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Sample records for anderson level ii

  1. Suitability of Palestine salt dome, Anderson Co. , Texas for disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Patchick, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    The suitability of Palestine salt dome, in Anderson County, Texas, is in serious doubt for a repository to isolate high-level nuclear waste because of abandoned salt brining operations. The random geographic and spatial occurrence of 15 collapse sinks over the dome may prevent safe construction of the necessary surface installations for a repository. The dissolution of salt between the caprock and dome, from at least 15 brine wells up to 500 feet deep, may permit increased rates of salt dissolution long into future geologic time. The subsurface dissolution is occurring at a rate difficult, if not impossible, to assess or to calculate. It cannot be shown that this dissolution rate is insignificant to the integrity of a future repository or to ancillary features. The most recent significant collapse was 36 feet in diameter and took place in 1972. The other collapses ranged from 27 to 105 feet in diameter and from 1.5 to more than 15 feet in depth. ONWI recommends that this dome be removed from consideration as a candidate site.

  2. Leona Anderson Oral History

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Leona; Gadd-Nelson, Rachel

    2009-09-18

    Oral history interview with Leona Anderson conducted by Rachel Gadd-Nelson in Burdick, Kansas, on September 18, 2009. In this interview, Leona Anderson discusses her experiences as a member of the Missouri Synod Lutheran ...

  3. 55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with eighty-eight 1-1/2" diameter copper ion return RF balance tube systems. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. Paired-Associate Learning at Three Imagery Levels in Level I and Level II Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prawat, Richard S.

    Two views of paired-associate learning were examined by assessing the paired-associate learning efficiency of eighth grade samples identified by digit span and IQ test performance as Jensen-type Level I and Level II learners. Eighty eighth grade students ranging in age from 13 years 3 months to 14 years 10 months were selected as subjects. Three…

  5. Technical/Support Job Level Technical/Support Level I Technical/Support Level II Technical/Support Level III

    E-print Network

    Impact Accountable for the delivery of own tasks within agreed time and quality standards May's degree or advanced degree Bachelor's degree or advanced degree #12;Project/Program Management Job Level Project/Program Management Level I Project/Program Management Level II Project/Program Management Level

  6. Relationship between Level I and Level II Abilities and Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroth, Marvin L.

    1982-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between Jensen's Level I-Level II mental abilities and how they correlate with problem solving in college students. The Level I-Level II correlation was not significant, but intelligence and problem solving were significantly correlated. Results are discussed in relation to prior findings. (Author/RD)

  7. Comments About a Chameleon Theory: Level I/Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, John; Stankov, Lazar

    1982-01-01

    Jensen's ideas about two levels of intellectual abilities are criticized as being oversimplified. More than two levels of intellectual abilities and relationships between variables reflecting more than racial and socioeconomic status (SES) differences are suggested, arguing that Jensen's statements about race and SES differences are not properly…

  8. Culture Curriculum for German, Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oetiker, Rosemary

    This teacher's guide to cultural instruction in a level-2 German course is designed to be used with the text "Deutsch, Erstes Buch, Erster Teil." Instructional observations pertain to the seventh through the 12th lessons and comprise the major portion of this text including: )1) die Eisenbahn, (2) Reisen und Essen in Deutschland, (3) die Familie,…

  9. Universality and the QCD Anderson transition.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Matteo; Kovács, Tamás G; Pittler, Ferenc

    2014-03-14

    We study the Anderson-type transition previously found in the spectrum of the QCD quark Dirac operator in the high-temperature, quark-gluon plasma phase. Using finite size scaling for the unfolded level spacing distribution, we show that in the thermodynamic limit there is a genuine mobility edge, where the spectral statistics changes from Poisson to Wigner-Dyson statistics in a nonanalytic way. We determine the correlation length critical exponent ? and find that it is compatible with that of the unitary Anderson model. PMID:24679282

  10. The Anderson Quin Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

    1993-03-18

    The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

  11. Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

  12. The Internal Validation of Level II and Level III Respiratory Therapy Examinations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jouett, Michael L.

    This project began with the delineation of the roles and functions of respiratory therapy personnel by the American Association for Respiratory Therapy. In Phase II, The Psychological Corporation used this delineation to develop six proficiency examinations, three at each of two levels. One exam at each level was designated for the purpose of the…

  13. 54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch at open port door. Note incoming waveguide and control switch at lower left of photograph and note several waveguides leaving top of scanner switch around the circumference of switch. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  14. 31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing various electronic central indicator panel to control building air conditioning, steam pressure, supply temperature, discharge temperature, supply pressure, transformer vault status, and radome conditioning system. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. 52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch with open port door in radar scanner building 105 showing emanating waveguides from lower switch in vertical run; photograph also shows catwalk to upper scanner switch in upper left side of photograph and structural supports. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  16. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD (II) LEVELS AND LEAD (II) NEUROTOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafl...

  17. Anderson localization of light near boundaries of disordered photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Jovic, Dragana M.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Denz, Cornelia; Belic, Milivoj R.

    2011-03-15

    We study numerically the effect of boundaries on Anderson localization of light in truncated two-dimensional photonic lattices in a nonlinear medium. We demonstrate suppression of Anderson localization at the edges and corners, so that stronger disorder is needed near the boundaries to obtain the same localization as in the bulk. We find that the level of suppression depends on the location in the lattice (edge vs corner), as well as on the strength of disorder. We also discuss the effect of nonlinearity on various regimes of Anderson localization.

  18. 1 UCLA ANDERSON EMBA UCLA ANDERSON SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

    E-print Network

    Palsberg, Jens

    32 UCLA ANDERSON EMBA UCLA ANDERSON EMBA 3 International Residency Program: China China's global, economy and business culture is essential. What better solution than immersion? Our China Residency, Chinese and Islamic Economies International Exchange Programs EMBA students can take one-week elective

  19. Wavelengths, energy levels and hyperfine structure of Mn II and Sc II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Pickering, Juliet C.; Townley-Smith, Keeley I. M.; Hala, .

    2015-08-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Groups at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Imperial College London (ICL) have measured atomic data of astronomical interest. Our spectrometers include Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers at NIST and ICL covering the region 1350 Å to 5.5 ?m and a 10.7-m grating spectrometer at NIST covering wavelengths from 300 - 5000 Å. Sources for these spectra include high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) lamps, Penning discharges, and sliding spark discharges. Recent work has focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure (HFS) constants for iron-group elements. The analysis of FT spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn II is being led by ICL and is described in a companion poster [1]. Current work being led by NIST includes the analysis of HFS in Mn II, analysis of Mn II in the vacuum ultraviolet, and a comprehensive analysis of Sc II.Comprehensive HFS constants for Mn II are needed for the interpretation of stellar spectra and incorrect abundances may be obtained when HFS is omitted. Holt et al. [2] have measured HFS constants for 59 levels of Mn II using laser spectroscopy. We used FT spectra of Mn/Ni and Mn/Cu HCLs covering wavelength ranges from 1350 Å to 5.4 ?m to confirm 26 of the A constants of Holt et al. and obtain values for roughly 40 additional levels. We aim to obtain HFS constants for the majority of lines showing significant HFS that are observed in chemically-peculiar stars.Spectra of Sc HCLs have been recorded from 1800 - 6700 Å using a vacuum ultraviolet FT spectrometer at NIST. Additional measurements to cover wavelengths above 6700 Å and below 1800 Å are in progress. The spectra are being analyzed by NIST and Alighar Muslim University, India in order to derive improved wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters.This work was partially supported by NASA, the STFC and PPARC (UK), the Royal Society of the UK, and the Leverhulme Trust.[1] J. C. Pickering, F. Liggins, C. Clear, M. Ruffoni, G. Nave, C. Sansonetti (this meeting)[2] R. A. Holt, T. J. Scholl & S. D. Rosner, MNRAS 306, 107 (1999)

  20. Anderson attractors in active arrays

    PubMed Central

    Laptyeva, Tetyana V.; Tikhomirov, Andrey A.; Kanakov, Oleg I.; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V.

    2015-01-01

    In dissipationless linear media, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of matter, light, and sound waves. The addition of nonlinearity causes interaction between the eigenmodes, which results in a slow wave diffusion. We go beyond the dissipationless limit of Anderson arrays and consider nonlinear disordered systems that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess specific excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the threshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multi-peak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices, active waveguide or cavity-QED arrays. PMID:26304462

  1. Anderson attractors in active arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptyeva, Tetyana V.; Tikhomirov, Andrey A.; Kanakov, Oleg I.; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V.

    2015-08-01

    In dissipationless linear media, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of matter, light, and sound waves. The addition of nonlinearity causes interaction between the eigenmodes, which results in a slow wave diffusion. We go beyond the dissipationless limit of Anderson arrays and consider nonlinear disordered systems that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess specific excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the threshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multi-peak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices, active waveguide or cavity-QED arrays.

  2. Anderson attractors in active arrays.

    PubMed

    Laptyeva, Tetyana V; Tikhomirov, Andrey A; Kanakov, Oleg I; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V

    2015-01-01

    In dissipationless linear media, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of matter, light, and sound waves. The addition of nonlinearity causes interaction between the eigenmodes, which results in a slow wave diffusion. We go beyond the dissipationless limit of Anderson arrays and consider nonlinear disordered systems that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess specific excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the threshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multi-peak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices, active waveguide or cavity-QED arrays. PMID:26304462

  3. Anderson attractors in active arrays

    E-print Network

    T. V. Laptyeva; A. A. Tikhomirov; O. I. Kanakov; M. V. Ivanchenko

    2015-06-28

    In dissipationless linear media, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of matter, light, and sound waves. The addition of nonlinearity causes interaction between the eigenmodes, which results in a slow wave diffusion. We go beyond the dissipationless limit of Anderson arrays and consider nonlinear disordered systems that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess specific excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the threshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multi-peak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices, active waveguide or cavity-QED arrays.

  4. Hybrid Bloch-Anderson localization of light

    E-print Network

    Stutzer, Simon; Vysloukh, Victor A; Konotop, Vladimir V; Nolte, Stefan; Torner, Lluis; Szameit, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the interplay of Bloch oscillations and Anderson localization in optics. Gradual washing out of Bloch oscillations and the formation of nearly stationary averaged intensity distributions, which are symmetric for narrow and strongly asymmetric for broad input excitations, are observed experimentally in laser-written waveguide arrays. At large disorder levels Bloch oscillations are completely destroyed and both narrow and wide excitations lead to symmetric stationary averaged intensity distributions with exponentially decaying tails.

  5. Jrgen Richter Meat and stones: Kabazi II, Levels VI/9 to VI/10

    E-print Network

    Hartmann, Robert

    Jürgen Richter Meat and stones: Kabazi II, Levels VI/9 to VI/10 Victor Chabai, Jürgen Richter-site. Meat and stones: Kabazi II, levels VI/9 to VI/10 Jürgen Richter Although lithological evidence suggests production efforts were minimal. #12;Chapter 13 221 Meat and stones: Kabazi II, levels VI/9 to VI/10 Fig. 13

  6. Anderson's Orthogonality Catastrophe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebert, Martin; Küttler, Heinrich; Müller, Peter

    2014-08-01

    We give an upper bound on the modulus of the ground-state overlap of two non-interacting fermionic quantum systems with N particles in a large but finite volume L d of d-dimensional Euclidean space. The underlying one-particle Hamiltonians of the two systems are standard Schrödinger operators that differ by a non-negative compactly supported scalar potential. In the thermodynamic limit, the bound exhibits an asymptotic power-law decay in the system size L, showing that the ground-state overlap vanishes for macroscopic systems. The decay exponent can be interpreted in terms of the total scattering cross section averaged over all incident directions. The result confirms and generalises P. W. Anderson's informal computation (Phys. Rev. Lett. 18:1049-1051, 1967).

  7. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level II, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part one of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level II of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.…

  8. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level II, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part two of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level II of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.…

  9. Best Practices for Lecturing with Digital Ink Richard Anderson

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Best Practices for Lecturing with Digital Ink Richard Anderson Department of Computer Science@cs.washington.edu ABSTRACT Systems allowing instructors to write on top of electronic slides with digital ink are becoming widely available. The combination of high quality projected images and rich ink offers new levels

  10. 2014 Integrated Scholar: Todd Anderson

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    in Home Texas Tech Today Media Resources News Experts Guide Emergency Communications TTYou Social Media/06/2014-integrated-scholar-todd-anderson/[6/6/2014 12:05:26 PM] TTU Home Communications & Marketing Home Texas Tech. Texas Tech Today Resources Communications & Marketing Resources Texas Tech University Home RSS Feeds

  11. M D Anderson Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    This proposal will establish a Small Animal Imaging Research Program (SAIRP) at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The proposed SAIRP will complement the existing institutional facility that provides small animal imaging services to NIH funded investigators. The broad goal of this SAIRP is to develop novel imaging approaches to solve cancer related biological questions and evaluate new cancer therapies.

  12. Publications for Bart Anderson Anderson, B. (2015). Bart Anderson. Current Biology, 25(15),

    E-print Network

    Müller, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    ] Ratnasingam, S., Anderson, B. (2015). The role of chromatic variance in modulating color appearance. Journal, B. (2014). The perceptual organzation of depth, lightness, color, and opacity. In John S Werner, Leo surface completion in stereoscopic transparency. Frontiers in Psychology, 3(SEP 2012), 1-11.

  13. Estimation of Failure Frequency for Type I and II High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K.H.

    2001-05-15

    The failure frequency of Type I and Type II High Level Waste tanks was calculated. The degradation mechanism that could lead to large break failure and the credits taken for steps taken to prevent large break failure were considered.

  14. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and complex II levels are associated with the outcome of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WU, JIANHUA; ZHAO, FEI; ZHAO, YUFEI; GUO, ZHANJUN

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, two oxidative stress parameters, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial respiratory complex II, were evaluated in the mitochondria of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells to determine the association between these parameters and the carcinogenesis and clinical outcome of HCC. High levels of ROS and low levels of complex II were found to be associated with reduced post-operative survival in HCC patients using the log-rank test. Furthermore, multivariate analysis confirmed that the levels of ROS [relative risk (RR)=2.867; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.062–7.737; P=0.038] and complex II (RR=5.422; 95% CI, 1.273–23.088; P=0.022) were independent predictors for the survival of patients with HCC. Therefore, the analysis of ROS and complex II levels may provide a useful research and therapeutic tool for the prediction of HCC prognosis and treatment.

  15. Anderson testifies on Planet Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainger, Lisa A.

    AGU president Don Anderson joined former astronaut Sally Ride and National Aeronautics and Space Administration official Lennard Fisk March 8 in testifying before the Senate committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. The three had been asked to speak on the future of the Mission to Planet Earth, proposed both in a National Academy of Sciences report and a NASA study.Anderson was chairman of the National Academy of Science's Task Group on Earth Sciences, which prepared the report Mission to Planet Earth as part of the series Space Science in the Twenty-First Century. In his testimony, Anderson highlighted parts of the report and quoted the frontispiece “We now have the technology and the incentive to move boldly forward on a Mission to Planet Earth. We call on the nation to implement an integrated global program using both spaceborne and earth-based instrumentation for fundamental research on the origin, evolution and nature of our planet, its place in our solar system, and its interaction with living things, including mankind.”

  16. Specification for Qualification and Certification for Level II - Advanced Welders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

    This document defines the requirements and program for the American Welding Society (AWS) to certify advanced-level welders through an evaluation process entailing performance qualification and practical knowledge tests requiring the use of advanced reading, computational, and manual skills. The following items are included: statement of the…

  17. Identification of new fluorescence processes in the UV spectra of cool stars from new energy levels of Fe II and Cr II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Two fluorescence processes operating in atmospheres of cool stars, symbiotic stars, and the Sun are presented. Two emission lines, at 1347.03 and 1360.17 A, are identified as fluorescence lines of Cr II and Fe II. The lines are due to transitions from highly excited levels, which are populated radiatively by the hydrogen Lyman alpha line due to accidental wavelength coincidences. Three energy levels, one in Cr II and two in Fe II, are reported.

  18. Factorial validity and measurement invariance across intelligence levels and gender of the overexcitabilities questionnaire-II (OEQ-II).

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Wim; Hofmans, Joeri; Cooremans, Sven; Staels, Eva

    2014-03-01

    The concept of overexcitability, derived from Dabrowski's theory of personality development, offers a promising approach for the study of the developmental dynamics of giftedness. The present study aimed at (a) examining the factorial structure of the Overexcitabilities Questionnaire-II scores (OEQ-II) and (b) testing measurement invariance of these scores across intelligence and gender. A sample of 641 Dutch-speaking adolescents from 11 to 15 years old, 363 girls and 278 boys, participated in this study. Results showed that a model without cross-loadings did not fit the data well (using confirmatory factor analysis), whereas a factor model in which all cross-loadings were included yielded fit statistics that were in support of the factorial structure of the OEQ-II scores (using exploratory structural equation modeling). Furthermore, our findings supported the assumption of (partial) strict measurement invariance of the OEQ-II scores across intelligence levels and across gender. Such levels of measurement invariance allow valid comparisons between factor means and factor relationships across groups. In particular, the gifted group scored significantly higher on intellectual and sensual overexcitability (OE) than the nongifted group, girls scored higher on emotional and sensual OE than boys, and boys scored higher on intellectual and psychomotor OE than girls. PMID:24079958

  19. Inhalation and ingestion intakes with associated dose estimates for level II and level III personnel using Capstone study data.

    PubMed

    Szrom, Frances; Falo, Gerald A; Lodde, Gordon M; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Daxon, Eric G

    2009-03-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone DU Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe-tests samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large-caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h(-1) based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h(-1) based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h(-1) to 38.9 mg h(-1) based on the wipe-tests data including surface-to-glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h(-1) and 1.78 mg h(-1), respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures. PMID:19204492

  20. Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data

    SciTech Connect

    Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

    2009-03-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

  1. Water pair potential of near spectroscopic accuracy. II. Vibrationrotationtunneling levels of the water dimer

    E-print Network

    Water pair potential of near spectroscopic accuracy. II. Vibration­rotation­tunneling levels-dimensional quantum calculations of the vibration­rotation­tunneling VRT levels of the water dimer for values of the water dimer G. C. Groenenboom, P. E. S. Wormer, and A. van der Avoird Institute of Theoretical Chemistry

  2. Primary colon cancer with a high serum PIVKA-II level

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kazuya; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Onodera, Kazuhiko; Matsuda, Minoru; Kawakami, Takako; Higuchi, Mineko; Kato, Kimitaka; Kato, Yurina; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Protein induced by vitamin K absence/antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) is an abnormal protein, and several reports have demonstrated the efficacy of PIVKA-II in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We report an extremely rare case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with a high serum PIVKA-II level. Presentation of Case A 95-year-old woman presented with right lower quadrant pain and appetite loss. An abdominal computed tomography scan and ultrasonography showed an ascending colon tumor and multiple metastatic tumors in the liver. The serum level of PIVKA-II was extremely high, 11,900 ng/mL. Colonoscopic examination revealed a tumor accompanied by an ulcer in the ascending colon, which was highly suspicious for malignancy. Multiple biopsies showed well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon, which was evaluated as colon cancer, stage IV. PIVKA-II-productive colon cancer was confirmed. Chemotherapy with TS-1 was administered. The patient died 3 months after initial admission. Discussion The expression of PIVKA-II was detected in non-cancer areas, with non-specific expression observed in plasma cells in our case. There might be some possibility that hepatoid differentiation exists in other regions of the colon tumor or in the liver tumor, parenchymal cells or lung metastases, which were composed of PIVKA-II-positive and AFP-negative cells. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, high serum levels of PIVKA-II resulting from colon adenocarcinoma have not been reported previously. We report this rare case together with a review of the literature. PMID:25528035

  3. Critically Evaluated Energy Levels and Spectral Lines of Singly Ionized Indium (In II)

    PubMed Central

    Kramida, A

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive list of the best measured wavelengths in the In II spectrum has been compiled. Uncertainties of the wavelength measurements have been analyzed, and existing inconsistencies have been resolved. An optimized set of fine-structure energy levels that fits all observed wavelengths has been derived. Uncertainties of the energy level values have been reduced by an order of magnitude. An improved value of the ionization limit of In II has been determined by fitting quantum-defect and polarization formulas for several series of levels. Intensities of lines observed by different authors have been analyzed and converted to a uniform scale. A set of recommended values of radiative transition rates has been critically compiled, and uncertainties of these rates have been estimated. The hyperfine structure interval in the 5s 2S ground state of In III has been determined from the measurements of the 5sng and 5snh series in In II. PMID:26401424

  4. An Explanation of "Levels" of Competence in Foreign Language Learning: Russian, Levels I, II, III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Kurt A.; Merriman, Derald

    This report, based on the recommendations of the Illinois Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages and intended to improve articulation, discusses the basic elements of each of the first three levels of foreign language learning. Desired student performance at the completion of levels 1, 2, and 3 of…

  5. An Explanation of "Levels" of Competence in Foreign Language Learning; French, Levels I, II, III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Pat; And Others

    This report of a two-day meeting at Bloomington, Illinois in April 1969 discusses the basic elements of each of the first three levels of foreign language learning. Desired student performance at the completion of levels 1, 2, and 3 of French is enumerated for listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, grammar, and culture. Suggested…

  6. An Explanation of "Levels" of Competence in Foreign Language Learning; German, Levels I, II, III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Pat; And Others

    This report of a two-day meeting at Bloomington, Illinois in April 1969 discusses the basic elements of each of the first three levels of foreign language learning. Desired student performance at the completion of levels 1, 2, and 3 of German is enumerated for listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, grammar, and culture. Suggested…

  7. An Explanation of "Levels" of Competence in Foreign Language Learning; Spanish, Levels I, II, III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Pat; And Others

    This report of a two-day meeting at Bloomington, Illinois in April 1969 discusses the basic elements of each of the first three levels of foreign language learning. Desired student performance at the completion of levels 1, 2, and 3 of Spanish is enumerated for listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, grammar, and culture. Suggested…

  8. Algebra II: Gatekeeper Course--An Examination of CST Proficiency Levels in California and the Bay Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailer-O'Keefe, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the Algebra II course and California Star Test (CST) proficiency levels in the San Francisco Bay Area and in the State of California. CST proficiency levels are examined by grade level for the State and nine counties of the San Francisco Bay Area region. Algebra II is shown to be one of the more complicated courses in the CSU…

  9. Guide for the Training and Qualification of Welding Personnel. Level II - Advanced Welders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

    This guide is designed to help education and training facilities develop and administer competency-based training programs to qualify and certify trainees in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) requirements for level II (advanced) welders. Presented first are the scope, objectives, and requirements of the AWS…

  10. Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 2: Locating clouds tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

    1995-01-01

    A comparison is made of the vertical distribution of high-level cloud tops derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements and from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for all Julys and Januarys in 1985 to 1990. The results suggest that ISCCP overestimates the pressure of high-level clouds by up to 50-150 mbar, particularly at low latitudes. This is caused by the frequent presence of clouds with diffuse tops (greater than 50% time when cloudy events are observed). The averaged vertical extent of the diffuse top is about 1.5 km. At midlatitudes where the SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressure agree best, clouds with distinct tops reach a maximum relative proportion of the total level cloud amount (about 30-40%), and diffuse-topped clouds are reduced to their minimum (30-40%). The ISCCP-defined cloud top pressure should be regarded not as the material physical height of the clouds but as the level which emits the same infrared radiance as observed. SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressures agree for clouds with distinct tops. There is also an indication that the cloud top pressures of optically thin clouds not overlying thicker clouds are poorly estimated by ISCCP at middle latitudes. The average vertical extent of these thin clouds is about 2.5 km.

  11. Level II scour analysis for bridge 2 (WODFTH00010002) on Town Highway 1, crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODFTH00010002 on Town Highway 1 crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  12. Coherent Backscattering Reveals the Anderson Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Delande, D.; Miniatura, C.; Cherroret, N.

    2015-11-01

    We develop an accurate finite-time scaling analysis of the angular width of the coherent backscattering (CBS) peak for waves propagating in 3D random media. Applying this method to ultracold atoms in optical speckle potentials, we show how to determine both the mobility edge and the critical exponent of the Anderson transition from the temporal behavior of the CBS width. Our method could be used in experiments to fully characterize the 3D Anderson transition.

  13. Serum uric acid level, blood pressure, and vascular angiotensin II responsiveness in healthy men and women

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Arian; Ramesh, Sharanya; Turin, Tanvir C.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Sarna, Magdalena A.; Reimer, Raylene A.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Sola, Darlene Y.; Ahmed, Sofia B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Uric acid is associated with hypertension and increased renin–angiotensin system activity, although this relationship diminishes after chronic exposure to high levels. Uric acid is more strongly associated with poor outcomes in women compared to men, although whether this is due to a sex?specific uric acid?mediated pathophysiology or reflects sex differences in baseline uric acid levels remains unknown. We examined the association between uric acid and vascular measures at baseline and in response to angiotensin?II challenge in young healthy humans. Fifty?two subjects (17 men, 35 premenopausal women) were studied in high?salt balance. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in men compared to women (328 ± 14 ?mol/L vs. 248 ± 10 ?mol/L, P < 0.001), although all values were within normal sex?specific range. Men demonstrated no association between uric acid and blood pressure, either at baseline or in response to angiotensin?II. In stark contrast, a significant association was observed between uric acid and blood pressure at baseline (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.005; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.02) and in response to angiotensin?II (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.035; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.056) in women. However, this sex difference lost significance after adjustment for baseline uric acid. When all subjects were stratified according to high (>300 ?mol/L) or low (?300 ?mol/L) uric acid levels, only the low uric acid group showed a positive association between uric acid and measures of vascular tone at baseline and in response to angiotensin?II. Differences in uric acid?mediated outcomes between men and women likely reflect differences in exposure to increased uric acid levels, rather than a sex?specific uric acid?mediated pathophysiology. PMID:25501427

  14. Highly effective biosorption of Sr(II) from low level radioactive wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Hu, Wenyuan; Huang, Xiaojun; Deng, Hongquan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis was first used to remove Sr(II) from low-level radioactive wastewater. Influence parameters, biosorption kinetics and biosorption equilibrium were investigated. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity of Sr(II) at over 2,000 mg g(-1) by Bacillus subtilis was higher than for other biosorbents. At pH 6.3, Sr(II) concentration of 15 mg L(-1), biomass dosage of 0.3 g L(-1) and temperature of 20 °C, the maximum removal efficiency was as high as 96.3% at 1,440 minutes. The biosorption kinetics and the equilibrium isotherm data can be described by the pseudo-second-order equation and Freundlich isotherm equation, respectively. The negative values of ?G and the positive values of ?H implied that Sr(II) biosorption on Bacillus subtilis was a spontaneous and endothermic process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that the functional groups, hydroxyl, carboxylate and amide groups, might participate in the interaction between Sr(II) and Bacillus subtilis. PMID:26038939

  15. The Use of Digital Ink in Lecture Presentation Richard Anderson, Ruth Anderson!!!!, Crystal Hoyer,

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    The Use of Digital Ink in Lecture Presentation Richard Anderson, Ruth Anderson!!!!, Crystal Hoyer 600 800 1000 1200 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Professor B Segmentation of ink strokes for two lectures Professional Masters' Program class Webviewer for lecture replay Instructor view of Classroom Presenter Ink

  16. Review of the Constellation Level II Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Documents during Participation in the Constellation Level II SR&QA Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Kenneth D.; Gentz, Steven J.; Beil, Robert J.; Minute, Stephen A.; Currie, Nancy J.; Scott, Steven S.; Thomas, Walter B., III; Smiles, Michael D.; Schafer, Charles F.; Null, Cynthia H.; Bay, P. Michael

    2009-01-01

    At the request of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and the Constellation Program (CxP) Safety, Reliability; and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Director, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) participated in the Cx SR&QA Requirements forum. The Requirements Forum was held June 24-26; 2008, at GRC's Plum Brook Facility. The forums purpose was to gather all stakeholders into a focused meeting to help complete the process of refining the CxP to refine its Level II SR&QA requirements or defining project-specific requirements tailoring. Element prime contractors had raised specific questions about the wording and intent of many requirements in areas they felt were driving costs without adding commensurate value. NESC was asked to provide an independent and thorough review of requirements that contractors believed were driving Program costs, by active participation in the forum. This document contains information from the forum.

  17. COMPREHENSIVE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND IMPROVED ENERGY LEVELS FOR SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph; Kerber, Florian

    2012-10-15

    We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 A. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

  18. Arc Detection and Interlock Module for the PEP II Low Level RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    A new arc detection and interlock generating module for the SLAC PEP-II low-level RF VXI-based system has been developed. The system is required to turn off the RF drive and high voltage power supply in the event of arcing in the cavity windows, klystron window, or circulator. Infrared photodiodes receive arc signals through radiation resistant optical fibers. Gain and bandwidth are selectable for each channel to allow tailoring response. The module also responds to interlock requests from other modules in the VXI system and communicates with the programmable logic controller (PLC) responsible for much of the low-level RF system's interlock functionality.

  19. SAGE II Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties at Non-Volcanic Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Burton, Sharon P.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Peter, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Since 2000, stratospheric aerosol levels have been relatively stable and at the lowest levels observed in the historical record. Given the challenges of making satellite measurements of aerosol properties at these levels, we have performed a study of the sensitivity of the product to the major components of the processing algorithm used in the production of SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements and the retrieval process that produces the operational surface area density (SAD) product. We find that the aerosol extinction measurements, particularly at 1020 nm, remain robust and reliable at the observed aerosol levels. On the other hand, during background periods, the SAD operational product has an uncertainty of at least a factor of 2 during due to the lack of sensitivity to particles with radii less than 100 nm.

  20. Quality assurance plan for the High Level Controller for the CBMS Block II

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.W.; Robbins, I.F.; Stewart, K.A.; Terry, C.L.; Whitaker, R.A.; Wolf, D.A.; Zager, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    This document establishes the software Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the High Level Controller for the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II (HLC/CBMS-II) project activities under the Computing, Robotics, and Education (CRE) Directorate management. It defines the requirements and assigns responsibilities for ensuring, with a high degree of confidence, that project objectives will be achieved as planned. The CBMS Program was awarded to ORNL by the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to design the next version (Block II) mass spectrometer for the detection and identification of chemical and biological warfare agents, to fabricate four engineering prototypes, and to construct eight preproduction units. Section 1 of this document provides an introduction to the HLC/CBMS-II project QAP. Sections 2 and 3 describe the specific aspects of quality assurance as applicable to the project. Section 4 reviews the project approach to risk management. The Risk Management Matrix given in Appendix A is a tool to assess, prioritize, and prevent problems before they occur; therefore, the matrix will be reviewed and revised on a periodic basis. Appendix B shows the quality assurance criteria of the DOE Order 5700.6C and their applicability to this project.

  1. Gestational Exposure to Elevated Testosterone Levels Induces Hypertension via Heightened Vascular Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Signaling in Rats1

    PubMed Central

    Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; More, Amar S.; Hankins, Gary D.; Yallampalli, Chandra; Sathishkumar, Kunju

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pre-eclampsia is a life-threatening pregnancy disorder whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Plasma testosterone levels are elevated in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia and polycystic ovary syndrome, who often develop gestational hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that increased gestational testosterone levels induce hypertension via heightened angiotensin II signaling. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with vehicle or testosterone propionate from Gestational Day 15 to 19 to induce a 2-fold increase in plasma testosterone levels, similar to levels observed in clinical conditions like pre-eclampsia. A subset of rats in these two groups was given losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist by gavage during the course of testosterone exposure. Blood pressure levels were assessed through a carotid arterial catheter and endothelium-independent vascular reactivity through wire myography. Angiotensin II levels in plasma and angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in mesenteric arteries were also examined. Blood pressure levels were significantly higher on Gestational Day 20 in testosterone-treated dams than in controls. Treatment with losartan during the course of testosterone exposure significantly attenuated testosterone-induced hypertension. Plasma angiotensin II levels were not significantly different between control and testosterone-treated rats; however, elevated testosterone levels significantly increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor protein levels in the mesenteric arteries. In testosterone-treated rats, mesenteric artery contractile responses to angiotensin II were significantly greater, whereas contractile responses to K+ depolarization and phenylephrine were unaffected. The results demonstrate that elevated testosterone during gestation induces hypertension in pregnant rats via heightened angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated signaling, providing a molecular mechanism linking elevated maternal testosterone levels with gestational hypertension. PMID:24855104

  2. CA-125 Level as a Prognostic Indicator in Type I and Type II Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Jing; Cheng, Wenjun; Chang, Doo Young; Huang, Jianfei; Wang, Xuan; Jia, Lizhou; Rosen, Daniel G.; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Da; Gershenson, David M.; Sood, Anil K.; Bast, Robert C.; Liu, Jinsong

    2013-01-01

    Objective The majority of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer achieved a complete clinical remission with normal CA-125 will still relapse and die from their disease. The present study was to determine whether CA-125 levels before, during and after primary treatment provided prognostic information for both Type I and Type II ovarian cancer. Methods In this retrospective study, we identified 410 epithelial ovarian cancer patients who had achieved a CCR between 1984 and 2011. A Cox proportional hazards model and log-rank test were used to assess associations between the nadir CA-125, histotype, and prognosis. Results The baseline serum CA-125 concentration was higher in patients with type II ovarian cancer than in those with type I (p < 0.001). The nadir CA-125 was an independent predictor of PFS (p < 0.001) and OS (p = 0.035) duration. The PFS and OS durations were 21.7 and 79.4 months in patients with CA-125 ? 10 U/ml and 13.6 and 64.6 months in those with 11-35 U/ml (p = 0.01 and 0.002, respectively). Histotype was an independent predictor of PFS (p = 0.041): the PFS and OS durations of type I patients were longer than those in type II (p < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions The nadir CA-125 and the histotype are predictive of PFS and OS duration in ovarian cancers experienced a CCR. PFS and OS durations were shorter in patients with CA-125 levels of 11-35 U/ml and type II disease than in those with ? 10 U/ml and type I. PMID:23669443

  3. Quantum phase transitions in a pseudogap Anderson-Holstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Mengxing; Ingersent, Kevin

    2013-02-01

    We study a pseudogap Anderson-Holstein model of a magnetic impurity level that hybridizes with a conduction band whose density of states vanishes in power-law fashion at the Fermi energy, and couples, via its charge, to a nondispersive bosonic mode (e.g., an optical phonon). The model, which we treat using poor-man's scaling and the numerical renormalization group, exhibits quantum phase transitions of different types depending on the strength of the impurity-boson coupling. For weak impurity-boson coupling, the suppression of the density of states near the Fermi energy leads to quantum phase transitions between strong-coupling (Kondo) and local-moment phases. For sufficiently strong impurity-boson coupling, however, the bare repulsion between a pair of electrons in the impurity level becomes an effective attraction, leading to quantum phase transitions between strong-coupling (charge Kondo) and local-charge phases. Even though the Hamiltonian exhibits different symmetries in the spin and charge sectors, the thermodynamic properties near the two types of quantum phase transition are closely related under spin-charge interchange. Moreover, the critical responses to a local magnetic field (for small impurity-boson coupling) and to an electric potential (for large impurity-boson coupling) are characterized by the same exponents, whose values place these quantum-critical points in the universality class of the pseudogap Anderson model. One specific case of the pseudogap Anderson-Holstein model may be realized in a double-quantum-dot device, where the quantum phase transitions manifest themselves in the finite-temperature linear electrical conductance.

  4. Anderson localization in laser-kicked molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floß, Johannes; Fishman, Shmuel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2013-08-01

    The paper explores the prospects of observing the phenomenon of dynamical Anderson localization via nonresonant Raman-type rotational excitation of molecules by periodic trains of short laser pulses. We define conditions for such an experiment and show that current femtosecond technology used for nonadiabatic laser alignment of linear molecules is sufficient for this task. Several observables which can serve as indicators for Anderson localization are suggested for measurement, and the influence of experimental limitations imposed by the laser intensity noise, finite pulse duration, limited number of pulses in a train, and thermal effects is analyzed.

  5. High levels of MHC class II allelic diversity in lake trout from Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorschner, M.O.; Duris, T.; Bronte, C.R.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.; Phillips, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Sequence variation in a 216 bp portion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II B1 domain was examined in 74 individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from different locations in Lake Superior. Forty-three alleles were obtained which encoded 71-72 amino acids of the mature protein. These sequences were compared with previous data obtained from five Pacific salmon species and Atlantic salmon using the same primers. Although all of the lake trout alleles clustered together in the neighbor-joining analysis of amino acid sequences, one amino acid allelic lineage was shared with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species in another genus which probably diverged from Salvelinus more than 10-20 million years ago. As shown previously in other salmonids, the level of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) exceeded the level of synonymous substitution (d(S)). The level of nucleotide diversity at the MHC class II B1 locus was considerably higher in lake trout than in the Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lake trout colonized Lake Superior from more than one refuge following the Wisconsin glaciation. Recent population bottlenecks may have reduced nucleotide diversity in Pacific salmon populations.

  6. Transverse Anderson localization of light near Dirac points of photonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hanying; Chen, Xianfeng; Malomed, Boris A; Panoiu, Nicolae C; Ye, Fangwei

    2015-01-01

    We perform a comparative study of the Anderson localization of light beams in disordered layered photonic nanostructures that, in the limit of periodic layer distribution, possess either a Dirac point or a Bragg gap in the spectrum of the wavevectors. In particular, we demonstrate that the localization length of the Anderson modes increases when the width of the Bragg gap decreases, such that in the vanishingly small bandgap limit, namely when a Dirac point is formed, even extremely high levels of disorder are unable to localize the optical modes residing near the Dirac point. A comparative analysis of the key features of the propagation of Anderson modes formed in the Bragg gap or near the Dirac point is also presented. Our findings could provide valuable guidelines in assessing the influence of structural disorder on the functionality of a broad array of optical nanodevices. PMID:26498634

  7. Transverse Anderson localization of light near Dirac points of photonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hanying; Chen, Xianfeng; Malomed, Boris A.; Panoiu, Nicolae C.; Ye, Fangwei

    2015-10-01

    We perform a comparative study of the Anderson localization of light beams in disordered layered photonic nanostructures that, in the limit of periodic layer distribution, possess either a Dirac point or a Bragg gap in the spectrum of the wavevectors. In particular, we demonstrate that the localization length of the Anderson modes increases when the width of the Bragg gap decreases, such that in the vanishingly small bandgap limit, namely when a Dirac point is formed, even extremely high levels of disorder are unable to localize the optical modes residing near the Dirac point. A comparative analysis of the key features of the propagation of Anderson modes formed in the Bragg gap or near the Dirac point is also presented. Our findings could provide valuable guidelines in assessing the influence of structural disorder on the functionality of a broad array of optical nanodevices.

  8. Transverse Anderson localization of light near Dirac points of photonic nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hanying; Chen, Xianfeng; Malomed, Boris A.; Panoiu, Nicolae C.; Ye, Fangwei

    2015-01-01

    We perform a comparative study of the Anderson localization of light beams in disordered layered photonic nanostructures that, in the limit of periodic layer distribution, possess either a Dirac point or a Bragg gap in the spectrum of the wavevectors. In particular, we demonstrate that the localization length of the Anderson modes increases when the width of the Bragg gap decreases, such that in the vanishingly small bandgap limit, namely when a Dirac point is formed, even extremely high levels of disorder are unable to localize the optical modes residing near the Dirac point. A comparative analysis of the key features of the propagation of Anderson modes formed in the Bragg gap or near the Dirac point is also presented. Our findings could provide valuable guidelines in assessing the influence of structural disorder on the functionality of a broad array of optical nanodevices. PMID:26498634

  9. Expression levels of urotensin II are associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress in patients with severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    He, W-Y; Chen, G-J; Lai, X; Wu, F; Tang, C-S; Zhang, A-H

    2016-02-01

    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain a leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. We aim to study urotensin II (UII) and its association with the markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in placentas of patients with severe preeclampsia (SPE). Thirty-three patients with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and twenty-two healthy pregnant women designated as healthy controls were recruited. Expression levels of UII, UII receptor (GPR14) and the markers of ERS in placenta specimens of patients were performed. Plasma and urinary UII levels were measured by radioimmunoassay method. Our study showed that the plasma levels of UII in patients with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy were significantly higher than that of the healthy control group. However, the urinary levels of UII had no difference in two groups. The expression level of mRNA and protein of UII, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose regulation protein 78 in placentas of SPE was significantly increased. Immunohistochemical analyses show that the expression levels of UII and ERS markers were mainly located in the cytoplasm of placental trophoblastic cells. Moreover, expression level of UII mRNA and protein was positively correlated with that of the markers of ERS. The positive correlation between UII and ERS markers expression level also corresponded with the level of patient's systolic blood pressure and proteinuria. In conclusion, we first verify that expression of UII is associated with ERS in patients with SPE. Our results indicate that UII may trigger ERS in placental trophoblastic cells in patients with preeclampsia. PMID:25880595

  10. Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 Unraveling the conundrum of river response to rising sea level from

    E-print Network

    Parker, Gary

    response to rising sea level from laboratory to field. Part II. The Fly-Strickland River System, Papua New recent deglaciation resulted in a global sea level rise of some 120 m over approximately 12000 years New Guinea. In the absence of better information, the model is applied to the case of sea level rise

  11. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Physiological Free Cu(II) Levels in Live Cells with a Cu(II)-Selective Carbonic Anhydrase-Based Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    McCranor, Bryan J.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Zeng, Hui Hui; Stoddard, A.K.; Hurst, Tamiika; Fierke, Carol A.; Lakowicz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a required trace element that plays key roles in a number of human enzymes, such that copper deficiency or genetic defects in copper transport lead to serious or fatal disease. Rae, et al., had famously predicted that free copper ion levels in the cell cytoplasm were extremely low, typically too low to be observable. We recently developed a variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase II for sensing metal ions that exhibits 25-fold better selectivity for Cu(II) over Zn(II) than the wild type protein, enabling us to accurately measure Cu(II) in the presence of ordinary cellular (picomolar) concentrations of free zinc. We inserted a fluorescent labeled Cu(II)-specific variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase into PC-12 cells and found that the levels are indeed extremely low (in the femtomolar range). We imaged the free Cu(II) levels in living cells by means of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy. Implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:24671220

  12. Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II.

    E-print Network

    Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II. Increased fertilizer use greatly. It was apparent well before the rapid expansion in fertilizer use that inexpensive ways to evaluate the fertility

  13. The Lost Career of Paul Y. Anderson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambeth, Edmund B.

    1983-01-01

    Examines major episodes in the reporting career of Paul Y. Anderson, Washington, D.C., newspaper correspondent and magazine columnist, to see how he helped maintain the practice and standing of enterprise journalism in the 1920s and 1930s. (FL)

  14. Peter G. Anderson, Computer Science Department

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Peter G.

    of identical clones A Genetic Algorithm must combine · Exploration (e.g., random search) · Exploitation (e#12;GA Issues Peter G. Anderson, Computer Science Department Rochester Institute of Technology & create two children Add the children to the new population pg. 12 #12;Mutation: Preserve Genetic

  15. The conductivity measure for the Anderson model

    E-print Network

    Abel Klein; Peter Müller

    2007-09-21

    We study the ac-conductivity in linear response theory for the Anderson tight-binding model. We define the electrical ac-conductivity and calculate the linear-response current at zero temperature for arbitrary Fermi energy. In particular, the Fermi energy may lie in a spectral region where extended states are believed to exist.

  16. Lifshits tails in the hierarchical Anderson model

    E-print Network

    Simon Kuttruf; Peter Müller

    2011-08-21

    We prove that the homogeneous hierarchical Anderson model exhibits a Lifshits tail at the upper edge of its spectrum. The Lifshits exponent is given in terms of the spectral dimension of the homogeneous hierarchical structure. Our approach is based on Dirichlet-Neumann bracketing for the hierarchical Laplacian and a large-deviation argument.

  17. Forecasting Total Risk Greg Anderson y

    E-print Network

    Forecasting Total Risk #3; Greg Anderson y Barra, Inc. Lisa Goldberg y Barra, Inc. Alec N. Kercheval z Florida State University Guy Miller y Barra, Inc. Kathy Sorge y Barra, Inc. May 1, 2003 x, optimization. y Barra, Inc., 2100 Milvia Street, Berkeley, CA 94704 USA z Department of Mathematics, Florida

  18. Direct determination of the timing of sea level change during termination II.

    PubMed

    Gallup, Christina D; Cheng, H; Taylor, F W; Edwards, R L

    2002-01-11

    An outcrop within the last interglacial terrace on Barbados contains corals that grew during the penultimate deglaciation, or Termination II. We used combined 230Th and 231Pa dating to determine that they grew 135.8 +/- 0.8 thousand years ago, indicating that sea level was 18 +/- 3 meters below present sea level at the time. This suggests that sea level had risen to within 20% of its peak last-interglacial value by 136 thousand years ago, in conflict with Milankovitch theory predictions. Orbital forcing may have played a role in the deglaciation, as may have isostatic adjustments due to large ice sheets. Other corals in the same outcrop grew during oxygen isotope (delta18O) substage 6e, indicating that sea level was 38 +/- 5 meters below present sea level, about 168.0 thousand years ago. When compared to the delta18O signal in the benthic V19-30/V19-28 record at that time, the coral data extend to the previous glacial cycle the conclusion that deep-water temperatures were colder during glacial periods. PMID:11786639

  19. Level II Milestone Review of LLNL Program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, M F; Benson, D J; Yip, S

    2003-01-14

    This document describes an evaluation of the Level II Milestone achievements of the LLNL program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives on January 14, 2003. ''The Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives Program'' is a mixture of advanced computational methodology and physico-chemical theory applied to understanding deflagration and detonation of plastic-bonded explosives from the nano to the macro scales. At many points, the modeling is tied directly to experiments within the precisions of both. Advances are needed in the experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of detonations. Work reported in this review represents significant, cross-pollinating advances in each area. The team successfully carried out ALE-3D simulations of deflagration in PBX with grain scale effects. (Milestone requirements 1 and 2), interpreted experimental data on flame speed vs. pressure and sensitivity to global kinetics in terms of ALE-3D simulations (Milestone requirement 3), and used the results of these simulations to develop a continuum reactive flow model that captures some of these effects (Milestone requirement 4). By comparing experiments and detonation velocities in small diameter, unconfined explosives, they found non-idealities that remain at intermediate diameters (ca. 1.5 mm) that require further analysis. In all of these areas, the project team has met, indeed exceeded, their Level II Milestone goals.

  20. The Anderson Quin Cycle. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

    1993-03-18

    The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

  1. The Influence of Alcoholic Liver Disease on Serum PIVKA-II Levels in Patients without Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kang, Seong Hee; Lee, Beom Jae; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Prothrombin induced by vitamin K deficiency or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) is a widely used diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We evaluated the correlation between alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and serum PIVKA-II levels in chronic liver disease (CLD) patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 2,528 CLD patients without HCC. Among these patients, 76 exhibited serum high PIVKA-II levels of >125 mAU/mL (group 1). We categorized 76 control patients matched by age, sex, and the presence of liver cirrhosis from the remaining patients who were negative for serum PIVKA-II (group 2). Results Group 1 revealed increased antibiotic usage (23.7% vs 2.6%, p<0.001) and incidence of ALD (60.5% vs 14.5%, p<0.001) as well as elevated aspartate aminotransferase (52.5 IU/L vs 30.5 IU/L, p=0.025) and ? glutamyl transpeptidase (67.5 IU/L vs 36.5 IU/L, p=0.005) levels compared with group 2. Further, group 1 was significantly associated with a worse Child-Pugh class than group 2. In the multivariate analysis, ALD (odds ratio [OR], 7.151; p<0.001) and antibiotic usage (OR, 5.846; p<0.001) were significantly associated with positive PIVKA-II levels. Conclusions Our study suggests that ALD and antibiotics usage may be confounding factors when interpreting high serum PIVKA-II levels in patients without HCC. Therefore, serum PIVKA-II levels in patients with ALD or in patients administered antibiotics should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25473073

  2. Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 1: Global and zonal mean cloud amounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

    1995-01-01

    Global high-level clouds identified in Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements for January and July in the period 1985 to 1990 are compared with near-nadir-looking observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Global and zonal mean high-level cloud amounts from the two data sets agree very well, if clouds with layer extinction coefficients of less than 0.008/km at 1.02 micrometers wavelength are removed from the SAGE II results and all detected clouds are interpreted to have an average horizontal size of about 75 km along the 200 km transimission path length of the SAGE II observations. The SAGE II results are much more sensitive to variations of assumed cloud size than to variations of detection threshold. The geographical distribution of cloud fractions shows good agreement, but systematic regional differences also indicate that the average cloud size varies somewhat among different climate regimes. The more sensitive SAGE II results show that about one third of all high-level clouds are missed by ISCCP but that these clouds have very low optical thicknesses (less than 0.1 at 0.6 micrometers wavelength). SAGE II sampling error in monthly zonal cloud fraction is shown to produce no bias, to be less than the intraseasonal natural variability, but to be comparable with the natural variability at longer time scales.

  3. Evaluation of Phase II glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A vendor glass formulation study was carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), supporting the Phase I and Phase II melter vendor testing activities for Westinghouse Hanford Company. This study is built upon the LLW glass optimization effort that will be described in a separate report. For Phase I vendor melter testing, six glass formulations were developed at PNL and additional were developed by Phase I vendors. All the doses were characterized in terms of viscosity and chemical durability by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. Twelve Phase II glass formulations (see Tables 3.5 and 3.6) were developed to accommodate 2.5 wt% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 1.0 wt% S0{sub 3} without significant processing problems. These levels of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SO{sub 3} are expected to be the highest possible concentrations from Hanford Site LLW streams at 25 wt% waste loading in glass. The Phase H compositions formulated were 6 to 23 times more durable than the environmental assessment (EA) glass. They melt within the temperature range of 1160{degrees} to 1410{degrees}C to suit different melting technologies. The composition types include boron-free for volatilization sensitive melters; boron-containing glasses for coId-cap melters; Zr-containing, glasses for enhanced Iong-term durability; and Fe-containing glasses for reducing melting temperature and melt volatility while maintaining chemical durability.

  4. NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

    2011-03-28

    The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. It is an open structure platform, and we try to provide a narrow API set for client application. With this narrow API, existing applications developed in different language under different architecture could be ported to our platform with small modification. This paper describes system infrastructure design, client API and system integration, and latest progress. As a new 3rd generation synchrotron light source with ultra low emittance, there are new requirements and challenges to control and manipulate the beam. A use case study and a theoretical analysis have been performed to clarify requirements and challenges to the high level applications (HLA) software environment. To satisfy those requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture of the software framework is critical for beam commissioning, study and operation. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating, plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology. The HLA is combination of tools for accelerator physicists and operators, which is same as traditional approach. In NSLS-II, they include monitoring applications and control routines. Scripting environment is very important for the later part of HLA and both parts are designed based on a common set of APIs. Physicists and operators are users of these APIs, while control system engineers and a few accelerator physicists are the developers of these APIs. With our Client/Server mode based approach, we leave how to retrieve information to the developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

  5. Influence of luminosity leveling on the CDF-II B-Physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Matthew; Lewis, Jonathan; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The effective bandwidth of the CDF-II level 1 trigger is approximately 25 kHz. Some of this bandwidth is used to record events that form the data sets used by the high p{sub T} physics analyses. The remaining bandwidth is used by triggers that are sensitive to hadronic B decays and provide one of the most important samples used for the study of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. At high luminosities, the hadronic B triggers have rates that greatly exceed the available bandwidth. Rather than incur large dead-times associated with these excessive rates, these B triggers are prescaled to limit the total trigger rate to the effective level 1 trigger bandwidth. The prescales are dynamically adjusted as the store progresses so that all of the bandwidth that is not used for the high p{sub T} physics program is used to record hadronic B triggers. In principle, the luminosity could be held at a more constant level throughout the store in such a way that the integrated luminosity would be the same as that obtained from a normal store. It has been suggested that this would allow B triggers to be recorded with lower prescales and consequently with higher B{sub s}{sup 0} signal efficiencies. This note describes a parametric model of the high p{sub T} and hadronic B triggers used by CDF and compares the yields of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} decays that would result with and without luminosity leveling.

  6. CONDITIONING AN ADDITIVE FUNCTIONAL OF A MARKOV CHAIN TO STAY NON-NEGATIVE II: HITTING A HIGH LEVEL 1

    E-print Network

    Jacka, Saul

    CONDITIONING AN ADDITIVE FUNCTIONAL OF A MARKOV CHAIN TO STAY NON-NEGATIVE II: HITTING A HIGH LEVEL the process (Xt, t)t0 on the event that (t)t0 hits level y before hitting zero and prove weak convergence conditioning (t)t0 with a negative drift to drift to drift to + and conditioning it to hit large levels before

  7. Vascular smooth muscle Jak2 mediates angiotensin II-induced hypertension via increased levels of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Kirabo, Annet; Kearns, Patrick N.; Jarajapu, Yagna P.; Sasser, Jennifer M.; Oh, Suk Paul; Grant, Maria B.; Kasahara, Hideko; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Baylis, Chris; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Sayeski, Peter P.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Angiotensin II (Ang II) type AT1 receptors expressed on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) couple to the Jak2 signalling pathway. However, the importance of this tissue-specific coupling is poorly understood. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the importance of VSMC-derived Jak2 in angiotensin II-mediated hypertension. Methods and results The Cre-loxP system was used to conditionally eliminate Jak2 tyrosine kinase expression within the smooth muscle cells of mice. Following chronic Ang II infusion, the resulting increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly attenuated in the Jak2 null mice when compared with littermate controls. The VSMC Jak2 null mice were also protected from the Ang II-induced vascular remodelling. Aortic rings from the VSMC Jak2 null mice exhibited reduced Ang II-induced contraction and enhanced endothelial-dependent relaxation via increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. When compared with controls, the VSMC Jak2 nulls also had lower levels of hydrogen peroxide, Rho kinase activity, and intracellular Ca2+ in response to Ang II. Conclusions The data indicate that VSMC Jak2 expression is involved in the pathogenesis of Ang II-dependent hypertension due to the increased presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). As such, VSMC-derived Jak2 tyrosine kinase modulates overall vascular tone via multiple, non-redundant mechanisms. PMID:21354995

  8. Genistein reduces glycosaminoglycan levels in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type II

    PubMed Central

    Friso, A; Tomanin, R; Salvalaio, M; Scarpa, M

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are lysosomal storage disorders resulting from a deficit of specific lysosomal enzymes catalysing glycosaminoglycan (GAG) degradation. The typical pathology involves most of the organ systems, including the brain, in its severe forms. The soy isoflavone genistein has recently attracted considerable attention as it can reduce GAG synthesis in vitro. Furthermore, genistein is able to cross the blood–brain barrier in the rat. The present study was undertaken to assess the ability of genistein to reduce urinary and tissue GAG levels in vivo. Experimental approach: We used mice with genetic deletion of iduronate-2-sulphatase (one of the GAG catabolizing enzymes) which provide a model of MPS type II. Two doses of genistein, 5 or 25 mg·kg?1·day?1, were given, in the diet for 10 or 20 weeks. Urinary and tissue GAG content was evaluated by biochemical and histochemical procedures. Key results: Urinary GAG levels were reduced after 10 weeks' treatment with genistein at either 5 or 25 mg·kg?1·day?1. In tissue samples from liver, spleen, kidney and heart, a reduction in GAG content was observed with both dosages, after 10 weeks' treatment. Decreased GAG deposits in brain were observed after genistein treatment in some animals. Conclusions and implications: There was decreased GAG storage in the MPSII mouse model following genistein administration. Our results would support the use of this plant-derived isoflavone in a combined therapeutic protocol for treatment of MPS. PMID:20136838

  9. Visualization on supercomputing platform level II ASC milestone (3537-1B) results from Sandia.

    SciTech Connect

    Geveci, Berk; Fabian, Nathan; Marion, Patrick; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2010-09-01

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia portion of the ASC Level II Visualization on the platform milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratories. This milestone contains functionality required for performing visualization directly on a supercomputing platform, which is necessary for peta-scale visualization. Sandia's contribution concerns in-situ visualization, running a visualization in tandem with a solver. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors(GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the performance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. Scientific simulation on parallel supercomputers is traditionally performed in four sequential steps: meshing, partitioning, solver, and visualization. Not all of these components are necessarily run on the supercomputer. In particular, the meshing and visualization typically happen on smaller but more interactive computing resources. However, the previous decade has seen a growth in both the need and ability to perform scalable parallel analysis, and this gives motivation for coupling the solver and visualization.

  10. Nutritional Restriction and Levels of Muscle IGF-II MRNA in Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth hormone-insulin like growth factor (GH-IGF) axis plays an important role in the endocrine control of fish growth. We have previously reported differential expression of insulin like growth factor-II (IGF-II) in faster growing channel catfish families, but IGF-II’s role during nutritional...

  11. Anderson localization of matter waves in quantum-chaos theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, E.; Pilati, S.

    2015-06-01

    We study the Anderson localization of atomic gases exposed to three-dimensional optical speckles by analyzing the statistics of the energy-level spacings. This method allows us to consider realistic models of the speckle patterns, taking into account the strongly anisotropic correlations which are realized in concrete experimental configurations. We first compute the mobility edge Ec of a speckle pattern created using a single laser beam. We find that Ec drifts when we vary the anisotropy of the speckle grains, going from higher values when the speckles are squeezed along the beam propagation axis to lower values when they are elongated. We also consider the case where two speckle patterns are superimposed, forming interference fringes, and we find that Ec is increased compared to the case of idealized isotropic disorder. We discuss the important implications of our findings for cold-atom experiments.

  12. Effects of cryptotanshinone on the expression levels of inflammatory factors in myocardial cells caused by Ang II and its mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shu; Wen, Qiang; Liu, Peiqing; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Li, Na; Zhang, Xiaojian; Kan, Quancheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the effects of the traditional Chinese medicine monomer cryptotanshinone (CTS) on the expression levels of inflammatory factors in myocardial cells caused by Ang II and its mechanism. Methods: The neonatal rat myocardial cells were cultured in vitro in this study. Their purities were identified by immunocytochemical method. The cellular viability in different groups was determined by MTT assay. The levels of TNF-? and IL-6 in the supernatant of cell culture were detected with ELISA method. The levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by Dihydrogen ethidium (DHE) staining method. The location changes of NF-?B in cells were detected by immunofluorescence method. Results: The purity of primary cultured neonatal rat myocardial cells was over 95%, CTS had no obvious effect on the viability of cells while it inhibited the increased levels of TNF-?, IL-6 and ROS caused by Ang II with dose dependent. NF-?B mainly distributed in the cytoplasmic region in normal cells, it translocated to the nucleus after Ang II stimulation while CTS inhibited the translocation. Conclusions: CTS could inhibit the inflammatory factors such as TNF-? and IL-6 in myocardial cells induced by Ang II with dose dependent, its mechanism may be related with that CTS could decrease the levels of ROS in myocardial cells and inhibit NF-?B translocation into the nucleus. PMID:26550173

  13. The role of the UTS2 gene polymorphisms and plasma Urotensin-II levels in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yumrutas, Onder; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Büyükhatipoglu, Hakan; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Igci, Yusuf Ziya; Bagis, Haydar; Cevik, M Ozgur; Kalender, M Emin; Eslik, Zeynep; Arslan, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy predominantly affecting women. To date, numerous numbers of studies were reported novel genetic contributors with diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic potential for the breast carcinogenesis. However, the role of urotensin-II in breast carcinogenesis has not been elucidated yet. Urotensin-II is a somatostatin-like cyclic tiny peptide identified by its potent vasoconstrictor activity. Soon after its discovery, its involvement in many disease states as well as its expression in various tissues including the tumors have been demonstrated. Moreover, there is strong evidence that suggest urotensin-II as the significant contributor of angiogenesis as well as cell proliferation and tumor biology. In this study, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were used to evaluate plasma levels of urotensin-II and Thr21Met and Ser89Asn polymorphisms of UTS2 gene in breast cancer patients. In the present case-control study, we noticed a significant decrease in the levels of urotensin-II protein in the plasma of the breast cancer patients (p??0.05). In addition, we demonstrated the gradual decreasing of urotensin-II protein levels from TT and TM to MM genotypes. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that urotensin-II could contribute to breast carcinogenesis and Thr21Met polymorphism can be an important risk factor in developing breast tumors. PMID:25604143

  14. High levels of Nrf2 determine chemoresistance in type II endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Chen, Ning; Zhao, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Kong, Beihua; Zheng, Wenxin; Zhang, Donna D.

    2010-01-01

    Type II endometrial cancer, which mainly presents as serous and clear cell types, has proved to be the most malignant and recurrent carcinoma among various female genital malignancies. The transcription factor, Nrf2, was first described as having chemopreventive activity. Activation of the Nrf2-mediated cellular defense response protects cells against the toxic and carcinogenic effects of environmental insults by upregulating an array of genes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS) and restore cellular redox homeostasis. However, the cancer-promoting role of Nrf2 has recently been revealed. Nrf2 is constitutively upregulated in several types of human cancer tissues and cancer cell lines. Furthermore, inhibition of Nrf2 expression sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, the constitutive level of Nrf2 was compared in different types of human endometrial tumors. It was found that Nrf2 was highly expressed in endometrial serous carcinoma (ESC), whereas complex hyperplasia (CH) and endometrial endometrioid carcinoma (EEC) had no or marginal expression of Nrf2. Likewise, the ESC derived SPEC-2 cell line had a higher level of Nrf2 expression and was more resistant to the toxic effects of cisplatin and paclitaxel than that of the Ishikawa cell line, which was generated from EEC. Silencing of Nrf2 rendered SPEC-2 cells more susceptible to chemotherapeutic drugs while it had a limited effect on Ishikawa cells. Inhibition of Nrf2 expression by overexpressing Keap1 sensitized SPEC-2 cells or SPEC-2-derived xenografts to chemotherapeutic treatments using both cell culture and SCID mouse models. Collectively, we provide a molecular basis for the use of Nrf2 inhibitors to increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs and to combat chemoresistance, the biggest obstacle in chemotherapy. PMID:20530669

  15. SNAP II index: an alternative to the COMFORT scale in assessing the level of sedation in mechanically ventilated pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Nievas, I Federico Fernandez; Spentzas, Thomas; Bogue, Clifford W

    2014-01-01

    Sedation monitoring is essential in pediatric patients on ventilatory support to achieve comfort and safety. The COMFORT scale was designed and validated to assess the level of sedation in intubated pediatric patients. However, it remains unreliable in pharmacologically paralyzed patients. The SNAP II index is calculated using an algorithm that incorporates high-frequency (80-420 Hz) electroencephalogram (EEG) components, known to be useful in discriminating between awake and unconscious states, unlike other measurements that only include low-frequency EEG segments such as the bispectral index score. Previous studies suggested that the SNAP II index is a reliable and sensitive indicator of the level of consciousness in adult patients. Despite its potential, no data are currently available in the pediatric critically ill population on ventilatory support. This is the first pilot study assessing the potential application of the SNAP II index in critically ill pediatric patients by comparing it to the commonly used COMFORT scale. PMID:23753227

  16. High expression level of T-box transcription factor 5 predicts unfavorable survival in stage I and II gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, YAN; LI, YUAN-FANG; WANG, WEI; CHEN, YONG-MING; WANG, DAN-DAN; ZHAO, JING-JING; PAN, QIU-ZHONG; JIANG, SHAN-SHAN; ZHANG, XIAO-FEI; YUAN, SHU-QIANG; QIU, HAI-BO; HUANG, CHUN-YU; ZHAO, BAI-WEI; ZHOU, ZHI-WEI; XIA, JIAN-CHUAN

    2015-01-01

    The expression of T-box transcription factor 5 (TBX5) has previously been observed in human cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate TBX5 expression and its potential clinical significance in gastric cancer (GC). Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the TBX5 mRNA expression levels in 30 pairs of surgically resected healthy gastric tissues and early stage (stages I and II) GC tissues were evaluated. The TBX5 mRNA expression levels were increased in GC stage I and II tumor tissues (P=0.01, n=30) compared with the matched adjacent non-tumor tissue. However, no significant difference was observed in TBX5 mRNA expression levels in matched adjacent non-tumor tissue compared with the tumor tissue from stage III and IV GC samples (P=0.318, n=30). Immunohistochemical analysis for TBX5 expression was performed on 161 paraffin-embedded stage I and II GC tissue blocks. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the associations between TBX5 expression, clinicopathological factors and prognosis. Patients with stage I and II GC and tumors with high TBX5 expression levels presented poor overall survival (OS) rate (P=0.024). The Cox proportional hazards model analysis demonstrated that TBX5 expression was an independent risk factor (P=0.017). The present study indicates that high expression of TBX5 is associated with unfavorable OS rates in patients with stage I and II GC. In conclusion, the expression of TBX5 may be a valuable biomarker for the selection of cases of high-risk stage I and II GC.

  17. Fire Fighter Level I-II-III [and] Practical Skills Test. Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series. Final Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribyl, Paul F.

    Practical skills tests are provided for fire fighter trainees in the Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series, Fire Fighter Levels I, II, and III. A course introduction appears first and contains this information: recommended instructional sequence, required facilities, instructional methodology, requirements for certification, course…

  18. Anderson transition for Google matrix eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a number of random matrix models describing the Google matrix G of directed networks. The properties of their spectra and eigenstates are analyzed by numerical matrix diagonalization. We show that for certain models it is possible to have an algebraic decay of PageRank vector with the exponent similar to real directed networks. At the same time the spectrum has no spectral gap and a broad distribution of eigenvalues in the complex plain. The eigenstates of G are characterized by the Anderson transition from localized to delocalized states and a mobility edge curve in the complex plane of eigenvalues.

  19. Anderson transition for Google matrix eigenstates

    E-print Network

    Zhirov, O V

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a number of random matrix models describing the Google matrix G of directed networks. The properties of their spectra and eigenstates are analyzed by numerical matrix diagonalization. We show that for certain models it is possible to have an algebraic decay of PageRank vector with the exponent similar to real directed networks. At the same time the spectrum has no spectral gap and a broad distribution of eigenvalues in the complex plain. The eigenstates of G are characterized by the Anderson transition from localized to delocalized states and a mobility edge curve in the complex plane of eigenvalues.

  20. Gutzwiller wave-function solution for Anderson lattice model: Emerging universal regimes of heavy quasiparticle states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysoki?ski, Marcin M.; Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Spa?ek, Jozef

    2015-09-01

    The recently proposed diagrammatic expansion (DE) technique for the full Gutzwiller wave function (GWF) is applied to the Anderson lattice model. This approach allows for a systematic evaluation of the expectation values with full Gutzwiller wave function in finite-dimensional systems. It introduces results extending in an essential manner those obtained by means of the standard Gutzwiller approximation (GA), which is variationally exact only in infinite dimensions. Within the DE-GWF approach we discuss the principal paramagnetic properties and their relevance to heavy-fermion systems. We demonstrate the formation of an effective, narrow f band originating from atomic f -electron states and subsequently interpret this behavior as a direct itineracy of f electrons; it represents a combined effect of both the hybridization and the correlations induced by the Coulomb repulsive interaction. Such a feature is absent on the level of GA, which is equivalent to the zeroth order of our expansion. Formation of the hybridization- and electron-concentration-dependent narrow f band rationalizes the common assumption of such dispersion of f levels in the phenomenological modeling of the band structure of CeCoIn5. Moreover, it is shown that the emerging f -electron direct itineracy leads in a natural manner to three physically distinct regimes within a single model that are frequently discussed for 4 f - or 5 f -electron compounds as separate model situations. We identify these regimes as (i) the mixed-valence regime, (ii) Kondo/almost-Kondo insulating regime, and (iii) the Kondo-lattice limit when the f -electron occupancy is very close to the f -state half filling, ?1 . The nonstandard features of the emerging correlated quantum liquid state are stressed.

  1. A Study of Diagrammatic Ink in Lecture Richard Anderson a

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    A Study of Diagrammatic Ink in Lecture Richard Anderson a Ruth Anderson b Crystal Hoyer a Craig ink, identifying phases in discussion of a diagram, and constructing the active context in a diagram. The technology to support presentation is rapidly advancing, in particular, there is growing use of digital ink

  2. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MD Anderson) was established by the Texas State Legislature in 1941and is a free-standing, degree-granting health institution within The University of Texas System. Mission areas include patient care, research, education, and prevention.

  3. Jack R. Anderson Jack R. Anderson has had an illustrious career as a music educator in Pennsylvania. Inhis 42

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    Jack R. Anderson Jack R. Anderson has had an illustrious career as a music educator in Pennsylvania throughout Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. Jack was born and raised in Sharon, Pennsylvania the University of Pittsburgh and a Masters of Education in Music from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania. During

  4. The Role of Contrast in the Perception of Achromatic Transparency: Comment on Singh and Anderson (2002) and Anderson (2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Marc K.

    2008-01-01

    M. Singh and B. L. Anderson proposed a perceptual theory of achromatic transparency in which the perceived transmittance of a perceived transparent filter is determined by the ratio of the Michelson contrast seen in the region of transparency to that of the background seen directly. Subsequently, B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and J. Meng proposed that…

  5. Professions Shannon Anderson, Ph.D.

    E-print Network

    ) 1 Chem 233 Organic Chemistry I 3 Sci 333 Science Concepts (OChem I) 1 Chem 234 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 #12;Core Courses Chem 335 Organic Chemistry II 3 Sci 335 Science Concepts (OChem I) 1 Chem 336 Organic Chemistry II Lab 2 Chem 215 General Chemistry II 3 Sci 215 Science Concepts (GChem II) 1 Chem 216

  6. Atomic-level insights into metabolite recognition and specificity of the SAM-II riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Urmi; Kelley, Jennifer M.; Hamelberg, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Although S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), a metabolic by-product of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), differs from SAM only by a single methyl group and an overall positive charge, SAH binds the SAM-II riboswitch with more than 1000-fold less affinity than SAM. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the molecular basis of such high selectivity in ligand recognition by SAM-II riboswitch. The biosynthesis of SAM exclusively generates the (S,S) stereoisomer, and (S,S)-SAM can spontaneously convert to the (R,S) form. We, therefore, also examined the effects of (R,S)-SAM binding to SAM-II and its potential biological function. We find that the unfavorable loss in entropy in SAM-II binding is greater for (S,S)- and (R,S)-SAM than SAH, which is compensated by stabilizing electrostatic interactions with the riboswitch. The positively charged sulfonium moiety on SAM acts as the crucial anchor point responsible for the formation of key ionic interactions as it fits favorably in the negatively charged binding pocket. In contrast, SAH, with its lone pair of electrons on the sulfur, experiences repulsion in the binding pocket of SAM-II and is enthalpically destabilized. In the presence of SAH, similar to the unbound riboswitch, the pseudoknot structure of SAM-II is not completely formed, thus exposing the Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Unlike SAM, this may further facilitate ribosomal assembly and translation initiation. Our analysis of the conformational ensemble sampled by SAM-II in the absence of ligands and when bound to SAM or SAH reveals that ligand binding follows a combination of conformational selection and induced-fit mechanisms. PMID:22194311

  7. Anderson's impurity-model analysis on CeO1-xFxBiS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Takuya; Joseph, Boby; Paris, Eugenio; Iadecola, Antonella; Demura, Satoshi; Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu; Takano, Yoshihiko; Mizokawa, Takashi; Saini, Naurang L.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the impact of F-doing on CeO1-xFxBiS2 in terms of the electronic-structural parameters of Anderson's impurity-model analysis. It was recently reported using Ce L3-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) that CeOBiS2 falls in the Ce valence fluctuation regime and the F-doping drives the system into the Kondo regime. The Ce L3- edge XAS spectra with the various F-doping levels can be reproduced by adjusting the transfer integral in the Anderson's impurity model. The present analysis indicates that the F-doping to the system corresponds to the decrease of the Ce-Bi transfer integral.

  8. Effect of smoking cessation on lipoprotein A-I and lipoprotein A-I:A-II levels.

    PubMed

    Richard, F; Marécaux, N; Dallongeville, J; Devienne, M; Tiem, N; Fruchart, J C; Fantino, M; Zylberberg, G; Amouyel, P

    1997-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with low plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I levels, which may explain, in part, its deleterious effects on coronary heart disease (CHD). In a group of ex-smokers, we assessed the influence of smoking cessation on apo A-I particle levels. Plasma lipid, apolipoprotein, and lipoparticle concentrations of 58 subjects who had completely stopped smoking (ex-smokers) were compared with those of 37 subjects who had continued smoking (smokers) before and after a smoking cessation counseling program. Nutritional intake was recorded before and after the program to adjust for potential interaction with plasma lipid variables. Smokers and ex-smokers were similar in gender distribution, age, body mass index (BMI), social status, and nutrient intake. There were significantly greater increases in total cholesterol (P < .04), HDL-C (P < .005), HDL2-C (P < .008), and lipoprotein (Lp) A-I:A-II (P < .04) in ex-smokers than in smokers. After smoking cessation, ex-smokers consumed more vegetable protein (P < .02) and polysaccharides (P < .04) and had higher plasma levels of HDL-C (P < .0004), apo A-I (P < .001), Lp A-I (P < .007), and Lp A-I:A-II (P < .01) than smokers. Adjustments on nutritional variables did not show any additional difference between ex-smokers and smokers, suggesting that smoking per se effects Lp A-I and Lp A-I:A-II levels. In conclusion, HDL particles including Lp A-I and Lp A-I:A-II are higher in ex-smokers than in smokers. PMID:9186310

  9. Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SHIMA, HIROAKI; KUTOMI, GORO; SATOMI, FUKINO; MAEDA, HIDEKI; TAKAMARU, TOMOKO; KAMESHIMA, HIDEKAZU; OMURA, TOSEI; MORI, MITSURU; HATAKENAKA, MASAMITSU; HASEGAWA, TADASHI; HIRATA, KOICHI

    2014-01-01

    In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

  10. Implementation of a Proficiency-Based Diploma System in Maine: Phase II--District Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvernail, David L.; Stump, Erika K.; McCafferty, Anita Stewart; Hawes, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the findings from Phase II of a study of Maine's implementation of a proficiency-based diploma system. At the request of the Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs of the Maine Legislature, the Maine Policy Research Institute (MEPRI) has conducted a two-phased study of the implementation of Maine law…

  11. COURSE OUTLINE FOR FIRST SIX WEEKS FOR SCIENCE-LEVEL II, TALENT PRESERVATION CLASSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, TX.

    THE FIRST 6-WEEK UNIT CONCERNS ANIMAL LIFE, AND TOPICS INCLUDE PROTOZOA, INVERTEBRATES, AND VERTEBRATES. UNIT II, "THE HUMAN BODY", INCLUDES BODY SYSTEMS, HEALTH, AND SAFETY. TEXTBOOK REFERENCES, CONTENT OUTLINE, TEACHING SUGGESTIONS, REFERENCE READINGS, AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS ARE GIVEN UNDER EACH TOPIC. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT FIRST EXPERIENCES WITH…

  12. SAUV II HIGH LEVEL SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE Steven G. Chappell chappell@ausi.org

    E-print Network

    ) and Technology Systems Inc. (TSI) to develop the second generation Solar powered Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Problems (IMTP) [Ageev et. al., 2001] and served as a proof of concept for solar re-powering of an AUV. The SAUV II development effort has been a team based program, where FSI focused on the vehicle hardware

  13. From Extreme Values of I.I.D. Random Fields to Extreme Eigenvalues of Finite-volume Anderson Hamiltonian

    E-print Network

    Arvydas Astrauskas

    2015-01-05

    The aim of this paper is to study asymptotic geometric properties almost surely or/and in probability of extreme order statistics of an i.i.d. random field (potential) indexed by sites of multidimensional lattice cube, the volume of which unboundedly increases. We discuss the following topics: (I) high level exceedances, in particular, clustering of exceedances; (II) decay rate of spacings in comparison with increasing rate of extreme order statistics; (III) minimum of spacings of successive order statistics; (IV) asymptotic behavior of values neighboring to extremes and so on. The conditions of the results are formulated in terms of regular variation (RV) of the cumulative hazard function and its inverse. A relationship between RV classes of the present paper as well as their links to the well-known RV classes (including domains of attraction of max-stable distributions) are discussed. The asymptotic behavior of functionals (I)--(IV) determines the asymptotic structure of the top eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the large-volume discrete Schr\\" odinger operators with an i.i.d. potential (Anderson Hamiltonian). Thus, another aim of the present paper is to review and comment a recent progress on extreme value theory for eigenvalues of random Schr\\"odinger operators as well as to provide a clear and rigorous understanding of the relationship between the top eigenvalues and extreme values of i.i.d. potentials.

  14. AERODYNAMICS(II) -Perfect Fluid Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    AERODYNAMICS(II) - Perfect Fluid Dynamics I) Course goals II) Textbook & Reference III) Course This course will attempt to offer the fundamental areas of aerodynamics that can be used to guide the design;Textbook Anderson, J D Jr., "Fundamentals of Aerodynamics" 5th edition, McGraw-Hill Book Company. #12

  15. Promise cut short: the career of William Anderson.

    PubMed

    Beasley, A W

    2012-03-01

    This paper traces the career of William Anderson, naval surgeon and naturalist, who served in Cook's ship Resolution on the second and final voyages, and died of tuberculosis high in the Arctic. PMID:22441070

  16. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  17. Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,H.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

  18. Precocene II, a Trichothecene Production Inhibitor, Binds to Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel and Increases the Superoxide Level in Mitochondria of Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Sakamoto, Naoko; Suzuki, Michio; Kimura, Makoto; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    Precocene II, a constituent of essential oils, shows antijuvenile hormone activity in insects and inhibits trichothecene production in fungi. We investigated the molecular mechanism by which precocene II inhibits trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum, the main causal agent of Fusarium head blight and trichothecene contamination in grains. Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, was identified as the precocene II-binding protein by an affinity magnetic bead method. Precocene II increased the superoxide level in mitochondria as well as the amount of oxidized mitochondrial proteins. Ascorbic acid, glutathione, and ?-tocopherol promoted trichothecene production by the fungus. These antioxidants compensated for the inhibitory activity of precocene II on trichothecene production. These results suggest that the binding of precocene II to VDAC may cause high superoxide levels in mitochondria, which leads to stopping of trichothecene production. PMID:26248339

  19. Thermalization and dynamics in the single-impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Ireneusz; von Delft, Jan; Weichselbaum, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the process of thermalization, dynamics, and the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) for the single-impurity Anderson model, focusing on the Kondo regime. For this we construct the complete eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian using the numerical renormalization group (NRG) method in the language of the matrix product states. It is a peculiarity of the NRG that while the Wilson chain is supposed to describe a macroscopic bath, very few single-particle excitations already suffice to essentially thermalize the impurity system at finite temperature, which amounts to having added a macroscopic amount of energy. Thus, given an initial state of the system such as the ground state together with microscopic excitations, we calculate the spectral function of the quantum impurity using the microcanonical and diagonal ensembles. These spectral functions are compared to the time-averaged spectral function obtained by time evolving the initial state according to the full Hamiltonian, and to the spectral function calculated using the thermal density matrix. By adding or removing particles at a certain Wilson energy shell on top of the ground state, we find qualitative agreement between the resulting spectral functions calculated for different ensembles. This indicates that the system thermalizes in the long-time limit, and can be described by an appropriate statistical-mechanical ensemble. Moreover, by calculating static quantities such as the impurity spectral density at the Fermi level as well as the dot occupancy for energy eigenstates relevant for microcanonical ensemble, we find good support for the ETH. The ultimate mechanism responsible for this effective thermalization within the NRG can be identified as Anderson orthogonality: the more charge that needs to flow to or from infinity after applying a local excitation within the Wilson chain, the more the system looks thermal afterwards at an increased temperature. For the same reason, however, thermalization fails if charge rearrangement after the excitation remains mostly local. In these cases, the different statistical ensembles lead to different results. Their behavior needs to be understood as a microscopic quantum quench only.

  20. Teaching Games Level Design Using the StarCraft II Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetser, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    Level design is often characterised as "where the rubber hits the road" in game development. It is a core area of games design, alongside design of game rules and narrative. However, there is a lack of literature dedicated to documenting teaching games design, let alone the more specialised topic of level design. Furthermore, there…

  1. The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level II. Books 1-20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Designed as supplementary reading materials for Indian and non-Indian children in the primary grades, this series of 10 booklets presents 13 legends and 7 stories of Northwest tribes. Stories in this second level of the six-level series were developed cooperatively by people of the Crow, Muckleshoot, Skokomish, Blackfeet, Northern Cheyenne,…

  2. Continuous assimilation of simulated Geosat altimetric sea level into an eddy-resolving numerical ocean model. I - Sea level differences. II - Referenced sea level differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Warren B.; Tai, Chang-Kou; Holland, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The optimal interpolation method of Lorenc (1981) was used to conduct continuous assimilation of altimetric sea level differences from the simulated Geosat exact repeat mission (ERM) into a three-layer quasi-geostrophic eddy-resolving numerical ocean box model that simulates the statistics of mesoscale eddy activity in the western North Pacific. Assimilation was conducted continuously as the Geosat tracks appeared in simulated real time/space, with each track repeating every 17 days, but occurring at different times and locations within the 17-day period, as would have occurred in a realistic nowcast situation. This interpolation method was also used to conduct the assimilation of referenced altimetric sea level differences into the same model, performing the referencing of altimetric sea sevel differences by using the simulated sea level. The results of this dynamical interpolation procedure are compared with those of a statistical (i.e., optimum) interpolation procedure.

  3. Anderson-Fabry disease in children.

    PubMed

    Sestito, Simona; Ceravolo, Ferdinando; Concolino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical evidence of major organ damage is typical of adulthood, many of the signs and symptoms of Anderson Fabry Disease (AFD) occur frequently in childhood. The clinical phenotype of AFD in pediatric patients has been described in several studies which show a higher incidence and an earlier onset of symptoms in male patients than in females. These include neurological manifestations (acroparaesthesias, chronic neuropathic pain, hypo-anhidrosis, tinnitus, hearing, loss), gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (abdominal pain and diarrhea), angiokeratomas, ocular abnormalities (cornea verticillata, tortuous retinal vessels and subcapsular cataracts). Such manifestations may impair quality of life and, because of their unspecific nature, rarely lead to an early diagnosis. In addition, signs of major organ damage (microalbuminuria or proteinuria, urinary hyperfiltration, impaired heart rate variability, left ventricular hypertrophy, stroke) are encountered in children with AFD. Clinical trials of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with agalsidase alfa and agalsidase beta have been conducted in children, with clinical and pharmacodinamc effects proved by both enzyme formulations, whereas differences in safety profile and administration were found. Although several studies suggest that ERT should be started before irreversible damage in critical organs have occurred, the issue of when to initiate it has not yet been resolved. More controlled trials must be done in order to demonstrate that an early start of ERT could prevent adult complications and to assess the optimal timing of treatment in children with AFD. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding for a better approach of pediatric AFD. PMID:23448455

  4. New Mn II energy levels from the STIS-HST spectrum of the HgMn star HD 175640

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, F.; Kurucz, R. L.; Cowley, C. R.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: The NIST database lists several Mn ii lines that were observed in the laboratory but not classified. They cannot be used in spectrum synthesis because their atomic line data are unknown. These lines are concentrated in the 2380-2700 Å interval. We aimed to assign energy levels and log gf values to these lines. Methods: Semi-empirical line data for Mn ii computed by Kurucz were used to synthesize the ultraviolet spectrum of the slow-rotating, HgMn star HD 175640. The spectrum was compared with the high-resolution spectrum observed with the HST-STIS equipment. A UVES spectrum covering the 3050-10 000 Å region was also examined. Results: We determined a total of 73 new energy levels, 58 from the STIS spectrum of HD 175640 and another 15 from the UVES spectrum. The new energy levels give rise to numerous new computed lines. We have identified more than 50% of the unclassified lines listed in the NIST database and have changed the assignment of another 24 lines. An abundance analysis of the star HD 175640, based on the comparison of observed and computed ultraviolet spectra in the 1250-3040 Å interval, is the by-product of this study on Mn ii. Tables A.1 and A.2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A10

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (BRNATH00290034) on Town Highway 29, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    The Town Highway 29 crossing of Locust Creek is a 37-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 32-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 23, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 25 degrees. There was no observable scour protection measure at the site. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E.

  6. Anderson’s orthogonality catastrophe in one dimension induced by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad Knörr, Hans; Otte, Peter; Spitzer, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    According to Anderson’s orthogonality catastrophe, the overlap of the N-particle ground states of a free Fermi gas with and without an (electric) potential decays in the thermodynamic limit. For the finite one-dimensional system various boundary conditions are employed. Unlike the usual setup the perturbation is introduced by a magnetic (vector) potential. Although such a magnetic field can be gauged away in one spatial dimension there is a significant and interesting effect on the overlap caused by the phases. We study the leading asymptotics of the overlap of the two ground states and the two-term asymptotics of the difference of the ground-state energies. In the case of periodic boundary conditions our main result on the overlap is based upon a well-known asymptotic expansion by Fisher and Hartwig on Toeplitz determinants with a discontinuous symbol. In the case of Dirichlet boundary conditions no such result is known to us and we only provide an upper bound on the overlap, presumably of the right asymptotic order.

  7. Development of a clinical pathway for near-term and convalescing premature infants in a Level II nursery.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Margie A

    2006-06-01

    A subcategory of premature infants, those born near term at 34 to 36 and 6/7 weeks gestation, may represent a previously unrecognized at-risk neonatal population. Evidence-based practice guidelines, crafted specifically for this population, are needed to effectively manage their care. In an effort to meet the needs of the near-term infant (NTI) population, and concurrently address the needs of the convalescing premature infants reverse transported to a Level II nursery setting, a multidisciplinary team of clinicians designed tools to provide a more consistent approach to care for and discharge these infants. This article describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of an evidence-based multidisciplinary clinical pathway specific to the needs of the NTI, including care plans, a standardized physician admission and discharge order set, evidence-based interventions, parent education, and recommendations for follow-up after hospital discharge that were developed for use in a Level II nursery. The use of the premature and near-term infant pathway has now been expanded to NTIs cared for in the newborn nursery, thereby ensuring safe, consistent, quality care for this population, regardless of their setting. PMID:16750809

  8. Modified Anderson Model——Dynamics of Brittle Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, H.

    2014-12-01

    Anderson's model has been a basic theory of fault mechanical analysis in one century. However, because of the assumptions, there are some major limitations in Anderson model, and it does not account for frequently observed oblique slips, complicated fault cases in nature and the slips occurring on pre-existing planes of weakness. On the basis of Reactivation Tendency Analysis theory proposed by Tong and Yin (2011), we proposed Modified Anderson model and extended Anderson model from 1) homogeneous media to Inhomogeneous media with pre-existing weakness(es); 2) Andersonian stress state to arbitrary stress state; 3) transient activity trend analysis to fault formation and evolution, and verified with sandbox experiments and natural cases. With Modified Anderson model, we can predict 1) the sequence of fault formation; 2) fault orientations and distribution; 3) slip directions (dip slip, oblique-dip slip, oblique slip, oblique strike slip and strike sip) of different fault when the directions of principal stress, orientations and mechanical properties (cohesion and frictional coefficient) of pre-existing weakness(es) are given. The origin of the complicated fault systems in nature can be explained reasonably. There will be a wide applications for oil and gas exploration and development, coal mining, earthquake risk evaluation, etc.

  9. Renal involvement in Anderson-Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Adalberto; Meroni, Mietta; Battini, Graziana; Righetti, Marco; Maglio, Alessia; Tosoni, Antonella; Nebuloni, Manuela; Vago, Gianluca; Giordano, Ferdinando

    2003-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFd) is a rare X-linked lisosomal storage disorder of glycosphingolipid (GL) metabolism, caused by a deficiency of the activity of alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-gal A). The progressive accumulation of GL in tissues results in the clinical manifestations of the disease, that are more evident in hemizygous males, and include characteristic skin lesions (angiokeratomas), neurological symptoms (acroparesthesia), ocular features (cornea verticillata), cardiac involvement (left ventricular enlargement, conduction abnormalities), cerebrovascular manifestations (thromboses, hemorrhage, etc.), and kidney involvement with progression to end-stage renal failure (ESRF). ESRF is a common manifestation in hemizygous males (3rd-5th decade) and death occurs around the 5th decade of life because of severe cardiac and/or cerebrovascular complications. Heterozygous females have an attenuated form of this systemic disease. In the kidney, accumulation of GL occurs in the endothelial cells of every vessel, in the epithelial cells of every tubular segment, and in all kinds of glomerular cells. The broad spectrum of renal lesions is a pathophysiological continuum with progressive impairment in the renal function related to continuous intracellular deposition of GL. Electron microscopic study of renal biopsies shows typical osmiophilic inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm of all kind of renal cells, characterized by concentric lamellation of clear and dark layers (35-50 A of periodicity). ESRF is treated by dialysis and kidney transplantation: neither treatment modifies the progression of the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular lesions due to progressive GL deposition. The outcome of kidney transplantation seems to be similar to that found in other non-diabetic patients, but the survival rate on dialysis is lower than in patients with other causes of ESRF. Nowadays, treatment with enzyme replacement infusion with purified alpha-Gal A, produced by a genetically engineered human cell line or Chinese hamster ovocytes, seems to be effective and safe. PMID:12774774

  10. MARVEL: Measured active rotational-vibrational energy levels. II. Algorithmic improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Császár, Attila G.

    2012-07-01

    When determining energy levels from several, in cases many, measured and assigned high-resolution molecular spectra according to the Ritz principle, it is advantageous to investigate the spectra via the concept of spectroscopic networks (SNs). Experimental SNs are finite, weighted, undirected, multiedge, rooted graphs, whereby the vertices are the energy levels, the edges are the transitions, and the weights are provided by transition intensities. A considerable practical problem arises from the fact that SNs can be very large for isotopologues of molecules widely studied; for example, the experimental dataset for the H2 16O molecule contains some 160,000 measured transitions and 20,000 energy levels. In order to treat such large SNs and extract the maximum amount of information from them, sophisticated algorithms are needed when inverting the transition data. To achieve numerical effectiveness, we found the following efficient algorithms applicable to very large SNs: reading the input data employs hash codes, building the components of the SN utilizes a recursive depth-first search algorithm, solving the linear least-squares problem is via the conjugate gradient method, and determination of the uncertainties of the energy levels takes advantage of the robust reweighting algorithm.

  11. Community-Based Career Guidance Practices. Vol. II--Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manatee Junior Coll., Bradenton, FL.

    This collection of eighty-six secondary level career guidance practices contains the following nine types of activities: novel practices such as games and role enactments, volunteering, field trips, special career emphases, intern/extern practices, work experience and exploration practices, exchanges, mobile practices, and educator in-services. A…

  12. Homemade Equipment for the Teaching of Electrochemistry at Advanced Level. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a detailed description for the construction of equipment needed to investigate acid/base equilibria through the measurement of pH and potentiometric titrations. Suggested experiments and calibration techniques are explained. This information helps to solve the problems of inadequate, expensive equipment required for A-level chemistry…

  13. Selective solid-phase extraction and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) Ions in wastewater using diethylenetriamine-functionalized carbon nanotubes dispersed in graphene oxide colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangbing; Cui, Yuemei; Chang, Xijun; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) were dispersed in graphene oxide (GO) colloids to be further functionalized with diethylenetriamine (DETA), resulting in GO-MCNTs-DETA nanocomposites for the solid-phase extraction and analysis of Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions at the trace levels in wastewater. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) indicates that this new solid-phase sorbent could facilitate the maximum static adsorption capacities of 5.4, 13.8, 6.6 and 9.5mgg(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, showing the adsorption capacity up to 95% within about 30min. Moreover, the detection limits of the GO-MCNTs-DETA-based analysis method were found to be 0.16, 0.50, 0.24 and 0.38ngmL(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, with the relative standard deviation of lower than 3.0% (n=5). Importantly, common coexisting ions showed no significant interference on the separation and pre-concentration of these heavy metal ions at pH 4.0. Subsequently, the GO-MCNTs-DETA sorbent was successfully employed for the separation and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions in wastewater samples yielding 75-folds concentration factors. PMID:26695275

  14. PRESTO-II: a low-level waste environmental transport and risk assessment code

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.E.; Emerson, C.J.; Chester, R.O.; Little, C.A.; Hiromoto, G.

    1986-04-01

    PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed for the evaluation of possible health effects from shallow-land and, waste-disposal trenches. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal operations. Human exposure scenarios considered include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and limited site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include ground-water transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, suspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, external exposure, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Both population doses and individual doses, as well as doses to the intruder and farmer, may be calculated. Cumulative health effects in terms of cancer deaths are calculated for the population over the 1000-year period using a life-table approach. Data are included for three example sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. A code listing and example input for each of the three sites are included in the appendices to this report.

  15. Molecular characterization and expression analyses of ST8Sia II and IV in piglets during postnatal development: lack of correlation between transcription and posttranslational levels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Nai; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Fengjun; Liu, Ni; Lv, Chunlong; Troy, Frederic A; Wang, Bing

    2015-12-01

    The two mammalian ?2,8-polysialyltransferases (polyST's), ST8Sia II (STX) and ST8Sia IV (PST), catalyze synthesis of the ?2-8-linked polysialic acid (polySia) glycans on neural cell adhesion molecules (NCAMs). The objective of this study was to clone the coding sequence of the piglet ST8Sia II and determine the mRNA expression levels of ST8Sia II, ST8Sia IV, NCAM and neuropilin-2 (NRP-2), also a carrier protein of polySia, during postnatal development. The amino acid sequence deduced from the coding sequence of ST8Sia II was compared with seven other mammalian species. Piglet ST8Sia II was highly conserved and shared 67.8 % sequence identity with ST8Sia IV. Genes coding for ST8Sia II and IV were differentially expressed and distinctly different in neural and non-neural tissues at postnatal days 3 and 38. Unexpectedly, the cellular levels of mRNA coding for ST8Sia II and IV showed no correlation with the posttranslational level of polySia glycans in different tissues. In contrast, mRNA abundance coding for NCAM and neuropilin-2 correlated with expression of ST8Sia II and IV. These findings show that the cellular abundance of ST8Sia II and IV in postnatal piglets is regulated at the level of translation/posttranslation, and not at the level of transcription, a finding that has not been previously reported. These studies further highlight differences in the molecular mechanisms controlling polysialylation in adult rodents and neonatal piglets. PMID:26452605

  16. The FERRUM project: Experimental lifetimes and transition probabilities from highly excited even 4d levels in Fe ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report lifetime measurements of the 6 levels in the 3d6(5D)4d e6G term in Fe ii at an energy of 10.4 eV, and f-values for 14 transitions from the investigated levels. The lifetimes were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions in a laser-produced plasma. The high excitation energy, and the fact that the levels have the same parity as the the low-lying states directly populated in the plasma, necessitated the use of a two-photon excitation scheme. The probability for this process is greatly enhanced by the presence of the 3d6(5D)4p z6F levels at roughly half the energy difference. The f-values are obtained by combining the experimental lifetimes with branching fractions derived using relative intensities from a hollow cathode discharge lamp recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer. The data is important for benchmarking atomic calculations of astrophysically important quantities and useful for spectroscopy of hot stars.

  17. Anderson localization effects near the Mott metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragança, Helena; Aguiar, M. C. O.; Vu?i?evi?, J.; Tanaskovi?, D.; Dobrosavljevi?, V.

    2015-09-01

    The interplay between Mott and Anderson routes to localization in disordered interacting systems gives rise to different transitions and transport regimes. Here, we investigate the phase diagram at finite temperatures using dynamical mean-field theory combined with typical medium theory, which is an effective theory of the Mott-Anderson metal-insulator transition. We mainly focus on the properties of the coexistence region associated with the Mott phase transition. For weak disorder, the coexistence region is found to be similar to that in the clean case. However, as we increase disorder, Anderson localization effects are responsible for shrinking the coexistence region, and at sufficiently strong disorder (approximately equal to twice the bare bandwidth) it drastically narrows, the critical temperature Tc abruptly goes to zero, and we observe a phase transition in the absence of a coexistence of the metallic and insulating phases. In this regime, the effects of interaction and disorder are found to be of comparable importance for charge localization.

  18. Lifshitz tails for matrix-valued Anderson models

    E-print Network

    Hakim Boumaza; Hatem Najar

    2013-10-20

    This paper is devoted to the study of Lifshitz tails for a continuous matrix-valued Anderson-type model $H_{\\omega}$ acting on $L^2(\\R^d)\\otimes \\C^{D}$, for arbitrary $d\\geq 1$ and $D\\geq 1$. We prove that the integrated density of states of $H_{\\omega}$ has a Lifshitz behavior at the bottom of the spectrum. We obtain a Lifshitz exponent equal to $-d/2$ and this exponent is independent of $D$. It shows that the behaviour of the integrated density of states at the bottom of the spectrum of a quasi-d-dimensional Anderson model is the same as its behaviour for a d-dimensional Anderson model.

  19. Exciton level structure and dynamics in the CP47 antenna complex of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.C.; Jankowiak, R.; Small, G.J. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA ); Yocum, C.F. ); Picorel, R. National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO ); Alfonso, M. ); Seibert, M. )

    1994-08-04

    Persistent nonphotochemical and population bottleneck hole-burning results obtained as a function of burn wavelength are reported for the CP47 proximal antenna protein complex of photosystem II. Attention is focused on the lower energy chlorophyll a Q[sub y] states. Results are presented for the CP47 complex from two preparations. The Chl a content per CP47 complex was determined, spectroscopically, to be 14 [+-] 2. On the basis of the analysis of the hole spectra and the 4.2 K static fluorescence spectrum, the lowest energy state of CP47 lies at 690 nm (fluorescence origin at 691 nm). The width of the weak 690-nm absorption band from inhomogeneous broadening is 100 cm[sup [minus]1]. The linear electron-phonon coupling of the 690-nm state is weak with a Huang-Rhys factor (S) of about 0.2 and a mean phonon frequency ([Omega][sub m]) of 120 cm[sup [minus]1], which explains why the Stokes shift (2S[Omega][sub m]) is so small. The 690-nm state is found to be excitonically correlated with a hitherto unobserved state at 687 nm. However, the combined absorption intensity of the 690- and 687-nm states was determined to be equivalent to only 1 Chl a molecule. Results are presented which illustrate that these two states are fragile (i.e., their associated chlorophyll a molecules are disrupted). Thus, it is possible that the correct number of Chl a molecules is 2, not 1. 53 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Ergodicity and dynamical localization for Delone-Anderson operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germinet, François; Müller, Peter; Rojas-Molina, Constanza

    2015-11-01

    We study the ergodic properties of Delone-Anderson operators, using the framework of randomly colored Delone sets and Delone dynamical systems. In particular, we show the existence of the integrated density of states and, under some assumptions on the geometric complexity of the underlying Delone sets, we obtain information on the almost-sure spectrum of the family of random operators. We then exploit these results to study the Lifshitz-tail behavior of the integrated density of states of a Delone-Anderson operator at the bottom of the spectrum. Furthermore, we use Lifshitz-tail estimates as an input for the multi-scale analysis to prove dynamical localization.

  1. Vacuum birefringence in strong magnetic fields: (II) Complex refractive index from the lowest Landau level

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Koichi; Itakura, Kazunori; Department of Particle and Nuclear Studies, Graduate University for Advanced Studies , 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801

    2013-07-15

    We compute the refractive indices of a photon propagating in strong magnetic fields on the basis of the analytic representation of the vacuum polarization tensor obtained in our previous paper. When the external magnetic field is strong enough for the fermion one-loop diagram of the polarization tensor to be approximated by the lowest Landau level, the propagating mode in parallel to the magnetic field is subject to modification: The refractive index deviates from unity and can be very large, and when the photon energy is large enough, the refractive index acquires an imaginary part indicating decay of a photon into a fermion–antifermion pair. We study dependences of the refractive index on the propagating angle and the magnetic-field strength. It is also emphasized that a self-consistent treatment of the equation which defines the refractive index is indispensable for accurate description of the refractive index. This self-consistent treatment physically corresponds to consistently including the effects of back reactions of the distorted Dirac sea in response to the incident photon. -- Highlights: •Vacuum birefringence and photon decay are described by the complex refractive index. •Resummed photon vacuum polarization tensor in the lowest Landau level is used. •Back reactions from the distorted Dirac sea are self-consistently taken into account. •Self-consistent treatment drastically changes structure in photon energy dependence. •Dependences on photon propagation angle and magnetic-field strength are presented.

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 68 (NFIETH00960068) on Town Highway 96, crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NFIETH00960068 on Town Highway 96 crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 30.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The right bank upstream is forested and the downstream right bank is pasture. Vermont state route 12A runs parallel to the river on the right bank. In the study area, the Dog River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 70 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 47.9 mm (0.157 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 96 crossing of the Dog River is a 45-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 43-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 41.5 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. Channel scour 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth, was observed under the bridge during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left bank upstream and type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream and downstream right banks that extends partially in front of the right wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.8 to 1.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 8.5 to 12.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson a

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (BURKTH00070016) on Town Highway 7, crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Severance, Tim

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BURKTH00070016 on Town Highway 7 crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 6.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the left bank upstream which is brushland. In the study area, Dish Mill Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 40 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 94.1 mm (0.309 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 7 crossing of Dish Mill Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 35 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left and right abutments during the Level I assessment. In front of the upstream and downstream left wingwalls the scour depth was only 0.5 ft, while in front of the downstream right wingwall it was 0.75 ft and in front of the upstream right wingwall it was 0.3 ft. The scour countermeasures at the site include type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream end of the right abutment and along the downstream right wingwall. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is along the upstream left bank, the upstream and downstream left wingwalls, and at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.7 to 9.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the left abutment and at the incipient road-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 26 (ROYATH00540026) on Town Highway 54, crossing Broad Brook, Royalton, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROYATH00540026 on Town Highway 54 crossing Broad Brook, Royalton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 11.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture with trees and brush on the immediate banks. The right bank, upstream and downstream of the bridge, is forested. In the study area, Broad Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 37 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 66.3 mm (0.218 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 13, 1995 and the Level II site visit on July 11, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 54 crossing of Broad Brook is a 29-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.3 ft. The bridge is supported by a vertical, concrete face laid-up stone abutment with concrete wingwalls on the left and a laid-up stone abutment on the right. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream end of the right abutment during the Level I assessment. Also, at the upstream end of the left abutment, the footing is exposed 0.5 ft. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left bank, at the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall, along the entire length of the downstream left wingwall, and at the upstream end of the right abutment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 2.2 to 7.4 ft on the left and from 14.7 to 17.7 ft on the right. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge for the left and at the 500-year discharge for the right. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is prese

  5. Anderson Acceleration of the Alternating Projections Method for Computing the Nearest

    E-print Network

    Higham, Nicholas J.

    Anderson Acceleration of the Alternating Projections Method for Computing the Nearest Correlation ISSN 1749-9097 #12;Anderson Acceleration of the Alternating Projections Method for Computing number of iterations to converge to within a given tolerance. We show that Anderson acceleration

  6. Price-Anderson Amendments Act UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 1

    E-print Network

    Price-Anderson Amendments Act UT-B Contracts Div Dec 2010 Page 1 of 1 paaa-ext-dec10.docx PRICE-ANDERSON AMENDMENTS ACT (December 2010) (a) This Agreement is subject to the Price-Anderson Amendments Act, Section 234A of the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) of 1954, as amended, and DOE's implementing regulations at 10 C

  7. Theory of single-photon transport in a single-mode waveguide. II. Coupling to a whispering-gallery resonator containing a two-level atom

    E-print Network

    Fan, Shanhui

    Theory of single-photon transport in a single-mode waveguide. II. Coupling to a whispering- gallery resonator containing a two-level atom Jung-Tsung Shen ( * and Shanhui Fan ( Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford interacting with a two-level atom. The single-photon transport properties such as the transmission

  8. Post-processing V&V level II ASC milestone (2360) results.

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Elmer; Karelitz, David B.; Brunner, Thomas A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Weirs, V. Gregory; Shead, Timothy M.

    2007-09-01

    The 9/30/2007 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2360) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include loading of edge and face data on an Exodus mesh, run-time computation of an exact solution to a verification problem, delivery of results data from the server to the client, computation of an integral-based error metric, simultaneous loading of simulation and test data, and comparison of that data using visual and quantitative methods. The capabilities were tested extensively by performing a typical ALEGRA HEDP verification task. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including completion of a verification task on a 13 million element mesh.

  9. Frequency response testing at Experimental Breeder Reactor II using discrete-level periodic signals

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, W.D.; Larson, H.A. . Coll. of Engineering); Dean, E.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-2) reactivity-to-power frequency-response function was measured with pseudo-random, discrete-level, periodic signals. The reactor power deviation was small with insignificant perturbation of normal operation and in-place irradiation experiments. Comparison of results with measured rod oscillator data and with theoretical predictions show good agreement. Moreover, measures of input signal quality (autocorrelation function and energy spectra) confirm the ability to enable this type of frequency response determination at EBR-2. Measurements were made with the pseudo-random binary sequence, quadratic residue binary sequence, pseudo-random ternary sequence, and the multifrequency binary sequence. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30 (BRIDTH00330030) on Town Highway 33, crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00330030 on town highway 33 crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 7.51-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Branch has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 45 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 60.7 mm (0.199 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 33 crossing of Dailey Hollow Branch is a 31-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Type-2 stone-fill (less than 36 inches diameter) protection was found at all four wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.5 to 3.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge, which is between the 100- and 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.9 to 14.6 ft. with the worst-case scenario also occurring at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 43 (CHELTH00460043) on Town Highway 46, crossing Jail Brook, Chelsea, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHELTH00460043 on Town Highway 46 crossing Jail Brook, Chelsea, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.68-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is best described as suburban with homes, lawns, and a few trees. In the study area, Jail Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 32 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from coarse sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 43.0 mm (0.141 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 18, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of Jail Brook is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 23-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.8 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately zero degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is also zero degrees. Channel scour was not observed. However, the left abutment footing was exposed one foot. Scour countermeasures at the site consisted of type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on the banks and road embankments upstream and downstream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.1 to 1.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 5.0 to 6.5 ft at the left abutment and 4.7 to 6.2 ft at the right abutment. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (SHARTH00040013) on Town Highway 4, crossing Broad Brook, Sharon, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SHARTH00040013 on Town Highway 4 crossing Broad Brook, Sharon, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is brushland on the downstream left overbank and row crops on the right overbank, while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. Upstream of the bridge, the overbanks are forested. In the study area, Broad Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 69 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 112 mm (0.369 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 11, 1995 and Level II site visit on July 23, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 4 crossing of Broad Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot concrete tee beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.1 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 2.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream end of the right abutment. At the downstream end of the left abutment, a 1.0 foot scour hole was observed . Scour countermeasures at the site include type-2 stone fill (less than 3 feet diameter) at each road embankment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.7 to 1.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 5.6 to 9.4 ft. The worst case left abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 19.0 to 19.8 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scou

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (BRIDTH00040042) on Town Highway 04, crossing Dailey Hollow Brook, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00040042 on town highway 4 crossing Dailey Hollow Brook, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic division of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 2.20-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the overbanks are covered by shrubs and trees except for the upstream right overbank where there is a house. Dailey Hollow Brook enters Dailey Hollow Branch at the downstream face of the bridge. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.035 ft/ft. The channel top width and channel depth upstream of the bridge is 19 ft and 3 ft, respectively. Downstream of the bridge and the confluence the channel top width and channel depth is 39 ft and 2 ft respectively. The predominant channel bed material is cobble and gravel (D50 is 64.7 mm or 0.212 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 4 crossing of Dailey Hollow Brook is a 25-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 23-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches) exists along all four wingwalls, the downstream right road approach, and the channel banks in the immediate vicinity of the bridge. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening; the opening-skewto-roadway is also 20 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for modelled flows was 0.0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 3.9 to 5.4 ft. with the worst-case abutment scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

  14. First participation by the NMISA in a low-level comparison: CCRI(II)-S9 exercise.

    PubMed

    van Wyngaardt, W M; van Staden, M J; Lubbe, J

    2013-11-01

    The NMISA Radioactivity Standards Laboratory participated in the CCRI(II)-S9 inter-comparison of the measurement of the activity concentration of (137)Cs and (40)K in rice material, piloted by the KRISS. The paper describes the equipment used, the measurement set-up and data analysis. The efficiency of the detector for (137)Cs and (40)K was determined by comparison against a spiked standard solution, and Monte Carlo simulations performed to estimate the difference in ?-ray escape probability between the solution standard and starch (as an approximation for milled rice) due to attenuation disparities. The uncertainty budget was estimated rather conservatively, since these were the first low-level measurements performed by the NMISA using an HPGe detector. PMID:23562433

  15. Significance of post-traumatic maxillary sinus fluid, or lack of fluid, in a level II trauma population.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Andrew; Burns, Judah; Scheinfeld, Meir H

    2015-12-01

    Our goal was to test the predictive value of high-attenuation material within the maxillary sinus for adjacent facial bone fracture. After IRB approval, all blunt trauma facial CTs performed over a 5-month period at a level II trauma center were reviewed in consensus by three radiologists for the presence of facial fractures or high attenuation maxillary sinus opacity (?30HU, ?40HU, or ?50HU). Three classes of fractures were analyzed: any fracture, any fracture contiguous with the maxillary sinus, and only fractures not contiguous with the maxillary sinus. Statistics were calculated using two-by-two tables. A total of 844 cases were reviewed with 273 patients having any fracture. There were 402 hemi-faces with any fracture and 62 hemi-faces with fracture contiguous with the maxillary sinus. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for any fracture (using the ?40HU threshold) were 13, 99, 85, and 78 % respectively; for fracture contiguous with the sinus, these were 71, 99, 72, and 99 % respectively; and for only non-contiguous fractures, these were 2.3, 96, 13, and 80 %, respectively. We conclude that in this level II trauma population, lack of high attenuation maxillary sinus material nearly ruled out fractures in contiguity with the sinus. High-attenuation sinus material is only moderately predictive of a fracture contiguous with the maxillary sinus. Therefore, if after careful review a fracture is not identified, the radiologist should not be overly concerned that a fracture is being missed. High-attenuation sinus material is a poor marker for fractures not contiguous with the maxillary sinus. PMID:26335132

  16. The Ce 4{ital f} surface shift: A test for the Anderson-impurity Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Duo, L.; De Rossi, S.; Vavassori, P.; Ciccacci, F.; Olcese, G.L.; Chiaia, G.; Lindau, I.

    1996-12-01

    Evidence is provided of the role of the different hybridization strengths between the surface and the bulk in determining the magnitude of the surface shift for the shallow Ce 4{ital f} levels, with respect to the deeper core levels. This was achieved by comparing the photoemission core levels for a weakly hybridized case (CeAl) to a case of intermediate hybridization ({gamma}-Ce). For CeAl a 4{ital f} surface shift of 0.45 eV was observed, similar to that for the 5{ital p} core level, whereas a smaller (if any) 4{ital f} surface shift was observed for {gamma}-Ce. Model calculations based on the Anderson impurity Hamiltonian are shown to give a correct evaluation of this effect, which can be exploited as a way of testing the results of such a description for the Ce {ital f} states. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. I.I. Rabi Prize Talk: Artificial gauge fields in multi-level atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielman, Ian

    2015-05-01

    We used Raman lasers to induce artificial gauge fields or spin-orbit coupling in the three-level system formed by the f=1 electronic ground state manifold of rubidium-87. In this colloquium I will report on two effects of this laser-coupling. I will explore the itinerant magnetic phases present in a spin-1 spin-orbit coupled atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC); in this system, itinerant ferromagnetic order is stabilized by the spin-orbit coupling, vanishing in its absence. We first located a second-order phase transition that continuously stiffens until, at a tricritical point, it transforms into a first-order transition. These measurements are all in agreement with theory. We engineered a two-dimensional magnetic lattice in an elongated strip geometry, with effective per-plaquette flux about 4/3 times the flux quanta. We imaged the localized edge and bulk states of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in this strip, with single lattice-site resolution along the narrow direction. Further, we observed both the skipping orbits of excited atoms traveling down our system's edges, analogues to edge magnetoplasmons in 2-D electron systems. Our lattice's long direction consisted of the sites of an optical lattice and its narrow direction consisted of the internal atomic spin states: a synthetic dimension.

  18. The Level and Nature of Autistic Intelligence II: What about Asperger Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Soulières, Isabelle; Dawson, Michelle; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Mottron, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    A distinctively uneven profile of intelligence is a feature of the autistic spectrum. Within the spectrum, Asperger individuals differ from autistics in their early speech development and in being less likely to be characterized by visuospatial peaks. While different specific strengths characterize different autistic spectrum subgroups, all such peaks of ability have been interpreted as deficits: isolated, aberrant, and irreconcilable with real human intelligence. This view has recently been challenged by findings of autistic strengths in performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), an important marker of general and fluid intelligence. We investigated whether these findings extend to Asperger syndrome, an autistic spectrum subgroup characterized by verbal peaks of ability, and whether the cognitive mechanisms underlying autistic and Asperger RPM performance differ. Thirty-two Asperger adults displayed a significant advantage on RPM over Wechsler Full-Scale and Performance scores relative to their typical controls, while in 25 Asperger children an RPM advantage was found over Wechsler Performance scores only. As previously found with autistics, Asperger children and adults achieved RPM scores at a level reflecting their Wechsler peaks of ability. Therefore, strengths in RPM performance span the autistic spectrum and imply a common mechanism advantageously applied to different facets of cognition. Autistic spectrum intelligence is atypical, but also genuine, general, and underestimated. PMID:21991394

  19. Diagnostic Value of Serum Level of Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor II? in Egyptian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Shawky A; Elsaaid, Nehal H; Mohamed, Nagwa A; Abutaleb, Osama M

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unfavorable and needs serum markers that could detect it early to start therapy at a potentially curable phase. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the value of serum soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-II? (sTNFR-II?) in diagnosis of HCC in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Patients and Methods: The study was performed on 110 subjects who were classified into five groups. Group I included 20 patients with chronic noncirrhotic HCV infection and persistently normal transaminases for ?6 months. Group II included 20 patients with chronic noncirrhotic HCV infection and elevated transaminases. Group III included 20 patients with Chronic HCV infection and liver cirrhosis. Group IV included 20 patients with chronic HCV infection with liver cirrhosis and HCC. Group V included 30 healthy age and sex-matched controls. Medical history was taken from all participants and they underwent clinical examination and abdominal ultrasonography. in addition, the following laboratory tests were requested: liver function tests, complete blood count, HBsAg, anti-HCVAb, HCV-RNA by qualitative PCR, and serum levels of ?-fetoprotein (AFP) and sTNFR-II?. Results: The serum level of sTNFR-II? was significantly higher in patients with HCC in comparison to the other groups. A positive correlation was found between the serum levels of sTNFR-II? and AST and ALT in patients of group-II. Diagnosis of HCC among patients with HCV infection and cirrhosis could be ascertained when sTNFR-II? is assessed at a cutoff value of ? 250 pg/mL. Conclusions: Serum sTNFR-II? could be used as a potential serum marker in diagnosing HCC among patients with HCV infection. PMID:25386197

  20. Examining the role of foraging and malvolio in host-finding behavior in the honey bee parasite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When a female varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), invades a honey bee brood cell, the physiology rapidly changes from the feeding phoretic to reproductive. Changes in the foraging and malvolio transcript levels in the brain have been associated with modulated intra-specific food sea...

  1. Variable induction of vitellogenin genes in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) by the honeybee, Apis mellifera L, host and its environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcript levels of vitellogenins (Vgs) in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) were variably induced by interactions between the developing honeybee as a food source and the capped honeybee cell environment. Transcripts for 2 Vgs of varroa mites were sequenced and putative Vg pr...

  2. Sodium selenite increases the transcript levels of iodothyronine deiodinases I and II in ovine and bovine fetal thyrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Mohammad Ali; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Bassami, Mohammad Reza

    2013-07-01

    Selenium is essential for thyroid hormone homeostasis. Selenium is co-translationally incorporated into the protein backbone of 5' deiodinase enzymes, which are responsible for the intra- and extra-thyroidal activation of thyroid hormones. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of sodium selenite on the transcript levels of type I (DIO1) and II (DIO2) deiodinases in the primary culture of ovine and bovine fetal thyroid. By culture of fetal thyrocytes in the presence or absence of sodium selenite, and quantification of DIO1 and DIO2 transcripts using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we found that sodium selenite is able to increase the abundance of transcripts for DIO1 and DIO2 genes. We also found that cultured thyrocytes in the presence of sodium selenite compared to control cultured thyrocytes release more T3 into the culture medium. This indicates that in the presence of sodium selenite higher levels of DIO1 and DIO2 enzymes are produced, which are able to convert T4 to T3. In conclusion, we have shown that sodium selenite is increasing the abundance of DIO1 and DIO2 transcripts and increasing the production and release of T3 from cultured fetal thyrocytes. This finding emphasizes the role of selenium in transcriptional and expression processes during development and suggests that selenium deficiency during pregnancy in sheep and cattle may lead to the lower levels of DIO1 and DIO2 transcription in fetal thyroid, and thus, lower level of thyroidal T3 release into the fetal serum. PMID:23481027

  3. Visiting Committee Meeting Forest Club Room, Anderson Hall

    E-print Network

    Brown, Sally

    Visiting Committee Meeting Forest Club Room, Anderson Hall October 10, 2007 Attendees: Committee milestone with a celebration of the completion of Phase I of the Pacific Connections Garden reported that the UW, City of Seattle, and Arboretum Botanical Garden Committee have taken the lead to make

  4. A Data Programming CS1 Course Ruth E. Anderson,

    E-print Network

    Ernst, Michael

    programming by means of real-world data analysis. We have found that students can be motivated to learn field, and "Big Data" is in the news everywhere [16]. Graduate students find they need to takeA Data Programming CS1 Course Ruth E. Anderson, Michael D. Ernst University of Washington Seattle

  5. Absolutely Continuous Spectrum for the Anderson Model on Trees

    E-print Network

    Fournier, John J.F.

    on the Green Function at an Arbitrary Site . . . . . . . . . 49 3.5 On a recursion relation.2 The nodes in the recurrence relation for the forward Green function. . . . . 32 3.3 Rearrangement of a tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3 Absolutely Continuous Spectrum for the Anderson Model on Some Tree-like Graphs

  6. Markovian Anderson Model: Bounds for the Rate of Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcheremchantsev, Serguei

    We consider the Anderson model in with potentials whose values at any site of the lattice are Markovian independent random functions of time. For solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation we show under some conditions that with probability 1 where for d=1,2 and for .

  7. TESLA: Temporally Enhanced System Logic Assertions Jonathan Anderson

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    TESLA: Temporally Enhanced System Logic Assertions Jonathan Anderson Robert N. M. Watson David and are not easily expressed in assertions. TESLA is a description, analysis, and validation tool that allows systems can span the interfaces between libraries and even lan- guages. TESLA exposes run-time behaviour using

  8. Credit: Michael Anderson. NOAA Selects St. Louis River Estuary as

    E-print Network

    Credit: Michael Anderson. NOAA Selects St. Louis River Estuary as Habitat Focus Area The St. Louis scale. A Watershed in Need The St. Louis River runs along the border of Minnesota and Wisconsin will be an important addition to the restoration effort. The objectives we have identified in the St. Louis River

  9. UCLA ANDERSON SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT FACULTY EXPERTISE GUIDE

    E-print Network

    Alwan, Abeer

    to view various regions and economies, and instills in students the necessary global social, intellectual knowledge into applicable practices within the global economy. www.anderson.ucla.edu/x27544.xml Ivo Welch watched and often-cited economic outlooks for California and the nation and was unique in predicting both

  10. Absence of transport in Anderson localization Fumihiko Nakano

    E-print Network

    that it is zero almost surely. This result has wider applicability than our previous work[12], while­diagonal compo­ nent of the conductivity tensor which recovers the famous result of quantization of Hall conductivity in quantum Hall systems. 1 Introduction Since the pioneering work of Anderson[5], where he

  11. Mary anderson she received a patent for her

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Mary anderson she received a patent for her "window cleaning device"in 1903.Within about a decade.s. patent. Hers was granted on July 14, 1885. hedy laMarr a Hollywood star, once dubbed"the most beautiful fabrics. Mary dixon kies In 1809, she received the first U.s. patent awarded to a woman

  12. Interpolation Processes in Object Perception: Reply to Anderson (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellman, Philip J.; Garrigan, Patrick; Shipley, Thomas F.; Keane, Brian P.

    2007-01-01

    P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, & T. F. Shipley presented a theory of 3-D interpolation in object perception. Along with results from many researchers, this work supports an emerging picture of how the visual system connects separate visible fragments to form objects. In his commentary, B. L. Anderson challenges parts of that view, especially the idea…

  13. Fuzzy Xor Classes from Quantum Computing Anderson Avila1

    E-print Network

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Fuzzy Xor Classes from Quantum Computing Anderson ´Avila1 , Murilo Schmalfuss1 , Renata Reiser1 modelling for fuzzy connectives and the corresponding computations of quantum states can be simultaneously and their dual constructions. So, via quantum computing not only the interpretation based on traditional quantum

  14. Neurological complications of Anderson-Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Salvatore; Arnao, Valentina; Licata, Giuseppe; Pinto, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic clinical manifestations of AFD such as acroparesthesias, angiokeratoma, corneal opacity, hypo/ and anhidrosis, gastrointestinal symptoms, renal and cardiac dysfunctions can occur in male and female patients, although heterozygous females with AFD usually seem to be less severely affected. The most prominent CNS manifestations consist of cerebrovascular events such as transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and (recurrent) strokes. For the most part, CNS complications in AFD have been attributed to cerebral vasculopathy, including anatomical abnormalities. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial accumulation of Gb-3. White matter lesions (WML) on occur MRI. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. Stroke in Anderson-Fabry disease study of 721 patients with cryptogenic stroke, aged 18-55 years, showed a high prevalence of Fabry disease in this group: 5% (21/432) of men and 3% (7/289) of women. Combining results of both sexes showed that 4% of young patients with stroke of previously unknown cause had Fabry disease, corresponding to about 1-2% of the general population of young stroke patients. Cerebral micro- and macro-vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease. Neuronal globotriaosylceramide accumulation in selective cortical and brain stem areas including the hippocampus has been reported by autopsy studies in FD, but clinical surrogates as well as the clinical relevance of these findings have not been investigated so far. Another Neurologic hallmark of Fabry disease (FD) includes small fiber neuropathy as well as cerebral micro- and macroangiopathy with premature stroke. Cranial MRI shows progressive white matter lesions (WML) at an early age, increased signal intensity in the pulvinar, and tortuosity and dilatation of the larger vessels. Conventional MRI shows a progressive load of white matter lesions (WMLs) due to cerebral vasculopathy in the course of FD. Another study has been conducted to quantify brain structural changes in clinically affected male and female patients with FD. The peripheral neuropathy in Fabry disease manifests as neuropathic pain, reduced cold and warm sensation and possibly gastrointestinal disturbances. Patients with Fabry disease begin having pain towards the end of the first decade of life or during puberty. Children as young as 6 years of age have complained of pain often associated with febrile illnesses with reduced heat and exercise tolerance. The patients describe the pain as burning that is often associated with deep ache or paresthesiae. Some patients also have joint pain. A high proportion of patients with Fabry disease is at increased risk of developing neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as depression and neuropsychological deficits. Due to both somatic and psychological impairment, health-related quality of life (QoL) is considerably reduced in patients with Fabry disease. Targeted screening for Fabry disease among young individuals with stroke seems to disclose unrecognized cases and may therefore very well be recommended as routine in the future. Furthermore, ischemic stroke is related to inflammation and arterial stiffness and no study had addressed this relationship in patients with AF disease and cerebrovascular disease, so this topic could represent a possible future research line. PMID:23448452

  15. Relationship between NOX4 level and angiotensin II signaling in Gitelman’s syndrome. Implications with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Calò, Lorenzo A; Savoia, Carmine; Davis, Paul A; Pagnin, Elisa; Ravarotto, Verdiana; Maiolino, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence showed that endogenous nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase 4 (NOX4) may exert a protective role on the cardiovascular system inducing vasodilation, reduction of blood pressure, and anti-proliferative actions. However, the functional significance of NOX4 in the cardiovascular system in humans remains elusive. Mononuclear cell levels of NOX4 were assessed by immunoblotting in 14 Gitelman’s patients (GS), a unique human model of endogenous Ang II signaling antagonism and activation of anti-atherosclerotic and anti-remodeling defenses, and compared to 11 untreated essential hypertensive patients as well as to 11 healthy normotensive subjects. The association between NOX4 and its effector heme oxygenase (HO-1) (sandwich immunoassay) was also evaluated. NOX4 protein levels were decreased in hypertensive patients as compared to both GS and healthy subjects (1.06±0.31 AU vs. 1.76±0.54, P=0.002 and vs. 1.61±0.54, P=0.018, respectively). NOX4 protein level did not differ between GS and healthy subjects. HO-1 levels were increased in GS patients as compared to both hypertensive patients and healthy subjects (8.65±3.08 ng/ml vs 3.70±1.19, P<0.0001, and vs 5.49±1.04, P=0.008, respectively. NOX4 levels correlate with HO-1 levels only in GS (r2=0.63; P=0.001), (r2=0.088; P=ns, in hypertensive patients and r2=0.082; P=ns, in healthy subjects). Our findings show that NOX4 and its effector HO-1 are reduced in hypertensive patients compared to GS patients, a human model opposite to hypertension. Although the functional significance of NOX4 needs further clarification, our preliminary data in a unique human model of anti-atherosclerotic and anti-remodeling defenses activation, highlight the potentially protective role of NOX4 in the human cardiovascular system. PMID:26221292

  16. Angiotensin II infusion decreases plasma adiponectin level via its type 1 receptor in rats: an implication for hypertension-related insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jianmin; Hirano, Tsutomu; Fukui, Tomoyasu; Saito, Kiyomi; Kageyama, Haruaki; Okada, Kenta; Adachi, Mitsuru

    2006-04-01

    We explored the mechanisms underlying the close association between hypertension and insulin resistance by measuring the changes in the plasma levels of adiponectin, a novel insulin sensitizer secreted by adipose tissue, in rats infused with angiotensin II (AII). Angiotensin II (100 ng/kg per minute) was subcutaneously infused with osmotic minipumps for 2 weeks in rats fed with either standard chow or a high-fructose diet. Insulin sensitivity index (SI) was assessed by the minimal model of Bergman [Diabetes 1989;38:1512-27]. Angiotensin II infusion significantly increased blood pressure and decreased SI. Angiotensin II decreased plasma adiponectin levels from 3.7 to 2.9 microg/mL (P < .01) without affecting the expression of adiponectin messenger RNA in adipose tissue. Angiotensin II infusion did not affect plasma leptin and tumor necrosis factor alpha levels. An AII type 1 receptor blocker, olmesartan, restored the low adiponectinemia induced by the AII infusion (50 ng/kg per minute). Plasma adiponectin levels were significantly lower in fructose-fed rats (2.3 microg/mL) than in chow-fed rats. Angiotensin II induced no further decrease of adiponectin, whereas olmesartan increased adiponectin remarkably both with and without AII infusion. The AII type 2 receptor blocker PD123319 left the AII-induced hypoadiponectinemia unchanged in both chow- and fructose-fed rats. The AII type 2 receptor agonist CGP42112A also left the adiponectin unchanged. Plasma adiponectin levels were substantially correlated with SI (r = 0.61, P < .0001). These results suggest that AII suppresses adiponectin production via AII type 1 receptor, resulting in impaired insulin sensitivity. PMID:16546478

  17. Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

    1987-10-01

    A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (RANDVT00120042) on State Highway 12, crossing Third Branch White River, Randolph, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    bridge consisting of four concrete spans. The maximum span length is 57 ft. (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., July 29, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments and three concrete piers. The toe of the left abutment is at the channel edge. The toe of the right abutment is set back on the right over-bank. The roadway centerline on the structure has a slight horizontal curve; however, the main channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

  19. Interactive roles of NPR1 gene-dosage and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels inmutantmice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Das, Subhankar; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to elucidate the interactive roles of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) gene (Npr1) and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II (ANG II), aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokines levels in Npr1 gene-targeted (1-copy, 2-copy, 3-copy, 4-copy) mice. Methods Npr1 genotypes included 1-copy gene-disrupted heterozygous (+/?), 2-copy wild-type (+/+), 3-copy gene-duplicated heterozygous (++/+) and 4-copy gene-duplicated homozygous (++/++) mice. Animals were fed low, normal and high-salt diets. Plasma and cardiac levels of ANG II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined. Results With a high-salt diet, cardiac ANG II levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (13.7 ± 2.8 fmol/mg protein, 111%) compared with 2-copy mice (6.5 ± 0.6), but decreased (?) in 4-copy (4.0 ± 0.5, 38%) mice. Cardiac aldosterone levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (80 ± 4 fmol/mg protein, 79%) compared with 2-copy mice (38 ± 3). Plasma tumour necrosis factor alpha was increased (+) in 1-copy mice (30.27 ± 2.32 pg/ml, 38%), compared with 2-copy mice (19.36 ± 2.49, 24%), but decreased (?) in 3-copy (11.59 ± 1.51, 12%) and 4-copy (7.13 ± 0.52, 22%) mice. Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1? levels were also significantly increased (+) in 1-copy compared with 2-copy mice but decreased (?) in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. Conclusion These results demonstrate that a high-salt diet aggravates cardiac ANG II, aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokine levels in Npr1 gene-disrupted 1-copy mice, whereas, in Npr1 gene-duplicated (3-copy and 4-copy) mice, high salt did not render such elevation, suggesting the potential roles of Npr1 against salt loading. PMID:23188418

  20. Extended recursion in operator space (EROS), a new impurity solver for the single impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, Robert C; Julien, Jean P

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new efficient and accurate impurity solver for the single impurity Anderson model (SIAM), which is based on a non-perturbative recursion technique in a space of operators and involves expanding the self-energy as a continued fraction. The method has no special occupation number or temperature restrictions; the only approximation is the number of levels of the continued fraction retained in the expansion. We also show how this approach can be used as a new approach to Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMTF) and illustrate this with the Hubbard model. The three lowest orders of recursion give the Hartree-Fock, Hubbard I, and Hubbard III approximations. A higher level of recursion is able to reproduce the expected 3-peak structure in the spectral function and Fermi liquid behavior.

  1. 3DVAR and Cloud Analysis with WSR-88D Level-II Data for the Prediction of the Fort Worth, Texas, Tornadic Thunderstorms.

    E-print Network

    Gao, Jidong

    Prediction System (ARPS) model is studied. Radar reflectivity data are used primarily in a cloud analysis-part paper, the impact of level-II Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) radar reflectivity and cloud analysis procedure with 10-min intermittent assimilation cycles, reflectivity data are found

  2. 3DVAR and Cloud Analysis with WSR-88D Level-II Data for the Prediction of the Fort Worth Tornadic Thunderstorms

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Regional Prediction System (ARPS) model is studied. Radar reflectivity data are used primarily in a cloud variational (3DVAR) analysis system, while reflectivity data are used through a cloud analysis procedure3DVAR and Cloud Analysis with WSR-88D Level-II Data for the Prediction of the Fort Worth Tornadic

  3. 3DVAR and Cloud Analysis with WSR-88D Level-II Data for the Prediction of the Fort Worth Tornadic Thunderstorms

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Regional Prediction System (ARPS) model are studied. Radar reflectivity data are used primarily in a cloud are examined. It is found that the experiment using the improved cloud analysis procedure with reflectivity3DVAR and Cloud Analysis with WSR-88D Level-II Data for the Prediction of the Fort Worth Tornadic

  4. Collinear Laser-Beam Ion-Beam Measurement of the Mean Lifetime of the Ar Ii 4p'2f-Degrees-7/2 Level 

    E-print Network

    Jin, J.; Church, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The mean lifetime tau of the 4p'F-2(7/2)-degrees level of Ar II has been measured using a variant of the collinear laser-beam-fast-ion-beam spectroscopy technique. Our variant requires no mechanical motion or laser frequency tuning. The result...

  5. Anderson localization of light in disordered superlattices containing graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, A. J.; Peres, N. M. R.; Pinheiro, F. A.

    2015-11-01

    We perform a theoretical investigation of light propagation and Anderson localization in one-dimensional disordered superlattices composed of dielectric stacks with graphene sheets in between. Disorder is introduced either on graphene material parameters (e.g., Fermi energy) or on the widths of the dielectric stacks. We derive an analytic expression for the localization length ? , and we compare it to numerical simulations using the transfer-matrix technique; a very good agreement is found. We demonstrate that the presence of graphene may strongly attenuate the anomalously delocalized Brewster modes, and it is at the origin of a periodic dependence of ? on frequency, in contrast to the usual asymptotic decay, ? ??-2 . By unveiling the effects of graphene on Anderson localization of light, we pave the way for new applications of graphene-based, disordered photonic devices in the THz spectral range.

  6. STS-107 Crew Interviews: Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-107 Mission Specialist 3 and Payload Commander Michael Anderson is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting onboard science experiments. He discusses the following instruments and sets of experiments in detail: CM2 (Combustion Module 2), FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enabling Science Technology and Research, MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) and MGM (Mechanics of Granular Materials). Anderson also mentions on-board activities and responsibilities during launch and reentry, mission training, and microgravity research. In addition, he touches on the dual work-shift nature of the mission, the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety during training and the value of international cooperation.

  7. Anderson localization on the Bethe lattice: nonergodicity of extended States.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Altshuler, B L; Kravtsov, V E; Scardicchio, A

    2014-07-25

    Statistical analysis of the eigenfunctions of the Anderson tight-binding model with on-site disorder on regular random graphs strongly suggests that the extended states are multifractal at any finite disorder. The spectrum of fractal dimensions f(?) defined in Eq. (3) remains positive for ? noticeably far from 1 even when the disorder is several times weaker than the one which leads to the Anderson localization; i.e., the ergodicity can be reached only in the absence of disorder. The one-particle multifractality on the Bethe lattice signals on a possible inapplicability of the equipartition law to a generic many-body quantum system as long as it remains isolated. PMID:25105646

  8. Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

  9. Kubo-Anderson Mixing in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Brink, A. Maassen Van Den

    A novel ab initio analysis of the Reynolds stress is presented in order to model non-local turbulence transport. The theory involves a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. A scaling relation maps the path space onto the boundary layer. Analytical sampling rates are shown to model mixing by exchange. Nonlocal mixing involves a scaling exponent ??0.58 (??? in the diffusion limit). The resulting transport equation represents a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process.

  10. Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Shu-Hui; Song, Juntao Li, Yu-Xian

    2013-11-14

    We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

  11. Variational exact diagonalization method for Anderson impurity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, M.; Renk, C.; Wehling, T. O.

    2015-06-01

    We describe a variational approach to solving Anderson impurity models by means of exact diagonalization. Optimized parameters of a discretized auxiliary model are obtained on the basis of the Peierls-Feynman-Bogoliubov principle. Thereby, the variational approach resolves ambiguities related to the bath discretization, which is generally necessary to make Anderson impurity models tractable by exact diagonalization. The choice of variational degrees of freedom made here allows systematic improvements of total energies over mean-field decouplings like Hartree-Fock. Furthermore, our approach allows us to embed arbitrary bath discretization schemes in total-energy calculations and to systematically optimize and improve on traditional routes to the discretization problem such as fitting of hybridization functions on Matsubara frequencies. Benchmarks in terms of a single orbital Anderson model demonstrate that the variational exact diagonalization method accurately reproduces free energies as well as several single- and two-particle observables obtained from an exact solution. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of the variational exact diagonalization approach to realistic five-orbital problems with the example system of Co impurities in bulk Cu and compare it to continuous-time Monte Carlo calculations. The accuracy of established bath discretization schemes is assessed in the framework of the variational approach introduced here.

  12. Centrifugal Distortion Causes Anderson Localization in Laser Kicked Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floss, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2014-05-01

    The periodically kicked 2D rotor is a textbook model in nonlinear dynamics. The classical kicked rotor can exhibit truly chaotic motion, whilst in the quantum regime this chaotic motion is suppressed by a mechanism similar to Anderson Localization. Up to now, these effects have been mainly observed in an atom optics analogue of a quantum rotor: cold atoms in a standing light wave. We demonstrate that common linear molecules (like N2, O2, CO2, ...), kicked by a train of short linearly polarized laser pulses, can exhibit a new mechanism for dynamical Anderson Localization due to their non-rigidity. When the pulses are separated by the rotational revival time trev = ?? / B , the angular momentum J grows ballistically (Quantum Resonance). We show that, due to the centrifugal distortion of fast spinning molecules, above some critical value J =Jcr the Quantum Resonance is suppressed via the mechanism of Anderson Localization. This leads to a non-sinusoidal oscillation of the angular momentum distribution, which may be experimentally observed even at ambient conditions by using current techniques for laser molecular alignment.

  13. Type I Vs. Type II Cytokine Levels as a Function of SOD1 G93A Mouse Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeyachandran, Amilia; Mertens, Benjamin; McKissick, Eric A.; Mitchell, Cassie S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motoneuron disease that is characterized by the degradation of neurons throughout the central nervous system. Inflammation have been cited a key contributor to ALS neurodegeneration, but the timeline of cytokine upregulation remains unresolved. The goal of this study was to temporally examine the correlation between the varying levels of pro-inflammatory type I cytokines (IL-1?, IL-1?, IL-12, TNF-?, and GFAP) and anti-inflammatory type II cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL-10) throughout the progression of ALS in the SOD1 G93A mouse model. Cytokine level data from high copy SOD1 G93A transgenic mice was collected from 66 peer-reviewed studies. For each corresponding experimental time point, the ratio of transgenic to wild type (TG/WT) cytokine was calculated. One-way ANOVA and t-tests with Bonferonni correction were used to analyze the data. Meta-analysis was performed for four discrete stages: early, pre-onset, post-onset, and end stage. A significant increase in TG cytokine levels was found when compared to WT cytokine levels across the entire SOD1 G93A lifespan for majority of the cytokines. The rates of change of the individual cytokines, and type I and type II were not significantly different; however, the mean fold change of type I was expressed at significantly higher levels than type II levels across all stages with the difference between the means becoming more pronounced at the end stage. An overexpression of cytokines occurred both before and after the onset of ALS symptoms. The trend between pro-inflammatory type I and type II cytokine mean levels indicate a progressive instability of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as anti-inflammatory cytokines fail to mediate the pronounced increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. Very early immunoregulatory treatment is necessary to successfully interrupt ALS-induced neuroinflammation. PMID:26648846

  14. Highly sensitive determination of Cu(II) iron in ng/mL level in natural waters using Sulfochlorophenol S.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Danhua; Zhang, Guoping

    2015-03-01

    The highly sensitive complexation of Cu(II) with Sulfochlorophenol S (SCPS) at pH 4.03 was characterized by the spectral correction technique. This reaction was used to determine the Cu(II) content in various sources by the light-absorption ratio variation approach (LARVA). The limit of detection of Cu(II) was only 1.35 ng/mL, thus facilitating the direct monitoring of natural water. The Cu(II) contents in the Huangpu River, Yangtze River, and Taihu Lake of China were determined with satisfactory results, and the recovery rates of Cu(II) using SCPS were between 94.5 and 102.6 %. PMID:25647804

  15. Cranial location of level II lymph nodes in laryngeal cancer: Implications for elective nodal target volume delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Braam, Petra M. . E-mail: P.M.Braam@umcutrecht.nl; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Terhaard, Chris

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the cranial distribution of level II lymph nodes in patients with laryngeal cancer to optimize the elective radiation nodal target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: The most cranially located metastatic lymph node was delineated in 67 diagnostic CT data sets. The minimum distance from the base of the skull (BOS) to the lymph node was determined. Results: A total of 98 lymph nodes were delineated including 62 ipsilateral and 36 contralateral lymph nodes. The mean ipsilateral and contralateral distance from the top of the most cranial metastatic lymph node to the BOS was 36 mm (range, -9-120; standard deviation [SD], 17.9) and 35 mm (range, 14-78; SD 15.0), respectively. Only 5% and 12% of the ipsilateral and 3% and 9% of the contralateral metastatic lymph nodes were located within 15 mm and 20 mm below the BOS, respectively. No significant differences were found between patients with only ipsilateral metastatic lymph nodes and patients with bilateral metastatic lymph nodes. Between tumors that do cross the midline and those that do not, no significant difference was found in the distance of the most cranial lymph node to the BOS and the occurrence ipsilateral or contralateral. Conclusions: Setting the cranial border of the nodal target volume 1.5 cm below the base of the skull covers 95% of the lymph nodes and should be considered in elective nodal irradiation for laryngeal cancer. Bilateral neck irradiation is mandatory, including patients with unilateral laryngeal cancer, when elective irradiation is advised.

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (BRNATH00800016) on Town Highway 80, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 17.5 to 23.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scou

  17. Correlation Estimates in the Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissard, Jean V.; Hislop, Peter D.; Stolz, Günter

    2007-11-01

    We give a new proof of correlation estimates for arbitrary moments of the resolvent of random Schrödinger operators on the lattice that generalizes and extends the correlation estimate of Minami for the second moment. We apply this moment bound to obtain a new n-level Wegner-type estimate that measures eigenvalue correlations through an upper bound on the probability that a local Hamiltonian has at least n eigenvalues in a given energy interval. Another consequence of the correlation estimates is that the results on the Poisson statistics of energy level spacing and the simplicity of the eigenvalues in the strong localization regime hold for a wide class of translation-invariant, selfadjoint, lattice operators with decaying off-diagonal terms and random potentials.

  18. Block Lanczos density-matrix renormalization group method for general Anderson impurity models: Application to magnetic impurity problems in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Tomonori; Yunoki, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a block Lanczos (BL) recursive technique to construct quasi-one-dimensional models, suitable for density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations, from single- as well as multiple-impurity Anderson models in any spatial dimensions. This new scheme, named BL-DMRG method, allows us to calculate not only local but also spatially dependent static and dynamical quantities of the ground state for general Anderson impurity models without losing elaborate geometrical information of the lattice. We show that the BL-DMRG method can be easily extended to treat a multiorbital Anderson impurity model where not only inter- and intraorbital Coulomb interactions but also Hund's coupling and pair hopping interactions are included. We also show that the symmetry adapted BL bases can be utilized, when it is appropriate, to reduce the computational cost. As a demonstration, we apply the BL-DMRG method to three different models for graphene with a structural defect and with a single hydrogen or fluorine absorbed, where a single Anderson impurity is coupled to conduction electrons in the honeycomb lattice. These models include (i) a single adatom on the honeycomb lattice, (ii) a substitutional impurity in the honeycomb lattice, and (iii) an effective model for a single carbon vacancy in graphene. Our analysis of the local dynamical magnetic susceptibility and the local density of states at the impurity site reveals that, for the particle-hole symmetric case at half-filling of electron density, the ground state of model (i) behaves as an isolated magnetic impurity with no Kondo screening, while the ground state of the other two models forms a spin-singlet state where the impurity moment is screened by the conduction electrons. We also calculate the real-space dependence of the spin-spin correlation functions between the impurity site and the conduction sites for these three models. Our results clearly show that, reflecting the presence or absence of unscreened magnetic moment at the impurity site, the spin-spin correlation functions decay as ? r-3, differently from the noninteracting limit (? r-2), for model (i) and as ? r-4, exactly the same as the noninteracting limit, for models (ii) and (iii) in the asymptotic r , where r is the distance between the impurity site and the conduction site. Finally, based on our results, we shed light on recent experiments on graphene where the formation of local magnetic moments as well as the Kondo-like behavior have been observed.

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 45 (CHELTH00440045) on Town Highway 44, crossing first Branch White River, Chelsea, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    bridge consisting of one 27-foot clear-span concrete-encased steel beam deck superstructure (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 5 degrees. Both abutment footings were reported as exposed and the left abutment was reported to be undermined by 0.5 ft at the time of the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left abutment which was reported as failed. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.4 to 5.1 ft. with the worst-case occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 9.9 to 20.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly ass

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (BRNAVT00120025) on State Highway 12, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along a bedrock outcrop near the upstream left wingwall during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures in place at the site are type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left abutment, upstream right bank, and both downstream banks; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the downstream side of the right road approach and upstream left bank; type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall and downstream end of downstream left wingwall; type-5 (wall/ artificial levee) at the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.5 to 20.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during f

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BRNATH00680035) on Town Highway 68, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    abutments with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment and downstream right wingwall during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure in place at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the left abutment and wingwalls except the downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 11.5 to 25.7 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled "Scour Results". Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives "excessively conservative estimates of scour depths" (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineerin

  2. Transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor by enhanced levels of endogenous angiotensin II contributes to the overexpression of Gi? proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells from SHR.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Yessica-Haydee Gomez; Li, Yuan; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2011-11-01

    We earlier showed that the increased expression of Gi proteins exhibited by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) was attributed to the enhanced levels of endogenous endothelin. Since the levels of angiotensin II (Ang II) are also enhanced in VSMC from SHR, the present study was undertaken to examine the role of enhanced levels of endogenous Ang II in the overexpression of Gi? proteins in VSMC from SHR and to further explore the underlying mechanisms responsible for this increase. The enhanced expression of Gi?-2 and Gi?-3 proteins in VSMC from SHR compared to WKY was attenuated by the captopril, losartan and AG1478, inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme, AT(1) receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) respectively as well as by the siRNAs of AT1, cSrc and EGFR. The enhanced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity by low concentrations of GTP?S (receptor-independent functions) and of inhibitory responses of hormones on adenylyl cyclase activity (receptor-dependent functions) in VSMC from SHR was also attenuated by losartan. Furthermore, the enhanced phosphorylation of EGFR in VSMC from SHR was also restored to control levels by captopril, losartan, PP2, a c-Src inhibitor and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) scavenger, whereas enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated by captopril and losartan. Furthermore, NAC also restored the enhanced phosphorylation of c-Src in SHR to control levels. These results suggest that the enhanced levels of endogenous Ang II in VSMC from SHR, transactivate EGFR, which through MAP kinase signaling, enhance the expression of Gi? proteins and associated adenylyl cyclase signaling. PMID:21712088

  3. HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma with Overt Level II and/or III metastases at presentation: The risk of subclinical disease in ipsilateral levels IB, IV and V

    PubMed Central

    SANGUINETI, GIUSEPPE; PAI, SARA; AGBAHIWE, HAROLD; RICCHETTI, FRANCESCO; WESTRA, WILLIAM; SORMANI, MARIA PIA; CLEMENTE, STEFANIA; CALIFANO, JOSEPH

    2015-01-01

    Background To assess the risk of subclinical neck nodal involvement of levels IB, IV and V for early T-stage, node positive, human papilloma virus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal carcinoma. Material and methods We retrospectively identified the patients with clinically positive and un-violated neck that underwent upfront ipsilateral neck dissection for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer between 1998 and 2010. From the pathology report we extracted the prevalence rate of involvement of each selected level and then estimated the risk that a level that does not contain any node larger than 10 mm at computed tomography (CT) harbors subclinical disease. Predictors of involvement were investigated as well. Results Ninety-one patients were analyzed. The risk of subclinical disease in both levels IB and V is < 5%, while it is 6.5% (95% CI 3.1–9.9%) for level IV. Level IB subclinical involvement slightly exceeds 5% when 2 + ipsilateral levels besides IB are involved. The risk of occult disease in level IV tends to be < 5% when level III is not involved. Conclusion These data support the exclusion from the elective nodal volume of level V and level IB but when 2 + other levels are involved. Level IV might also be spared when level III is negative. Clinical implementation within a prospective study is justified. PMID:24274389

  4. Astronaut Clay Anderson Speaks With S.C. Students - Duration: 25 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA astronaut Clay Anderson participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at Crayton Middle School, Columbia,...

  5. Experimental Observation of Two-Dimensional Anderson Localization with the Atomic Kicked Rotor.

    PubMed

    Manai, Isam; Clément, Jean-François; Chicireanu, Radu; Hainaut, Clément; Garreau, Jean Claude; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Delande, Dominique

    2015-12-11

    Dimension 2 is expected to be the lower critical dimension for Anderson localization in a time-reversal-invariant disordered quantum system. Using an atomic quasiperiodic kicked rotor-equivalent to a two-dimensional Anderson-like model-we experimentally study Anderson localization in dimension 2 and we observe localized wave function dynamics. We also show that the localization length depends exponentially on the disorder strength and anisotropy and is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the self-consistent theory for the 2D Anderson localization. PMID:26705619

  6. NX-PVKA levels before and after hepatectomy of hepatocellular carcinoma as predictors of patient survival: a preliminary evaluation of an improved assay for PIVKA-II.

    PubMed

    Nanashima, Atsushi; Abo, Takafumi; Taura, Naota; Shibata, Hideki; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Takagi, Katsunori; Arai, Junichi; Oyama, Shousaburou; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Although the protein-induced vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) is used as a prognostic marker in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a newly-improved assay, NX-PVKA (PIVKA-II measured using P-11 and P-16 antibodies) and NX-PVKA-R (ratio of PIVKA-II and NX-PVKA), are more accurate markers of PIVKA-II. We conducted a prospectively preliminary analysis of the relationship between NX-PVKA-R and clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in 22 patients with HCC who underwent hepatectomy and measured changes of this marker's levels after treatment. Median value of PIVKA-II (80 mAU/ml), NX-PVKA (60 mAU/ml), NX-PVKA-R (1.5) and NX-PVKA-D (difference of markers, 15 mAU/ml) were determined. Tumor relapse was observed in six patients, and the one year relapse-free survival rate was 88%. Correlation between PIVKA-II or alpha-fetoprotein levels and NX-PVKA, NX-PVKA-R or -D levels was significant (p<0.001). NX-PVKA-R was significantly correlated with tumor size (p<0.05). In patients who underwent pre-treatment before hepatectomy, PIVKA-II, NX-PVKA and NX-PVKA-R tended to be higher than in patients without pre-treatment, but this difference was not significant (p>0.10). For macroscopic findings, NX-PVKA-R for the confluent-nodular type was significantly higher than that for the simple-nodular type (p<0.05). The tumor-free survival rate in the group with a high NX-PVKA-R was significantly lower than that in the group with a low NX-PVKA-R group (p<0.05). In patients with tumor recurrence, postoperative NX-PVKA-R increased again. We conclude that a high value of NX-PVKA-R after hepatectomy for HCC reflects malignant potential and predicts early recurrence in patients with HCC. PMID:23749928

  7. Tunable Anderson metal-insulator transition in quantum spin-Hall insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chui-Zhen; Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-feng; Wang, Ziqiang; Xie, X. C.

    2015-06-01

    We numerically study disorder effects in the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang (BHZ) model, and we find that the Anderson transition of a quantum spin-Hall insulator (QSHI) is determined by model parameters. The BHZ Hamiltonian is equivalent to two decoupled spin blocks that belong to the unitary class. In contrast to the common belief that a two-dimensional unitary system scales to an insulator except at certain critical points, we find, through calculations scaling properties of the localization length, level statistics, and participation ratio, that a possible exotic metallic phase emerges between the QSHI and normal insulator phases in the InAs/GaSb-type BHZ model. On the other hand, direct transition from a QSHI to a normal insulator is found in the HgTe/CdTe-type BHZ model. Furthermore, we show that the metallic phase originates from the Berry phase and can survive both inside and outside the gap.

  8. Elevated serum levels of creatine kinase BB in autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II--a family study.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Fowler, H L; Pendleton, J W; Sforza, P P; Gerard, R D; Lui, C Y; Eldridge, T H; Iranmanesh, A

    1992-07-01

    A markedly elevated BB isoenzyme fraction of serum creatine kinase was noted in four male siblings and correlated with typical radiographic findings of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis Type II (ADO Type II). Patients with other sclerosing bone diseases had no elevation of CK-BB. The precision of the electrophoretic mobility patterns and correlation by I-125 tagged radioimmunoassay method confirms that this is CK-BB. We postulate that the dysfunctional and/or immature osteoclasts in ADO are more dependent on CK-BB than on the usual tricarboxylic acid cycle for the production of energy. The correlation of marked elevation of serum CK-BB with radiographic evidence of ADO Type II may prove to be of value as a biologic marker in the early diagnosis of the illness and lead to better understanding of the metabolism of bone. PMID:1516225

  9. An assessment of global and regional sea level for years 1993-2007 in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffies, Stephen M.; Yin, Jianjun; Durack, Paul J.; Goddard, Paul; Bates, Susan C.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus W.; Bozec, Alexandra; Chassignet, Eric; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Domingues, Catia M.; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Holland, David M.; Ilicak, Mehmet; Large, William G.; Lorbacher, Katja; Lu, Jianhua; Marsland, Simon J.; Mishra, Akhilesh; George Nurser, A. J.; Salas y Mélia, David; Palter, Jaime B.; Samuels, Bonita L.; Schröter, Jens; Schwarzkopf, Franziska U.; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Treguier, Anne Marie; Tseng, Yu-heng; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Winton, Michael; Zhang, Xuebin

    2014-06-01

    We provide an assessment of sea level simulated in a suite of global ocean-sea ice models using the interannual CORE atmospheric state to determine surface ocean boundary buoyancy and momentum fluxes. These CORE-II simulations are compared amongst themselves as well as to observation-based estimates. We focus on the final 15 years of the simulations (1993-2007), as this is a period where the CORE-II atmospheric state is well sampled, and it allows us to compare sea level related fields to both satellite and in situ analyses. The ensemble mean of the CORE-II simulations broadly agree with various global and regional observation-based analyses during this period, though with the global mean thermosteric sea level rise biased low relative to observation-based analyses. The simulations reveal a positive trend in dynamic sea level in the west Pacific and negative trend in the east, with this trend arising from wind shifts and regional changes in upper 700 m ocean heat content. The models also exhibit a thermosteric sea level rise in the subpolar North Atlantic associated with a transition around 1995/1996 of the North Atlantic Oscillation to its negative phase, and the advection of warm subtropical waters into the subpolar gyre. Sea level trends are predominantly associated with steric trends, with thermosteric effects generally far larger than halosteric effects, except in the Arctic and North Atlantic. There is a general anti-correlation between thermosteric and halosteric effects for much of the World Ocean, associated with density compensated changes.

  10. STS-118 Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Clay Anderson Perform EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist Rick Mastracchio was anchored on the foot restraint of the Canadarm2 as he participated in the third session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. Assisting Mastracchio was Expedition 15 flight engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame). During the 5 hour, 28 minute space walk, the two relocated the S-band Antenna Sub-Assembly from the Port 6 (P6) truss to the Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1 and retrieved the P6 transponder.

  11. Fractional moment methods for Anderson localization with SAW representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Fumika

    2013-03-01

    The Green function contains much information about physical systems. Mathematically, the fractional moment method (FMM) developed by Aizenman and Molchanov connects the Green function and the transport of electrons in the Anderson model. Recently, it has been discovered that the Green function on a graph can be represented using self-avoiding walks on a graph, which allows us to connect localization properties in the system and graph properties. We discuss FMM in terms of the self-avoiding walks on a general graph, the only general condition being that the graph has a uniform bound on the vertex degree.

  12. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment during training at SPACEHAB. STS-107 is a research mission. The primary payload is the first flight of the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM). The experiments range from material sciences to life sciences (many rats). Also part of the payload is the Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research (FREESTAR) that incorporates eight high priority secondary attached shuttle experiments. STS-107 is scheduled to launch July 11, 2002

  13. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method

    SciTech Connect

    Sabik, A. Go?ek, F.; Antczak, G.

    2015-05-15

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (??) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present ?? of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers.

  14. Lifshitz tails in the 3D Anderson model

    E-print Network

    Alexander Elgart

    2008-04-21

    Consider the 3D Anderson model with a zero mean and bounded i.i.d. random potential. Let $\\lambda$ be the coupling constant measuring the strength of the disorder, and $\\sigma(E)$ the self energy of the model at energy $E$. For any $\\epsilon>0$ and sufficiently small $\\lambda$, we derive almost sure localization in the band $E \\le -\\sigma(0)-\\lambda^{4-\\epsilon}$. In this energy region, we show that the typical correlation length $\\xi_E$ behaves roughly as $O((|E|-\\sigma(E))^{-1/2})$, completing the argument outlined in the unpublished work of T. Spencer.

  15. High levels of microRNA-21 in the stroma of colorectal cancers predict short disease-free survival in stage II colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Stine; Fog, Jacob Ulrik; Søkilde, Rolf; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Hansen, Ulla; Brünner, Nils; Baker, Adam; Møller, Søren; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all patients with stage II colorectal cancer will experience recurrent disease and subsequently die within 5 years. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is upregulated in several cancer types and has been associated with survival in colon cancer. In the present study we developed a robust in situ hybridization assay using high-affinity Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) probes that specifically detect miR-21 in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples. The expression of miR-21 was analyzed by in situ hybridization on 130 stage II colon and 67 stage II rectal cancer specimens. The miR-21 signal was revealed as a blue chromogenic reaction, predominantly observed in fibroblast-like cells located in the stromal compartment of the tumors. The expression levels were measured using image analysis. The miR-21 signal was determined as the total blue area (TB), or the area fraction relative to the nuclear density (TBR) obtained using a red nuclear stain. High TBR (and TB) estimates of miR-21 expression correlated significantly with shorter disease-free survival (p = 0.004, HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.06–1.55) in the stage II colon cancer patient group, whereas no significant correlation with disease-free survival was observed in the stage II rectal cancer group. In multivariate analysis both TB and TBR estimates were independent of other clinical parameters (age, gender, total leukocyte count, K-RAS mutational status and MSI). We conclude that miR-21 is primarily a stromal microRNA, which when measured by image analysis identifies a subgroup of stage II colon cancer patients with short disease-free survival. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10585-010-9355-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21069438

  16. Event-based Document Sensing for Insider Threats Kenneth Anderson, Antonio Carzaniga, Dennis Heimbigner, Alexander Wolf

    E-print Network

    Wolf, Alexander L.

    Event-based Document Sensing for Insider Threats Kenneth Anderson, Antonio Carzaniga, Dennis University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80309-0430 #12;#12;1 Event-based Document Sensing for Insider Threats Kenneth Anderson, Antonio Carzaniga, Dennis Heimbigner, Alexander Wolf 6 February 2004 Abstract

  17. 75 FR 34170 - Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Assistance on March 18, 2010, applicable to workers of Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, South Carolina. The notice was published in the Federal Register April 23, 2010 (75 FR 21356). The... and Training Administration Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic...

  18. Benjamin Olney Anderson, MD, FACS Chair and Director, The Breast Health Global Initiative, Fred Hutch

    E-print Network

    Brent, Roger

    Health, University of Washington Director Breast Health Clinic, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Dr. Anderson practice is devoted to caring for patients with breast health issues and cancer. Dr. Anderson's clinical contributed to the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) Cancer Prevention and Control Resolution. The American

  19. 78 FR 41835 - Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ...NRC-2013-0072] RIN 3150-AJ25 Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act...specified in the Price-Anderson Act for inflation at least once during each 5-year period...70 FR 61885), and the first periodic inflation adjustments on September 29,...

  20. Nonequilibrium dynamics of a singlet-triplet Anderson impurity near the quantum phase transition.

    PubMed

    Roura Bas, P; Aligia, A A

    2010-01-20

    We study the singlet-triplet Anderson model (STAM) in which a configuration with a doublet is hybridized with another containing a singlet and a triplet, as a minimal model to describe two-level quantum dots coupled to two metallic leads in effectively a one-channel fashion. The model has a quantum phase transition which separates regions of a doublet and a singlet ground state. The limits of integer valence of the STAM (which include a model similar to the underscreened spin-1 Kondo model) are derived and used to predict the behavior of the conductance through the system on both sides of the transition, where it jumps abruptly. At a special quantum critical line, the STAM can be mapped to an infinite- U ordinary Anderson model (OAM) plus a free spin 1/2. We use this mapping to obtain the spectral densities of the STAM as a function of those of the OAM at the transition. Using the non-crossing approximation (NCA), we calculate the spectral densities and conductance through the system as a function of temperature and bias voltage, and determine the changes that take place at the quantum phase transition. The separation of the spectral density into a singlet and a triplet part allows us to shed light on the underlying physics and to explain a shoulder observed recently in the zero bias conductance as a function of temperature in transport measurements through a single fullerene molecule (Roch et al 2008 Nature 453 633). The structure with three peaks observed in nonequilibrium transport in these experiments is also explained. PMID:21386260

  1. Phase Boundaries of the Pseudogap Anderson Impurity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Aaron; Chowdhury, Tathagata; Ingersent, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    As the temperature of metals containing dilute concentrations of magnetic impurities reach very low temperatures, a phenomenon known as the Kondo effect takes place in which the resistance increases. This is due to the domination of spin-exchange processes that occur between the electrons of the metal and the electrons of the magnetic impurity near absolute zero. The Anderson model is a quantum impurity model that was developed in the 1960s to explain this phenomenon. It involves a single magnetic impurity tunnel-coupled to the conduction band of a metal. If the conduction band of this system contains a pseudogap, or a power-law decrease in the density of states around the Fermi energy, then quantum phase transitions will occur. The phase boundaries of the pseudogap Anderson impurity model have been previously approximated using poor man's scaling analysis. Here, we focus on using the more accurate numerical renormalization group method to calculate the location of these boundaries. We then compare these numerical results with the predictions derived from the scaling approximations. The development of nanotechnology like quantum dots and STM have rekindled interest in the Kondo effect since it can now be studied within controlled settings. Supported by the NSF REU Grant DMR-1156737: REU Site in Materials Physics at the University of Florida.

  2. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    PubMed Central

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  3. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    E-print Network

    Krzysztof Sacha

    2015-06-16

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain.

  4. AERODYNAMICS (II) Time: Tuesday. 14:00 -17:00

    E-print Network

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    AERODYNAMICS (II) Time: Tuesday. 14:00 - 17:00 Location: 5829 Grading: Homework(40%), Midterm Exam(30%), Final Exam (30%) Text: Anderson, J D Jr., "Fundamentals of Aerodynamics" 6th edition, Mc;High Speed Aerodynamics is an applied science to study: · High speed External Flow: The prediction

  5. 19() /r~mlc,,,'urcl~ .:' i;-,( )!'~Ii ~ Stimuli that produce sensitization lead to elevation of cyclic AMP levels in tail

    E-print Network

    Byrne, John H.

    to elevation of cyclic AMP levels in tail sensory neurons of Aplysia KAREN A. OCORR, MINATO TABATA and JOHN H and motor neurons mediating the tail withdrawal reflex in Aplysia is produced by the modulatory effects stimuli delivered to the tail of a semi-intact preparation lead to elevation of cAMP levels in the tail

  6. 3DVAR and Cloud Analysis with WSR-88D Level-II Data for the Prediction of the Fort Worth, Texas, Tornadic Thunderstorms. Part I: Cloud Analysis and Its Impact

    E-print Network

    Xue, Ming

    . Radar reflectivity data are used primarily in a cloud analysis procedure that retrieves the amount-II Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) reflectivity and radial velocity data on the prediction nested inside a 9-km one. The level-II reflectivity data are assimilated, through the cloud analysis

  7. Room Temperature ppb Level Chlorine Gas Sensor Based on Copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine Films

    SciTech Connect

    Bedi, R. K.; Saini, Rajan; Mahajan, Aman

    2010-12-01

    Spin coating technique has been used to fabricate room temperature chlorine gas sensor based on copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine (CuPc(OBu){sub 8}) films. Gas sensor shows a response of 185% to few parts per billion level of Cl{sub 2} gas with response time of 9.5 minutes at room temperature. The interactions between sensor and analytes followed first order kinetics with rate constant 0.01{<=}k{<=}0.02. The chemiresistive sensor showed very good stability at room temperature over a long period of time.

  8. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: II. Organism and population-level endpoints.

    PubMed

    Costa, Filipe O; Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to test the performance of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in chronic sediment toxicity tests. It constitutes part of a multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments, integrating organism and population-level endpoints with biochemical markers responses. Here we account for organism and population-level effects, while biomarker responses were reported in a companion article. Five moderately contaminated sediments from Sado and Tagus estuaries were tested, comprising 3 muddy and 2 sandy sediments. These sediments either did not show acute toxicity or were diluted with control sediment as much as required to remove acute toxicity. Subsequent chronic tests consisted of 28-day exposures with survival, individual growth and reproductive traits as endpoints. Two of the muddy sediments induced higher growth rates in the amphipods, and improved reproductive traits. This was understood to be a consequence of the amount of organic matter in the sediment, which was nutritionally beneficial to the amphipods, while concurrently decreasing contaminant bioavailability. Biomarker responses did not reveal toxicant-induced stress in amphipods exposed to these sediments. One of the sandy sediments was acutely toxic at 50% dilution, but in contrast stimulated amphipod growth when diluted 75%. This was presumed to be an indication of a hormetic response. Finally the two remaining contaminated sediments showed pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting survival and reproduction. The sex ratio of survivors was highly biased towards females, and offspring production was severely impaired. The particulars of the responses of this amphipod were examined, as well as strengths versus limitations of the sediment test. This study illustrates the utility of this chronic test for toxicity assessment of contaminated estuarine sediments, with potential application all along Atlantic Europe. PMID:15649529

  9. Quench dynamics of Anderson impurity model using configuration interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chungwei; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-10-01

    We study the quench dynamics of an Anderson impurity model using the configuration interaction (CI) method. In particular, we focus on the relaxation behavior of the impurity occupation. The system is found to behave very differently in the weak-coupling and strong-coupling regimes. In the weak-coupling regime, the impurity occupation relaxes to a time-independent constant quickly after only a few oscillations. In the strong-coupling regime, the impurity occupation develops a fast oscillation, with a much slower relaxation. We show that it is the multipeak structure in the many-body energy spectrum that separates these two regimes. The characteristic behavior, including the power-law decay and the period of oscillation, can also be related to certain features in the many-body energy spectrum. The respective advantages of several impurity solvers are discussed, and the convergence of different CI truncation schemes is provided.

  10. Anderson Localization, Non-linearity and Stable Genetic Diversity

    E-print Network

    Epstein, Charles L

    2009-01-01

    In many models of genotypic evolution, the vector of genotype populations satisfies a system of linear ordinary differential equations. This system of equations models a competition between differential replication rates (fitness) and mutation. Mutation operates as a generalized diffusion process on genotype space. In the large time asymptotics, the replication term tends to produce a single dominant quasispecies, unless the mutation rate is too high, in which case the populations of different genotypes becomes de-localized. We introduce a more macroscopic picture of genotypic evolution wherein a random replication term in the linear model displays features analogous to Anderson localization. When coupled with non-linearities that limit the population of any given genotype, we obtain a model whose large time asymptotics display stable genotypic diversity

  11. New superconducting state of the Anderson-lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.H. ); Zimanyi, G.T. )

    1989-11-01

    We discuss the possible existence of a new superconducting state, the two-component superconducting (TCSC) state, of the Anderson-lattice model, when the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg exchange energy {ital J}{sub {ital H}} generated by the hybridization between the conduction band and localized orbitals exceeds a constant multiple of the Kondo energy {ital k}{sub {ital B}}T{sub K}. In this new state, holes in both the conduction band and localized orbitals exhibit two-particle off-diagonal long-range order, and the condensate wave function is a coherent mixture of both types of singlet pairs. We propose that the TCSC phase is a possible candidate for the superconducting phase in the high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} copper oxides.

  12. Anderson and Stoner Published White Dwarf Mass Limits Before Chandrasekhar

    E-print Network

    Blackman, Eric G

    2011-01-01

    In their engaging recountals of Chandrasekhar's extraordinary career (Physics Today, vol 63, Issue 12, Dec 2010), neither Dyson nor Wali mention that Chandrasekhar was the third person not the first, to publish a white dwarf mass limit incorporating a relativistic treatment of degenerate electrons. As it has become a common misconception that Chandrasekhar was the first, a clarifying reminder on this historical point is warranted. In short, the white dwarf mass limit widely attributed to Chandrasekhar (1931) should be the specific white dwarf mass limit calculated for a polytrope. The insight that a relativistic treatment of degeneracy leads to the existence of a white dwarf mass limit first appeared in papers of W. Anderson (1929) and E.C. Stoner (1930) for a uniform density star. Accordingly, Chandrasekhar (1931) cites Stoner (1930) and points out that the polytrope white dwarf mass limit is less than Stoner's uniform density white dwarf mass limit by about 20%.

  13. Higher Lipoprotein (a) Levels Are Associated with Better Pulmonary Function in Community-Dwelling Older People – Data from the Berlin Aging Study II

    PubMed Central

    Buchmann, Nikolaus; Kassner, Ursula; Norman, Kristina; Goldeck, David; Eckardt, Rahel; Pawelec, Graham; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    Reduced pulmonary function and elevated serum cholesterol levels are recognized risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Currently, there is some controversy concerning relationships between cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, serum triglycerides and lung function. However, most previous studies compared patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with healthy controls, and only a small number examined this relationship in population-based cohorts. Moreover, lipoprotein a [Lp(a)], another lipid parameter independently associated with cardiovascular diseases, appears not to have been addressed at all in studies of lung function at the population level. Here, we determined relationships between lung function and several lipid parameters including Lp(a) in 606 older community-dwelling participants (55.1% women, 68±4 years old) from the Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II). We found a significantly lower forced expiration volume in 1 second (FEV1) in men with low Lp(a) concentrations (t-test). This finding was further substantiated by linear regression models adjusting for known covariates, showing that these associations are statistically significant in both men and women. According to the highest adjusted model, men and women with Lp(a) levels below the 20th percentile had 217.3ml and 124.2ml less FEV1 and 239.0ml and 135.2ml less FVC, respectively, compared to participants with higher Lp(a) levels. The adjusted models also suggest that the known strong correlation between pro-inflammatory parameters and lung function has only a marginal impact on the Lp(a)-pulmonary function association. Our results do not support the hypothesis that higher Lp(a) levels are responsible for the increased CVD risk in people with reduced lung function, at least not in the group of community-dwelling older people studied here. PMID:26421427

  14. A Critical Compilation of Energy Levels, Spectral Lines, and Transition Probabilities of Singly Ionized Silver, Ag II

    PubMed Central

    Kramida, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    All available experimental measurements of the spectrum of the Ag+ ion are critically reviewed. Systematic shifts are removed from the measured wavelengths. The compiled list of critically evaluated wavelengths is used to derive a comprehensive list of energy levels with well-defined uncertainties. Eigenvector compositions and level designations are found in two alternate coupling schemes. Some of the older work is found to be incorrect. A revised value of the ionization energy, 173283(7) cm?1, equivalent to 21.4844(8) eV, is derived from the new energy levels. A set of critically evaluated transition probabilities is given. PMID:26401429

  15. Quantum criticality at the Anderson transition: A typical medium theory perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, Samiyeh; Tang, Shao; Dobrosavljevi?, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    We present a complete analytical and numerical solution of the typical medium theory (TMT) for the Anderson metal-insulator transition. This approach self-consistently calculates the typical amplitude of the electronic wave functions, thus representing the conceptually simplest order-parameter theory for the Anderson transition. We identify all possible universality classes for the critical behavior, which can be found within such a mean-field approach. This provides insights into how interaction-induced renormalizations of the disorder potential may produce qualitative modifications of the critical behavior. We also formulate a simplified description of the leading critical behavior, thus obtaining an effective Landau theory for Anderson localization.

  16. Investigation of a near mid-gap trap energy level in mid-wavelength infrared InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, Jaros?aw; Ciura, ?ukasz; Motyka, Marcin; Szmulowicz, Frank; Kolek, Andrzej; Kowalewski, Andrzej; Moszczy?ski, Pawe?; Dyksik, Mateusz; Madejczyk, Pawe?; Krishna, Sanjay; Rogalski, Antoni

    2015-11-01

    In this report, we present results of an experimental investigation of a near mid-gap trap energy level in InAs10 ML/GaSb10 ML type-II superlattices. Using thermal analysis of dark current, Fourier transform photoluminescence and low-frequency noise spectroscopy, we have examined several wafers and diodes with similar period design and the same macroscopic construction. All characterization techniques gave nearly the same value of about 140 meV independent of substrate type. Additionally, photoluminescence spectra show that the transition related to the trap centre is temperature independent. The presented methodology for thermal analysis of dark current characteristics should be useful to easily estimate the position of deep energy levels in superlattice photodiodes.

  17. Involvement of Difference in Decrease of Hemoglobin Level in Poor Prognosis of Stage I and II Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Implication in Outcome of Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jin; Tao Yalan; Li Guo; Yi Wei; Xia Yunfei

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and the difference in its decrease during treatment on outcome of radiotherapy (RT) alone for patients with Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 572 patients with Stage I-II nasopharyngeal carcinoma with RT alone between January 2001 and December 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. Patient characteristics, tumor variables, and Hb level, including pre-RT Hb, mid-RT Hb, and dynamic change of Hb between pre- and post- RT and its difference in decrease ( White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb) were subjected to univariate and multivariable analysis to identify factors that predict disease-specific survival (DSS), local regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS). Results: The 5-year DSS was poorer in the Hb continuous decrease group than in the Hb noncontinuous decrease group (84% vs. 89%; p = 0.008). There was poorer 5-year DSS in patients with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of >11.5 g/L than in those with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of {<=}11.5 g/L (82% vs. 89%; p = 0.001), and poorer LRFS (79% vs. 83%; p = 0.035). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that Hb decrease difference with greater than 11.5 g/L was an independent prognostic factor for DSS and LRFS. Conclusions: The difference in decrease of Hb level during the course of radiation treatment appeared as a poor prognostic factor in Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

  18. Binge-like ethanol consumption increases corticosterone levels and neurodegneration whereas occupancy of type II glucocorticoid receptors with mifepristone is neuroprotective.

    PubMed

    Cippitelli, Andrea; Damadzic, Ruslan; Hamelink, Carol; Brunnquell, Michael; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus; Eskay, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Excessive ethanol (EtOH) use leads to impaired memory and cognition. Using a rat model of binge-like intoxication, we tested whether elevated corticosterone (Cort) levels contribute to the neurotoxic consequences of EtOH exposure. Rats were adrenalectomized (Adx) and implanted with cholesterol pellets, or cholesterol pellets containing Cort in order to achieve basal, medium, or high blood concentrations of Cort. Intragastric EtOH or an isocaloric control solution was given three times daily for 4 days to achieve blood alcohol levels ranging between 200 and 350 mg/dl. Mean 24-hour plasma levels of Cort were ?110 and ?40 ng/ml in intact EtOH-treated and intact control animals, respectively. Basal Cort replacement concentrations in EtOH-treated Adx animals did not exacerbate alcohol-induced neurodegeneration in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) or the entorhinal cortex (EC) as observed by amino-cupric silver staining. In contrast, Cort replacement pellets resulting in plasma Cort levels twofold higher (medium) than normal, or greater than twofold higher (high) in Adx-Cort-EtOH animals increased neurodegeneration. In separate experiments, pharmacological blockade of the Type II glucocorticoid (GC) receptor was initiated with mifepristone (RU38486; 0, 5, 15 mg/kg/day, i.p.). At the higher dose, mifepristone decreased the number of degenerating hippocampal DG cells in binge-EtOH-treated intact animals, whereas, only a trend for reduction was observed in 15 mg/kg/day mifepristone-treated animals in the EC, as determined by fluoro-jade B staining. These results suggest that elevated circulating Cort in part mediates EtOH-induced neurotoxicity in the brain through activation of Type II GC receptors. PMID:22500955

  19. Analysis on the serum levels of the biomarker CTX-II in professional indoor soccer players over the course of one season?

    PubMed Central

    Severino, Rodrigo Miziara; Jorge, Pedro Baches; Martinelli, Mauro Olivo; de Lima, Marcos Vaz; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Duarte Junior, Aires

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the blood serum levels of CTX-II in professional indoor soccer players, at three different times during one season: at the start of the pre-season, four months later (a time that marks the middle of the season) and at the end of the season. Methods Fourteen male soccer players of mean age 19 years were included. Blood samples of 3 mL were collected from each individual. The samples were analyzed by means of Elisa tests. Results There was a significant increase in the serum level of CTX-II in the indoor soccer players, from the beginning to the end of the season (p < 0.01). Conclusion These data suggest that joint degradation had occurred in these soccer players, by the end of this period. It is evident that further studies are needed, with methodological rigor, so as to make an effective contribution toward precise elucidation of the etiology of this osteoarthritis and its relationship with the biomarkers, as a tool for early diagnosis. PMID:26229939

  20. Correlation between levels of expression of minichromosome maintenance proteins, Ki-67 proliferation antigen and metallothionein I/II in laryngeal squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Nowinska, Katarzyna; Chmielewska, Magdalena; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Pula, Bartosz; Pastuszewski, Wojciech; Krecicki, Tomasz; Podhorska-Oko?ow, Marzena; Zabel, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    MCM2, MCM3 and MCM7 are minichromosome maintenance proteins found in dividing cells and they play a role in DNA synthesis. Increased MCM expression level is observed in cells of different cancer types. Additionally, metallothioneins (MT-I/II) are involved in control of cell proliferation and differentiation and changes of their expression are observed in many types of cancer. Ki-67 is known cancer cell proliferation antigen currently used in prognostic evaluation. The study material consisted of 83 laryngeal squamous cell cancer (LSCC) cases and 10 benign hypertrophic lesions of larynx epithelium as a control group. For the present study, laryngeal cancer cell line HEp-2 and human keratinocytes were employed, and to evaluate expression of all the markers, immunohistochemical method (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF) and western blot analysis were used. Statistical analysis showed strong positive correlation between expression of MCM2, MCM3, MCM7 and Ki-67 antigen in LSCC. Additionally, moderate positive correlation was observed between MCM3 and MT-I/II expression. In cancer cells, the level of expression of MCM3, MCM2, MCM7 and Ki-67 markers was increasing with the grade of LSCC malignancy. IF and western blot analysis showed higher MCM2, MCM3, MCM7 expression in HEp-2 cells in comparison to their expression in keratinocytes. MCM proteins might be useful markers of cell proliferation in LSCC. PMID:26648405

  1. Strong feedbacks between hydrology and sliding of a small alpine Robert S. Anderson,1,2

    E-print Network

    Loso, Michael G.

    , Alaska, glacier dynamics, glacial sliding, glacial hydrology, GPS Citation: Anderson, R. S., S. P.1029/2004JF000120. 1. Introduction [2] The rate of subglacier erosion, both by abrasion and by quarrying

  2. Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson - Duration: 2 minutes, 45 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

  3. An Archaeological Survey of a Proposed Borrow Pit in Anderson County, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Moore, William

    2015-07-10

    An archaeological survey of a 15 acre borrow pit in a floodplain setting adjacent to the Trinity River in northern Anderson County was conducted by Brazos Valley Research Associates in September 2003. Six trackhoe trenches were dug through clay...

  4. A guide to source materials of the life and work of Lawrence B. Anderson '30

    E-print Network

    Laguette, Victoria.

    1998-01-01

    From 1933 to 1976, Professor Lawrence B. Anderson taught in the MIT Department of Architecture, and from 1947 to 1971, he served as its chairman and dean. Concurrently, from 1937 to 1972 , he was principal partner in the ...

  5. Supporting Nested Locking in Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems Bryan C. Ward and James H. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Anderson, James

    Supporting Nested Locking in Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems Bryan C. Ward and James H. Anderson Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Abstract This paper presents

  6. CONFORMAL IMMERSIONS OF PRESCRIBED MEAN CURVATURE IN R3 MICHAEL T. ANDERSON

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Michael

    CONFORMAL IMMERSIONS OF PRESCRIBED MEAN CURVATURE IN R3 MICHAEL T. ANDERSON Abstract.We prove the existence of (branched) conformal immersions F : S2* *igher genus. 1.Introduction Consider an immersed closed surface

  7. Composite pairing in a mixed-valent two-channel Anderson model

    E-print Network

    Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.

    Using a two-channel Anderson model, we develop a theory of composite pairing in the 115 family of heavy fermion superconductors that incorporates the effects of f-electron valence fluctuations. Our calculations introduce ...

  8. 75 FR 34170 - Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...TA-W-73,230; TA-W-73,230A] Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Troy...March 18, 2010, applicable to workers of Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC,...

  9. Evaluation of NOAA Climate Outlooks in Extended Great Lakes Water Levels Forecasts Thomas E. Croley II1

    E-print Network

    , precipitation, wind speed, and cloud cover) for all available stations. Optional inputs are snow water1 Evaluation of NOAA Climate Outlooks in Extended Great Lakes Water Levels Forecasts Thomas E meteorology time series (scenario) taken from the historical record. They do this to make a de- terministic

  10. Competency-Based Adult Education Classroom Management Guide for Adult Basic Education Curriculum (Level II, 5-8).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elizabeth

    This Competency-Based Adult Basic Education (CBABE) Classroom Management Guide was developed to aid the Adult Basic Education (ABE) facilitator in implementing a model CBABE Level 5-8 curriculum. First, introductory material provides background on the CBABE project at Brevard Community College (Florida) and the rationale for the development of the…

  11. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT TOXICITY: II. COMPARISON OF GENERIC BENCHMARK DOSE ESTIMATES WITH NO OBSERVED ADVERSE EFFECT LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses (RfDDTS) or reference concentrations (RfCDTS) based on the use of no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELS) divided by uncertainty factors (UFs)The benchmark dose (BUD) has been proposed...

  12. Behavior of mercury in bio-systems. II. Depuration of /sup 203/Hg/sup 2 +/ in various trophic levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdy, M.K.; Prabhu, N.V.

    1984-01-01

    Using radiotracer techniques, the depuration rates for methylmercury at three trophic levels in an aquatic ecosystem are examined. Bacteria (decomposers), mosquito larvae (primary consumers), and fish (secondary consumers) were studied. Results indicated that depuration rates for mercury were temperature dependent - the rate of depuration increased with increase in temperature (up to 45/sup 0/C)

  13. A review of "Queen Anne: Patroness of Arts" by James Anderson Winn 

    E-print Network

    McClain, Molly

    2015-01-01

    seventeenth-century news James Anderson Winn. Queen Anne: Patroness of Arts. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. xxi + 792 pp. + 35 illus. + 18 col. pl. + 28 mus. ex. $39.95. Review by Molly McClain, University of San Diego. Known for gambling heavily..., and visual artists. James Anderson Winn reveals the extensive menu of literary, theatrical, and musical entertainments enjoyed by English elites. Unfortunately, he burdens that information with a political narrative and a biography (of sorts) that takes...

  14. Dietary iodine and selenium affected the mRNA expression levels of skin monodeiodinase (II, III) in Liaoning Cashmere goats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Feng; Li, Jianyun; Zhu, Xiaoping; Zhou, Jiaping; Yang, Jie; Jia, Zhihai

    2013-03-01

    Livestock are frequently provided nutrient-depleted diets, which can negatively impact animal health and productivity. In our previous trial, we found that iodine (I) supplementation (not selenium (Se)) could increase cashmere production. In order to explore the role of I and Se in cashmere growth, we investigated the effects of dietary I and Se supplementation in Liaoning cashmere goats. Serum thyroid hormone status and the mRNA expression levels of skin monodeiodinase (MDII, MDIII) were measured during the cashmere fiber growth period. Forty-eight 2.5-year-old Liaoning cashmere goats (38.6 ± 2.65 kg BW) were divided into six equal groups, and their diets were supplemented with I (0, 2, or 4 mg/kg DM) and Se (0 or 1 mg/kg DM) in a 2 × 3 factorial treatment design. The six treatment groups were: I(0)Se(0), I(2)Se(0), I(4)Se(0), I(0)Se(1), I(2)Se(1), and I(4)Se(1). Concentrations of I and Se in the basal diet (group I(0)Se(0)) were 0.67 and 0.09 mg/kg DM, respectively. The trial started in September of 2009 and lasted 70 days. For every measured parameter, supplemental Se had no significant effect on thyroid hormones, but improved the mRNA expression levels of skin MDIII (P < 0.01). However, supplemental I increased levels of thyroid hormones (thyroxine and triiodothyronine) and improved the mRNA expression levels of skin MDII (P < 0.05). These results show that the addition of I to cashmere goat feedstock may be an effective means of increasing cashmere production through thyroid hormones regulating the mRNA expression of skin MDII. PMID:23274772

  15. Common polymorphism in H19 associated with birthweight and cord blood IGF-II levels in humans

    E-print Network

    Petry, Clive J.; Ong, Ken K.; Barratt, Bryan J.; Wingate, Diane; Cordell, Heather J.; Ring, Susan M.; Pembrey, Marcus E.; ALSPAC Study Team; Reik, Wolf; Todd, John A.; Dunger, David B.

    2005-05-10

    , John A Todd2 and David B Dunger*1 Address: 1Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital Level 8, Box 116, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK, 2Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation/Wellcome Trust Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory... , Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK, 3Unit of Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, UK, 4Clinical and Molecular Genetics Unit...

  16. Usefulness of Serum Unbound Free Fatty Acid Levels to Predict Death Early in Patients with ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction[From the TIMI II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Andrew H.; Kampf, J. Patrick; Kwan, Thomas; Zhu, Baolong; Adams, Jesse; Kleinfeld, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Circulating total free fatty acids (FFA) are elevated early in myocardial infarction (MI) and are associated with an increase in mortality. We investigated the association of serum unbound free fatty acids (FFAu) levels with mortality,in patients presenting with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) II trial.TIMI II enrolled patients within 4 hours of chest pain. Patients were treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within 1 hour of enrollment. The concentration of FFAu was evaluated in serum samplesfrom 1834 patients obtained at baseline, before therapy.FFAu was an independent risk factor for death as early as one day of hospitalization and continued to be an independent risk factor for the more than 3·8 years of follow up. When adjusted for other cardiovascular risk factors FFAu levels in the fourth as compared to the first quartile remained an independent risk factor for death due to MI (hazard ratio, 5.0; 95 % confidence interval, 1.9-13.0), to all cardiac death (hazard ratio, 2.4; confidence interval, 1.3-4.4) and to all cause death (hazard ratio, 1.9, confidence interval, 1.2-3.1).Females were twice as likely to be in the upper two FFAu quartiles and had approximately twice the rate of death as males. In conclusion, increased levels of FFAu are one of the earliest molecular biomarkers of mortality in STEMI and are independent of other risk factors known to affect outcomes in STEMI. PMID:24176067

  17. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (REDSTH00360025) on Town Highway 36, crossing the West Branch Deerfield River, Readsboro, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure REDSTH00360025 on Town Highway 36 crossing the West Branch Deerfield River, Readsboro, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 14.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the upstream right bank and forest on the upstream left bank. The surface cover on the downstream right and left banks is primarily grass, shrubs and brush. In the study area, the West Branch Deerfield River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 65 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders, with a median grain size (D50) of 117 mm (0.383 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 1, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 36 crossing of the West Branch Deerfield River is a 59-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 57-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, September 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 54 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. During the Level I assessment, a scour hole approximately 2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right wingwall and a scour hole approximately 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream left wingwall. The scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the downstream end of the downstream left wingwall, at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall, at the downstream end of the right abutment, along the entire base length of the downstream right wingwall, along the upstream right bank and along the downstream left bank. A stone wall was noted along the upstream left bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.6 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 15.1 to 16.3 ft along the left abutment and from 7.4 to 9.2 ft along the right abutment. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping and 500-year discharges for the left abutment and at the 500-year discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on t

  19. Confinement effect on Anderson-Higgs modes in superfluid 3He-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, T.; Sauls, J. A.

    2015-03-01

    Superfluid 3He is a prototype to observe the spectrum of Anderson-Higgs (AH) modes associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. In bulk superfluid 3He, AH modes have been observed experimentally through attenuation of zero sound, propagation of transverse sound and its acoustic Faraday rotation. Starting from a Lagrangian formulation, we examine the AH modes of 3He-B confined in a restricted geometry. For bulk 3He-B this formalism leads to the well known spectrum of bosonic collectives modes of the bulk B-phase labelled by the quantum numbers for total angular momentum, J = 0 , 1 , 2 , ... , the projection along an axis, Jz = - J , ... , + J , and the parity under particle-hole conversion, K = +/- 1 . For the equilibrium phases of 3He confinement induces pair breaking and leads to symmetry breaking, giving rise to a rich topological phase diagram. In terms of the bosonic excitations, we find that confinement induces symmetry breaking and leads to mixing of modes with different J, as well as to level splittings of the AH modes that are otherwise degenerate in bulk 3He-B. We find a new spectrum of Bosonic modes is generated that are bound to the surface of superfluid 3He in a restricted geometry. We also report on the coupling of the AH modes to ultra-sound.

  20. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan

    2014-08-20

    We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude W{sub c}, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, W{sub c} is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

  1. Anderson Localization for Schrödinger Operators on with Strongly Mixing Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgain, Jean; Schlag, Wilhelm

    In this paper we show that for a.e. x?[ 0,2 ?) the operators defined on as and with Dirichlet condition ?- 1= 0, have pure point spectrum in with exponentially decaying eigenfunctions where ? > 0 and are small. As it is a simple consequence of known techniques that for small ? one has [- 2 +?, 2-?]? spectrum (H(x)) for a.e.x?[ 0, 2 ?), we thus established Anderson localization on the spectrum up to the edges and the center. More general potentials than cosine can be treated, but only those energies with nonzero spectral density are allowed. Finally, we prove the same result for operators on the whole line with potential , where A:?2-->?2 is a hyperbolic toral automorphism, F?C1(?2), ?F= 0, and ? small. The basis for our analysis is an asymptotic formula for the Lyapunov exponent for ?--> 0 by Figotin-Pastur, and generalized by Chulaevski-Spencer. We combine this asymptotic expansion with certain martingale large deviation estimates in order to apply the methods developed by Bourgain and Goldstein in the quasi-periodic case.

  2. Renal ultrastructural findings in Anderson-Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Adalberto; Toson, Antonella; Nebuloni, Manuela; Pallotti, Francesco; Giordano, Ferdinando; Battini, Graziana; Maglio, Alessia; Meroni, Mietta; Calconi, Gilberto; Bertolone, Gabriele; Gatti, Pierlucio

    2002-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFd) is caused by an X-linked inborn error in the glycosphingoLipid metabolic pathway due to an enzymatic defect in a lysosomal hydrolase: alpha-galactosidase A. The defect results in the progressive accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids in most body fluids and several tissues. The clinical manifestations of AFd are related to organ damage and, obviously, are more severe in hemizygous males than in heterozygous females. In the third decade of life, the course of the disease involves severe deterioration of kidney function progressing to end-stage renal failure. All kind of cells of renal structures are filled with glycosphingolipid deposits. Electron microscopic studies document typical intracytoplasmic osmiophilic bodies with a characteristic "zebra" or "onion-skin" appearance due to concentric lamellation of alternating clear and dark layers. Clinical interest in Fabry patients is related to recent advances in treatment with an intravenous specific enzyme to modify the biochemical error of the glycosphingolipid catabolic pathway. PMID:12018625

  3. Anomalously suppressed localization in the two-channel Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ba Phi; Kim, Kihong

    2012-04-01

    We study numerically the localization properties of a two-channel quasi-one-dimensional Anderson model with uncorrelated diagonal disorder within the nearest-neighbor tight-binding approximation. We calculate and analyze the disorder-averaged transmittance and the Lyapunov exponent. We find that the localization of the entire system is enhanced by increasing the interchain hopping strength t?. From the numerical investigation of the energy dependence of the Lyapunov exponent for many different interchain hopping strengths, we find that apart from the band center anomaly, which usually occurs in strictly one-dimensional disordered systems, additional anomalies appear at special spectral points. They are found to be associated with the interchain hopping strength and occur at E = ± t?/2 and ± t?. We find that the anomalies at E = ± t? are associated with the ?-coupling occurring within one energy band and those at E = ± t?/2 are associated with the ?-coupling occurring between two different energy bands. Despite having a similar origin, these two anomalies have distinct characteristics in their dependence on the strength of disorder. We also show that for a suitable range of parameter values, effectively delocalized states are observed in finite-size systems. PMID:22406739

  4. Theory of Anderson pseudospin resonance with Higgs mode in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Naoto; Aoki, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    A superconductor illuminated by an ac electric field with frequency ? is theoretically found to generate a collective precession of Anderson's pseudospins, and hence a coherent amplitude oscillation of the order parameter, with a doubled frequency 2 ? through a nonlinear light-matter coupling. We provide a fundamental theory, based on the mean-field formalism, to show that the induced pseudospin precession resonates with the Higgs amplitude mode of the superconductor at 2 ? =2 ? with 2 ? being the superconducting gap. The resonant precession is accompanied by a divergent enhancement of the third-harmonic generation (THG). By decomposing the THG susceptibility into the bare one and vertex correction, we find that the enhancement of the THG cannot be explained by individual quasiparticle excitations (pair breaking), so that the THG serves as a smoking gun for an identification of the collective Higgs mode. We further explore the effect of electron-electron scattering on the pseudospin resonance by applying the nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory to the attractive Hubbard model driven by ac electric fields. The result indicates that the pseudospin resonance is robust against electron correlations, although the resonance width is broadened due to electron scattering, which determines the lifetime of the Higgs mode.

  5. Strong amplification of sidebands in a strongly driven three-level atomic system. II. Classical description of the laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavroyannis, Constantine

    1986-04-01

    The fluorescent spectra arising from the interaction of a three-level atom with a strong pump field and a weak signal field have been studied simultaneously. The atom consists of an upper excited state ||2> and two lower ground states ||3> and ||1>, which arise by removing the degeneracy of the ground state by applying internal or external fields. The laser field depletes the metastable state ||3> by bringing the electrons into the excited state ||2> from where the electrons emit photons and decay into the lower states through the transitions ||2> ? ||3> and ||2> ? ||1>, which are described by the signal field. Using a classical description of the laser field, where in the model Hamiltonian the laser-atom interaction is treated classically while the free and interacting electron and signal fields are quantized, the decay process ||2> ? ||1> of the signal field is considered by evaluating the appropriate Green's function of the system. The spectral function for the ||2> ? ||1> transition of the signal field describes one-photon, three-photon, and two-photon Raman processes, respectively. The one-photon spectra consist of the main peak at the signal frequency and a pair of sidebands, which are symmetrically located from the position of the main peak. The intensity of the main peak is positive while that of the sidebands is negative indicating that the signal is attenuated and is amplified at the corresponding frequencies, respectively. The three-photon and two-photon Raman spectra are described by a doublet, respectively, whose intensities are always negative, implying amplification of the signal field. The computed spectra are presented graphically and compared with those derived in a recent study, where the laser field is quantized and photon-photon correlations are taken into consideration in the limit of high photon densities of the laser field. A detailed discussion of both treatments is given for the processes under investigation.

  6. Training Level, Acculturation, Role Ambiguity, and Multicultural Discussions in Training and Supervising International Counseling Students in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Kok-Mun; Smith, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    This research partially replicated Nilsson and Anderson's "Professional Psychology: Research and Practice" (2004) study on training and supervising international students. It investigated the relationships among international counseling students' training level, acculturation, supervisory working alliance (SWA), counseling self-efficacy (COSE),…

  7. Linalool decreases HepG2 viability by inhibiting mitochondrial complexes I and II, increasing reactive oxygen species and decreasing ATP and GSH levels.

    PubMed

    Usta, Julnar; Kreydiyyeh, Sawsan; Knio, Khuzama; Barnabe, Pascale; Bou-Moughlabay, Yolla; Dagher, Shawki

    2009-06-15

    Coriander is used as an appetizer, a common food seasoning in Mediterranean dishes, and a remedy for many ailments. In this study we tested the biochemical effect of its essential oil components, in particular linalool, its main component. The oil extract was prepared by hydro-distillation of coriander seeds. The various components were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy. The effect of the various oil components on the viability of different cell lines (HepG2, Caco2, NIH3t3, MCF7 and Hek293) was examined using MTT assay. Linalool was the most potent and HepG2 cells the most sensitive. A 50% and 100% decrease in the viability of HepG2 was obtained at 0.4 microM and 2 microM linalool, respectively. Whereas none of the other components exerted a significant effect at concentrations lower than 50 microM, myrcene and nerolidol, the structural analogues of linalool, were more potent at 100 microM than the other components decreasing HepG2 viability to 26%. The biochemical effect of linalool on mitochondria isolated from HepG2 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition in complexes I and II activities of the respiratory chain, and a time-dependent decrease in ATP level. In addition, a time-dependent decrease in glutathione (GSH) level and in the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium was obtained, indicating increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Pretreatment with the antioxidants: N-acetyl cysteine (2mM), Trolox (100 microM) and different flavonoids (50 microM) was partially protective against the linalool-induced cell death; the most effective response was that of rutin and apigenin which restored 91% of HepG2 viability. We hereby report a decrease in cell viability of HepG2 cells by linalool and identify the mitochondria as one possible target for its site of action, inhibiting complexes I and II and decreasing ATP. In addition linalool increased ROS generation and decreased GSH level. PMID:19428344

  8. A report documenting the completion of the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the ASC level II milestone ""Visualization on the supercomputing platform

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, James P; Patchett, John M; Lo, Li - Ta; Mitchell, Christopher; Mr Marle, David; Brownlee, Carson

    2011-01-24

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Los Alamos portion of the ASC Level II 'Visualization on the Supercomputing Platform' milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The milestone text is shown in Figure 1 with the Los Alamos portions highlighted in boldfaced text. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is the most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors (GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the perfromance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. In conclusion, we improved CPU-based rendering performance by a a factor of 2-10 times on our tests. In addition, we evaluated CPU and CPU-based rendering performance. We encourage production visualization experts to consider using CPU-based rendering solutions when it is appropriate. For example, on remote supercomputers CPU-based rendering can offer a means of viewing data without having to offload the data or geometry onto a CPU-based visualization system. In terms of comparative performance of the CPU and CPU we believe that further optimizations of the performance of both CPU or CPU-based rendering are possible. The simulation community is currently confronting this reality as they work to port their simulations to different hardware architectures. What is interesting about CPU rendering of massive datasets is that for part two decades CPU performance has significantly outperformed CPU-based systems. Based on our advancements, evaluations and explorations we believe that CPU-based rendering has returned as one viable option for the visualization of massive datasets.

  9. A fatal iatrogenic right vertebral injury after transoral odontoidectomy and posterior cervical stabilization for a type II odontoid fracture.

    PubMed

    Scalici, Edoardo; Indorato, Francesca; Portelli, Francesca; Savì, Tommaso; Maresi, Emiliano; Busardò, Francesco P

    2014-02-01

    The authors present a singular case of an iatrogenic right vertebral artery injury, involving a 67 year-old man, who reported a type II odontoid fracture (Anderson and D'Alonzo Classification) and posterior atlantoaxial dislocation following a road traffic accident. A small injury involving the right vertebral artery occurred as a consequence of transoral odontoidectomy and posterior cervical stabilization. It was caused by bone spicules of spinal origin and their presence was confirmed by the histological section of the right vertebral artery at the level of C1-C2. The case confirms how iatrogenic vertebral artery injuries during cervical spine surgery may be potentially lethal, especially where complications arise some days after surgery. PMID:24485420

  10. Anderson's disease/chylomicron retention disease in a Japanese patient with uniparental disomy 7 and a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anderson's Disease (AD)/Chylomicron Retention Disease (CMRD) is a rare hereditary hypocholesterolemic disorder characterized by a malabsorption syndrome with steatorrhea, failure to thrive and the absence of chylomicrons and apolipoprotein B48 post-prandially. All patients studied to date exhibit a mutation in the SAR1B gene, which codes for an essential component of the vesicular coat protein complex II (COPII) necessary for endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. We describe here a patient with AD/CMRD, a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence and maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7). Methods and Results The patient, one of two siblings of a Japanese family, had diarrhea and steatorrhea beginning at five months of age. There was a white duodenal mucosa upon endoscopy. Light and electron microscopy showed that the intestinal villi were normal but that they had lipid laden enterocytes containing accumulations of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm and lipoprotein-size particles in membrane bound structures. Although there were decreased amounts in plasma of total- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoproteins AI and B and vitamin E levels, the triglycerides were normal, typical of AD/CMRD. The presence of low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein B in the plasma, although in decreased amounts, ruled out abetalipoproteinemia. The parents were asymptomatic with normal plasma cholesterol levels suggesting a recessive disorder and ruling out familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. Sequencing of genomic DNA showed that the 8 exons of the SAR1B gene were normal. Whole genome SNP analysis and karyotyping revealed matUPD7 with a normal karyotype. In contrast to other cases of AD/CMRD which have shown catch-up growth following vitamin supplementation and a fat restricted diet, our patient exhibits continued growth delay and other aspects of the matUPD7 and Silver-Russell Syndrome phenotypes. Conclusions This patient with AD/CMRD has a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence which suggests that factors other than the SAR1B protein may be crucial for chylomicron secretion. Further, this patient exhibits matUPD7 with regions of homozygosity which might be useful for elucidating the molecular basis of the defect(s) in this individual. The results provide novel insights into the relation between phenotype and genotype in these diseases and for the mechanisms of secretion in the intestine. PMID:22104167

  11. Induction of a Stem Lexicon for Two-level Morphological Analysis Erika F. de Lima

    E-print Network

    !1 II II II II II II I! II II II II II Induction of a Stem Lexicon for Two-level Morphological ac- quire from text corpora a Portuguese stem lex- icon for two-level morphological analysis. It makes use of a lexical transducer to generate all possible stems for a given unknown inflected word form

  12. Abrupt physical and chemical changes during 1992-1999, Anderson Springs, SE Geyser Geothermal Field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, Cathy J.; Goff, Fraser; Walter, Stephen R.; Sorey, Michael L.; Counce, Dale; Colvard, Elizabeth M.

    2000-01-01

    The Anderson Springs area is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. Patrons drank a variety of cool to hot mineral waters from improved springs, swam in various baths and pools, and hiked in the rugged hills flanking Anderson Creek and its tributaries. In the bluffs to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. By the early 1970s, the higher ridges south and west of Anderson Springs became part of the southeast sector of the greater Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric power plants are built on these ridges, producing energy from a vapor-dominated 240 °C reservoir. Only the main hot spring at Anderson Springs has maintained a recognizable identity since the 1930s. The hot spring is actually a cluster of seeps and springs that issue from a small fault in a ravine southwest of Anderson Creek. Published and unpublished records show that the maximum temperature (Tm) of this cluster fell gradually from 63°C in 1889 to 48°C in 1992. However, Tm of the cluster climbed to 77°C in 1995 and neared boiling (98°C) in 1998. A new cluster of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm = 99.3°C) formed in 1998 about 30 m north of the old spring cluster. Several evergreen trees on steep slopes immediately above these vents apparently were killed by the new activity. Thermal waters at Anderson Hot Springs are mostly composed of near-surface ground waters with some added gases and condensed steam from The Geysers geothermal system. Compared to gas samples from Southeast Geysers wells, the hot spring gases are higher in CO2 and lower in H2S and NH3. As the springs increased in temperature, however, the gas composition became more like the mean composition of steam discharges from the Southeast Geysers. The hot spring waters are low in ions of Cl, B, and Li, but relatively high in HCO3, SO4 and NH4. The stable-isotope compositions (deuterium and oxygen-18) of these waters plot near the global meteoric water line. Geochemical data through time reveal apparent maxima in the concentrations of SO4, Fe, and Mn in 1991 to 1992, before the cluster became hotter. The black-to-gray deposits from the new spring cluster are rich in pyrite and contain anomalous metals. About one-half mile to the east of the hot springs, mineralized water discharges intermittently from an old adit of the Schwartz (Anderson) mine, and enters a tributary of Anderson Creek. This drainage increased substantially in July 1998, and a slurry of mine water and precipitates were transported down the tributary and into Anderson Creek. In December 1998, the adit water was 22°C, and had a chemical composition that was similar to spring waters that once discharged in the ravines surrounding the old Anderson Springs resort. The cause for the abrupt changes that have occurred in thermal features at Anderson Springs is still not resolved. One possibility is that these changes are a response to withdrawal of steam from The Geysers geothermal field over more than 20 years of production. Pressure declines in the geothermal reservoir may have caused a "drying out" of the overlying condensation zone. Induced boiling in this zone and upflow of deep steam to shallower depths would cause heating and vaporization of shallow ground waters. In addition, earthquakes occurring in the vicinity of Anderson Springs have increased significantly after nearby geothermal power plants began operation. These earthquakes may have enhanced surface discharge of thermal fluids along fractures and faults.

  13. R. SCHUMANNand K. ELK:Thermal Conductivity of the Periodic Anderson Model 221 phys. stat. sol. (b)119, 221 (1983)

    E-print Network

    Schumann, Rolf

    1983-01-01

    R. SCHUMANNand K. ELK:Thermal Conductivity of the Periodic Anderson Model 221 phys. stat. sol. (b BY It.SCHUMANNand K. ELK The periodic Anderson model is used as a simple niodel describing intermediate.SGHUMANNand K. ELK Then the thermopower X is given by and the thermal conductivity ~tfollows from I n

  14. Quantum computation of the Anderson transition in the presence of imperfections A. A. Pomeransky and D. L. Shepelyansky*

    E-print Network

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    Quantum computation of the Anderson transition in the presence of imperfections A. A. Pomeransky sensitivity to static imperfections in a quantum computer. In the vicinity of the critical point the algorithm to the known classical algorithms. We show that the Anderson transition can be detected on quantum computers

  15. Anderson transition and multifractals in the spectrum of the Dirac operator of quantum chromodynamics at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujfalusi, László; Giordano, Matteo; Pittler, Ferenc; Kovács, Tamás G.; Varga, Imre

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the Anderson transition found in the spectrum of the Dirac operator of quantum chromodynamics at high temperature, studying the properties of the critical quark eigenfunctions. Applying multifractal finite-size scaling we determine the critical point and the critical exponent of the transition, finding agreement with previous results, and with available results for the unitary Anderson model. We estimate several multifractal exponents, finding also in this case agreement with a recent determination for the unitary Anderson model. Our results confirm the presence of a true Anderson localization-delocalization transition in the spectrum of the quark Dirac operator at high temperature, and further support that it belongs to the 3D unitary Anderson model class.

  16. Differences in strength and conditioning coach self-perception of leadership style behaviors at the National Basketball Association, Division I-A, and Division II levels.

    PubMed

    Magnusen, Marshall J

    2010-06-01

    Leader behaviors have been found to vary by competitive level (6,9,11,26). Similar differences based on the competitive environment have been reported with strength coaches and their training emphases (15,28) but not their leadership style behaviors. This latter area is important to explore because strength coach leader behaviors may result in enhanced cooperation, improved communication, and improved athlete psychological and emotional well-being (14,23,25,27). Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to examine the differences in self-perceived leadership styles of National Basketball Association, Division I-A (DI-A) men's basketball, and Division II (DII) men's basketball strength and conditioning coaches. The self-perceived leadership styles of 145 men's basketball strength coaches (National Basketball Association [NBA]=22, DI-A=92, and DII=31) were obtained using the Revised Leadership Scale for Sport (26,41). Frequency data about demographics and training methods were also collected. No significant differences were reported for positive feedback. Otherwise, NBA strength coaches reported more democratic leadership style behaviors than DI-A strength coaches. Division I-A strength coaches were found to be more autocratic than NBA or DII strength coaches. Both NBA and DI-A strength coaches indicated a higher level of training and instruction than did DII strength coaches. National Basketball Association strength coaches also reported engaging in more situational and socially supportive leader behaviors than DI-A and DII strength coaches. Leader behaviors can positively and negatively impact an athlete (23); thus, strength coaches need to evaluate their competitive environment and reflect on the impact of their behaviors and how their approach to leading athletes may need to vary based on the situation. PMID:20453682

  17. Systematic Source Term Analyses for Level 3 PSA of a BWR With Mark-II Type Containment With THALES-2 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Jun Ishikawa; Ken Muramatsu; Toru Sakamoto

    2002-07-01

    The THALES-2 code is an integrated severe accident analysis code developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in order to simulate the accident progression and transport of radioactive material for probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of a nuclear power plant. As part of a level 3 PSA being performed at JAERI for a 1,100 MWe BWR-5 with a Mark-II containment, a series of calculations were performed by THALES-2 to evaluate the source terms for extensive accident scenarios. For some of the containment failure modes not modeled in THALES-2, such as steam explosion, simple models were coupled with the analysis results of THALES-2 to estimate the source terms. This paper presents the methods and insights from the analyses. An insight from the analyses was that the source terms depend more strongly on the differences in the containment function failure scenarios, such as overpressure failure, controlled containment venting, and small leakage to the reactor building, than those core damage sequences. (authors)

  18. User-level Internet Path Diagnosis Ratul Mahajan Neil Spring David Wetherall Thomas Anderson

    E-print Network

    Sirer, Emin Gun

    tool, tulip, diagnoses reordering, loss and significant queuing events by leveraging well deployed but little exploited router features that approximate our architecture. Tulip can locate points of reordering

  19. Main-Chain Conformational Tendencies of Amino Acids Robert J. Anderson,1,2

    E-print Network

    Weng, Zhiping

    Main-Chain Conformational Tendencies of Amino Acids Robert J. Anderson,1,2 Zhiping Weng,2 Robert K tendencies of an amino acid. Despite forty years of research, the shape of Ramachandran plots is still tendencies among amino acids, and showed that the conformational relationships of amino ac- ids are well

  20. Potential energy surface for the hydrogen-iodine reaction James B. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Anderson, James B.

    Potential energy surface for the hydrogen-iodine reaction James B. Anderson Department of Chemistry valenceelectronsand with effectivepotentials for the iodine core electrons.The favored pathway for the overall-H-H-I. The pathway is accessibleto bound and unbound iodine atom pairs and it allows the bimolecular and termolecular

  1. Wireless Sensor Network Localization Techniques Guoqiang Mao, Baris Fidan and Brian D.O. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Scheuermann, Peter

    1 Wireless Sensor Network Localization Techniques Guoqiang Mao, Baris¸ Fidan and Brian D.O. Anderson Abstract-- Wireless sensor network localization is an important area that attracted significant on possible approaches to them. Index Terms-- wireless sensor networks, localization, AOA, RSS, TDOA. I

  2. 78 FR 41835 - Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... operate a combination of 2 or more nuclear reactors located at a single site, each of which has a rated... made the initial changes to the Price-Anderson Act amounts on October 27, 2005 (70 FR 61885), and the first periodic inflation adjustments on September 29, 2008 (73 FR 56451). This final rule makes...

  3. Tor Instead of IP Vincent Liu, Seungyeop Han, Arvind Krishnamurthy, Thomas Anderson

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Tom

    Tor Instead of IP Vincent Liu, Seungyeop Han, Arvind Krishnamurthy, Thomas Anderson University, and denial of service. Al- though anonymizing overlays such as Tor [2] provide some help to end users approach: instead of running Tor on top of IP, we propose to run Tor instead of IP. We ask: what might

  4. AUTO ANSWER CIRCUIT DESIGN FOR AN ANDERSON JACOBSON AD 342 MODEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a circuit which connects a Western Electric Model 1001F Data Accessing Arrangement to an Anderson Jacobson Model AD 342 Modem. It automatically answers the phone and holds a data connection as long as a received carrier is present. It self resets upon loss of...

  5. Understanding Diagrammatic Ink in Lecture Richard Anderson, Crystal Hoyer, Craig Prince,

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Understanding Diagrammatic Ink in Lecture Richard Anderson, Crystal Hoyer, Craig Prince, Jonathan We are interested in understanding how digital ink and speech are used together in presentation. Our long range goal is to develop tools to analyze the ink and speech channels of recorded lectures

  6. 54. August 18, 1939 Oakland, California A.E. Anderson Taken during ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. August 18, 1939 Oakland, California A.E. Anderson Taken during trials on San Fransico Bay. Photograph taken for the U.S. Lighthouse Service. Currently in collection at Columbia River Maritime Museum. (Negative #67-133.3) - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter FIR, Puget Sound Area, Seattle, King County, WA

  7. Bio390 Glucose and the Kidney ANSWERS thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson,

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    1 Bio390 Glucose and the Kidney ANSWERS thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson, Dept Zoology Univ of Florida of urine formation: 1.0 ml min plasma glucose concentration: 80 mg 100 ml plasma urine glucose concentration: 0 mg ml CALCULATE: the reabsorption rate for glucose ANS: 100 mg glucose / min Since glucose

  8. Quantum vacuum instability of "eternal" de Sitter space Paul R. Anderson*

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Quantum vacuum instability of "eternal" de Sitter space Paul R. Anderson* Department of Physics invariant one is constructed, which is also not a stable vacuum state under perturbations. The role by quantum fluctuations. Potential consequences of this result for cosmology and the problem of vacuum energy

  9. The effects of interannual climate variability on the moraine"! Leif S. Anderson1

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Robert S.

    ! "! The effects of interannual climate variability on the moraine"! record#! Leif S. Anderson1(! ABSTRACT)! Glacial moraines are commonly used to infer mean climate conditions (annual*! precipitation and melt-season temperature) at the time of moraine formation. However, recent"+! research has demonstrated

  10. Bio390 Problem: Gas Laws thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson,

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    Bio390 Problem: Gas Laws thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson, Dept. Zoology Univ. of Florida, Gainesville atmosphere has the following composition, all on a dry gas basis: (a) oxygen = 70%; (b) carbon dioxide = 3 the percent concentration on a dry gas basis and the partial pressure of each gas in the chamber atmosphere

  11. Generation of the S boxes of Tiger Ross Anderson 1 and Eli Biham 2

    E-print Network

    Biham, Eli

    Generation of the S boxes of Tiger Ross Anderson 1 and Eli Biham 2 1 Cambridge University, England algorithm of the S boxes of Tiger uses the compression func­ tion of Tiger in order to achieve random the S boxes to the unity columns, and the state to the initial value of the state of Tiger. Then it randomizes

  12. On the Stability of Web Crawling and Web Reid Anderson1

    E-print Network

    Borgs, Christian

    On the Stability of Web Crawling and Web Search Reid Anderson1 , Christian Borgs1 , Jennifer Chayes moti- vated by web crawling. We introduce a notion of stable cores, which is the set of web pages that are usually contained in the crawling buffer when the buffer size is smaller than the total number of web

  13. An Expressive Text-Driven 3D Talking Head Robert Anderson1

    E-print Network

    Cipolla, Roberto

    An Expressive Text-Driven 3D Talking Head Robert Anderson1 , Bj¨orn Stenger2 , Vincent Wan2 Introduction Creating a realistic talking head, which given an arbitrary text as input generates a realistic looking face speaking the text, has been a long standing research challenge. Talking heads which cannot

  14. Publications for Xiaohui Sun Sun, X., Rudnick, L., Akahori, T., Anderson, C., Bell, M., Bray,

    E-print Network

    Müller, Dietmar

    Publications for Xiaohui Sun 2015 Sun, X., Rudnick, L., Akahori, T., Anderson, C., Bell, M., Bray Reich, W., Sun, X., Reich, P., Gao, X., Xiao, L., Han, J. (2014). A Sino-German λ6 cm polarisation-10. [More Information] Sun, X., Gaensler, B

  15. CONFORMAL IMMERSIONS OF PRESCRIBED MEAN CURVATURE IN R 3 MICHAEL T. ANDERSON

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Michael

    CONFORMAL IMMERSIONS OF PRESCRIBED MEAN CURVATURE IN R 3 MICHAEL T. ANDERSON Abstract. We prove the existence of (branched) conformal immersions F : S 2 # R 3 with mean curvature H > 0 arbitrarily prescribed and partial results for surfaces of higher genus. 1. Introduction Consider an immersed closed surface F

  16. CONFORMAL IMMERSIONS OF PRESCRIBED MEAN CURVATURE IN R3 MICHAEL T. ANDERSON

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Michael

    CONFORMAL IMMERSIONS OF PRESCRIBED MEAN CURVATURE IN R3 MICHAEL T. ANDERSON Abstract. We prove the existence of (branched) conformal immersions F : S2 R3 with mean curvature H > 0 arbitrarily prescribed up and partial results for surfaces of higher genus. 1. Introduction Consider an immersed closed surface F : S R

  17. Einstein/MMC CFAR Awarded Pilot Projects for 2006 Dr. Matthew Anderson, Department of

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    Einstein/MMC CFAR Awarded Pilot Projects for 2006 PI Title Dr. Matthew Anderson, Department retention of gp160 Einstein/MMC CFAR Awarded Pilot Projects for 2005 PI Title Dr. Carol Harris, Department Einstein/MMC CFAR Awarded Pilot Projects for 2004 PI Title Dr. Laura Santambrogio, Department of Pathology

  18. Thomas Young's research on fluid transients: 200 years on Arris S Tijsseling Alexander Anderson

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    1 Thomas Young's research on fluid transients: 200 years on Arris S Tijsseling Alexander Anderson The Netherlands United Kingdom ABSTRACT Thomas Young published in 1808 his famous paper (1) in which he derived, solid transients, wave speed, history, Thomas Young NOTATION c sonic wave speed, m/s D internal tube

  19. LEGO MindStorms: Not Just for K-12 Anymore Frank Klassner, Scott D. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Klassner, Frank

    the possibility of using the Lego Mindstorms robots to support the ACM Computing Curriculum 2001, using them 2001, curriculum development, robotics, Lego Mindstorms Introduction The fields of RoboticsLEGO MindStorms: Not Just for K-12 Anymore Frank Klassner, Scott D. Anderson Department

  20. Melissa L. Anderson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association/American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. The 2012 winner is Melissa L. Anderson for her ongoing commitment to understanding, treating, and preventing domestic violence in Deaf women…

  1. Quartz: A Tool for Tuning Parallel Program Performance Thomas E. Anderson andEdward D. Lazowska

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Tom

    Quartz: A Tool for Tuning Parallel Program Performance Thomas E. Anderson andEdward D. Lazowska on the quality of the instrumentation that is available to the programmer. This paper describes Quartz, a new underlying Quartz was inspired by that of the sequential UNIX tool gprof: to appropriately direct

  2. Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long

    E-print Network

    Long, David G.

    Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long Brigham Young for mapping polar sea ice extent. In this study, a new al- gorithm for polar sea ice mapping is developed for use with the SeaWinds instrument. The approach utilizes a priori information within the framework

  3. Serial exploitation of global sea cucumber fisheries Sean C Anderson1

    E-print Network

    Myers, Ransom A.

    Serial exploitation of global sea cucumber fisheries Sean C Anderson1 , Joanna Mills Flemming2 trajectory of sea cucumber fisheries 5 Drivers of sea cucumber fisheries 6 Rate of development 8 Distance in catch and value worldwide. One increasingly harvested group is sea cucumbers (class Holothuroidea

  4. Lamport on Mutual Exclusion: 27 Years of Planting Seeds James H. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Anderson, James

    Lamport on Mutual Exclusion: 27 Years of Planting Seeds James H. Anderson Department of Computer Science University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Abstract Mutual exclusion is a topic that Leslie on the mutual exclusion problem than any other single researcher. In this survey article, I describe some of his

  5. Natural Decompositions of Perceived Transparency: Reply to Albert (2008) Barton L. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Singh, Manish

    2008-01-01

    Natural Decompositions of Perceived Transparency: Reply to Albert (2008) Barton L. Anderson proposed a model based on ratios of Michelson contrasts to explain how human observers quantitatively scale general model based on ratios of perceived contrasts. M. K. Albert's (2008) main experiment aimed to test

  6. Lifshitz tails estimate for the density of states of the Anderson model

    E-print Network

    Jean-Michel Combes; Fran\\c cois Germinet; Abel Klein

    2010-08-27

    We prove an upper bound for the (differentiated) density of states of the Anderson model at the bottom of the spectrum. The density of states is shown to exhibit the same Lifshitz tails upper bound as the integrated density of states.

  7. PDF tails and self-organization of shear flows Johan Anderson

    E-print Network

    PDF tails and self-organization of shear flows Johan Anderson Department of Applied Mathematics and motivation · Goal: To find the generic analytical expression for the PDF tails. · The tails are often close to Gaussian but reveals a significant deviation from Gaussianity at the tails (intermittency

  8. Replacement of the Green Bank Telescope azimuth track Robert Anderson*, Arthur Symmes, Dennis Egan

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    of the Green Bank Telescope did not perform as designed. Relative movement of components was noted duringReplacement of the Green Bank Telescope azimuth track Robert Anderson*, Arthur Symmes, Dennis Egan National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV USA 24944 ABSTRACT The azimuth track

  9. Hypobetalipoproteinemia with accumulation of an apoprotein B-like protein in intestinal cells. Immunoenzymatic and biochemical characterization of seven cases of Anderson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bouma, M E; Beucler, I; Aggerbeck, L P; Infante, R; Schmitz, J

    1986-01-01

    We describe here seven cases (from five kindreds) of Anderson's disease, which is characterized by diarrhea, steatorrhea, hypobetalipoproteinemia with low levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and phospholipids, and failure to secrete chylomicrons after a fat meal. Enterocytes isolated from intestinal biopsies of patients after overnight fast showed numerous fat droplets, a histological picture resembling that of abetalipoproteinemia. Immunoenzymatic staining of the enterocytes demonstrated large amounts of material that reacted with a polyclonal antiserum to apolipoprotein B. Further, the immunoreactive material was found to react with several different monoclonal antibodies capable of recognizing both the B100 and B48 forms of apoprotein B, but not with any of several monoclonal antibodies capable of recognizing only B100. This suggests that the material in the enterocytes is the B48 form of apoprotein B or a fragment thereof. Additional findings included decreased low density lipoprotein levels with an abnormal chemical composition, abnormal high density lipoprotein2 (HDL2) and HDL3 particle size distributions, and an abnormal HDL apoprotein composition. Increased amounts of proteins having electrophoretic mobilities similar to apo E and the E-AII complex were present. Finally, some cases exhibited additional protein components of apparent molecular weights between 17,000 and 28,000, which was similar to some cases of abetalipoproteinemia. These findings demonstrate that Anderson's disease is not due to the absence of synthesis of intestinal apo B and suggest that it is more complex than previously thought, affecting all the lipoprotein classes. Images PMID:2426307

  10. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1987-06-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

  11. Thinking Levels of Questions in Christian Reading Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    If Christian schools desire students to achieve higher-level thinking, then the textbooks that teachers use should reflect such thinking. Using Risner's (1987) methodology, raters classified questions from two Christian publishers' fifth grade reading textbooks based on the revised Bloom's taxonomy (Anderson et al., 2001). The questions in the A…

  12. TRIHALOMETHANE LEVELS IN HOME TAP WATER AND SEMEN QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trihalomethane Levels in Home Tap Water and Semen Quality
    Laura Fenster, 1 Kirsten Waller, 2 Gayle Windham, 1 Tanya Henneman, 2 Meredith Anderson, 2 Pauline Mendola, 3 James W. Overstreet, 4 Shanna H. Swan5

    1California Department of Health Services, Division of Environm...

  13. Small ab initio Cu(II) oxide cluster model with localized states and strong screening effects accompanying ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratenko, A. V.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    1991-05-01

    A neutral Cu(II) oxide CuO cluster with external point charges is studied in some detail. This cluster is small enough to allow the investigation of many-body effects by ab initio approaches. The electronic structure of the ground and low excited states as well as of core and valence ionic states of the cluster is discussed. We have thereby applied self-consistent-field, configuration-interaction, and Green's-function methods. The possibility is discussed that the cluster may serve as a model for solid-state Cu(II) oxides. The calculations show that the one-electron states of the cluster are strongly localized on either the copper or oxygen site. Strong screening effects are found to accompany the ionization of both valence and core metal levels of the cluster and result in many-electron shakedown satellites in the spectra. These effects are connected with an intense charge-transfer process from the occupied O 2p states to the vacant Cu 3d? states in accord with predictions of non-parameter-free approaches (based on the Anderson impurity model, the Hubbard model, and other models) for the respective solid-state Cu(II) oxides. Connection is made with experimental x-ray-photoelectron and optical spectra. To substantiate the findings, the results of Green's-function calculations on ZnO and CuO- clusters are also discussed, which are of interest by themselves.

  14. 77 FR 72906 - Chessie Logistics Co., LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ...Docket No. FD 35700] Chessie Logistics Co., LLC--Acquisition...Anderson & Son, Inc. Chessie Logistics Co., LLC (Chessie), a...proceeding, Mannheim Armitage Railway, LLC (Mannheim), a wholly...Legal Counsel, Chessie Logistics Co., LLC, 1001 Green...

  15. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS...Insurance, in Law and Administration in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony...

  16. GPUSync: A Framework for Real-Time GPU Management Glenn A. Elliott, Bryan C. Ward, and James H. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Anderson, James

    GPUSync: A Framework for Real-Time GPU Management Glenn A. Elliott, Bryan C. Ward, and James H. Anderson Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Abstract This paper

  17. Spectroscopic Studies of the Salmonella enterica Adenosyltransferase Enzyme SeCobA: Molecular-Level Insight into the Mechanism of Substrate Cob(II)alamin Activation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    CobA from Salmonella enterica (SeCobA) is a member of the family of ATP:Co(I)rrinoid adenosyltransferase (ACAT) enzymes that participate in the biosynthesis of adenosylcobalamin by catalyzing the transfer of the adenosyl group from an ATP molecule to a reactive Co(I)rrinoid species transiently generated in the enzyme active site. This reaction is thermodynamically challenging, as the reduction potential of the Co(II)rrinoid precursor in solution is far more negative than that of available reducing agents in the cell (e.g., flavodoxin), precluding nonenzymic reduction to the Co(I) oxidation state. However, in the active sites of ACATs, the Co(II)/Co(I) redox potential is increased by >250 mV via the formation of a unique four-coordinate (4c) Co(II)rrinoid species. In the case of the SeCobA ACAT, crystallographic and kinetic studies have revealed that the phenylalanine 91 (F91) and tryptophan 93 (W93) residues are critical for in vivo activity, presumably by blocking access to the lower axial ligand site of the Co(II)rrinoid substrate. To further assess the importance of the F91 and W93 residues with respect to enzymatic function, we have characterized various SeCobA active-site variants using electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. Our data provide unprecedented insight into the mechanism by which SeCobA converts the Co(II)rrinoid substrate to 4c species, with the hydrophobicity, size, and ability to participate in offset ?-stacking interactions of key active-site residues all being critical for activity. The structural changes that occur upon Co(II)rrinoid binding also appear to be crucial for properly orienting the transiently generated Co(I) “supernucleophile” for rapid reaction with cosubstrate ATP. PMID:25423616

  18. Observation of Anderson Localization in Ultrathin Films of Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jian; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Xiao; Yang, Shuo; Lin, Chaojing; Yang, Wenmin; Wu, Kehui; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Li, Yongqing

    2015-05-01

    Anderson localization, the absence of diffusive transport in disordered systems, has been manifested as hopping transport in numerous electronic systems, whereas in recently discovered topological insulators it has not been directly observed. Here, we report experimental demonstration of a crossover from diffusive transport in the weak antilocalization regime to variable range hopping transport in the Anderson localization regime with ultrathin (Bi1 -xSbx)2Te3 films. As disorder becomes stronger, negative magnetoconductivity due to the weak antilocalization is gradually suppressed, and eventually, positive magnetoconductivity emerges when the electron system becomes strongly localized. This work reveals the critical role of disorder in the quantum transport properties of ultrathin topological insulator films, in which theories have predicted rich physics related to topological phase transitions.

  19. Observation of migrating transverse Anderson localizations of light in nonlocal media.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

    2014-05-16

    We report the experimental observation of the interaction and attraction of many localized modes in a two-dimensional system realized by a disordered optical fiber supporting transverse Anderson localization. We show that a nonlocal optically nonlinear response of thermal origin alters the localization length by an amount determined by the optical power and also induces an action at a distance between the localized modes and their spatial migration. Evidence of a collective and strongly interacting regime is given. PMID:24877941

  20. Ferromagnetic instability in a mean-field slave-boson approach for the Anderson lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Dorin, V.; Schlottmann, P. )

    1993-05-15

    We consider a stoichiometric metallic Anderson lattice with orbital degeneracy in the [ital U][r arrow][infinity] limit. A Gutzwiller type of mean-field approximation is formulated in terms of three slave bosons per site in analogy to Kotliar and Ruckenstein's approach for the Hubbard model. In the orbitally nondegenerate case the paramagnetic solution becomes unstable towards ferromagnetism if the valence is smaller than a critical one. This instability is suppressed with increasing orbital degeneracy.

  1. Properties of a localized magnetic impurity in a superconducting host: The Anderson-Holstein-BCS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha Raju, Ch.; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-12-01

    A symmetric Anderson-Holstein model with a BCS interaction term is considered to investigate the effect of local electron-phonon interaction on a magnetic impurity in a superconductor. The Kikuchi-Morita Cluster variation (CV) method is used to calculate the local impurity magnetic moment and the binding energy between the impurity and the conduction electrons in the superconductor. The effect of electron-phonon interaction and the order parameter on the bound state is discussed.

  2. Magnetic frustration in the three-band Anderson lattice model for high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ihle, D.; Kasner, M. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-band Anderson lattice model for the CuO{sub 2} planes in high-{Tc} superconductors is established. Treating this model by perturbation theory, the effective spin interactions are derived. The antiferromagnetic superexchange integrals are calculated as functions of the direct oxygen transfer and the hole concentration. It is found that frustration in the superexchange occurs, even in the undoped case, which increases with oxygen trnasfer and decreases with hole concentration.

  3. Electronic structure of vitamin B12 within the framework of the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Zafer; Mayda, Selma; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-03-01

    We study the electronic structure of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine C63H88CoN14O14P) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. Here, our purpose is to understand the many-body effects originating from the transition-metal impurity. In this approach, the cobalt 3 d orbitals are treated as the impurity states placed in a semiconductor host which consists of the rest of the molecule. The parameters of the resulting effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock approximation for the electronic structure of the molecule. The quantum Monte Carlo technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective Haldane-Anderson model for vitamin B12. We find that new states form inside the semiconductor gap due to the on-site Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3 d orbitals and that these states become the highest occupied molecular orbitals. In addition, we present results on the charge distribution and spin correlations around the Co atom. We compare the results of this approach with those obtained by the density-functional theory calculations.

  4. Xylosyltransferase II is the predominant isoenzyme which is responsible for the steady-state level of xylosyltransferase activity in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Joachim; Götting, Christian; Beahm, Brendan J; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Faust, Isabel; Kuzaj, Patricia; Knabbe, Cornelius; Hendig, Doris

    2015-04-10

    In mammals, two active xylosyltransferase isoenzymes (EC 2.4.2.16) exist. Both xylosyltransferases I and II (XT-I and XT-II) catalyze the transfer of xylose from UDP-xylose to select serine residues in the proteoglycan core protein. Altered XT activity in human serum was found to correlate directly with various diseases such as osteoarthritis, systemic sclerosis, liver fibrosis, and pseudoxanthoma elasticum. To interpret the significance of the enzyme activity alteration observed in disease states it is important to know which isoenzyme is responsible for the XT activity in serum. Until now it was impossible for a specific measurement of XT-I or XT-II activity, respectively, because of the absence of a suitable enzyme substrate. This issue has now been solved and the following experimental study demonstrates for the first time, via the enzyme activity that XT-II is the predominant isoenzyme responsible for XT activity in human serum. The proof was performed using natural UDP-xylose as the xylose donor, as well as the artificial compound UDP-4-azido-4-deoxyxylose, which is a selective xylose donor for XT-I. PMID:25748573

  5. Drosophila Casein Kinase I Alpha Regulates Homolog Pairing and Genome Organization by Modulating Condensin II Subunit Cap-H2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huy Q.; Nye, Jonathan; Buster, Daniel W.; Klebba, Joseph E.; Rogers, Gregory C.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The spatial organization of chromosomes within interphase nuclei is important for gene expression and epigenetic inheritance. Although the extent of physical interaction between chromosomes and their degree of compaction varies during development and between different cell-types, it is unclear how regulation of chromosome interactions and compaction relate to spatial organization of genomes. Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying chromosomal interactions including homolog pairing. Recent work has shown that condensin II governs both interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing and condensin II activity is controlled by the turnover of its regulatory subunit Cap-H2. Specifically, Cap-H2 is a target of the SCFSlimb E3 ubiquitin-ligase which down-regulates Cap-H2 in order to maintain homologous chromosome pairing, chromosome length and proper nuclear organization. Here, we identify Casein Kinase I alpha (CK1?) as an additional negative-regulator of Cap-H2. CK1?-depletion stabilizes Cap-H2 protein and results in an accumulation of Cap-H2 on chromosomes. Similar to Slimb mutation, CK1? depletion in cultured cells, larval salivary gland, and nurse cells results in several condensin II-dependent phenotypes including dispersal of centromeres, interphase chromosome compaction, and chromosome unpairing. Moreover, CK1? loss-of-function mutations dominantly suppress condensin II mutant phenotypes in vivo. Thus, CK1? facilitates Cap-H2 destruction and modulates nuclear organization by attenuating chromatin localized Cap-H2 protein. PMID:25723539

  6. Competency-Based Adult Basic Education Manual for Level I (0-4.9) and Level II (5-8). A Training Manual for CBABE Instruction and Program Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elizabeth; And Others

    This training manual was developed as a source of information about Competency-Based Adult Basic Education (CBABE) for administrators, counselors, and teachers involved in the implementation of a CBABE program. After section I provides an introduction to Brevard Community College's development of CBABE curricula, section II explains the purposes…

  7. The 2012 Thomas Hunt Morgan medal: Kathryn V. Anderson.

    PubMed

    Wolfner, Mariana F; Schedl, Tim

    2012-06-01

    The Genetics Society of America annually honors members who have made outstanding contributions to genetics. The Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal recognizes a lifetime contribution to the science of genetics. The Genetics Society of America Medal recognizes particularly outstanding contributions to the science of genetics over the past 31 years. The George W. Beadle Medal recognizes distinguished service to the field of genetics and the community of geneticists. The Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education recognizes individuals or groups who have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level, from kindergarten through graduate school and beyond. The Novitski Prize recognizes an extraordinary level of creativity and intellectual ingenuity in solving significant problems in biological research through the application of genetic methods. We are pleased to announce the 2012 awards. PMID:22701044

  8. Potential clinical relevance of uPA and PAI-1 levels in node-negative, postmenopausal breast cancer patients bearing histological grade II tumors with ER/PR expression, during an early follow-up.

    PubMed

    Buta, Marko; Džodi?, Radan; ?uriši?, Igor; Markovi?, Ivan; Vujasinovi?, Tijana; Marki?evi?, Milan; Nikoli?-Vukosavljevi?, Dragica

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) prognostic value in postmenopausal, node-negative breast cancer patients bearing tumors with estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) expression, treated with locoregional therapy alone, within an early follow-up. We focused our analysis on tumors of histological grade II in order to improve its prognostic value and, consequently, to improve a decision-making process. The cytosol extracts of 73 tumor samples were used for assessing several biomarkers. ER and PR levels were measured by classical biochemical method. Cathepsin D was assayed by a radiometric immunoassay while both uPA and PAI-1 level determinations were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. HER-2 gene amplification was determined by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) in primary tumor tissue. Patients bearing tumors smaller than or equal to 2 cm (pT1) or those with low PAI-1 levels (PAI-1?levels, respectively. Analyses of 4 phenotypes, defined by tumor size and PAI-1 status, revealed that patients bearing either pT1 tumors, irrespective of PAI-1 levels, or pT2,3 tumors with low PAI-1 levels, had similar disease-free interval probabilities and showed favorable outcome compared to those bearing pT2,3 tumors with high PAI-1 levels. Our findings suggest that tumor size and PAI-1, used in combination as phenotypes are not only prognostic but might also be predictive in node-negative, postmenopausal breast cancer patients bearing histological grade II tumors with ER/PR expression, during an early follow-up period. PMID:25994573

  9. Analysis of chemical warfare agents. II. Use of thiols and statistical experimental design for the trace level determination of vesicant compounds in air samples.

    PubMed

    Muir, Bob; Quick, Suzanne; Slater, Ben J; Cooper, David B; Moran, Mary C; Timperley, Christopher M; Carrick, Wendy A; Burnell, Christopher K

    2005-03-18

    Thermal desorption with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) remains the technique of choice for analysis of trace concentrations of analytes in air samples. This paper describes the development and application of a method for analysing the vesicant compounds sulfur mustard and Lewisites I-III. 3,4-Dimercaptotoluene and butanethiol were used to spike sorbent tubes and vesicant vapours sampled; Lewisite I and II reacted with the thiols while sulfur mustard and Lewisite III did not. Statistical experimental design was used to optimise thermal desorption parameters and the optimum method used to determine vesicant compounds in headspace samples taken from a decontamination trial. 3,4-Dimercaptotoluene reacted with Lewisites I and II to give a common derivative with a limit of detection (LOD) of 260 microg m(-3), while the butanethiol gave distinct derivatives with limits of detection around 30 microg m(-3). PMID:15830938

  10. Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, C.J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M.L.; Rytuba, J.J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E.M.; Huebner, M.; White, L.D.; Foster, A.

    1999-01-01

    Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240°C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85°C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63°C in 1889, 42–52°C from 1974 through 1991, and 77°C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98°C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3°C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring. During August–October 1999, several field trips were conducted in the vicinity of Anderson Springs to continue monitoring and sampling the thermal manifestations. The new fumarolic area had increased in temperature and in discharge intensity since 1998, and a zone of dead trees had developed on the steep bank directly west of the fumaroles. Ground temperatures and diffuse flow of CO2 flow through soils were measured in the area surrounding the main spring and new fumaroles and in the zone of tree-kill.

  11. Literacy Behaviors of Kindergarten-Primary Children in High Stimulus-Level Literacy Environments. Part I: The Instruments. Part II: Environments and Literacy Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughlin, Catherine E.; Ivener, Bonnie L.

    A study of patterns of literacy behaviors in high level literacy environments with varying levels of access to the environment began with a study of the instruments involved. Goals were to: (1) examine the reliability of the Survey of Displayed Literacy Stimuli; (2) study the correlation between scores from the Survey of Displayed Literacy Stimuli…

  12. What's Driving You Crazy? A Question To Drive Collaborative, Inquiry-Based Middle School Reform. Part II: Private and Multi-Level Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deering, Paul D.; And Others

    2003-01-01

    Describes how the question "What's driving you crazy?" is used by Hawaii middle-level educators to improve working conditions and meet students' needs by making schools more developmentally responsive. Focuses on the 6-step collaborative, inquiry-based innovation process at two private, multi-level schools embedded within K-8 or 6-12 campuses.…

  13. Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, William D

    2014-11-01

    For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25507406

  14. Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, William D

    2014-11-01

    For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25423683

  15. Multi-Particle Anderson Localisation: Induction on the Number of Particles

    E-print Network

    Victor Chulaevsky; Yuri Suhov

    2008-11-15

    This paper is a follow-up of our recent papers \\cite{CS08} and \\cite{CS09} covering the two-particle Anderson model. Here we establish the phenomenon of Anderson localisation for a quantum $N$-particle system on a lattice $\\Z^d$ with short-range interaction and in presence of an IID external potential with sufficiently regular marginal cumulative distribution function (CDF). Our main method is an adaptation of the multi-scale analysis (MSA; cf. \\cite{FS}, \\cite{FMSS}, \\cite{DK}) to multi-particle systems, in combination with an induction on the number of particles, as was proposed in our earlier manuscript \\cite{CS07}. Similar results have been recently obtained in an independent work by Aizenman and Warzel \\cite{AW08}: they proposed an extension of the Fractional-Moment Method (FMM) developed earlier for single-particle models in \\cite{AM93} and \\cite{ASFH01} (see also references therein) which is also combined with an induction on the number of particles. An important role in our proof is played by a variant of Stollmann's eigenvalue concentration bound (cf. \\cite{St00}). This result, as was proved earlier in \\cite{C08}, admits a straightforward extension covering the case of multi-particle systems with correlated external random potentials: a subject of our future work. We also stress that the scheme of our proof is \\textit{not} specific to lattice systems, since our main method, the MSA, admits a continuous version. A proof of multi-particle Anderson localization in continuous interacting systems with various types of external random potentials will be published in a separate papers.

  16. Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

  17. Ensemble-Averaged Quantum Correlations between Path-Entangled Photons Undergoing Anderson Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilead, Yehonatan; Verbin, Mor; Silberberg, Yaron

    2015-09-01

    We measure ensemble-averaged quantum correlations of path-entangled photons, propagating in a disordered lattice and undergoing Anderson localization. These result in intriguing patterns, which show that quantum interference leads to unexpected dependencies of the location of one particle on the location of the other. These correlations are shared between localized and nonlocalized components of the two-photon wave function, and, moreover, yield information regarding the nature of the disorder itself. Such effects cannot be reproduced with classical waves, and are undetectable without ensemble averaging.

  18. Steady-state and dynamical Anderson localization of counterpropagating beams in two-dimensional photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Jovic, Dragana M.; Belic, Milivoj R.

    2010-02-15

    We demonstrate Anderson localization of mutually incoherent counterpropagating beams in an optically induced two-dimensional photonic lattice. The effect is displayed in a system of two broad probe beams propagating head-on through a fixed disordered photonic lattice recorded in a photorefractive crystal. In addition to the steady-state localization, we also observe the dynamical localization; that is, the localization of time-changing beams. As compared to the localization of single beams, in which there exist no dynamical effects, the localization of counterpropagating beams is more pronounced and prone to instabilities.

  19. Quantum transport and integrability of the Anderson model for a quantum dot with multiple leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sam Young; Zhou, Huan-Qiang; McKenzie, Ross H.

    2003-09-01

    We show that an Anderson Hamiltonian describing a quantum dot connected to multiple leads is integrable. A general expression for the nonlinear conductance is obtained by combining the Bethe ansatz exact solution with Landauer-Büttiker theory. In the Kondo regime, a closed form expression is given for the matrix conductance at zero temperature and when all the leads are close to the symmetric point. A bias-induced splitting of the Kondo resonance is possible for three or more leads. Specifically, for N leads, with each at a different chemical potential, there can be N-1 Kondo peaks in the conductance.

  20. Between a metal and an insulator: the critical state of the Anderson transition

    E-print Network

    Gabriel Lemarié; Hans Lignier; Dominique Delande; Pascal Szriftgiser; Jean Claude Garreau

    2010-05-10

    Using a three-frequency one-dimensional kicked rotor experimentally realized with a cold atomic gas, we study the transport properties at the critical point of the metal-insulator Anderson transition. We accurately measure the time-evolution of an initially localized wavepacket and show that it displays at the critical point a scaling invariance characteristic of this second-order phase transition. The shape of the momentum distribution at the critical point is found to be in excellent agreement with the analytical form deduced from self-consistent theory of localization.

  1. STS-118 Astronaut Williams and Expedition 15 Engineer Anderson Perform EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 Astronaut Dave Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, participated in the fourth and final session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). During the 5 hour space walk, Williams and Expedition 15 engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame) installed the External Wireless Instrumentation System Antenna, attached a stand for the shuttle robotic arm extension boom, and retrieved the two Materials International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) for return to Earth. MISSE collects information on how different materials weather in the environment of space.

  2. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson during TCDT M113 training activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson takes a break during training on the operation of an M113 armored personnel carrier during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia.

  3. Observation of the Anderson Metal-Insulator Transition with Atomic Matter Waves: Theory and Experiment

    E-print Network

    Gabriel Lemarié; Julien Chabé; Pascal Szriftgiser; Jean-Claude Garreau; Benoît Grémaud; Dominique Delande

    2009-07-20

    Using a cold atomic gas exposed to laser pulses -- a realization of the chaotic quasiperiodic kicked rotor with three incommensurate frequencies -- we study experimentally and theoretically the Anderson metal-insulator transition in three dimensions. Sensitive measurements of the atomic wavefunction and the use of finite-size scaling techniques make it possible to unambiguously demonstrate the existence of a quantum phase transition and to measure its critical exponents. By taking proper account of systematic corrections to one-parameter scaling, we show the universality of the critical exponent $\

  4. Toward a robust analytical method for separating trace levels of nano-materials in natural waters: cloud point extraction of nano-copper(II) oxide.

    PubMed

    Majedi, Seyed Mohammad; Kelly, Barry C; Lee, Hian Kee

    2014-10-01

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) factors, namely Triton X-114 (TX-114) concentration, pH, ionic strength, incubation time, and temperature, were optimized for the separation of nano-sized copper(II) oxide (nCuO) in aqueous matrices. The kinetics of phase transfer was studied using UV-visible spectroscopy. From the highest separation rate, the most favorable conditions were observed with 0.2 % w/v of TX-114, pH = 9.0, ionic strength of 10 mM NaCl, and incubation at 40 °C for 60 min, yielding an extraction efficiency of 89.2 ± 3.9 % and a preconcentration factor of 86. The aggregate size distribution confirmed the formation of very large nCuO-micelle assemblies (11.9 ?m) under these conditions. The surface charge of nCuO was also diminished effectively. An extraction efficiency of 91 % was achieved with a mixture of TX-100 and TX-114 containing 30 wt.% of TX-100. Natural organic and particulate matters, represented by humic acid (30 mg/L) and micron-sized silica particles (50 mg/L), respectively, did not significantly reduce the CPE efficiency (<10 %). The recovery of copper(II) ions (20 mg/L) in the presence of humic acid was low (3-10 %). The spiked natural water samples were analyzed either directly or after CPE by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following acid digestion/microwave irradiation. The results indicated the influence of matrix effects and their reduction by CPE. A delay between spiking nCuO and CPE may also influence the recovery of nCuO due to aggregation and dissolution. A detection limit of 0.04 ?g Cu/L was achieved for nCuO. PMID:24293302

  5. ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE

    E-print Network

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM 589 DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE ANALYSES ACCURATELY QUANTIFY THE CLIMATE IMPACTS OF BIOFUELS-RELATED LAND USE CHANGE? Kristina J. Anderson in determining the sustainability of biofuels. To ensure that legal standards are effective in limiting climate

  6. A review of "Translating Investments: Metaphor and the Dynamic of Cultural Change in Tudor-Stuart England." by Judith H. Anderson 

    E-print Network

    Ira Clark

    2006-01-01

    of two poles of translation that include extended, transferred, or polysemous use vs misuse or excessive use, and use requisite for lack of a word, extended or tropic use vs misuse or degenerative or improper use. Anderson?s motto counterbalancing one...

  7. The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less or More, Chris Anderson. Hyperion, New York (2006). $24.95, ISBN: 1-4013-0237-8

    E-print Network

    Jansen, James

    2006-01-01

    The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less or More, Chris Anderson. Hyperion, New York (2006). $24.95, ISBN: 1-4013-0237-8 The Long Tail: How Technology is turning mass markets by Chris Anderson is a good and worthwhile read for information scientists, computer scientists, ecommerce

  8. Increased number of forkhead box P3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes correlates with high preoperative albumin level and better survival in patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-liang; Liu, Yan-yan; Gu, Yuan-long; Qin, Yu; Ji, Hong-fei; Wu, Li-hua; Qi, Ning; Su, Dan; Huang, Sun-hui; Zhang, Yan-qiao

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that test positive for forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) and elevated preoperative serum albumin levels have been positively associated with survival in colorectal cancer (CRC). This study aimed to investigate correlations among FOXP3+ TILs, preoperative serum albumin, overall survival, and other clinicopathological features of CRC patients. Surgical specimens from 340 stage II-III CRC patients were stained immunohistochemically for the presence of FOXP3+ TILs. Serum albumin levels were determined using an automatic biochemistry analyzer. Associations between various clinicopathological features and patient survival were analyzed via a Cox proportional hazards regression model. The correlation between FOXP3+ TILs and preoperative serum albumin was assessed using Pearson's correlation analysis. Survival curves were constructed by the Kaplan-Meier method. A high FOXP3+ TIL density (>15/five high-power fields), elevated preoperative serum albumin (?35 g/L), and proximal colon carcinoma were significantly associated with better survival, and high FOXP3+ TIL number and elevated preoperative serum albumin were independent predictors of better survival. The correlation between the number of FOXP3+ TILs and preoperative serum albumin level was significant but neither of these correlated with gender, age, tumor size, tumor differentiation, mucinous tumor, T4 stage, postoperative chemotherapy, or tumor location. Our findings suggest that increased FOXP3+ TILs and high preoperative serum albumin levels are independent prognostic markers for improved survival in CRC patients. Furthermore, the number of FOXP3+ TILs correlates with preoperative serum albumin levels in these patients. PMID:25697896

  9. Polymorphisms in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Genes Affect the Expression Levels of Membrane-Bound Type I and Type II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sennikov, Sergey V.; Vasilyev, Filipp F.; Lopatnikova, Julia A.; Shkaruba, Nadezhda S.; Silkov, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    The level of TNF receptors on various cells of immune system and its association with the gene polymorphism were investigated. Determining the levels of membrane-bound TNF? receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed by flow cytometry using BD QuantiBRITE calibration particles. Soluble TNF? receptor (sTNFRs) levels were determined by ELISA and genotyping was determined by PCR-RFLP. Homozygous TT individuals at SNP ?609G/T TNFRI (rs4149570) showed lower levels of sTNFRI compared to GG genotype carriers. Homozygous carriers of CC genotype at SNP ?1207G/C TNFRI (rs4149569) had lower expression densities of membrane-bound TNFRI on intact CD14+ monocytes compared to individuals with the GC genotype. The frequency differences in the CD3+ and CD19+ cells expressing TNFRII in relation to SNP ?1709A/T TNFRII (rs652625) in healthy individuals were also determined. The genotype CC in SNP ?3609C/T TNFRII (rs590368) was associated with a lower percentage of CD14+ cells expressing TNFRII compared to individuals with the CT genotype. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had no significant changes in the frequencies of genotypes. Reduced frequency was identified for the combination TNFRI ?609GT + TNFRII ?3609CC only. The polymorphisms in genes represent one of cell type-specific mechanisms affecting the expression levels of membrane-bound TNF? receptors and TNF?-mediated signaling. PMID:24782596

  10. Morphing Wing Weight Predictors and Their Application in a Template-Based Morphing Aircraft Sizing Environment II. Part 2; Morphing Aircraft Sizing via Multi-level Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillen, Michael D.; Crossley, William A.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents an approach for sizing of a morphing aircraft based upon a multi-level design optimization approach. For this effort, a morphing wing is one whose planform can make significant shape changes in flight - increasing wing area by 50% or more from the lowest possible area, changing sweep 30 or more, and/or increasing aspect ratio by as much as 200% from the lowest possible value. The top-level optimization problem seeks to minimize the gross weight of the aircraft by determining a set of "baseline" variables - these are common aircraft sizing variables, along with a set of "morphing limit" variables - these describe the maximum shape change for a particular morphing strategy. The sub-level optimization problems represent each segment in the morphing aircraft's design mission; here, each sub-level optimizer minimizes fuel consumed during each mission segment by changing the wing planform within the bounds set by the baseline and morphing limit variables from the top-level problem.

  11. Usefulness of serum unbound free fatty acid levels to predict death early in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (from the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction [TIMI] II trial).

    PubMed

    Huber, Andrew H; Kampf, J Patrick; Kwan, Thomas; Zhu, Baolong; Adams, Jesse; Kleinfeld, Alan M

    2014-01-15

    Circulating total free fatty acid (FFA) levels are elevated early in myocardial infarction (MI) and have been associated with an increase in mortality. We investigated the association of serum unbound FFA (FFAu) levels with mortality in patients presenting with ST-segment elevation MI in the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction II trial. The Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction II trial enrolled patients within 4 hours of chest pain onset. The patients were treated with a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within 1 hour of enrollment. The FFAu concentration was evaluated in serum samples from 1,834 patients obtained at baseline, before therapy. The FFAu level was an independent risk factor for death as early as at 1 day of hospitalization and continued to be an independent risk factor for the >3.8 years of follow-up. When adjusted for other cardiovascular risk factors, the FFAu levels in the fourth versus the first quartile remained an independent risk factor for death from MI (hazard ratio 5.0, 95% confidence interval 1.9 to 13.0), all cardiac death (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 4.4), and all-cause death (hazard ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 3.1). Women were twice as likely to be in the upper 2 FFAu quartiles and had approximately twice the rate of death as men. In conclusion, FFAu elevation is 1 of the earliest molecular biomarkers of mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation MI and was independent of other risk factors known to affect the outcomes after ST-segment elevation MI. PMID:24176067

  12. Multigenerational exposure of the estuarine sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) to 17?-estradiol. II. Population-level effects through two life cycles.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Sandy; Hemmer, Becky L; Goodman, Larry R; Cripe, Geraldine M

    2009-11-01

    The evaluation of multigeneration, population-level impacts is particularly important in the risk assessment of endocrine-disrupting compounds, because adverse effects may not be evident during the first generation of exposure. Population models were developed for the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) exposed to 17?-estradiol (E2) for two complete generations (F1 and F2) to determine population-level effects of multigenerational exposure to a model estrogen. Stage-structured matrix models were used to determine interactions between treatment and the number of generations exposed. Reproduction was significantly reduced in both the 0.08 and 0.2 ?g E2/L treatments in both generations, and embryo and larval stages experienced reduced survival at 0.2 ?g/L in the second generation only. However, increased female to male sex ratio in these treatments compensated for the loss in reproductive output, and significant population-level effects only occurred in the 0.2 ?g E2/L treatment of the F2 population. The F2 population in the 0.2 ?g E2/L treatment also had an altered, stable stage distribution relative to the control population of both generations and the Fl population in the 0.2 ?g E2/L treatment, resulting in additional population-level effects. These results demonstrate that continued exposure to E2 had compounding effects on sheepshead minnow populations and that long-term exposures may be necessary to understand the risk that exposures to environmental estrogens pose to native populations. Although population-level effects did not occur in the Fl generation, a risk decision based on Fl organism-level effects would be protective of the population exposed for two generations. PMID:19586131

  13. Quantum criticality in the pseudogap Bose-Fermi Anderson and Kondo models: Interplay between fermion- and boson-induced Kondo destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, J. H.; Kirchner, Stefan; Ingersent, Kevin; Si, Qimiao

    2013-12-01

    We address the phenomenon of critical Kondo destruction in pseudogap Bose-Fermi Anderson and Kondo quantum impurity models. These models describe a localized level coupled both to a fermionic bath having a density of states that vanishes like |?|r at the Fermi energy (?=0) and, via one component of the impurity spin, to a bosonic bath having a sub-Ohmic spectral density proportional to |?|s. Each bath is capable by itself of suppressing the Kondo effect at a continuous quantum phase transition. We study the interplay between these two mechanisms for Kondo destruction using continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo for the pseudogap Bose-Fermi Anderson model with 0

  14. European Structures of Qualification Levels: Reports on Recent Developments in Germany, Spain, France, the Netherlands and in the United Kingdom (England and Wales). Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerhuis, Anneke

    This document contains reports on the structures of qualification levels in Germany, Spain, France, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom that were commissioned during a study to identify trends and developments in the European Union related to national certification frameworks. Each country report examines the following topics: the history of…

  15. Near-Field Acoustic Power Level Analysis of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Cruise Conditions, Technical Report II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Near-field acoustic power level analysis of F31A31 open rotor model has been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated cruise flight conditions. The non-proprietary parts of the test data obtained from experiments in the 8x6 supersonic wind tunnel were provided by NASA-Glenn Research Center. The tone and broadband components of total noise have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, freestream Mach number, and input shaft power, with different blade-pitch setting angles at simulated cruise flight conditions, are presented and discussed. Empirical equations relating models acoustic power level and input shaft power have been developed. The near-field acoustic efficiency of the model at simulated cruise conditions is also determined. It is hoped that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  16. Multigenerational Exposure of the Estuarine Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) to 17?-estradiol. II. Population-Level Effects Through Two Life Cycles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evaluation of multi-generation, population-level impacts is particularly important in the risk assessment of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) because adverse effects may not be evident during the first generation of exposure. Population models were developed for the shee...

  17. An ecological model of the habitat mosaic in estuarine nursery areas: Part II – Projecting effects of sea level rise on fish production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the response of fish populations to habitat change mediated by sea level rise (SLR) is a key component of ecosystem-based management. Yet, no direct link has been established between habitat change due to SLR and fish population production. Here we take a coupled ...

  18. Electronic structure and correlations of vitamin B12 studied within the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    E-print Network

    Kandemir, Zafer; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-01-01

    We study the electronic structure and correlations of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. In this approach, the cobalt 3d orbitals are treated as the impurity states placed in a semiconductor host where the host consists of the rest of the molecule. The parameters of the resulting effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. The quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective model. We observe that new states form inside the semiconductor gap found by HF due to the intra-orbital Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3d orbitals. In particular, the lowest unoccupied states correspond to an impurity bound state, which consists of the states from the CN axial ligand and the corring ring as well as the Co e_g orbitals. We present results on the charge distri...

  19. Simulation of Anderson localization in two-dimensional ultracold gases for pointlike disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morong, W.; DeMarco, B.

    2015-08-01

    Anderson localization has been observed for a variety of media, including ultracold atomic gases with speckle disorder in one and three dimensions. However, observation of Anderson localization in a two-dimensional geometry for ultracold gases has been elusive. We show that a cause of this difficulty is the relatively high percolation threshold of a speckle potential in two dimensions, resulting in strong classical localization. We propose a realistic pointlike disorder potential that circumvents this percolation limit with localization lengths that are experimentally observable. The percolation threshold is evaluated for experimentally realistic parameters, and a regime of negligible classical trapping is identified. Localization lengths are determined via scaling theory, using both exact scattering cross sections and the Born approximation, and by direct simulation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We show that the Born approximation can underestimate the localization length by four orders of magnitude at low energies, while exact cross sections and scaling theory provide an upper bound. Achievable experimental parameters for observing localization in this system are proposed.

  20. Anderson Localization and the Quantum Phase Diagram of Three Dimensional Disordered Dirac Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, J. H.; Goswami, Pallab; Das Sarma, S.

    2015-08-01

    We study the quantum phase diagram of a three dimensional noninteracting Dirac semimetal in the presence of either quenched axial or scalar potential disorder, by calculating the average and the typical density of states as well as the inverse participation ratio using numerically exact methods. We show that as a function of the disorder strength a half-filled (i.e., undoped) Dirac semimetal displays three distinct ground states, namely an incompressible semimetal, a compressible diffusive metal, and a localized Anderson insulator, in stark contrast to a conventional dirty metal that only supports the latter two phases. We establish the existence of two distinct quantum critical points, which respectively govern the semimetal-metal and the metal-insulator quantum phase transitions and also reveal their underlying multifractal nature. Away from half-filling the (doped) system behaves as a diffusive metal that can undergo Anderson localization only, which is shown by determining the mobility edge and the phase diagram in terms of energy and disorder.

  1. Determination of ionophore coccidiostats in feeding stuffs by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Part II. Application to cross-contamination levels and non-targeted feed.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Ursula; Ezerskis, Zigmas; Chedin, Mostafa; von Holst, Christoph

    2011-02-20

    A fit to purpose multi-analyte method for the official control of six coccidiostats (monensin sodium, salinomycin sodium, narasin, lasalocid sodium, semduramicin sodium and maduramicin ammonium alpha) at cross-contamination concentration levels in poultry, cattle, pig and calf compound feed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed and in-house validated. The corresponding maximum levels have been recently introduced by European legislation. The method developed involved a simple extraction of the coccidiostats from the feed samples followed by centrifugation and filtration of the supernatants for all matrices. For calf feed an additional de-fattening step of the filtrated supernatants with n-hexane was necessary. The resulting supernatants were submitted to chromatographic analysis. The analytes were quantified by a modified approach of the standard additions technique applied to the extracts, hence allowing a workload comparable to matrix-matched standard calibration curves. A further simplification of this technique was reached by applying the same addition levels of the target analytes for different concentration ranging from 0.5× maximum level up to 2.5× maximum level (universal approach). The concentration independent intermediate precision expressed in terms of relative standard deviation varied between 3 and 12% (except for maduramicin ammonium alpha and semduramicin sodium up to 21%) and the recovery rates ranged from 80 to 111%, depending on the target analyte and matrix. The limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) were different for the various analyte/matrix/instrument combinations but all LOQs were in the 0.01-0.65 mg kg(-1) range, hence well below the target concentrations of each analyte. Based on the obtained method performance characteristics the method is considered fit for the intended purpose. PMID:21041054

  2. Preconcentration, separation and spectrophotometric determination of aluminium(III) in water samples and dialysis concentrates at trace levels with 8-hydroxyquinoline-cobalt(II) coprecipitation system.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Volkan Numan; Arslan, Deniz; Ozdes, Duygu; Soylak, Mustafa; Tufekci, Mehmet

    2010-10-15

    A separation-preconcentration procedure was developed for the determination of trace amounts of aluminium in water samples and dialysis concentrates by UV-vis Spectrophotometry after coprecipitation using 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) as a chelating agent and Co(II) as a carrier element. This procedure is based on filtration of the solution containing precipitate on a cellulose nitrate membrane filter following aluminium(III) coprecipitation with Co/8-HQ and then the precipitates together with membrane filter were dissolved in concentrated nitric acid. The metal contents of the final solution were determined by UV-vis Spectrophotometry with Erio Chrome Cyanine-R standard method. Several parameters including pH of sample solution, amount of carrier element and reagent, standing time, sample volume for precipitation and the effects of diverse ions were examined. The enrichment factor was calculated as 50 and the detection limits, corresponding to three times the standard deviation of the blank (N: 10), was found to be 0.2 microg L(-1). The accuracy of the method was tested with standard reference material (CRM-TMDW-500) and spiked addition. Determination of aluminium(III) was carried out in sea water, river water, tap water and haemodialysis fluids samples. The recoveries were >95%. The relative standard deviations of determination were less than 6%. PMID:20619964

  3. The type II cGMP dependent protein kinase regulates GluA1 levels at the plasma membrane of developing cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Incontro, Salvatore; Ciruela, Francisco; Ziff, Edward; Hofmann, Franz; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Torres, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Trafficking of ?-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) is regulated by specific interactions with other proteins and by post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation. We have found that the type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGKII) phosphorylates GluA1 (formerly GluR1) at S845, augmenting the surface expression of AMPARs at both synaptic and extrasynaptic sites. Activation of cGKII by 8-Br-cGMP enhances the surface expression of GluA1, whereas its inhibition or suppression effectively diminished the expression of this protein at the cell surface. In granule cells, NMDA receptor activation (NMDAR) stimulates nitric oxide and cGMP production, which in turn activates cGKII and induces the phosphorylation of GluA1, promoting its accumulation in the plasma membrane. GluA1 is mainly incorporated into calcium permeable AMPARs as exposure to 8-Br-cGMP or NMDA activation enhanced AMPA-elicited calcium responses that are sensitive to NASPM inhibition. We summarize evidence for an increase of calcium permeable AMPA receptors downstream of NMDA receptor activation that might be relevant for granule cell development and plasticity. PMID:23545413

  4. Molecular analysis and intestinal expression of SAR1 genes and proteins in Anderson's disease (Chylomicron retention disease)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anderson's disease (AD) or chylomicron retention disease (CMRD) is a very rare hereditary lipid malabsorption syndrome. In order to discover novel mutations in the SAR1B gene and to evaluate the expression, as compared to healthy subjects, of the Sar1 gene and protein paralogues in the intestine, we investigated three previously undescribed individuals with the disease. Methods The SAR1B, SAR1A and PCSK9 genes were sequenced. The expression of the SAR1B and SAR1A genes in intestinal biopsies of both normal individuals and patients was measured by RTqPCR. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies to recombinant Sar1 protein was used to evaluate the expression and localization of the Sar1 paralogues in the duodenal biopsies. Results Two patients had a novel SAR1B mutation (p.Asp48ThrfsX17). The third patient, who had a previously described SAR1B mutation (p.Leu28ArgfsX7), also had a p.Leu21dup variant of the PCSK9 gene. The expression of the SAR1B gene in duodenal biopsies from an AD/CMRD patient was significantly decreased whereas the expression of the SAR1A gene was significantly increased, as compared to healthy individuals. The Sar1 proteins were present in decreased amounts in enterocytes in duodenal biopsies from the patients as compared to those from healthy subjects. Conclusions Although the proteins encoded by the SAR1A and SAR1B genes are 90% identical, the increased expression of the SAR1A gene in AD/CMRD does not appear to compensate for the lack of the SAR1B protein. The PCSK9 variant, although reported to be associated with low levels of cholesterol, does not appear to exert any additional effect in this patient. The results provide further insight into the tissue-specific nature of AD/CMRD. PMID:21235735

  5. Full dimensional Franck-Condon factors for the acetylene ˜{A} 1Au—{˜{X}} {^1? _g^+} transition. II. Vibrational overlap factors for levels involving excitation in ungerade modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G. Barratt; Baraban, Joshua H.; Field, Robert W.

    2014-10-01

    A full-dimensional Franck-Condon calculation has been applied to the tilde{A} 1Au—tilde{X} ^1? _g^+ transition in acetylene in the harmonic normal mode basis. Details of the calculation are discussed in Part I of this series. To our knowledge, this is the first full-dimensional Franck-Condon calculation on a tetra-atomic molecule undergoing a linear-to-bent geometry change. In the current work, the vibrational intensity factors for levels involving excitation in ungerade vibrational modes are evaluated. Because the Franck-Condon integral accumulates away from the linear geometry, we have been able to treat the out-of-plane component of trans bend (? _4^' ' }) in the linear tilde{X} state in the rotational part of the problem, restoring the ? Euler angle and the a-axis Eckart conditions. A consequence of the Eckart conditions is that the out-of-plane component of ? _4^' ' } does not participate in the vibrational overlap integral. This affects the structure of the coordinate transformation and the symmetry of the vibrational wavefunctions used in the overlap integral, and results in propensity rules involving the bending modes of the tilde{X} state that were not previously understood. We explain the origin of some of the unexpected propensities observed in IR-UV laser-induced fluorescence spectra, and we calculate emission intensities from bending levels of the tilde{A} state into bending levels of the tilde{X} state, using normal bending mode and local bending mode basis sets. Our calculations also reveal Franck-Condon propensities for the Cartesian components of the cis bend (? _5^' ' }), and we predict that the best tilde{A}-state vibrational levels for populating tilde{X}-state levels with large amplitude bending motion localized in a single C-H bond (the acetylene?vinylidene isomerization coordinate) involve a high degree of excitation in ? _6^' } (cis-bend). Mode ? _4^' } (torsion) populates levels with large amplitude counter-rotational motion of the two hydrogen atoms.

  6. Low density lipoprotein receptor gene Ava II polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several common genetic polymorphisms in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene have associated with modifications of serum total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, but the results are not consistent in different populations. Bai Ku Yao is a special subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 1024 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 792 participants of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotyping of the LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of serum TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL-C, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and the ratio of ApoA1 to ApoB were lower in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.01 for all). The frequency of A- and A+ alleles was 65.5% and 34.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 80.7% and 19.3% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. The frequency of A-A-, A-A+ and A+A+ genotypes was 42.6%, 45.9% and 11.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 64.9%, 31.6% and 3.5% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. There was also significant difference in the genotypic frequencies between males and females in Bai Ku Yao (P <0.05), and in the genotypic and allelic frequencies between normal LDL-C (? 3.20 mmol/L) and high LDL-C (>3.20 mmol/L) subgroups in Bai Ku Yao (P < 0.05 for each) and between males and females in Han (P < 0.05 for each). The levels of LDL-C in males and TC and HDL-C in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05 for all) in Bai Ku Yao, whereas the levels of HDL-C in males and HDL-C and ApoA1 in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05-0.001) in Han. The subjects with A+A+ genotype had higher serum LDL-C, TC, HDL-C or ApoA1 levels than the subjects with A-A+ and A-A- genotypes. Spearman rank correlation analysis revealed that the levels of LDL-C in Bai Ku Yao and HDL-C in Han were correlated with genotypes (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01; respectively). Conclusions The association of LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism and serum lipid levels is different between the Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. The discrepancy might partly result from different LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism or LDL-R gene-enviromental interactions. PMID:21345210

  7. Geologic and hydrologic characterization and evaluation of the Basin and Range Province relative to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Part II. Geologic and hydrologic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, K.A.; Bedinger, M.S.

    1985-12-31

    The geology and hydrology of the Basin and Range Province of the western conterminous United States are characterized in a series of data sets depicted in maps compiled for evaluation of prospective areas for further study of geohydrologic environments for isolation of high-level radioactive waste. The data sets include: (1) average precipitation and evaporation; (2) surface distribution of selected rock types; (3) tectonic conditions; and (4) surface- and ground-water hydrology and Pleistocene lakes and marshes. Rocks mapped for consideration as potential host media for the isolation of high-level radioactive waste are widespread and include argillaceous rocks, granitic rocks, tuffaceous rocks, mafic extrusive rocks, evaporites, and laharic breccias. The unsaturated zone, where probably as thick as 150 meters (500 feet), was mapped for consideration as an environment for isolation of high-level waste. Unsaturated rocks of various lithologic types are widespread in the Province. Tectonic stability in the Quaternary Period is considered the key to assessing the probability of future tectonism with regard to high-level radioactive waste disposal. Tectonic conditions are characterized on the basis of the seismic record, heat-flow measurements, the occurrence of Quaternary faults, vertical crustal movement, and volcanic features. Tectonic activity, as indicated by seismicity, is greatest in areas bordering the western margin of the Province in Nevada and southern California, the eastern margin of the Province bordering the Wasatch Mountains in Utah and in parts of the Rio Grande valley. Late Cenozoic volcanic activity is widespread, being greatest bordering the Sierra Nevada in California and Oregon, and bordering the Wasatch Mountains in southern Utah and Idaho. 43 refs., 22 figs.

  8. The anderson's rotating interferometer and its application to binary star measurements. (French Title: L'interféromètre à rotation de john august anderson (1876-1956) et son application - la tentative de résolution de nouvelles binaires)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneau, D.

    2011-12-01

    Following the tests of interferometric observations carried out by Albert A. Michelson with the 2.5 m telescope of the Mount Wilson, George. E. Hale thinks that this technique could be applied to the measurement of close double stars. He asks John A. Anderson to produce an instrument allowing such measurements. The principle of the ocular rotating interferometer and the way of using it for the measurement of double stars are first described. Then the effects of atmospheric dispersion on the observation of the stellar interference fringes and the remedy that Anderson implements to compensate it are described. Images of the Anderson's interferometer are used to present the instrument and to describe its operation. Installed at the 2,5 m telescope, this instrument was used by Anderson and Paul W. Merrill to resolve the spectroscopic binary Capella for the first time, like a 'visual binary'. Moreover, Merrill took the measurement of two difficult visual pairs discovered by Aitken (kap UMa = A 1585 and nu2 Boo = A 1634) and tried to resolve some new visual binaries among stars known as binary spectroscopic, stars with composite spectra, variable stars and some bright stars, which led him to publish a list of 73 stars finally found simple. Finally, the remarks made by Merrill in conclusion of his work will be analyzed.

  9. The effects of graded levels of calorie restriction: II. Impact of short term calorie and protein restriction on circulating hormone levels, glucose homeostasis and oxidative stress in male C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sharon E; Delville, Camille; Konstantopedos, Penelope; Hurst, Jane; Derous, Davina; Green, Cara; Chen, Luonan; Han, Jackie J D; Wang, Yingchun; Promislow, Daniel E L; Lusseau, David; Douglas, Alex; Speakman, John R

    2015-09-15

    Limiting food intake attenuates many of the deleterious effects of aging, impacting upon healthspan and leading to an increased lifespan. Whether it is the overall restriction of calories (calorie restriction: CR) or the incidental reduction in macronutrients such as protein (protein restriction: PR) that mediate these effects is unclear. The impact of 3 month CR or PR, (10 to 40%), on C57BL/6 mice was compared to controls fed ad libitum. Reductions in circulating leptin, tumor necrosis factor-? and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were relative to the level of CR and individually associated with morphological changes but remained unchanged following PR. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were improved following CR but not affected by PR. There was no indication that CR had an effect on oxidative damage, however CR lowered antioxidant activity. No biomarkers of oxidative stress were altered by PR. CR significantly reduced levels of major urinary proteins suggesting lowered investment in reproduction. Results here support the idea that reduced adipokine levels, improved insulin/IGF-1 signaling and reduced reproductive investment play important roles in the beneficial effects of CR while, in the short-term, attenuation of oxidative damage is not applicable. None of the positive effects were replicated with PR. PMID:26061745

  10. Measuring sediment deposition and accretion on anthropogenic marshland - Part II: The adaptation capacity of the North Frisian Halligen to sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Malte; Karius, Volker; Arns, Arne; Deicke, Matthias; von Eynatten, Hilmar

    2014-12-01

    Low coastlands, marshlands and islands all over the world are challenged by rising water levels due to climatic changes. The adaptation capacity of such lowlands is based on frequent inundations and according sedimentation processes. Exemplarily, a system of small islands west of Northern Germany was investigated over three years. At three out of ten so-called Halligen located in the Wadden Sea, the adaptation capacity of the anthropogenic marshland was determined. The Halligen Hooge, Langeness and Nordstrandischmoor have surface elevations only a few decimetres above mean high water and have to cope with an inundation frequency of nowadays up to 22 times per year. By use of methods introduced in Schindler et al. (2014, this volume) in combination with a 137Cs and 210Pb dating campaign on 12 sediment cores, vertical accretion rates were measured and detailed sediment accretion patterns presented. A good agreement was found between the used methods to calculate long term and short term marshland accretion rates. Sediment deposition and vertical marshland accretion is mainly controlled by the high tide events (single storm surges). Coastal protection structures, established in the early 20th century, decrease the inundation frequency and hinder the efficiency of the sediment transport by the tidal channel system on the Halligen. Vertical marshland accretion based on 210Pb dating for the time span 1915-2011 (1.0 ± 0.3 mm/a, Hooge, 1.2 ± 0.3 mm/a, Langeness and 2.6 ± 0.9 mm/a, Nordstrandischmoor) is in disequilibrium with the fast increasing mean high water level (MHW, 5.0 ± 0.3 mm/a). Projections until 2100 revealed that the extreme values (highest high waters, HHW) tend to rise much faster than the MHW or relative mean sea level (RMSL). Therefore an increasing hazard potential for the Halligen has to be expected if vertical marshland accretion does not accelerate in the future.

  11. Quantification of cells with specific phenotypes II: determination of CD4 expression level on reconstituted lyophilized human PBMC labelled with anti-CD4 FITC antibody.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Stebbings, R; Gaigalas, A K; Sutherland, J; Kammel, M; John, M; Roemer, B; Kuhne, M; Schneider, R J; Braun, M; Engel, A; Dikshit, D; Abbasi, F; Marti, G E; Sassi, M; Revel, L; Kim, S K; Baradez, M; Lekishvili, T; Marshall, D; Whitby, L; Jing, W; Ost, V; Vonsky, M; Neukammer, J

    2015-03-01

    This report focuses on the characterization of CD4 expression level in terms of equivalent number of reference fluorophores (ERF). Twelve different flow cytometer platforms across sixteen laboratories were utilized in this study. As a first step the participants were asked to calibrate the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) channel of each flow cytometer using commercially available calibration standard consisting of five populations of microspheres. Each population had an assigned value of equivalent fluorescein fluorophores (EFF denotes a special case of the generic term ERF with FITC as the reference fluorophore). The EFF values were assigned at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A surface-labelled lyophilized cell preparation was provided by the National Institute of Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) pre-labeled with a FITC conjugated anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. Three PBMC sample vials, provided to each participant, were used for the CD4 expression analysis. The PBMC are purported to have a fixed number of surface CD4 receptors. On the basis of the microsphere calibration, the EFF value of the PBMC samples was measured to characterize the population average CD4 expression level of the PBMC preparations. Both the results of data analysis performed by each participant and the results of centralized analysis of all participants' raw data are reported. Centralized analysis gave a mean EFF value of 22,300 and an uncertainty of 750, corresponding to 3.3% (level of confidence 68%) of the mean EFF value. The next step will entail the measurement of the ERF values of the lyophilized PBMC stained with labels for other fluorescence channels. The ultimate goal is to show that lyophilized PBMC is a suitable biological reference cell material for multicolor flow cytometry and that it can be used to present multicolor flow cytometry measurements in terms of ABC (antibodies bound per cell) units. PMID:25655377

  12. Gray-body factor and infrared divergences in 1D BEC acoustic black holes Paul R. Anderson,1,*

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Gray-body factor and infrared divergences in 1D BEC acoustic black holes Paul R. Anderson,1) It is shown that the gray-body factor for a one-dimensional elongated Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) acoustic in contrast with the case of a Schwarzschild black hole where the gray-body factor vanishes as 0

  13. Identification and Analysis of Learning Preferences of Mentally Ill Adults in Rehabilitative Psychosocial Therapy at the Anderson Mental Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Michael K.

    A study identified and analyzed the learning preferences of 17 seriously and chronically mentally ill adults participating in the rehabilitative psychosocial therapy program at the Toxaway Church Site of the Anderson Mental Health Center. Staff perceived as boring and unfocused the traditional treatment approach that relied mainly upon…

  14. Improving Smart Card Security using Self-timed Circuits Simon Moore, Ross Anderson, Paul Cunningham, Robert Mullins, George Taylor

    E-print Network

    Moore, Simon

    Improving Smart Card Security using Self-timed Circuits Simon Moore, Ross Anderson, Paul Cunningham for constructing smart card functions that are resistant to side channel attacks and fault injection. A novel alarm propagation technique is also introduced. These techniques have been used to produce a prototype smart card

  15. Program Spotlight: University of Puerto Rico and MD Anderson Partnership Welcomes Its First Graduates, Dedicated to Researching Cancer Health Disparities

    Cancer.gov

    CRCHD joins the Principal Investigators and Diversity Training co-leaders of the University of Puerto Rico and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center U54 Partnership for Excellence in Cancer Research in congratulating its first MDPhD graduates Sergei Gumá-de La Vega and Nahir Cortés-Santiago.

  16. Effects of quantized scalar fields in cosmological spacetimes with big rip singularities Jason D. Bates* and Paul R. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Paul R.

    time the phantom energy density will become infi- nite and the Universe will expand by an infinite that as the Universe expands the phantom energy density increases with the result that in a finite amount of proper. Bates* and Paul R. Anderson Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  17. Interactive Pen-and-Ink Illustration Michael P. Salisbury Sean E. Anderson Ronen Barzel3 David H. Salesin

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Interactive Pen-and-Ink Illustration Michael P. Salisbury Sean E. Anderson Ronen Barzel3 David H for creating pen-and-ink illustra- tions. The system uses stroke textures--collections of strokes ar- ranged-photorea- listic rendering, prioritized stroke textures. 1 Introduction Pen-and-ink is an extremely limited medium

  18. Scale-Dependent Reproduction of Pen-and-Ink Illustrations Mike Salisbury Corin Anderson Dani Lischinski David H. Salesin

    E-print Network

    Meenakshisundaram, Gopi

    Scale-Dependent Reproduction of Pen-and-Ink Illustrations Mike Salisbury Corin Anderson Dani This paper describes a representation for pen-and-ink illustrations that allows the creation of high-fidelity illustrations at any scale or resolution. We represent a pen-and-ink illustration as a low-reso- lution grey

  19. Measurements of Vapor Flow Regimes in Liquid Metal Pools M.H. ANDERSON, M. L. CORRADINI, R. BONAZZA

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Measurements of Vapor Flow Regimes in Liquid Metal Pools M.H. ANDERSON, M. L. CORRADINI, R. BONAZZA fractions within a pool of low-density liquid metal (NaK) during gas injection inside a horizontal magnetic from 0 to 5 SCFH (0 liquid metal, flow regimes 1

  20. www.water-alternatives.org Volume 7 | Issue 2 Bauer, C. 2014. Book review of Anderson et al. 2012.

    E-print Network

    restrictions on private transfers] 6. Privatising in-stream flows [including water pollution issues] 7www.water-alternatives.org Volume 7 | Issue 2 Bauer, C. 2014. Book review of Anderson et al. 2012. Tapping water markets. RFF Press/Routledge. Water Alternatives 7(2): 436-438 Book Review: Tapping water

  1. Cluster I/O with River: Making the Fast Case Common Remzi H. ArpaciDusseau, Eric Anderson, Noah Treuhaft,

    E-print Network

    Yelick, Katherine

    Cluster I/O with River: Making the Fast Case Common Remzi H. Arpaci­Dusseau, Eric Anderson, Noah University of California, Berkeley Abstract We introduce River, a data­flow programming environment and I/O substrate for clusters of computers. River is designed to provide max­ imum performance in the common case

  2. Cluster I/O with River: Making the Fast Case Common Remzi H. Arpaci-Dusseau, Eric Anderson, Noah Treuhaft,

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Cluster I/O with River: Making the Fast Case Common Remzi H. Arpaci-Dusseau, Eric Anderson, Noah University of California, Berkeley Abstract We introduce River, a data-flow programming environ- ment and I/O substrate for clusters of computers. River is designed to provide maximum performance in the common case

  3. Cluster I/O with River: Making the Fast Case Common Remzi H. Arpaci-Dusseau, Eric Anderson, Noah Treuhaft,

    E-print Network

    Arpaci-Dusseau, Remzi

    Cluster I/O with River: Making the Fast Case Common Remzi H. Arpaci-Dusseau, Eric Anderson, Noah University of California, Berkeley ¢¡¤£¦¥¦§©¨¤¥ We introduce River, a data-flow programming environment and I/O substrate for clusters of computers. River is designed to provide max- imum performance

  4. 77 FR 72906 - Chessie Logistics Co., LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Surface Transportation Board Chessie Logistics Co., LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption-- J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc. Chessie Logistics Co., LLC (Chessie), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of... copy of each pleading must be served on Ariel A. Erbacher, Legal Counsel, Chessie Logistics Co.,...

  5. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony before the Joint Committee last year, Professor Samuel... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS §...

  6. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony before the Joint Committee last year, Professor Samuel... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS §...

  7. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony before the Joint Committee last year, Professor Samuel... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS §...

  8. HighPerformance I/O and Networking Software in Sequoia 2000 Joseph Pasquale, Eric Anderson, Kevin Fall, Jonathan Kay

    E-print Network

    Polyzos, George C.

    Page 1 High­Performance I/O and Networking Software in Sequoia 2000 Joseph Pasquale, Eric Anderson}@cs.ucsd.edu Abstract We describe our experiences producing high­speed network and I/O software in the Sequoia 2000, is a key requirement for Sequoia distributed applications. We present new designs and implementations

  9. Managing Energy and Server Resources in Hosting Centers Jeffrey S. Chase, Darrell C. Anderson, Prachi N. Thakar, Amin M. Vahdat

    E-print Network

    Vahdat, Amin

    Managing Energy and Server Resources in Hosting Centers Jeffrey S. Chase, Darrell C. Anderson approach to managing shared server resources, in which services "bid" for resources as a func- tion data centers managed by third-party hosting providers. Managed hosting in shared centers offers

  10. Genomic organization and reproductive regulation of a carrier/storage protein in the Varroa Mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genomic region and corresponding transcript of the most abundant protein in the phoretic varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), were sequenced and found to be homologous with hemelipoglyco-proteins (HeLP/CP) of acarines. The genomic arrangement showed the presence of 14 in...

  11. A versatile and highly efficient post-functionalization method for grafting organic molecules onto Anderson-type polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecht, Stef; Jacobs, Jeroen; Van Meervelt, Luc; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2015-11-28

    A new azide functionalized Anderson polyoxometalate was synthesized, fully characterized and subsequently used as a building block for further POM post-functionalization with organic compounds through a copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Optimization of the reaction conditions led to an efficient, fast, convenient and versatile POM coupling method. PMID:26486549

  12. Influence of Cadmium(II) Ions and Brewery Sludge on Metallothionein Level in Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) – Bio-transforming of Toxic Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Huska, Dalibor; Krizkova, Sona; Beklova, Miroslava; Havel, Ladislav; Zehnalek, Josef; Diopan, Vaclav; Adam, Vojtech; Zeman, Ladislav; Babula, Petr; Kizek, Rene

    2008-01-01

    Metallothioneins belong to a group of intracellular, high molecular and cysteine-rich proteins whose content in an organism increase with increasing concentration of a heavy metal. The aim of this work was to apply the electrochemical analysis for the analysis of metallothioneins in earthworms exposed to cadmium ions and brewery sludge. Here we utilized adsorptive transfer technique coupled with differential pulse voltammetry Brdicka reaction to determine metallothionein in different biological samples. By means this very sensitive technique it was possible to analyze metallothionein in concentrations below 1 ?mol.l?1 with the standard deviation of 4-5%. We found out that the average MT level in the non-treated earthworms oscillated between 19 and 48 ?mol.l?1. When we analysed samples of earthworms treated by cadmium, we observed that the MT content increased with the exposition length and increase dose of cadmium ions. Finally, we attempted to study and compare the toxicity of the raw sludge and its leach by using of earthworms. The raw brewery sludge caused the death of the earthworms quickly. Earthworms held in the presence of leach from brewery sludge increased their weight of 147 % of their original weight because they ingested the nutrients from the sludge. The metallothionein level changes markedly with increasing time of exposition and applied dose of toxic compound. It clearly follows from the obtained results that the MT synthesis is insufficient in the first hours of the exposition and increases after more than 24 h.

  13. Nutritional control of xanthine dehydrogenase. II. Effects on xanthine dehydrogenase and aldehyde oxidase of culturing wild-type and mutant Drosophila on different levels of molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Duke, E J; Rushing, D R; Glassman, E

    1975-02-01

    Two new mutants, deficient in aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase, have been isolated from a wild-type stock of Drosophila melanogaster and have been provisionally termed lxd-c and lxd-d, respectively, as both mutants appear to be allelic with lxd (low xanthine dehydrogenase). An analysis has been made of the effects of dietary molybdenum on lxd, lxd-c, lxd-d, lao (low aldehyde oxidase), mal (maroon-like eye color), and pac (Pacific) wild-type flies. On the lower dietary levels of 10(-3) M and 10(-2) M molybdenum, increases in specific activity of both enzymes were observed only in lxd. Furthermore, two- to three-fold increases in specific activity of both enzymes occurred in all strains, except mal, when cultured on 5 x 10(-2) M molybdenum. The lxd and lxd-c strains failed to survive on this high concentration of the ion. Similar concentrations of molybdenum had no effect in vitro. An extra electrophoretic band of xanthine dehydrogenase was observed on polyacrylamide gel from extracts of wild-type flies cultured on certain levels of molybdenum, but its appearance was not always correlated with the increases in specific activity. PMID:806286

  14. Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. II. Rare-gas plasmas and Ar-molecular gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Boffard, John B. Lin, Chun C.; Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Culver, Cody; Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold

    2015-03-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emissions from excited plasma species can play a variety of roles in processing plasmas, including damaging the surface properties of materials used in semiconductor processing. Depending on their wavelength, VUV photons can easily transmit thin upper dielectric layers and affect the electrical characteristics of the devices. Despite their importance, measuring VUV fluxes is complicated by the fact that few materials transmit at VUV wavelengths, and both detectors and windows are easily damaged by plasma exposure. The authors have previously reported on measuring VUV fluxes in pure argon plasmas by monitoring the concentrations of Ar(3p{sup 5}4s) resonance atoms that produce the VUV emissions using noninvasive optical emission spectroscopy in the visible/near-infrared wavelength range [Boffard et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 32, 021304 (2014)]. Here, the authors extend this technique to other rare-gases (Ne, Kr, and Xe) and argon-molecular gas plasmas (Ar/H{sub 2}, Ar/O{sub 2}, and Ar/N{sub 2}). Results of a model for VUV emissions that couples radiation trapping and the measured rare-gas resonance level densities are compared to measurements made with both a calibrated VUV photodiode and a sodium salicylate fluorescence detection scheme. In these more complicated gas mixtures, VUV emissions from a variety of sources beyond the principal resonance levels of the rare gases are found to contribute to the total VUV flux.

  15. An effective medium approach to the asymptotics of the statistical moments of the parabolic Anderson model and Lifshitz tails

    E-print Network

    Bernd Metzger

    2011-06-28

    Originally introduced in solid state physics to model amorphous materials and alloys exhibiting disorder induced metal-insulator transitions, the Anderson model $H_{\\omega}= -\\Delta + V_{\\omega} $ on $l^2(\\bZ^d)$ has become in mathematical physics as well as in probability theory a paradigmatic example for the relevance of disorder effects. Here $\\Delta$ is the discrete Laplacian and $V_{\\omega} = \\{V_{\\omega}(x): x \\in \\bZ^d\\}$ is an i.i.d. random field taking values in $\\bR$. A popular model in probability theory is the parabolic Anderson model (PAM), i.e. the discrete diffusion equation $\\partial_t u(x,t) =-H_{\\omega} u(x,t)$ on $ \\bZ^d \\times \\bR_+$, $u(x,0)=1$, where random sources and sinks are modelled by the Anderson Hamiltonian. A characteristic property of the solutions of (PAM) is the occurrence of intermittency peaks in the large time limit. These intermittency peaks determine the thermodynamic observables extensively studied in the probabilistic literature using path integral methods and the theory of large deviations. The rigorous study of the relation between the probabilistic approach to the parabolic Anderson model and the spectral theory of Anderson localization is at least mathematically less developed. We see our publication as a step in this direction. In particular we will prove an unified approach to the transition of the statistical moments $$ and the integrated density of states from classical to quantum regime using an effective medium approach. As a by-product we will obtain a logarithmic correction in the traditional Lifshitz tail setting when $V_{\\omega}$ satisfies a fat tail condition.

  16. Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards: Part II. Validation of satellite-derived Volcanic Sulphur Dioxide Levels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouli, MariLiza; Balis, Dimitris; Dimopoulos, Spiros; Clarisse, Lieven; Carboni, Elisa; Hedelt, Pascal; Spinetti, Claudia; Theys, Nicolas; Tampellini, Lucia; Zehner, Claus

    2014-05-01

    The eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in the spring of 2010 turned the attention of both the public and the scientific community to the susceptibility of the European airspace to the outflows of large volcanic eruptions. The ash-rich plume from Eyjafjallajökull drifted towards Europe and caused major disruptions of European air traffic for several weeks affecting the everyday life of millions of people and with a strong economic impact. This unparalleled situation revealed limitations in the decision making process due to the lack of information on the tolerance to ash of commercial aircraft engines as well as limitations in the ash monitoring and prediction capabilities. The European Space Agency project Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards, was introduced to facilitate the development of an optimal End-to-End System for Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring and Prediction. This system is based on comprehensive satellite-derived ash plume and sulphur dioxide [SO2] level estimates, as well as a widespread validation using supplementary satellite, aircraft and ground-based measurements. The validation of volcanic SO2 levels extracted from the sensors GOME-2/MetopA and IASI/MetopA are shown here with emphasis on the total column observed right before, during and after the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruptions. Co-located ground-based Brewer Spectrophotometer data extracted from the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre, WOUDC, were compared to the different satellite estimates. The findings are presented at length, alongside a comprehensive discussion of future scenarios.

  17. Development and validation of personal monitoring methods for low levels of acrylonitrile in workplace atmosphere. II. Thermal desorption and field validation

    SciTech Connect

    Borders, R.A.; Gluck, S.J.; Sowle, W.F.; Melcher, R.G.

    1986-03-01

    Thermal desorption is a more sensitive alternative to solvent desorption for the determination of acrylonitrile in air. A dual-bed collection tube (Tenax GC and Carbosieve B) was developed for collecting and concentrating low levels of acrylonitrile. Two thermal desorption techniques were evaluated for the recovery of acrylonitrile collected on the dual-bed tubes over a concentration range from 0.05 to 5 ppm. A commercially-available system, the Century Programmable Thermal Desorption Unit, was easy to operate, allowed for multiple injections of the sample and had a recovery of 82 +/- 12% (RSD). Sampled were stored for up to two months without affecting the recovery and there was not an observable effect from humidity or from the presence of other organic compounds. This system was found to have limitations at acrylonitrile concentrations above 1 ppm. A field validation study tested the sampling and analytical methods developed for monitoring low levels of acrylonitrile in the workplace. Three methods employing Pittsburgh Coconut-Base activated charcoal, Ambersorb XE-348 and Tenax-GC and Carbosieve B sampling mediums were validated for concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 5 ppm and confirmed in the field from 0.02 to 3 ppm in tests conducted at plant sites. These field studies were run over varying humidity and temperature conditions. The overall absolute recoveries and relative standard deviations found for these methods found during the field trials are 90 +/- 18% for charcoal; 85 +/- 11% for Ambersorb XE-348; and 90 +/- 19% for the Century dual-bed sorbent. These values were in quite good agreement with the 91 +/- 10%, 88 +/- 8%, and 82 +/- 12% determined in laboratory studies.

  18. Decay of a nonlinear impurity in a structured continuum from a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2007-05-01

    The decay dynamics of a nonlinear impurity mode embedded in a linear structured continuum is theoretically investigated in the framework of a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model. A gradient flow dynamics for the survival probability is derived in the Van Hove ({lambda}{sup 2}t) limit by a multiple-scale asymptotic analysis, and the role of nonlinearity on the decay law is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the existence of bound states embedded in the continuum acts as transient trapping states which slow down the decay. The dynamical behavior predicted in the {lambda}{sup 2}t limit is studied in detail for a simple tight-binding one-dimensional lattice model, which may describe electron or photon transport in condensed matter or photonic systems. Numerical simulations of the underlying equations confirm, in particular, the trapping effect in the decay process due to bound states embedded in the continuum.

  19. Leggett Modes and the Anderson-Higgs Mechanism in Superconductors without Inversion Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Nikolaj; Einzel, Dietrich; Klam, Ludwig; Manske, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    We develop a microscopic and gauge-invariant theory for collective modes resulting from the phase of the superconducting order parameter in noncentrosymmetric superconductors. Considering various crystal symmetries, we derive the corresponding gauge mode ?G(q ) and find, in particular, new Leggett modes ?L(q ) with characteristic properties that are unique to noncentrosymmetric superconductors. We calculate their mass and dispersion that reflect the underlying spin-orbit coupling and thus the balance between triplet and singlet superconductivity occurring simultaneously. Finally, we demonstrate the role of the Anderson-Higgs mechanism: while the long-range Coulomb interaction shifts ?G(q ) to the condensate plasma mode ?P(q ), it leaves the mass ?0 of the new Leggett mode unaffected and only slightly modifies its dispersion.

  20. Classical mapping for Hubbard operators: Application to the double-Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Miller, William H.; Levy, Tal J.; Rabani, Eran

    2014-05-28

    A classical Cartesian mapping for Hubbard operators is developed to describe the nonequilibrium transport of an open quantum system with many electrons. The mapping of the Hubbard operators representing the many-body Hamiltonian is derived by using analogies from classical mappings of boson creation and annihilation operators vis-à-vis a coherent state representation. The approach provides qualitative results for a double quantum dot array (double Anderson impurity model) coupled to fermionic leads for a range of bias voltages, Coulomb couplings, and hopping terms. While the width and height of the conduction peaks show deviations from the master equation approach considered to be accurate in the limit of weak system-leads couplings and high temperatures, the Hubbard mapping captures all transport channels involving transition between many electron states, some of which are not captured by approximate nonequilibrium Green function closures.

  1. Competition between Hund's coupling and Kondo effect in a one-dimensional extended periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagymási, I.; Sólyom, J.; Legeza, Ö.

    2015-07-01

    We study the ground-state properties of an extended periodic Anderson model to understand the role of Hund's coupling between localized and itinerant electrons using the density-matrix renormalization group algorithm. By calculating the von Neumann entropies we show that two phase transitions occur and two new phases appear as the hybridization is increased in the symmetric half-filled case due to the competition between Kondo effect and Hund's coupling. In the intermediate phase, which is bounded by two critical points, we found a dimerized ground state, while in the other spatially homogeneous phases the ground state is Haldane-like and Kondo-singlet-like, respectively. We also determine the entanglement spectrum and the entanglement diagram of the system by calculating the mutual information thereby clarifying the structure of each phase.

  2. Magnetic Moments of Chromium-Doped Gold Clusters: The Anderson Impurity Model in Finite Systems

    E-print Network

    Hirsch, K; Langenberg, A; Niemeyer, M; Langbehn, B; Möller, T; Terasaki, A; Issendorff, B v; Lau, J T

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic moment of a single impurity atom in a finite free electron gas is studied in a combined x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and density functional theory study of size-selected free chromium-doped gold clusters. The observed size-dependence of the local magnetic moment can essentially be understood in terms of the Anderson impurity model. Electronic shell closure in the host metal minimizes the interaction of localized impurity states with the confined free electron gas and preserves the full magnetic moment of $\\unit[5]{\\mu_B}$ in $\\mathrm{CrAu}_{2}^{+}$ and $\\mathrm{CrAu}_{6}^{+}$ clusters. Even for open-shell species, large local moments are observed that scale with the energy gap of the gold cluster. This indicates that an energy gap in the free electron gas generally stabilizes the local magnetic moment of the impurity.

  3. Perfect absorption in nanotextured thin films via Anderson-localized photon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschlimann, Martin; Brixner, Tobias; Differt, Dominik; Heinzmann, Ulrich; Hensen, Matthias; Kramer, Christian; Lükermann, Florian; Melchior, Pascal; Pfeiffer, Walter; Piecuch, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Stiebig, Helmut; Strüber, Christian; Thielen, Philip

    2015-10-01

    The enhancement of light absorption in absorber layers is crucial in a number of applications, including photovoltaics and thermoelectrics. The efficient use of natural resources and physical constraints such as limited charge extraction in photovoltaic devices require thin but efficient absorbers. Among the many different strategies used, light diffraction and light localization at randomly nanotextured interfaces have been proposed to improve absorption. Although already exploited in commercial devices, the enhancement mechanism for devices with nanotextured interfaces is still subject to debate. Using coherent two-dimensional nanoscopy and coherent light scattering, we demonstrate the existence of localized photonic states in nanotextured amorphous silicon layers as used in commercial thin-film solar cells. Resonant absorption in these states accounts for the enhanced absorption in the long-wavelength cutoff region. Our observations establish that Anderson localization—that is, strong localization—is a highly efficient resonant absorption enhancement mechanism offering interesting opportunities for the design of efficient future absorber layers.

  4. High-order terms in the renormalized perturbation theory for the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandis, Vassilis; Hewson, Alex C.

    2015-09-01

    We study the renormalized perturbation theory of the single-impurity Anderson model, particularly the high-order terms in the expansion of the self-energy in powers of the renormalized coupling U ˜. Though the presence of counterterms in the renormalized theory may appear to complicate the diagrammatics, we show how these can be seamlessly accommodated by carrying out the calculation order-by-order in terms of skeleton diagrams. We describe how the diagrams pertinent to the renormalized self-energy and four vertex can be automatically generated, translated into integrals, and numerically integrated. To maximize the efficiency of our approach we introduce a generalized k -particle/hole propagator, which is used to analytically simplify the resultant integrals and reduce the dimensionality of the integration. We present results for the self-energy and spectral density to fifth order in U ˜, for various values of the model asymmetry, and compare them to a numerical renormalization group calculation.

  5. Multi-Overlap Simulations of the $3d$ Edwards-Anderson Ising Spin Glass

    E-print Network

    Bernd A. Berg; Wolfhard Janke

    1997-12-30

    We introduce a novel method for numerical spin glass investigations: Simulations of two replica at fixed temperature, weighted such that a broad distribution of the Parisi overlap parameter $q$ is achieved. Canonical expectation values for the entire $q$-range (multi-overlap) follow by re-weighting. We demonstrate the feasibility of the approach by studying the $3d$ Edwards-Anderson Ising ($J_{ik}=\\pm 1$) spin glass in the broken phase ($\\beta=1$). For the first time it becomes possible to obtain reliable results about spin glass tunneling barriers. In addition, as do some earlier numerical studies, our results support that Parisi mean field theory is valid down to $3d$.

  6. Modified Anderson-Darling Test-Based Target Detector in Non-Homogenous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wei, Yinsheng; Li, Bingfei; Alterovitz, Gil

    2014-01-01

    A constant false alarm rate (CFAR) target detector in non-homogenous backgrounds is proposed. Based on K-sample Anderson-Darling (AD) tests, the method re-arranges the reference cells by merging homogenous sub-blocks surrounding the cell under test (CUT) into a new reference window to estimate the background statistics. Double partition test, clutter edge refinement and outlier elimination are used as an anti-clutter processor in the proposed Modified AD (MAD) detector. Simulation results show that the proposed MAD test based detector outperforms cell-averaging (CA) CFAR, greatest of (GO) CFAR, smallest of (SO) CFAR, order-statistic (OS) CFAR, variability index (VI) CFAR, and CUT inclusive (CI) CFAR in most non-homogenous situations. PMID:25177800

  7. Topologically invariant tensor renormalization group method for the Edwards-Anderson spin glasses model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuang; Qin, Shao-Meng; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Tensor renormalization group (TRG) method is a real space renormalization group approach. It has been successfully applied to both classical and quantum systems. In this paper, we study a disordered and frustrated system, the two-dimensional Edwards-Anderson model, by a new topological invariant TRG scheme. We propose an approach to calculate the local magnetizations and nearest pair correlations simultaneously. The Nishimori multicritical point predicted by the topological invariant TRG agrees well with the recent Monte Carlo results. The TRG schemes outperform the mean-field methods on the calculation of the partition function. We notice that it might obtain a negative partition function at sufficiently low temperatures. However, the negative contribution can be neglected if the system is large enough. This topological invariant TRG can also be used to study three-dimensional spin glass systems.

  8. d -wave superconductivity in the frustrated two-dimensional periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Tremblay, A.-M.-S.

    2015-01-01

    Superconductivity in heavy-fermion materials can sometimes appear in the incoherent regime and in proximity to an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. Here, we study these phenomena using large-scale determinant quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the dynamical cluster approximation with various impurity solvers for the periodic Anderson model with frustrated hybridization. We obtain solid evidence for a dx2-y2 superconducting phase arising from an incoherent normal state in the vicinity of an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. There is a coexistence region, and the width of the superconducting dome increases with frustration. Through a study of the pairing dynamics, we find that the retarded spin fluctuations give the main contribution to the pairing glue. These results are relevant for unconventional superconductivity in the Ce-115 family of heavy fermions.

  9. Leveraging Anderson Acceleration for improved convergence of iterative solutions to transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Taitano, William T.; Knoll, Dana

    2014-09-15

    In this note we demonstrate that using Anderson Acceleration (AA) in place of a standard Picard iteration can not only increase the convergence rate but also make the iteration more robust for two transport applications. We also compare the convergence acceleration provided by AA to that provided by moment-based acceleration methods. Additionally, we demonstrate that those two acceleration methods can be used together in a nested fashion. We begin by describing the AA algorithm. At this point, we will describe two application problems, one from neutronics and one from plasma physics, on which we will apply AA. We provide computational results which highlight the benefits of using AA, namely that we can compute solutions using fewer function evaluations, larger time-steps, and achieve a more robust iteration.

  10. Analytic Flow Equations for the Fermi Liquid Parameters of the Anderson Impurity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandis, Vassilis; Hewson, Alex C.

    2015-08-01

    The low temperature behavior of a Fermi liquid can be described in terms of quasiparticle excitations that are in 1-1 correspondence with those of the noninteracting system. Because of adiabatic continuity, the Landau parameters, which describe the interactions between the quasiparticles, must evolve continuously as the interactions are turned on and be described by a set of flow equations. For strongly correlated electron systems it is not possible to follow this flow in perturbation theory when the interactions become strong. We explore the idea here of overcoming this problem by renormalizing the quasiparticles in this flow using a renormalized perturbation theory. This approach is tested in the case of a single impurity Anderson model. Analytic flow equations are derived which give excellent results for the Landau parameters in the strong correlation regime.

  11. Quantum resonance, Anderson localization, and selective manipulations in molecular mixtures by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floß, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2012-08-01

    We show that the current laser technology used for field-free molecular alignment via impulsive Raman rotational excitation allows for observing long-discussed nonlinear quantum phenomena in the dynamics of the periodically kicked rotor. This includes the scaling of the absorbed energy near the conditions of quantum resonance and Anderson-like localization in the angular momentum. Based on this, we show that periodic trains of short laser pulses provide an efficient tool for selective rotational excitation and alignment in a molecular mixture. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach by applying it to a mixture of two nitrogen isotopologues (14N2 and 15N2), and show that strong selectivity is possible even at room temperature.

  12. One-dimensional Anderson Localization: distribution of wavefunction amplitude and phase at the band center

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V. E.; Yudson, V. I.

    2009-05-14

    The statistics of normalized wavefunctions in the one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model of localization is considered. It is shown that at any energy that corresponds to a rational filling factor f = (p/q) there is a statistical anomaly which is seen in expansion of the generating function (GF) to the order q-2 in the disorder parameter. We study in detail the principle anomaly at f = (1/2) that appears in the leading order. The transfer-matrix equation of the Fokker-Planck type with a two-dimensional internal space is derived for GF. It is shown that the zero-mode variant of this equation is integrable and a solution for the generating function is found in the thermodynamic limit.

  13. Quantum walk and Anderson localization of rotational excitations in disordered ensembles of polar molecules

    E-print Network

    Tianrui Xu; Roman V. Krems

    2015-05-05

    We consider the dynamics of rotational excitations placed on a single molecule in spatially disordered 1D, 2D and 3D ensembles of ultracold molecules trapped in optical lattices. The disorder arises from incomplete populations of optical lattices with molecules. This leads to a model corresponding to a quantum particle with long-range tunnelling amplitudes moving on a lattice with the same on-site energy but with forbidden access to random sites (vacancies). We examine the time and length scales of Anderson localization for this type of disorder with realistic experimental parameters in the Hamiltonian. We show that for an experimentally realized system of KRb molecules on an optical lattice this type of disorder leads to disorder-induced localization in 1D and 2D systems on a time scale $t \\sim 1$ sec. For 3D lattices with $55$ sites in each dimension and vacancy concentration $ 90~\\%$, the rotational excitations diffuse to the edges of the lattice and show no signature of Anderson localization. We examine the role of the long-range tunnelling amplitudes allowing for transfer of rotational excitations between distant lattice sites. Our results show that the long-range tunnelling has little impact on the dynamics in the diffusive regime but affects significantly the localization dynamics in lattices with large concentrations of vacancies, enhancing the width of the localized distributions in 2D lattices by more than a factor of 2. Our results raise a general question whether quantum particles with long-range tunnelling can undergo quantum localization in 3D lattices with substitutional disorder.

  14. Performance of the L3 second level trigger implemented for the LEP II with the SGS Thomson C104 packet switch

    SciTech Connect

    Blaising, J.J.; Chollet-Le Flour, F.

    1998-08-01

    The L3 experiment is one of the four experiments collecting data at LEP. For the LEP phase 2, the second level trigger has been upgraded to a network of 28 ST T9000 transputers and 2 ST C104 asynchronous packet switches interconnected by IEEE1355 links. It collects trigger data at each LEP crossing (22 {micro}s), builds-up the trigger data block, processes it and rejects online the background events in a few milliseconds. The L3 data acquisition has been running with this system since July 1995. In the data-taking environment and for different hardware and software implementations, the event building throughput rate has been measured. A bandwidth of 5.9 Mbytes per second per link has been measured in a configuration with 12 sources and one processing unit connected with 2 links. The expected global throughput of 70 Mbytes per second has been measured in a farm of 6 processing units. While varying the number of sources and destinations, the authors didn`t observe any significant bandwidth loss. Nevertheless performance relies strongly on some software implementation choices, which are presented and discussed.

  15. Energy level alignment at the Si(1 1 1)/RCA-SiO2/copper(II) phthalocyanine ultra-thin film interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzywiecki, Maciej; Grz?dziel, Lucyna

    2014-08-01

    The photoemission experimental techniques (i.e. ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy-UPS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS) were used to investigate the charge-rearrangement-related phenomena occuring at organic-inorganic semiconductor interface. Examined samples were copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) ultra-thin (up to 16 nm) layers deposited onto oxidized silicon Si(1 1 1) of n- and p-type of conductivity. The 1.3-nm-thick silicon oxide was prepared by means of RCA wet cleaning procedure. The analysis of the photoemission data (mainly UPS) suggested the existance of the polarization layer within first 3 nm of CuPc layer thickness. Basing on the UPS and XPS results the energy level diagrams of examined structures have been constructed. In present paper it is suggested that the existance of the polarization layer could be assigned to the disordered adsorption and continous molecular reorientation of the CuPc molecules during the interface formation process. In the terms of the lack of the charge transfer via substrate/organic overlayer interface and disordered adsorption the fluctuations of CuPc electronic parameters were detected. Moreover the ionization energy and the work function parameters of final CuPc layer were affected. The values were more consistent with those obtained for much thicker (over 500 nm) CuPc layers. Performed studies showed that contrary to CuPc layers deposited on native substrates (where the charge transfer via tunnelable oxide - determined as dipole effect - has been detected), the thicker RCA-prepared oxide seems to be non-tunnelable hence the possibility for Si(1 1 1)/RCA-SiO2/CuPc structures in organic transistor application remains open; however the substrate surface should be tailored prior the deposition in order to avoid disordered adsorption.

  16. Quantifying repetitive hand activity for epidemiological research on musculoskeletal disorders--part II: comparison of different methods of measuring force level and repetitiveness.

    PubMed

    Bao, S; Howard, N; Spielholz, P; Silverstein, B

    2006-03-15

    This paper focuses on comparisons between the different methods of assessing repetitive hand activities. Various methods were used to measure hand force and repetitiveness of hand activities on 733 subjects in the study described by Bao et al. (2006). Two definitions of repetitiveness were used in analysis of detailed time studies of repetitive hand activities and four parameters of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) hand activity level (HAL) and the Strain Index methods were estimated by ergonomists and used to quantify repetitiveness. Hand forces were measured or estimated using three different methods: 1) measured with a force gauge or mimicked on a force gauge (force matching); 2) estimated by ergonomists using rating scales; 3) self-reports by subjects. The jobs were also evaluated using the ACGIH HAL and Strain Index methods when different repetitiveness quantification methods were used. Results showed that different definitions of repetitive exertion might lead to measuring different physical exposure phenomena and produce very different results. There were poor correlations between the measures of repetitiveness estimated by the different methods. Correlations between force quantifications using different methods were also poor. This suggests that parameters measured by different methods might not be interchangeable. Both the ACGIH HAL and Strain Index methods identified more 'hazardous' jobs when repetitiveness was estimated by ergonomists than when it was calculated by detailed time studies of forceful hand exertions. The Strain Index method identified more 'hazardous' jobs than the ACGIH HAL method. Overall, the between-methods agreements were found to be moderate to substantial. PMID:16690566

  17. Effect of water management, arsenic and phosphorus levels on rice in a high-arsenic soil-water system: II. Arsenic uptake.

    PubMed

    Talukder, A S M H M; Meisner, C A; Sarkar, M A R; Islam, M S; Sayre, K D; Duxbury, J M; Lauren, J G

    2012-06-01

    Rice consumption is one of the major pathways for As intake in populations that depend on a rice diet in several countries of South and South-east Asia. Pot experiments were undertaken to investigate the effects of water management (WM), arsenic (As) contaminated soil-water and Phosphorus (P) rates on As uptake in rice plants. There were 18 treatments comprising of three each of As rates (0, 20 and 40 mg kg(-1) soil) and P rates (0, 12.5 and 25 mg kg(-1) soil) and two WM (aerobic and anaerobic) strategies on winter (boro var. BRRI dhan 29) and monsoon (aman var. BRRI dhan 32) rice at the Wheat Research Center (WRC), Nashipur, Dinajpur, Bangladesh. Arsenic concentrations in rice grain and straw increased significantly (P ? 0.01) with the increasing As rates in the soil. Arsenic availability in soil pore-water solution was less (58%) under aerobic WM (redox potential-Eh=+135 to +138 mV; pH-6.50 at 24.3 °C) as compared to anaerobic WM (flooded: Eh=-41 to -76 mV; pH-6.43 at 23 °C). The highest total grain As content 2.23 ± 0.12 mg kg(-1) and 0.623 ± 0.006 mg kg(-1) was found in T(6) (P(12.5)As(40)-anaerobic) and T(9) (P(25)As(40)-anaerobic) in BRRI dhan 29 and BRRI dhan 32, respectively, which was significantly higher (41-45%) than in the same As and P treatments for pots under aerobic WM. The As content in rice straw (up to 24.7 ± 0.49 ppm in BRRI dhan 29, 17.3 ± 0.49 mg kg(-1) in BRRI dhan 32 with the highest As level) suggested that As can more easily be translocated to the shoots under anaerobic conditions than aerobic condition. BRRI dhan 29 was more sensitive to As than BRRI dhan 32. Under aerobic WM, P soil amendments reduced As uptake by rice plants. The study demonstrated that aerobic water management along with optimum P amendment and selection of arsenic inefficient rice varieties are appropriate options that can be applied to minimize As accumulation in rice which can reduce effects on human and cattle health risk as well as soil contamination. PMID:22425734

  18. Far-infrared to millimeter astrophysical dust emission. II. Comparison of the two-level systems (TLS) model with astronomical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, D.; Bernard, J.-P.; Mény, C.; Gromov, V.

    2011-10-01

    Aims: In a previous paper we proposed a new model for the emission by amorphous astronomical dust grains, based on solid-state physics. The model uses a description of the disordered charge distribution (DCD) combined with the presence of two-level systems (TLS) defects in the amorphous solid composing the grains. The goal of this paper is to compare this new model to astronomical observations of different Galactic environments in the far-infrared/submillimeter, in order to derive a set of canonical model parameters to be used as a Galactic reference to be compared to in future Galactic and extragalactic studies. Methods: We compare the TLS model with existing astronomical data. We consider the average emission spectrum at high latitudes in our Galaxy as measured with FIRAS and WMAP, as well as the emission from Galactic compact sources observed with the Archeops balloon experiment, for which an inverse relationship between the dust temperature and the emissivity spectral index has been shown. Results: We show that, unlike models previously proposed that often invoke two dust components at different temperatures, the TLS model successfully reproduces both the shape of the Galactic spectral energy distribution and its evolution with temperature as observed in the Archeops data. The best TLS model parameters indicate a charge coherence length of ?13 nm and other model parameters in broad agreement with expectations from laboratory studies of dust analogs. We conclude that the millimeter excess emission, which is often attributed to the presence of very cold dust in the diffuse ISM, is very likely caused solely by TLS emission in disordered amorphous dust grains. We discuss the implications of the new model, in terms of mass determinations from millimeter continuum observations and the expected variations in the emissivity spectral index with wavelength and dust temperature. The implications for analyzing the Herschel and Planck satellite data are discussed. Table 5 is also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/534/A118

  19. QUANTUM MECHANICS II Physics 342

    E-print Network

    Rosner, Jonathan L.

    QUANTUM MECHANICS II Physics 342 KPTC 103 9:00 ­ 10:20 a.m. 1 Tues., Thurs. ­ Winter Quarter 2011 quantum mechanics at the graduate level. The text for Quantum Mechanics II will be J. J. Sakurai and Jim Napolitano, Modern Quantum Mechanics, Second Edition (Addison-Wesley, San Francisco, 2011). For supplemental

  20. Topoisomerase II and leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, MaryJean; Lindsey, R. Hunter; Felix, Carolyn A.; Grimwade, David; Osheroff, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes that modulate DNA under- and overwinding, knotting, and tangling. Beyond their critical physiological functions, these enzymes are the targets for some of the most widely prescribed anticancer drugs (topoisomerase II poisons) in clinical use. Topoisomerase II poisons kill cells by increasing levels of covalent enzyme-cleaved DNA complexes that are normal reaction intermediates. Drugs such as etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone are frontline therapies for a variety of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, their use is also associated with the development of specific leukemias. Regimens that include etoposide or doxorubicin are linked to the occurrence of acute myeloid leukemias that feature rearrangements at chromosomal band 11q23. Similar rearrangements are seen in infant leukemias and are associated with gestational diets that are high in naturally occurring topoisomerase II–active compounds. Finally, regimens that include mitoxantrone and epirubicin are linked to acute promyelocytic leukemias that feature t(15;17) rearrangements. The first part of this article will focus on type II topoisomerases and describe the mechanism of enzyme and drug action. The second part will discuss how topoisomerase II poisons trigger chromosomal breaks that lead to leukemia and potential approaches for dissociating the actions of drugs from their leukemogenic potential. PMID:24495080

  1. Dual nature of localization in guiding systems with randomly corrugated boundaries: Anderson-type versus entropic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Yu. V.; Shostenko, L. D.

    2015-05-01

    A unified theory for the conductance of an infinitely long multimode quantum wire whose finite segment has randomly rough lateral boundaries is developed. It enables one to rigorously take account of all feasible mechanisms of wave scattering, both related to boundary roughness and to contacts between the wire rough section and the perfect leads within the same technical frameworks. The rough part of the conducting wire is shown to act as a mode-specific randomly modulated effective potential barrier whose height is governed essentially by the asperity slope. The mean height of the barrier, which is proportional to the average slope squared, specifies the number of conducting channels. Under relatively small asperity amplitude this number can take on arbitrary small, up to zero, values if the asperities are sufficiently sharp. The consecutive channel cut-off that arises when the asperity sharpness increases can be regarded as a kind of localization, which is not related to the disorder per se but rather is of entropic or (equivalently) geometric origin. The fluctuating part of the effective barrier results in two fundamentally different types of guided wave scattering, viz., inter- and intramode scattering. The intermode scattering is shown to be for the most part very strong except in the cases of (a) extremely smooth asperities, (b) excessively small length of the corrugated segment, and (c) the asperities sharp enough for only one conducting channel to remain in the wire. Under strong intermode scattering, a new set of conducting channels develops in the corrugated waveguide, which have the form of asymptotically decoupled extended modes subject to individual solely intramode random potentials. In view of this fact, two transport regimes only are realizable in randomly corrugated multimode waveguides, specifically, the ballistic and the localized regime, the latter characteristic of one-dimensional random systems. Two kinds of localization are thus shown to coexist in waveguide-like systems with randomly corrugated boundaries, specifically, the entropic localization and the one-dimensional Anderson (disorder-driven) localization. If the particular mode propagates across the rough segment ballistically, the Fabry-Pérot-type oscillations should be observed in the conductance, which are suppressed for the mode transferred in the Anderson-localized regime.

  2. Commensurability effects in one-dimensional Anderson localization: Anomalies in eigenfunction statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V.E.; Yudson, V.I.

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Statistics of normalized eigenfunctions in one-dimensional Anderson localization at E = 0 is studied. > Moments of inverse participation ratio are calculated. > Equation for generating function is derived at E = 0. > An exact solution for generating function at E = 0 is obtained. > Relation of the generating function to the phase distribution function is established. - Abstract: The one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model (AM), i.e. a tight-binding chain with random uncorrelated on-site energies, has statistical anomalies at any rational point f=(2a)/({lambda}{sub E}) , where a is the lattice constant and {lambda}{sub E} is the de Broglie wavelength. We develop a regular approach to anomalous statistics of normalized eigenfunctions {psi}(r) at such commensurability points. The approach is based on an exact integral transfer-matrix equation for a generating function {Phi}{sub r}(u, {phi}) (u and {phi} have a meaning of the squared amplitude and phase of eigenfunctions, r is the position of the observation point). This generating function can be used to compute local statistics of eigenfunctions of 1d AM at any disorder and to address the problem of higher-order anomalies at f=p/q with q > 2. The descender of the generating function P{sub r}({phi}){identical_to}{Phi}{sub r}(u=0,{phi}) is shown to be the distribution function of phase which determines the Lyapunov exponent and the local density of states. In the leading order in the small disorder we derived a second-order partial differential equation for the r-independent ('zero-mode') component {Phi}(u, {phi}) at the E = 0 (f=1/2 ) anomaly. This equation is nonseparable in variables u and {phi}. Yet, we show that due to a hidden symmetry, it is integrable and we construct an exact solution for {Phi}(u, {phi}) explicitly in quadratures. Using this solution we computed moments I{sub m} = N< vertical bar {psi} vertical bar {sup 2m}> (m {>=} 1) for a chain of the length N {yields} {infinity} and found an essential difference between their m-behavior in the center-of-band anomaly and for energies outside this anomaly. Outside the anomaly the 'extrinsic' localization length defined from the Lyapunov exponent coincides with that defined from the inverse participation ratio ('intrinsic' localization length). This is not the case at the E = 0 anomaly where the extrinsic localization length is smaller than the intrinsic one. At E = 0 one also observes an anomalous enhancement of large moments compatible with existence of yet another, much smaller characteristic length scale.

  3. [Heart involvement in Anderson-Fabry disease: Italian recommendations for diagnostic, follow-up and therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Pieruzzi, Federico; Pieroni, Maurizio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Marziliano, Nicola; Morrone, Amelia; Cecchi, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations of the GLA gene that encodes alpha-galactosidase A. It is characterized by a multisystemic involvement: the renal, neurological, heart, cochleovestibular and cutaneous systems are the most damaged. Morbidity and mortality of Anderson-Fabry disease depend on renal insufficiency, heart failure and nervous system involvement. Left ventricular hypertrophy is the most common cardiac manifestation followed by conduction system disease, valve dysfunction, and arrhythmias. Mild to moderate left ventricular hypertrophy may simulate a non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Management of Anderson-Fabry disease starting from the diagnosis of cardiac involvement, the prevention of complications, the therapeutic aspects, up to appropriate clinical follow-up, requires a multidisciplinary approach. According to recent management guidelines, only few evidence-based data are available to guide the clinical and therapeutic approach to this rare disease. An Italian Board, composed by nephrologists, cardiologists, geneticists, pediatricians and neurologists has been established in order to approve by consensus a diagnostic and therapeutic management protocol. The authors report the results of this cardiologic management consensus. PMID:26571477

  4. This paper presents a hierarchical hybrid system modeling and simulation framework using the Ptolemy II environ-

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    the Ptolemy II environ- ment. Ptolemy II is a system-level design tool that supports the integration introduce Ptolemy II [5], a system-level design environment, and show how hybrid system simula- H H Q X U Y

  5. Career Ladder and Curriculum Guide. Entry Position: Code Enforcement Aide, Mid-Level Position: Code Enforcement Inspector I, Goal Position: Code Enforcement Inspector II; Entry Position: Zoning Inspector Aide, Mid-Level Position: Zoning Inspector I, Goal Position: Zoning Inspector II. Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC.

    This instructor's manual contains two independent "volumes," Career Ladder and Curriculum Guides to Code Positions and Zoning Positions. Each guide is structured representing the progression of required and/or suggested training needed to progress from entry to journeyman levels in the requisite occupational field. The training designs are…

  6. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2010-09-01

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  7. Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    James Barber

    2005-04-28

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  8. Evaluation of the MPN, Anderson-Baird-Parker, Petrifilm E. coli and Fluorocult ECD method for enumeration of Escherichia coli in foods of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Bredie, W L; de Boer, E

    1992-07-01

    Commercially available beta-D-glucuronidase (GUR) based methods, Petrifilm E. coli (PEC) and Fluorocult ECD (FECD), and ISO standard MPN and Anderson-Baird-Parker (ABP) procedures were evaluated for routine enumeration of E. coli in naturally contaminated foods of animal origin. The methods concerned were classifiable in a sequence of best qualities for: production, MPN > ABP = PEC = FECD; costs, FECD > ABP = PEC > MPN; time per measurement, ABP = PEC = FECD > MPN; practical use, PEC > FECD > ABP > MPN; detection at low contamination, MPN > ABP = PEC > FECD. The ABP and PEC method appeared useful for routine counting of E. coli in raw meat, poultry and meat products, whereas the MPN procedure turned out to be more sensitive, however, impractical and considerably more expensive. The FECD method was inexpensive although suitable for the enumeration of E. coli at higher contamination level (> 50 cfu/g). The indole and MUG indicators both applied to demonstrate E. coli with the ABP or FECD method proved to be equal in specificity. PMID:1445766

  9. Validation of the Lower-Risk MD Anderson Prognostic Scoring System for Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, Rami; Ramadan, Hanadi; Al Ali, Najla; Corrales-Yepez, Maria; Zhang, Ling; Padron, Eric; Lancet, Jeffrey; List, Alan

    2015-06-01

    The International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) is the most widely used tool for risk assessment and treatment decisions for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Several new models have been proposed to identify a subset of lower-risk patients with MDS who are experiencing inferior than expected outcomes. We validated the Lower-Risk MD Anderson Risk Model (LR-MDAS) in 1288 lower-risk patients with MDS by the IPSS. On the basis of the LR-MDAS, 228 patients (17%) were in category 1, 730 patients (57%) were in category 2, 315 patients (25%) were in category 3, and 15 patients (1%) were in an unknown category. The median overall survival for the corresponding LR-MDAS categories was (1) 109 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 82-137), (2) 56 months (95% CI, 58-73), and (3) 29 months (95% CI, 24-35) (P < .005). Overall, 25% of patients were upstaged to category 3. LR-MDAS refined prognostic value among very low-, low-, and intermediate-risk Revised IPSS. The rate of acute myeloid leukemia transformation according to LR-MDAS was 15%, 18%, and 29% for categories 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P < .005). Our data validate the prognostic value of the LR-MDAS model, but the utility of it as a treatment decision tool should be studied prospectively. PMID:26297280

  10. An inventory of wetlands in the East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    An inventory of wetlands within the floodplain of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee was conducted during October, 1991 through May, 1992 for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District. About 15 miles of EFPC channel and 500 acres of its floodplain are contaminated with mercury and other contaminants released from the Y-12 Plant on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. The wetland inventory will serve as baseline information for DOE`s remedial action planning and National Environmental Policy Act compliance efforts related to the contamination. In order to provide broad wetland determinations beyond which future wetland definitions are unlikely to expand, the 1989 Federal Manual for Identifying And Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands was utilized. Using the manual`s methodology in a contaminated system under the approved health and safety plan presented some unique problems, resulting in intrusive sampling for field indicators of hydric soils being accomplished separately from observation of other criteria. Beginning with wetland areas identified on National Wetland Inventory Maps, the entire floodplain was examined for presence of wetland criteria, and 17 wetlands were identified ranging from 0.01 to 2.81 acres in size. The majority of wetlands identified were sized under 1 acre. Some of the wetlands identified were not delineated on the National Wetland Inventory Maps, and much of the wetland area delineated on the maps did not meet the criteria under the 1989 manual.

  11. Anderson localization enhanced ferromagnetism in Zn0.95Co0.05O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snure, Michael; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2009-08-01

    We report an enhancement in the ferromagnetic characteristics of Zn0.95Co0.05O thin films due to the localization of charge carriers. Epitaxial thin films of Zn0.95-xCo0.05GaxO (x =0-0.05) were grown on single-crystal sapphire (0001) substrates by pulsed laser deposition technique. The role of charge carrier localization on the electrical and magnetic properties of ZnO:Co was studied by introducing Ga into the system. It was observed that Ga plays a significant role in affecting both the electrical transport mechanism as well as the magnetization of the material. Electrical resistivity of Zn0.95Co0.05O at room temperature was ˜96 m? cm and exhibited metal-like temperature dependence, although strongly influenced by electron-electron (e-e) interactions. Strong e-e interaction was understood to arise because of the randomness introduced in the crystal potential of ZnO by the cobalt dopants. As the Ga dopants are introduced, randomness in crystal potential and hence the disorder further increases resulting in the Anderson localization of the carriers. The increase in localization was accompanied by a significant enhancement in the magnetic moment from 0.75?B/Co in Zn0.95Co0.05O films to 1.6?B/Co in Zn0.90Co0.05Ga0.05O.

  12. Ultrastructural study of renal involvement in two females with Anderson-Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Tosoni, A; Nebuloni, M; Zerbi, P; Vago, L; Comotti, C; Sessa, A

    2005-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is a rare X-linked lipid storage disorder due to a deficient lysosomal a-galactosidase A (a-Gal) activity. In males with the classic form of the disease the enzymatic defect leads to progressive accumulation of glycosphingolipids (GL) in different organs, mainly in the kidney, heart, and brain, causing severe multisystem failure. AFD is usually mild in heterozygous females, but severe cerebrovascular, renal, and cardiac manifestations have been rarely described. The aim of this study is to describe renal involvement of mild symptomatic female carriers by ultrastructural analysis focusing to microvascular lesions, considered to be one of the major causes of systemic disease in AFD. Resin-embedded renal biopsies from 2 sisters with isolated mild proteinuria and belonging to a family group with AFD were observed by light and electron microscopy. In spite of the mild clinical symptoms, diffuse GL storages were demonstrated in all types of glomerular cells and in interstitial endothelial cells. Moreover, platelets were frequently observed in glomerular vassels, a feature coherent with a possible role of prothrombotic state, and platelet activation, in early glomerular lesions. PMID:16036875

  13. Magnetic Moments of Chromium-Doped Gold Clusters: The Anderson Impurity Model in Finite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, K.; Zamudio-Bayer, V.; Langenberg, A.; Niemeyer, M.; Langbehn, B.; Möller, T.; Terasaki, A.; Issendorff, B. v.; Lau, J. T.

    2015-02-01

    The magnetic moment of a single impurity atom in a finite free electron gas is studied in a combined x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy, charge transfer multiplet calculation, and density functional theory study of size-selected free chromium-doped gold clusters. The observed size dependence of the local magnetic moment can be understood as a transition from a local moment to a mixed valence regime. This shows that the Anderson impurity model essentially describes finite systems even though the discrete density of states introduces a significant deviation from a bulk metal, and the free electron gas is only formed by less than 10 electrons. Electronic shell closure in the gold host minimizes the interaction of localized impurity states with the confined free electron gas and preserves the magnetic moment of 5 ?B fully in CrAu2+ and almost fully in CrAu6+. Even for open-shell species, large local moments are observed that scale with the energy gap of the gold cluster. This indicates that an energy gap in the free electron gas stabilizes the local magnetic moment of the impurity atom.

  14. Advanced Anderson-Fabry disease presenting with left ventricular apical aneurysm and ventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Marie-France; Shah, Alap; Trohman, Richard G; Madias, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old female with Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD)-R342Q missense mutation on exon 7 in alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) gene - presented with sustained ventricular tachycardia. Imaging confirmed the presence of a new left ventricular apical aneurysm (LVAA) and a significantly reduced intra-cavitary gradient compared to two years prior. AFDcv is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by GLA enzyme deficiency. The phenotypic expression of AFD in the heart is not well described. Cardiac involvement can include left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), which is typically symmetric, but can also mimic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Left ventricular apical aneurysm is a rare finding in HCM. We suggest a shared mechanism of LVAA formation in AFD and HCM, independent of the underlying cardiomyopathy. Mechanisms of LVAA formation in HCM include genetic predisposition and long-standing left ventricular wall stress from elevated intra-cavitary systolic pressures due to mid-cavitary obstruction. Both mechanisms are supported in this patient (a brother with AFD also developed a small LVAA). Screening for AFD should be considered in cases of unexplained LVH, particularly in patients with the aneurysmal variant of HCM. PMID:26090373

  15. Phase diagram and reentrance for the 3D Edwards-Anderson model using information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, V.; Saravia, G.; Vogel, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Data compressor techniques are used to study the phase diagram of the generalized Edwards-Anderson model in three dimensions covering the full range of mixture between ferromagnetic (concentration 1-x) and antiferromagnetic interactions (concentration x). The recently proposed data compressor wlzip is used to recognize criticality by the maximum information content in the files storing the simulation processes. The method allows not only the characterization of the ferromagnetic to paramagnetic (FP) transition (x<0.22, or x>0.78) but also it equally well yields the spin-glass to paramagnetic (SP) transition (0.22

  16. ACCURATE RITZ WAVELENGTHS OF PARITY-FORBIDDEN [Co II] AND [V II] LINES OF ASTROPHYSICAL INTEREST

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffoni, M. P.; Pickering, J. C.

    2013-08-15

    We report a comprehensive list of accurate Ritz wavelengths for parity-forbidden [Co II] and [V II] lines obtained from the analysis of energy levels measured in the laboratory with Fourier transform emission spectroscopy. Such lines, particularly those in the infrared, are in demand for the analysis of low-density astrophysical plasmas in and around objects such as planetary nebulae, star-forming regions, and active galactic nuclei. Transitions between all known metastable levels of Co II and V II are included in our analysis, producing wavelengths for 1477 [V II] lines and 782 [Co II] lines. Of these, 170 [V II] lines and 171 [Co II] lines arise from transitions with calculated transition probabilities greater than 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} s{sup -1} and upper level excitations of less than 5 eV, and thus are likely to be observed in astrophysical spectra.

  17. Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions alter the dynamics and distribution of Mn(II) in cultured chick glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wedler, F.C.; Ley, B.W. )

    1990-12-01

    Previous studies revealed that Mn(II) is accumulated in cultured glial cells to concentrations far above those present in whole brain or in culture medium. The data indicated that Mn(II) moves across the plasma membrane into the cytoplasm by facilitated diffusion or counter-ion transport with Ca(II), then into mitochondria by active transport. The fact that 1-10 microM Mn(II) ions activate brain glutamine synthetase makes important the regulation of Mn(II) transport in the CNS. Since Cu(II) and Zn(II) caused significant changes in the accumulation of Mn(II) by glia, the mechanisms by which these ions alter the uptake and efflux of Mn(II) ions has been investigated systematically under chemically defined conditions. The kinetics of (54MN)-Mn(II) uptake and efflux were determined and compared under four different sets of conditions: no adducts, Cu(II) or Zn(II) added externally, and with cells preloaded with Cu(II) or Zn(II) in the presence and absence of external added metal ions. Zn(II) ions inhibit the initial velocity of Mn(II) uptake, increase total Mn(II) accumulated, but do not alter the rate or extent Mn(II) efflux. Cu(II) ions increase both the initial velocity and the net Mn(II) accumulated by glia, with little effect on rate or extent of Mn(II) efflux. These results predict that increases in Cu(II) or Zn(II) levels may also increase the steady-state levels of Mn(II) in the cytoplasmic fraction of glial cells, which may in turn alter the activity of Mn(II)-sensitive enzymes in this cell compartment.

  18. On Planetary Evolution and the Evolution of Planetary Science During the Career of Don Anderson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2003-12-01

    The planets of our solar system have long been viewed by Don Anderson as laboratories for testing general aspects of planetary evolution and as points of comparison to the Earth. I was fortunate to have been a student 39 years ago in a course at Caltech that Don taught with Bob Kovach on the interiors of the Earth and the planets. At that time, Mariner 4 had not yet flown by Mars, the lunar Ranger program was still in progress, and it was permissible to entertain the hypothesis that all of the terrestrial planets were identical in bulk composition. In the last four decades spacecraft have visited every planet from Mercury to Neptune; samples from the Moon, Mars, asteroids, and comets reside in our laboratories; and more than 100 planets have been discovered orbiting other stars. More importantly, traditionally distinct fields have merged to the point where planetary scientists must be conversant with the findings and modes of thinking from astronomy and biology as well as the geosciences. A few examples illustrate this confluence. Theoretical models for the structure of the atmospheres of gas-giant planets led to the first astronomical detection of an extrasolar planetary atmosphere for the transiting planet HD209458b. Although the atmospheric models were based on those for solar-system gas giants, the 3.5-day orbital period means that this planet is 100 times closer to its star than Jupiter is to the Sun, its effective temperature is 1100 K, and the detected signature of the planetary atmosphere was absorption by neutral sodium. Sodium in Mercury's exosphere, detected astronomically from Earth, figures into the question of how the terrestrial planets came to have distinct bulk compositions. Hypotheses to account for Mercury's high uncompressed density, and by inference its high ratio of metal to silicate, range from chemical gradients in the early solar nebula to preferential removal of silicates from a differentiated protoplanet by nebular heating or giant impact disruption, processes that would have affected the final composition of the other inner planets to lesser degrees. These hypotheses will be distinguishable by future remote sensing measurements from a spacecraft in Mercury orbit, but all lead to the prediction that volatile species such as sodium should be deficient in Mercury's silicate fraction. The most recent models for Mercury's exosphere are consistent with the idea that the required fresh supply of sodium from Mercury's surface is no greater than that predicted for meteorite infall. One of the leading questions driving the current exploration of Mars is whether the surface or subsurface was ever conducive to the origin and evolution of life. Sites of hydrothermal circulation within the crust may have provided the necessary energy and chemical building blocks. Remote sensing of candidate hydrothermal minerals at the Martian surface is the leading technique being used to seek such sites, but paleomagnetism may offer another route. Several hypotheses link hydrothermal activity to either the formation of magnetic carriers during the lifetime of the Martian dynamo or the alteration of such carriers after the dynamo ceased, leading to the possibility that high-resolution mapping of crustal magnetism may provide a prospecting tool for promising Martian biological habitats. As Don Anderson showed us by example throughout his career, students of the Earth need not confine their attention to a single planet or even a single planetary system. The lessons from diverse fields that planetary scientists must master to stay current will keep all of us --- like Don --- young and curious.

  19. Chronic renal failure, dialysis, and renal transplantation in Anderson-Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Adalberto; Meroni, Mietta; Battini, Graziana; Righetti, Marco; Mignani, Renzo

    2004-09-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFd) is a rare, inherited, x-linked disease characterized by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzymatic alpha-galactosidase A activity (alpha-Gal-A). The enzyme defect leads to progressive accumulation of glycosphingolipids (GL) in all kinds of cells, tissues, organs, and body fluids. The clinical manifestations are very protean, the residual activity of alpha-Gal-A and/or different gene mutations might explain different phenotypes, but as yet these concepts have not been proven. Usually, patients with AFd show 3 clinical phases, more evident in men than in heterozygous women. The first phase (childhood and adolescence) is characterized by myalgia, arthralgia, acroparesthesia, fever, cutaneous angiokeratomas, and corneal opacities. The second phase is characterized mainly by renal involvement. In the third phase, severe renal impairment and involvement of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular systems are present. The progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is common in hemizygous males (3rd-5th decade of life); usually, death occurs because of cerebral and/or cardiovascular complications in patients undergoing chronic dialysis therapies. The survival of patients with AFd in dialysis is better than in diabetic patients, but it clearly is decreased compared with uremic patients with other nephropathies, despite a lower mean age of uremia (50 versus 60 y). The outcome of kidney transplantation is similar to that found in other patients with ESRD, despite controversial issues published in the past. The use of a kidney donor with normal alpha-Gal-A activity in the control of the metabolic systemic disease is unproven. The recurrence of GL deposits in the kidney graft has been documented rarely. The definitive treatment for AFd is enzyme replacement therapy with purified alpha-Gal-A produced by a genetically engineered human cell line or Chinese hamster oocytes: relatively short-term studies have shown a significant treatment effect on clinical outcome measures. PMID:15490423

  20. A non-Monte Carlo approach to analyzing 1D Anderson localization in dispersive metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, Glen J.

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have long been used to study Anderson localization in models of one-dimensional random stacks. Because such simulations use substantial computational resources and because the randomness of random number generators for such simulations has been called into question, a non-Monte Carlo approach is of interest. This paper uses a non-Monte Carlo methodology, limited to discrete random variables, to determine the Lyapunov exponent, or its reciprocal, known as the localization length, for a one-dimensional random stack model, proposed by Asatryan, et al., consisting of various combinations of negative, imaginary and positive index materials that include the effects of dispersion and absorption, as well as off-axis incidence and polarization effects. Dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability are the two variables randomized in the models. In the paper, Furstenberg's integral formula is used to calculate the Lyapunov exponent of an infinite product of random matrices modeling the one-dimensional stack. The integral formula requires integration with respect to the probability distribution of the randomized layer parameters, as well as integration with respect to the so-called invariant probability measure of the direction of the vector propagated by the long chain of random matrices. The non-Monte Carlo approach uses a numerical procedure of Froyland and Aihara which calculates the invariant measure as the left eigenvector of a certain sparse row-stochastic matrix, thus avoiding the use of any random number generator. The results show excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo generated simulations which make use of continuous random variables, while frequently providing reductions in computation time.

  1. Non-equilibrium STLS approach to transport properties of single impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, Raheleh Ebrahimi, Farshad

    2014-04-15

    In this work, using the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we study the effects of the electron–electron interaction and the electron-spin correlation on the non-equilibrium Kondo effect and the transport properties of the symmetric single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) at zero temperature by generalizing the self-consistent method of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander (STLS) for a single-band tight-binding model with Hubbard type interaction to out of equilibrium steady-states. We at first determine in a self-consistent manner the non-equilibrium spin correlation function, the effective Hubbard interaction, and the double-occupancy at the impurity site. Then, using the non-equilibrium STLS spin polarization function in the non-equilibrium formalism of the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) of Yosida and Yamada, and Horvatic and Zlatic, we compute the spectral density, the current–voltage characteristics and the differential conductance as functions of the applied bias and the strength of on-site Hubbard interaction. We compare our spectral densities at zero bias with the results of numerical renormalization group (NRG) and depict the effects of the electron–electron interaction and electron-spin correlation at the impurity site on the aforementioned properties by comparing our numerical result with the order U{sup 2} IPT. Finally, we show that the obtained numerical results on the differential conductance have a quadratic universal scaling behavior and the resulting Kondo temperature shows an exponential behavior. -- Highlights: •We introduce for the first time the non-equilibrium method of STLS for Hubbard type models. •We determine the transport properties of SIAM using the non-equilibrium STLS method. •We compare our results with order-U2 IPT and NRG. •We show that non-equilibrium STLS, contrary to the GW and self-consistent RPA, produces the two Hubbard peaks in DOS. •We show that the method keeps the universal scaling behavior and correct exponential behavior of Kondo temperature.

  2. Disorder-induced trapping versus Anderson localization in Bose-Einstein condensates expanding in disordered potentials

    E-print Network

    Laurent Sanchez-Palencia; David Clément; Pierre Lugan; Philippe Bouyer; Alain Aspect

    2008-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the localization of an expanding Bose-Einstein condensate with repulsive atom-atom interactions in a disordered potential. We focus on the regime where the initial inter-atomic interactions dominate over the kinetic energy and the disorder. At equilibrium in a trapping potential and for small disorder, the condensate shows a Thomas-Fermi shape modified by the disorder. When the condensate is released from the trap, a strong suppression of the expansion is obtained in contrast to the situation in a periodic potential with similar characteristics. This effect crucially depends on both the momentum distribution of the expanding BEC and the strength of the disorder. For strong disorder, the suppression of the expansion results from the fragmentation of the core of the condensate and from classical reflections from large modulations of the disordered potential in the tails of the condensate. We identify the corresponding disorder-induced trapping scenario for which large atom-atom interactions and strong reflections from single modulations of the disordered potential play central roles. For weak disorder, the suppression of the expansion signals the onset of Anderson localization, which is due to multiple scattering from the modulations of the disordered potential. We compute analytically the localized density profile of the condensate and show that the localization crucially depends on the correlation function of the disorder. In particular, for speckle potentials the long-range correlations induce an effective mobility edge in 1D finite systems. Numerical calculations performed in the mean-field approximation support our analysis for both strong and weak disorder.

  3. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; Cox, James; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John

    2003-08-26

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week.

  4. Welding II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding II, a performance-based course offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to introduce students to out-of-position shielded arc welding with emphasis on proper heats, electrode selection, and alternating/direct currents. After introductory…

  5. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-09-05

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  6. Fugu II

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-11-19

    Broadcast Transcript: Fugu Part II: In the last Postcard, we talked about fugu, the poisonous poisson that has been a favorite in Japan for centuries. Well, it seems that a fish farm has recently raised fugu that are poison-free. A non-toxic fugu...

  7. An Archaeological Survey for the Dogwood Springs Water Supply Corporation Water System Improvements Project in Anderson County, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Moore, William

    2015-07-29

    to the Northwest). According to the soil survey for Anderson County (Coffee 1975), the project area is located within soils of the Darco Association. The soils in the project area are described by Coffee (1975:Sheet 19) as Darco fine sand (DaD), 1 to 8... percent slopes (Coffee 1975:12). This is a gently sloping to sloping soil that occurs on the uplands in areas from ten acres to several hundred acres in size. A typical profile is fine sand from the surface to 49 inches. Below that is a sandy clay...

  8. Valence fluctuations and electric reconstruction in the extended Anderson model on the two-dimensional Penrose lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Shinichi; Takemori, Nayuta; Koga, Akihisa

    2015-04-01

    We study the extended Anderson model on the two-dimensional Penrose lattice, combining the real-space dynamical mean-field theory with the noncrossing approximation. It is found that the Coulomb repulsion between localized and conduction electrons does not induce a valence transition, but the crossover between the Kondo and mixed valence states is in contrast to the conventional periodic system. In the mixed-valence region close to the crossover, nontrivial valence distributions appear, characteristic of the Penrose lattice, demonstrating that the mixed-valence state coexists with local Kondo states in certain sites. The electric reconstruction in the mixed valence region is also addressed.

  9. Ferromagnetic ordering in Mn-doped quantum wells GaAs-AlGaAs resulting from the virtual Anderson transition

    SciTech Connect

    Agrinskaya, N. V.; Berezovets, V. A.; Bouravlev, A.; Kozub, V. I.

    2014-08-20

    We present our results obtained for Mn-doped GaAs quantum wells where the evidences of the ferromagnetic transition at relatively high temperatures were found at unusually small Mn concentrations. The observed values of hopping resistance at small temperatures evidenced that the samples are deep in the insulating regime. Thus the corresponding estimates of the overlapping integrals can hardly explain the large values of Curie temperatures T{sub c} ? 100 K. We develop a theoretical model qualitatively explaining the experimental results basing on the concept of virtual Anderson transition.

  10. Carl J. Rothfels*, Michael A. Sundue*, Li-Yaung Kuo, Anders Larsson, Masahiro Kato, Eric Schuettpelz & Kathleen M. Pryer. A revised family-level classification for eupolypod II ferns (Polypodiidae: Polypodiales). Taxon.

    E-print Network

    Molofsky, Jane

    for eupolypod II ferns (Polypodiidae: Polypodiales). Taxon. (*equally contributing). Sundue, a new genus of grammitid fern segregated from Terpsichore (Polypodiaceae). Systematic. Cryptochlorophyllous Spores in Ferns: Nongreen Spores that Contain Chlorophyll. International

  11. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  12. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  13. BORE II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore »upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  14. NPDES Phase II Compliance &

    E-print Network

    Radcliffe, David

    NPDES Phase II Compliance & Illicit Discharge Ordinances Benjamin Corson-Knowles Fall 2005 #12;The-0612 jroskie@uga.edu #12;NPDES Phase II Compliance & Illicit Discharge Ordinances Author: Benjamin Corson..................................................................................2 II. Background of the Phase II Rule

  15. Tris-functionalized hybrid Anderson polyoxometalates: synthesis, characterization, hydrolytic stability and inversion of protein surface charge.

    PubMed

    Blazevic, Amir; Al-Sayed, Emir; Roller, Alexander; Giester, Gerald; Rompel, Annette

    2015-03-16

    Single- and double-sided functionalized hybrid organic-inorganic Anderson polyoxomolybdates with Ga(III) and Fe(III) positioned as central heteroatoms have been synthesized in a mild, two-step synthesis in an aqueous medium. Compounds 1-4 were isolated as hydrated salts, [TBA]3[GaMo6O18(OH)3{(OCH2)3CCH2OH}]×12?H2O (1) (TBA = tetrabutylammonium), Na3[FeMo6O18{(OCH2)3CCH2OH}2]×11?H2O (2), [TMA]2[GaMo6O18(OH)3{(OCH2)3CNH3}]×7?H2O (3) (TMA = tetramethylammonium), and Na[TMA]2[FeMo6O18(OH)3{(OCH2)3CNH3}](OH)×6?H2O (4). All the compounds were characterized based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD), FTIR, UV/Vis, thermogravimetric, ESI-MS, NMR, and elemental analyses. Compound 1 was also crystallized with two smaller organic cations, giving [TMA]3[GaMo6O18(OH)3{(OCH2)3CCH2OH}]×n?H2O (5) and [GDM]3[GaMo6O18(OH)3{(OCH2)3CCH2OH}]×n?H2O (6) (GDM = guanidinium) and were characterized based on UV/Vis, NMR, FTIR, and elemental analyses. The use of these compounds as additives in macromolecular crystallography was investigated by examining their hydrolytic stability by using ESI-MS in a pH range of 4 to 9. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed that BSA remains intact in a solution containing up to 100?equivalents of 1 or 4 over more than four days at 20?°C. Zeta potential measurements demonstrate that 1-4 induce charge inversions on the positively charged surface of BSA (1?mg?mL(-1)) with concentrations starting as low as 1.29?mM for compounds 1 and 2, which have the highest negative surface charge. PMID:25677371

  16. The magnetocaloric effect with critical behavior of a periodic Anderson-like organic polymer.

    PubMed

    Ding, L J; Zhong, Y; Fan, S W; Zhu, L Y

    2016-01-01

    We study the magnetocaloric effect and the critical behavior of a periodic Anderson-like organic polymer using Green's function theory, in which the localized f orbitals hybridize with the conduction orbitals at even sites. The field-induced metal-insulator transitions with the magnetic Grüneisen parameter showing |?h|?T(-1) power-law critical behaviour are revealed, which provides a new thermodynamic means for probing quantum phase transitions. It is found that the competition of up-spin and down-spin hole excitations is responsible for the double peak structure of magnetic entropy change (-?S) for the dominant Kondo coupling case, implying a double magnetic cooling process via demagnetization, which follows a power law dependence of the magnetic field h: -?S?h(n). The local exponent n tends to 1 and 2 below and above TC, while has a minimum of 0.648 at TC, which is in accordance with the experimental observation of perovskite manganites Pr0.55Sr0.45MnO3 and Nd0.55Sr0.45MnO3 (J. Y. Fan et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 2011, 98, 072508; Europhys. Lett., 2015, 112, 17005) corresponding to the conventional ferromagnets within the mean field theory -?S?h(2/3). At TC, the -?S?h curves with a convex curvature superpose each other for small V values, which are separated by the large V case, distinguishing the RKKY interaction and Kondo coupling explicitly. Furthermore, the critical scaling law n(TC) = 1 + (?- 1)/(? + ?) = 1 + 1/?(1 - 1/?) is related to the critical exponents (?, ?, and ?) extracted from the Arrott-Noakes equation of state and the Kouvel-Fisher method, which fulfill the Widom scaling relation ? = 1 + ??(-1), indicating the self-consistency and reliability of the obtained results. In addition, based on the scaling hypothesis through checking the scaling analysis of magnetization, the M-T-h curves collapse into two independent universal branches below and above TC. PMID:26617276

  17. Development of the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Gynecologic Applicators for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Historical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yordy, John S.; Almond, Peter R.; Delclos, Luis

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To provide historical background on the development and initial studies of the gynecological (gyn) applicators developed by Dr. Gilbert H. Fletcher, a radiation oncologist and chairperson from 1948 to 1981 of the department at the M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) for Cancer Research in Houston, TX, and to acknowledge the previously unrecognized contribution that Dr. Leonard G. Grimmett, a radiation physicist and chairperson from 1949 to 1951 of the physics department at MDAH, made to the development of the gynecological applicators. Methods and Materials: We reviewed archival materials from the Historical Resource Center and from the Department of Radiation Physics at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, as well as contemporary published papers, to trace the history of the applicators. Conclusions: Dr. Fletcher's work was influenced by the work on gynecologic applicators in the 1940s in Europe, especially work done at the Royal Cancer Hospital in London. Those efforts influenced not only Dr. Fletcher's approach to the design of the applicators but also the methods used to perform in vivo measurements and determine the dose distribution. Much of the initial development of the dosimetry techniques and measurements at MDAH were carried out by Dr. Grimmett.

  18. Preliminary report on coal resources of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Margaret S.; Gunther, Gregory L.; Flores, Romeo M.; Ochs, Allen M.; Stricker, Gary D.; Roberts, Steven B.; Taber, Thomas T.; Bader, Lisa R.; Schuenemeyer, John H.

    1998-01-01

    The National Coal Resource Assessment (NCRA) project by the U.S. Geological Survey is designed to assess US coal with the greatest potential for development in the next 20 to 30 years. Coal in the Wyodak-Anderson (WA) coal zone in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana is plentiful, clean, and compliant with EPA emissions standards. This coal is considered to be very desirable for development for use in electric power generation. The purpose of this NCRA study was to compile all available data relating to the Wyodak- Anderson coal, correlate the beds that make up the WA coal zone, create digital files pertaining to the study area and the WA coal, and produce a variety of reports on various aspects of the assessed coal unit. This report contains preliminary calculations of coal resources for the WA coal zone and is one of many products of the NCRA study. Coal resource calculations in this report were produced using both public and confidential data from many sources. The data was manipulated using a variety of commercially available software programs and several custom programs. A general description of the steps involved in producing the resource calculations is described in this report.

  19. Nailing the coffin shut on doubts that violent video games stimulate aggression: comment on Anderson et al. (2010).

    PubMed

    Huesmann, L Rowell

    2010-03-01

    Over the past half century the mass media, including video games, have become important socializers of children. Observational learning theory has evolved into social-cognitive information processing models that explain that what a child observes in any venue has both short-term and long-term influences on the child's behaviors and cognitions. C. A. Anderson et al.'s (2010) extensive meta-analysis of the effects of violent video games confirms what these theories predict and what prior research about other violent mass media has found: that violent video games stimulate aggression in the players in the short run and increase the risk for aggressive behaviors by the players later in life. The effects occur for males and females and for children growing up in Eastern or Western cultures. The effects are strongest for the best studies. Contrary to some critics' assertions, the meta-analysis of C. A. Anderson et al. is methodologically sound and comprehensive. Yet the results of meta-analyses are unlikely to change the critics' views or the public's perception that the issue is undecided because some studies have yielded null effects, because many people are concerned that the implications of the research threaten freedom of expression, and because many people have their identities or self-interests closely tied to violent video games. PMID:20192555

  20. APOLLO II

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Mondot, J.; Stankovski, Z.; Cossic, A.; Zmijarevic, I.

    1988-11-01

    APOLLO II is a new, multigroup transport code under development at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The code has a modular structure and uses sophisticated software for data structuralization, dynamic memory management, data storage, and user macrolanguage. This paper gives an overview of the main methods used in the code for (a) multidimensional collision probability calculations, (b) leakage calculations, and (c) homogenization procedures. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the potential of the modular structure of the code and the novel multilevel flat-flux representation used in the calculation of the collision probabilities.

  1. Optical conductivity of a metal-insulator transition for the Anderson-Hubbard model in three dimensions away from half filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Gooding, R. J.

    2009-09-01

    The Anderson-Hubbard model is considered to be the least complicated model using lattice fermions with which one can hope to study the physics of transition-metal oxides with spatial disorder. We have completed a numerical investigation of this model for three-dimensional simple-cubic lattices using a real-space self-consistent Hartree-Fock decoupling approximation for the Hubbard interaction. In this formulation we treat the spatial disorder exactly and therefore we account for effects arising from localization physics. We have examined the model for electronic densities well away from 1/2 filling thereby avoiding the physics of a Mott insulator. Several recent studies have made clear that the combined effects of electronic interactions and spatial disorder can give rise to a suppression of the electronic density of states and a subsequent metal-insulator transition can occur. We supplement such studies by calculating the ac conductivity for such systems. Our numerical results show that weak interactions enhance the density of states at the Fermi level and the low-frequency conductivity, there are no local magnetic moments, and the ac conductivity is Drude like. However, with a large enough disorder strength and larger interactions the density of states at the Fermi level and the low-frequency conductivity are both suppressed, the conductivity becomes non-Drude like, and these phenomena are accompanied by the presence of local magnetic moments. The low-frequency conductivity changes from a ?-?dc˜?1/2 behavior in the metallic phase, to a ?˜?2 behavior in the nonmetallic regime. For intermediate disorder at 1/4 electronic filling, a metal-to-insulator transition is predicted to take place at a critical U/B?0.75 ( U being the Hubbard interaction strength and B the electronic band width). Our numerical results show that the formation of magnetic moments is essential to the suppression of the density of states at the Fermi level and therefore essential to the metal-insulator transition. At weaker disorder a small lessening of the density of states at the Fermi level occurs but screening suppresses the spatial disorder and with increasing interactions no metal-insulator transition is found.

  2. Simultaneous Separation and Preconcentration of Trace Amounts of Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with Modified Nanoporous Pumpellyite Zeolite.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Sayed Zia; Shamspur, Tayebeh; Shahsavani, Elham; Fozooni, Samieh

    2015-01-01

    A procedure for determination of trace levels of Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), and Cd(II) by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a preconcentration system has been proposed. In this system, we used modified nanoporous pumpellyite zeolite loaded with 2-phenyl-4-[1-(2-thienyl) methylidene]-5-oxazolone as a sorbent for extracting Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), and Cd(II) ions from real samples. Several parameters such as pH of the sample solution, amount of nanoporous pumpellyite zeolite, amount of ligand, volumes of sample and eluent, type of eluent, flow rates of sample and eluent, and the effects of diverse ions on the preconcentration were investigated. The LODs for Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), and Cd(II) in the original solution were 2.6, 1.3, 3.2, and 1.1 ng/mL, respectively. The preconcentration factor was 250 for Zn and Ni, 100 for Cd, and 125 for Cu. The developed method was applied to the determination of trace metal ions in certified reference material tea leaves and water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26086263

  3. Enhancement of thermal transport in the degenerate periodic Anderson model V. Zlati,1,2 R. Monnier,3 and J. K. Freericks4

    E-print Network

    Freericks, Jim

    indicate that the renormalization of the thermal conductivity and of the Seebeck coefficient can lead-temperature Seebeck coefficient T and the specific-heat coefficient =CV/T. In many of these systems, the dimensionless July 2008 The low-temperature transport coefficients of the degenerate periodic SU N Anderson model

  4. Dual hidden landscapes in Anderson localization on discrete lattices Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceio, AL, Brazil

    E-print Network

    Mayboroda, Svitlana

    Dual hidden landscapes in Anderson localization on discrete lattices M.L.Lyra Instituto de F in continuous disordered media have been recently demon- strated to be governed by a hidden landscape localization confinement is determined by this landscape, and continuously decreases as the energy increases

  5. All Stem Cell Publications by CIRM-CSULB Interns Anderson AJ, Haus DL, Hooshmand MJ, Perez H, Sontag CJ, Cummings BJ. 2011. Achieving

    E-print Network

    Manley, Steven L.

    All Stem Cell Publications by CIRM-CSULB Interns Anderson AJ, Haus DL stem/progenitor cells. Leukemia 27:1469-1478. PMID: 23307033 Gold EM, Su D-labeled human neural stem cells: studies leading to clinical use. Stem Cells Transl Med

  6. All Stem Cell Publications by CIRM-CSULB Interns Anderson AJ, Haus DL, Hooshmand MJ, Perez H, Sontag CJ, Cummings BJ. 2011. Achieving

    E-print Network

    Manley, Steven L.

    All Stem Cell Publications by CIRM-CSULB Interns Anderson AJ, Haus DL, Hooshmand MJ, Perez H, Sontag CJ, Cummings BJ. 2011. Achieving stable human stem cell engraftment and survival in the CNS-activating beta-catenin, ERK, Akt and Notch1 and promoting the growth of human leukemia stem/progenitor cells

  7. Valvano, Nho and Anderson May 7, 1999 Page 1 Analysis of the Weinbaum-Jiji Model of Blood Flow in the Canine Kidney

    E-print Network

    in the Canine Kidney Cortex for Self-Heated Thermistors Jonathan W. Valvano*, Sungwoo Nho* and Gary T. Anderson thermistors are placed in the kidney cortex. In this paper, the Weinbaum-Jiji bioheat equation is used to analyze the steady state response of four different sized self-heated thermistors in the canine kidney

  8. professor: John Long, x7305; email: jolong office: Olmsted 317 required text: Hill, Wyse, Anderson (HWA, below), Animal Physiology, 2004, Sinauer.

    E-print Network

    Long Jr., John H.

    , Anderson (HWA, below), Animal Physiology, 2004, Sinauer. · lecture TR: 9:00 - 10:15 a.m., OH 201; · lab T T Flight: migration & navigation HWA, Ch 16 Flight III: Field Measurements 22 R Locomotion: integrated Symposium 8 R Extreme Phyisology: Desert Adapations HWA, Ch 28 Animal Physiology Biology 228, Fall, 2005

  9. Specific heat of a localized magnetic impurity in a non-magnetic host: A spectral density method for the Anderson-Holstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Ch. Narasimha; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-10-01

    The effect of electron-phonon interaction on the spectral function of a magnetic impurity in a non-magnetic host metal is studied within the framework of the Anderson-Holstein model using a spectral density method. The impurity contribution to the specific heat of the host metal is also calculated.

  10. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-152. 1995. 395 Anderson, Daniel W.; Jehl, Joseph R., Jr.; Risebrough, R.W.; Woods,

    E-print Network

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-152. 1995. 395 Anderson, Daniel W.; Jehl, Joseph R., Jr. 1979. The adaptive significance of the reproductive pattern in the Black Guillemot Cepphus grylle. The Black Noddy Anous tenuirostris on Ascension Island. Part 1. Ibis 103b:235-273. Ashmole, N.P. 1971. Avian

  11. The impacts of `run-of-river' hydropower on the physical and ecological condition of rivers Anderson et al, 2014 (Water and Environment Journal)

    E-print Network

    Hinch, Scott G.

    The impacts of `run-of-river' hydropower on the physical and ecological condition of rivers Anderson et al, 2014 (Water and Environment Journal) OF HYDROPOWER AND STREAMS A tale of run-of-river hydropower facilities and their possible impacts on fish populations #12;2 #12;3 IPCC, 2014 #12;4 From left

  12. A Web Tool for Age-Period-Cohort Analysis - William Anderson, M.D., M.P.H., Philip Rosenberg, Ph.D., David Check, B.S.

    Cancer.gov

    March 06, 2014 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM Shady Grove, Room TE406 + Add to Outlook Calendar Speakers William Anderson, M.D., M.P.H., Senior Investigator, Biostatistics Branch Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG), National Cancer Institute (NCI) Philip

  13. Mechanisms contributing to angiotensin II regulation of body weight.

    PubMed

    Cassis, L A; Marshall, D E; Fettinger, M J; Rosenbluth, B; Lodder, R A

    1998-05-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have implicated adipose tissue as a potential site for local angiotensin II (ANG II) synthesis. However, functions of ANG II in adipose tissue and the impact of ANG II on body weight regulation are not well defined. To study the effect of ANG II on body weight, a chronic ANG II infusion model was used. In study 1, a low dose of ANG II (175 ng.kg-1.min-1) was infused into rats for 14 days. Plasma ANG II levels were not elevated after 14 days of infusion. ANG II-infused rats did not gain weight over the 14-day protocol and exhibited a lower body weight than controls on day 8. Food intake was not altered, but water intake was increased in ANG II-infused rats. Blood pressure gradually increased to significantly elevated levels by day 14. Thermal infrared imaging demonstrated an increase in abdominal surface temperature. Measurement of organ mass demonstrated site-specific reductions in white adipose tissue mass after ANG II infusion. In study 2, the dose-response relationship for ANG II infusion (200, 350, and 500 ng.kg-1.min-1) was determined. Body weight (decrease), blood pressure (increase), white adipose mass (decrease), plasma ANG II levels (increase), and plasma leptin levels (decrease) were altered in a dose-related manner after ANG II infusion. In study 3, the effect of ANG II infusion (350 ng.kg-1.min-1) was examined in rats treated with the vasodilator hydralazine. Hydralazine treatment normalized blood pressure in ANG II-infused rats. The effect of ANG II to decrease body weight was augmented in hydralazine-treated rats. These results demonstrate that low levels of ANG II infusion regulate body weight through mechanisms related to increased peripheral metabolism and independent of elevations in blood pressure. PMID:9612245

  14. [Neonatal mucolipidosis type II].

    PubMed

    Hmami, F; Oulmaati, A; Bouharrou, A

    2016-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type II (ML II, OMIM 252,500) is an autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by facial dysmorphia similar to Hurler syndrome and pronounced gingival hypertrophy. The disorder is caused by a defect in targeting acid hydrolases on the surface of lysosomes, which impede their entry and lead to accumulation of undigested substrates in lysosomes. The onset of the symptoms is usually in infancy, beginning in the 6th month of life. Early onset, at birth or even in utero, is a sign of severity and involves the specific dysmorphia as well as skeletal dysplasia related to hyperparathyroidism. We report on a severe neonatal form of this disorder revealed by respiratory distress with severe chest deformity. The dysmorphic syndrome, combining coarse features, pronounced gingival hypertrophy, with diffuse bone demineralization and secondary hyperparathyroidism associating significant elevation of parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase with normal levels of vitamin D and calcium were characteristics of mucolipidosis type II. Recognizing this specific association of anomalies helps eliminate the differential diagnosis and establish appropriate diagnosis and care. PMID:26552632

  15. Paleontological analysis of a lacustrine carbonaceous uranium deposit at the Anderson mine, Date Creek basin, west-central Arizona (U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, J.K.; Bradbury, J.P.; Forester, R.M.; Hanley, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Tertiary sedimentary sequence of the Date Creek basin area of Arizona is composed principally of intertonguing alluvial-fan and lacustrine deposits. The lacustrine rocks contain large intermediate- to, locally, high-grade uranium deposits that form one of the largest uranium resources in the United States (an estimated 670,000 tons of U3O8 at an average grade of 0.023% is indicated by drilling to date). At the Anderson mine, about 50,000 tons of U3O8 occurs in lacustrine carbonaceous siltstones and mudstones (using a cutoff grade of 0.01%). The Anderson mine constitutes a new class of ore deposit, a lacustrine carbonaceous uranium deposit. Floral and faunal remains at the Anderson mine played a critical role in creating and documenting conditions necessary for uranium mineralization. Organic-rich, uraniferous rocks at the Anderson mine contain plant remains and ostracodes having remarkably detailed preservation of internal features because of infilling by opaline silica. This preservation suggests that the alkaline lake waters in the mine area contained high concentrations of dissolved silica and that silicification occurred rapidly, before compaction or cementation of the enclosing sediment. Uranium coprecipitated with the silica. Thinly laminated, dark-colored, siliceous beds contain centric diatoms preserved with carbonaceous material suggesting that lake waters at the mine were locally deep and anoxic. These alkaline, silica-charged waters and a stagnant, anoxic environment in parts of the lake were necessary conditions for the precipitation of large amounts of uranium in the lake-bottom sediments. Sediments at the Anderson mine contain plant remains and pollen that were derived from diverse vegetative zones suggesting about 1500 m of relief in the area at the time of deposition. The pollen suggests that the valley floor was semiarid and subtropical, whereas nearby mountains supported temperate deciduous forests. ?? 1990.

  16. Preliminary report on methodology for calculating coal resources of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Margaret S.; Gunther, Gregory L.; Flores, Romeo M.; Stricker, Gary D.; Ochs, Allan M.; Schuenemeyer, John H.

    1998-01-01

    The National Coal Resource Assessment of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone includes reports on the geology, stratigraphy, quality, and quantity of coal. The calculation of resources is only one aspect of the assessment. Without thorough documentation of the coal resource study and the methods used, the results of our study could be misinterpreted. The task of calculating coal resources included many steps, the use of several commercial software programs, and the incorporation of custom programs. The methods used for calculating coal resources for the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone vary slightly from the methods used in other study areas, and by other workers in the National Coal Resource Assessment. The Wyodak-Anderson coal zone includes up to 10 coal beds in any given location. The net coal thickness of the zone at each data point location was calculated by summing the thickness of all of the coal beds that were greater than 2.5 ft thick. The amount of interburden is not addressed or reported in this coal resource assessment. The amount of overburden reported is the amount of rock above the stratigraphically highest coal bed in the zone. The resource numbers reported do not include coal within mine or lease areas, in areas containing mapped Wyodak-Anderson clinker, or in areas where the coal is extrapolated to be less than 2.5 ft thick. The resources of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone are reported in Ellis and others (1998). A general description of how the resources were calculated is included in that report. The purpose of this report is to document in more detail some of the parameters and methods used, define our spatial data, compare resources calculated using different grid options and calculation methods, and explain the application of confidence limits to the resource calculation.

  17. Case 22:Type II diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. It is composed of two types depending on the pathogenesis. Type I diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency and usually has its onset during childhood or teenage years. This is also called ketosis-prone diabetes. Type II diab...

  18. Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 1986. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session. August 5, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The committee recommends several amendments to H.R. 3653, a bill designed to improve nuclear insurance procedures. Among the amendments are the inclusion of storage, handling, transportation, treatment, or disposal of, or research and development on and changes dealing with reimbursement procedures and limits. The bill reauthorizes the Price-Anderson Act, but limits liability and creates industry-wide liability in the event of a major accident. The report covers background information and hearings, summarizes the 15 amendments and each section how the bill will effect relevant changes in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. Dissenting views argue against setting a liability cap on nuclear waste accidents because it discourages safety consciousness on the part of contractors and because there is no precedent in liability insurance for limiting liability.

  19. Review of immune-related adverse events in prostate cancer patients treated with ipilimumab: MD Anderson experience.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; He, Q; Subudhi, S; Aparicio, A; Zurita-Saavedra, A; Lee, D H; Jimenez, C; Suarez-Almazor, M; Sharma, P

    2015-10-01

    Targeting a T-cell inhibitory checkpoint with the anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody, ipilimumab, represents a scientific breakthrough in immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. However, ipilimumab therapy is also associated with unique side effects, known as immune-related adverse events (irAEs), which need to be recognized and managed with immunosuppressive agents. To date, the majority of our knowledge regarding ipilimumab-associated side effects is based upon clinical studies in melanoma. Here we provide a review of ipilimumab-induced irAEs and our experience in a cohort of 44 patients with prostate cancer who were treated at the MD Anderson Cancer Center on two different clinical trial protocols. PMID:25659583

  20. Physical analysis of the through-ligand long-distance magnetic coupling: spin-polarization versus Anderson mechanism.

    PubMed

    Terencio, T; Bastardis, R; Suaud, N; Maynau, D; Bonvoisin, J; Malrieu, J P; Calzado, C J; Guihéry, N

    2011-07-14

    The physical factors governing the magnetic coupling between two magnetic sites are analyzed and quantified as functions of the length of the bridging conjugated ligand. Using wave-function-theory based ab initio calculations, it has been possible to separate and calculate the various contributions to the magnetic coupling, i.e. the direct exchange, the spin polarization and the kinetic exchange. It is shown in model systems that while the Anderson mechanism brings the leading contribution for short-length ligands, the spin polarization dominates the through-long-ligand couplings. Since the spin polarization decreases more slowly than the kinetic exchange, highly spin polarizable bridging ligands would generate a good magneto-communication between interacting magnetic units. PMID:21647490

  1. Effet de l'interaction coulombienne sur la localisation d'Anderson dans le gaz bidimensionnel d'électrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, G.

    2010-09-01

    Nous étudions l’effet des interactions coulombiennes sur la localisation d’Anderson dans le gaz bidimensionnel d’électrons désordonné. L’objectif est de statuer sur la question de l’existence de métaux à deux dimensions. En l’absence d’interaction, la théorie d’échelle de la localisation prédit qu’un désordre infinitésimal suffit à localiser la fonction d’onde électronique et donc à rendre le système isolant à température nulle (Abrahams et al., 1979). Dans certaines limites extrêmes, les interactions peuvent être prises en compte et l’on aboutit également à un état isolant. Cependant, aucune théorie analytique ne permet de traiter le régime quantique non-perturbatif où désordre et interaction sont intermédiaires. Expérimentalement, il est possible de l’explorer dans des échantillons de haute mobilité et basse densité. Depuis 1994, des comportements métalliques inexpliqués y ont été observés (Kravchenko et al., 1994). Nous avons mis au point une méthode numérique permettant d’étudier le problème couplé de la localisation d’Anderson en présence d’interaction. Cette méthode mêle Monte Carlo quantique à température nulle et théorie d’échelle pour la conductance de Thouless. Nous trouvons que la théorie d’échelle de la localisation est préservée en présence d’interaction et donc que le gaz bidimensionnel, même corrélé, est isolant à température nulle. Nos résultats montrent de plus que les interactions délocalisent le gaz bidimensionnel et que cet effet de délocalisation est accru en présence de dégénérescence de vallées. Ils nous permettent de proposer un mécanisme simple rendant compte des principales caractéristiques des comportements métalliques observés expérimentalement.

  2. Triglyceride level

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may also cause swelling of your pancreas (called pancreatitis). The triglyceride level is usually included in a ... lower triglyceride levels may be used to prevent pancreatitis for levels above 500 mg/dL Low triglyceride ...

  3. TID Tests of the TileCal Optical Interface Board K. Anderson, J. Pilcher

    E-print Network

    to a total ionizing dose 50% larger than the required one. #12;- 2 - Components Irradiated Part Number barrels are similar or smaller. Radiation Type Simulated Level Safety Factors Required Level Simuln. Low Dose Rate Lot Varn. Total Total Ionizing Dose (TID) 0.023 Krad 3.5 5 4 70 1.6 Krad Non-ionizing energy

  4. Validating Safety Models with Fault Trees Glenn Bruns and Stuart Anderson

    E-print Network

    Bruns, Glenn

    an example. 2 Example To make discussion of the problem more concrete, we present a simple boiler system example (see Figure 2). Pump Sensor 1 Sensor 2 Control System Boiler sensor 2 reading water level water level sensor 1 reading pump input signal water Fig. 2. A Simple Boiler System Steam is produced by water

  5. THE EFFECTS OF METHIONINE DEFICIENCIES ON PLASMA LEVELS OF THYROID HORMONES, INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTORS I AND II, LIVER AND BODY WEIGHTS, AND FEED INTAKE IN GROWING CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A deficiency of methionine (Met) at 0.25% of the diet, or 50% of the National Research Council's recommended level, has been reported to cause elevations in plasma triiodothyronine (T3) in growing broiler chickens. In the present study, plasma levels of thyroid hormones as well as insulin-like grow...

  6. The endocrine control of reproduction and molt in male and female emperor (Aptenodytes forsteri) and adelie (Pygoscelis adeliae) penguins. II. Annual changes in plasma levels of thyroxine and triiodothyronine.

    PubMed

    Groscolas, R; Leloup, J

    1986-08-01

    Changes in plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels were studied during a breeding season and in more detail during the postbreeding molt in male and female emperor (Aptenodytes forsteri) and adelie (Pygoscelis adeliae) penguins under natural conditions in the Antarctic. During the 4-month natural fast that accompanies courtship and incubation in male emperors, plasma T4 and T3 levels were maintained around 11 and 0.6 ng/ml, respectively. In courting, fasting female emperors plasma T4 levels were maintained around 10 ng/ml for more than 1 month; plasma T3 levels were around 0.8 ng/ml but were markedly depressed (0.1 ng/ml) at the time of copulation although they increased again (2.2 ng/ml) at oviposition. During the 5-month period of chick rearing, plasma T3 (males and females) and T4 (females) were maintained at the same levels as during courtship and incubation, but plasma T4 levels in male emperors were slightly lower (7 ng/ml). Similar plasma T4 and T3 levels were observed in breeding adelie penguins. These results do not provide any convincing evidence for thyroid-gonadal interrelations in breeding penguins, but demonstrate their capacity to maintain plasma thyroid hormone levels during very prolonged natural fasts. During the heavy postnuptial molt when the birds were fasting, in both species and sexes, marked but separate peaks in plasma T4 and T3 levels occurred concurrently with the initial growth of the new feathers, and with the subsequent shedding of the old plumage, respectively. Peak plasma T4 levels were observed at the time of the emergence of the new feathers out of the skin, and peak plasma T3 levels were roughly concurrent with the maximum daily body weight loss. This is the first strong evidence that increases in plasma T4 and T3 levels are correlated with different stages of molt in a wild seabird. Increased plasma T4 but not T3 levels at the time of feather papilla eruption suggest that T4 is concerned with feather growth, but is not exclusive of a role of T3. Increased plasma T3 but not T4 levels during the reduction in thermal insulation in molting penguins suggest that this hormone rather than T4 might be active in energy metabolism in penguins. PMID:3781233

  7. A Logical Approach to Data Fusion # Glenn Bruns and Stuart Anderson

    E-print Network

    Bruns, Glenn

    into account. The goal of data fusion is to use sensor data to detect sensor failures and to provide good#, and exits the vessel as steam. The boiler is instrumented with a level sensor, a steaming rate sensor

  8. A Logical Approach to Data Fusion Glenn Bruns and Stuart Anderson

    E-print Network

    Bruns, Glenn

    into account. The goal of data fusion is to use sensor data to detect sensor failures and to provide good, and exits the vessel as steam. The boiler is instrumented with a level sensor, a steaming rate sensor

  9. Basic Instrumentation for Hall A at Je erson J. Alcorn af , B.D. Anderson r , K.A. Aniol c , J.R.M. Annand ai ,

    E-print Network

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Basic Instrumentation for Hall A at Je#11;erson Lab J. Alcorn af , B.D. Anderson r , K.A. Aniol c.T. Katramatou r , J.J. Kelly am , S. Kerhoas d , A. Ketikyan as , M. Khandaker v , M. Khayat r , K. Kino ag , I. Kominis y , W. Korsch r , S. Kox t , K. Kramer e , K.S. Kumar y;an , G. Kumbartzki aa , M. Kuss af , L

  10. Guest Expert August 2011: Karen Anderson—How Do You Keep Participants on Long Term Follow-Up? | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Please welcome our guest expert for August, Karen Anderson of Cancer Research And Biostatistics. Karen worked as a Retention Manager on the Carotene and Retinol (vitamin A) Efficacy Trial (CARET) at the Coordinating Center for 12 years. CARET, a lung cancer prevention trial, had six study sites that recruited over 18,000 male and female adult participants who were either heavy smokers or had asbestos exposure.

  11. Re II and Other Exotic Spectra in HD 65949

    E-print Network

    C. R. Cowley; S. Hubrig; G. M. Wahlgren

    2008-02-07

    Powerful astronomical spectra reveal an urgent need for additional work on atomic lines, levels, and oscillator strengths. The star HD 65949 provides some excellent examples of species rarely identified in stellar spectra. For example, the Re II spectrum is well developed, with 17 lines between 3731 and 4904 [A], attributed wholly or partially to Re II. Classifications and oscillator strengths are lacking for a number of these lines. The spectrum of Os II is well identified. Of 14 lines attributed wholly or partially to Os II, only one has an entry in the VALD database. We find strong evidence that Te II is present. There are NO Te II lines in the VALD database. Ru II is clearly present, but oscillator strengths for lines in the visual are lacking. There is excellent to marginal evidence for a number of less commonly identified species, including Kr II, Nb II, Sb II, Xe II, Pr III, Ho III, Au II, and Pt II (probably Pt-198), to be present in the spectrum of HD 65949. The line Hg II at 3984 [A] is of outstanding strength, and all three lines of Multiplet 1 of Hg I are present, even though the surface temperature of HD 65949 is relatively high. Finally, we present the case of an unidentified, 24 [mA], line at 3859.63 [A], which could be the same feature seen in magnetic CP stars. It is typically blended with a putative U II line used in cosmochronology.

  12. Much ado about nothing: the misestimation and overinterpretation of violent video game effects in eastern and western nations: comment on Anderson et al. (2010).

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Christopher J; Kilburn, John

    2010-03-01

    The issue of violent video game influences on youth violence and aggression remains intensely debated in the scholarly literature and among the general public. Several recent meta-analyses, examining outcome measures most closely related to serious aggressive acts, found little evidence for a relationship between violent video games and aggression or violence. In a new meta-analysis, C. A. Anderson et al. (2010) questioned these findings. However, their analysis has several methodological issues that limit the interpretability of their results. In their analysis, C. A. Anderson et al. included many studies that do not relate well to serious aggression, an apparently biased sample of unpublished studies, and a "best practices" analysis that appears unreliable and does not consider the impact of unstandardized aggression measures on the inflation of effect size estimates. They also focused on bivariate correlations rather than better controlled estimates of effects. Despite a number of methodological flaws that all appear likely to inflate effect size estimates, the final estimate of r = .15 is still indicative of only weak effects. Contrasts between the claims of C. A. Anderson et al. (2010) and real-world data on youth violence are discussed. PMID:20192554

  13. Systematics and the origin of species from the viewpoint of a botanist: edgar anderson prepares the 1941 jesup lectures with ernst mayr.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    The correspondence between Edgar Anderson and Ernst Mayr leading into their 1941 Jesup Lectures on "Systematics and the Origin of Species" addressed population thinking, the nature of species, the relationship of microevolution to macroevolution, and the evolutionary dynamics of plants and animals, all central issues in what came to be known as the Evolutionary Synthesis. On some points, they found ready agreement; for others they forged only a short term consensus. They brought two different working styles to this project reflecting their different appreciations of what was possible at this point in evolutionary studies. For Mayr, it was a focused project with definitive short term conclusions imminent while Anderson viewed it as an episode in an ongoing historical process that, while exciting and suggestive, remained openended. Thus, Mayr and Anderson represent two distinct perspectives on the Evolutionary Synthesis in formation; by understanding both of their points of view, we can grasp more fully the state of evolutionary theory at this key moment. PMID:22684268

  14. 33. View of data converter and power supply for TR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. View of data converter and power supply for TR system in transmitter building no. 102, mezzanine level. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. 60. View of radome hydraulic module control center in mezzanine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. View of radome hydraulic module control center in mezzanine level in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  16. 59. View of high voltage (4160 volts alternating current) electric ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. View of high voltage (4160 volts alternating current) electric load center and motor control center at mezzanine level in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. Three Halloween genes from the Varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) and their expression during reproduction.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, A R; Shirk, P D; Evans, J D; Hung, K; Sims, J; Alborn, H; Teal, P E A

    2015-06-01

    The ecdysteroid biosynthetic pathway involves sequential enzymatic hydroxylations by a group of enzymes collectively known as Halloween gene proteins. Complete sequences for three Halloween genes, spook (Vdspo), disembodied (Vddib) and shade (Vdshd), were identified in varroa mites and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of predicted amino acid sequences for Halloween orthologues showed that the acarine orthologues were distantly associated with insect and crustacean clades indicating that acarine genes had more ancestral characters. The lack of orthologues or pseudogenes for remaining genes suggests these pathway elements had not evolved in ancestral arthropods. Vdspo transcript levels were highest in gut tissues, while Vddib transcript levels were highest in ovary-lyrate organs. In contrast, Vdshd transcript levels were lower overall but present in both gut and ovary-lyrate organs. All three transcripts were present in eggs removed from gravid female mites. A brood cell invasion assay was developed for acquiring synchronously staged mites. Mites within 4?h of entering a brood cell had transcript levels of all three that were not significantly different from mites on adult bees. These analyses suggest that varroa mites may be capable of modifying 7-dehydro-cholesterol precursor and hydroxylations of other steroid precursors, but whether the mites directly produce ecdysteroid precursors and products remains undetermined. PMID:25488435

  18. Collaborators: Paul Anderson, Kim Christensen, Simone A di Collobiano, Matt Hall,

    E-print Network

    Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    ;from reproduction probability 1 Henrik Jeldtoft Jensen Imperial College London #12;Asexual reproduction #12;Motivation: How far can a minimal model go? Input: mutation prone reproduction at level Imperial College London #12;Reproduction: Choose indiv. at random Determine occupancy at the location

  19. Biceps Tenodesis for Type II SLAP Tears.

    PubMed

    Tayrose, Gregory A; Karas, Spero G; Bosco, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Tears of the superior glenoid labrum are a common cause ofshoulder pain and disability, especially in overhead athletessuch as pitchers, swimmers, and volleyball players. Type IISLAP lesions have been the most clinically important superiorlabral pathology, and the management of this lesionhas been a very controversial topic. Currently, there are nohigh level studies in the literature to guide treatment. Whilethe few level 3 and level 4 evidence studies that are availablefollowing arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesionsall report reasonable overall patient satisfaction, persistentpostoperative pain is common and associated with a lowreturn to pre-injury level of sports participation. There hasbeen a recent school of thought that biceps tenodesis, whichmaintains the length-tension relationship of the long head ofbiceps, should be the procedure of choice for patients withisolated type II SLAP lesions. The current paper reviewsthe role biceps tenodesis plays in the management of typeII SLAP tears. PMID:26517164

  20. Spin-current Seebeck effect in an interacting quantum dot: Atomic approximation for the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, E.; Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Siqueira, E. C.; Figueira, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    We study the spin-current Seebeck effect through an immersed gate defined quantum dot, employing the U-finite atomic method for the single impurity Anderson model. Our description qualitatively confirms some of the results obtained by an earlier Hartree-Fock work, but as our calculation includes the Kondo effect, some new features will appear in the spin-current Seebeck effect S, which as a function of the gate voltage present an oscillatory shape. At intermediate temperatures, our results show a three zero structure and at low temperatures, our results are governed by the emergence of the Kondo peak in the transmittance, which defines the behavior of the shape of the S coefficient as a function of the parameters of the model. The oscillatory behavior obtained by the Hartree-Fock approximation reproduces the shape obtained by us in a non-interacting system (U=0). The S sign is sensitive to different polarization of the quantum dot, and as a consequence the device could be employed to experimentally detect the polarization states of the system. Our results also confirm that the large increase of S upon increasing U, obtained by the mean field approximation, is correct only for low temperatures. We also discuss the role of the Kondo peak in defining the behavior of the spin thermopower at low temperatures.