercalator quercetin-copper(II) complex broke away from the surface of the PEC aptasensor. As the concentration of mercury ions increased, the photocurrent gradually decreased. The electrode response for mercury ions detection was in the linear range from 0.01 pmol L(-1) to 1.00 pmol L(-1) with the detection limit of 3.33 fmol L(-1). The label-free PEC aptasensor has excellent performances with ultrasensitivity and good selectivity besides the advantage of economic and facile fabrication. The strategy of quercetin-copper(II) complex as a novel DNA intercalator paves a new way to improve the performances for PEC sensors. PMID:24291750

Li, Hongbo; Xue, Yan; Wang, Wei

2014-04-15

366

The Effects of Add-On Low-Dose Memantine on Cytokine Levels in Bipolar II Depression: A 12-Week Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial.  

PubMed

Memantine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist with a mood-stabilizing effect, and an association between bipolar disorder and proinflammatory cytokine levels have been reported. Whether adding-on memantine would reduce cytokine levels and is more effective than valproic acid (VPA) alone in bipolar II disorder was investigated. A randomized, double-blind, controlled, 12-week study was conducted. Patients undergoing regular VPA treatments were randomly assigned to a group: VPA + memantine (5 mg/d) (n = 106) or VPA + placebo (n = 108). The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were used to evaluate clinical response. Symptom severity, plasma tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?), interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, and IL-1 levels were examined during weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. To adjust within-subject dependence over repeated assessments, multiple linear regressions with generalized estimating equation methods were used to examine the therapeutic effect. Tumor necrosis factor ? levels were significantly lower in the VPA + memantine group than in the VPA + placebo group (P = 0.013). Posttreatment HDRS and YMRS scores decreased significantly in both groups, but not significant, nor was the other between-group cytokine level difference pretreatment and posttreatment. The HDRS score changes were significantly associated with IL-6 (P = 0.012) and IL-1 (P = 0.005) level changes and changes in YMRS score changes with TNF-? (P = 0.005) level changes. Treating bipolar II depression with VPA + memantine may improve the plasma TNF-? level. However, adding-on memantine may not improve clinical symptoms or cytokine levels other than TNF-?. Clinical symptoms may be correlated with certain cytokines. PMID:24717258

Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Po See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Yu-Shan; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I Hui; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

2014-06-01

367

Combined Linkage and Association Studies Show that HLA Class II Variants Control Levels of Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens.  

PubMed

Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA) or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p?=?5×10-5 for rs9268403). The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p?=?0.02). In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL. PMID:25025336

Pedergnana, Vincent; Syx, Laurène; Cobat, Aurélie; Guergnon, Julien; Brice, Pauline; Fermé, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Pendeven, Catherine Le-; Amiel, Corinne; Taoufik, Yassine; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Theodorou, Ioannis; Besson, Caroline; Abel, Laurent

2014-01-01

368

Combined Linkage and Association Studies Show that HLA Class II Variants Control Levels of Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens  

PubMed Central

Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA) or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p?=?5×10–5 for rs9268403). The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p?=?0.02). In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL.

Cobat, Aurelie; Guergnon, Julien; Brice, Pauline; Ferme, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Pendeven, Catherine Le-; Amiel, Corinne; Taoufik, Yassine; Alcais, Alexandre; Theodorou, Ioannis; Besson, Caroline; Abel, Laurent

2014-01-01

369

Anderson's disease (chylomicron retention disease): a new mutation in the SARA2 gene associated with muscular and cardiac abnormalities.  

PubMed

Anderson's disease (AD) or chylomicron retention disease (CMRD) is a rare hereditary lipid malabsorption syndrome linked to SARA2 gene mutations. We report in this study a novel mutation in two sisters for which the Sar1b protein is predicted to be truncated by 32 amino acids at its carboxyl-terminus. Because the SARA2 gene is also expressed in the muscle, heart, liver and placenta, extraintestinal clinical manifestations may exist. For the first time, we describe in this study in the two sisters muscular as well as cardiac abnormalities that could be related to the reported expression of SARA2 in these tissues. We also evaluated six other patients for potential manifestations of the SARA2 mutation. The creatine phosphokinase levels were increased in all patients [1.5-9.4 x normal (N)] and transaminases were moderately elevated in five of the eight patients (1.2-2.6 x N), probably related to muscle disease rather than to liver dysfunction. A decreased ejection fraction occurred in one patient (40%, N: 60%). The muscle, liver and placental tissues that were examined had no specific abnormalities and, in particular, no lipid accumulation. These results suggest that myolysis and other extraintestinal abnormalities can occur in AD/CMRD and that the clinical evaluation of patients should reflect this. PMID:18786134

Silvain, M; Bligny, D; Aparicio, T; Laforêt, P; Grodet, A; Peretti, N; Ménard, D; Djouadi, F; Jardel, C; Bégué, J M; Walker, F; Schmitz, J; Lachaux, A; Aggerbeck, L P; Samson-Bouma, M E

2008-12-01

370

Investigation of the dynamic Stark effect in a J=0-->1-->0 three-level system. II. Theoretical description  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have calculated the steady-state intensity of fluorescence emitted from the middle and upper levels of a three-level (J=0-->1-->0) atomic ladder system subjected to a weak probe laser tuned to the transition between the lower two levels and a strong laser tuned to the transition between the upper two levels. This configuration of strong and probe lasers is the reverse

P. T. H. Fisk; H.-A. Bachor; R. J. Sandeman

1986-01-01

371

Stability of free amino acid levels in stressed Abarenicola pacifica  

Microsoft Academic Search

JEFFRIES (1972), BAYNE et al. (1976), and ROESIJADI + ANDERSON (1979) have described a change in the composition of the free amino acid (FAA) pool of pelecypod molluscs under stress. This response consists of a significant decrease in the level of glycine, while the taurine level remains constant, leading to a decrease in the total free amino acid level and

J. M. Augenfeld; J. W. Anderson

1980-01-01

372

Elevated Testosterone Levels During Rat Pregnancy Cause Hypersensitivity to Angiotensin II and Attenuation of Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation in Uterine Arteries.  

PubMed

Elevated testosterone levels increase maternal blood pressure and decrease uterine blood flow in pregnancy, resulting in abnormal perinatal outcomes. We tested whether elevated testosterone alters uterine artery adaptations during pregnancy, and whether these alterations depend on endothelium-derived factors such as nitric oxide, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, and prostacyclin, or endothelium-independent mechanisms such as angiotensin II (Ang-II). Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with vehicle (n=20) or testosterone propionate (0.5 mg/kg per day from gestation day 15 to 19; n=20). Plasma testosterone levels increased 2-fold in testosterone-injected rats compared with controls. Elevated testosterone significantly decreased placental and pup weights compared with controls. In endothelium-intact uterine arteries, contractile responses to thromboxane, phenylephrine, and Ang-II were greater in testosterone-treated rats compared with controls. In endothelium-denuded arteries, contractile responses to Ang-II (pD2=9.1±0.04 versus 8.7±0.04 in controls; P<0.05), but not thromboxane and phenylephrine, were greater in testosterone-treated rats. Ang-II type 1b receptor expression was increased, whereas Ang-II type 2 receptor was decreased in testosterone-exposed arteries. In endothelium-denuded arteries, relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were unaffected. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was significantly lower in arteries from testosterone-treated dams (Emax=51.80±6.9% versus 91.98±1.4% in controls; P<0.05). The assessment of endothelial factors showed that nitric oxide-, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-, and prostacyclin-mediated relaxations were blunted in testosterone-treated dams. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase, small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel-3, and prostacyclin receptor expressions were significantly decreased in arteries from testosterone-treated dams. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1?, Ankrd37, and Egln were significantly increased in testosterone-exposed placentas. These results suggest that elevated maternal testosterone impairs uterine vascular function, which may lead to an increased vascular resistance and a decrease in uterine blood flow. PMID:24842922

Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; Blesson, Chellakkan S; Vincent, Kathleen L; Saade, George R; Hankins, Gary D; Yallampalli, Chandra; Sathishkumar, Kunju

2014-08-01

373

Antibody levels to the class I and II epitopes of the M protein and myosin are related to group A streptococcal exposure in endemic populations.  

PubMed

Rheumatic fever (RF)/rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis are thought to be autoimmune diseases, and follow group A streptococcal (GAS) infection. Different GAS M types have been associated with rheumatogenicity or nephritogenicity and categorized into either of two distinct classes (I or II) based on amino acid sequences present within the repeat region ('C' repeats) of the M protein. Sera from ARF patients have previously been shown to contain elevated levels of antibodies to the class I-specific epitope and myosin with the class I-specific antibodies also being cross-reactive to myosin, suggesting a disease association. This study shows that immunoreactivity of the class I-specific peptide and myosin does not differ between controls and acute RF (ARF)/RHD in populations that are highly endemic for GAS, raising the possibility that the association is related to GAS exposure, not the presence of ARF/RHD. Peptide inhibition studies suggest that the class I epitope may be conformational and residue 10 of the peptide is critical for antibody binding. We demonstrate that correlation of antibody levels between the class I and II epitope is due to class II-specific antibodies recognizing a common epitope with class I which is contained within the sequence RDL-ASRE. Our results suggest that antibody prevalence to class I and II epitopes and myosin is associated with GAS exposure, and that antibodies to these epitopes are not an indicator of disease nor a pathogenic factor in endemic populations. PMID:11581178

Brandt, E R; Yarwood, P J; McMillan, D J; Vohra, H; Currie, B; Mammo, L; Pruksakorn, S; Saour, J; Good, M F

2001-10-01

374

Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240°C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85°C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63°C in 1889, 42–52°C from 1974 through 1991, and 77°C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98°C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3°C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring. During August–October 1999, several field trips were conducted in the vicinity of Anderson Springs to continue monitoring and sampling the thermal manifestations. The new fumarolic area had increased in temperature and in discharge intensity since 1998, and a zone of dead trees had developed on the steep bank directly west of the fumaroles. Ground temperatures and diffuse flow of CO2 flow through soils were measured in the area surrounding the main spring and new fumaroles and in the zone of tree-kill.

Janik, C. J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M. L.; Rytuba, J. J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E. M.; Huebner, M.; White, L. D.; Foster, A.

1999-01-01

375

Pu 4f XPS spectra analyzed in the Anderson impurity model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

X-ray photoemission spectra of the ?, ?, ?, and ? phases of Pu have been analyzed using the Gunnarsson-Schönhammer implementation of the Anderson impurity model. Changes in the relative spectral weights of the two features representing mixed f 5 and f 6 final states are in reasonable agreement with the model's predictions. The Coulomb terms, Uff and Ufc, are quite consistent with those derived from atomic and LDA calculations. Multiplet structure, which agrees with atomic calculations for 4f 135f 5, strongly suggests 5f localization in the final state.

Cox, L. E.; Peek, J. M.; Allen, J. W.

1999-01-01

376

Anisotropic behavior of quantum transport in graphene superlattices: Coexistence of ballistic conduction with Anderson insulating regime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the possibility to generate highly anisotropic quantum conductivity in disordered graphene-based superlattices. Our quantum simulations, based on an efficient real-space implementation of the Kubo-Greenwood formula, show that in disordered graphene superlattices the strength of multiple scattering phenomena can strongly depend on the transport measurement geometry. This eventually yields the coexistence of a ballistic waveguide and a highly resistive channel (Anderson insulator) in the same two-dimensional platform, evidenced by a ?yy/?xx ratio varying over several orders of magnitude, and suggesting the possibility of building graphene electronic circuits based on the unique properties of chiral massless Dirac fermions in graphene.

Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Cummings, Aron W.; Roche, Stephan

2014-04-01

377

STS-118 Astronaut Williams and Expedition 15 Engineer Anderson Perform EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 Astronaut Dave Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, participated in the fourth and final session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). During the 5 hour space walk, Williams and Expedition 15 engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame) installed the External Wireless Instrumentation System Antenna, attached a stand for the shuttle robotic arm extension boom, and retrieved the two Materials International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) for return to Earth. MISSE collects information on how different materials weather in the environment of space.

2007-01-01

378

STS-89 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson is assisted with his flight suit in the white room  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-89 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39A before entering Space Shuttle Endeavour for launch. The STS- 89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS- 89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m.

1998-01-01

379

STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson during TCDT M113 training activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson takes a break during training on the operation of an M113 armored personnel carrier during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia.

2002-01-01

380

On the Lower Critical Dimension of the Edwards-Anderson Spin Glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Edwards-Anderson model of Spin Glasses is studied on dilute hyper-cubic lattices in dimensions d=2,3,,. Accurate predictions for the stiffness exponent yd are obtained that describes low-energy excitations. Continuing yd off the integers shows that its zero is located at d=5/2 to within 0.1%, a prediction that is corroborated by other numerical and theoretical work. Related Publication: Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 197205 (2005). Related Webpage: http://www.physics.emory.edu/faculty/boettcher/ .

Boettcher, Stefan

2006-03-01

381

Steady-state and dynamical Anderson localization of counterpropagating beams in two-dimensional photonic lattices  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate Anderson localization of mutually incoherent counterpropagating beams in an optically induced two-dimensional photonic lattice. The effect is displayed in a system of two broad probe beams propagating head-on through a fixed disordered photonic lattice recorded in a photorefractive crystal. In addition to the steady-state localization, we also observe the dynamical localization; that is, the localization of time-changing beams. As compared to the localization of single beams, in which there exist no dynamical effects, the localization of counterpropagating beams is more pronounced and prone to instabilities.

Jovic, Dragana M. [Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Texas A and M University at Qatar, P. O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Belic, Milivoj R. [Texas A and M University at Qatar, P. O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar)

2010-02-15

382

The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam paradox, Anderson Localization problem and the generalized diffusion approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this paper is two-fold. First, based on the interpretation of a\\u000aquantum tight-binding model in terms of a classical Hamiltonian map, we\\u000aconsider the Anderson localization (AL) problem as the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU)\\u000aeffect in a modified dynamical system containing both stable and unstable\\u000a(inverted) modes. Delocalized states in the AL are analogous to the stable\\u000aquasi-periodic motion

V. N. Kuzovkov

2008-01-01

383

Cardiac Anderson-Fabry disease: Lessons from a 25-year-follow up.  

PubMed

Sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cause of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy and has no specific treatment. Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is rare and usually multisystemic, but occasionally expresses clinically as a predominantly cardiac phenotype mimicking HCM. We describe an illustrative case of a patient followed regularly for 25 years with a diagnosis of familial HCM and no identified sarcomeric mutations. Next-generation sequencing analysis identified a novel pathogenic mutation in the GLA gene, leading to a diagnosis of previously unknown multisystemic AFD, with consequent implications for the patient's treatment and prognosis and familial screening. PMID:24830310

Brito, Dulce; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Moldovan, Oana; Navarro, Carmen; Madeira, Hugo Costa

2014-04-01

384

Critical exponent for the Anderson transition in the three-dimensional orthogonal universality class  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a careful finite size scaling study of the metal-insulator transition in Anderson's model of localization. We focus on the estimation of the critical exponent ? that describes the divergence of the localization length. We verify the universality of this critical exponent for three different distributions of the random potential: box, normal and Cauchy. Our results for the critical exponent are consistent with the measured values obtained in experiments on the dynamical localization transition in the quantum kicked rotor realized in a cold atomic gas.

Slevin, Keith; Ohtsuki, Tomi

2014-01-01

385

Dynamic susceptibility of the Anderson model: A quantum Monte Carlo study  

SciTech Connect

Using a highly accurate method of analytic continuation, we calculated the dynamic susceptibility and NMR relaxation rate 1/{ital T}{sub 1} of magnetic (Anderson or Kondo) impurities over the {ital entire} range {ital T}{much lt}{ital T}{sub {ital K}} to {ital T}{much gt}{ital T}{sub {ital K}}. We find that the susceptibility and NMR relaxation rate are universal functions when properly scaled and that the NMR relaxation rate is directly proportional to the universal Kondo resistivity.

Jarrell, M. (Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio (USA)); Gubernatis, J.E. (Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (USA)); Silver, R.N. (Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (USA) Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (USA))

1991-09-01

386

Conductance fluctuation of edge-disordered graphene nanoribbons: Crossover from diffusive transport to Anderson localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conductance fluctuation of edge-disordered graphene nanoribbons (ED-GNRs) is examined using the non-equilibrium Green's function technique combined with the extended Hückel approximation. The mean free path ? and the localization length ? of the ED-GNRs are determined to classify the quantum transport regimes. In the diffusive regime where the length Lc of the ED-GNRs is much longer than ? and much shorter than ?, the conductance histogram is given by a Gaussian distribution function with universal conductance fluctuation. In the localization regime where Lc??, the histogram is no longer the universal Gaussian distribution but a lognormal distribution that characterizes Anderson localization.

Takashima, Kengo; Yamamoto, Takahiro

2014-03-01

387

Measurement-based tailoring of Anderson localization of partially coherent light  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We put forward an experimental configuration to observe transverse Anderson localization of partially coherent light beams with a tunable degree of first-order coherence. The scheme makes use of entangled photons propagating in disordered waveguide arrays and is based on the unique relationship between the degree of entanglement of a pair of photons and the coherence properties of the individual photons constituting the pair. The scheme can be readily implemented with current waveguide-on-a-chip technology, and surprisingly the tunability of the coherence properties of the individual photons is done at the measurement stage, without resorting to changes of the light source itself.

Svozilík, Ji?í; Pe?ina, Jan; Torres, Juan P.

2014-05-01

388

Unified description of perturbation theory and band center anomaly in one-dimensional Anderson localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We calculated numerically the localization length of one-dimensional Anderson model with diagonal disorder. For weak disorder, we showed that the localization length changes continuously as the energy changes from the band center to the boundary of the anomalous region near the band edge. We found that all the localization lengths for different disorder strengths and different energies collapse onto a single curve, which can be fitted by a simple equation. Thus the description of the perturbation theory and the band center anomaly were unified into this equation.

Kang, Kai; Qin, Shaojing; Wang, Chuilin

2011-09-01

389

Atmospheric optical turbulence measurements taken at Anderson Mesa, Flagstaff, Arizona between 13-19 November 1989  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From 13 to 19 November 1989, the Naval Postgraduate School Atmospheric Optics Group acquired atmospheric optical turbulence measurements at the 31-inch Lowell Observatory telescope dome facility on Anderson Mesa, 16 km southeast of Flagstaff, Arizona. The parameters measured, the transverse coherence length and the isoplanatic angle, were part of an ongoing site survey for a large-scale, ground-based, synthetic aperture system (100 to 300 m baseline stellar interferometer). This report compiles, analyses and summarizes the acquired optical data. Also discussed are the synoptic meteorological events present during the data acquisition period.

Vaucher, Gail T.; Vaucher, Christopher A.; Walters, Donald L.

1991-01-01

390

Magnetic susceptibility and electronic specific heat of Anderson lattice with finite f-band width  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study an extension of the periodic Anderson model by considering finite f-band width. A variational method recently developed, has been used to study the temperature dependence of the average valence of magnetic susceptibility chi(sub s) and electronic specific heat C(sub v) for different values of the f-band width. As f-band width increases, the low-temperature peak in chi(sub s) and C(sub v) becomes more broad and shifts towards the high-temperature region.

Panwar, Sunil; Singh, Ishwar

1994-11-01

391

Ground-state of the single impurity Anderson model with correlated conduction electrons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Utilizing the nonperturbative Lanczos procedure, we study the ground-state spectrum of the Single-Impurity Anderson Model. An additional term is added to the Hamiltonian which represents a Coulomb-repulsion between the conduction electrons. The ground-state energy as well as the singlet-triplet energy is calculated in this strongly interacting system. Our results are consistent with those of Fermi-liquid theory which predicts a renormalization of the low energy properties of the system upon introduction of local, repulsive conduction electron interactions.

Fessatidis, Vassilios; Mancini, Jay D.; Massano, William J.; Bowen, Samuel P.

2002-10-01

392

Fosinopril decreases levels of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in borderline hypertensive type II diabetic patients with microalbuminuria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) are a mainstay for the treatment of heart failure, and of diabetic microalbuminuria. Recently ACE-I have been found to decrease plasma levels of circulating vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (cVCAM-1) in patients with congestive heart failure. As increased cVCAM-1 levels are pathognomonic for diabetics with microangiopathy, we investigated the effects of ACE-I on plasma levels of

Slobodan Gasic; Oswald F. Wagner; Peter Fasching; Christine Ludwig; Mario Veitl; Stylianos Kapiotis; Bernd Jilma

1999-01-01

393

Sound levels forecasting for city-centers Part II: effect of source model parameters on sound level in built-up area  

Microsoft Academic Search

To control an environmental noise the simulation programs are the best tools. The computer simulation program PROP5, that allows predicting the time-average sound level within an urban system, contains road traffic as noise source. In the applied source model a road is represented by a sum of the sound exposures due to individual vehicle drive-by. The PROP5 allows the multi-lanes

E. Walerian; R. Janczur; M. Czechowicz

2001-01-01

394

An mtDNA mutation in the initiation codon of the cytochrome C oxidase subunit II gene results in lower levels of the protein and a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy.  

PubMed Central

A novel heteroplasmic 7587T-->C mutation in the mitochondrial genome which changes the initiation codon of the gene encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX II), was found in a family with mitochondrial disease. This T-->C transition is predicted to change the initiating methionine to threonine. The mutation load was present at 67% in muscle from the index case and at 91% in muscle from the patient's clinically affected son. Muscle biopsy samples revealed isolated COX deficiency and mitochondrial proliferation. Single-muscle-fiber analysis revealed that the 7587C copy was at much higher load in COX-negative fibers than in COX-positive fibers. After microphotometric enzyme analysis, the mutation was shown to cause a decrease in COX activity when the mutant load was >55%-65%. In fibroblasts from one family member, which contained >95% mutated mtDNA, there was no detectable synthesis or any steady-state level of COX II. This new mutation constitutes a new mechanism by which mtDNA mutations can cause disease-defective initiation of translation.

Clark, K M; Taylor, R W; Johnson, M A; Chinnery, P F; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Z M; Andrews, R M; Nelson, I P; Wood, N W; Lamont, P J; Hanna, M G; Lightowlers, R N; Turnbull, D M

1999-01-01

395

Summary of data acquisition and field operations: Terra Resources, Anderson Canyon No. 3-17, Lincoln County, Wyoming; Terra Resources, North Anderson Canyon No. 40-16, Sweetwater County, Wyoming. Topical report, August 1989  

SciTech Connect

A summary is presented of open-hole data collected on two cooperative wells for the GRI Tight Gas Sands Program. The overall objective of gathering well data in the Frontier Formation is to identify and evaluate technological problems in formation evaluation and hydraulic fracturing. Open-hole data acquisition is emphasized for the Anderson Canyon No. 3-17, a full cooperative well (i.e., coring, logging, cased-hole stress testing, fracture monitoring). Data collected on the North Anderson Canyon No. 40-16, a partial cooperative well (i.e., logging only), is described in an appendix.

Not Available

1989-08-01

396

Anderson-Gruneisen parameter under high temperature in (Fe,Mn,Co,Mg)2SiO4  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) is of considerable importance to Earth scientists because it sets limitations on the thermo-elastic properties of the lower mantle and core. However, there are several formulations on the Grüneisen parameter, which are in frequent use and predict varying dependence of d as a function of temperature. In this paper, the expressions for thermal expansion, thermal expansion coefficients and bulk modulus are obtained considering the anharmonic dependence on temperature and are applied to study these constants to (Fe,Mn,Co,Mg)2SiO4. Using the derived expressions, we have shown that different parameters on which the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) depends are temperature dependent, but above all the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) is independent of temperature. The results obtained have been found to be comparable to experimental data.

Gupta, S.; Goyal, S. C.

2012-07-01

397

Two new architectures based on Anderson-type polyoxoanions and cadmium fragments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two new hybrid compounds with cadmium cations/coordination complexes as linkers, (C 6H 5NO 2) 4[(H 2O) 14Cd 3(CrMo 6H 6O 24) 2] 1 (C 6H 5NO 2 = pyridine-4-carboxylic acid) and H[(H 2O) 2(C 6H 5NO 2)(C 6H 4NO 2)Cd] 2[CrMo 6H 6O 24]·9H 2O 2 (C 6H 5NO 2, C 6H 4NO 2 = pyridine-3-carboxylic acid), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, TG, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the polar space group Pc and is made up of [CrMo 6H 6O 24] 3- polyoxoanions covalently linked by cadmium cations to yield an unprecedented one-dimensional chain, which represents the first example of one-dimensional assemblies based on Anderson-type POMs and cadmium cations. Adjacent inorganic chains are further in close contact by pyridine-4-carboxylic acid glues to form three-dimensional supramolecular polar networks via strong hydrogen-bonding interactions. Compound 2 exhibits a three-dimensional supramolecular channel framework constructed from cationic cadmium-pyridine-3-carboxylic acid coordination polymer sheets pillared by Anderson-type polyoxoanions, with dissociated water molecules situated in the channels. Furthermore, both of the compounds exhibit photoluminescent properties at ambient temperature.

An, Haiyan; Xu, Tieqi; Jia, Cuiying; Zheng, Hui; Mu, Wensheng

2009-09-01

398

Finding Order in Chaos: Complexity in the Career of Don L Anderson  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Don Anderson's career has been marked by a long standing interest in plate tectonics and the earth's interior. But from time to time, he has departed from these major themes to investigate related topics. For example, during the 1970's, he proposed several seminal ideas, such as the applicability of cracks and fracture theory to earthquakes, and the idea of accelerated plate tectonics. Although on the surface, these topics might seem quite disparate from mantle convection, seismic structure of the earth's interior, and thermodynamics of mineral phases, they nonetheless are now known to share common theoretical underpinnings. In particular, the concepts of nonlinear dynamical systems, complexity, chaos, and energy and fitness landscapes can be used to describe the evolution of all complex nonlinear systems. The principle of minimum free energy (maximum fitness) is frequently used to obtain Langevin-type equations for such systems, and ideas of statistical field theory are employed to obtain scaling exponents and other features. In this talk, we describe these ideas and relate them to the types of problems in which Don Anderson has been primarily interested.

Rundle, P.; Rundle, J.; Klein, W.

2003-12-01

399

Damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and photosystem II after water shortage and high-temperature stress in two lines of maize which differ in endogenous levels of abscisic acid and drought resistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and photosystem II (PS II), and the rate of COâ fixation after exposure to 7-d water shortage followed by 6-h (WTS-6) or 24-h (WTS-24) high temperature (45C) stress in the high-level. Abscisic acid (ABA) drought-resistant (DR) line of maize ZPBL 1304 and the low-level ABA drought-sensitive line ZPL 389. Seven-day water shortage

Z. Ristic; D. D. Cass

1991-01-01

400

Involvement of Difference in Decrease of Hemoglobin Level in Poor Prognosis of Stage I and II Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Implication in Outcome of Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the effect of hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and the difference in its decrease during treatment on outcome of radiotherapy (RT) alone for patients with Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 572 patients with Stage I-II nasopharyngeal carcinoma with RT alone between January 2001 and December 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. Patient characteristics, tumor variables, and Hb level, including pre-RT Hb, mid-RT Hb, and dynamic change of Hb between pre- and post- RT and its difference in decrease ( White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb) were subjected to univariate and multivariable analysis to identify factors that predict disease-specific survival (DSS), local regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS). Results: The 5-year DSS was poorer in the Hb continuous decrease group than in the Hb noncontinuous decrease group (84% vs. 89%; p = 0.008). There was poorer 5-year DSS in patients with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of >11.5 g/L than in those with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of {<=}11.5 g/L (82% vs. 89%; p = 0.001), and poorer LRFS (79% vs. 83%; p = 0.035). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that Hb decrease difference with greater than 11.5 g/L was an independent prognostic factor for DSS and LRFS. Conclusions: The difference in decrease of Hb level during the course of radiation treatment appeared as a poor prognostic factor in Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

Gao Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Anhui provincial hospital, Hefei (China); Tao Yalan; Li Guo; Yi Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xia Yunfei, E-mail: xiayf@sysucc.org.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

2012-03-15

401

Gene expression levels of human shelterin complex and shelterin-associated factors regulated by the topoisomerase II inhibitors doxorubicin and etoposide in human cultured cells.  

PubMed

Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is responsible for telomere elongation, and its activity is strongly related to the expression level of the hTERT gene; however, the transcriptional regulation of telomeric genes, which play a central role in telomere maintenance and protection by facilitating replication and regulating telomerase access, is poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to reveal the changes in the mRNA expression of six components of the shelterin complex and three shelterin complex-associated factors in topoisomerase II inhibitor-treated human cultured cells. Using a quantitative gene expression analysis, we found that a reduction in telomeric repeat-binding factor 1 (TRF1), protection of telomeres (POT1), and TRF1-interacting ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (TNKS1) mRNAs was observed in etoposide- and doxorubicin-treated HeLa and U-2 OS cells, while an increased TRF2-interacting telomeric protein (RAP1) mRNA level was observed in U-2 OS cells. Furthermore, doxorubicin suppressed TRF1 and POT1 mRNAs in both Saos-2 and WI-38 cells and increased RAP1 mRNA in WI-38 cells. In agreement with the results obtained in the quantitative gene expression analysis in U-2 OS cells, the topoisomerase II inhibitors negatively and positively regulated the POT1 and RAP1 gene promoters, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest the successful identification of unique topoisomerase II inhibitor-inducible telomeric genes and provide mechanistic insight into the regulation of telomeric gene expression by chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:23247865

Kato, Masahiro; Nakayama, Masahiro; Agata, Minako; Yoshida, Kenichi

2013-04-01

402

Experimental evidence of coupling between sheared-flow development and an increase in the level of turbulence in the TJ-II stellarator  

SciTech Connect

The link between the development of sheared flows and the structure of turbulence has been investigated in the plasma boundary region of the TJ-II stellarator. The development of the naturally occurring velocity shear layer requires a minimum plasma density. Near this critical density, the level of edge turbulent transport and the turbulent kinetic energy significantly increases in the plasma edge. The resulting shearing rate in the phase velocity of fluctuations is comparable to the one required to trigger a transition to improved confinement regimes with reduction of edge turbulence, suggesting that spontaneous sheared flows and fluctuations keep themselves near marginal stability. These findings provide the experimental evidence of coupling between sheared flows development and increasing in the level of edge turbulence. The experimental results are consistent with the expectations of second-order transition models of turbulence-driven sheared flows.

Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Garcia, L.; Ware, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Euratom-Ciemat, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Universidad Carlos III, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); University of Montana-Missoula, Missoula, Montana 59812 (United States)

2004-12-01

403

Accurate f-Values for Ultraviolet Transitions from the 3d5(6S)4p Levels in MN II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have measured branching fractions for ultraviolet electric dipole transitions from upper levels belonging to the 3d5(6S)4p 7P and 3d5(6S)4p 5P terms of Mn II. The levels were excited in a hollow cathode lamp and the spectra were observed with a Fourier transform spectrometer. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the Mn II lines in our spectra permitted the measurement of branching fractions even for the weakest transitions in the ultraviolet, which are of particular astrophysical interest. A comparison with previous measurements revealed that many of these measurements, including the most recent, show systematic distortions that may indicate that they are affected by self-absorption. Absolute oscillator strengths, based on the new branching fraction measurements, were determined using existing experimental lifetime data. The uncertainty of the f-values is less than 5% for strong transitions. Oscillator strengths for several very weak intercombination lines with loggf<-2 are reported for the first time.

Kling, Rainer; Griesmann, Ulf

2000-03-01

404

Fibrin Glue Reduces the Duration of Lymphatic Drainage after Lumpectomy and Level II or III Axillary Lymph Node Dissection for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Trial  

PubMed Central

This randomized prospective study investigated the effect of fibrin glue use on drainage duration and overall drain output after lumpectomy and axillary dissection in breast cancer patients. A total of 100 patients undergoing breast lumpectomy and axillary dissection were randomized to a fibrin glue group (N=50; glue sprayed onto the axillary dissection site) or a control group (N=50). Outcome measures were drainage duration, overall drain output, and incidence of seroma. Overall, the fibrin glue and control groups were similar in terms of drainage duration, overall drain output, and incidence of seroma. However, subgroup analysis showed that fibrin glue use resulted in a shorter drainage duration (3.5 vs. 4.7 days; p=0.0006) and overall drain output (196 vs. 278 mL; p=0.0255) in patients undergoing level II or III axillary dissection. Fibrin glue use reduced drainage duration and overall drain output in breast cancer patients undergoing a lumpectomy and level II or III axillary dissection.

Ko, Eunyoung; Han, Wonshik; Cho, Jihyoung; Lee, Jong Won; Kang, So Young; Jung, So-Youn; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Hwang, Ki-Tae

2009-01-01

405

Inhibition of toxigenesis of group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B in meat products by using a reduced level of nitrite.  

PubMed

The effect of three different concentrations of sodium nitrite (0, 75, and 120 mg/kg) on growth and toxigenesis of group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B was studied in Finnish wiener-type sausage, bologna-type sausage, and cooked ham. A low level of inoculum (2.0 log CFU/g) was used for wiener-type sausage and bologna-type sausage, and both low (2.0 log CFU/g) and high (4.0 log CFU/g) levels were used for cooked ham. The products were formulated and processed under simulated commercial conditions and stored at 8°C for 5 weeks. C. botulinum counts were determined in five replicate samples of each nitrite concentration at 1, 3, and 5 weeks after thermal processing. All samples were positive for C. botulinum type B. The highest C. botulinum counts were detected in nitrite-free products. Toxigenesis was observed in nitrite-free products during storage, but products containing either 75 or 120 mg/kg nitrite remained nontoxic during the 5-week study period, suggesting that spores surviving the heat treatment were unable to germinate and develop into a toxic culture in the presence of nitrite. The results suggest that the safety of processed meat products with respect to group II C. botulinum type B can be maintained even with a reduced concentration (75 mg/kg) of sodium nitrite. PMID:22980023

Keto-Timonen, Riikka; Lindström, Miia; Puolanne, Eero; Niemistö, Markku; Korkeala, Hannu

2012-07-01

406

Binge-like ethanol consumption increases corticosterone levels and neurodegneration whereas occupancy of type II glucocorticoid receptors with mifepristone is neuroprotective.  

PubMed

Excessive ethanol (EtOH) use leads to impaired memory and cognition. Using a rat model of binge-like intoxication, we tested whether elevated corticosterone (Cort) levels contribute to the neurotoxic consequences of EtOH exposure. Rats were adrenalectomized (Adx) and implanted with cholesterol pellets, or cholesterol pellets containing Cort in order to achieve basal, medium, or high blood concentrations of Cort. Intragastric EtOH or an isocaloric control solution was given three times daily for 4 days to achieve blood alcohol levels ranging between 200 and 350 mg/dl. Mean 24-hour plasma levels of Cort were ?110 and ?40 ng/ml in intact EtOH-treated and intact control animals, respectively. Basal Cort replacement concentrations in EtOH-treated Adx animals did not exacerbate alcohol-induced neurodegeneration in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) or the entorhinal cortex (EC) as observed by amino-cupric silver staining. In contrast, Cort replacement pellets resulting in plasma Cort levels twofold higher (medium) than normal, or greater than twofold higher (high) in Adx-Cort-EtOH animals increased neurodegeneration. In separate experiments, pharmacological blockade of the Type II glucocorticoid (GC) receptor was initiated with mifepristone (RU38486; 0, 5, 15 mg/kg/day, i.p.). At the higher dose, mifepristone decreased the number of degenerating hippocampal DG cells in binge-EtOH-treated intact animals, whereas, only a trend for reduction was observed in 15 mg/kg/day mifepristone-treated animals in the EC, as determined by fluoro-jade B staining. These results suggest that elevated circulating Cort in part mediates EtOH-induced neurotoxicity in the brain through activation of Type II GC receptors. PMID:22500955

Cippitelli, Andrea; Damadzic, Ruslan; Hamelink, Carol; Brunnquell, Michael; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus; Eskay, Robert L

2014-01-01

407

Topoisomerase II and IV quinolone resistance-determining regions in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolates with different levels of quinolone susceptibility.  

PubMed

The quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of topoisomerase II and IV genes from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ATCC 13637 were sequenced and compared with the corresponding regions of 32 unrelated S. maltophilia clinical strains for which ciprofloxacin MICs ranged from 0.1 to 64 microg/ml. GyrA (Leu-55 to Gln-155, Escherichia coli numbering), GyrB (Met-391 to Phe-513), ParC (Ile-34 to Arg-124), and ParE (Leu-396 to Leu-567) fragments from strain ATCC 13637 showed high degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa, with the degrees of identity ranging from 85.0 to 93.5%. Lower degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (70.9 to 88.6%) and E. coli (73.0 to 88.6%) were observed. Amino acid changes were present in GyrA fragments from 9 of the 32 strains at positions 70, 85, 90, 103, 112, 113, 119, and 124; but there was no consistent relation to higher ciprofloxacin MICs. The absence of changes at positions 83 and 87, commonly involved in quinolone resistance in gram-negative bacteria, was unexpected. The GyrB sequences were identical in all strains, and only one strain (ciprofloxacin MIC, 16 microg/ml) showed a ParC amino acid change (Ser-80-->Arg). In contrast, a high frequency (16 of 32 strains) of amino acid replacements was present in ParE. The frequencies of alterations at positions 437, 465, 477, and 485 were higher (P < 0.05) in strains from cystic fibrosis patients, but these changes were not linked with high ciprofloxacin MICs. An efflux phenotype, screened by the detection of decreases of at least twofold doubling dilutions of the ciprofloxacin MIC in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (0.5 microg/ml) or reserpine (10 microg/ml), was suspected in seven strains. These results suggest that topoisomerases II and IV may not be the primary targets involved in quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia. PMID:11850246

Valdezate, Sylvia; Vindel, Ana; Echeita, Aurora; Baquero, Fernando; Cantó, Rafael

2002-03-01

408

Topoisomerase II and IV Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Clinical Isolates with Different Levels of Quinolone Susceptibility  

PubMed Central

The quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of topoisomerase II and IV genes from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ATCC 13637 were sequenced and compared with the corresponding regions of 32 unrelated S. maltophilia clinical strains for which ciprofloxacin MICs ranged from 0.1 to 64 ?g/ml. GyrA (Leu-55 to Gln-155, Escherichia coli numbering), GyrB (Met-391 to Phe-513), ParC (Ile-34 to Arg-124), and ParE (Leu-396 to Leu-567) fragments from strain ATCC 13637 showed high degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa, with the degrees of identity ranging from 85.0 to 93.5%. Lower degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (70.9 to 88.6%) and E. coli (73.0 to 88.6%) were observed. Amino acid changes were present in GyrA fragments from 9 of the 32 strains at positions 70, 85, 90, 103, 112, 113, 119, and 124; but there was no consistent relation to higher ciprofloxacin MICs. The absence of changes at positions 83 and 87, commonly involved in quinolone resistance in gram-negative bacteria, was unexpected. The GyrB sequences were identical in all strains, and only one strain (ciprofloxacin MIC, 16 ?g/ml) showed a ParC amino acid change (Ser-80?Arg). In contrast, a high frequency (16 of 32 strains) of amino acid replacements was present in ParE. The frequencies of alterations at positions 437, 465, 477, and 485 were higher (P < 0.05) in strains from cystic fibrosis patients, but these changes were not linked with high ciprofloxacin MICs. An efflux phenotype, screened by the detection of decreases of at least twofold doubling dilutions of the ciprofloxacin MIC in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (0.5 ?g/ml) or reserpine (10 ?g/ml), was suspected in seven strains. These results suggest that topoisomerases II and IV may not be the primary targets involved in quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia.

Valdezate, Sylvia; Vindel, Ana; Echeita, Aurora; Baquero, Fernando; Canto, Rafael

2002-01-01

409

Pattern and Level of Risk in Chinese Communist Foreign Policy-Making 1949-1965. Part II.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is a replication of a study entitled STUDIES IN DETERRENCE XIII. 'Pattern and Level of Risk in Soviet Foreign Policy-Making, 1945-1963 (NOTS TP 3880, U. S. Naval Ordnance Test Station, China Lake, California October 1966). Here, the behavior of...

J. P. Triska M. L. Adelman H. R. Beck D. D. Finley J. E. Marti

1967-01-01

410

Behavior of mercury in bio-systems. II. Depuration of /sup 203/Hg/sup 2 +/ in various trophic levels  

SciTech Connect

Using radiotracer techniques, the depuration rates for methylmercury at three trophic levels in an aquatic ecosystem are examined. Bacteria (decomposers), mosquito larvae (primary consumers), and fish (secondary consumers) were studied. Results indicated that depuration rates for mercury were temperature dependent - the rate of depuration increased with increase in temperature (up to 45/sup 0/C)

Hamdy, M.K.; Prabhu, N.V.

1984-01-01

411

High Na intake increases renal angiotensin II levels and reduces expression of the ACE2-AT2R-MasR axis in obese Zucker rats  

PubMed Central

High sodium intake is known to regulate the renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and is a risk factor for the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension. The complex nature of the RAS reveals that its various components may have opposing effects on natriuresis and blood pressure regulation. We hypothesized that high sodium intake differentially regulates and shifts a balance between opposing components of the renal RAS, namely, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-ANG II-type 1 ANG II receptor (AT1R) vs. AT2-ACE2-angiotensinogen (Ang) (1–7)-Mas receptor (MasR), in obesity. In the present study, we evaluated protein and/or mRNA expression of angiotensinogen, renin, AT1A/BR, ACE, AT2R, ACE2, and MasR in the kidney cortex following 2 wk of a 8% high-sodium (HS) diet in lean and obese Zucker rats. The expression data showed that the relative expression pattern of ACE and AT1BR increased, renin decreased, and ACE2, AT2R, and MasR remained unaltered in HS-fed lean rats. On the other hand, HS intake in obese rats caused an increase in the cortical expression of ACE, a decrease in ACE2, AT2R, and MasR, and no changes in renin and AT1R. The cortical levels of ANG II increased by threefold in obese rats on HS compared with obese rats on normal salt (NS), which was not different than in lean rats. The HS intake elevated mean arterial pressure in obese rats (27 mmHg) more than in lean rats (16 mmHg). This study suggests that HS intake causes a pronounced increase in ANG II levels and a reduction in the expression of the ACE2-AT2R-MasR axis in the kidney cortex of obese rats. We conclude that such changes may lead to the potentially unopposed function of AT1R, with its various cellular and physiological roles, including the contribution to the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension.

Samuel, Preethi; Ali, Quaisar; Sabuhi, Rifat; Wu, Yonnie

2012-01-01

412

The anderson's rotating interferometer and its application to binary star measurements. (French Title: L'interféromètre â?¡ rotation de john august anderson (1876-1956) et son application - la tentative de résolution de nouvelles binaires)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Following the tests of interferometric observations carried out by Albert A. Michelson with the 2.5 m telescope of the Mount Wilson, George. E. Hale thinks that this technique could be applied to the measurement of close double stars. He asks John A. Anderson to produce an instrument allowing such measurements. The principle of the ocular rotating interferometer and the way of using it for the measurement of double stars are first described. Then the effects of atmospheric dispersion on the observation of the stellar interference fringes and the remedy that Anderson implements to compensate it are described. Images of the Anderson's interferometer are used to present the instrument and to describe its operation. Installed at the 2,5 m telescope, this instrument was used by Anderson and Paul W. Merrill to resolve the spectroscopic binary Capella for the first time, like a 'visual binary'. Moreover, Merrill took the measurement of two difficult visual pairs discovered by Aitken (kap UMa = A 1585 and nu2 Boo = A 1634) and tried to resolve some new visual binaries among stars known as binary spectroscopic, stars with composite spectra, variable stars and some bright stars, which led him to publish a list of 73 stars finally found simple. Finally, the remarks made by Merrill in conclusion of his work will be analyzed.

Bonneau, D.

2011-12-01

413

The impact of soil lead abatement on urban children's blood lead levels: phase II results from the Boston Lead-In-Soil Demonstration Project.  

PubMed

The Boston Lead-In-Soil Demonstration Project was a randomized environmental intervention study of the impact of urban soil lead abatement on children's blood lead levels. Lead-contaminated soil abatement was associated with a modest reduction in children's blood lead levels in both phases of the project; however, the reduction in Phase II was somewhat greater than that in Phase I. The combined results from both phases suggest that a soil lead reduction of 2060 ppm is associated with a 2.25 to 2.70 micrograms/dl decline in blood lead levels. Low levels of soil recontamination 1 to 2 years following abatement indicate that the intervention is persistent, at least over the short-term. Furthermore, the intervention appears to benefit most children since no measurable differences in efficacy were observed for starting blood and soil lead level, race, neighborhood, gender, and many other characteristics. However, soil abatement did appear to be more beneficial to children in the higher socioeconomic classes, with low baseline ferritin levels, and who spent time away from home on a regular basis and lived in nonowner occupied housing, and with adults who had lead-related hobbies and almost always washed their hands before meals. Children who lived in apartments with consistently elevated floor dust lead loading levels derived almost no benefit from the soil abatement. It was not possible to separate the effects of the variables that had a beneficial impact on efficacy because they were closely correlated and the number of subjects was small. We recommend that further research be conducted to identify subgroups of children to whom soil lead abatement might be targeted. PMID:7982389

Aschengrau, A; Beiser, A; Bellinger, D; Copenhafer, D; Weitzman, M

1994-11-01

414

Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist decreases plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 and soluble adhesion molecules in patients with chronic heart failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESTo evaluate the effects of an angiotensin (Ang II) type 1 receptor antagonist on immune markers in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF).BACKGROUNDAng II stimulates production of immune factors via the Ang II type 1 receptor in vitro, and the long-term effects of Ang II type 1 receptor antagonists on plasma markers of immune activation are unknown in patients with

Takayoshi Tsutamoto; Atsuyuki Wada; Keiko Maeda; Naoko Mabuchi; Masaru Hayashi; Takashi Tsutsui; Masato Ohnishi; Masahide Sawaki; Masanori Fujii; Takehiro Matsumoto; Masahiko Kinoshita

2000-01-01

415

One-level modeling for diagnosing surface winds over complex terrain. II - Applicability to short-range forecasting  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Alpert and Getenio (1988) modification of the Mass and Dempsey (1985) one-level sigma-surface model was used to study four synoptic events that included two winter cases (a Cyprus low and a Siberian high) and two summer cases. Results of statistical verification showed that the model is not only capable of diagnosing many details of surface mesoscale flow, but might also be useful for various applications which require operative short-range prediction of the diurnal changes of high-resolution surface flow over complex terrain, for example, in locating wildland fires, determining the dispersion of air pollutants, and predicting changes in wind energy or of surface wind for low-level air flights.

Alpert, P.; Getenio, B.; Zak-Rosenthal, R.

1988-01-01

416

Dietary iodine and selenium affected the mRNA expression levels of skin monodeiodinase (II, III) in Liaoning Cashmere goats.  

PubMed

Livestock are frequently provided nutrient-depleted diets, which can negatively impact animal health and productivity. In our previous trial, we found that iodine (I) supplementation (not selenium (Se)) could increase cashmere production. In order to explore the role of I and Se in cashmere growth, we investigated the effects of dietary I and Se supplementation in Liaoning cashmere goats. Serum thyroid hormone status and the mRNA expression levels of skin monodeiodinase (MDII, MDIII) were measured during the cashmere fiber growth period. Forty-eight 2.5-year-old Liaoning cashmere goats (38.6 ± 2.65 kg BW) were divided into six equal groups, and their diets were supplemented with I (0, 2, or 4 mg/kg DM) and Se (0 or 1 mg/kg DM) in a 2 × 3 factorial treatment design. The six treatment groups were: I(0)Se(0), I(2)Se(0), I(4)Se(0), I(0)Se(1), I(2)Se(1), and I(4)Se(1). Concentrations of I and Se in the basal diet (group I(0)Se(0)) were 0.67 and 0.09 mg/kg DM, respectively. The trial started in September of 2009 and lasted 70 days. For every measured parameter, supplemental Se had no significant effect on thyroid hormones, but improved the mRNA expression levels of skin MDIII (P < 0.01). However, supplemental I increased levels of thyroid hormones (thyroxine and triiodothyronine) and improved the mRNA expression levels of skin MDII (P < 0.05). These results show that the addition of I to cashmere goat feedstock may be an effective means of increasing cashmere production through thyroid hormones regulating the mRNA expression of skin MDII. PMID:23274772

Qin, Feng; Li, Jianyun; Zhu, Xiaoping; Zhou, Jiaping; Yang, Jie; Jia, Zhihai

2013-03-01

417

Decreased levels of serum soluble complement receptor-II (CR2\\/CD21) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The soluble cluster of differentiation 21 (sCD21) represents the extracellular portion of the CD21 glycoprotein and is released by shedding from cell surfaces into plasma. Soluble CD21 binds complement fragments and activates monocytes through binding to membrane CD23. Elevated levels of sCD21 are found during Epstein-Barr virus EBV infections, B-cell lymphoma and other lymphoblastoid tumours. The present study was

M. Masilamani; J. von Kempis; H. Illges

2004-01-01

418

Profile of iodine content of salt at trader level in the selected districts of India: Part II - Haryana.  

PubMed

Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) are endemic in Haryana state. Since consuming iodized salt is the best way to prevent IDD, the government of Haryana under the National Iodine Deficiency Disorder Control Program (NIDDCP) has followed a policy of universal salt iodization (USI) since 1986, under which the state's population receives only iodized salt. However, despite this policy, the prevalence of IDD remains high in Haryana. UNICEF-PAMM-MI-WHO-ICCIDD recently recommended monitoring the iodine content of salt at the trader level as a means of assessing the quality of salt being consumed by the population. The authors assessed the iodine content and types of iodized salt being sold by traders in 13 of Haryana's 16 districts. Analysis of a total 117 salt samples from 117 traders using the standard iodometric titration method found all but one sample to contain some iodine. 20% of the traders, however, were selling salt containing less than 15 ppm of iodine, below the state government recommended minimum level of salt iodization for the retail level. PMID:12292802

Kapil, U; Nayar, D; Singh, C

1997-01-01

419

Molecular analysis and intestinal expression of SAR1 genes and proteins in Anderson's disease (Chylomicron retention disease)  

PubMed Central

Background Anderson's disease (AD) or chylomicron retention disease (CMRD) is a very rare hereditary lipid malabsorption syndrome. In order to discover novel mutations in the SAR1B gene and to evaluate the expression, as compared to healthy subjects, of the Sar1 gene and protein paralogues in the intestine, we investigated three previously undescribed individuals with the disease. Methods The SAR1B, SAR1A and PCSK9 genes were sequenced. The expression of the SAR1B and SAR1A genes in intestinal biopsies of both normal individuals and patients was measured by RTqPCR. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies to recombinant Sar1 protein was used to evaluate the expression and localization of the Sar1 paralogues in the duodenal biopsies. Results Two patients had a novel SAR1B mutation (p.Asp48ThrfsX17). The third patient, who had a previously described SAR1B mutation (p.Leu28ArgfsX7), also had a p.Leu21dup variant of the PCSK9 gene. The expression of the SAR1B gene in duodenal biopsies from an AD/CMRD patient was significantly decreased whereas the expression of the SAR1A gene was significantly increased, as compared to healthy individuals. The Sar1 proteins were present in decreased amounts in enterocytes in duodenal biopsies from the patients as compared to those from healthy subjects. Conclusions Although the proteins encoded by the SAR1A and SAR1B genes are 90% identical, the increased expression of the SAR1A gene in AD/CMRD does not appear to compensate for the lack of the SAR1B protein. The PCSK9 variant, although reported to be associated with low levels of cholesterol, does not appear to exert any additional effect in this patient. The results provide further insight into the tissue-specific nature of AD/CMRD.

2011-01-01

420

Anderson-Fabry disease: a histopathological study of three cases with observations on the mechanism of production of pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

A clinical review and histopathological study of three cases of Anderson-Fabry disease is presented and pathological changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems are reported, in some sites for the first time. These are telangiectatic changes in vessels of the sympathetic ganglia in the vertebral trunk; storage of glycolipid in pigmented cells of the substantia nigra and in anterior

Pauline Kahn

1973-01-01