Sample records for anderson level ii

  1. Energy level statistics in disordered metals with an Anderson transition

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelou, S.N. [Univ. of Ioannina (Greece)]|[Institute for Electronic Structure & Lasers, Crete (Greece); Katsanos, D.E. [Univ. of Ioannina (Greece)

    1996-12-01

    We present numerical scaling results for the energy level statistics in orthogonal and symplectic tight-binding Hamiltonian random matrix ensembles defined on disordered two and three-dimensional electronic systems with and without spin-orbit coupling (SOC), respectively. In the metallic phase for weak disorder the nearest level spacing distribution function P(S), the number variance <({delta}N){sup 2}>, and the two-point correlation function K{sub 2}({epsilon}) are shown to be described by the Gaussian random matrix theories. In the insulating phase, for strong disorder, the correlations vanish for large scales and the ordinary Poisson statistics is asymptotically recovered, which is consistent with localization of the corresponding eigenstates. At the Anderson metal-insulator transition we obtain new universal scale-invariant distribution functions describing the critical spectral density fluctuations.

  2. Biosafety Level II Biosafety Level 2

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    /particularly when visibly contaminated with blood * Extreme precaution with contaminated needles or sharp 2 Standard Microbiological Practices 2.4 #12;Biosafety Level 2 Safety Equipment (Primary Barriers) n/techniques 2.4 #12;Biosafety Level 2 Special Practices Needles & Sharps Precautions n Use sharps containers n

  3. Surface hopping with a manifold of electronic states. II. Application to the many-body Anderson-Holstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Wenjie; Nitzan, Abraham; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate a simple surface hopping (SH) approach for modeling a single impurity level coupled to a single phonon and an electronic (metal) bath (i.e., the Anderson-Holstein model). The phonon degree of freedom is treated classically with motion along-and hops between-diabatic potential energy surfaces. The hopping rate is determined by the dynamics of the electronic bath (which are treated implicitly). For the case of one electronic bath, in the limit of small coupling to the bath, SH recovers phonon relaxation to thermal equilibrium and yields the correct impurity electron population (as compared with numerical renormalization group). For the case of out of equilibrium dynamics, SH current-voltage (I-V) curve is compared with the quantum master equation (QME) over a range of parameters, spanning the quantum region to the classical region. In the limit of large temperature, SH and QME agree. Furthermore, we can show that, in the limit of low temperature, the QME agrees with real-time path integral calculations. As such, the simple procedure described here should be useful in many other contexts.

  4. Surface hopping with a manifold of electronic states. II. Application to the many-body Anderson-Holstein model.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenjie; Nitzan, Abraham; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-02-28

    We investigate a simple surface hopping (SH) approach for modeling a single impurity level coupled to a single phonon and an electronic (metal) bath (i.e., the Anderson-Holstein model). The phonon degree of freedom is treated classically with motion along--and hops between--diabatic potential energy surfaces. The hopping rate is determined by the dynamics of the electronic bath (which are treated implicitly). For the case of one electronic bath, in the limit of small coupling to the bath, SH recovers phonon relaxation to thermal equilibrium and yields the correct impurity electron population (as compared with numerical renormalization group). For the case of out of equilibrium dynamics, SH current-voltage (I-V) curve is compared with the quantum master equation (QME) over a range of parameters, spanning the quantum region to the classical region. In the limit of large temperature, SH and QME agree. Furthermore, we can show that, in the limit of low temperature, the QME agrees with real-time path integral calculations. As such, the simple procedure described here should be useful in many other contexts. PMID:25725715

  5. Review Meeting of Level II Inspections Spring 2012

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Robert E.

    of permanent wiring). (Electrical Safety) #12;Level II Inspection Findings and Correction Finding 2 44506: ES-1 Safety) #12;Level II Inspection Findings and Correction Finding 3 44507: ES-4: Access to an electrical panel was obstructed. (Electrical Safety) #12;Level II Inspection Findings and Correction Finding 3

  6. Anderson Localization and Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efetov, K. B.

    The supersymmetry method for study of disordered systems is shortly reviewed. The discussion starts with a historical introduction followed by an explanation of the idea of using Grassmann anticommuting variables for investigating disordered metals. After that the nonlinear supermatrix ?-model is derived. Solution of several problems obtained with the help of the ?-model is presented. This includes the problem of the level statistics in small metal grains, localization in wires and films, and Anderson metal-insulator transition. Calculational schemes developed for studying these problems form the basis of subsequent applications of the supersymmetry approach.

  7. Paired-Associate Learning at Three Imagery Levels in Level I and Level II Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prawat, Richard S.

    Two views of paired-associate learning were examined by assessing the paired-associate learning efficiency of eighth grade samples identified by digit span and IQ test performance as Jensen-type Level I and Level II learners. Eighty eighth grade students ranging in age from 13 years 3 months to 14 years 10 months were selected as subjects. Three…

  8. 53. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with incoming waveguide and control switch. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  9. 55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with eighty-eight 1-1/2" diameter copper ion return RF balance tube systems. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  10. Comments About a Chameleon Theory: Level I/Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, John; Stankov, Lazar

    1982-01-01

    Jensen's ideas about two levels of intellectual abilities are criticized as being oversimplified. More than two levels of intellectual abilities and relationships between variables reflecting more than racial and socioeconomic status (SES) differences are suggested, arguing that Jensen's statements about race and SES differences are not properly…

  11. Culture Curriculum for German, Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oetiker, Rosemary

    This teacher's guide to cultural instruction in a level-2 German course is designed to be used with the text "Deutsch, Erstes Buch, Erster Teil." Instructional observations pertain to the seventh through the 12th lessons and comprise the major portion of this text including: )1) die Eisenbahn, (2) Reisen und Essen in Deutschland, (3) die Familie,…

  12. Materials balance for benzene: Level II. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Hall; R. Burger; F. Montecalvo

    1980-01-01

    A Level II materials balance was performed on benzene. Data are reported for benzene production from petroleum by four processes (catalytic reformation, toluene dealkylation, toluene disproportionation, and isolation from pyrolysis gasoline) for production from coal during coking. Amounts of benzene consumed for the synthesis of eight direct derivatives (ethylbenzene, cumene, cyclohexane, nitrobenzene, maleic anhydride, mono- and dichlorobenzene, alkylbenzenes, and biphenyl)

  13. Home Economics. Sample Test Items. Levels I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Educational Testing.

    A sample of behavioral objectives and related test items that could be developed for content modules in Home Economics levels I and II, this book is intended to enable teachers to construct more valid and reliable test materials. Forty-eight one-page modules are presented, and opposite each module are listed two to seven specific behavioral…

  14. The Anderson Transition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nevill Mott; M. Pepper; S. Pollitt; R. H. Wallis; C. J. Adkins

    1975-01-01

    An outline is given of the electrical properties expected in a disordered solid or fluid which shows a metal-insulator transition of Anderson type. This is one in which the Fermi energy of the electrons passes through a mobility edge separating extended states from states localized by disorder, as the composition or some other parameter is changed. Some of the experimental

  15. 54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch at open port door. Note incoming waveguide and control switch at lower left of photograph and note several waveguides leaving top of scanner switch around the circumference of switch. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  16. 31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing various electronic central indicator panel to control building air conditioning, steam pressure, supply temperature, discharge temperature, supply pressure, transformer vault status, and radome conditioning system. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD (II) LEVELS AND LEAD (II) NEUROTOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafl...

  18. Kondo-Anderson transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettemann, S.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Varga, I.; Slevin, K.

    2012-03-01

    Dilute magnetic impurities in a disordered Fermi liquid are considered close to the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT). Critical power-law correlations between electron wave functions at different energies in the vicinity of the AMIT result in the formation of pseudogaps of the local density of states. Magnetic impurities can remain unscreened at such sites. We determine the density of the resulting free magnetic moments in the zero-temperature limit. While it is finite on the insulating side of the AMIT, it vanishes at the AMIT, and decays with a power law as function of the distance to the AMIT. Since the fluctuating spins of these free magnetic moments break the time-reversal symmetry of the conduction electrons, we find a shift of the AMIT, and the appearance of a semimetal phase. The distribution function of the Kondo temperature TK is derived at the AMIT, in the metallic phase, and in the insulator phase. This allows us to find the quantum phase diagram in an external magnetic field B and at finite temperature T. We calculate the resulting magnetic susceptibility, the specific heat, and the spin relaxation rate as a function of temperature. We find a phase diagram with finite-temperature transitions among insulator, critical semimetal, and metal phases. These new types of phase transitions are caused by the interplay between Kondo screening and Anderson localization, with the latter being shifted by the appearance of the temperature-dependent spin-flip scattering rate. Accordingly, we name them Kondo-Anderson transitions.

  19. Anderson attractors in active arrays

    E-print Network

    T. V. Laptyeva; A. A. Tikhomirov; O. I. Kanakov; M. V. Ivanchenko

    2015-06-28

    In dissipationless linear media, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of matter, light, and sound waves. The addition of nonlinearity causes interaction between the eigenmodes, which results in a slow wave diffusion. We go beyond the dissipationless limit of Anderson arrays and consider nonlinear disordered systems that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess specific excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the threshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multi-peak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices, active waveguide or cavity-QED arrays.

  20. KT Monograph Section D6 Pottery Data - Level II

    E-print Network

    Hansen, C; Thomas, D C; Postgate, J N

    2004-12-09

    Phase of Level II#7;a-d#7;d-e#7;e#7;e-f#7;f-h#7;#7;Jars:#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;Square rim with cross-hatching - red or brown paint#7;19#7;2#7;#7;2#7;1#7;#7;Square rim with stripes on top#7;1#7;#7;#7;#7;1#7;#7;Square rim with bichrome paint#7... ;#7;#7;#7;#7;1#7;#7;Square rim - plain#7;15#7;1#7;#7;2#7;7#7;#7;Other rims with cross-hatching - red or brown paint#7;14#7;#7;#7;#7;2#7;#7;Body sherds with cross-hatching - red or brown paint#7;19#7;5#7;3#7;3#7;15#7;#7;Kindergarten ware#7;4#7;>11#7;3#7;#7;>12#7;#7;Wavy lines...

  1. Price-Anderson Act: Congressional review begins

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-05

    Every 10 years Congress reviews, amends, and extends the Price-Anderson Act of 1957, which was designed to encourage the new nuclear industry by guaranteeing insurance beyond the level provided by private insurers. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is recommending five congressional actions for the 1987 extension: reauthorization, replacement of the absolute insurance limitation with an annual limitation of liability, raising the retrospective premium per reactor per incident from $5 million to $10 million, raising the statute of limitations on claims for 20 to 30 years, and retaining current language dealing with extraordinary events. Two bills, H.R. 421 and H.R. 3277, were introduced with provisions that broaden the opportunity for victims compensation and eliminate the subsidy aspect. Hearings began in July, with reactions from the National Taxpayers Union and Nuclear insurance underwriters in conflict over the limitations on liability. DOE and DOE contractors urge continuation of the Price-Anderson limitation.

  2. Phase Structure of the Topological Anderson Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongwei; Sacksteder, Vincent E.; Qi, Junjie; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Hua; Xie, X. C.

    2012-02-01

    We report the phase structure of disordered HgTe topological Anderson insulator in a 2-D geometry. We use exact diagonalization to calculate the spectrum and eigenstate structure, and recursive green's functions to calculate the conductance. All observables are measured at several system sizes, allowing us to determine phase transitions and two critical points. The quantized-conductance TAI phase contains two phases: TAI-I lying in a bulk band gap, and TAI-II where bulk states exist but are localized. We find that the TAI-II phase persists at disorder strengths where there is no bulk band gap; a bulk band gap is not necessary to obtain conductance quantization. In a previous work the weak-disorder edge of the TAI phase was explained as a transition into the bulk gap (TAI-I), but we find also a direct transition into the ungapped (TAI-II) quantized phase. Effective medium theory (SCBA) predicts well the boundaries and interior of the TAI-I phase, but fails at larger disorders including the interior of the TAI-II phase. When the system size is smaller than the bulk localization length, the quantized TAI region is bounded by either the bulk band edge or the localization length, but when the system size is large it is bounded by a transition of edge states.

  3. JOANNA E. ANDERSON CURRICULUM VITAE

    E-print Network

    of conflict discussions. Talk presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Positive Psychology Association with low self-esteem derogate a partner's sacrifices. Talk presented at the annual meeting of the American1 JOANNA E. ANDERSON CURRICULUM VITAE Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Psychology Cornell

  4. M D Anderson Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    This proposal will establish a Small Animal Imaging Research Program (SAIRP) at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The proposed SAIRP will complement the existing institutional facility that provides small animal imaging services to NIH funded investigators. The broad goal of this SAIRP is to develop novel imaging approaches to solve cancer related biological questions and evaluate new cancer therapies.

  5. Multiphase flow in porous media: II. Pore-level modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, K.K.; Salter, S.J.

    1982-09-01

    The pores a phase occupies and the way those pores are interconnected are shown here to determine the macroscopic transport properties of that phase. Such transport properties are dispersivity, capacitance, relative permeability and capillary pressure. A pore-level, three-dimensional network model is presented in this paper which incorporates the structure of porous rock, pore-level fluid displacement mechanisms and saturation history. The model calculates pore-level distribution of fluids, and then computes steady-state transport properties of such distributions. The results are compared with experimentally obtained values and illustrate the nature of fluid flow and the mechanisms of mixing in strongly wetting rocks.

  6. Identification of new fluorescence processes in the UV spectra of cool stars from new energy levels of Fe II and Cr II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Two fluorescence processes operating in atmospheres of cool stars, symbiotic stars, and the Sun are presented. Two emission lines, at 1347.03 and 1360.17 A, are identified as fluorescence lines of Cr II and Fe II. The lines are due to transitions from highly excited levels, which are populated radiatively by the hydrogen Lyman alpha line due to accidental wavelength coincidences. Three energy levels, one in Cr II and two in Fe II, are reported.

  7. Anderson testifies on Planet Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainger, Lisa A.

    AGU president Don Anderson joined former astronaut Sally Ride and National Aeronautics and Space Administration official Lennard Fisk March 8 in testifying before the Senate committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. The three had been asked to speak on the future of the Mission to Planet Earth, proposed both in a National Academy of Sciences report and a NASA study.Anderson was chairman of the National Academy of Science's Task Group on Earth Sciences, which prepared the report Mission to Planet Earth as part of the series Space Science in the Twenty-First Century. In his testimony, Anderson highlighted parts of the report and quoted the frontispiece “We now have the technology and the incentive to move boldly forward on a Mission to Planet Earth. We call on the nation to implement an integrated global program using both spaceborne and earth-based instrumentation for fundamental research on the origin, evolution and nature of our planet, its place in our solar system, and its interaction with living things, including mankind.”

  8. The chromospheric Ca II and Mg II radiative losses in late-type stars: a computational comparison between two-level and multi-level atomic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawzy, Diaa E.

    2015-06-01

    In the current study we present radiation correction factors to compute the radiative losses by Mg II and Ca II ions during the process of constructing theoretical models for the chromospheres in late-type stars (spectral type in the range F5V-K8V). We combine the two-level atom approach with the multi-level atom method to accurately compute the radiation correction factors. The procedure is fast and reasonably accurate to be implemented in the time-dependent computations. In the current computations we implement what is called pseudo-partial frequency redistribution and the time-dependent ionization in regard to hydrogen. The radiative correction factors for Mg II show very slight variation for the different spectral types with average value of 1.5. The values we obtained for Ca II show very strong dependence on spectral types and the basic parameters, with values range between 5.58 to 4.22 for F5V and K8V spectral types, respectively. The obtained results accelerate the process of constructing theoretical model chromospheres based on mechanical heating by monochromatic and wave spectra. The current study is an initial step in establishing hybrid multi-dimensional models of stellar chromospheres.

  9. Inhalation and ingestion intakes with associated dose estimates for level II and level III personnel using Capstone study data.

    PubMed

    Szrom, Frances; Falo, Gerald A; Lodde, Gordon M; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Daxon, Eric G

    2009-03-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone DU Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe-tests samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large-caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h(-1) based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h(-1) based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h(-1) to 38.9 mg h(-1) based on the wipe-tests data including surface-to-glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h(-1) and 1.78 mg h(-1), respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures. PMID:19204492

  10. Primary colon cancer with a high serum PIVKA-II level

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kazuya; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Onodera, Kazuhiko; Matsuda, Minoru; Kawakami, Takako; Higuchi, Mineko; Kato, Kimitaka; Kato, Yurina; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Protein induced by vitamin K absence/antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) is an abnormal protein, and several reports have demonstrated the efficacy of PIVKA-II in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We report an extremely rare case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with a high serum PIVKA-II level. Presentation of Case A 95-year-old woman presented with right lower quadrant pain and appetite loss. An abdominal computed tomography scan and ultrasonography showed an ascending colon tumor and multiple metastatic tumors in the liver. The serum level of PIVKA-II was extremely high, 11,900 ng/mL. Colonoscopic examination revealed a tumor accompanied by an ulcer in the ascending colon, which was highly suspicious for malignancy. Multiple biopsies showed well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon, which was evaluated as colon cancer, stage IV. PIVKA-II-productive colon cancer was confirmed. Chemotherapy with TS-1 was administered. The patient died 3 months after initial admission. Discussion The expression of PIVKA-II was detected in non-cancer areas, with non-specific expression observed in plasma cells in our case. There might be some possibility that hepatoid differentiation exists in other regions of the colon tumor or in the liver tumor, parenchymal cells or lung metastases, which were composed of PIVKA-II-positive and AFP-negative cells. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, high serum levels of PIVKA-II resulting from colon adenocarcinoma have not been reported previously. We report this rare case together with a review of the literature. PMID:25528035

  11. Theoretical lifetimes and Landé g values of Cs II 5p5 6p levels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald R. Beck

    1998-01-01

    Lifetimes of Cs II 5p5 6p levels, oscillator strengths to the lower 5p5 5d and 5p5 6s levels, Landé g factors and LS compositions of all these levels are presented. Results are in very good agreement with most available experiment. Large correlation effects are associated with those 5p5 5d and 5p5 6s states, which strongly interact.

  12. DEAN P. ANDERSON Department of Zoology

    E-print Network

    Turner, Monica G.

    , and J. Fryxell. 2005. Factors influencing female home-range sizes in elk (Cervus elaphus) in North American landscapes. Landscape Ecology 20:257-271. Anderson D.P. 2005. Preface: Reciprocal interactions the seasonality of estrus in Chimpanzees. Primates 47:43-50. Boesch, C., Z.B.G. Bi, D.P. Anderson, D. Stahl. 2005

  13. Algebra II: Gatekeeper Course--An Examination of CST Proficiency Levels in California and the Bay Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailer-O'Keefe, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the Algebra II course and California Star Test (CST) proficiency levels in the San Francisco Bay Area and in the State of California. CST proficiency levels are examined by grade level for the State and nine counties of the San Francisco Bay Area region. Algebra II is shown to be one of the more complicated courses in the CSU…

  14. Identification of an association between HLA class II alleles and low antibody levels after measles immunization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory A. Poland; Inna G. Ovsyannikova; Robert M. Jacobson; Robert A. Vierkant; Steven J. Jacobsen; V. Shane Pankratz; Daniel J. Schaid

    2001-01-01

    This is the first large cohort study to report a genetic association between humoral antibody level after measles vaccine and the HLA class II genes. The WHO goal to eradicate measles world-wide magnifies the importance of data relating to the influence of immunogenetics on measles vaccine-induced antibody responses. We present here the analysis of 242 individuals who received one dose

  15. Low level RF system design for the PEP-II B factory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Corredottra; R. Claus; L F Sapozhnikov; H. Schwarz; R J Tighe; C D Ziomek

    1995-01-01

    Heavy beam loading in PEP-II has driven the design of the low level RF system to contain feedback loops similar to those used in proton rings. The RF feedback loops control longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities caused by the beam interaction with the accelerating mode of the RF cavities by reducing the cavity impedance observed by the beam. The RF system employs

  16. Relationship between skin resistance level and static balance in type II diabetic subjects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eyyup Gulbandilar; Ali Cimbiz; Murat Sari; Hilmi Ozden

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is major cause leading to pathological changes in skin foot plantar area (SFPA) and affected the static standing balance duration (SSBD). Skin resistance level (SRL) is related to skin conductance which changes in the presence of sweat. This study aims to find out the relationship between the SRL and SSBD in type II diabetic patients. Sixty-eight voluntary students,

  17. Mathematics Program Analysis of Grade 6, Stanford Achievement Test, Intermediate Level II. Fall 1984 Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    The Stanford Achievement Test (SAT), Intermediate Level II, was administered to 11,077 sixth grade students during fall 1984. This two-section report presents findings of the SAT's three mathematics subtests. These subtests measured competency related to: (1) mathematics concepts (number, notation, operations, and geometry/measurement), (2)…

  18. Anderson and Kohn, page 1 Dikaryons, diploids, and evolution

    E-print Network

    Anderson, James B.

    Anderson and Kohn, page 1 - Dikaryons, diploids, and evolution James B. Anderson and Linda M Kohn@utm.utoronto.ca #12;Anderson and Kohn, page 2 - The regular association of unfused, haploid, gametic- type nuclei genomes follow different rules, iii) #12;Anderson and Kohn, page 3 - dikaryons produce recombinant

  19. Energy levels and isotope shifts for singly ionized uranium (U II)

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise, J.; Wyart, J.; Verges, J. (Laboratoire Aime Cotton, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Batiment 505, Campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France)); Engleman, R. Jr. (Department of Chemistry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)); Palmer, B.A. (Chemistry and Laser Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Radziemski, L.J. (Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-3520 (United States))

    1994-10-01

    New uranium hollow-cathode Fourier-transform spectra have been recorded between 1800 and 42 000 cm[sup --1]. Combined with earlier visible and ultraviolet spectra, these have led to 354 odd levels and 809 even levels of singly ionized uranium (U II) belonging to four odd and six even configurations. High-resolution Fourier-transform spectra of an electrodeless discharge lamp containing [sup 238]UI[sub 4] and [sup 234]UI[sub 4] were used to measure splittings of more than 800 isotopic U II doublets to an accuracy of [similar to] 0.001 cm[sup --1]. From these transition isotope shifts 114 odd- and 397 even-level isotope shifts were determined.

  20. Light focusing in the Anderson Regime

    E-print Network

    Leonetti, Marco; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Anderson localization is a regime in which diffusion is inhibited and waves (also electromagnetic waves) get localized. Here we exploit adaptive optics to achieve focusing in disordered optical fibers in the Anderson regime. By wavefront shaping and optimization, we observe the generation of a propagation invariant beam, where light is trapped transversally by disorder, and show that Anderson localizations can be also excited by extended speckled beams. We demonstrate that disordered fibers allow a more efficient focusing action with respect to standard fibers in a way independent of their length, because of the propagation invariant features and cooperative action of transverse localizations.

  1. Light focusing in the Anderson regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

    2014-07-01

    Anderson localization is a regime in which diffusion is inhibited and waves (also electromagnetic waves) get localized. Here we exploit adaptive optics to achieve focusing in disordered optical fibres in the Anderson regime. By wavefront shaping and optimization, we observe the generation of a propagation-invariant beam, where light is trapped transversally by disorder, and show that Anderson localizations can be also excited by extended speckled beams. We demonstrate that disordered fibres allow a more efficient focusing action with respect to standard fibres in a way independent of their length, because of the propagation-invariant features and cooperative action of transverse localizations.

  2. UNLOCKING THE TREASURE CHEST OF LEVEL-II RADAR DATA: LESSONS IN TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER POLICY FOR THE ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES

    E-print Network

    P 1.6 UNLOCKING THE TREASURE CHEST OF LEVEL-II RADAR DATA: LESSONS IN TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER POLICY This analysis of Level-II radar data presents a great success story about partnerships in technology transfer could serve as a future model for meteorological information transfer between the sectors

  3. J.T. Anderson ,,10 Cusco, Peru

    E-print Network

    J.T. Anderson ,,10 Cusco, Peru In the summer of May 2010, I was honored to be given an opportunity in Peru. It is located near the Urubamba Valley of the Andes mountain range. Cusco has its historic roots

  4. Reconstructing Northern Hemisphere upper-level fields during World War II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Brönnimann; J. Luterbacher

    2004-01-01

    Monthly mean fields of temperature and geopotential height (GPH) from 700 to 100 hPa were statistically reconstructed for the extratropical Northern Hemisphere for the World War II period. The reconstruction was based on several hundred predictor variables, comprising temperature series from meteorological stations and gridded sea level pressure data (1939-1947) as well as a large amount of historical upper-air data

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (NORWTH00120010) Town Highway 012 Bloody Brook, Norwich, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NORWTH00120010 on town highway 12 crossing Bloody Brook, Norwich, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, available from VTAOT files, was compiled prior to conducting the Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 8.98-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the left bank upstream and the left and right banks downstream are forested. The immediate right bank upstream is covered by shrub and brush with pasture on the overbank. Town Highway 12 runs along the valley of Bloody Brook; however, at structure NORWTH00120010 the road crosses Bloody Brook at a 90-degree angle. In the study area, Bloody Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.014 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 41 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 51.0 mm or 0.167 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on October 31, 1994, indicated that the reach was unstable. The town highway 12 crossing of Bloody Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., July 29, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The right abutment is protected by sparse type-2 stone fill (less than 24 inches diameter). The channel is skewed 0 degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

  6. Quality assurance plan for the High Level Controller for the CBMS Block II

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.W.; Robbins, I.F.; Stewart, K.A.; Terry, C.L.; Whitaker, R.A.; Wolf, D.A.; Zager, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    This document establishes the software Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the High Level Controller for the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II (HLC/CBMS-II) project activities under the Computing, Robotics, and Education (CRE) Directorate management. It defines the requirements and assigns responsibilities for ensuring, with a high degree of confidence, that project objectives will be achieved as planned. The CBMS Program was awarded to ORNL by the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to design the next version (Block II) mass spectrometer for the detection and identification of chemical and biological warfare agents, to fabricate four engineering prototypes, and to construct eight preproduction units. Section 1 of this document provides an introduction to the HLC/CBMS-II project QAP. Sections 2 and 3 describe the specific aspects of quality assurance as applicable to the project. Section 4 reviews the project approach to risk management. The Risk Management Matrix given in Appendix A is a tool to assess, prioritize, and prevent problems before they occur; therefore, the matrix will be reviewed and revised on a periodic basis. Appendix B shows the quality assurance criteria of the DOE Order 5700.6C and their applicability to this project.

  7. The Use of Digital Ink in Lecture Presentation Richard Anderson, Ruth Anderson!!!!, Crystal Hoyer,

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    The Use of Digital Ink in Lecture Presentation Richard Anderson, Ruth Anderson!!!!, Crystal Hoyer 600 800 1000 1200 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Professor B Segmentation of ink strokes for two lectures Professional Masters' Program class Webviewer for lecture replay Instructor view of Classroom Presenter Ink

  8. Effect of external magnetic field on the bound state between the localized and conduction electrons in Anderson-Holstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebrolu, Narasimha Raju; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2014-09-01

    A single-level Anderson-Holstein model is investigated in the presence of a magnetic field. Employing a Lang-Firsov transformation followed by a zero-phonon averaging, an effective Anderson model is obtained, which is then solved by using the Kikuchi-Morita Cluster variation (CV) method as adopted by Bose and Tanaka in the case of Anderson model. The effect of electron-phonon interaction on the binding energy between a magnetic impurity electron and the conduction electrons and on the local magnetic moment are investigated at zero temperature in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  9. Effect of dietary fiber on the level of free angiotensin II receptor blocker in vitro.

    PubMed

    Iwazaki, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Tamezane, Yui; Tanaka, Kenta; Nakagawa, Minami; Imai, Kimie; Nakanishi, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers (ARBs), such as losartan potassium (LO), candesartan (CA), and telmisartan (TE), and dietary fiber was studied as to the level of free ARB in vitro. When ARB was incubated with soluble (sodium alginate, pectin, and glucomannan) or insoluble (cellulose and chitosan) dietary fiber, the levels of free LO, TE, and CA decreased. This resulted only from mixing the dietary fiber with the ARBs and differed among the types of dietary fiber, and the pH and electrolytes in the mixture. The levels of free LO and TE tended to decrease with a higher concentration of sodium chloride in pH 1.2 fluid. These results suggest that it is important to pay attention to the possible interactions between ARBs and dietary fiber. PMID:24790001

  10. High levels of MHC class II allelic diversity in lake trout from Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorschner, M.O.; Duris, T.; Bronte, C.R.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.; Phillips, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Sequence variation in a 216 bp portion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II B1 domain was examined in 74 individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from different locations in Lake Superior. Forty-three alleles were obtained which encoded 71-72 amino acids of the mature protein. These sequences were compared with previous data obtained from five Pacific salmon species and Atlantic salmon using the same primers. Although all of the lake trout alleles clustered together in the neighbor-joining analysis of amino acid sequences, one amino acid allelic lineage was shared with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species in another genus which probably diverged from Salvelinus more than 10-20 million years ago. As shown previously in other salmonids, the level of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) exceeded the level of synonymous substitution (d(S)). The level of nucleotide diversity at the MHC class II B1 locus was considerably higher in lake trout than in the Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lake trout colonized Lake Superior from more than one refuge following the Wisconsin glaciation. Recent population bottlenecks may have reduced nucleotide diversity in Pacific salmon populations.

  11. Language Assessment Scales, Level 2, LAS II, for Grades 6 and Up, English/Spanish. Examiner's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sharon E.; De Avila, Edward A.

    Language Assessment Scales, Level 2 (LAS II) are used to assess the linguistic proficiency of limited-English-speaking or non-English-speaking adolescents. LAS II, like its predecessor, LAS I, provides a picture of oral linguistic proficiency based on a student's performance across four linguistic subsystems: phonemic, lexical, syntactic and…

  12. Talmadge Anderson Heritage House Talmadge Anderson Heritage House

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    present at the event. 4. All events must have a Cultural House Assistant on hand. The Office of Equity the event, be on hand to answer questions and check in with the coordinator occasionally. II. Washington should be properly cleaned upon departure: a. Counters and stoves wiped off, floors swept clean

  13. Aakre Caitlyn Elementary Education Anderson Courtney Elementary Education

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    EDUCATION Aakre Caitlyn Elementary Education Anderson Courtney Elementary Education Anderson Sarah Elementary Education Bailey Molly Elementary Education Barber Elizabeth Elementary Education Bechtold Ryan Elementary Education Bigelow Katrina Elementary Education Bigelow Katrina Elementary Education Bradford

  14. Anderson localization in QCD-like theories

    E-print Network

    Matteo Giordano; Tamas G. Kovacs; Ferenc Pittler

    2014-09-18

    We review the present status of the Anderson transition in the spectrum of the Dirac operator of QCD-like theories on the lattice. Localized modes at the low-end of the spectrum have been found in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with overlap and staggered valence fermions as well as in Nf=2+1 QCD with staggered quarks. We draw an analogy between the transition from localized to delocalized modes in the Dirac spectrum and the Anderson transition in electronic systems. The QCD transition turns out to be in the same universality class as the transition in the corresponding Anderson model. We also speculate on the possible physical relevance of this transition to QCD at high temperature and the possible finite temperature phase transition in QCD-like models with different fermion contents.

  15. EHS-MS Level II Inspection System User Guide Updated: 06/25/2014 1 of 14

    E-print Network

    Entekhabi, Dara

    beside a DLC to view the list of Roomsets for each DLC. A DLC may have one or more Roomsets. Following). \\ Authorizations: DLC EHS Coordinators and DLC EHS Lead Contacts have full authorizations. #12;EHS-MS Level II

  16. Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II.

    E-print Network

    Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II. Increased fertilizer use greatly. It was apparent well before the rapid expansion in fertilizer use that inexpensive ways to evaluate the fertility

  17. Operator Interface for the PEP-II Low Level RF Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Stephanie; Claus, Richard

    1997-05-01

    We describe the operator interface for the Low Level RF Control System being built for the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The operator interface consists of displays for monitor and control from UNIX workstations, slow feedback loops and control sequences residing on microprocessors running the VxWorks real time operating system, and an interface to the existing SLAC Linear Collider control system for archiving, alarming, message logging, configuration, correlations, and multiknobs. The displays, database, and slower controls and monitoring are implemented using the EPICS control system package. Control sequences include the cavity tuner loop, automatic processing, klystron voltage loop, and RF station state control. Monitored subsystems include the machine protection system and low level RF. Challenges encountered in the operator interface design consist of the interface to a legacy control system, ability to change hardware and databases with minimal software impact and quick turnaround, intuitive user displays and tools, and reliable, bumpless, 24 hour a day operation.

  18. Improved trauma care in a rural hospital after establishing a level II trauma center.

    PubMed

    Wenneker, W W; Murray, D H; Ledwich, T

    1990-12-01

    A study of motor vehicle accident deaths occurring in Napa County, California, from 1979 through 1983 showed that there was a preventable death rate of 42% for deaths that were not related to central nervous system injuries. After developing a Level II trauma center at our hospital, the preventable death rate decreased to 14%. This was statistically significant (total chi-square, 0.01 less than p less than 0.025). There was a significant increase in the average Injury Severity Score (34 versus 45, p less than 0.005) as well as significant improvements in the surgeon's response time (32 minutes versus 11 minutes, p less than 0.005) and in the time from hospital arrival to the start of surgery (3.6 hours versus 1.9 hours, 0.01 less than p less than 0.025). We conclude that these changes are indicative of improved trauma care and reflect favorably upon the effectiveness of a rural trauma center that meets Level II trauma center guidelines established by the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. PMID:2252131

  19. Splenic salvage in adults at a level II community hospital trauma center.

    PubMed

    Clancy, T V; Weintritt, D C; Ramshaw, D G; Churchill, M P; Covington, D L; Maxwell, J G

    1996-12-01

    Recognition of the important role of the spleen within the immune system has prompted surgeons to regularly consider splenic preservation. We studied our experience at a Level II trauma center to determine whether this trend is reflected in our management. We reviewed 81 adult blunt trauma patients with splenic injury admitted between January 1988 and December 1993. We examined age, race, and clinical data including mechanism of injury, trauma and injury severity scores, organ injury scale (OIS) grade, admitting blood pressure, operations, length of stay, hospital charges, and outcome. Thirty-nine patients underwent immediate splenectomy. Nonoperative treatment was successful in 31 of 37 patients (83.7%). Mean OIS grade (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma) was significantly different between patients treated nonoperatively (1.6 +/- 0.9) and patients treated with immediate splenectomy (3.9 +/- 1.1), (P = <0.001). American Association for the Surgery of Trauma OIS grade correlated well between CT classification and classification at operation (r = 0.7, P = 0.0001) but did not predict success in nonoperative management. Hemodynamic stability, injury severity, and abdominal CT scan findings determine choice of therapy. Splenorrhaphy is frequently discussed but infrequently performed. Splenectomy remains the most commonly performed operation for splenic injury in adults with blunt splenic trauma. Nonoperative management is the most common method of splenic salvage at the Level II community hospital trauma center. PMID:8955246

  20. Anderson transition in a three-dimensional kicked rotor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao; García-García, Antonio M

    2009-03-01

    We investigate Anderson localization in a three-dimensional (3D) kicked rotor. By a finite-size scaling analysis we identify a mobility edge for a certain value of the kicking strength k = k(c) . For k > k(c) dynamical localization does not occur, all eigenstates are delocalized and the spectral correlations are well described by Wigner-Dyson statistics. This can be understood by mapping the kicked rotor problem onto a 3D Anderson model (AM) where a band of metallic states exists for sufficiently weak disorder. Around the critical region k approximately k(c) we carry out a detailed study of the level statistics and quantum diffusion. In agreement with the predictions of the one parameter scaling theory (OPT) and with previous numerical simulations, the number variance is linear, level repulsion is still observed, and quantum diffusion is anomalous with proportional t(2/3) . We note that in the 3D kicked rotor the dynamics is not random but deterministic. In order to estimate the differences between these two situations we have studied a 3D kicked rotor in which the kinetic term of the associated evolution matrix is random. A detailed numerical comparison shows that the differences between the two cases are relatively small. However in the deterministic case only a small set of irrational periods was used. A qualitative analysis of a much larger set suggests that deviations between the random and the deterministic kicked rotor can be important for certain choices of periods. Heuristically it is expected that localization effects will be weaker in a nonrandom potential since destructive interference will be less effective to arrest quantum diffusion. However we have found that certain choices of irrational periods enhance Anderson localization effects. PMID:19392034

  1. Development of High Level Trigger Software for Belle II at SuperKEKB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Mineo, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Belle collaboration has been trying for 10 years to reveal the mystery of the current matter-dominated universe. However, much more statistics is required to search for New Physics through quantum loops in decays of B mesons. In order to increase the experimental sensitivity, the next generation B-factory, SuperKEKB, is planned. The design luminosity of SuperKEKB is 8 x 1035cm-2s-1 a factor 40 above KEKB's peak luminosity. At this high luminosity, the level 1 trigger of the Belle II experiment will stream events of 300 kB size at a 30 kHz rate. To reduce the data flow to a manageable level, a high-level trigger (HLT) is needed, which will be implemented using the full offline reconstruction on a large scale PC farm. There, physics level event selection is performed, reducing the event rate by ~ 10 to a few kHz. To execute the reconstruction the HLT uses the offline event processing framework basf2, which has parallel processing capabilities used for multi-core processing and PC clusters. The event data handling in the HLT is totally object oriented utilizing ROOT I/O with a new method of object passing over the UNIX socket connection. Also under consideration is the use of the HLT output as well to reduce the pixel detector event size by only saving hits associated with a track, resulting in an additional data reduction of ~ 100 for the pixel detector. In this contribution, the design and implementation of the Belle II HLT are presented together with a report of preliminary testing results.

  2. UNIONE MATEMATICA ITALIANA David F. Anderson, Ayman Badawi, David E.

    E-print Network

    Badawi, Ayman

    BOLLETTINO UNIONE MATEMATICA ITALIANA David F. Anderson, Ayman Badawi, David E. Dobbs Pseudo. ANDERSON - AYMAN BADAWI - DAVID E. DOBBS Sunto. ­ Viene data una condizione sufficiente affinchè un sopra #12;DAVID F. ANDERSON - AYMAN BADAWI - DAVID E. DOBBS536 of R if R%B%T; if I is an ideal of R, then (I

  3. INET 2000 Anderson, Camp The Telecom Road Less Traveled

    E-print Network

    Camp, L. Jean

    1 INET 2000 Anderson, Camp The Telecom Road Less Traveled Brian L. Anderson brian · Efficacy of poverty alleviation programs #12;2 INET 2000 Anderson, Camp The Road Less Chosen · Bangladesh As a Nation · 1,800 miles of railway · 8,500 miles of road ­In comparison Wisconsin has 110,000 · Per capita

  4. FY 2013-2014 Cardinal Level Donors

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    & Rosemary Anderson *Gordon & Liz Anderson *Rudy T. Andriani *Sonny Astani *Doris Atteberry *Walter & Haleh Gramian *Richard R. Grey *Noah Grimmett (Kelly Slater Wave Co.) *Rudolf W. Gunnerman *Chanresh and Gloria Kaprielian *David V. Karney *Michael E. Kassner *Jerome Kay *Jay Kear *William Myron Keck, II

  5. Image transport through a disordered optical fibre mediated by transverse Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J.; Koch, Karl W.; Hawkins, Thomas; Ballato, John; Mafi, Arash

    2014-02-01

    Transverse Anderson localization of light allows localized optical-beam-transport through a transversely disordered and longitudinally invariant medium. Its successful implementation in disordered optical fibres recently resulted in the propagation of localized beams of radii comparable to that of conventional optical fibres. Here we demonstrate optical image transport using transverse Anderson localization of light. The image transport quality obtained in the polymer disordered optical fibre is comparable to or better than some of the best commercially available multicore image fibres with less pixelation and higher contrast. It is argued that considerable improvement in image transport quality can be obtained in a disordered fibre made from a glass matrix with near wavelength-size randomly distributed air-holes with an air-hole fill-fraction of 50%. Our results open the way to device-level implementation of the transverse Anderson localization of light with potential applications in biological and medical imaging.

  6. The Influence of Alcoholic Liver Disease on Serum PIVKA-II Levels in Patients without Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kang, Seong Hee; Lee, Beom Jae; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Prothrombin induced by vitamin K deficiency or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) is a widely used diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We evaluated the correlation between alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and serum PIVKA-II levels in chronic liver disease (CLD) patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 2,528 CLD patients without HCC. Among these patients, 76 exhibited serum high PIVKA-II levels of >125 mAU/mL (group 1). We categorized 76 control patients matched by age, sex, and the presence of liver cirrhosis from the remaining patients who were negative for serum PIVKA-II (group 2). Results Group 1 revealed increased antibiotic usage (23.7% vs 2.6%, p<0.001) and incidence of ALD (60.5% vs 14.5%, p<0.001) as well as elevated aspartate aminotransferase (52.5 IU/L vs 30.5 IU/L, p=0.025) and ? glutamyl transpeptidase (67.5 IU/L vs 36.5 IU/L, p=0.005) levels compared with group 2. Further, group 1 was significantly associated with a worse Child-Pugh class than group 2. In the multivariate analysis, ALD (odds ratio [OR], 7.151; p<0.001) and antibiotic usage (OR, 5.846; p<0.001) were significantly associated with positive PIVKA-II levels. Conclusions Our study suggests that ALD and antibiotics usage may be confounding factors when interpreting high serum PIVKA-II levels in patients without HCC. Therefore, serum PIVKA-II levels in patients with ALD or in patients administered antibiotics should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25473073

  7. Administration Noma Bennett Anderson, PhD

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    Administration Dean Noma Bennett Anderson, PhD Assistant Deans Faculty and Academic Affairs RebeccaD Department of Physical Therapy Chair and Program Director CarolCountLikens,PT,PhD,MBA Department of Physician Assistant Studies Chair & Director Johnna Tanner, MSPAS, PA

  8. The Anderson Model as a matrix model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Magnen; G. Poirot; V. Rivasseau

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe a strategy to study the Anderson model of an electron in a random potential at weak coupling by a renormalization group analysis. There is an interesting technical analogy between this problem and the theory of random matrices. In d = 2 the random matrices which appear are approximately of the free type well known to

  9. Biology Office Shauna C. Anderson, Director

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    Biology Biology Office Shauna C. Anderson, Director 375 WIDB, (801) 422-4295 College of Biology program in biology has open enrollment. The Discipline A degree for students who desire a broad approach to biology, the major provides solid preparation for graduate schools in most fields of biology as well

  10. Anderson localization in the seventies and beyond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Thouless

    2009-01-01

    Little attention was paid to Anderson's challenging paper on localization for the first ten years, but from 1969 onwards it generated a lot of interest. Around that time a number of challenging questions were raised by the community, on matters such as the existence of a sharp distinction between localized and extended states, or between conductors and insulators. For some

  11. Anderson Localization in the Seventies and Beyond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Thouless

    2010-01-01

    Little attention was paid to Anderson's challenging paper on localization for the first ten years, but from 1968 onwards it generated a lot of interest. Around that time a number of important questions were raised by the community, on matters such as the existence of a sharp distinction between localized and extended states, or between conductors and insulators. For some

  12. California's Snow Zone Lands Henry W. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Water Losses in Winter and Spring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Water Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Water Savings in Summer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Water LossesManaging California's Snow Zone Lands for Water Henry W. Anderson U S . F O R E S T S E R V I C E R

  13. Type II deiodinase polymorphisms and serum thyroid hormone levels in patients with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Luo, M; Zhou, X H; Zou, T; Keyim, K; Dong, L M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated type II deiodinase (DIO2) polymorphisms and serum thyroid hormone levels in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a Uygur population. We studied the DIO2 Thr92Ala (rs225014) and ORFa-Gly3Asp (rs12885300) polymorphisms of 129 unrelated MCI cases and 131 matched controls. All subjects were genotyped using SNaPshot SNP genotyping assays. Serum thyroid hormone levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Levels of serum triiodothyronine and thyroxine in the MCI group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Genotype and allele frequencies in the DIO2 gene between the MCI and control groups were not significantly different. There was no association in genotype and allele frequencies of Thr92Ala between genders in both groups. ORFa-Gly3Asp genotype and allele frequencies were significantly different in patients and controls by gender. The Asp allele was less frequent among male MCI patients compared to controls (odds ratio = 0.471, 95% confidence interval = 0.261-0.848). However, female Asp carriers were more frequent among MCI patients than among controls (odds ratio = 2.842, 95% confidence interval = 1.326-6.09). Serum levels of triiodothyronine and thyroxine were lower in individuals of the Ala/Ala genotype than in those with the Thr/Thr or Thr/Ala genotype. Serum levels of triiodothyronine were lower in male Gly/Gly carriers than in Gly/Asp or Asp/Asp carriers. Decreased serum levels of triiodothyronine and thyroxine may influence the incidence of MCI in the Uygur population. DIO2 gene polymorphisms may play a role in the incidence of MCI in male patients. PMID:26125736

  14. Commissioning experience with the PEP-II low-level RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

    1997-05-01

    The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment and supported by EPICS. All signal processing and control is done at baseband using in-phase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. Remotely configurable RF feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to the required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. The system contains a built-in baseband network analyzer which allows remote measurement of the RF feedback loop transfer functions and automated configuration of these loops. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system.

  15. Software Architecture of the PEP-II Low Level RF Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claus, R.; Allison, S. A.

    1997-05-01

    We describe the software architecture of the Low Level RF Control System being built for the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. This VXI based system utilizes a commercially available embedded CPU controller board running the VxWorks real time operating system for each RF station. The operator interface and slower data processing are implemented using the EPICS control system package. The embedded processors are used to load, calibrate, monitor and diagnose various components of the system. The system consists of custom hardware modules containing fixed algorithm DSPs with programmable coefficients to implement FIR and DDF filters, and software programmable DSPs to implement the line supply ripple cancelation feedback loop and the ion clearing gap adaptation algorithm. Machine protection is implemented using a PLC based platform.

  16. Influence of luminosity leveling on the CDF-II B-Physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Matthew; /Purdue U.; Lewis, Jonathan; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The effective bandwidth of the CDF-II level 1 trigger is approximately 25 kHz. Some of this bandwidth is used to record events that form the data sets used by the high p{sub T} physics analyses. The remaining bandwidth is used by triggers that are sensitive to hadronic B decays and provide one of the most important samples used for the study of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. At high luminosities, the hadronic B triggers have rates that greatly exceed the available bandwidth. Rather than incur large dead-times associated with these excessive rates, these B triggers are prescaled to limit the total trigger rate to the effective level 1 trigger bandwidth. The prescales are dynamically adjusted as the store progresses so that all of the bandwidth that is not used for the high p{sub T} physics program is used to record hadronic B triggers. In principle, the luminosity could be held at a more constant level throughout the store in such a way that the integrated luminosity would be the same as that obtained from a normal store. It has been suggested that this would allow B triggers to be recorded with lower prescales and consequently with higher B{sub s}{sup 0} signal efficiencies. This note describes a parametric model of the high p{sub T} and hadronic B triggers used by CDF and compares the yields of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} decays that would result with and without luminosity leveling.

  17. Reply. [to the comment by Anderson et al. (1993)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.; Ferek, Ronald G.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1994-01-01

    While Hegg et al. (1993) accepts the criticism of Anderson et al. (1994) in principle, this involves the adoption of an aerosol composition model and the model that they propose to reconcile these observations with the assertion of Charlson et al. (1992) does not agree with many observations, particularly those made over the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the use of a gain factor (i.e. the partial derivative of aerosol mass with respect to the sulfate ion), proposed by Anderson et al., may be valid for particular cases where a proposed composition model really reflects the actual aerosol composition, this procedure is considered questionable in general. The use of sulfate as a tracer for nonsulfate aerosol mass is questionable, because in the present authors' data set, sulfate averaged only about 26% of the dry aerosol mass. The ammonium mass associated with sulfate mass is not analogous to that betwen the oxygen mass and sulfur mass in the sulfate ion. Strong chemical bonds are present between sulfur and oxygen in sulfate, whereas ammonium and sulfate in haze droplets are ions in solution that may or may not be associated with one another. Thus, there is no reason to assume that sulfate will act as a reliable tracer of ammonium mass. Hegg et al. expresses the view that their approach used for estimating sulfate light scattering efficiency is appropriate for the current level of understanding of atmospheric aerosols.

  18. [Level of knowledge of patients with type II diabetes mellitus in primary care].

    PubMed

    Piñeiro Chonsa, F; Lara Valdivielso, E; Muñoz Cacho, P; Herrera Plaza, T; Rodríguez Cordero, R; Mayo Alastrey, M A

    1991-01-01

    A personal interview to 148 patients was carried out with the aim of getting to know the level of information of type II diabetic patients at an Urban Health Center in Santander. A validated questionnaire made up of 14 questions on general aspects of diabetis, dietetic habits and capability to handle complications was used. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of questionnaire was 0.69. The correct answer average was 6.3 (IC = 5.9-6.5). Patients were best informed about general aspects and had much less information with regard to the handling of complications and to their diet. The differences among these three sections of questions were significative (p less than 0.001). The patients under diet treatment obtained worse results than those treated with oral hipoglucemiants and insulin. Our results are worse than those reported by other similar populations at a national level. Also, and due to the differences in knowledge within this group, we believe that the establishment of groups and subgroups when educating diabetic patients is possible and also highly recommended. PMID:1917331

  19. An Exploratory Study of Web-Based Supports for Occupational Therapy Students During Level II Fieldwork.

    PubMed

    Wooster, Donna

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY Occupational therapy students often experience high levels of anxiety about transitioning from the academic student role to the fieldwork student role. The separation from their classmates and the geographical relocation may isolate some students. Additionally, the quality and quantity of on-site supports available to individual students vary with each placement. A web-based resource was designed to assist occupational therapy students from the University of South Alabama with the transition from student role in an academic environment to level II fieldwork in off-campus work environments. Participation was voluntary and no grades were assigned. Students were invited to participate as needed with their classmates for support and information sharing. Resources were provided asynchronously so students could access them whenever and wherever they could gain access to the Internet. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of the data was conducted. Data analysis included frequency of web-based communication, analysis of emerging themes based on the communication, outcome of student fieldwork performance, and students' perceptions based on their participation. The information gained during this exploratory study could be useful to other faculty in developing similar web-based resources to promote student success. Additionally, the technology skills gained by the students are hoped to improve their confidence to participate in web-based professional list serves and distance education opportunities in the future. PMID:23944662

  20. Tropomyosin and myosin-II cellular levels promote actomyosin ring assembly in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; Sladewski, Thomas E; Pollard, Luther W; Lord, Matthew

    2010-03-15

    Myosin-II (Myo2p) and tropomyosin are essential for contractile ring formation and cytokinesis in fission yeast. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches to understand how these proteins function at contractile rings. We find that ring assembly is delayed in Myo2p motor and tropomyosin mutants, but occurs prematurely in cells engineered to express two copies of myo2. Thus, the timing of ring assembly responds to changes in Myo2p cellular levels and motor activity, and the emergence of tropomyosin-bound actin filaments. Doubling Myo2p levels suppresses defects in ring assembly associated with a tropomyosin mutant, suggesting a role for tropomyosin in maximizing Myo2p function. Correspondingly, tropomyosin increases Myo2p actin affinity and ATPase activity and promotes Myo2p-driven actin filament gliding in motility assays. Tropomyosin achieves this by favoring the strong actin-bound state of Myo2p. This mode of regulation reflects a role for tropomyosin in specifying and stabilizing actomyosin interactions, which facilitates contractile ring assembly in the fission yeast system. PMID:20110347

  1. Radiative lifetimes, branching fractions, transition probabilities and oscillator strengths of even-parity levels for Eu II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Shang, Xue; Tian, Yanshan; Fan, Shuang; Dai, Zhenwen

    2013-11-01

    Radiative lifetimes for 30 even-parity levels in the 4f65d6s, 4f65d2 and 4f8 configurations with the energy range between 34923.43 and 57388.87 cm-1 of Eu II were measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) method. Branching fraction measurements of seven levels for Eu II were performed based on the emission spectrum of a hollow cathode lamp. By combining the measured lifetimes and the branching fractions, absolute transition probabilities and oscillator strengths for 18 transitions were derived. The obtained results were compared with published data, and a basically good agreement was achieved.

  2. Numerical studies on the Anderson localization problem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Stein; U. Krey

    1981-01-01

    The Anderson localization transition has been studied by numerical methods for very large two- and three-dimensional samples with up to 30 000 sites, varying both the energy and the strength of disorder of the electronic system, which is described by a tight-binding Hamiltonian with both diagonal and off-diagonal disorder. By an orthogonal transformation, the system is mapped numerically onto an

  3. Laparoscopic Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty in children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Schier

    1998-01-01

    In two children (ages 14 and 7 years) a laparoscopic Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty was performed. In the 14-year-old boy a para-anastomotic\\u000a drain was placed; a urinoma developed postoperatively, which was treated by a pyelostoma placed transcutaneously. In the 7-year-old\\u000a boy a transanastomotic pyelostoma splint was placed intraoperatively. The splint was removed 10?days later; the postoperative\\u000a course was uneventful. Operative time was

  4. Human cytomegalovirus decreases constitutive transcription of MHC class II genes in mature Langerhans cells by reducing CIITA transcript levels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andrew W.; Wang, Nan; Hornell, Tara M.C.; Harding, James J.; Deshpande, Chetan; Hertel, Laura; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Macaubas, Claudia; Mocarski, Edward S.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) productively infects CD34+ progenitor-derived, mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (matLC) and reduces surface expression of MHC class II complexes (MHC II) by increasing intracellular retention of these molecules. To determine whether HCMV also inhibits MHC II expression by other mechanisms, we assessed mRNA levels of the class II transcriptional regulator, CIITA, and several of its target genes in infected matLC. Levels of CIITA, HLA-DRA (DRA) and DRB transcripts, and new DR protein synthesis were compared in mock-infected and HCMV-infected cells by quantitative PCR and pulse-chase immunoprecipitation analyses, respectively. CIITA mRNA levels were significantly lower in HCMV-infected matLC as compared to mock-infected cells. When assessed in the presence of Actinomycin D, the stability of CIITA transcripts was not diminished by HCMV. Analysis of promoter-specific CIITA isoforms revealed that types I, III and IV all were decreased by HCMV, a result that differs from changes after incubation of these cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure to UV-inactivated virus failed to reduce CIITA mRNA levels, implicating de novo viral gene expression in this effect. HCMV-infected matLC also expressed lower levels of DR transcripts and reduced DR protein synthesis rates compared to mock-infected matLC. In summary, we demonstrate that HCMV infection of a human dendritic cell subset inhibits constitutive CIITA expression, most likely at the transcriptional level, resulting in reduced MHC II biosynthesis. We suggest this represents a new mechanism of modulation of mature LC by HCMV. PMID:21458073

  5. Evaluation of NOAA Climate Outlooks in Extended Great Lakes Water Levels Forecasts Thomas E. Croley II1

    E-print Network

    1 Evaluation of NOAA Climate Outlooks in Extended Great Lakes Water Levels Forecasts Thomas E. Croley II1 Abstract The Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) simulates time series of daily Great Lakes hydrology by first estimating initial hydrological conditions and then using a daily

  6. Fire Fighter Level I-II-III [and] Practical Skills Test. Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series. Final Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribyl, Paul F.

    Practical skills tests are provided for fire fighter trainees in the Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series, Fire Fighter Levels I, II, and III. A course introduction appears first and contains this information: recommended instructional sequence, required facilities, instructional methodology, requirements for certification, course…

  7. Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 Unraveling the conundrum of river response to rising sea level from

    E-print Network

    Parker, Gary

    Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 1 Unraveling the conundrum of river to Sedimentology, May, 2006 2 deltas is adapted to describe the response of the Fly-Strickland River system, Papua of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 3 Pleistocene-Holocene eustatic sea level rise of some 120 m

  8. An Integrated System for Near Real-Time 3D Visualization of NEXRAD Level II Data on

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    An Integrated System for Near Real-Time 3D Visualization of NEXRAD Level II Data on Tera challenges exist in providing visual displays that fully utilize the 3D information in the radar data in real-time an integrated solution for near real-time data delivery and 3D visualization that can be deployed as a service

  9. Cranial location of level II lymph nodes in laryngeal cancer: Implications for elective nodal target volume delineation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petra M.. Braam; Cornelis P. J. Raaijmakers; Chris H. J. Terhaard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the cranial distribution of level II lymph nodes in patients with laryngeal cancer to optimize the elective radiation nodal target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: The most cranially located metastatic lymph node was delineated in 67 diagnostic CT data sets. The minimum distance from the base of the skull (BOS) to the lymph node was determined. Results:

  10. Anderson localization of matter waves in quantum-chaos theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, E.; Pilati, S.

    2015-06-01

    We study the Anderson localization of atomic gases exposed to three-dimensional optical speckles by analyzing the statistics of the energy-level spacings. This method allows us to consider realistic models of the speckle patterns, taking into account the strongly anisotropic correlations which are realized in concrete experimental configurations. We first compute the mobility edge Ec of a speckle pattern created using a single laser beam. We find that Ec drifts when we vary the anisotropy of the speckle grains, going from higher values when the speckles are squeezed along the beam propagation axis to lower values when they are elongated. We also consider the case where two speckle patterns are superimposed, forming interference fringes, and we find that Ec is increased compared to the case of idealized isotropic disorder. We discuss the important implications of our findings for cold-atom experiments.

  11. Apolipoprotein A-II Influences Apolipoprotein E-Linked Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Women with High Levels of HDL Cholesterol and C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Corsetti, James P.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Sparks, Charles E.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2012-01-01

    Background In a previous report by our group, high levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) were demonstrated to be associated with risk of incident cardiovascular disease in women with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the setting of both low (designated as HR1 subjects) and high (designated as HR2 subjects) levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). To assess whether apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) plays a role in apoE-associated risk in the two female groups. Methodology/Principal Outcome event mapping, a graphical data exploratory tool; Cox proportional hazards multivariable regression; and curve-fitting modeling were used to examine apoA-II influence on apoE-associated risk focusing on HDL particles with apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) without apoA-II (LpA-I) and HDL particles with both apoA-I and apoA-II (LpA-I:A-II). Results of outcome mappings as a function of apoE levels and the ratio of apoA-II to apoA-I revealed within each of the two populations, a high-risk subgroup characterized in each situation by high levels of apoE and additionally: in HR1, by a low value of the apoA-II/apoA-I ratio; and in HR2, by a moderate value of the apoA-II/apoA-I ratio. Furthermore, derived estimates of LpA-I and LpA-I:A-II levels revealed for high-risk versus remaining subjects: in HR1, higher levels of LpA-I and lower levels of LpA-I:A-II; and in HR2 the reverse, lower levels of LpA-I and higher levels of LpA-I:A-II. Results of multivariable risk modeling as a function of LpA-I and LpA-I:A-II (dichotomized as highest quartile versus combined three lower quartiles) revealed association of risk only for high levels of LpA-I:A-II in the HR2 subgroup (hazard ratio 5.31, 95% CI 1.12–25.17, p?=?0.036). Furthermore, high LpA-I:A-II levels interacted with high apoE levels in establishing subgroup risk. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that apoA-II plays a significant role in apoE-associated risk of incident CVD in women with high levels of HDL-C and CRP. PMID:22723940

  12. Anderson transition for Google matrix eigenstates

    E-print Network

    Zhirov, O V

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a number of random matrix models describing the Google matrix G of directed networks. The properties of their spectra and eigenstates are analyzed by numerical matrix diagonalization. We show that for certain models it is possible to have an algebraic decay of PageRank vector with the exponent similar to real directed networks. At the same time the spectrum has no spectral gap and a broad distribution of eigenvalues in the complex plain. The eigenstates of G are characterized by the Anderson transition from localized to delocalized states and a mobility edge curve in the complex plane of eigenvalues.

  13. Anderson localization of light with topological dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Valery E.; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Vysloukh, Victor A.; Torner, Lluis

    2013-11-01

    We predict Anderson localization of light with nested screw topological dislocations propagating in disordered two-dimensional arrays of hollow waveguides illuminated by vortex beams. The phenomenon manifests itself in the statistical presence of topological dislocations in ensemble-averaged output distributions accompanying standard disorder-induced localization of light spots. Remarkably, screw dislocations are captured by the light spots despite the fast and irregular transverse displacements and topological charge flipping undertaken by the dislocations due to the disorder. The statistical averaged modulus of the output local topological charge depends on the initial vorticity carried by the beam.

  14. Percolating states in the topological Anderson insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girschik, Adrian; Libisch, Florian; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the presence of percolating states in disordered two-dimensional topological insulators. In particular, we uncover a close connection between these states and the so-called topological Anderson insulator, which is a topologically nontrivial phase induced by the presence of disorder. The decay of this phase could previously be connected to a delocalization of bulk states with increasing disorder strength. We identify this delocalization to be the result of a percolation transition of states that circumnavigate the hills of the bulk disorder potential.

  15. Theoretical lifetimes and Land{acute e} g values of CsthinspII 5p⁵thinsp6p levels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beck

    1998-01-01

    Lifetimes of CsthinspII 5p⁵thinsp6p levels, oscillator strengths to the lower 5p⁵thinsp5d and 5p⁵thinsp6s levels, Land{acute e} g factors and LS compositions of all these levels are presented. Results are in very good agreement with most available experiment. Large correlation effects are associated with those 5p⁵thinsp5d and 5p⁵thinsp6s states, which strongly interact. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. SEAL A SIMPLE ENTITY ANNOTATION LANGUAGE Eike F Anderson

    E-print Network

    Davies, Christopher

    SEAL ­ A SIMPLE ENTITY ANNOTATION LANGUAGE Eike F Anderson The National Centre for Computer introduce the simple entity annotation language SEAL, a fully working subset of the AvDL behaviour definition language introduced by [Anderson 2005]. SEAL presents a simple scripting solution for embedding

  17. Microwave driven atoms: from Anderson localization to Einstein's photo effect

    E-print Network

    Schelle, Alexej; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    We study the counterpart of Anderson localization in driven one-electron Rydberg atoms. By changing the initial Rydberg state at fixed microwave frequency and interaction time, we numerically monitor the crossover from Anderson localization to the photo effect in the atomic ionization signal.

  18. Phase diagram for Anderson disorder: Beyond single-parameter scaling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nigel Goldenfeld; Roger Haydock

    2006-01-01

    The Anderson model for independent electrons in a disordered potential is transformed analytically and exactly to a basis of random extended states leading to a variant of augmented space. In addition to the widely accepted phase diagrams in all physical dimensions, a plethora of additional, weaker Anderson transitions are found, characterized by the long-distance behavior of states. Critical disorders are

  19. Carl Anderson, former Biol-ogy Department Chair, has been

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    the Bulletin Carl Anderson, former Biol- ogy Department Chair, has been named Senior Scientist pathways in cancerous cells to stop them from growing and... See Carl Anderson on p. 2 Vol. 65 - No. 30 August 26, 2011 RogerStoutenburghD1400810CourtesyofCornellUniversity RogerStoutenburghD2260605 Roger

  20. Participant List and Biographies Cheryl Anderson, canderso@hawaii.edu

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    - 92 - APPENDIX A Participant List and Biographies Cheryl Anderson, canderso@hawaii.edu Social Science Research Institute, University of Hawai`i C heryl L. Anderson is a certified planner (AICP), doctoral candidate, and the Director of the Hazards, Climate, and Environment Program, University of Hawai`i

  1. Probing statistical properties of Anderson localization with quantum emitters

    E-print Network

    Stephan Smolka; Henri Thyrrestrup; Luca Sapienza; Tau B. Lehmann; Kristian R. Rix; Luis S. Froufe-Pérez; Pedro D. García; Peter Lodahl

    2011-03-30

    Wave propagation in disordered media can be strongly modified by multiple scattering and wave interference. Ultimately the so-called Anderson-localized regime is reached when the waves become strongly confined in space. So far, Anderson localization of light has been probed in transmission experiments by measuring the intensity of an external light source after propagation through a disordered medium. However, discriminating between Anderson localization and losses in these experiments remains a major challenge. Here we present an alternative approach where we use quantum emitters embedded in disordered photonic crystal waveguides as light sources. Anderson-localized modes are efficiently excited and the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra allows to explore their statistical properties paving a way for controlling Anderson localization in disordered photonic crystals.

  2. Probing statistical properties of Anderson localization with quantum emitters

    E-print Network

    Smolka, Stephan; Sapienza, Luca; Lehmann, Tau B; Rix, Kristian R; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S; García, Pedro D; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Wave propagation in disordered media can be strongly modified by multiple scattering and wave interference. Ultimately the so-called Anderson-localized regime is reached when the waves become strongly confined in space. So far, Anderson localization of light has been probed in transmission experiments by measuring the intensity of an external light source after propagation through a disordered medium. However, discriminating between Anderson localization and losses in these experiments remains a major challenge. Here we present an alternative approach where we use quantum emitters embedded in disordered photonic crystal waveguides as light sources. Anderson-localized modes are efficiently excited and the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra allows to explore their statistical properties paving a way for controlling Anderson localization in disordered photonic crystals.

  3. The Role of Contrast in the Perception of Achromatic Transparency: Comment on Singh and Anderson (2002) and Anderson (2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Marc K.

    2008-01-01

    M. Singh and B. L. Anderson proposed a perceptual theory of achromatic transparency in which the perceived transmittance of a perceived transparent filter is determined by the ratio of the Michelson contrast seen in the region of transparency to that of the background seen directly. Subsequently, B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and J. Meng proposed that…

  4. Valence Fluctuation from f2 Singlet Crystal-Field Ground State in Generalized Periodic Anderson Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryousuke Shiina

    2005-01-01

    A generalized periodic Anderson model with stable f2 configuration is examined through a Gutzwiller-type variational method (GM). In particular, we focus on the effect of the f2 crystal-field (CF) level scheme with singlet ground and triplet low-lying excited states. It is demonstrated that valence fluctuation from the f2 states is slightly enhanced by a small singlet--triplet CF splitting whereas it

  5. Geographic Analysis of Traffic Injury in Wisconsin: Impact on Case Fatality of Distance to Level I\\/II Trauma Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maureen Durkin; Jane McElroy; Hui Guan; Wayne Bigelow; Tom Brazelton

    Purpose: Traffic injuries are an important public health problem in Wisconsin. This paper examines geographic variations in the incidence and case fatality of traffic injuries, and evaluates proximity to Level I\\/II trauma care as a predictor of case fatality. Methods: Data on all persons injured in motor vehicle crashes on Wisconsin roadways during a 10-year pe- riod (1992-2001) were obtained

  6. Electrochemical Studies on Speciation of Cadmium(II) in ppb Level by Complexation with Ethylenediamine in Aqueous Media

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nurun Nahar; Anshaya Ramim; M. Nurul Abser

    2009-01-01

    The speciation of cadmium(II) in ppb level by complexation with ethylenediamine (EN) has been inves- tigated by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) using thin mercury film coated glassy carbon electrode (TMFGCE). The overall work has been carried out at constant ionic strength of 0.01 mol dm -3 (NaNO 3 ) at ambient temperature. The pH was kept constant at

  7. Spectroscopy of unbound levels with the aid of Weinberg's quasiparticles. II. Unbound levels with more than one open channel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Kelvin; R. Huby

    1977-01-01

    For pt.I see Huby, Nucl. Phys., vol.A167, p.271 (1971). A theory is developed for resonant nucleon-nucleus scattering which yields a particularly apt form of wavefunction for use in calculating DWBA matrix elements for stripping to unbound levels. It is a generalization of an existing theory to cover the case that the unbound state can decay through more than one channel.

  8. Anderson localization in metamaterials and other complex media (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gredeskul, Sergey A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Asatryan, Ara A.; Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Bliokh, Yuri P.; Freilikher, Valentin D.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.

    2012-07-01

    This is a review of some recent (mostly ours) results on Anderson localization of light and electron waves in complex disordered systems, including: (i) left-handed metamaterials, (ii) magnetoactive optical structures, (iii) graphene superlattices, and (iv) nonlinear dielectric media. First, we demonstrate that left-handed metamaterials can significantly suppress localization of light and lead to an anomalously enhanced transmission. This suppression is essential at the long-wavelength limit in the case of normal incidence, at specific angles of oblique incidence (Brewster anomaly), and in vicinity of zero-? or zero-? frequencies for dispersive metamaterials. Remarkably, in disordered samples comprised of alternating normal and left-handed metamaterials, the reciprocal Lyapunov exponent and reciprocal transmittance increment can differ from each other. Second, we study magnetoactive multilayered structures, which exhibit nonreciprocal localization of light depending on the direction of propagation and on polarization. At resonant frequencies or realizations such nonreciprocity results in effectively unidirectional transport of light. Third, we discuss the analogy between wave propagation through multilayered samples with metamaterials and charge transport in graphene, which provides a simple physical explanation of unusual conductive properties of disordered graphene superlatices. We predict disorder-induced resonance of the transmission coefficient at oblique incidence of Dirac quasiparticles. Finally, we demonstrate that an interplay of nonlinearity and disorder in dielectric media can lead to bistability of individual localized states excited inside the medium at resonant frequencies. This results in nonreciprocity of wave transmission and unidirectional transport of light.

  9. Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SHIMA, HIROAKI; KUTOMI, GORO; SATOMI, FUKINO; MAEDA, HIDEKI; TAKAMARU, TOMOKO; KAMESHIMA, HIDEKAZU; OMURA, TOSEI; MORI, MITSURU; HATAKENAKA, MASAMITSU; HASEGAWA, TADASHI; HIRATA, KOICHI

    2014-01-01

    In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

  10. Resonant enhancement of Anderson localization: analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Herrera-González, I F; Izrailev, F M; Makarov, N M

    2013-11-01

    We study localization properties of the eigenstates and wave transport in a one-dimensional system consisting of a set of barriers and/or wells of fixed thickness and random heights. The inherent peculiarity of the system resulting in the enhanced Anderson localization is the presence of the resonances emerging due to the coherent interaction of the waves reflected from the interfaces between the wells and/or barriers. Our theoretical approach allows to derive the localization length in infinite samples both out of the resonances and close to them. We examine how the transport properties of finite samples can be described in terms of this length. It is shown that the analytical expressions obtained by standard methods for continuous random potentials can be used in our discrete model, in spite of the presence of resonances that cannot be described by conventional theories. All our results are illustrated with numerical data manifesting an excellent agreement with the theory. PMID:24329215

  11. Magnetoresistance of an Anderson Insulator of Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Anirban; Galitski, Victor; Müller, Markus

    2013-07-01

    We study the magnetoresistance of two-dimensional bosonic Anderson insulators. We describe the change in spatial decay of localized excitations in response to a magnetic field, which is given by an interference sum over alternative tunneling trajectories. The excitations become more localized with increasing field (in sharp contrast to generic fermionic excitations which get weakly delocalized): the localization length ?(B) is found to change as ?-1(B)-?-1(0)˜B4/5. The quantum interference problem maps onto the classical statistical mechanics of directed polymers in random media (DPRM). We explain the observed scaling using a simplified droplet model which incorporates the nontrivial DPRM exponents. Our results have implications for a variety of experiments on magnetic-field-tuned superconductor-to-insulator transitions observed in disordered films, granular superconductors, and Josephson junction arrays, as well as for cold atoms in artificial gauge fields.

  12. The Anderson Reservoir seismic gap - Induced aseismicity?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bufe, C.G.

    1976-01-01

    A persistent 10-km seismicity gap along the Calaveras fault appears to be related to the presence of the Leroy Anderson Reservoir in the Calaveras-Silver Creek fault zones southeast of San Jose, California. A magnitude-4.7 earthquake occurred at a depth of 5 km in the centre of the gap on October 3, 1973. The sequence of immediate aftershocks usually accompanying shallow earthquakes of this magnitude in central California did not occur. A bridge crossing the reservoir near its southeast end has been severely deformed, apparently the result of tectonic creep on the Calaveras fault. The occurrence of creep and absence of small earthquakes along the Calaveras in the vicinity of the reservoir suggest a transition from stick slip to stable sliding, possibly brought about by increased pore pressure. ?? 1976.

  13. Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,H.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

  14. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  15. Osteobiology, strain, and microgravity. Part II: Studies at the tissue level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Vico; M. Hinsenkamp; D. Jones; P. J. Marie; A. Zallone; R. Cancedda

    2001-01-01

    Loading, microgravity, and\\/or defective mechanical strain\\/forces have important effects on bone cells and bone quality and\\u000a quantity. The complex mechanisms induced by strain and microgravity on bone cells have been reviewed in Part I of this paper.\\u000a In Part II, we have considered the data on the alterations induced by unloading and microgravity on the skeleton and the mechanisms\\u000a that

  16. From Extreme Values of I.I.D. Random Fields to Extreme Eigenvalues of Finite-volume Anderson Hamiltonian

    E-print Network

    Arvydas Astrauskas

    2015-01-05

    The aim of this paper is to study asymptotic geometric properties almost surely or/and in probability of extreme order statistics of an i.i.d. random field (potential) indexed by sites of multidimensional lattice cube, the volume of which unboundedly increases. We discuss the following topics: (I) high level exceedances, in particular, clustering of exceedances; (II) decay rate of spacings in comparison with increasing rate of extreme order statistics; (III) minimum of spacings of successive order statistics; (IV) asymptotic behavior of values neighboring to extremes and so on. The conditions of the results are formulated in terms of regular variation (RV) of the cumulative hazard function and its inverse. A relationship between RV classes of the present paper as well as their links to the well-known RV classes (including domains of attraction of max-stable distributions) are discussed. The asymptotic behavior of functionals (I)--(IV) determines the asymptotic structure of the top eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the large-volume discrete Schr\\" odinger operators with an i.i.d. potential (Anderson Hamiltonian). Thus, another aim of the present paper is to review and comment a recent progress on extreme value theory for eigenvalues of random Schr\\"odinger operators as well as to provide a clear and rigorous understanding of the relationship between the top eigenvalues and extreme values of i.i.d. potentials.

  17. New Mn II energy levels from STIS-HST spectrum of the HgMn star HD 175640

    E-print Network

    Castelli, F; Cowley, C R

    2015-01-01

    The NIST database lists several Mn II lines that were observed in the laboratory but not classified. They cannot be used in spectrum synthesis because their atomic line data are unknown. These lines are concentrated in the 2380-2700 A interval. We aimed to assign energy levels and log gf values to these lines. Semi-empirical line data for Mn II computed by Kurucz were used to synthesize the ultraviolet spectrum of the slow-rotating, HgMn star HD 175640. The spectrum was compared with the high-resolution spectrum observed with the HST-STIS equipment. A UVES spectrum covering the 3050-10000 A region was also examined. We determined a total of 73 new energy levels, 58 from the STIS spectrum of HD 175640 and another 15 from the UVES spectrum. The new energy levels give rise to numerous new computed lines. We have identified more than 50% of the unclassified lines listed in the NIST database and have changed the assignement of another 24 lines. An abundance analysis of the star HD 175640, based on the comparison o...

  18. Monitoring of ozone in selected forest ecosystems in Southern Carpathian and Romanian Intensive Monitoring Network (level II).

    PubMed

    Silaghi, Diana; Badea, Ovidiu

    2012-05-01

    In the Romanian forest ecosystems, the first measurements of ambient ozone (O(3)) concentrations started in 1997 in 6 of 26 locations established in a trans-Carpathian Network. Furthermore, three additional ozone and other phytotoxic pollutant (NO(x), SO(2) and NH(3)) monitoring networks were installed in 2000 in Retezat (11 locations) and during 2006-2009 in Bucegi-Piatra Craiului (22 locations) LTER Sites. Since 2007, in four Intensive Forest Monitoring plots (level II), measurements of ozone concentrations were developed. Measurements were made using the Ogawa® passive sampler system during the growing season (April to October). In the Bucegi LTER Site, the seasonal means of 42.5-47.2 ppb in 2006 and 2008 were higher than those determined in the Carpathian Network in the 1997-1999 period (39.0-42.0 ppb), while the 2009 mean of 40.0 ppb was in the range of these values. The O(3) levels were slightly higher than those measured in Retezat LTER Site. In the Intensive Forest Monitoring Network (level II), no significant differences in ozone concentrations between individual core plots were noticed. The seasonal means for each plot range between 36.8 and 49.8 ppb in 2008. An influence of ozone concentrations on crown condition and tree volume growth was not determined. PMID:22531931

  19. Biotransformation of PCBs in Arctic seabirds: characterization of phase I and II pathways at transcriptional, translational and activity levels.

    PubMed

    Helgason, Lisa B; Arukwe, Augustine; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Harju, Mikael; Hegseth, Marit N; Heimstad, Eldbjørg S; Jørgensen, Even H; Mortensen, Anne S; Wolkers, Johannes

    2010-06-01

    Arctic seabirds are exposed to a wide range of halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs). Exposure occurs mainly through food intake, and many pollutants accumulate in lipid-rich tissues. Little is known about how HOCs are biotransformed in arctic seabirds. In this study, we characterized biotransformation enzymes in chicks of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) and black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) from Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway). Phase I and II enzymes were analyzed at the transcriptional, translational and activity levels. For gene expression patterns, quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), using gene-sequence primers, were performed. Protein levels were analyzed using immunochemical assays of western blot with commercially available antibodies. Liver samples were analyzed for phase I and II enzyme activities using a variety of substrates including ethoxyresorufin (cytochrome (CYP)1A1/1A2), pentoxyresorufin (CYP2B), methoxyresorufin (CYP1A), benzyloxyresorufin (CYP3A), testosterone (CYP3A/CYP2B), 1-chloro-2,4-nitrobenzene (CDNB) (glutathione S-transferase (GST)) and 4-nitrophenol (uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT)). In addition, the hydroxylated (OH-) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were analyzed in the blood, liver and brain tissue, whereas the methylsulfone (MeSO(2)-) PCBs were analyzed in liver tissue. Results indicated the presence of phase I (CYP1A4/CYP1A5, CYP2B, and CYP3A) and phase II (GST and UDPGT) enzymes at the activity, protein and/or mRNA level in both species. Northern fulmar chicks had higher enzyme activity than black-legged kittiwake chicks. This in combination with the higher SigmaOH-PCB to parent PCB ratios suggests that northern fulmar chicks have a different biotransformation capacity than black-legged kittiwake chicks. PMID:20176133

  20. Flight-Level Thermodynamic Instrument Wetting Errors in Hurricanes. Part II: Implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew D. Eastin; Peter G. Black; William M. Gray

    2002-01-01

    The implications of flight-level instrument wetting error removal upon the mean thermodynamic structure across the eyewall, buoyancy of rainband vertical motions, and vertical energy fluxes near the top of the inflow layer are studied. Thermodynamic quantities across the mean eyewall are found to increase at all levels. As a result, maximum radial gradients of each quantity are shifted from the

  1. Level spacing statistics of bidimensional Fermi liquids: II. Landau fixed point and quantum chaos

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Melin

    We investigate the presence of quantum chaos in the spectrum of the bidimen- sional Fermi liquid by means of analytical and numerical methods. This model is integrable in a certain limit by bosonization of the Fermi surface. We study the effect on the level statisticsof the momentum cutoffpresent in the bidimen- sional bosonization procedure. We first analyse the level spacing

  2. The lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine, increases cell surface BMPR-II levels and restores BMP9 signalling in endothelial cells harbouring BMPR-II mutations.

    PubMed

    Dunmore, Benjamin J; Drake, Kylie M; Upton, Paul D; Toshner, Mark R; Aldred, Micheala A; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2013-09-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by dysregulated pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) proliferation, apoptosis and permeability. Loss-of-function mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type-II (BMPR-II) are the most common cause of heritable PAH, usually resulting in haploinsufficiency. We previously showed that BMPR-II expression is regulated via a lysosomal degradative pathway. Here, we show that the antimalarial drug, chloroquine, markedly increased cell surface expression of BMPR-II protein independent of transcription in PAECs. Inhibition of protein synthesis experiments revealed a rapid turnover of cell surface BMPR-II, which was inhibited by chloroquine treatment. Chloroquine enhanced PAEC expression of BMPR-II following siRNA knockdown of the BMPR-II transcript. Using blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs), we confirmed that signalling in response to the endothelial BMPR-II ligand, BMP9, is compromised in BOECs from patients harbouring BMPR-II mutations, and in BMPR-II mutant PAECs. Chloroquine significantly increased gene expression of BMP9-BMPR-II signalling targets Id1, miR21 and miR27a in both mutant BMPR-II PAECs and BOECs. These findings provide support for the restoration of cell surface BMPR-II with agents such as chloroquine as a potential therapeutic approach for heritable PAH. PMID:23669347

  3. Investigating the causes for decreased levels of glutathione in individuals with type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Minette; Ly, Judy; Saing, Tommy; Kaur Singh, Manpreet; Vera Tudela, Enrique; Morris, Devin; Chi, Po-Ting; Ochoa, Cesar; Sathananthan, Airani; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains an eminent global burden with one third of the world's population latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). Individuals with compromised immune systems are especially vulnerable to M. tb infection. In fact, individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) are two to three times more susceptible to TB than those without T2DM. In this study, we report that individuals with T2DM have lower levels of glutathione (GSH) due to compromised levels of GSH synthesis and metabolism enzymes. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?), a cytokine that is known to decrease the expression of the catalytic subunit of glutamine-cysteine ligase (GCLC) was found in increased levels in the plasma samples from individuals with T2DM, explaining the possible underlying mechanism that is responsible for decreased levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM. Moreover, increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) were observed in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. Increased levels of IL-6 and IL-17 was accompanied by enhanced production of free radicals further indicating an alternative mechanism for the decreased levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM. Augmenting the levels of GSH in macrophages isolated from individuals with T2DM resulted in improved control of M. tb infection. Furthermore, cytokines that are responsible for controlling M. tb infection at the cellular and granuloma level such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), interleukin-1? (IL-1?), interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-?), and interleukin-12 (IL-12), were found to be compromised in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. On the other hand, interleukin-10 (IL-10), an immunosuppressive cytokine was increased in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. Overall, these findings suggest that lower levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM lead to their increased susceptibility to M. tb infection. PMID:25790445

  4. SAUV II HIGH LEVEL SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE Steven G. Chappell chappell@ausi.org

    E-print Network

    ., 2004]. In September, a circa 12 hour scientific mission to collect dissolved oxygen data in Greenwich and the hull. This includes the low level microprocessors (with software), electronics, sensors, effectors

  5. Level II scour analysis for bridge 35 (BURKTH00310035) on Town Highway 31, crossing the West Branch Passumpsic River, Burke, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BURKTH00310035 on Town Highway 31 crossing the West Branch Passumpsic River, Burke, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  6. Anderson localization in the seventies and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouless, David

    2009-03-01

    Little attention was paid to Anderson's challenging paper on localization for the first ten years, but from 1969 onwards it generated a lot of interest. Around that time a number of challenging questions were raised by the community, on matters such as the existence of a sharp distinction between localized and extended states, or between conductors and insulators. For some of these questions the answers are unambiguous. There certainly are energy ranges in which states are exponentially localized, in the presence of a static disordered potential. In a one-diensional potential all states are localized. There is clear evidence, in three dimensions, for energy ranges in which states are extended and diffusive. Magnetic and spin-dependent interactions play an important part in reducing localization effects. For massive particles like electrons and atoms the lowest energy states are localized, but for massless particles like photons and acoustic phonons the lowest energy states are extended. In a one-dimensional disordered system all states are localized. Uncertainties remain. Scaling theory shows that in two-dimensional systems all states are weakly localized, and that there is no minimum metallic conductivity. The interplay between disorder and mutual interactions is still an area of uncertainty, which is very important for electronic systems. Optical and dilute atomic systems provide experimental tests which allow interaction to be much less important. The quantum Hall effect provided a system where states on the Fermi surface are localized, but non-dissipative currents flow in response to an electric field.

  7. Anderson Localization in the Seventies and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouless, David

    Little attention was paid to Anderson's challenging paper on localization for the first ten years, but from 1968 onwards it generated a lot of interest. Around that time a number of important questions were raised by the community, on matters such as the existence of a sharp distinction between localized and extended states, or between conductors and insulators. For some of these questions the answers are unambiguous. There certainly are energy ranges in which states are exponentially localized, in the presence of a static disordered potential. In a weakly disordered one-dimensional potential, all states are localized. There is clear evidence, in three dimensions, for energy ranges in which states are extended, and ranges in which they are diffusive. Magnetic and spin-dependent interactions play an important part in reducing localization effects. For massive particles like electrons and atoms the lowest energy states are localized, but for massless particles like photons and acoustic phonons the lowest energy states are extended. Uncertainties remain. Scaling theory suggests that in two-dimensional systems all states are weakly localized, and that there is no minimum metallic conductivity. The interplay between disorder and mutual interactions is still an area of uncertainty, which is very important for electronic systems. Optical and dilute atomic systems provide experimental tests which allow interaction to be much less important. The quantum Hall effect provided a system where states on the Fermi surface are localized, but non-dissipative currents flow in response to an electric field.

  8. Naringin Levels in Citrus Tissues : II. Quantitative Distribution of Naringin in Citrus paradisi MacFad.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, P S; McIntosh, C A; Mansell, R L

    1985-04-01

    The quantitative distribution of the flavanone-7-neohesperidoside, naringin, in seeds, seedlings, young plants, branches, flowers, and fruit of Citrus paradisi Macfad., cv ;Duncan' was analyzed by radioimmunoassay. High levels of naringin were associated with very young tissue and lower levels were found in older tissues. Seed coats of ungerminated seeds and young shoots had high naringin concentrations whereas cotyledons and roots had very low concentrations. Light-grown seedlings contained nearly twice as much naringin as etiolated seedlings and, in young plants and branches, the naringin content was highest in developing leaves and stem tissue. In flowers, the ovary had the highest levels of naringin, accounting for nearly 11% of the fresh weight. There was a net increase in the total naringin content of fruits during growth. However, due to the large increase in fruit size, there was a concomitant decrease in the naringin concentration as the fruit matured. PMID:16664159

  9. A three-level model for alkali metal vapor lasers. Part II: broadband optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, Gordon D.; Perram, Glen P.

    2013-09-01

    The effects of pump laser spectral bandwidth on the performance of longitudinally pumped diode-pumped alkali lasers is explored by extending the analytic, three-level model using longitudinally averaged number densities. By assuming a statistical distribution between the upper two levels, the limiting solution for the quasi-two level system is achieved. A second limiting solution is identified for strongly bleached conditions where the atom recycle rate, limited by spin-orbit relaxation, fully specifies the output power. Performance in the intermediate regime depends significantly on the pump bandwidth relative to the atomic absorption line width and requires numerical simulation. The ratio of populations for the two excited, 2P3/2,1/2 states completes an analytic solution and depends primarily on pump laser bandwidth, threshold, and alkali concentration. Absorption well into the wings on the atomic profile can be utilized by increasing alkali concentration, but imposes increased pump intensity threshold.

  10. Alcohol and Alcohol Safety: A Curriculum Manual for Senior High Level. Volume I of II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; Platt, Judith

    This manual is the third in a series of Alcohol and Alcohol Safety Curriculum Manuals for use by teachers and curriculum developers. Geared to the senior high school level, the objective of the manual is the promoting of responsible decisions about alcohol use. Emphasis is placed on driver and pedestrian safety in consonance with the concern and…

  11. Alcohol and Alcohol Safety: A Curriculum Manual for Elementary Level. Volume I of II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; Platt, Judith

    This manual is the first in a series of Alcohol and Alcohol Safety Curriculum Manuals for use by teachers and curriculum developers. Geared to the elementary grade level, the objective of the manual is to promote responsible present and future decisions about alcohol. Emphasis has been placed on driver and pedestrian safety in recognition of the…

  12. A level set approach for computing solutions to incompressible two- phase flow II

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Fatemi, E.; Osher, S. [Univ. of California , Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Math; Smereka, P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Math

    1995-06-01

    A level set method for capturing the interface between two fluids is combined with a variable density projection method to allow for computation of two-phase flow where the interface can merge/break and the flow can have a high Reynolds number. A distance function formulation of the level set method enables one to compute flows with large density ratios (1000/1) and flows that are surface tension driven; with no emotional involvement. Recent work has improved the accuracy of the distance function formulation and the accuracy of the advection scheme. We compute flows involving air bubbles and water drops, to name a few. We validate our code against experiments and theory.

  13. Path model for a level-zero extremal weight module over a quantum affine algebra II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Satoshi Naito; Daisuke Sagaki

    2006-01-01

    Let ?i be a level-zero fundamental weight for an affine Lie algebra g over Q, and let B(?i) be the crystal of all Lakshmibai–Seshadri paths of shape ?i. First, we prove that the crystal graph of B(?i) is connected. By combining this fact with the main result of our previous work, we see that B(?i) is, as a crystal, isomorphic

  14. Topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Milovanov, Alexander V; Iomin, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    We study the phenomena of Anderson localization in the presence of nonlinear interaction on a lattice. A class of nonlinear Schrödinger models with arbitrary power nonlinearity is analyzed. We conceive the various regimes of behavior, depending on the topology of resonance overlap in phase space, ranging from a fully developed chaos involving Lévy flights to pseudochaotic dynamics at the onset of delocalization. It is demonstrated that the quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. We describe this localization-delocalization transition as a percolation transition on the infinite Cayley tree (Bethe lattice). It is found in the vicinity of the criticality that the spreading of the wave field is subdiffusive in the limit t?+?. The second moment of the associated probability distribution grows with time as a power law ? t^{?}, with the exponent ?=1/3 exactly. Also we find for superquadratic nonlinearity that the analog pseudochaotic regime at the edge of chaos is self-controlling in that it has feedback on the topology of the structure on which the transport processes concentrate. Then the system automatically (without tuning of parameters) develops its percolation point. We classify this type of behavior in terms of self-organized criticality dynamics in Hilbert space. For subquadratic nonlinearities, the behavior is shown to be sensitive to the details of definition of the nonlinear term. A transport model is proposed based on modified nonlinearity, using the idea of "stripes" propagating the wave process to large distances. Theoretical investigations, presented here, are the basis for consistency analysis of the different localization-delocalization patterns in systems with many coupled degrees of freedom in association with the asymptotic properties of the transport. PMID:25019865

  15. Vacuum birefringence in strong magnetic fields: (II) Complex refractive index from the lowest Landau level

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Koichi, E-mail: khattori@yonsei.ac.kr [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Itakura, Kazunori, E-mail: kazunori.itakura@kek.jp [Theory Center, IPNS, High energy accelerator research organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan) [Theory Center, IPNS, High energy accelerator research organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Department of Particle and Nuclear Studies, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    We compute the refractive indices of a photon propagating in strong magnetic fields on the basis of the analytic representation of the vacuum polarization tensor obtained in our previous paper. When the external magnetic field is strong enough for the fermion one-loop diagram of the polarization tensor to be approximated by the lowest Landau level, the propagating mode in parallel to the magnetic field is subject to modification: The refractive index deviates from unity and can be very large, and when the photon energy is large enough, the refractive index acquires an imaginary part indicating decay of a photon into a fermion–antifermion pair. We study dependences of the refractive index on the propagating angle and the magnetic-field strength. It is also emphasized that a self-consistent treatment of the equation which defines the refractive index is indispensable for accurate description of the refractive index. This self-consistent treatment physically corresponds to consistently including the effects of back reactions of the distorted Dirac sea in response to the incident photon. -- Highlights: •Vacuum birefringence and photon decay are described by the complex refractive index. •Resummed photon vacuum polarization tensor in the lowest Landau level is used. •Back reactions from the distorted Dirac sea are self-consistently taken into account. •Self-consistent treatment drastically changes structure in photon energy dependence. •Dependences on photon propagation angle and magnetic-field strength are presented.

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 49 (WALLVT01030049) on State Highway 103, crossing Freeman Brook, Wallingford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Severance, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WALLVT01030049 on State Highway 103 crossing Freeman Brook, Wallingford, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 11.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture with trees and brush on the immediate banks except for the upstream left overbank which is tree covered. A levee composed of stone fill was constructed along the upstream left bank in order to keep flow from reaching the flood plain left (south) of the brook. In the study area, Freeman Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 56 ft and an average channel depth of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 62.9 mm (0.206 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 10, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The State Highway 103 crossing of the Freeman Brook is a 54-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 50-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 15, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream end of the left abutment and downstream left wingwall during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream left and downstream right wingwall and type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall. Type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) was found along the upstream left and right banks. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 7.6 to 21.4 ft. The worst-case abutment scour was predicted at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives

  17. First participation by the NMISA in a low-level comparison: CCRI(II)-S9 exercise.

    PubMed

    van Wyngaardt, W M; van Staden, M J; Lubbe, J

    2013-11-01

    The NMISA Radioactivity Standards Laboratory participated in the CCRI(II)-S9 inter-comparison of the measurement of the activity concentration of (137)Cs and (40)K in rice material, piloted by the KRISS. The paper describes the equipment used, the measurement set-up and data analysis. The efficiency of the detector for (137)Cs and (40)K was determined by comparison against a spiked standard solution, and Monte Carlo simulations performed to estimate the difference in ?-ray escape probability between the solution standard and starch (as an approximation for milled rice) due to attenuation disparities. The uncertainty budget was estimated rather conservatively, since these were the first low-level measurements performed by the NMISA using an HPGe detector. PMID:23562433

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (JAMATH00010025) on Town Highway 1, crossing Ball Mountain Brook, Jamaica, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure JAMATH00010025 on Town Highway 1 crossing Ball Mountain Brook, Jamaica, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southern Vermont. The 29.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right bank which is pasture with some trees along the channel. In the study area, Ball Mountain Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.021 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 86 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 222 mm (0.727 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 13, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Ball Mountain Brook is a 78-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 75-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 73 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed at the upstream bridge face. The scour protection measures at the site were type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream banks and along both abutments, and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the downstream banks. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour only occurred at the 500-year discharge and was 0.1 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 11.2 to 15.7 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTA

  19. Use of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles for enhanced interlibrary loan, part II: Network application.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, V M; Dell, E Y

    1993-01-01

    The Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery, and Union List Task Force of the Health Sciences Libraries Consortium (HSLC) accepted the charge of maximizing use of the advanced features of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles. A pilot project was initiated to address the task force's recommendation to the HSLC Board that all nonrush interlibrary loan (ILL) documents be transmitted to participants within forty-eight hours of request receipt. This paper describes the project, which tests a network application for unattended, overnight transmission of documents. In determining whether this technology could be used as the primary medium for ILL of photocopies, the following criteria were used: the percentage of ILL requests filled by telefacsimile; the speed, quality, and reliability of service; and the impact of telefacsimile on document delivery costs. The article discusses the project history, optimal use of equipment features for library applications, full-scale implementation, and operational issues that affect ILL policy. PMID:8374580

  20. Teachers' Perception of Their Classroom Technological Resources and the Perceived Feasibility of Implementation of Their Connecticut Teacher Technology Competencies: Level II Proposals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Miranda E.; Holcomb, Lori B.; Lima, Clarisse O.; Brown, Scott W.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the possible relationship between teachers' perception of their classroom technological resources and the perceived feasibility of implementation of their Connecticut Teacher Technology Competencies (2001) Level II (LII) proposals. The impact of gender, years of teaching experience, and level of education were evaluated…

  1. Procollagen II C propeptide level in the synovial fluid as a predictor of radiographic progression in early knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, S; Itokazu, M; Suzuki, Y; Shimizu, K

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prognostic value of procollagen type II carboxy-terminal propeptide (PIICP) level in synovial fluid in relation to early tibiofemoral joint osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Data were collected on 172 women (age 40 to 59 years) who had knee pain and tibiofemoral joint OA in the early stage. Standing semiflexed knee radiographs were obtained by fluoroscopy at baseline and at four year follow up and a computerised, magnification corrected measurement system was applied to measurement of minimal joint space width in the tibiofemoral compartment. Synovial fluid sampling was performed at baseline and at the four year follow up. Levels of PIICP in the synovial fluid were measured by enzyme immunoassay. The outcome measures were assessed by radiographic joint space narrowing (JSN) in the tibiofemoral joints over four years. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine the relation between radiographic JSN and synovial fluid level of PIICP. Results: The number of women available at both baseline and at four year follow up was 110. The average of radiographic JSN over four years was 0.53 mm (range 0.00-2.01). Body mass index showed a slightly positive association with baseline PIICP level. In multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for age and body mass index, radiographic JSN over four years had a direct positive correlation with baseline PIICP level (r=0.395; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.231 to 0.529; p<0.001). Conclusion: In a four year prospective study of women, quantification of synovial fluid PIICP was able to predict subsequent radiographic progression in early tibiofemoral joint OA. PMID:12480665

  2. 75 FR 34170 - Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...TA-W-73,230A] Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Troy, MI; Amended...applicable to workers of Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, South...

  3. Vacuum birefringence in strong magnetic fields: (II) Complex refractive index from the lowest Landau level

    E-print Network

    Koichi Hattori; Kazunori Itakura

    2013-03-08

    We compute the refractive indices of a photon propagating in strong magnetic fields on the basis of the analytic representation of the vacuum polarization tensor obtained in our previous paper. When the external magnetic field is strong enough for the fermion one-loop diagram of the polarization tensor to be approximated by the lowest Landau level, the propagating mode in parallel to the magnetic field is subject to modification: The refractive index deviates from unity and can be very large, and when the photon energy is large enough, the refractive index acquires an imaginary part indicating decay of a photon into a fermion-antifermion pair. We study dependences of the refractive index on the propagating angle and the magnetic-field strength. It is also emphasized that a self-consistent treatment of the equation which defines the refractive index is indispensable for accurate description of the refractive index. This self-consistent treatment physically corresponds to consistently including the effects of back reactions of the distorted Dirac sea in response to the incident photon.

  4. Vacuum birefringence in strong magnetic fields: (II) Complex refractive index from the lowest Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Koichi; Itakura, Kazunori

    2013-07-01

    We compute the refractive indices of a photon propagating in strong magnetic fields on the basis of the analytic representation of the vacuum polarization tensor obtained in our previous paper. When the external magnetic field is strong enough for the fermion one-loop diagram of the polarization tensor to be approximated by the lowest Landau level, the propagating mode in parallel to the magnetic field is subject to modification: The refractive index deviates from unity and can be very large, and when the photon energy is large enough, the refractive index acquires an imaginary part indicating decay of a photon into a fermion-antifermion pair. We study dependences of the refractive index on the propagating angle and the magnetic-field strength. It is also emphasized that a self-consistent treatment of the equation which defines the refractive index is indispensable for accurate description of the refractive index. This self-consistent treatment physically corresponds to consistently including the effects of back reactions of the distorted Dirac sea in response to the incident photon.

  5. The level and nature of autistic intelligence II: what about Asperger syndrome?

    PubMed

    Soulières, Isabelle; Dawson, Michelle; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Mottron, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    A distinctively uneven profile of intelligence is a feature of the autistic spectrum. Within the spectrum, Asperger individuals differ from autistics in their early speech development and in being less likely to be characterized by visuospatial peaks. While different specific strengths characterize different autistic spectrum subgroups, all such peaks of ability have been interpreted as deficits: isolated, aberrant, and irreconcilable with real human intelligence. This view has recently been challenged by findings of autistic strengths in performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), an important marker of general and fluid intelligence. We investigated whether these findings extend to Asperger syndrome, an autistic spectrum subgroup characterized by verbal peaks of ability, and whether the cognitive mechanisms underlying autistic and Asperger RPM performance differ. Thirty-two Asperger adults displayed a significant advantage on RPM over Wechsler Full-Scale and Performance scores relative to their typical controls, while in 25 Asperger children an RPM advantage was found over Wechsler Performance scores only. As previously found with autistics, Asperger children and adults achieved RPM scores at a level reflecting their Wechsler peaks of ability. Therefore, strengths in RPM performance span the autistic spectrum and imply a common mechanism advantageously applied to different facets of cognition. Autistic spectrum intelligence is atypical, but also genuine, general, and underestimated. PMID:21991394

  6. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor-? Agonist Slows the Progression of Hypertension, Attenuates Plasma Interleukin-6 Levels and Renal Inflammatory Markers in Angiotensin II Infused Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Justin L.; Duan, Rong; El-Marakby, Ahmed; Alhashim, Abdulmohsin; Lee, Dexter L.

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR-? plays an important role in attenuating hypertension. The current study determines the anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory role of PPAR-? agonist during a slow-pressor dose of Ang II (400?ng/kg/min). Ten to twelve week old male PPAR-? KO mice and their WT controls were implanted with telemetry devices and infused with Ang II for 12 days. On day 12 of Ang II infusion, MAP was elevated in PPAR-? KO mice compared to WT (161 ± 4?mmHg versus 145 ± 4?mmHg) and fenofibrate (145?mg/kg/day) reduced MAP in WT + Ang II mice (134 ± 7?mmHg). Plasma IL-6 levels were higher in PPAR-? KO mice on day 12 of Ang II infusion (30 ± 4 versus 8 ± 2?pg/mL) and fenofibrate reduced plasma IL-6 in Ang II-treated WT mice (10 ± 3?pg/mL). Fenofibrate increased renal expression of CYP4A, restored renal CYP2J expression, reduced the elevation in renal ICAM-1, MCP-1 and COX-2 in WT + Ang II mice. Our results demonstrate that activation of PPAR-? attenuates Ang II-induced hypertension through up-regulation of CYP4A and CYP2J and an attenuation of inflammatory markers such as plasma IL-6, renal MCP-1, renal expression of ICAM-1 and COX-2. PMID:22848208

  7. ANDERSON ACCELERATION FOR FIXED-POINT ITERATIONS HOMER F. WALKER AND PENG NI

    E-print Network

    Walker, Homer F.

    ANDERSON ACCELERATION FOR FIXED-POINT ITERATIONS HOMER F. WALKER AND PENG NI Abstract. This paper concerns an acceleration method for fixed-point iterations that originated in work of D. G. Anderson-560], which we accordingly call Anderson acceleration here. This method has enjoyed considerable success

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (BETHTH00070038) on Town Highway 007, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    The town highway 5 crossing of the Black River is a 70-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 65-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. There is also a retaining wall along the upstream side of the road embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 3.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment. The scour hole was 27 feet long, 15 feet wide, and was 2.5 feet below the abutment footing at the time of the Level I assessment. This right abutment had numerous cracks and had settled. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 22 (JAY-TH00400022) on Town Highway 40, crossing Jay Branch, Jay, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

    1997-01-01

    8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northern Vermont. The 2.15-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is primarily pasture on the upstream and downstream left overbank while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The downstream right overbank of the bridge is forested. In the study area, Jay Branch Tributary has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 26 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 40.5 mm (0.133 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 40 crossing of Jay Branch Tributary is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel skew and the opening-skew-to-roadway are zero degrees. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the left and right abutments, at the upstream right wingwall, and at the downstream left wingwall. There was also type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream left and downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.7 to 1.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 4.6 to 4.9 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 4.0 to 5.0 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information i

  10. Circulating levels of the vasoactive peptide urotensin II in patients with acute coronary syndrome and stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Al Kindi, Hamood; Hafiane, Anouar; You, Zhipeng; Albanese, Isabella; Pilote, Louise; Genest, Jacques; Schwertani, Adel

    2014-05-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a vasoactive peptide with various roles in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. There is an accumulating evidence implicating UII in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, making it an important target in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In this study, we sought to determine the plasma levels of UII in ACS patients within 48 h of clinical presentation and after a 12-week recovery period. We compared them to patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and a control group of normolipidemic subjects without known CAD. Using a highly sensitive ELISA technique, we measured plasma UII in 27 ACS patients, 26 stable CAD patients and 22 age-matched controls. ACS patients had significantly elevated plasma UII during the first 48 h of clinical presentation compared to stable CAD patients and controls. We also found significant positive correlations between UII and CRP and with triglycerides and a significant negative correlation between UII and EF. There was no correlation with LDL-C. In conclusion, plasma UII levels were elevated in patients with acute coronary syndrome, particularly immediately after clinical presentation. This suggests an upregulation of UII expression in ACS. PMID:24642358

  11. Alan Levander John B.Anderson

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    : BA, BS, MS, PhD All undergraduate majors in earth science take a 4 -course core sequence Physics I and II with lab ESCI 321 Earth System Evolution and Cycles ESCI 322 Earth Chemistry and Materials ESCI 323 Earth Structure and Deformation with lab ESCI 324 Earth's Interior ESCI Degrees Offered

  12. On one-step replica symmetry breaking in the Edwards-Anderson spin glass model

    E-print Network

    Del Ferraro, Gino; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Aurell, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We consider a one-step replica symmetry breaking description of the Edwards-Anderson spin glass model in 2D. The ingredients of this description are a Kikuchi approximation to the free energy and a second-level statistical model built on the extremal points of the Kikuchi approximation, which are also fixed points of a Generalized Belief Propagation (GBP) scheme. We show that a generalized free energy can be constructed where these extremal points are exponentially weighted by their Kikuchi free energy and a Parisi parameter y, and that the Kikuchi approximation of this generalized free energy leads to second-level, one-step replica symmetry breaking, GBP equations. We then show that contrary to the analogous case of Bethe approximations in locally tree-like graphs this second-level GBP does not have a class of simpler solutions analogous to Survey Propagation. We attribute this discrepancy to the presence of short loops in a region graph description of the Edwards-Anderson model, and argue that it should be ...

  13. Kondo effect in metals and nanostructures II

    E-print Network

    Kondo effect in metals and nanostructures II Ramón Aguado ICMM-CSIC Ramón Aguado ICMM-CSIC #12 to the understanding of the Kondo effect in metals: · the Anderson and Kondo models. · Kondo's calculation. · scaling. · non-perturbative approaches. · Strong coupling: the Kondo resonance. ·The two-impurity Kondo problem

  14. Programming Satan's Computer Ross Anderson and Roger Needham

    E-print Network

    Perrig, Adrian

    Programming Satan's Computer Ross Anderson and Roger Needham Cambridge University Computer and maliciously wrong at the most inconvenient possible moment. This is a fascinating problem; and we hope attacked. This brings us to the fascinating subject of cryp- tographic protocol failure. 2 Some Simple

  15. Anderson localization in Nb/Al superconducting bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, M.; Lacquaniti, V.; Maggi, S.; Menichetti, E.; Rinaudo, G.

    2000-01-01

    The authors have measured the temperature dependence of resistivity in relatively thick Nb/Al bilayers fabricated at room temperature, observing the decrease of {rho} for increasing T typical of Anderson localization in disordered systems. The authors report the experimental conditions which determine this behavior and compare it to theoretical models for localization in 3D systems.

  16. Markovian Anderson Model: Bounds for the Rate of Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcheremchantsev, Serguei

    We consider the Anderson model in with potentials whose values at any site of the lattice are Markovian independent random functions of time. For solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation we show under some conditions that with probability 1 where for d=1,2 and for .

  17. Key Infection: Smart Trust for Smart Dust Ross Anderson

    E-print Network

    Perrig, Adrian

    Key Infection: Smart Trust for Smart Dust Ross Anderson University of Cambridge Ross become cheaper and more commoditised, they will become attractive to home users and small businesses technology is given by the `Smart Dust' project which is developing tiny sensors [9]. Its goal is to make

  18. Measuring the Cost of Cybercrime Ross Anderson 1

    E-print Network

    Savage, Stefan

    Measuring the Cost of Cybercrime Ross Anderson 1 Chris Barton 2 Rainer B¨ohme 3 Richard Clayton 4 what we believe to be the first systematic study of the costs of cybercrime. It was prepared the problem. For each of the main categories of cybercrime we set out what is and is not known of the direct

  19. POLAR SEA ICE MAPPING FOR SEAWINDS Hyrum S. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Long, David G.

    POLAR SEA ICE MAPPING FOR SEAWINDS by Hyrum S. Anderson A thesis submitted to the faculty, College of Engineering and Technology #12;viii #12;ABSTRACT POLAR SEA ICE MAPPING FOR SEAWINDS Hyrum S sea ice. Advances in microwave remote sensing technology have allowed a large-scale and detailed study

  20. Error Diffusion Using Linear Pixel Shuffling Peter G. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Peter G.

    Error Diffusion Using Linear Pixel Shuffling Peter G. Anderson Rochester Institute of Technology Rochester, NY, USA Abstract Linear pixel shuffling error diffusion is a digital halfton­ ing algorithm that combines the linear pixel shuffling (LPS) order of visiting pixels in an image with diffusion of quanti

  1. Microdissection: a tool for bee chromosome studies Anderson FERNANDES

    E-print Network

    Microdissection: a tool for bee chromosome studies Anderson FERNANDES 1,2 , Patrícia Elda Sobrinho a microdissection protocol for cytogenetic studies in bees. This methodology was first used in these insects and may chromosomes and others. For this study, the centromeric region of chromosomes in the stingless bee

  2. A Genetic Algorithm for Grammars James Anderson and Joe Staines

    E-print Network

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    A Genetic Algorithm for Grammars James Anderson and Joe Staines July 1, 2010 Background training data. 1 #12;A Genetic Algorithm for Grammars Of course, there are many more grammars than be able to search heuristically. Project Proposal We propose a project which uses a genetic algorithm

  3. Variational ground states for the periodic Anderson model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Fazekas

    1987-01-01

    A trial state of the kind suggested by Brandow is used for the nondegenerate periodic Anderson model with arbitrary band filling. An approximate N-parameter minimisation is carried out analytically. A Gutzwiller-type approximation leads to predicting a magnetic instability even in the valence fluctuation regime.

  4. Critical transport and anomalously localized states at the Anderson transition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Obuse; K. Yakubo

    2003-01-01

    The effect of anomalously localized states (ALS) for electron transport at the critical point of the Anderson transition is numerically investigated for two-dimensional symplectic systems. Defining ALS quantitatively, it is found that a probability of finding ALS at criticality increases with the system size, and saturates in an infinite system. This remarkable feature influences transport properties at criticality.

  5. Partitions of trees and ACA0 Bernard A. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Hirst, Jeff

    Partitions of trees and ACA0 Bernard A. Anderson Jeffry L. Hirst Appalachian State University is equivalent to the subsystem ACA0 of reverse mathemat- ics. In [1], a version of Ramsey's theorem for trees of Ramsey's theorem are also equivalent. Because there are so few examples of proofs involving ACA0

  6. Lifshitz Tails for Continuous Matrix-Valued Anderson Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumaza, Hakim; Najar, Hatem

    2015-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of Lifshitz tails for a continuous matrix-valued Anderson-type model acting on L^2({R}^d)? {C}D , for arbitrary d? 1 and D? 1 . We prove that, under a hypothesis of non-degeneracy of the bottom of the spectrum, the integrated density of states of the model has a Lifshitz behaviour at the bottom of the spectrum. We obtain a Lifshitz exponent equal to -d/2 and this exponent is independent of D . It shows that the behaviour of the integrated density of states at the bottom of the spectrum of a quasi-d-dimensional Anderson model is the same as its behaviour for a d-dimensional Anderson model. For d=1 , we prove that the bottom of the spectrum is always non-dege nerate, for any matrix-valued periodic background potential, and thus each quasi-one-dimensional Anderson model has a Lifshitz exponent equal to -1/2.

  7. A struggle for freedom; Maxwell Anderson, 1938-1952 

    E-print Network

    Odeski, Thomas Francis

    1979-01-01

    of the jungle, the evils of collectivism those of the ant-hill. And since we must choose between them I prefer the jungle. After all, we evolved from the jungle. Nothing will ever evolve from the ant-hill. Anderson was convinced that greater individual...

  8. Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and the professionalism of medical publicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claire Brock

    2008-01-01

    A B S T R A C T • This article examines how early women doctors managed their professional and public images in the second half of the nineteenth century through a case study of the career of the first medical woman to qualify in Britain: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (1836—1917). In fighting for their cause, Victorian women doctors had to

  9. A Study of Diagrammatic Ink in Lecture Richard Anderson a

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    delivered from a Tablet PC. The main result of the paper is the identification of three specific challenges of reuse, and the ability to share materials across machines and archive arti- facts of the presentation slides with digital ink on a Tablet PC. We collected data using Classroom Presenter (Anderson et al

  10. Examining the role of foraging and malvolio in host-finding behavior in the honey bee parasite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When a female varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), invades a honey bee brood cell, the physiology rapidly changes from the feeding phoretic to reproductive. Changes in the foraging and malvolio transcript levels in the brain have been associated with modulated intra-specific food sea...

  11. Variable induction of vitellogenin genes in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) by the honeybee, Apis mellifera L, host and its environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcript levels of vitellogenins (Vgs) in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) were variably induced by interactions between the developing honeybee as a food source and the capped honeybee cell environment. Transcripts for 2 Vgs of varroa mites were sequenced and putative Vg pr...

  12. Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

    1987-10-01

    A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Characterization of MHC class II B polymorphism in bottlenecked New Zealand saddlebacks reveals low levels of genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Jolene T; Robertson, Bruce C; Grueber, Catherine E; Stanton, Jo-Ann L; Jamieson, Ian G

    2013-08-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is integral to the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Characterizing diversity at functional MHC genes is invaluable for elucidating patterns of adaptive variation in wild populations, and is particularly interesting in species of conservation concern, which may suffer from reduced genetic diversity and compromised disease resilience. Here, we use next generation sequencing to investigate MHC class II B (MHCIIB) diversity in two sister taxa of New Zealand birds: South Island saddleback (SIS), Philesturnus carunculatus, and North Island saddleback (NIS), Philesturnus rufusater. These two species represent a passerine family outside the more extensively studied Passerida infraorder, and both have experienced historic bottlenecks. We examined exon 2 sequence data from populations that represent the majority of genetic diversity remaining in each species. A high level of locus co-amplification was detected, with from 1 to 4 and 3 to 12 putative alleles per individual for South and North Island birds, respectively. We found strong evidence for historic balancing selection in peptide-binding regions of putative alleles, and we identified a cluster combining non-classical loci and pseudogene sequences from both species, although no sequences were shared between the species. Fewer total alleles and fewer alleles per bird in SIS may be a consequence of their more severe bottleneck history; however, overall nucleotide diversity was similar between the species. Our characterization of MHCIIB diversity in two closely related species of New Zealand saddlebacks provides an important step in understanding the mechanisms shaping MHC diversity in wild, bottlenecked populations. PMID:23686447

  14. Size at Birth and Cord Blood Levels of Insulin, Insulin Like Growth Factor I (IGF-I), IGF-II, IGF-Binding Protein1 (IGFBP-1), IGFBP-3, and the Soluble IGF-II\\/ Mannose6Phosphate Receptor in Term Human Infants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KEN ONG; JURGEN KRATZSCH; WIELAND KIESS; MICHAEL COSTELLO; CAROLYN SCOTT; DAVID DUNGER

    Experimental rodent studies demonstrate that insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) promotes fetal growth, whereas the nonsignaling IGF-II receptor (IGF2R) is inhibitory; in humans their influence is as yet unclear. A soluble, circulating form of IGF2R inhibits IGF-II mediated DNA synthesis and may therefore restrain fetal growth. We measured cord blood levels of IGF-II, soluble IGF2R, insulin, IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1),

  15. Collinear Laser-Beam Ion-Beam Measurement of the Mean Lifetime of the Ar Ii 4p'2f-Degrees-7/2 Level 

    E-print Network

    Jin, J.; Church, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The mean lifetime tau of the 4p'F-2(7/2)-degrees level of Ar II has been measured using a variant of the collinear laser-beam-fast-ion-beam spectroscopy technique. Our variant requires no mechanical motion or laser frequency tuning. The result...

  16. Fabrication and characterization of disordered polymer optical fibers for transverse Anderson localization of light.

    PubMed

    Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J; Mirr, Craig R; Koch, Karl W; Mafi, Arash

    2013-01-01

    We develop and characterize a disordered polymer optical fiber that uses transverse Anderson localization as a novel waveguiding mechanism. The developed polymer optical fiber is composed of 80,000 strands of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) that are randomly mixed and drawn into a square cross section optical fiber with a side width of 250 ?m. Initially, each strand is 200 ?m in diameter and 8-inches long. During the mixing process of the original fiber strands, the fibers cross over each other; however, a large draw ratio guarantees that the refractive index profile is invariant along the length of the fiber for several tens of centimeters. The large refractive index difference of 0.1 between the disordered sites results in a small localized beam radius that is comparable to the beam radius of conventional optical fibers. The input light is launched from a standard single mode optical fiber using the butt-coupling method and the near-field output beam from the disordered fiber is imaged using a 40X objective and a CCD camera. The output beam diameter agrees well with the expected results from the numerical simulations. The disordered optical fiber presented in this work is the first device-level implementation of 2D Anderson localization, and can potentially be used for image transport and short-haul optical communication systems. PMID:23929276

  17. Cranial location of level II lymph nodes in laryngeal cancer: Implications for elective nodal target volume delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Braam, Petra M. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: P.M.Braam@umcutrecht.nl; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Terhaard, Chris [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the cranial distribution of level II lymph nodes in patients with laryngeal cancer to optimize the elective radiation nodal target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: The most cranially located metastatic lymph node was delineated in 67 diagnostic CT data sets. The minimum distance from the base of the skull (BOS) to the lymph node was determined. Results: A total of 98 lymph nodes were delineated including 62 ipsilateral and 36 contralateral lymph nodes. The mean ipsilateral and contralateral distance from the top of the most cranial metastatic lymph node to the BOS was 36 mm (range, -9-120; standard deviation [SD], 17.9) and 35 mm (range, 14-78; SD 15.0), respectively. Only 5% and 12% of the ipsilateral and 3% and 9% of the contralateral metastatic lymph nodes were located within 15 mm and 20 mm below the BOS, respectively. No significant differences were found between patients with only ipsilateral metastatic lymph nodes and patients with bilateral metastatic lymph nodes. Between tumors that do cross the midline and those that do not, no significant difference was found in the distance of the most cranial lymph node to the BOS and the occurrence ipsilateral or contralateral. Conclusions: Setting the cranial border of the nodal target volume 1.5 cm below the base of the skull covers 95% of the lymph nodes and should be considered in elective nodal irradiation for laryngeal cancer. Bilateral neck irradiation is mandatory, including patients with unilateral laryngeal cancer, when elective irradiation is advised.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BRNATH00680035) on Town Highway 68, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    abutments with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment and downstream right wingwall during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure in place at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the left abutment and wingwalls except the downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 11.5 to 25.7 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled "Scour Results". Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives "excessively conservative estimates of scour depths" (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineerin

  19. Cumulant expansion of the periodic Anderson model in infinite dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglio, M. E.; Figueira, M. S.

    1997-11-01

    The diagrammatic cumulant expansion for the periodic Anderson model with infinite Coulomb repulsion 0305-4470/30/22/024/img5 is considered here for an hypercubic lattice of infinite dimension 0305-4470/30/22/024/img6. The nearest neighbour hopping of the uncorrelated electrons is described exactly by a conduction band, while two different models of hybridization are treated as a perturbation. The same type of simplifications obtained by Metzner for the cumulant expansion of the Hubbard model in the limit of 0305-4470/30/22/024/img7, are also shown to be valid for the periodic Anderson model. The derivation of these properties had to be modified because of the exact treatment of the conduction band.

  20. Various Litter Species and High Water-Table Levels Hamper Type II Methanotrophs in a Bare Peatland Regeneration

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of Neuchâtel, Rue Emile Argand 11, CH-2009 Neuchâtel, Switzerland Significant areas of temperate bogs have been bogs. Nature 436: 1153-1156. Contrasted Relationships Between Type I and Type II Methanotrophs

  1. Theoretical lifetimes and Land{acute e} g values of CsthinspII 5p{sup 5}thinsp6p levels

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.R. [Physics Department, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States)] [Physics Department, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Lifetimes of CsthinspII 5p{sup 5}thinsp6p levels, oscillator strengths to the lower 5p{sup 5}thinsp5d and 5p{sup 5}thinsp6s levels, Land{acute e} g factors and LS compositions of all these levels are presented. Results are in very good agreement with most available experiment. Large correlation effects are associated with those 5p{sup 5}thinsp5d and 5p{sup 5}thinsp6s states, which strongly interact. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Anderson localization and the theory of dirty superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapitulnik, A.; Kotliar, G.

    1985-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of Anderson localization in dirty superconductors. The scale dependence of the diffusion in the vicinity of the mobility edge results in a strong renormalization of the zero-temperature coherence length. This implies the breakdown of the Ginzburg criterion close to the metal-insulator transition and thus the importance of fluctuations in this regime. The upper critical field is calculated, and possible experiments are also discussed.

  3. Kubo-Anderson Mixing in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Brink, A. Maassen Van Den

    A novel ab initio analysis of the Reynolds stress is presented in order to model non-local turbulence transport. The theory involves a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. A scaling relation maps the path space onto the boundary layer. Analytical sampling rates are shown to model mixing by exchange. Nonlocal mixing involves a scaling exponent ??0.58 (??? in the diffusion limit). The resulting transport equation represents a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process.

  4. Wegner estimate and Anderson localization for random magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Laszlo Erdoes; David Hasler

    2010-12-23

    We consider a two dimensional magnetic Schroedinger operator with a spatially stationary random magnetic field. We assume that the magnetic field has a positive lower bound and that it has Fourier modes on arbitrarily short scales. We prove the Wegner estimate at arbitrary energy, i.e. we show that the averaged density of states is finite throughout the whole spectrum. We also prove Anderson localization at the bottom of the spectrum.

  5. Anderson and Belnap’s Invitation to Sin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alasdair Urquhart

    2010-01-01

    Quine has argued that modal logic began with the sin of confusing use and mention. Anderson and Belnap, on the other hand,\\u000a have offered us a way out through a strategy of nominalization. This paper reviews the history of Lewis’s early work in modal\\u000a logic, and then proves some results about the system in which “A is necessary” is intepreted

  6. Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

  7. NX-PVKA levels before and after hepatectomy of hepatocellular carcinoma as predictors of patient survival: a preliminary evaluation of an improved assay for PIVKA-II.

    PubMed

    Nanashima, Atsushi; Abo, Takafumi; Taura, Naota; Shibata, Hideki; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Takagi, Katsunori; Arai, Junichi; Oyama, Shousaburou; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Although the protein-induced vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) is used as a prognostic marker in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a newly-improved assay, NX-PVKA (PIVKA-II measured using P-11 and P-16 antibodies) and NX-PVKA-R (ratio of PIVKA-II and NX-PVKA), are more accurate markers of PIVKA-II. We conducted a prospectively preliminary analysis of the relationship between NX-PVKA-R and clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in 22 patients with HCC who underwent hepatectomy and measured changes of this marker's levels after treatment. Median value of PIVKA-II (80 mAU/ml), NX-PVKA (60 mAU/ml), NX-PVKA-R (1.5) and NX-PVKA-D (difference of markers, 15 mAU/ml) were determined. Tumor relapse was observed in six patients, and the one year relapse-free survival rate was 88%. Correlation between PIVKA-II or alpha-fetoprotein levels and NX-PVKA, NX-PVKA-R or -D levels was significant (p<0.001). NX-PVKA-R was significantly correlated with tumor size (p<0.05). In patients who underwent pre-treatment before hepatectomy, PIVKA-II, NX-PVKA and NX-PVKA-R tended to be higher than in patients without pre-treatment, but this difference was not significant (p>0.10). For macroscopic findings, NX-PVKA-R for the confluent-nodular type was significantly higher than that for the simple-nodular type (p<0.05). The tumor-free survival rate in the group with a high NX-PVKA-R was significantly lower than that in the group with a low NX-PVKA-R group (p<0.05). In patients with tumor recurrence, postoperative NX-PVKA-R increased again. We conclude that a high value of NX-PVKA-R after hepatectomy for HCC reflects malignant potential and predicts early recurrence in patients with HCC. PMID:23749928

  8. Variational exact diagonalization method for Anderson impurity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, M.; Renk, C.; Wehling, T. O.

    2015-06-01

    We describe a variational approach to solving Anderson impurity models by means of exact diagonalization. Optimized parameters of a discretized auxiliary model are obtained on the basis of the Peierls-Feynman-Bogoliubov principle. Thereby, the variational approach resolves ambiguities related to the bath discretization, which is generally necessary to make Anderson impurity models tractable by exact diagonalization. The choice of variational degrees of freedom made here allows systematic improvements of total energies over mean-field decouplings like Hartree-Fock. Furthermore, our approach allows us to embed arbitrary bath discretization schemes in total-energy calculations and to systematically optimize and improve on traditional routes to the discretization problem such as fitting of hybridization functions on Matsubara frequencies. Benchmarks in terms of a single orbital Anderson model demonstrate that the variational exact diagonalization method accurately reproduces free energies as well as several single- and two-particle observables obtained from an exact solution. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of the variational exact diagonalization approach to realistic five-orbital problems with the example system of Co impurities in bulk Cu and compare it to continuous-time Monte Carlo calculations. The accuracy of established bath discretization schemes is assessed in the framework of the variational approach introduced here.

  9. Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Shu-Hui [Hebei Advanced Thin Film Laboratory, College of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Hebei 050024 (China); College of Sciences, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Shijiazhuang 050018 (China); Song, Juntao, E-mail: jtsong@mail.hebtu.edu.cn; Li, Yu-Xian, E-mail: yxli@mail.hebtu.edu.cn [Hebei Advanced Thin Film Laboratory, College of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Hebei 050024 (China)

    2013-11-14

    We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

  10. Super-diffusion in optical realizations of Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolapov, Yevgeny; Levi, Liad; Fishman, Shmuel; Segev, Mordechai; Wilkinson, Michael

    2012-04-01

    We discuss the dynamics of particles in one dimension in potentials that are random in both space and time. The results are applied to recent optics experiments on Anderson localization, in which the transverse spreading of a beam is suppressed by random fluctuations in the refractive index. If the refractive index fluctuates along the direction of the paraxial propagation of the beam, the localization is destroyed. We analyze this broken localization in terms of the spectral decomposition of the potential. When the potential has a discrete spectrum, the spread is controlled by the overlap of Chirikov resonances in phase space. As the number of Fourier components is increased, the resonances merge into a continuum, which is described by a Fokker-Planck equation. We express the diffusion coefficient in terms of the spectral intensity of the potential. For a general class of potentials that are commonly used in optics, the solutions to the Fokker-Planck equation exhibit anomalous diffusion in phase space, implying that when Anderson localization is broken by temporal fluctuations of the potential, the result is transport at a rate similar to a ballistic one or even faster. For a class of potentials which arise in some existing realizations of Anderson localization, atypical behavior is found.

  11. Antigen processing by epidermal Langerhans cells correlates with the level of biosynthesis of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and expression of invariant chain

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Two prior studies with a small number of T cell lines have shown that the presentation of native protein antigens by epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) is regulated. When freshly isolated, LC are efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC), but after a period of culture LC are inefficient or even inactive. The deficit in culture seems to be a selective loss in antigen processing, since cultured LC are otherwise rich in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II products and are active APC for alloantigens and mitogens, which do not require processing. We have extended the analysis by studying presentation to bulk populations of primed lymph node and a T-T hybrid. Only freshly isolated LC can be pulsed with the protein antigens myoglobin and conalbumin, but once pulsed, antigen is retained in an immunogenic form for at least 2 d. The acquisition of antigen, presumably as MHC-peptide complexes, is inhibited if the fresh LC are exposed to foreign protein in the presence of chloroquine or cycloheximide. The latter, in contrast, improves the efficacy of antigen pulsing in anti-Ig- stimulated B blasts. In additional studies of mechanism, we noted that both fresh and cultured LC endocytose similar amounts of an antigen, rhodamineovalbumin, into perinuclear granules. However, freshly isolated LC synthesize high levels class II MHC molecules and express higher amounts of the class II-associated invariant chain. Fresh LC are at least 5-10 times more active than many other cells types in the level of biosynthesis of MHC class II products. These findings provide a physiologic model in which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules appear to be the principal vehicle for effective antigen processing by APC of the dendritic cell lineage. Another APC, the B lymphoblast, does not appear to require newly synthesized MHC class II molecules for presentation. PMID:2121888

  12. Andrew E. Anderson Department of Bioengineering,

    E-print Network

    Utah, University of

    understanding of the three-dimensional mechanics of the pelvis, at the patient- specific level, may lead bone strains were monitored with rosette strain gauges in ten locations on the left hemipelvis. FE of the pelvis. DOI: 10.1115/1.1894148 Keywords: Pelvis, Finite Element, Biomechanics, Strain Gauges Introduction

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30 (NEWFVT00300013) on Vermont Highway 30, crossing Smith Brook, Newfane, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    roadway is 55 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site were type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank. There was also type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left bank. A stone wall extends to 72 feet upstream from the end of the upstream left wingwall. There is another stone wall along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 14.4 to 18.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ fr

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (BRIDTH00050046) on Town Highway 05, crossing North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    bridge consisting of a 34-ft steel-beam span, supported by vertical abutments with no wingwalls (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The left abutment is stone; the right abutment is log cribwork with type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along its base. Type-2 stone fill has also been placed on the upstream and downstream sides of the road embankments, except the upstream left which has type-3 (less than 48 inches diameter). The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees; the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of these computed results follow. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 5.7 ft to 7.7 ft. with the worst-case abutment scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the computed scour at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 22). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BETHTH00190035) on Town Highway 19, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream wingwalls, left abutment, and upstream right road embankment; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is at the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 2.1 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 3.9 to 9.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

  16. Astronaut Clay Anderson Speaks With S.C. Students - Duration: 25 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA astronaut Clay Anderson participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at Crayton Middle School, Columbia,...

  17. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is associated with improved survival compared to level I & II axillary lymph node dissection in node negative breast cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Langer; U. Guller; S. F. Hsu-Schmitz; A. Ladewig; C. T. Viehl; H. Moch; E. Wight; F. Harder; D. Oertli; M. Zuber

    2009-01-01

    ObjectiveThe few long-term follow-up data for sentinel lymph node (SLN) negative breast cancer patients demonstrate a 5-year disease-free survival of 96–98%. It remains to be elucidated whether the more accurate SLN staging defines a more selective node negative patient group and whether this is associated with better overall and disease-free survival compared with level I & II axillary lymph node

  18. A Nonextractive Quenchofluorimetric Method for the Determination of Palladium(II) at µg\\/L Levels Using Bathophenanthroline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. K. Pal; M. Sahedur Rahman

    1999-01-01

    A very simple ultra-sensitive and selective quenchofluorimetric method for the determination of Pd(II) is described. The method is based on the quenching action by Pd(II) upon the native fluorescence of bathophenanthroline (4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) solution (uex (max)=291 nm; uem (max)= 451 nm) in the optimum acidity range 0.025 M-0.20 M H2SO4 at room temperature (25LJ °C). The fluorescence quenching is collinear in

  19. Tunable Anderson metal-insulator transition in quantum spin-Hall insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chui-Zhen; Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-feng; Wang, Ziqiang; Xie, X. C.

    2015-06-01

    We numerically study disorder effects in the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang (BHZ) model, and we find that the Anderson transition of a quantum spin-Hall insulator (QSHI) is determined by model parameters. The BHZ Hamiltonian is equivalent to two decoupled spin blocks that belong to the unitary class. In contrast to the common belief that a two-dimensional unitary system scales to an insulator except at certain critical points, we find, through calculations scaling properties of the localization length, level statistics, and participation ratio, that a possible exotic metallic phase emerges between the QSHI and normal insulator phases in the InAs/GaSb-type BHZ model. On the other hand, direct transition from a QSHI to a normal insulator is found in the HgTe/CdTe-type BHZ model. Furthermore, we show that the metallic phase originates from the Berry phase and can survive both inside and outside the gap.

  20. Effects of correlated hybridization in the single-impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Líbero, Valter; Veiga, Rodrigo

    2013-03-01

    The development of new materials often dependents on the theoretical foundations which study the microscopic matter, i.e., the way atoms interact and create distinct configurations. Among the interesting materials, those with partially filled d or f orbitals immersed in nonmagnetic metals have been described by the Anderson model, which takes into account Coulomb correlation (U) when a local level (energy Ed) is doubled occupied, and an electronic hybridization between local levels and conduction band states. In addition, here we include a correlated hybridization term, which depends on the local-level occupation number involved. This term breaks particle-hole symmetry (even when U + 2Ed = 0), enhances charge fluctuations on local levels and as a consequence strongly modifies the crossover between the Hamiltonian fixed-points, even suppressing one or other. We exemplify these behaviors showing data obtained from the Numerical Renormalization Group (NRG) computation for the impurity temperature-dependent specific heat, entropy and magnetic susceptibility. The interleaving procedure is used to recover the continuum spectrum after the NRG-logarithmic discretization of the conduction band. The development of new materials often dependents on the theoretical foundations which study the microscopic matter, i.e., the way atoms interact and create distinct configurations. Among the interesting materials, those with partially filled d or f orbitals immersed in nonmagnetic metals have been described by the Anderson model, which takes into account Coulomb correlation (U) when a local level (energy Ed) is doubled occupied, and an electronic hybridization between local levels and conduction band states. In addition, here we include a correlated hybridization term, which depends on the local-level occupation number involved. This term breaks particle-hole symmetry (even when U + 2Ed = 0), enhances charge fluctuations on local levels and as a consequence strongly modifies the crossover between the Hamiltonian fixed-points, even suppressing one or other. We exemplify these behaviors showing data obtained from the Numerical Renormalization Group (NRG) computation for the impurity temperature-dependent specific heat, entropy and magnetic susceptibility. The interleaving procedure is used to recover the continuum spectrum after the NRG-logarithmic discretization of the conduction band. Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo - FAPESP.

  1. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method.

    PubMed

    Sabik, A; Go?ek, F; Antczak, G

    2015-05-01

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (??) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present ?? of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers. PMID:26026572

  2. Bistability of anderson localized States in nonlinear random media.

    PubMed

    Shadrivov, Ilya V; Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Bliokh, Yuri P; Freilikher, Valentin; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2010-03-26

    We study wave transmission through one-dimensional random nonlinear structures and predict a novel effect resulting from an interplay of nonlinearity and disorder. We reveal that, while weak nonlinearity does not change the typical exponentially small transmission in the regime of the Anderson localization, it affects dramatically the disorder-induced localized states excited inside the medium leading to bistable and nonreciprocal resonant transmission. Our numerical modeling shows an excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on the concept of a high-Q resonator associated with each localized state. This offers a new way for all-optical light control employing statistically homogeneous random media without regular cavities. PMID:20366536

  3. Transversal Anderson localization of sound in acoustic waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yangtao; Ke, Manzhu; Feng, Junheng; Wang, Mudi; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-22

    We present designs of one-dimensional acoustic waveguide arrays and investigate wave propagation inside. Under the condition of single identical waveguide mode and weak coupling, the acoustic wave motion in waveguide arrays can be modeled with a discrete mode-coupling theory. The coupling constants can be retrieved from simulations or experiments as the function of neighboring waveguide separations. Sound injected into periodic arrays gives rise to the discrete diffraction, exhibiting ballistic or extended transport in transversal direction. But sound injected into randomized waveguide arrays readily leads to Anderson localization transversally. The experimental results show good agreement with simulations and theoretical predictions. PMID:25812602

  4. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabik, A.; Go?ek, F.; Antczak, G.

    2015-05-01

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (??) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present ?? of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers.

  5. Transversal Anderson localization of sound in acoustic waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yangtao; Ke, Manzhu; Feng, Junheng; Wang, Mudi; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-01

    We present designs of one-dimensional acoustic waveguide arrays and investigate wave propagation inside. Under the condition of single identical waveguide mode and weak coupling, the acoustic wave motion in waveguide arrays can be modeled with a discrete mode-coupling theory. The coupling constants can be retrieved from simulations or experiments as the function of neighboring waveguide separations. Sound injected into periodic arrays gives rise to the discrete diffraction, exhibiting ballistic or extended transport in transversal direction. But sound injected into randomized waveguide arrays readily leads to Anderson localization transversally. The experimental results show good agreement with simulations and theoretical predictions.

  6. Anderson localization and breakdown of hydrodynamics in random ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Bruinsma, R.; Coppersmith, S.N.

    1986-05-01

    The dynamic structure factor of Heisenberg magnets with weak randomness is computed. Under circumstances which are explained in detail, we find failure of hydrodynamic theory in the longitudinal structure factor due to localization of spin waves. Localization induces a power-law dependence on q and ..omega.. for the neutron scattering line shape near magnetic Bragg spots. The exponent describing the power law is related to the correlation-length exponent of Anderson localization. Random anisotropy magnets appear to be promising candidates for experimental investigations.

  7. Destruction of Anderson localization by a weak nonlinearity

    E-print Network

    A. S. Pikovsky; D. L. Shepelyansky

    2007-08-24

    We study numerically a spreading of an initially localized wave packet in a one-dimensional discrete nonlinear Schr\\"odinger lattice with disorder. We demonstrate that above a certain critical strength of nonlinearity the Anderson localization is destroyed and an unlimited subdiffusive spreading of the field along the lattice occurs. The second moment grows with time $ \\propto t^\\alpha$, with the exponent $\\alpha$ being in the range $0.3 - 0.4$. For small nonlinearities the distribution remains localized in a way similar to the linear case.

  8. Topoisomerase II and IV Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Clinical Isolates with Different Levels of Quinolone Susceptibility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sylvia Valdezate; Ana Vindel; Aurora Echeita; Fernando Baquero; R. Canto

    2002-01-01

    The quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of topoisomerase II and IV genes from Stenotropho- monas maltophilia ATCC 13637 were sequenced and compared with the corresponding regions of 32 unrelated S. maltophilia clinical strains for which ciprofloxacin MICs ranged from 0.1 to 64 g\\/ml. GyrA (Leu-55 to Gln-155, Escherichia coli numbering), GyrB (Met-391 to Phe-513), ParC (Ile-34 to Arg-124), and ParE (Leu-396

  9. 78 FR 41835 - Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ...NRC-2013-0072] RIN 3150-AJ25 Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act...specified in the Price-Anderson Act for inflation at least once during each 5-year period...70 FR 61885), and the first periodic inflation adjustments on September 29,...

  10. A. Andrzejak, D. Kondo, D. P. Anderson NOMS 2010 Exploiting Non-Dedicated Resources

    E-print Network

    Kondo, Derrick

    A. Andrzejak, D. Kondo, D. P. Anderson NOMS 2010 Exploiting Non-Dedicated Resources for Cloud Computing Artur Andrzejak andrzejak@zib.de Zuse Institute Berlin, Germany Derrick Kondo dkondo@imag.fr INRIA Grenoble, France David P. Anderson davea@ssl.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley, USA #12;A. Andrzejak, D. Kondo, D. P

  11. PRINT ONLY: MISSIONS AND INSTRUMENTS Anderson J. A. Robinson M. S.

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    PRINT ONLY: MISSIONS AND INSTRUMENTS Anderson J. A. Robinson M. S. Challenges Utilizing Pushframe #12;CHALLENGES UTILIZING PUSHFRAME CAMERA IMAGES. J.A. Anderson1 and M.S. Robinson2 , 1 U University (School of Earth and Space Exploration, Box 871404, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1404, robinson

  12. James Anderson's Political Economy--His Influence on Smith and Malthus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renee Prendergast

    1987-01-01

    James Anderson's powerful critique of Adam Smith's position on the corn export bounty was published in 1777. It focuse d on Smith's proposition that the bounty could not lead to increased corn production because it could not increase corn's real price. Smit h's response to the critique is traced in later editions of Wealth of Nations. While Anderson's critique of

  13. The perceived transmittance of inhomogeneous surfaces and media Barton L. Anderson a,*, Manish Singh b

    E-print Network

    Singh, Manish

    The perceived transmittance of inhomogeneous surfaces and media Barton L. Anderson a,*, Manish the transmittance of inhomogeneous surfaces and media. Previous work (Anderson, B. L. (1999) Stereoscopic surface a transmittance anchoring principle in determining when transparency is perceived. This principle states

  14. ON -DEDEKIND RINGS AND -KRULL RINGS DAVID F. ANDERSON AND AYMAN BADAWI

    E-print Network

    Badawi, Ayman

    ON -DEDEKIND RINGS AND -KRULL RINGS DAVID F. ANDERSON AND AYMAN BADAWI Abstract. The purpose(RNil(R)) = (Nil(R)) = Nil((R)) = Z((R)), T((R)) = RNil(R) 1 #12;2 DAVID F. ANDERSON AND AYMAN BADAWI is quasilocal

  15. The Innovation Butterfly E.G. Anderson Jr. The Innovation Butterfly

    E-print Network

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    .G. Anderson Jr. Maneuver-Driven Competition (PDCA to OODA to SROM) The SROM Cycle The speed of the cycle is completed) #12;The Innovation Butterfly E.G. Anderson Jr. Maneuver-Driven Competition Slow SROM Loop Fast SROM Loop Market Firm Market Firm Faster SROM loops make the firm more agile

  16. UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE COMPUTER LABORATORY Computer Science Tripos Parts IA, IB, and II

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Ullrich

    should be used in conjunction with those in the syllabus booklets, which give more information, techniques and tools. Addison-Wesley (2nd ed.). [**, IB, II] Anderson, R. (2008). Security engineering. Wiley, II] Bloch, E.D. (2011). Proofs and fundamentals: A first Course in abstract mathematics. Springer (2

  17. CALEA II: Risks of Wiretap Modifications to Endpoints Ben Adida

    E-print Network

    Schneider, Fred B.

    Anderson Annie I. Anton (Georgia Institute of Technology) Matt Blaze (University and other peer- to-peer tools that allow communications in real-time directly between individuals & Technology for coordinating this effort. #12;2 1 Introduction: "Going Dark" and CALEA II

  18. Functional-integral study of the asymmetric Anderson model for dilute fluctuating-valence systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianxi, Dai; Ting, Chin-Sen

    1983-11-01

    The functional-integral method in the harmonic approximation which was developed by Amit and Keiter has been extended to study the asymmetric Anderson model. This model gives a valid description of dilute rare-earth ions in metal. The magnetic susceptibility and the occupation number of the localized or f electrons are expressed in terms of some series of double integrals. These double integrals are evaluated numerically by an integration method in number theory. Our results for the temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility agree quite well with those of renormalization-group calculation by Krishna-Murthy et al. for the f level lying above the Fermi level. However, when the f level lies below the Fermi level, the result of the present approximation loses its agreement with that of the renormalization-group calculation at low temperatures. The f-electron occupation number has also been calculated as a function of temperature and as a function of the energy level of f electrons.

  19. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  20. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    PubMed Central

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  1. Price-Anderson Act - the third decade. Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Saltzman, J.

    1983-12-01

    Subsection 170p. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, requires that the Commission submit to the Congress by August 1, 1983, a detailed report on the need for continuation or modification of Section 170 of the Act, the Price-Anderson provisions. The report is divided into four sections with detailed subject reports appended to the main report. Sections I through III include an examination of issues that the Commission was required by statute to study (i.e., condition of the nuclear industry, state of knowledge of nuclear safety, and availability of private insurance), and discussion of other issues of interest and importance to the Congress and to the public. The subjects covered are as follows: (1) overview of the Price-Anderson system; (2) the state of knowledge of nuclear safety; (3) availability of private insurance; (4) conditions of the nuclear industry; (5) causality and proof of damages; (6) limitation of liability and subsidy; and (7) a proposal that would provide for removal of the limitation of liability but with limited annual liability payments. Section IV of the report contains conclusions and recommendations. Section V contains a bibliography.

  2. Phase Boundaries of the Pseudogap Anderson Impurity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Aaron; Chowdhury, Tathagata; Ingersent, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    As the temperature of metals containing dilute concentrations of magnetic impurities reach very low temperatures, a phenomenon known as the Kondo effect takes place in which the resistance increases. This is due to the domination of spin-exchange processes that occur between the electrons of the metal and the electrons of the magnetic impurity near absolute zero. The Anderson model is a quantum impurity model that was developed in the 1960s to explain this phenomenon. It involves a single magnetic impurity tunnel-coupled to the conduction band of a metal. If the conduction band of this system contains a pseudogap, or a power-law decrease in the density of states around the Fermi energy, then quantum phase transitions will occur. The phase boundaries of the pseudogap Anderson impurity model have been previously approximated using poor man's scaling analysis. Here, we focus on using the more accurate numerical renormalization group method to calculate the location of these boundaries. We then compare these numerical results with the predictions derived from the scaling approximations. The development of nanotechnology like quantum dots and STM have rekindled interest in the Kondo effect since it can now be studied within controlled settings. Supported by the NSF REU Grant DMR-1156737: REU Site in Materials Physics at the University of Florida.

  3. Chiral Condensate and Mott-Anderson Freeze-Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.; Berdermann, J.; Cleymans, J.; Redlich, K.

    2012-07-01

    We present the idea of a Mott-Anderson freeze-out that suggests a key role of the localization of the hadron wave functions when traversing the hadronization transition. The extension of hadron wave functions in dense matter is governed by the behavior of the chiral quark condensate such that its melting at finite temperatures and chemical potentials entails an increase of the size of hadrons and thus their geometrical strong interaction cross sections. It is demonstrated within a schematic resonance gas model, that a kinetic freeze-out condition reveals a correlation with the reduction of the chiral condensate in the phase diagram up to 50% of its vacuum value. Generalizing the description of the chiral condensate by taking into account a full hadron resonance gas such correlation gets distorted. We discuss, that this may be due to our approximations in calculating the chiral condensate which disregard both, in-medium effects on hadron masses and hadron-hadron interactions. The latter, in particular due to quark exchange reactions, could lead to a delocalization of the hadron wave functions in accordance with the picture of a Mott-Anderson transition.

  4. Macronutrient composition of formulated diets for Atlantic halibut ( Hippoglossus hippoglossus, L.) juveniles, II: protein\\/lipid levels at low carbohydrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristin Hamre; Grete Baeverfjord; Torstein Harboe

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to show that Atlantic halibut on the weaning stage, fed low carbohydrate levels, tolerates a wide variation in lipid as long as protein requirement is fulfilled. The fish (0.4 g) were fed diets with lipid levels increasing from 50 to 300 g kg-1 concomitant with protein decreasing from 860 to 620 g kg?1

  5. Level dependent signal flow in the light pupil reflex. II. Phase velocity of responses to sinusoidal light stimuli.

    PubMed

    Myers, G A; Gannon, J A; Stark, L W

    1993-01-01

    Pupillary responses to sinusoidal light stimuli were measured over a range of light levels and frequencies. The phase lag and equivalent time delay of these responses were reduced in an approximately log-linear fashion with increasing mean light level (slope = -60 ms/log unit). The magnitude of this level dependence is reduced at higher frequencies, and at higher light levels. This nonlinear level dependent signal flow (LDSF) effect is shown to be essentially independent of target distance (accommodative stimulus) which influences pupil size, and of pupil size itself. Thus most of the level dependence probably resides in the afferent path of the light-pupil reflex arc, before the accommodation signal joins the light signal in the Edinger-West-phal nucleus. A systems model is presented to the LDSF effect described here and in the companion papers (Myers and Stark 1993a, b). When parameters of the model are adjusted to fit pupillary responses to transient light stimuli over a range of light levels, the model simulates reduced phase lag in response to increased mean light level, and the reduction in this LDSF effect with increased mean light level or increasing stimulus frequency without further changes in parameters. This latter reduction explains the relatively small level dependence seen in latency data (-34 ms/log unit). These data will be shown (Myers and Stark 1990b) to be commensurate with reduction in pupil cycle time (increased frequency of oscillation) observed in high gain oscillation experiments as mean brightness increases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8452892

  6. Involvement of Difference in Decrease of Hemoglobin Level in Poor Prognosis of Stage I and II Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Implication in Outcome of Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Anhui provincial hospital, Hefei (China); Tao Yalan; Li Guo; Yi Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xia Yunfei, E-mail: xiayf@sysucc.org.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and the difference in its decrease during treatment on outcome of radiotherapy (RT) alone for patients with Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 572 patients with Stage I-II nasopharyngeal carcinoma with RT alone between January 2001 and December 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. Patient characteristics, tumor variables, and Hb level, including pre-RT Hb, mid-RT Hb, and dynamic change of Hb between pre- and post- RT and its difference in decrease ( White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb) were subjected to univariate and multivariable analysis to identify factors that predict disease-specific survival (DSS), local regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS). Results: The 5-year DSS was poorer in the Hb continuous decrease group than in the Hb noncontinuous decrease group (84% vs. 89%; p = 0.008). There was poorer 5-year DSS in patients with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of >11.5 g/L than in those with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of {<=}11.5 g/L (82% vs. 89%; p = 0.001), and poorer LRFS (79% vs. 83%; p = 0.035). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that Hb decrease difference with greater than 11.5 g/L was an independent prognostic factor for DSS and LRFS. Conclusions: The difference in decrease of Hb level during the course of radiation treatment appeared as a poor prognostic factor in Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

  7. Proposed design requirements for high-integrity containers used to store, transport, and dispose of high-specific-activity, low-level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.; Allen, G.C.; Pope, R.B.

    1981-04-01

    This report develops proposed design requirements for high integrity containers used to store, transport and/or dispose of high-activity, low-level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II. The wastes considered are the dewatered resins produced by the EPICOR II waste treatment system used to clean-up the auxiliary building water. The radioactivity level of some of these EPICOR II liners is 1300 curies per container. These wastes may be disposed of in an intermediate depth burial (10 to 20 meter depth) facility. The proposed container design requirements are directed to ensure isolation of the waste and protection of the public health and safety.

  8. Topology, delocalization via average symmetry and the symplectic Anderson transition.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang; Kane, C L

    2012-12-14

    A field theory of the Anderson transition in two-dimensional disordered systems with spin-orbit interactions and time-reversal symmetry is developed, in which the proliferation of vortexlike topological defects is essential for localization. The sign of vortex fugacity determines the Z(2) topological class of the localized phase. There are two distinct fixed points with the same critical exponents, corresponding to transitions from a metal to an insulator and a topological insulator, respectively. The critical conductivity and correlation length exponent of these transitions are computed in an N=1-[symbol: see text] expansion in the number of replicas, where for small [symbol: see text] the critical points are perturbatively connected to the Kosterlitz-Thouless critical point. Delocalized states, which arise at the surface of weak topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators, occur because vortex proliferation is forbidden due to the presence of symmetries that are violated by disorder, but are restored by disorder averaging. PMID:23368359

  9. Photon transport enhanced by transverse Anderson localization in disordered superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, P.; Chung, C.; McMillan, J. F.; Tsai, M.; Lu, M.; Panoiu, N. C.; Wong, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the flow of light at subwavelength scales provides access to functionalities such as negative or zero index of refraction, transformation optics, cloaking, metamaterials and slow light, but diffraction effects severely restrict our ability to control light on such scales. Here we report the photon transport and collimation enhanced by transverse Anderson localization in chip-scale dispersion-engineered anisotropic media. We demonstrate a photonic crystal superlattice structure in which diffraction is nearly completely arrested by cascaded resonant tunnelling through transverse guided resonances. By modifying the geometry of more than 4,000 scatterers in the superlattices we add structural disorder controllably and uncover the mechanism of disorder-induced transverse localization. Arrested spatial divergence is captured in the power-law scaling, along with exponential asymmetric mode profiles and enhanced collimation bandwidths for increasing disorder. With increasing disorder, we observe the crossover from cascaded guided resonances into the transverse localization regime, beyond both the ballistic and diffusive transport of photons.

  10. Extended states in 1-D Anderson chain diluted by periodic disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazo, E.; Onell, M. E.

    2001-05-01

    In this work, we generalize the periodic random Anderson model, because instead of using constant site energies between disordered sites, we dilute the Anderson lattice by means of ( P-1) site energies given by an arbitrary periodic function ? l=f (l)=f (l+P), l=2, 3,…,P , where P is the period of the Anderson lattice. Using a block decimation scheme, we analytically find the mathematical conditions for the appearing of delocalized states with critical energies Ec. In addition, we find some of the symmetries associated to the function f (l) which allows the propagation of extended electronic waves through our generalized model.

  11. Toxicity of oxidized fats II: tissue levels of lipid peroxides in rats fed a thermally oxidized corn oil diet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. C Nwanguma; A. C Achebe; L. C Eze

    1999-01-01

    Male Wistar albino rats were fed for 21 days on a diet in which fat (12%) was included either as fresh corn oil, malonaldehyde content=0.11±0.05?g\\/g (control) or thermally oxidized corn oil, malonaldehyde content=0.20±0.03?g\\/g (experimental) and the tissue levels of lipid peroxides in six organs—namely, liver, kidney, brain, heart, lungs and testes—were determined. Of the organs studied, significantly (P<0.1) higher concentrations

  12. An Archaeological Survey of a Proposed Borrow Pit in Anderson County, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Moore, William

    2015-07-10

    An archaeological survey of a 15 acre borrow pit in a floodplain setting adjacent to the Trinity River in northern Anderson County was conducted by Brazos Valley Research Associates in September 2003. Six trackhoe trenches were dug through clay...

  13. Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson - Duration: 2 minutes, 45 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

  14. Characterization of the Anderson metal-insulator transition for non ergodic operators and application

    E-print Network

    Constanza Rojas-Molina

    2011-10-31

    We study the Anderson metal-insulator transition for non ergodic random Schr\\"odinger operators in both annealed and quenched regimes, based on a dynamical approach of localization, improving known results for ergodic operators into this more general setting. In the procedure, we reformulate the Bootstrap Multiscale Analysis of Germinet and Klein to fit the non ergodic setting. We obtain uniform Wegner Estimates needed to perform this adapted Multiscale Analysis in the case of Delone-Anderson type potentials, that is, Anderson potentials modeling aperiodic solids, where the impurities lie on a Delone set rather than a lattice, yielding a break of ergodicity. As an application we study the Landau operator with a Delone-Anderson potential and show the existence of a mobility edge between regions of dynamical localization and dynamical delocalization.

  15. Task partitioning upon memory-constrained multiprocessors Nathan Fisher James H. Anderson Sanjoy Baruah

    E-print Network

    Anderson, James

    Baruah Department of Computer Science The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill {fishern, anderson, baruah}@cs.unc.edu Abstract Most prior theoretical research on partitioning algo- rithms for real

  16. A guide to source materials of the life and work of Lawrence B. Anderson '30

    E-print Network

    Laguette, Victoria.

    1998-01-01

    From 1933 to 1976, Professor Lawrence B. Anderson taught in the MIT Department of Architecture, and from 1947 to 1971, he served as its chairman and dean. Concurrently, from 1937 to 1972 , he was principal partner in the ...

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (BRIDTH00050033) on Town Highway 5, crossing the North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00050033 on town highway 5 crossing the North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 5.01-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the downstream banks are forested and the upstream banks have dense woody brush; the upstream right overbank is an open field. In the study area, the North Branch Ottauquechee River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.017 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 30 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 83.2 mm (0.273 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 3, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. Also at the time of the site visit, there was considerable backwater at the bridge site due to a three foot tall beaver dam 40 feet downstream. The beaver dam was assumed destroyed by flood flow and was ignored in the analyses. The town highway 5 crossing of the North Branch Ottauquechee Riveris a 25-ft-long, onelane bridge consisting of one 23-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment and upstream right wingwall during the Level I assessment. Scour protection measures at the site include type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the ends of all the wingwalls except the upstream left which has type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter). Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 5.3 to 7.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A crosssection of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour)

  18. Toxicity of oxidized fats II: tissue levels of lipid peroxides in rats fed a thermally oxidized corn oil diet.

    PubMed

    Nwanguma, B C; Achebe, A C; Ezeanyika, L U; Eze, L C

    1999-04-01

    Male Wistar albino rats were fed for 21 days on a diet in which fat (12%) was included either as fresh corn oil, malonaldehyde content = 0.11+/-0.05 micro microg/g (control) or thermally oxidized corn oil, malonaldehyde content = 0.20+/-0.03 microg/g (experimental) and the tissue levels of lipid peroxides in six organs-namely, liver, kidney, brain, heart, lungs and testes-were determined. Of the organs studied, significantly (P < 0.1) higher concentrations of lipid peroxides were observed only in the liver and kidney of the experimental rats. In the course of the feeding, the experimental rats showed significantly (P < 0.1) lower gains in body weights as well as higher relative liver weights than the control rats. PMID:10418956

  19. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El-Maaref, A., E-mail: aahmh@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Uosif, M.A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt)] [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M. [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)] [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2012-07-15

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  20. Urinary CTX?II levels are associated with radiographic subtypes of osteoarthritis in hip, knee, hand, and facet joints in subject with familial osteoarthritis at multiple sites: the GARP study

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbelt, I; Kloppenburg, M; Kroon, H M; Houwing?Duistermaat, J J; Garnero, P; Graverand, M?P Hellio Le; DeGroot, J; Slagboom, P E

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the relation between the urinary concentrations of type II collagen C?telopeptide (UCTX?II) and radiographic signs of osteoarthritis (ROA) in the GARP (Genetics, Arthrosis and Progression) study. Methods UCTX?II levels were measured in GARP study participants, who are sibling pairs predominantly with symptomatic osteoarthritis at multiple sites. Kellgren and Lawrence scores were used to assess ROA in the knees, hips, hands, and vertebral facet joints, and spinal disc degeneration. A proportionate score was made for each joint location, based on the number of joints with ROA. The sum total ROA score represents a measure of cartilage abnormalities within each patient. By using linear mixed models the total ROA score and the joint site specific ROA scores were correlated with the UCTX?II level. Results In 302 subjects the mean (SD) and median (range) for UCTX?II were 265 (168) and 219 (1346) ng/mmol creatine, respectively. There was a significant association between the total ROA score and UCTX?II levels. Subsequent multivariate analysis showed that the joint site specific ROA score at all joint sites, except for spinal disc degeneration, contributed independently to this association. Conclusions The total ROA score of GARP patients, representing cartilage abnormalities at the most prevalent ROA joint locations, showed an excellent correlation with UCTX?II levels. The specific ROA scores at the hip, hand, facet, and knee joints additively and independently explained this association. Even in patients with osteoarthritis at multiple sites, UCTX?II may be a sensitive quantitative marker of ROA. PMID:16079167

  1. In vivo modulation of extracellular hippocampal glutamate and GABA levels and limbic seizures by group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Ilse; Lindekens, Hilde; Clinckers, Ralph; Meurs, Alfred; O'Neill, Michael J; Lodge, David; Ebinger, Guy; Michotte, Yvette

    2004-03-01

    The effects of several metabotropic receptor (mGluR) ligands on baseline hippocampal glutamate and GABA overflow in conscious rats and the modulation of limbic seizure activity by these ligands were investigated. Intrahippocampal mGluR group I agonist perfusion via a microdialysis probe [1 mm (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine] induced seizures and concomitant augmentations in amino acid dialysate levels. The mGlu1a receptor antagonist LY367385 (1 mm) decreased baseline glutamate but not GABA concentrations, suggesting that mGlu1a receptors, which regulate hippocampal glutamate levels, are tonically activated by endogenous glutamate. This decrease in glutamate may contribute to the reported LY367385-mediated anticonvulsant effect. The mGlu5 receptor antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (50 mg/kg) also clearly abolished pilocarpine-induced seizures. Agonist-mediated actions at mGlu2/3 receptors by LY379268 (100 microm, 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) decreased basal hippocampal GABA but not glutamate levels. This may partly explain the increased excitation following systemic LY379268 administration and the lack of complete anticonvulsant protection within our epilepsy model with the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist. Group II selective mGluR receptor blockade with LY341495 (1-10 microm) did not alter the rats' behaviour or hippocampal amino acid levels. These data provide a neurochemical basis for the full anticonvulsant effects of mGlu1a and mGlu5 antagonists and the partial effects observed with mGlu2/3 agonists in vivo. PMID:15009663

  2. Anderson localization and the topology of classifying spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Takahiro; Furusaki, Akira; Mudry, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    We construct the generic phase diagrams encoding the topologically distinct localized and delocalized phases of noninteracting fermionic quasiparticles for any symmetry class from the tenfold way in one, two, and three dimensions. To this end, we start from a massive Dirac Hamiltonian perturbed by a generic disorder for any dimension of space and for any one of the ten symmetry classes from the tenfold way. The physics of Anderson localization is then encoded by a two-dimensional phase diagram that we deduce from the topology of the space of normalized Dirac masses. This approach agrees with previously known results and gives an alternative explanation for the even-odd effect in the one-dimensional chiral symmetry classes. We also give a qualitative explanation for the Gade singularity and Griffiths effects in the density of states using the first homotopy group of the normalized Dirac masses in two dimensions. Finally, this approach is used to analyze the stability of massless Dirac fermions on the surface of three-dimensional topological crystalline insulators.

  3. Anderson Localization for Schrödinger Operators on with Strongly Mixing Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgain, Jean; Schlag, Wilhelm

    In this paper we show that for a.e. x?[ 0,2 ?) the operators defined on as and with Dirichlet condition ?- 1= 0, have pure point spectrum in with exponentially decaying eigenfunctions where ? > 0 and are small. As it is a simple consequence of known techniques that for small ? one has [- 2 +?, 2-?]? spectrum (H(x)) for a.e.x?[ 0, 2 ?), we thus established Anderson localization on the spectrum up to the edges and the center. More general potentials than cosine can be treated, but only those energies with nonzero spectral density are allowed. Finally, we prove the same result for operators on the whole line with potential , where A:?2-->?2 is a hyperbolic toral automorphism, F?C1(?2), ?F= 0, and ? small. The basis for our analysis is an asymptotic formula for the Lyapunov exponent for ?--> 0 by Figotin-Pastur, and generalized by Chulaevski-Spencer. We combine this asymptotic expansion with certain martingale large deviation estimates in order to apply the methods developed by Bourgain and Goldstein in the quasi-periodic case.

  4. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude Wc, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, Wc is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

  5. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Daniel [School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH, Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen, Germany and Division of Advanced Materials Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kettemann, Stefan [School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH,Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen, Germany and Division of Advanced Materials Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-20

    We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude W{sub c}, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, W{sub c} is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

  6. Induction of a Stem Lexicon for Two-level Morphological Analysis Erika F. de Lima

    E-print Network

    !1 II II II II II II I! II II II II II Induction of a Stem Lexicon for Two-level Morphological ac- quire from text corpora a Portuguese stem lex- icon for two-level morphological analysis. It makes use of a lexical transducer to generate all possible stems for a given unknown inflected word form

  7. Confinement effect on Anderson-Higgs modes in superfluid 3He-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, T.; Sauls, J. A.

    2015-03-01

    Superfluid 3He is a prototype to observe the spectrum of Anderson-Higgs (AH) modes associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. In bulk superfluid 3He, AH modes have been observed experimentally through attenuation of zero sound, propagation of transverse sound and its acoustic Faraday rotation. Starting from a Lagrangian formulation, we examine the AH modes of 3He-B confined in a restricted geometry. For bulk 3He-B this formalism leads to the well known spectrum of bosonic collectives modes of the bulk B-phase labelled by the quantum numbers for total angular momentum, J = 0 , 1 , 2 , ... , the projection along an axis, Jz = - J , ... , + J , and the parity under particle-hole conversion, K = +/- 1 . For the equilibrium phases of 3He confinement induces pair breaking and leads to symmetry breaking, giving rise to a rich topological phase diagram. In terms of the bosonic excitations, we find that confinement induces symmetry breaking and leads to mixing of modes with different J, as well as to level splittings of the AH modes that are otherwise degenerate in bulk 3He-B. We find a new spectrum of Bosonic modes is generated that are bound to the surface of superfluid 3He in a restricted geometry. We also report on the coupling of the AH modes to ultra-sound.

  8. Damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and photosystem II after water shortage and high-temperature stress in two lines of maize which differ in endogenous levels of abscisic acid and drought resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ristic, Z.; Cass, D.D. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1991-05-01

    This study examines damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and photosystem II (PS II), and the rate of CO{sub 2} fixation after exposure to 7-d water shortage followed by 6-h (WTS-6) or 24-h (WTS-24) high temperature (45C) stress in the high-level. Abscisic acid (ABA) drought-resistant (DR) line of maize ZPBL 1304 and the low-level ABA drought-sensitive line ZPL 389. Seven-day water shortage followed by 6-h high-temperature stress slightly damaged PS II in the DR line ZPBL 1304. The DS line ZPL 389 was affected by WTS-6 to a great extent; however, the stress-caused damage to this line was reversible. Exposure to WTS-24 caused reversible damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and PS II in DR line. The DS line was not capable of withstanding severe stress conditions; WTS-24 killed almost all the plants. The results on the rate of CO{sub 2} fixation were in agreement with those on the damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and PS II. Considerable drought and heat resistance was apparent in the line (ZPBL 1304) which synthesizes a unique band of heat-shock protein(s) of 45 KDa. In conclusion, the high-level ABA DR line ZPBL 1304 showed much greater capability of withstanding WTS than the low-level ABA DS line ZPL 389.

  9. Interactive Vector Field Feature Identification Joel Daniels II, Erik W. Anderson, Student Member, IEEE,

    E-print Network

    Utah, University of

    to mimic natural phenomena; such as, smoke highlighting the updraft above a flame or creamer depicting, they are not without their complications. Particle tracing, in particular stream- lines, stream-surfaces and dye

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The HII Region Discovery Survey (HRDS). II. (Anderson+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, D. S.; Rood, R. T.

    2011-08-01

    Our observations were made with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) 100m telescope from 2008 June through 2010 October. We assembled our target list from the following multi-frequency, large solid angle Galactic surveys: the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) Galactic Plane Survey at 21cm HI and continuum (VGPS: Stil et al. 2006AJ....132.1158S), the NRAO VLA Sky Survey at 20cm continuum (NVSS: Condon et al. 1998, Cat. VIII/65), the Southern Galactic Plane Survey at 21cm HI and continuum (SGPS: Haverkorn et al. 2006ApJS..167..230H), the VLA MAGPIS at 20cm continuum (Helfand et al. 2006, Cat. J/AJ/131/2525), and the Spitzer 24um MIPSGAL survey (Carey et al. 2009PASP..121...76C). Our analysis here also uses 8.0um data from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE: Benjamin et al. 2003PASP..115..953B), which were obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. (4 data files).

  11. Evolution in Complex Systems PAUL E. ANDERSON,1

    E-print Network

    Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    behavior of type II superconductors and biological macroevolution. Each system is metastable when observed macroevolution, for example, in the form of a slowly decreasing extinction rate [8]. Similar ef- fects are one

  12. Anderson's disease/chylomicron retention disease in a Japanese patient with uniparental disomy 7 and a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anderson's Disease (AD)/Chylomicron Retention Disease (CMRD) is a rare hereditary hypocholesterolemic disorder characterized by a malabsorption syndrome with steatorrhea, failure to thrive and the absence of chylomicrons and apolipoprotein B48 post-prandially. All patients studied to date exhibit a mutation in the SAR1B gene, which codes for an essential component of the vesicular coat protein complex II (COPII) necessary for endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. We describe here a patient with AD/CMRD, a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence and maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7). Methods and Results The patient, one of two siblings of a Japanese family, had diarrhea and steatorrhea beginning at five months of age. There was a white duodenal mucosa upon endoscopy. Light and electron microscopy showed that the intestinal villi were normal but that they had lipid laden enterocytes containing accumulations of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm and lipoprotein-size particles in membrane bound structures. Although there were decreased amounts in plasma of total- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoproteins AI and B and vitamin E levels, the triglycerides were normal, typical of AD/CMRD. The presence of low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein B in the plasma, although in decreased amounts, ruled out abetalipoproteinemia. The parents were asymptomatic with normal plasma cholesterol levels suggesting a recessive disorder and ruling out familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. Sequencing of genomic DNA showed that the 8 exons of the SAR1B gene were normal. Whole genome SNP analysis and karyotyping revealed matUPD7 with a normal karyotype. In contrast to other cases of AD/CMRD which have shown catch-up growth following vitamin supplementation and a fat restricted diet, our patient exhibits continued growth delay and other aspects of the matUPD7 and Silver-Russell Syndrome phenotypes. Conclusions This patient with AD/CMRD has a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence which suggests that factors other than the SAR1B protein may be crucial for chylomicron secretion. Further, this patient exhibits matUPD7 with regions of homozygosity which might be useful for elucidating the molecular basis of the defect(s) in this individual. The results provide novel insights into the relation between phenotype and genotype in these diseases and for the mechanisms of secretion in the intestine. PMID:22104167

  13. Critical charge fluctuations in a pseudogap Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Tathagata; Ingersent, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The Anderson impurity model with a density of states ? (? ) ?|?| r containing a power-law pseudogap centered on the Fermi energy (? =0 ) features for 0

  14. Two-dimensional Anderson-Hubbard model in the DMFT + {Sigma} approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchinskii, E. Z., E-mail: kuchinsk@iep.uran.ru; Kuleeva, N. A.; Nekrasov, I. A.; Sadovskii, M. V., E-mail: sadovski@iep.uran.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Electrophysics (Russian Federation)

    2010-02-15

    The density of states, the dynamic (optical) conductivity, and the phase diagram of the paramagnetic two-dimensional Anderson-Hubbard model with strong correlations and disorder are analyzed within the generalized dynamical mean field theory (DMFT + {Sigma} approximation). Strong correlations are accounted by the DMFT, while disorder is taken into account via the appropriate generalization of the self-consistent theory of localization. We consider the two-dimensional system with the rectangular 'bare' density of states (DOS). The DMFT effective single-impurity problem is solved by numerical renormalization group (NRG). The 'correlated metal,' Mott insulator, and correlated Anderson insulator phases are identified from the evolution of the density of states, optical conductivity, and localization length, demonstrating both Mott-Hubbard and Anderson metal-insulator transitions in two-dimensional systems of finite size, allowing us to construct the complete zero-temperature phase diagram of the paramagnetic Anderson-Hubbard model. The localization length in our approximation is practically independent of the strength of Hubbard correlations. But the divergence of the localization length in a finite-size two-dimensional system at small disorder signifies the existence of an effective Anderson transition.

  15. Abrupt physical and chemical changes during 1992-1999, Anderson Springs, SE Geyser Geothermal Field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, Cathy J.; Goff, Fraser; Walter, Stephen R.; Sorey, Michael L.; Counce, Dale; Colvard, Elizabeth M.

    2000-01-01

    The Anderson Springs area is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. Patrons drank a variety of cool to hot mineral waters from improved springs, swam in various baths and pools, and hiked in the rugged hills flanking Anderson Creek and its tributaries. In the bluffs to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. By the early 1970s, the higher ridges south and west of Anderson Springs became part of the southeast sector of the greater Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric power plants are built on these ridges, producing energy from a vapor-dominated 240 °C reservoir. Only the main hot spring at Anderson Springs has maintained a recognizable identity since the 1930s. The hot spring is actually a cluster of seeps and springs that issue from a small fault in a ravine southwest of Anderson Creek. Published and unpublished records show that the maximum temperature (Tm) of this cluster fell gradually from 63°C in 1889 to 48°C in 1992. However, Tm of the cluster climbed to 77°C in 1995 and neared boiling (98°C) in 1998. A new cluster of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm = 99.3°C) formed in 1998 about 30 m north of the old spring cluster. Several evergreen trees on steep slopes immediately above these vents apparently were killed by the new activity. Thermal waters at Anderson Hot Springs are mostly composed of near-surface ground waters with some added gases and condensed steam from The Geysers geothermal system. Compared to gas samples from Southeast Geysers wells, the hot spring gases are higher in CO2 and lower in H2S and NH3. As the springs increased in temperature, however, the gas composition became more like the mean composition of steam discharges from the Southeast Geysers. The hot spring waters are low in ions of Cl, B, and Li, but relatively high in HCO3, SO4 and NH4. The stable-isotope compositions (deuterium and oxygen-18) of these waters plot near the global meteoric water line. Geochemical data through time reveal apparent maxima in the concentrations of SO4, Fe, and Mn in 1991 to 1992, before the cluster became hotter. The black-to-gray deposits from the new spring cluster are rich in pyrite and contain anomalous metals. About one-half mile to the east of the hot springs, mineralized water discharges intermittently from an old adit of the Schwartz (Anderson) mine, and enters a tributary of Anderson Creek. This drainage increased substantially in July 1998, and a slurry of mine water and precipitates were transported down the tributary and into Anderson Creek. In December 1998, the adit water was 22°C, and had a chemical composition that was similar to spring waters that once discharged in the ravines surrounding the old Anderson Springs resort. The cause for the abrupt changes that have occurred in thermal features at Anderson Springs is still not resolved. One possibility is that these changes are a response to withdrawal of steam from The Geysers geothermal field over more than 20 years of production. Pressure declines in the geothermal reservoir may have caused a "drying out" of the overlying condensation zone. Induced boiling in this zone and upflow of deep steam to shallower depths would cause heating and vaporization of shallow ground waters. In addition, earthquakes occurring in the vicinity of Anderson Springs have increased significantly after nearby geothermal power plants began operation. These earthquakes may have enhanced surface discharge of thermal fluids along fractures and faults.

  16. Algebraic and geometric mean density of states in topological Anderson insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Yang; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2013-11-01

    Algebraic and geometric mean density of states in disordered systems may reveal properties of electronic localization. In order to understand the topological phases with disorder in two dimensions, we present the calculated density of states for the disordered Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. The topological phase is characterized by a perfectly quantized conducting plateau, carried by helical edge states, in a two-terminal setup. In the presence of disorder, the bulk of the topological phase is either a band insulator or an Anderson insulator. Both of them can protect edge states from backscattering. The topological phases are explicitly distinguished as a topological band insulator or a topological Anderson insulator from the ratio of the algebraic mean density of states to the geometric mean density of states. The calculation reveals that the topological Anderson insulator can be induced by disorders from either a topologically trivial band insulator or a topologically nontrivial band insulator.

  17. Energy-Level and Wave-Function Statistics in the Anderson Model of Localization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernhard Mehlig; Michael Schreiber

    Universal aspects of correlations in the spectra and wave functions of closed, complex quantum systems can be described by\\u000a random-matrix theory (RMT) [1]. On small energy scales, for example, the eigenvalues, eigenfunctions and matrix elements of\\u000a disordered quantum systems in the metallic regime [2] or those of classically chaotic quantum systems [3] exhibit universal\\u000a statistical properties very well described by

  18. User-level Internet Path Diagnosis Ratul Mahajan Neil Spring David Wetherall Thomas Anderson

    E-print Network

    Wetherall, David

    tool, tulip, diagnoses reordering, loss and significant queuing events by leveraging well deployed but little exploited router features that approximate our architecture. Tulip can locate points of reordering

  19. Observation of the Anderson metal-insulator transition with atomic matter waves: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lemarie, Gabriel; Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Chabe, Julien; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude [Laboratoire PhLAM, , Universite de Lille 1, CNRS, CERLA, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Gremaud, Benoit [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2009-10-15

    Using a cold atomic gas exposed to laser pulses - a realization of the chaotic quasiperiodic kicked rotor with three incommensurate frequencies - we study experimentally and theoretically the Anderson metal-insulator transition in three dimensions. Sensitive measurements of the atomic wave function and the use of finite-size scaling techniques make it possible to unambiguously demonstrate the existence of a quantum phase transition and to measure its critical exponents. By taking proper account of systematic corrections to one-parameter scaling, we show the universality of the critical exponent {nu}=1.59{+-}0.01, which is found to be equal to the one previously computed for the Anderson model.

  20. Experimental Observation of the Anderson Metal-Insulator Transition with Atomic Matter Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chabe, Julien; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molecules, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, CNRS, CERLA, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Lemarie, Gabriel; Gremaud, Benoit; Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2008-12-19

    We realize experimentally an atom-optics quantum-chaotic system, the quasiperiodic kicked rotor, which is equivalent to a 3D disordered system that allows us to demonstrate the Anderson metal-insulator transition. Sensitive measurements of the atomic wave function and the use of finite-size scaling techniques make it possible to extract both the critical parameters and the critical exponent of the transition, the latter being in good agreement with the value obtained in numerical simulations of the 3D Anderson model.

  1. Mean-field theory and ? expansion for Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. B.; Lubensky, T. C.

    1981-03-01

    A general field-theoretic formulation of the Anderson model for the localization of wave functions in a random potential is given in terms of n-component replicated fields in the limit n-->0, and is analyzed primarily for spatial dimension d>=4. Lengths ?1 and ?2 associated with the spatial decay of correlations in the single-particle and two-particle Green's functions, respectively, are introduced. Two different regimes, the weak coupling and strong coupling, are distinguished depending on whether ?-11 or ?-12, respectively, vanishes as the mobility energy, Ec, is approached. The weak-coupling regime vanishes as d-->4+. Mean-field theory is developed from the uniform minimum of the Lagrangian for both the strong- and weak-coupling cases. For the strong-coupling case it gives the exponents va=14, ?a=?a=12, ?=0, and ?=1, where ?a is the exponent associated with the density of extended states and ? is that associated with the conductivity. Simple heuristic arguments are used to verify the correctness of these unusual mean-field values. Infrared divergences in perturbation theory for the strong-coupling case occur for d<8, and an ? expansion (?=8-d) is developed which is found to be identical to that previously analyzed for the statistics of lattice animals and which gives ?a=12-?12, ?=-?9, va=14+?36, and ?=1-5?36. The results are consistent with the Ward identity, which in combination with scaling arguments requires that ?a+?a=1. The treatment takes account of the fact that the average of the on-site Green's function [G(x-->,x-->E)]av is nonzero and is predicated on this quantity being real, i.e., on the density of states vanishing at the mobility edge. We also show that localized states emerge naturally from local minima of finite action in the Lagrangian. These instanton solutions are analyzed on a lattice where the cutoff produced by the lattice constant leads to lattice instantons which exist for all d, in contrast to the case for the continuum model where instanton solutions seem not to occur for d>4. This analysis leads to a density of localized states ?loc satisfying ln?loc~-E2 at large E and ln?loc~-|E-Ec|-? at the mobility edge, where for the weak-coupling case ?=(12)(d-4) and for the strong-coupling case ?=(d-2+?)va-2?a=12+?18 for d<8 and ?=(14)(d-6) for d>8. A brief discussion of the relationship between this work and the theories of localization below four dimensions is presented.

  2. ESL II Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flander, Leonard

    This curriculum guide for English as a Second Language (ESL) Level II is the second of six in the Guam Community College ESL project series. The other five guides, a companion teacher's guide, and pre- and post-tests are available separately (see note). The entire project centers around the Peabody Kits P, Level P, Level 1, Level 2, Level 3, and…

  3. Second order U-perturbation approach to the Anderson lattice model in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, H.; Czycholl, G.

    1989-01-01

    We study the periodic Anderson model (PAM), i.e. highly correlated, localized f-shells on a d-dimensional (simple-cubic) lattice hybridized with the states of a (tight-binding) conduction band. At least for the symmetric PAM (i.e. the unperturbed f-level energy E f and E f+U lie symmetric around the chemical potential, where U denotes the on-site Coulomb correlation between the f-electrons,) the second order (standard) U-perturbation treatment around the non-magnetic Hartree-Fock solution provides for a proper approximate treatment of the PAM even for relatively large values of U. In this communication we study this approach in the limit of high dimensions d of the underlying lattice. In this limit, which has recently been introduced by Metzner and Vollhardt for the Hubbard model, the selfenergy becomes site-diagonal, i.e. momentum independent, because of which the explicit calculation of the selfenergy in second order in U is much simpler than in lower dimensions. But one still obtains an f-electron spectral function, which shows all the properties, which are usually expected for heavy fermion systems, in particular single-particle peaks near to E f and E f+U, a strongly temperature dependent many-particle (Kondo) resonance peak near to the chemical potential, a hybridization (coherence) gap at the chemical potential, etc. Thus practical calculations may become much simpler for high d, but the essential physics remains the same as for realistic low d (=1,2,3).

  4. Shouting to be Heard in Advertising Simon P. Anderson and Andr de Palma

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Shouting to be Heard in Advertising Simon P. Anderson and André de Palma July 2011 revised October 2012 Abstract Advertising competes for scarce consumer attention, so more profitable advertisers send of loud shouters or large range of quiet whisperers. All advertisers prefer there to be less shouting

  5. ENHANCED WEGNER AND MINAMI ESTIMATES AND EIGENVALUE STATISTICS OF RANDOM ANDERSON MODELS

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    for the unfolded eigenvalues; · the local asymptotic ergodicity of the unfolded eigenvalues; In dimension 1, for the standard Anderson model, the improvement enables us to obtain the local spectral statistics at band edge distribution. [Kl10] used this re- duction to study the local ergodicity of the unfolded eigenvalues

  6. Melissa L. Anderson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association/American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. The 2012 winner is Melissa L. Anderson for her ongoing commitment to understanding, treating, and preventing domestic violence in Deaf women…

  7. Web Search with Metadata Links and Multimedia Presentations G. Ozsoyoglu, M. R. Anderson, Z. M. Ozsoyoglu

    E-print Network

    Michigan, University of

    1 Web Search with Metadata Links and Multimedia Presentations G. Ozsoyoglu, M. R. Anderson, Z. M. Ozsoyoglu Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Case Western Reserve University, and report its preliminary testing. Contact Author: Gultekin Ozsoyoglu tekin@eecs.cwru.edu http

  8. Kondo screening cloud in the single-impurity Anderson model: A density matrix renormalization group study

    E-print Network

    von Delft, Jan

    Kondo screening cloud in the single-impurity Anderson model: A density matrix renormalization group through the mechanism of the Kondo effect. This gives rise to spin-spin correlations between the magnetic this phenomenon, the so-called Kondo cloud, by means of the density matrix renormalization group method

  9. Serial exploitation of global sea cucumber fisheries Sean C Anderson1

    E-print Network

    Myers, Ransom A.

    Serial exploitation of global sea cucumber fisheries Sean C Anderson1 , Joanna Mills Flemming2 trajectory of sea cucumber fisheries 5 Drivers of sea cucumber fisheries 6 Rate of development 8 Distance in catch and value worldwide. One increasingly harvested group is sea cucumbers (class Holothuroidea

  10. SILK { a playful blend of Scheme and Java Kenneth R. Anderson, BBN Technologies, Cambridge, MA

    E-print Network

    Strickland, Stevie

    SILK { a playful blend of Scheme and Java Kenneth R. Anderson, BBN Technologies, Cambridge, MA) interpreter in Java [after [6] p. 176]. Abstract SILK (Scheme in about 50 K) is a compact Scheme imple- mented Scheme in Java, but its access to Java was awkward. The current version has altered SILK's syntax

  11. Virtual herding for flexible livestock management a review Dean M. AndersonA,D

    E-print Network

    . Additional keywords: grazing systems, hoof-action, livestock management, paddocks, pastures, plant­animalVirtual herding for flexible livestock management ­ a review Dean M. AndersonA,D , Rick E. Estell Cruces, NM 88003, USA. B Department of Animal and Range Sciences, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces

  12. Topological Superconductor to Anderson Localization Transition in One-Dimensional Incommensurate Lattices

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Topological Superconductor to Anderson Localization Transition in One-Dimensional Incommensurate.--Topological superconductors (TSCs) have attracted intense recent studies, as they are promising candidates for the practical feasibility on the detection of Majorana fermions in hybrid superconductor-semiconductor wires [8­10], which

  13. The visual core of a hyperbolic 3manifold James W. Anderson and Richard D. Canary \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Canary, Dick

    The visual core Before describing the basic properties of the visual core, we give some definitionsThe visual core of a hyperbolic 3­manifold James W. Anderson and Richard D. Canary \\Lambda Faculty of the visual core of a hyperbolic 3­manifold N = H 3 =\\Gamma. One may think of the visual core as a harmonic

  14. Bio390 Glucose and the Kidney ANSWERS thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson,

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    1 Bio390 Glucose and the Kidney ANSWERS thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson, Dept Zoology Univ of Florida of urine formation: 1.0 ml min plasma glucose concentration: 80 mg 100 ml plasma urine glucose concentration: 0 mg ml CALCULATE: the reabsorption rate for glucose ANS: 100 mg glucose / min Since glucose

  15. Anderson transition in three and four effective dimensions for the frequency modulated kicked rotator

    E-print Network

    D. L. Shepelyansky

    2011-02-22

    The critical exponents for the Anderson transition in three and four effective dimensions are discussed on the basis of previous data obtained for the frequency modulated kicked rotator. Without appeal to a scaling function they are shown to be in a satisfactory agreement with the theoretical relation known for them.

  16. Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long

    E-print Network

    Long, David G.

    Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long Brigham Young for mapping polar sea ice extent. In this study, a new al- gorithm for polar sea ice mapping is developed of Bayes detection to produce sea ice extent maps. Statistical models for sea ice and ocean are represented

  17. Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Author(s): Alan Ross Anderson and Nuel D. Belnap, Jr.

    E-print Network

    Belnap, Nuel

    Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Enthymemes Author(s): Alan Ross Anderson and Nuel D. Belnap, Jr. Source: The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 58, No. 23, American Philosophical Association Eastern Division Fifty: Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2023169 Accessed: 28/05/2009 15

  18. ANALYSIS OF SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF CERIUM COMPOUNDS IN THE ANDERSON MODEL

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    E 1105 ANALYSIS OF SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF CERIUM COMPOUNDS IN THE ANDERSON MODEL P the theory of Lacroix-Lyon-Caen et al., who have calculated the magnetic susceptibility of a cerium Kondo of the exchange parameter 0393n(EF) and the Kondo temperature TK of some cerium compounds from susceptibility

  19. What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider? Edward Anderson , Tim Coltman*

    E-print Network

    Coltman, Tim

    1 What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider? Edward Anderson , Tim Coltman and the direction of the research project. #12;2 What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider of their distinctive value propositions ­ a fact one would also expect holds true when companies choose a logistics

  20. Dystopian Visions of Global Capitalism: Philip Reeve's "Mortal Engines" and M.T Anderson's "Feed"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullen, Elizabeth; Parsons, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This article examines Philip Reeve's novel for children, "Mortal Engines", and M.T. Anderson's young adult novel, "Feed", by assessing these dystopias as prototypical texts of what Ulrich Beck calls risk society. Through their visions of a fictional future, the two narratives explore the hazards created by contemporary techno-economic progress,…

  1. Real-Time Character Animation for Computer Games Eike F Anderson

    E-print Network

    Davies, Christopher

    Real-Time Character Animation for Computer Games Eike F Anderson National Centre for Computer Animation Bournemouth University ABSTRACT The importance of real-time character animation in computer games and prospects of their real-time application, ranging from the animation of simple articulated objects to real-time

  2. Generation of the S boxes of Tiger Ross Anderson 1 and Eli Biham 2

    E-print Network

    Biham, Eli

    Generation of the S boxes of Tiger Ross Anderson 1 and Eli Biham 2 1 Cambridge University, England algorithm of the S boxes of Tiger uses the compression func­ tion of Tiger in order to achieve random the S boxes to the unity columns, and the state to the initial value of the state of Tiger. Then it randomizes

  3. Economic Impact of the 32nd Annual Peter Anderson Arts and Crafts Festival, Ocean Springs, Mississippi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert E. Myles; Rachael Carter

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the Economic Impact of Festivals and Special Events: Lessons From the 32st Annual Peter Anderson Arts and Crafts Festival in Ocean Springs, Mississippi Background: Festivals are an integral part of the economies of most communities in Mississippi. The economic benefits of festivals can be assigned a dollar value, but no amount of money will accurately reflect the personal and

  4. How democratic will e-Democracy be? Stuart Anderson Massimo Felici

    E-print Network

    Felici, Massimo

    How democratic will e-Democracy be? Stuart Anderson Massimo Felici LFCS, School of Informatics developments (e.g., e-Government, e-Democracy, e-Voting, etc.) of the Information Society expose the limits multidisciplinary audi- ence. This panel advocates a multidisciplinary debate on e-Democracy: How democratic will e-Democracy

  5. Phase diagram for Anderson disorder: Beyond single-parameter scaling Nigel Goldenfeld

    E-print Network

    Haydock, Roger

    Phase diagram for Anderson disorder: Beyond single-parameter scaling Nigel Goldenfeld Department, Cambridge CB3 0WA, United Kingdom Roger Haydock Department of Physics and Materials Science Institute, 1274 in a disordered potential is transformed analytically and exactly to a basis of random extended states leading

  6. Rebound Discharge in Deep Cerebellar Nuclear Neurons Reza Tadayonnejad & Dustin Anderson &

    E-print Network

    Turner, Ray

    Rebound Discharge in Deep Cerebellar Nuclear Neurons In Vitro Reza Tadayonnejad & Dustin Anderson the capacity to translate membrane hyperpolarizations into a rebound increase in firing frequency. The primary. In particular, it was shown that large diameter cells in the rat DCN exhibit two phenotypes of rebound discharge

  7. A Limit Study of JavaScript Parallelism Emily Fortuna Owen Anderson Luis Ceze Susan Eggers

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    A Limit Study of JavaScript Parallelism Emily Fortuna Owen Anderson Luis Ceze Susan Eggers Computer://sampa.cs.washington.edu Abstract--JavaScript is ubiquitous on the web. At the same time, the language's dynamic behavior makes on the potential parallelism of JavaScript appli- cations, including popular web pages and standard Java

  8. Decadal climate cycles and declining Columbia River salmon James J. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    1 Decadal climate cycles and declining Columbia River salmon James J. Anderson School of Fisheries - This paper explores the effects of the interaction of anthropogenic trends and climate cycles on salmon river salmon production resulted from the interactions of human activities and climatic regime shifts

  9. Anderson, David P., Adjunct Professor, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. BA, Clemson University, 1973; MS,

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    233 Faculty Anderson, David P., Adjunct Professor, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. BA, Associate Professor, Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management. BA, Illinois Wesleyan University, 1992; MS Professor, History. BA, University of North Carolina, 1990; MA, 1994, PhD, 1998, University of Mississippi

  10. Encoding and Response Strategies in Complex Skill Acquisition Dario D. Salvucci John R. Anderson Scott Douglass

    E-print Network

    Salvucci, Dario D.

    domain knowledge, and to decide whether to output the response during or after computation. The ACT-R theory (Anderson, 1993) seems well-suited to address these challenges. ACT-R allows for the creation strategies. We are currently experimenting with an ACT-R model of the task to ascertain its ability

  11. An Integrated Theory of the Mind John R. Anderson and Daniel Bothell

    E-print Network

    Byrne, Mike

    University Adaptive control of thought­rational (ACT­R; J. R. Anderson & C. Lebiere, 1998) has evolved are presented as examples of specialized systems in ACT­R. These modules are associated with distinct cortical. We have been working on a cognitive architecture called adaptive control of thought­rational (ACT­R

  12. Demonstration of the Secure Wireless Agent Testbed (SWAT) Gustave Anderson Andrew Burnheimer Vincent Cicirello David Dorsey

    E-print Network

    Demonstration of the Secure Wireless Agent Testbed (SWAT) Gustave Anderson Andrew Burnheimer will demonstrate the Secure Wireless Agent Testbed (SWAT), a unique facility developed at Drexel University systems. SWAT is an implemented system that fully integrates: (1) mobile agents, (2) wireless ad hoc multi

  13. Understanding Diagrammatic Ink in Lecture Richard Anderson, Crystal Hoyer, Craig Prince,

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Understanding Diagrammatic Ink in Lecture Richard Anderson, Crystal Hoyer, Craig Prince, Jonathan We are interested in understanding how digital ink and speech are used together in presentation. Our long range goal is to develop tools to analyze the ink and speech channels of recorded lectures

  14. On the Stability of Web Crawling and Web Reid Anderson1

    E-print Network

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    On the Stability of Web Crawling and Web Search Reid Anderson1 , Christian Borgs1 , Jennifer Chayes moti- vated by web crawling. We introduce a notion of stable cores, which is the set of web pages that are usually contained in the crawling buffer when the buffer size is smaller than the total number of web

  15. High-Performance Task Distribution for Volunteer Computing David P. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Korpela, Eric J.

    High-Performance Task Distribution for Volunteer Computing David P. Anderson Eric Korpela Rom], Distributed.net [6] and Folding@home [12]. Volunteer computing is being used in high-energy physics, molecular overloaded, requests fail and hosts become idle. Thus, server performance can limit the computing capacity

  16. LEGO MindStorms: Not Just for K-12 Anymore Frank Klassner, Scott D. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Klassner, Frank

    LEGO MindStorms: Not Just for K-12 Anymore Frank Klassner, Scott D. Anderson Department the possibility of using the Lego Mindstorms robots to support the ACM Computing Curriculum 2001, using them 2001, curriculum development, robotics, Lego Mindstorms Introduction The fields of Robotics

  17. AUTO ANSWER CIRCUIT DESIGN FOR AN ANDERSON JACOBSON AD 342 MODEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a circuit which connects a Western Electric Model 1001F Data Accessing Arrangement to an Anderson Jacobson Model AD 342 Modem. It automatically answers the phone and holds a data connection as long as a received carrier is present. It self resets upon loss of...

  18. Biology 390 Problem: Evaporative Water Loss and Temp Reg. thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson,

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    by evaporative cooling during one day by a 70 kg mammal whose rate of metabolism is 3,000 Kcal/day. Assume evaporative cooling is the only mode of heat exchange this mammal can use to regulate its body temperature, iBiology 390 Problem: Evaporative Water Loss and Temp Reg. thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson, Dept Zoology

  19. Acetaldehyde Aldol Condensation Kinetics J. 8. ANDERSON' and M. S. PETERS

    E-print Network

    Anderson, James B.

    Acetaldehyde Aldol Condensation Kinetics J. 8. ANDERSON' and M. S. PETERS University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. ACETALDEHYDEmay react to form aldol when- ever acetaldehyde and hydroxide ions are present reactions such as the formation of pentaerythrose. The mechanism of the acetaldehyde aldol reaction has been

  20. ON STATIONARY VACUUM SOLUTIONS TO THE EINSTEIN EQUATIONS MICHAEL T. ANDERSON

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Michael

    systems, e.g. stars * *or black holes. The reasoning here is that as one moves further and further away physical syste* *ms such as isolated stars or black holes, outside regions of matter. The most important MICHAEL T. ANDERSON 0.Introduction. A stationary space-time (M, g

  1. Inference of Tamoxifen's Effects on Prevention of Breast U T M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

    E-print Network

    Jin, Jiashun

    Inference of Tamoxifen's Effects on Prevention of Breast Cancer by Yu Shen U T M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Department of Biostatistics, Unit 1411 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 EMAIL yshen Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project's Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (NSABP- BCPT), evaluated

  2. A Novel Low-Power FPGA Routing Switch Jason H. Anderson and Farid N. Najm

    E-print Network

    Najm, Farid N.

    A Novel Low-Power FPGA Routing Switch Jason H. Anderson and Farid N. Najm Department of Electrical FPGA routing switch that can operate in three different modes: high-speed, low-power or sleep. High in industrial FPGA designs. Specifi- cally, we show that a considerable fraction of routing switches may

  3. Plate Tectonics as a Far-From-Equilibrium Self-Organized System Don L. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Don L.

    Plate Tectonics as a Far- From- Equilibrium Self-Organized System By Don L. Anderson Word Count: 3 and other forces at the top. Plate tectonics was once regarded as passive motion of plates on top of mantle convection cells but it now appears that continents and plate tectonics organize the flow in the mantle

  4. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1987-06-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

  5. Spectroscopic studies of the Salmonella enterica adenosyltransferase enzyme SeCobA: molecular-level insight into the mechanism of substrate Cob(II)alamin activation.

    PubMed

    Pallares, Ivan G; Moore, Theodore C; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C; Brunold, Thomas C

    2014-12-23

    CobA from Salmonella enterica (SeCobA) is a member of the family of ATP:Co(I)rrinoid adenosyltransferase (ACAT) enzymes that participate in the biosynthesis of adenosylcobalamin by catalyzing the transfer of the adenosyl group from an ATP molecule to a reactive Co(I)rrinoid species transiently generated in the enzyme active site. This reaction is thermodynamically challenging, as the reduction potential of the Co(II)rrinoid precursor in solution is far more negative than that of available reducing agents in the cell (e.g., flavodoxin), precluding nonenzymic reduction to the Co(I) oxidation state. However, in the active sites of ACATs, the Co(II)/Co(I) redox potential is increased by >250 mV via the formation of a unique four-coordinate (4c) Co(II)rrinoid species. In the case of the SeCobA ACAT, crystallographic and kinetic studies have revealed that the phenylalanine 91 (F91) and tryptophan 93 (W93) residues are critical for in vivo activity, presumably by blocking access to the lower axial ligand site of the Co(II)rrinoid substrate. To further assess the importance of the F91 and W93 residues with respect to enzymatic function, we have characterized various SeCobA active-site variants using electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. Our data provide unprecedented insight into the mechanism by which SeCobA converts the Co(II)rrinoid substrate to 4c species, with the hydrophobicity, size, and ability to participate in offset ?-stacking interactions of key active-site residues all being critical for activity. The structural changes that occur upon Co(II)rrinoid binding also appear to be crucial for properly orienting the transiently generated Co(I) "supernucleophile" for rapid reaction with cosubstrate ATP. PMID:25423616

  6. 2014 Rice University / UT MD Anderson Med Into Grad Program in Translational Cancer Diagnostics & Therapeutics Research for Bioengineers & Biophysicists

    E-print Network

    Zhang, David Yu

    2014 Rice University / UT MD Anderson Med Into Grad Program in Translational Cancer Diagnostics & Therapeutics Research for Bioengineers & Biophysicists Program Details: Rice University and The University Research for Bioengineers and Biophysicists. Doctoral students from Rice's Bioengineering, Biochemistry

  7. Unprecedented ? isomers of single-side triol-functionalized Anderson polyoxometalates and their proton-controlled isomer transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangwei; Liu, Zhenhua; Huang, Yichao; Zhang, Jin; Hao, Jian; Wei, Yongge

    2015-05-19

    The ?2-O atom in Anderson polyoxometalates was regioselectively activated by the introduction of protons, which, upon functionalization with triol ligands, could afford a series of unique ? isomers of the organically-derived Anderson cluster {[RCC(CH2O)3]MMo6O18(OH)3}(3-). Herein proton-controlled isomer transformation between the ? and ? isomer was observed by using the fingerprint region in the IR spectra and (13)C NMR spectra. PMID:25959667

  8. Effective models for Anderson impurity and Kondo problems from continuous unitary transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krones, Jörn; Uhrig, Götz S.

    2015-03-01

    The method of continuous unitary transformations (CUTs) is applied to the Anderson impurity and the Kondo model aiming at the systematic derivation of convergent effective models. If CUTs are applied in a conventional way, diverging differential equations occur. Similar to poor man's scaling, the energy scale, below which the couplings diverge, corresponds to the Kondo temperature TK. We present a way to apply CUTs to the Kondo and to the Anderson impurity model so that no divergences occur but a converged effective low-energy model is derived with small finite parameters at arbitrarily small energies. The ground state corresponds to a bound singlet with a binding energy given by the Kondo temperature TK.

  9. Observation of Anderson Localization in Ultrathin Films of Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jian; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Xiao; Yang, Shuo; Lin, Chaojing; Yang, Wenmin; Wu, Kehui; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Li, Yongqing

    2015-05-01

    Anderson localization, the absence of diffusive transport in disordered systems, has been manifested as hopping transport in numerous electronic systems, whereas in recently discovered topological insulators it has not been directly observed. Here, we report experimental demonstration of a crossover from diffusive transport in the weak antilocalization regime to variable range hopping transport in the Anderson localization regime with ultrathin (Bi1 -xSbx)2Te3 films. As disorder becomes stronger, negative magnetoconductivity due to the weak antilocalization is gradually suppressed, and eventually, positive magnetoconductivity emerges when the electron system becomes strongly localized. This work reveals the critical role of disorder in the quantum transport properties of ultrathin topological insulator films, in which theories have predicted rich physics related to topological phase transitions.

  10. Observation of Anderson Localization in Ultrathin Films of Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jian; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Xiao; Yang, Shuo; Lin, Chaojing; Yang, Wenmin; Wu, Kehui; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Li, Yongqing

    2015-05-29

    Anderson localization, the absence of diffusive transport in disordered systems, has been manifested as hopping transport in numerous electronic systems, whereas in recently discovered topological insulators it has not been directly observed. Here, we report experimental demonstration of a crossover from diffusive transport in the weak antilocalization regime to variable range hopping transport in the Anderson localization regime with ultrathin (Bi_{1-x}Sb_{x})_{2}Te_{3} films. As disorder becomes stronger, negative magnetoconductivity due to the weak antilocalization is gradually suppressed, and eventually, positive magnetoconductivity emerges when the electron system becomes strongly localized. This work reveals the critical role of disorder in the quantum transport properties of ultrathin topological insulator films, in which theories have predicted rich physics related to topological phase transitions. PMID:26066450

  11. Massive bowel resection upregulates the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II and apolipoprotein A-IV and alters the intestinal vitamin A status in rats.

    PubMed

    Hebiguchi, Taku; Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Morii, Mayako; Watanabe, Ryo; Yoshikawa, Kiwamu; Miura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Katsuyuki; Senoo, Haruki; Yoshino, Hiroaki

    2015-03-01

    Short bowel (SB) syndrome causes the malabsorption of various nutrients. Among these, vitamin A is important for a number of physiological activities. Vitamin A is absorbed by epithelial cells of the small intestine and is discharged into the lymphatic vessels as a component of chylomicrons and is delivered to the liver. In the present study, we used a rat model of SB syndrome in order to assess its effects on the expression of genes associated with the absorption, transport and metabolism of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II (CRBP II, gene symbol Rbp2) and apolipoprotein A-IV (gene symbol Apoa4) were higher than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by RT-qPCR. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that absorptive epithelial cells stained positive for both CRBP II and lecithin retinol acyltransferase, which are both required for the effective esterification of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the retinol content in the ileum and the retinyl ester content in the jejunum were lower than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by quantitative analysis of retinol and retinyl esters by high performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that the elevated mRNA expression levels of Rbp2 and Apoa4 in the rats with SB contribute to the effective esterification and transport of vitamin A. PMID:25585692

  12. Effect of Cd(II) and Se(IV) exposure on cellular distribution of both elements and concentration levels of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in Lepidium sativum.

    PubMed

    Gómez Ojeda, Armando; Corrales Escobosa, Alma Rosa; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Yanez Barrientos, Eunice; Wrobel, Katarzyna

    2013-09-01

    In this work, the effect of cadmium (0-5.0 mg L(-1) as cadmium chloride, Cd(II)) and selenium (0-2.0 mg L(-1) as sodium selenite, Se(IV)) was studied in Lepidium sativum with specific focus on glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MGO) and on the cellular distribution of both elements under different exposure conditions. The concentrations of two reactive ?-ketoaldehydes present as natural metabolites and as by-products of lipid peroxidation, were increased in plants treated with Cd(II), providng complementary experimental evidence on element phytotoxicity in garden cress, in terms of oxidative damage. Even though for higher than 1.0 mg L(-1) Se in medium similar adverse effect was found, under simultaneous exposure to both elements the changes in GO and MGO concentrations were clearly attenuated as compared to a single stressor treatment. This effect was accompanied by lower uptake of the two elements, significant decrease of their relative distribution in the fraction containing polar compounds and their increase in fraction corresponding to insoluble cell fragments/components, suggesting that the direct in vivo interaction between two element forms might be involved in the favorable effects of simultaneous treatment with Cd(II) + Se(IV). The fluorescence spectra obtained for biomass extracts corresponding to different exposure conditions suggested possible in vivo formation of CdSe quantum dots; however further studies are needed for ultimate identification and characterization of such nanoparticulate species. PMID:23799538

  13. Anderson–Stuart model to analyze conductivity of fluormica glass-ceramics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahantappa S Jogad

    2002-01-01

    AC and DC conductivities have been measured in glass-ceramics (GC) at different temperatures in the range 298–628 K and in the frequency range 100 Hz–5 MHz. Using the Anderson–Stuart model, we have calculated the activation energy, which is observed to be lower than that of the DC conductivity. The analysis for glass-ceramics indicates that the conductivity variation with frequency exhibits

  14. On Mott's formula for the ac-conductivity in the Anderson model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abel Klein; Olivier Lenoble; Peter M

    2006-01-01

    We study the ac-conductivity in linear response theory in the general framework of ergodic magnetic Schrodinger operators. For the Anderson model, if the Fermi energy lies in the localization regime, we prove that the ac-conductivity is bounded by C?2(log 1 ?) d+2 at small frequencies ?. This is to be compared to Mott's formula, which predicts the leading term to

  15. Ferromagnetic instability in a mean-field slave-boson approach for the Anderson lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Dorin, V.; Schlottmann, P. (Department of Physics and Center for Materials Research and Technology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States))

    1993-05-15

    We consider a stoichiometric metallic Anderson lattice with orbital degeneracy in the [ital U][r arrow][infinity] limit. A Gutzwiller type of mean-field approximation is formulated in terms of three slave bosons per site in analogy to Kotliar and Ruckenstein's approach for the Hubbard model. In the orbitally nondegenerate case the paramagnetic solution becomes unstable towards ferromagnetism if the valence is smaller than a critical one. This instability is suppressed with increasing orbital degeneracy.

  16. ACCURACY OF THE BRCAPRO RISK ASSESSMENT MODEL IN MALES PRESENTING TO MD ANDERSON FOR BRCA TESTING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carolyn Garby; Arun Banu M. D; Jackson Michelle M. S. CGC; Litton Jennifer M. D; HashmiSyed M. D; Giordano Sharon M. D MPH; Singletary Claire M. S CGC

    2012-01-01

    ACCURACY OF THE BRCAPRO RISK ASSESSMENT MODEL IN MALES PRESENTING TO MD ANDERSON FOR BRCA TESTING\\u000aPublication No. _______\\u000aCarolyn A. Garby, B.S.\\u000aSupervisory Professor: Banu Arun, M.D.\\u000aHereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) syndrome is due to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Women with HBOC have high risks to develop breast and ovarian cancers. Males with HBOC are

  17. Ground state properties of the two-band Anderson-type model in one dimension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Kaga; T. Fujiwara

    1986-01-01

    We study the ground states of the one-dimensional two-band Anderson type model in both the symmetric and the asymmetric cases. In the symmetric case the analytical expression of the charge-complex distribution function is formally derived, which is then applied to calculate the binding energy of the Kondo state. In the general asymmetric cases the behaviors of localized- and conduction-electron numbers

  18. Solution of the multichannel Anderson impurity model: Ground state and thermodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Bolech; N. Andrei

    2005-01-01

    We present the solution of the SU(N)?SU(M) Anderson impurity model using the Bethe-Ansatz. We first explain what extensions to the formalism were required for the solution. Subsequently we determine the ground state and derive the thermodynamics over the full range of temperature and fields. We identify the different regimes of valence fluctuation at high temperatures, followed by moment formation or

  19. Variational ground state for the periodic Anderson model with an indirect hybridization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zheng Hang

    1987-01-01

    As the direct on-site hybridization is forbidden by inversion symmetry in most of the mixed-valence compounds, an indirect on-site hybridization mediated by phonons has been introduced into the periodic Anderson model to constitute our model system. Then we try to construct a variational ground state for the model Hamiltonian by the following steps. First, we develop a new procedure to

  20. Variational theory of valence fluctuations: Ground states and quasiparticle excitations of the Anderson lattice model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. H. Brandow

    1986-01-01

    A variational study of ground states of the orbitally nondegenerate Anderson lattice model, using a wave function with one variational parameter per Bloch state k, has been extended to deal with essentially metallic systems having a nonintegral number of electrons per site. Quasiparticle excitations are obtained by direct appeal to Landau's original definition for interacting Fermi liquids, scrEqp(k,sigma)=deltaEtotal\\/deltan qp(k,sigma). This

  1. Variational theory of valence fluctuations: Ground states and quasiparticle excitations of the Anderson lattice model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Brandow

    1986-01-01

    A variational study of ground states of the orbitally nondegenerate Anderson lattice model, using a wave function with one variational parameter per Bloch state k, has been extended to deal with essentially metallic systems having a nonintegral number of electrons per site. Quasiparticle excitations are obtained by direct appeal to Landau's original definition for interacting Fermi liquids, scrE\\/sub qp\\/(k,sigma) =

  2. Observation of migrating transverse Anderson localizations of light in nonlocal media.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

    2014-05-16

    We report the experimental observation of the interaction and attraction of many localized modes in a two-dimensional system realized by a disordered optical fiber supporting transverse Anderson localization. We show that a nonlocal optically nonlinear response of thermal origin alters the localization length by an amount determined by the optical power and also induces an action at a distance between the localized modes and their spatial migration. Evidence of a collective and strongly interacting regime is given. PMID:24877941

  3. Electronic structure of vitamin B12 within the framework of the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Zafer; Mayda, Selma; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-03-01

    We study the electronic structure of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine C63H88CoN14O14P) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. Here, our purpose is to understand the many-body effects originating from the transition-metal impurity. In this approach, the cobalt 3 d orbitals are treated as the impurity states placed in a semiconductor host which consists of the rest of the molecule. The parameters of the resulting effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock approximation for the electronic structure of the molecule. The quantum Monte Carlo technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective Haldane-Anderson model for vitamin B12. We find that new states form inside the semiconductor gap due to the on-site Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3 d orbitals and that these states become the highest occupied molecular orbitals. In addition, we present results on the charge distribution and spin correlations around the Co atom. We compare the results of this approach with those obtained by the density-functional theory calculations.

  4. Children Who Desperately Want To Read, But Are Not Working at Grade Level: Use Movement Patterns As "Windows" To Discover Why. Part II: The Transverse Midline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corso, Marjorie

    This paper discusses a multi-part longitudinal study which compared the developmental movement levels and the academic learning level in young children, noting that the relationship between movement education and academic education is based on the assumption that both realms of learning are dependent on the adequate development of the brain. The…

  5. Literacy Behaviors of Kindergarten-Primary Children in High Stimulus-Level Literacy Environments. Part I: The Instruments. Part II: Environments and Literacy Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughlin, Catherine E.; Ivener, Bonnie L.

    A study of patterns of literacy behaviors in high level literacy environments with varying levels of access to the environment began with a study of the instruments involved. Goals were to: (1) examine the reliability of the Survey of Displayed Literacy Stimuli; (2) study the correlation between scores from the Survey of Displayed Literacy Stimuli…

  6. Growth condition-dependent synchronized changes in transcript levels of type II hexokinase and type 1 glucose transporter in tumor cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasuo Shinohara; Mami Hino; Taro Ishida; Yasuhisa Yamanaka; Hiroshi Terada

    2001-01-01

    Transcript levels of hexokinase (HK) isozymes and glucose transporter (GLUT) isoforms in RNA samples of AH130 cells obtained from dish cultures and ascites were evaluated in a quantitative manner. In AH130 cells cultured in dishes, HKI and HKII were expressed at a similar level, but HKIII and HKIV were not. GLUT1 and GLUT3 were also expressed, and messages of these

  7. Quantum diffusion for the Anderson model in the scaling limit

    E-print Network

    Laszlo Erdos; Manfred Salmhofer; Horng-Tzer Yau

    2007-03-26

    We consider random Schr\\"odinger equations on $\\bZ^d$ for $d\\ge 3$ with identically distributed random potential. Denote by $\\lambda$ the coupling constant and $\\psi_t$ the solution with initial data $\\psi_0$. The space and time variables scale as $x\\sim \\lambda^{-2 -\\kappa/2}, t \\sim \\lambda^{-2 -\\kappa}$ with $0< \\kappa < \\kappa_0(d)$. We prove that, in the limit $\\lambda \\to 0$, the expectation of the Wigner distribution of $\\psi_t$ converges weakly to a solution of a heat equation in the space variable $x$ for arbitrary $L^2$ initial data. The diffusion coefficient is uniquely determined by the kinetic energy associated to the momentum $v$. This work is an extension to the lattice case of our previous result in the continuum \\cite{ESYI}, \\cite{ESYII}. Due to the non-convexity of the level surfaces of the dispersion relation, the estimates of several Feynman graphs are more involved.

  8. Toward a robust analytical method for separating trace levels of nano-materials in natural waters: cloud point extraction of nano-copper(II) oxide.

    PubMed

    Majedi, Seyed Mohammad; Kelly, Barry C; Lee, Hian Kee

    2014-10-01

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) factors, namely Triton X-114 (TX-114) concentration, pH, ionic strength, incubation time, and temperature, were optimized for the separation of nano-sized copper(II) oxide (nCuO) in aqueous matrices. The kinetics of phase transfer was studied using UV-visible spectroscopy. From the highest separation rate, the most favorable conditions were observed with 0.2 % w/v of TX-114, pH = 9.0, ionic strength of 10 mM NaCl, and incubation at 40 °C for 60 min, yielding an extraction efficiency of 89.2 ± 3.9 % and a preconcentration factor of 86. The aggregate size distribution confirmed the formation of very large nCuO-micelle assemblies (11.9 ?m) under these conditions. The surface charge of nCuO was also diminished effectively. An extraction efficiency of 91 % was achieved with a mixture of TX-100 and TX-114 containing 30 wt.% of TX-100. Natural organic and particulate matters, represented by humic acid (30 mg/L) and micron-sized silica particles (50 mg/L), respectively, did not significantly reduce the CPE efficiency (<10 %). The recovery of copper(II) ions (20 mg/L) in the presence of humic acid was low (3-10 %). The spiked natural water samples were analyzed either directly or after CPE by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following acid digestion/microwave irradiation. The results indicated the influence of matrix effects and their reduction by CPE. A delay between spiking nCuO and CPE may also influence the recovery of nCuO due to aggregation and dissolution. A detection limit of 0.04 ?g Cu/L was achieved for nCuO. PMID:24293302

  9. Morphing Wing Weight Predictors and Their Application in a Template-Based Morphing Aircraft Sizing Environment II. Part 2; Morphing Aircraft Sizing via Multi-level Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillen, Michael D.; Crossley, William A.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents an approach for sizing of a morphing aircraft based upon a multi-level design optimization approach. For this effort, a morphing wing is one whose planform can make significant shape changes in flight - increasing wing area by 50% or more from the lowest possible area, changing sweep 30 or more, and/or increasing aspect ratio by as much as 200% from the lowest possible value. The top-level optimization problem seeks to minimize the gross weight of the aircraft by determining a set of "baseline" variables - these are common aircraft sizing variables, along with a set of "morphing limit" variables - these describe the maximum shape change for a particular morphing strategy. The sub-level optimization problems represent each segment in the morphing aircraft's design mission; here, each sub-level optimizer minimizes fuel consumed during each mission segment by changing the wing planform within the bounds set by the baseline and morphing limit variables from the top-level problem.

  10. Full dimensional Franck-Condon factors for the acetylene A? (1)Au-X? (1)?(g)(+) transition. II. Vibrational overlap factors for levels involving excitation in ungerade modes.

    PubMed

    Park, G Barratt; Baraban, Joshua H; Field, Robert W

    2014-10-01

    A full-dimensional Franck-Condon calculation has been applied to the A? (1)Au-X? 1?g+ transition in acetylene in the harmonic normal mode basis. Details of the calculation are discussed in Part I of this series. To our knowledge, this is the first full-dimensional Franck-Condon calculation on a tetra-atomic molecule undergoing a linear-to-bent geometry change. In the current work, the vibrational intensity factors for levels involving excitation in ungerade vibrational modes are evaluated. Because the Franck-Condon integral accumulates away from the linear geometry, we have been able to treat the out-of-plane component of trans bend (?4('')) in the linear X? state in the rotational part of the problem, restoring the ? Euler angle and the a-axis Eckart conditions. A consequence of the Eckart conditions is that the out-of-plane component of ?4('') does not participate in the vibrational overlap integral. This affects the structure of the coordinate transformation and the symmetry of the vibrational wavefunctions used in the overlap integral, and results in propensity rules involving the bending modes of the X? state that were not previously understood. We explain the origin of some of the unexpected propensities observed in IR-UV laser-induced fluorescence spectra, and we calculate emission intensities from bending levels of the A? state into bending levels of the X? state, using normal bending mode and local bending mode basis sets. Our calculations also reveal Franck-Condon propensities for the Cartesian components of the cis bend (?5('')), and we predict that the best A?-state vibrational levels for populating X?-state levels with large amplitude bending motion localized in a single C-H bond (the acetylene?vinylidene isomerization coordinate) involve a high degree of excitation in ?6(') (cis-bend). Mode ?4(') (torsion) populates levels with large amplitude counter-rotational motion of the two hydrogen atoms. PMID:25296804

  11. Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, William D

    2014-11-01

    For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25507406

  12. Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, William D

    2014-11-01

    For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25423683

  13. Investigation of Anderson lattice behavior in Yb1-xLuxAl3

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.D.; Booth, C.H.; Lawrence, J.M.; Hundley, M.F.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.; Riseborough, P.S.; Ebihara, T.

    2003-10-06

    Measurements of magnetic susceptibility {chi}(T), specific heat C(T), Hall coefficient R{sub H}(T), and Yb valence {nu} = 2 + n{sub f} [f-occupation number n{sub f} (T) determined from Yb L{sub 3} x-ray absorption measurements] were carried out on single crystals of Yb{sub 1-x}Lu{sub x}Al{sub 3}. The low temperature anomalies observed in {chi}(T) and C(T) corresponding to an energy scale T{sub coh} {approx} 40 K in the intermediate valence, Kondo lattice compound YbAl{sub 3} are suppressed by Lu concentrations as small as 5% suggesting these low-T anomalies are extremely sensitive to disorder and, therefore, are a true coherence effect. By comparing the temperature dependence of various physical quantities to the predictions of the Anderson Impurity Model, the slow crossover behavior observed in YbAl{sub 3}, in which the data evolve from a low-temperature coherent, Fermi-liquid regime to a high temperature local moment regime more gradually than predicted by the Anderson Impurity Model, appears to evolve to fast crossover behavior at x {approx} 0.7 where the evolution is more rapid than predicted. These two phenomena found in Yb{sub 1-x}Lu{sub x}Al{sub 3}, i.e., the low-T anomalies and the slow/fast crossover behavior are discussed in relation to recent theories of the Anderson lattice.

  14. Ferrimagnetism and single-particle excitations in a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiro; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Zhang, Qinfang; Li, Tao; Yunoki, Seiji

    2015-04-01

    By using the variationalcluster approximation and cluster perturbation theory, we investigate the magnetism and single-particle excitations of a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice as an effective model for the single-side hydrogenated graphene, namely, graphone. We calculate the magnetic moment as a function of U (Coulomb interaction on impurity sites) with showing that the ground state is ferrimagneticfor any U > 0. We then calculate the single-particle excitations and show that the single-particle excitations are gapless and exhibit quadratic dispersion relation near the Fermi energy.

  15. Asymmetric Anderson model and spin excitations in the Kondo insulator YbB{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanov, A. F., E-mail: abarabanov@mtu-net.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for High-Pressure Physics (Russian Federation); Maksimov, L. A. [Kurchatov Institute Russian Research Center (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-15

    A cluster problem is analyzed as an example demonstrating that the observed three-mode behavior of spin-triplet excitations in YbB{sub 12} can be described by the asymmetric Anderson model with insulating singlet ground state. In the case of an infinite system, it is argued that the behavior of the f subsystem can be analyzed by using an effective Hamiltonian H{sub J} with direct antiferromagnetic f-f exchange interaction. The spin excitation spectrum is shown to have a minimum at the antiferromagnetic vector, as observed experimentally. A distinctive feature of the analysis is the use of singlet and triplet basis operators.

  16. Critical State of the Anderson Transition: Between a Metal and an Insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Lemarie, Gabriel; Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Lignier, Hans; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molecules, Universite Lille 1 Sciences et Technologies, UMR CNRS 8523, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-08-27

    Using a three-frequency one-dimensional kicked rotor experimentally realized with a cold atomic gas, we study the transport properties at the critical point of the metal-insulator Anderson transition. We accurately measure the time evolution of an initially localized wave packet and show that it displays at the critical point a scaling invariance characteristic of this second-order phase transition. The shape of the momentum distribution at the critical point is found to be in excellent agreement with the analytical form deduced from the self-consistent theory of localization.

  17. Machine learning for many-body physics: The case of the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Millis, Andrew J.

    2014-10-01

    Machine learning methods are applied to finding the Green's function of the Anderson impurity model, a basic model system of quantum many-body condensed-matter physics. Different methods of parametrizing the Green's function are investigated; a representation in terms of Legendre polynomials is found to be superior due to its limited number of coefficients and its applicability to state of the art methods of solution. The dependence of the errors on the size of the training set is determined. The results indicate that a machine learning approach to dynamical mean-field theory may be feasible.

  18. Atmospheric optical turbulence measurements taken at Anderson Mesa, Flagstaff, Arizona between 13-19 November 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaucher, Gail T.; Vaucher, Christopher A.; Walters, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    From 13 to 19 November 1989, the Naval Postgraduate School Atmospheric Optics Group acquired atmospheric optical turbulence measurements at the 31-inch Lowell Observatory telescope dome facility on Anderson Mesa, 16 km southeast of Flagstaff, Arizona. The parameters measured, the transverse coherence length and the isoplanatic angle, were part of an ongoing site survey for a large-scale, ground-based, synthetic aperture system (100 to 300 m baseline stellar interferometer). This report compiles, analyses and summarizes the acquired optical data. Also discussed are the synoptic meteorological events present during the data acquisition period.

  19. Disorder-limited photon propagation and Anderson-localization in photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasley, N. A.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Coles, R. J.; Clarke, E.; Fox, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the disorder-limited propagation of photons in photonic crystal waveguides in the slow-light regime. We use analysis of Fabry-Perot resonances to map the mode dispersion and extract the photon localization length. Propagation lengths are deduced to be limited to less than 20 ?m for group index >50. Anderson-localized modes are observed at high group indices, when the localization lengths are shorter than the waveguide lengths, consistent with the Fabry-Perot analysis. The results have consequences for integrated quantum-dot single-photon circuits which rely on slow-light effects to enhance emission rates.

  20. Exponential scaling limit of the single-particle Anderson model via adaptive feedback scaling

    E-print Network

    Victor Chulaevsky

    2015-03-09

    We propose a reformulation of the bootstrap version of the Multi-Scale Analysis (BMSA), developed by Germinet and Klein, to make explicit the fact that BMSA implies asymptotically exponential decay of eigenfunctions (EFs) and of EF correlators (EFCs), in the lattice Anderson models with diagonal disorder, viz. with an IID random potential. We also show that the exponential scaling limit of EFs and EFCs holds true for a class of marginal distributions of the random potential with regularity lower than H\\"older continuity of any positive order.

  1. Magnetic field induced quantum phase transitions in the two-impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lujun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhu, Jian - Xin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-17

    In the two-impurity Anderson model, the inter-impurity spin exchange interaction favors a spin singlet state between two impurities leading to the localization of quasiparticles. We show that a local uniform magnetic field can delocalize the quasiparticies to restore the Kondo resonance. This transition is found to be continuous, accompanied by not only the divergence of the staggered (anti ferromagnetic) susceptibility, but also the divergence of the uniform spin susceptibility. This implies that the magnetic field induced quantum phase transitions in Kondo systems are in favor of the local critical type.

  2. An ecological model of the habitat mosaic in estuarine nursery areas: Part II ? Projecting effects of sea level rise on fish production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the response of fish populations to habitat change mediated by sea level rise (SLR) is a key component of ecosystem-based management. Yet, no direct link has been established between habitat change due to SLR and fish population production. Here we take a coupled ...

  3. The effects of site selected variables on human responses to traffic noise, Part II: Road type by socio-economic status by traffic noise level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Bradley; B. A. Jonah

    1979-01-01

    The results of the second part of a field study of human response to traffic noise are reported. The influence of traffic noise level, socio-economic status, and road type (freeway or conventional road) were investigated in a controlled manner determined by subject selection procedures. Human response measures were obtained from interviewer administered questionnaires, and were as spatially and temporally coincident

  4. Anderson-Gruneisen parameter under high temperature in (Fe,Mn,Co,Mg)2SiO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Goyal, S. C.

    2012-07-01

    The Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) is of considerable importance to Earth scientists because it sets limitations on the thermo-elastic properties of the lower mantle and core. However, there are several formulations on the Grüneisen parameter, which are in frequent use and predict varying dependence of d as a function of temperature. In this paper, the expressions for thermal expansion, thermal expansion coefficients and bulk modulus are obtained considering the anharmonic dependence on temperature and are applied to study these constants to (Fe,Mn,Co,Mg)2SiO4. Using the derived expressions, we have shown that different parameters on which the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) depends are temperature dependent, but above all the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) is independent of temperature. The results obtained have been found to be comparable to experimental data.

  5. H. R. 2524: a Bill to amend the Price-Anderson provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, May 15, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The Federal Nuclear Waste Disposal Liability Act of 1985 (H.R.2524) amends the Price-Anderson provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to establish liability and indemnification for nuclear incidents arising out of Federal storage, disposal, or related transportation of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. The proposals ensure that the federal government assumes responsibility for total indemnification for public liability claims. The aggregate amount of payments made from amounts available through the Nuclear Waste Fund shall not exceed $5 billion in connection with each nuclear incident.

  6. ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE

    E-print Network

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM 589 DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE ANALYSES ACCURATELY QUANTIFY THE CLIMATE IMPACTS OF BIOFUELS-RELATED LAND USE CHANGE? Kristina J. Anderson in determining the sustainability of biofuels. To ensure that legal standards are effective in limiting climate

  7. [Correction of aldosterone level as marker of RAAS dysfunction in patients with arterial hypertension degree II-III and chronic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Dralova, O V; Maksimov, M L; Derbentseva, E A; Ermolaeva, A S; Starodubtsev, A K

    2011-01-01

    The hyperactivation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) underlies the development and the progression of arterial hypertension and chronic kidney diseases. Aldosterone is the main unit of RAAS and self-sufficient predictor of the development of cardiovascular events. In this study, the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan, ACE inhibitor enalapril, and direct renin inhibitor aliskiren were used for the correction of blood pressure and aldosterone levels in patients with hypertension and chronic kidney diseases. The data obtained suggest that the proposed complex therapy provides the most complete blood pressure reduction and aldosterone level correction (as evidence of RAAS activity recovery), greatly improves the prognoses, and ensures maximum nephroprotection in the patients with arterial hypertension and chronic kidney diseases. PMID:21678653

  8. Low density lipoprotein receptor gene Ava II polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several common genetic polymorphisms in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene have associated with modifications of serum total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, but the results are not consistent in different populations. Bai Ku Yao is a special subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 1024 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 792 participants of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotyping of the LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of serum TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL-C, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and the ratio of ApoA1 to ApoB were lower in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.01 for all). The frequency of A- and A+ alleles was 65.5% and 34.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 80.7% and 19.3% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. The frequency of A-A-, A-A+ and A+A+ genotypes was 42.6%, 45.9% and 11.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 64.9%, 31.6% and 3.5% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. There was also significant difference in the genotypic frequencies between males and females in Bai Ku Yao (P <0.05), and in the genotypic and allelic frequencies between normal LDL-C (? 3.20 mmol/L) and high LDL-C (>3.20 mmol/L) subgroups in Bai Ku Yao (P < 0.05 for each) and between males and females in Han (P < 0.05 for each). The levels of LDL-C in males and TC and HDL-C in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05 for all) in Bai Ku Yao, whereas the levels of HDL-C in males and HDL-C and ApoA1 in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05-0.001) in Han. The subjects with A+A+ genotype had higher serum LDL-C, TC, HDL-C or ApoA1 levels than the subjects with A-A+ and A-A- genotypes. Spearman rank correlation analysis revealed that the levels of LDL-C in Bai Ku Yao and HDL-C in Han were correlated with genotypes (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01; respectively). Conclusions The association of LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism and serum lipid levels is different between the Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. The discrepancy might partly result from different LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism or LDL-R gene-enviromental interactions. PMID:21345210

  9. Social problems, primary care and pathways to help and support: addressing health inequalities at the individual level. Part II: lay perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Popay, Jennie; Kowarzik, Ute; Mallinson, Sara; Mackian, Sara; Barker, Jacqui

    2007-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to describe social problems presented to general practitioners (GPs) in UK inner cities and GPs' responses; describe patients help?seeking pathways; and consider how these pathways can be improved. Methods The study involved a pilot survey and follow?up qualitative interviews with patients in two inner city areas in London and Salford in 2001–2. The pilot survey involved five practices in each locality. GPs completed questionnaires on 57 people presenting with social problems. A diversity sample of 12 patients was followed up for interview. Results Study results are presented in two parts. Here (Part II) qualitative research results are reported highlighting four themes: the complex and enduring nature of social problems; the persistence people display seeking help; the fragmented and problematic pathways available; and the roles GPs play as: primary medical adviser; formal gateway to another service; advocates or facilitators to another service; and sources of support and advice during a process of recovery. Commonly, GPs occupied more than one role. Conclusions GPs do help people deal with social problems, but their responses are limited. More integrated pathways to help and advice for social problems are needed. Existing pathways could be more visible and accessible, and new pathways developed through commissioning and extending social prescribing. More partnerships across sectors may create more co?ordinated provision, but these are notoriously difficult, and other trends such as the focus on lifestyle issues and long?standing conditions may make it more difficult for people with social needs to access support. PMID:17933955

  10. Geologic and hydrologic characterization and evaluation of the Basin and Range Province relative to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Part II. Geologic and hydrologic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, K.A.; Bedinger, M.S.

    1985-12-31

    The geology and hydrology of the Basin and Range Province of the western conterminous United States are characterized in a series of data sets depicted in maps compiled for evaluation of prospective areas for further study of geohydrologic environments for isolation of high-level radioactive waste. The data sets include: (1) average precipitation and evaporation; (2) surface distribution of selected rock types; (3) tectonic conditions; and (4) surface- and ground-water hydrology and Pleistocene lakes and marshes. Rocks mapped for consideration as potential host media for the isolation of high-level radioactive waste are widespread and include argillaceous rocks, granitic rocks, tuffaceous rocks, mafic extrusive rocks, evaporites, and laharic breccias. The unsaturated zone, where probably as thick as 150 meters (500 feet), was mapped for consideration as an environment for isolation of high-level waste. Unsaturated rocks of various lithologic types are widespread in the Province. Tectonic stability in the Quaternary Period is considered the key to assessing the probability of future tectonism with regard to high-level radioactive waste disposal. Tectonic conditions are characterized on the basis of the seismic record, heat-flow measurements, the occurrence of Quaternary faults, vertical crustal movement, and volcanic features. Tectonic activity, as indicated by seismicity, is greatest in areas bordering the western margin of the Province in Nevada and southern California, the eastern margin of the Province bordering the Wasatch Mountains in Utah and in parts of the Rio Grande valley. Late Cenozoic volcanic activity is widespread, being greatest bordering the Sierra Nevada in California and Oregon, and bordering the Wasatch Mountains in southern Utah and Idaho. 43 refs., 22 figs.

  11. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression within Balb\\/C and C57Black\\/6 mouse locus coeruleus. II. Quantitative study of the enzyme level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Ginovart; D. Marcel; L. Bezin; C. Gagne; J. F. Pujol; D. Weissmann

    1996-01-01

    The tyrosine hydroxylase phenotype expression was further investigated in the perikarya and pericoerulean areas of the locus coeruleus of two pure inbred mouse strains, Balb\\/C and C57Black\\/6, which the topological organization and phenotypic plasticity of the enzyme-containing cell population were previously studied. The tyrosine hydroxylase level and the mean protein quantity provided by each cell were significantly higher within the

  12. Observations of nighttime winds using pilot balloons in Anderson Creek Valley, Geysers, California

    SciTech Connect

    Nappo, C.J.; Snodgrass, H.F.

    1981-06-01

    Nighttime drainage or downslope winds along the east-facing slope of Anderson Creek Valley located in the Geysers area of northern California are examined using pilot balloons as air parcel tracers. Observations made over four nights show a persistent pattern of winds. Before sunset strong westerly winds blow into the valley. These winds are believed due to the late afternoon sea breeze. Drainage winds become fully developed within 2 h after sunset. The drainage wind has an average speed of approx.3 m s/sup -1/ regardless of the speed of the ambient wind. The drainage layer thickness grows at a rate of approx.80 m per kilometer of downwind distance. Balloons in the drainage current quickly spread throughout the shallow, sidewall canyon containing Anderson Creek. The transition from the local valley wind system to the free, ambient wind occurs at about ridge height, i.e., /sub 5/00 m above the valley basin, for weak ambient winds, and at /sub 3/00 m above the valley basin for strong ambient winds.

  13. Quantum walk and Anderson localization of rotational excitations in disordered ensembles of polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T.; Krems, R. V.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the dynamics of rotational excitations placed on a single molecule in spatially disordered one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) ensembles of ultracold molecules trapped in optical lattices. The disorder arises from incomplete populations of optical lattices with molecules. This leads to a model corresponding to a quantum particle with long-range tunnelling amplitudes moving on a lattice with the same on-site energy but with forbidden access to random sites (vacancies). We examine the time and length scales of Anderson localization for this type of disorder with realistic experimental parameters in the Hamiltonian. We show that for an experimentally realized system of KRb molecules on an optical lattice this type of disorder leads to disorder-induced localization in 1D and 2D systems on a time scale t? 1 s. For 3D lattices with 55 sites in each dimension and vacancy concentration 90%, the rotational excitations diffuse to the edges of the lattice and show no signature of Anderson localization. We examine the role of the long-range tunnelling amplitudes allowing for transfer of rotational excitations between distant lattice sites. Our results show that the long-range tunnelling has little impact on the dynamics in the diffusive regime but affects significantly the localization dynamics in lattices with large concentrations of vacancies, enhancing the width of the localized distributions in 2D lattices by more than a factor of 2.

  14. LPT. Low power test (TAN640) interior. Basement level. Camera facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Low power test (TAN-640) interior. Basement level. Camera facing north. Cable trays and conduit cross tunnel between critical experiment cell and critical experiment control room. Construction 93% complete. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. Date: October 23, 1957. INEEL negative no. 57-5339 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. The anderson's rotating interferometer and its application to binary star measurements. (French Title: L'interféromètre à rotation de john august anderson (1876-1956) et son application - la tentative de résolution de nouvelles binaires)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneau, D.

    2011-12-01

    Following the tests of interferometric observations carried out by Albert A. Michelson with the 2.5 m telescope of the Mount Wilson, George. E. Hale thinks that this technique could be applied to the measurement of close double stars. He asks John A. Anderson to produce an instrument allowing such measurements. The principle of the ocular rotating interferometer and the way of using it for the measurement of double stars are first described. Then the effects of atmospheric dispersion on the observation of the stellar interference fringes and the remedy that Anderson implements to compensate it are described. Images of the Anderson's interferometer are used to present the instrument and to describe its operation. Installed at the 2,5 m telescope, this instrument was used by Anderson and Paul W. Merrill to resolve the spectroscopic binary Capella for the first time, like a 'visual binary'. Moreover, Merrill took the measurement of two difficult visual pairs discovered by Aitken (kap UMa = A 1585 and nu2 Boo = A 1634) and tried to resolve some new visual binaries among stars known as binary spectroscopic, stars with composite spectra, variable stars and some bright stars, which led him to publish a list of 73 stars finally found simple. Finally, the remarks made by Merrill in conclusion of his work will be analyzed.

  16. Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards: Part II. Validation of satellite-derived Volcanic Sulphur Dioxide Levels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouli, MariLiza; Balis, Dimitris; Dimopoulos, Spiros; Clarisse, Lieven; Carboni, Elisa; Hedelt, Pascal; Spinetti, Claudia; Theys, Nicolas; Tampellini, Lucia; Zehner, Claus

    2014-05-01

    The eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in the spring of 2010 turned the attention of both the public and the scientific community to the susceptibility of the European airspace to the outflows of large volcanic eruptions. The ash-rich plume from Eyjafjallajökull drifted towards Europe and caused major disruptions of European air traffic for several weeks affecting the everyday life of millions of people and with a strong economic impact. This unparalleled situation revealed limitations in the decision making process due to the lack of information on the tolerance to ash of commercial aircraft engines as well as limitations in the ash monitoring and prediction capabilities. The European Space Agency project Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards, was introduced to facilitate the development of an optimal End-to-End System for Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring and Prediction. This system is based on comprehensive satellite-derived ash plume and sulphur dioxide [SO2] level estimates, as well as a widespread validation using supplementary satellite, aircraft and ground-based measurements. The validation of volcanic SO2 levels extracted from the sensors GOME-2/MetopA and IASI/MetopA are shown here with emphasis on the total column observed right before, during and after the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruptions. Co-located ground-based Brewer Spectrophotometer data extracted from the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre, WOUDC, were compared to the different satellite estimates. The findings are presented at length, alongside a comprehensive discussion of future scenarios.

  17. EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP1, RYOKI FUKUSHIMA2 AND WOLFGANG KNIG3,4

    E-print Network

    König, Wolfgang

    EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP1, RYOKI FUKUSHIMA2. Biskup, R. Fukushima and W. König. Reproduction, by any means, of the entire article for non-commercial purposes is permitted without charge. 1 #12;2 BISKUP, FUKUSHIMA, K�NIG where (d) is the standard lattice

  18. EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP 1 , RYOKI FUKUSHIMA 2 AND WOLFGANG KNIG 3,4

    E-print Network

    König, Wolfgang

    EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP 1 , RYOKI FUKUSHIMA 2. Fukushima and W. König. Reproduction, by any means, of the entire article for non­commercial purposes is permitted without charge. 1 #12; 2 BISKUP, FUKUSHIMA, K�NIG where # (d) is the standard lattice Laplacian

  19. Skrjabinoclava inornatae Wong & Anderson, 1987 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea) as a sporadic parasite of the greater yellowlegs Tringa melanoleuca Gmelin (Aves: Scolopacidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. Anderson; C. M. Bartlett

    1996-01-01

    Skrjabinoclava inornatae Wong & Anderson, 1987 was found in one of five adult greater yellowlegs Tringa melanoleuca collected near Framboise, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada. This is the first report of a member of the genus in this host. The infection is regarded as sporadic and a further indication that the host distribution of members of Skrjabinoclava may be determined

  20. Identification and Analysis of Learning Preferences of Mentally Ill Adults in Rehabilitative Psychosocial Therapy at the Anderson Mental Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Michael K.

    A study identified and analyzed the learning preferences of 17 seriously and chronically mentally ill adults participating in the rehabilitative psychosocial therapy program at the Toxaway Church Site of the Anderson Mental Health Center. Staff perceived as boring and unfocused the traditional treatment approach that relied mainly upon…

  1. Anderson localization of polaron states Franz X. Bronold 1,2 and Holger Fehske 3,2

    E-print Network

    Fehske, Holger

    Anderson localization of polaron states Franz X. Bronold 1,2 and Holger Fehske 3,2 1 Institut fu# Using the vanishing of the typical polaron tunneling rate as an indicator of the breakdown of itinerancy, we study the localization of polaron states in a generic model for a disordered polaronic material

  2. Hierarchical Concurrency in Jade Daniel J. Scales, Martin C. Rinard, Monica S. Lam, and Jennifer M. Anderson

    E-print Network

    Rinard, Martin

    Hierarchical Concurrency in Jade Daniel J. Scales, Martin C. Rinard, Monica S. Lam, and Jennifer M. Anderson Computer Systems Laboratory Stanford University, CA 94305 Abstract Jade is a data, or C++. A Jade programmer simply augments the program with assertions specify­ ing how the program

  3. Collisional damping of plasma waves on a pure electron plasma column M. W. Anderson and T. M. O'Neil

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Collisional damping of plasma waves on a pure electron plasma column M. W. Anderson and T. M. O of electron plasma waves or Trivelpiece­Gould waves on a pure electron plasma column is discussed. The damping in a pure electron plasma differs from that in a neutral plasma, since there are no ions to provide

  4. A Conceptual Knowledge-link model for supporting Dental Implant Anderson Luis Szejka1,2,a

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Conceptual Knowledge-link model for supporting Dental Implant Process Anderson Luis Szejka1,2,a.rudek@pucpr.br, dherve.panetto@univ-lorraine.fr. Keywords: Knowledge-link. Medical Image Processing. Dental Implant visualization of CT images to define the parameters for dental implant process leaving to the dentist discretion

  5. Scale-Dependent Reproduction of Pen-and-Ink Illustrations Mike Salisbury Corin Anderson Dani Lischinski David H. Salesin

    E-print Network

    Meenakshisundaram, Gopi

    Scale-Dependent Reproduction of Pen-and-Ink Illustrations Mike Salisbury Corin Anderson Dani This paper describes a representation for pen-and-ink illustrations that allows the creation of high-fidelity illustrations at any scale or resolution. We represent a pen-and-ink illustration as a low-reso- lution grey

  6. Scincus mitranus Anderson 1871 (Sauria Scincidae) a new host of Eimeria scinci Phisalix 1923 (Apicomplexa Eimeriidae) in Saudi Arabia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Kasim; M. K. Al-Sadoon; Y. R. Al-Shawa

    1993-01-01

    Eimeria scinci Phisalix 1923, is redescribed from the gall bladder of six of 20 (30%) specimens of the sandfish lizard, Scincus mitranus Anderson 1871 from Zulfi in the central region of Saudi Arabia. This report represents a new host and geographic record for the parasite. Oocyst measurements were similar to those reported previously from Scincus officinalis Laurenti 1768 in Tunisia.

  7. Electron hopping between localized states: A simulation of the finite-temperature Anderson problem using density functional methods

    E-print Network

    Drabold, David

    Electron hopping between localized states: A simulation of the finite-temperature Anderson problem- ficiently disordered one-band model. Sophisticated hopping theory2­4 proposes that the quantum jump the process of hopping or ``phonon-induced delocalization.'' The hopping6 we describe is correctly between

  8. Intelligent Systems Demonstration: The Secure Wireless Agent Testbed (SWAT) Gustave Anderson and Andrew Burnheimer and Vincent Cicirello

    E-print Network

    Cicirello, Vincent A.

    Intelligent Systems Demonstration: The Secure Wireless Agent Testbed (SWAT) Gustave Anderson Chestnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19104 Abstract We will demonstrate the Secure Wireless Agent Testbed (SWAT for next-generation wireless mobile agent systems. SWAT is an implemented system that fully integrates: 1

  9. 3. Discussion by T. Van Gestel, B. De Moor, B.D.O. Anderson and P. Van Overschee

    E-print Network

    endorse their other comments. References [1] D.F. Enns, Model reduction for control system design, Ph3. Discussion by T. Van Gestel, B. De Moor, B.D.O. Anderson and P. Van Overschee Frequency weighted balancing [1] is an important technique with interpretations and ap- plications in system identification

  10. Ion-temperature-gradient modes in stellarator geometry (T Rafiq, J Anderson, M Nadeem and M Persson)

    E-print Network

    Ion-temperature-gradient modes in stellarator geometry (T Rafiq, J Anderson, M Nadeem and M Persson Göteborg, Sweden) The stability of the ion-temperature gradient mode has been examined in the short calculations have been presented on field line of reference at $\\theta =\\zeta =0$ on the magnetic surface $s=0

  11. UModelling Leaf Shape Evolution Jotun Hein, Nick Jones, Miltos Tsiantis, James Anderson and John Moriarty. 17.6.2011

    E-print Network

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    UModelling Leaf Shape Evolution Jotun Hein, Nick Jones, Miltos Tsiantis, James Anderson and John on simple models of shape evolution and their application to leaf shapes. Shape analysis is a well in the Tsiantis group (Piazza et al, 2010; Hay and Tsiantis, 2006). Leaf shape can be described as simple

  12. Exact goodness-of-fit tests for shape-scale families and type II censoring.

    PubMed

    Bagdonavi?ius, Vilijandas B; Bogdonavi?ius, Vilijandas B; Levuliene, R?ta J; Nikulin, Mikhail S

    2013-07-01

    A survey of statistical methods for validation of shape-scale families of probability distributions from type II censored samples is given. We propose "integrated likelihood ratio tests" which are modifications of Zhang's tests from complete to type II censored data. We also give modifications of Cramér-von-Mises and Anderson-Darling tests using integration with respect to non-parametric estimators of the cumulative distribution function. Explicit formulas for modified chi-squared tests from censored data with data driven choice of partitioning are given. Powers of tests against most used alternatives to the Weibull, loglogistic and lognormal distribution are compared. PMID:23483381

  13. Influence of avenue-trees on air quality at the urban neighborhood scale. Part II: traffic pollutant concentrations at pedestrian level.

    PubMed

    Gromke, Christof; Blocken, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Flow and dispersion of traffic-emitted pollutants were studied in a generic urban neighborhood for various avenue-tree layouts by employing 3D steady RANS simulations with the realizable k-? turbulence model. In comparison to the tree-free situation quantitative and qualitative changes with flow reversal in the wind field were observed. Low to moderate increases (<13.2%) in the neighborhood-averaged pollutant concentration were found at pedestrian level. An approximately 1% increase in the neighborhood-averaged concentration was obtained with each percent of the street canyon volumes being occupied by vegetation for occupation fractions between 4 and 14%. The overall pattern of concentration changes relative to the tree-free situation was similar for all avenue-tree layouts. However, pronounced locally restricted decreases or increases in concentration (-87 to +1378%) occurred. The results indicate the necessity to account for existing or planned avenue-trees in neighborhood scaled is dispersion studies. Their consideration is prerequisite for reliable urban air quality assessment. PMID:25463712

  14. Mapping the synthesis of low nuclearity polyoxometalates from octamolybdates to Mn-Anderson clusters.

    PubMed

    Rosnes, Mali H; Yvon, Carine; Long, De-Liang; Cronin, Leroy

    2012-09-01

    A comprehensive study of the isomer-independent synthesis of TRIS ((HOCH(2))(3)CNH(2)) Mn-Anderson compounds from Na(2)MoO(4)·2H(2)O, via the corresponding octamolybdate species, is presented. Three octamolybdate salts of [Mo(8)O(26)](4-) in the ?-isomer form, with tetramethylammonium (TMA), tetraethylammonium (TEA) and tetrapropylammonium (TPA) as the counter cation, were synthesised from the sodium molybdate starting material. Fine white powdery products for the three compounds were obtained, which were fully characterised by elemental analysis, TGA, solution and solid state Raman, IR and ESI-MS, revealing a set ratio of Na and organic cations for each of the three compounds; (TMA)(2)Na(2)[Mo(8)O(26)] (1), (TEA)(3)Na(1)[Mo(8)O(26)] (2) and (TPA)(2)Na(2)[Mo(8)O(26)] (3), and the analyses also confirmed that the three compounds all consisted of the octamolybdate in the ?-isomeric form. ESI-MS analyses of 1, 2 and 3 show similar fragmentation for these ?-isomers compared to the previously reported study for the ?-isomer ((TBA)(4)[?-Mo(8)O(26)]) (A) in the synthesis of ((TBA)(3)[MnMo(6)O(18)((OCH(2))(3)CNH(2))(2)]) (B), and compounds 1, 2 and 3 were successfully used to synthesise equivalent TRIS Mn-Anderson compounds: (TMA)(3)[MnMo(6)O(18)((OCH(2))(3)CNH(2))(2)] (4), (TEA)(3)[MnMo(6)O(18)((OCH(2))(3)CNH(2))(2)] (5) and (TPA)(2)Na(1)[MnMo(6)O(18)((OCH(2))(3)CNH(2))(2)] (6), as well as Na(3)[MnMo(6)O(18)((OCH(2))(3)CNH(2))(2)] (7). This is the first example where symmetric organically-grafted Mn-Anderson compounds have been synthesised in DMF from anything but the {Mo(8)O(26)} ?-isomer. PMID:22825595

  15. Far-infrared to millimeter astrophysical dust emission. II. Comparison of the two-level systems (TLS) model with astronomical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, D.; Bernard, J.-P.; Mény, C.; Gromov, V.

    2011-10-01

    Aims: In a previous paper we proposed a new model for the emission by amorphous astronomical dust grains, based on solid-state physics. The model uses a description of the disordered charge distribution (DCD) combined with the presence of two-level systems (TLS) defects in the amorphous solid composing the grains. The goal of this paper is to compare this new model to astronomical observations of different Galactic environments in the far-infrared/submillimeter, in order to derive a set of canonical model parameters to be used as a Galactic reference to be compared to in future Galactic and extragalactic studies. Methods: We compare the TLS model with existing astronomical data. We consider the average emission spectrum at high latitudes in our Galaxy as measured with FIRAS and WMAP, as well as the emission from Galactic compact sources observed with the Archeops balloon experiment, for which an inverse relationship between the dust temperature and the emissivity spectral index has been shown. Results: We show that, unlike models previously proposed that often invoke two dust components at different temperatures, the TLS model successfully reproduces both the shape of the Galactic spectral energy distribution and its evolution with temperature as observed in the Archeops data. The best TLS model parameters indicate a charge coherence length of ?13 nm and other model parameters in broad agreement with expectations from laboratory studies of dust analogs. We conclude that the millimeter excess emission, which is often attributed to the presence of very cold dust in the diffuse ISM, is very likely caused solely by TLS emission in disordered amorphous dust grains. We discuss the implications of the new model, in terms of mass determinations from millimeter continuum observations and the expected variations in the emissivity spectral index with wavelength and dust temperature. The implications for analyzing the Herschel and Planck satellite data are discussed. Table 5 is also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/534/A118

  16. Pu 4f XPS spectra analyzed in the Anderson impurity model

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L.E.; Peek, J.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Materials Technology Div.; Allen, J.W. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1998-05-09

    X-ray photoemission spectra of the {alpha},{beta},{gamma}, and {delta} phases of Pu have been analyzed using the Gunnarsson-Schonhammer implementation of the Anderson impurity model. Changes in the relative intensities of the two spectral features representing mixed f{sup 5} and f{sup 6} final states are in reasonable agreement with the model`s predictions. The coulomb terms, U{sub ff} and U{sub fc}, are quite consistent with those derived from atomic and LDA calculations. Multiplet structure, which agrees with atomic calculations for 4f{sup 13}5f{sup 5}, strongly suggests 5f localization in the final state.

  17. GW approach to Anderson model in and out of equilibrium : scaling properties in the Kondo regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Spataru, Dan Catalin

    2010-03-01

    The low-energy properties of the Anderson model for a single impurity coupled to two leads are studied using the GW approximation. We find that quantities such as the spectral function at zero temperature, the linear-response conductance as function of temperature or the differential conductance as function of bias voltage exhibit universal scaling behavior in the Kondo regime. We show how the form of the GW scaling functions relates to the form of the scaling functions obtained from the exact solution at equilibrium. We also compare the energy scale that goes inside the GW scaling functions with the exact Kondo temperature, for a broad range of the Coulomb interaction strength in the asymptotic regime. This analysis allows to clarify a presently suspended question in the literature, namely whether or not the GW solution captures the Kondo resonance.

  18. Strong-disorder renormalization group study of the Anderson localization transition in three and higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan Mard, Hossein; Dobrosavljevi?, Vladimir; Hoyos, José A.; Miranda, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    We implement an efficient strong-disorder renormalization group (SDRG) procedure for disordered tight-binding models in dimension D >= 3 , including the localization properties on Erd?s-Rényi random graphs, which represent an appropriate infinite dimensional limit. Our dramatically improved SDRG algorithm is based on a judicious elimination of most (irrelevant) new bonds generated under RG. It yields excellent agreement with exact numerical results for universal properties at the critical point, without significant increase of the required computer time, even as the spatial dimension is increased beyond D = 3 . This opens an efficient avenue to explore the critical properties of Anderson transition in the strong-coupling limit of high spatial dimensions.

  19. d -wave superconductivity in the frustrated two-dimensional periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Tremblay, A.-M.-S.

    2015-01-01

    Superconductivity in heavy-fermion materials can sometimes appear in the incoherent regime and in proximity to an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. Here, we study these phenomena using large-scale determinant quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the dynamical cluster approximation with various impurity solvers for the periodic Anderson model with frustrated hybridization. We obtain solid evidence for a dx2-y2 superconducting phase arising from an incoherent normal state in the vicinity of an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. There is a coexistence region, and the width of the superconducting dome increases with frustration. Through a study of the pairing dynamics, we find that the retarded spin fluctuations give the main contribution to the pairing glue. These results are relevant for unconventional superconductivity in the Ce-115 family of heavy fermions.

  20. Crossover from conventional to inverse indirect magnetic exchange in the depleted Anderson lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Maximilian W.; Titvinidze, Irakli; Potthoff, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the finite-temperature properties of an Anderson lattice with regularly depleted impurities. The physics of this model is ruled by two different magnetic exchange mechanisms: conventional Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction at weak hybridization strength V and an inverse indirect magnetic exchange (IIME) at strong V , both favoring a ferromagnetic ground state. The stability of ferromagnetic order against thermal fluctuations is systematically studied by static mean-field theory for an effective low-energy spin-only model emerging perturbatively in the strong-coupling limit as well as by dynamical mean-field theory for the full model. The Curie temperature is found at a maximum for a half-filled conduction band and at intermediate hybridization strengths in the crossover regime between RKKY and IIME.

  1. Quantum critical phase and Lifshitz transition in an extended periodic Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Laad, M S; Koley, S; Taraphder, A

    2012-06-13

    We study the quantum phase transition in f-electron systems as a quantum Lifshitz transition driven by selective-Mott localization in a realistic extended Anderson lattice model. Using dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), we find that a quantum critical phase with anomalous ?/T scaling separates a heavy Landau-Fermi liquid from ordered phase(s). This non-Fermi liquid state arises from a lattice orthogonality catastrophe originating from orbital-selective Mott localization. Fermi surface reconstruction occurs via the interplay between and penetration of the Green function zeros to the poles, leading to violation of Luttinger's theorem in the strange metal. We show how this naturally leads to scale-invariant responses in transport. Thus, our work represents a specific DMFT realization of the hidden-FL and FL* theories, and holds promise for the study of 'strange' metal phases in quantum matter. PMID:22589244

  2. Probing Anderson localization of light by weak non-linear effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, T.; Bührer, W.; Ackermann, M.; Aegerter, C. M.; Maret, G.

    2014-11-01

    Breakdown of wave transport due to strong disorder is a universal phenomenon known as Anderson localization (AL). It occurs because of the macroscopic population of reciprocal multiple scattering paths, which in three dimensional systems happens at a critical scattering strength. Intensities on these random loops should thus be highly increased relative to those of a diffusive sample. In order to highlight localized modes of light, we exploit the optical nonlinearities of TiO2. Power dependent and spectrally resolved time of flight distribution measurements in transmission through slabs of TiO2 powders at various turbidities reveal that mostly long loops are affected by nonlinearities and that the deviations from diffusive transport observed at long times are due to these localized modes. Our data are a first step in the experimental investigation of the interplay between nonlinear effects and AL in 3D.

  3. Decoherence-induced conductivity in the one-dimensional Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Stegmann, Thomas; Wolf, Dietrich E. [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen and CENIDE, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Ujsághy, Orsolya [Department of Theoretical Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8., H-1521 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-08-20

    We study the effect of decoherence on the electron transport in the one-dimensional Anderson model by means of a statistical model [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. In this model decoherence bonds are randomly distributed within the system, at which the electron phase is randomized completely. Afterwards, the transport quantity of interest (e.g. resistance or conductance) is ensemble averaged over the decoherence configurations. Averaging the resistance of the sample, the calculation can be performed analytically. In the thermodynamic limit, we find a decoherence-driven transition from the quantum-coherent localized regime to the Ohmic regime at a critical decoherence density, which is determined by the second-order generalized Lyapunov exponent (GLE) [4].

  4. Tunable Anderson Localization in Hydrogenated Graphene Based on the Electric Field Effect: First-Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joongoo; Wei, Su-Huai

    2014-03-01

    We present a mechanism for reversible switching of the Anderson localization (AL) of electrons in hydrogenated graphene through modulation of the H coverage on graphene by external electric fields. The main idea is to exploit the unique acid-base chemistry (i.e., proton transfer reaction) between NH3 gas and hydrogenated graphene, which can be controlled by applying perpendicular electric fields. The proposed field-induced control of disorder in hydrogenated graphene not only has scientific merits in a systematic study of AL of electrons in grapheme but can also lead to new insight into the development of a new type of transistor based on reversible on/off switching of AL. Furthermore, the reversible and effective tuning of the H coverage on graphene should be useful for tailoring material properties of weakly hydrogenated graphene. This work was funded by the NREL LDRD program (DE-AC36-08GO28308).

  5. Quantum walk and Anderson localization of rotational excitations in disordered ensembles of polar molecules

    E-print Network

    Tianrui Xu; Roman V. Krems

    2015-05-05

    We consider the dynamics of rotational excitations placed on a single molecule in spatially disordered 1D, 2D and 3D ensembles of ultracold molecules trapped in optical lattices. The disorder arises from incomplete populations of optical lattices with molecules. This leads to a model corresponding to a quantum particle with long-range tunnelling amplitudes moving on a lattice with the same on-site energy but with forbidden access to random sites (vacancies). We examine the time and length scales of Anderson localization for this type of disorder with realistic experimental parameters in the Hamiltonian. We show that for an experimentally realized system of KRb molecules on an optical lattice this type of disorder leads to disorder-induced localization in 1D and 2D systems on a time scale $t \\sim 1$ sec. For 3D lattices with $55$ sites in each dimension and vacancy concentration $ 90~\\%$, the rotational excitations diffuse to the edges of the lattice and show no signature of Anderson localization. We examine the role of the long-range tunnelling amplitudes allowing for transfer of rotational excitations between distant lattice sites. Our results show that the long-range tunnelling has little impact on the dynamics in the diffusive regime but affects significantly the localization dynamics in lattices with large concentrations of vacancies, enhancing the width of the localized distributions in 2D lattices by more than a factor of 2. Our results raise a general question whether quantum particles with long-range tunnelling can undergo quantum localization in 3D lattices with substitutional disorder.

  6. QUANTUM MECHANICS II Physics 342

    E-print Network

    Rosner, Jonathan L.

    QUANTUM MECHANICS II Physics 342 KPTC 103 9:00 ­ 10:20 a.m. 1 Tues., Thurs. ­ Winter Quarter 2011 quantum mechanics at the graduate level. The text for Quantum Mechanics II will be J. J. Sakurai and Jim Napolitano, Modern Quantum Mechanics, Second Edition (Addison-Wesley, San Francisco, 2011). For supplemental

  7. Model Checking Large Software Specifications Pdchard J. Anderson* Paul Beame Steve Burns William Chan

    E-print Network

    Beame, Paul

    of TCAS II (Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System) into a form accepted by a model checker (SMV is to evaluate symbolic model checking of state-machine based specifications, not to eval- uate the TCAS II of the TCAS II (Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System) System Re- quirements Specification [11] from

  8. Binghamton University Software II

    E-print Network

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Design Graphic 412 Binghamton University Software II Course Syllabus #12;Arts412 Graphic Design between fine art and graphic design· To prepare students for a typical design/production atmosphere in ARTS305, broaden the students' aesthetic experience and complement upper level design classes. Creative

  9. Clustering II Hierarchical Clustering

    E-print Network

    Terzi, Evimaria

    Clustering II #12;Hierarchical Clustering · Produces a set of nested clusters organized Clustering · No assumptions on the number of clusters ­ Any desired number of clusters can be obtained by `cutting' the dendogram at the proper level · Hierarchical clusterings may correspond to meaningful

  10. This paper presents a hierarchical hybrid system modeling and simulation framework using the Ptolemy II environ-

    E-print Network

    the Ptolemy II environ- ment. Ptolemy II is a system-level design tool that supports the integration introduce Ptolemy II [5], a system-level design environment, and show how hybrid system simula- H H Q X U Y

  11. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2010-09-01

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  12. Evaluation of the modified Anderson sampler for determining particle size distributions and respirable concentrations of particulate matter present in the working environment of cottonseed oil mills

    E-print Network

    Matlock, Stanley Wayne

    1976-01-01

    EVALUATION OF THE MODIFIED ANDERSON SAMPLER FOR DETERMINING PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS AND RESPIRABLE CONCENTRATIONS OF PARTICULATE MATTER PRESENT IN THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT OF COTTONSEED OIL MILLS A Thesis by STANLEY WAYNE MATLOCK Submitted... to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering FVALUATION OF THE MODIFIED ANDERSON SAMPLER FOR DETERMINING PARTICLE SIZE...

  13. The Geographic Variation in Stroke Incidence in Two Areas of the Southeastern Stroke Belt The Anderson and Pee Dee Stroke Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel T. Lackland; David L. Bachman; Timothy D. Carter; Derek L. Barker; Stephen Timms; Harvinder Kohli

    Background and Purpose—South Carolina and the southeastern United States have maintained the highest stroke mortality in the country. The Anderson and Pee Dee Stroke Study is an assessment of cerebrovascular disease incidence in 2 geographically defined communities in the stroke belt. Methods—Strokes were identified in the Anderson and Pee Dee areas of South Carolina. All hospitalized and out-of-hospital deaths occurring

  14. Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Orphan and Ultra-Orphan Diseases: The Limitations of Standard Economic Metrics as Exemplified by Fabry-Anderson Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David F. Moore; Markus Ries; Evelyn L. Forget; Raphael Schiffmann

    2007-01-01

    Background: Fabry-Anderson disease is an x-linked deficiency of lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A (GALA), resulting in chronic renal failure, cardiac arrhythmia, hypertrophy, valvular disease, pain (acro-paraesthesiae) and stroke, together with premature mortality. The disease has a significant impact on quality of life (QOL), as illustrated by studies using the EQ-5D. A specific treatment is available for Fabry-Anderson disease consisting of intravenous enzyme

  15. Beta2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-II and synapsin I protein levels in the nucleus accumbens after nicotine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Imad Damaj, M

    2013-02-15

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are calcium-permeable and the initial targets for nicotine. Studies suggest that calcium-dependent mechanisms mediate some behavioral responses to nicotine; however, the post-receptor calcium-dependent mechanisms associated with chronic nicotine and nicotine withdrawal remain unclear. The proteins calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and synapsin I are essential for neurotransmitter release and were shown to be involved in drug dependence. In the current study, using pharmacological techniques, we sought to (a) complement previously published behavioral findings from our lab indicating a role for calcium-dependent signaling in nicotine dependence and (b) expand on previously published acute biochemical and pharmacological findings indicating the relevance of calcium-dependent mechanisms in acute nicotine responses by evaluating the function of CaMKII and synapsin I after chronic nicotine and withdrawal in the nucleus accumbens, a brain region implicated in drug dependence. Male mice were chronically infused with nicotine for 14 days, and treated with the ?2-selective antagonist dihydro-?-erythroidine (DH?E), or the ?7 antagonist, methyllycaconitine citrate (MLA) 20min prior to dissection of the nucleus accumbens. Results show that phosphorylated and total CaMKII and synapsin I protein levels were significantly increased in the nucleus accumbens after chronic nicotine infusion, and reduced after treatment with DH?E, but not MLA. A spontaneous nicotine withdrawal assessment also revealed significant reductions in phosphorylated CaMKII and synapsin I levels 24h after cessation of nicotine treatment. Our findings suggest that post-receptor calcium-dependent mechanisms associated with nicotine withdrawal are mediated through ?2-containing nicotinic receptors. PMID:23313759

  16. A modification of the Anderson–Mirkovi? conjecture for Mirkovi?–Vilonen polytopes in types B and C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Satoshi Naito; Daisuke Sagaki

    2008-01-01

    We give an explicit description of the (lowering) Kashiwara operators on Mirkovi?–Vilonen polytopes in types B and C, which provides a simple method for generating Mirkovi?–Vilonen polytopes inductively. This description can be thought of as a modification of the one in the original Anderson–Mirkovi? conjecture, which Kamnitzer proved in the case of type A, and presented a counterexample in the

  17. Babies, Child Bearers and Commodification: Anderson, Brazier et al., and the Political Economy of Commercial Surrogate Motherhood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugh V. McLachlan; J. K. Swales

    2000-01-01

    It is argued by Anderson and also in the BrazierReport that Commercial Surrogate Motherhood (C.S.M.)contracts and agencies should be illegal on thegrounds that C.S.M. involves the commodification ofboth mothers and babies. This paper takes issue withthis view and argues that C.S.M. is not inconsistentwith the proper respect for, and treatment of,children and women. A case for the legalisation ofC.S.M. is

  18. Effet de l'interaction coulombienne sur la localisation d'Anderson dans le gaz bidimensionnel d'électrons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Fleury

    2010-01-01

    Nous étudions l'effet des interactions coulombiennes sur la localisation d'Anderson dans le gaz bidimensionnel d'électrons désordonné. L'objectif est de statuer sur la question de l'existence de métaux à deux dimensions. En l'absence d'interaction, la théorie d'échelle de la localisation prédit qu'un désordre infinitésimal suffit à localiser la fonction d'onde électronique et donc à rendre le système isolant à température nulle

  19. Commensurability effects in one-dimensional Anderson localization: Anomalies in eigenfunction statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V.E., E-mail: kravtsov@ictp.it [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 586, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, 2 Kosygina st., 117940 Moscow (Russian Federation); Yudson, V.I., E-mail: yudson@isan.troitsk.ru [Institute for Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190 Troitsk, Moscow reg. (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Statistics of normalized eigenfunctions in one-dimensional Anderson localization at E = 0 is studied. > Moments of inverse participation ratio are calculated. > Equation for generating function is derived at E = 0. > An exact solution for generating function at E = 0 is obtained. > Relation of the generating function to the phase distribution function is established. - Abstract: The one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model (AM), i.e. a tight-binding chain with random uncorrelated on-site energies, has statistical anomalies at any rational point f=(2a)/({lambda}{sub E}) , where a is the lattice constant and {lambda}{sub E} is the de Broglie wavelength. We develop a regular approach to anomalous statistics of normalized eigenfunctions {psi}(r) at such commensurability points. The approach is based on an exact integral transfer-matrix equation for a generating function {Phi}{sub r}(u, {phi}) (u and {phi} have a meaning of the squared amplitude and phase of eigenfunctions, r is the position of the observation point). This generating function can be used to compute local statistics of eigenfunctions of 1d AM at any disorder and to address the problem of higher-order anomalies at f=p/q with q > 2. The descender of the generating function P{sub r}({phi}){identical_to}{Phi}{sub r}(u=0,{phi}) is shown to be the distribution function of phase which determines the Lyapunov exponent and the local density of states. In the leading order in the small disorder we derived a second-order partial differential equation for the r-independent ('zero-mode') component {Phi}(u, {phi}) at the E = 0 (f=1/2 ) anomaly. This equation is nonseparable in variables u and {phi}. Yet, we show that due to a hidden symmetry, it is integrable and we construct an exact solution for {Phi}(u, {phi}) explicitly in quadratures. Using this solution we computed moments I{sub m} = N< vertical bar {psi} vertical bar {sup 2m}> (m {>=} 1) for a chain of the length N {yields} {infinity} and found an essential difference between their m-behavior in the center-of-band anomaly and for energies outside this anomaly. Outside the anomaly the 'extrinsic' localization length defined from the Lyapunov exponent coincides with that defined from the inverse participation ratio ('intrinsic' localization length). This is not the case at the E = 0 anomaly where the extrinsic localization length is smaller than the intrinsic one. At E = 0 one also observes an anomalous enhancement of large moments compatible with existence of yet another, much smaller characteristic length scale.

  20. DeltaCare USA Enhanced and Delta Dental PPO Level II Enhanced Plans Benefits Comparison For eligible employees in the following categories: Units 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, and C99, M98, M80 and FERP Annuitants

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    DeltaCare USA Enhanced and Delta Dental PPO Level II Enhanced Plans Benefits Comparison and FERP Annuitants Plan Benefit DeltaCare USA Enhanced Plan Charges: Delta Dental PPO of California No charge 80% Implants Not covered 80% ORTHODONTICS No Deductible* No Deductible* Orthodontics $1

  1. LAMPF II

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    We present a plan for two rapid-cycling synchrotrons - a 45-GeV, 40 ..mu..A proton synchrotron with a 9-GeV, 200-..mu..A booster. These machines can provide simultaneously 45-GeV slow-extracted beam for the production of kaons, antiprotons, and other secondary particles, and 9-GeV fast-extracted beam for neutrino and pulsed muon physics. The LAMPF II machines are compared with existing and proposed kaon factories. Relative to the Brookhaven AGS as it exists today, LAMPF II will provide 90 times as many neutrino events per year and 300 times as many kaons per year. Some design features of the LAMPF II accelerators that are important for reducing beam losses and increasing beam availability are discussed. Because of the large rf power and voltage required, an innovative design of the ferrite-tuned cavities is necessary. A commercially available Mg-Mn ferrite with perpendicular bias has been shown to raise the available ferrite Q by more than a factor of 10 when compared with materials now in use at other accelerators. The 45-GeV LAMPF II synchrotron would produce far more neutrinos, kaons, and antiprotons per unit cost than an upgraded conventional machine. The LAMPF II booster by itself, which can provide 100 ..mu..A at 12 GeV, is a very interesting option at moderate cost. 5 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Phase diagram and reentrance for the 3D Edwards-Anderson model using information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, V.; Saravia, G.; Vogel, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Data compressor techniques are used to study the phase diagram of the generalized Edwards-Anderson model in three dimensions covering the full range of mixture between ferromagnetic (concentration 1-x) and antiferromagnetic interactions (concentration x). The recently proposed data compressor wlzip is used to recognize criticality by the maximum information content in the files storing the simulation processes. The method allows not only the characterization of the ferromagnetic to paramagnetic (FP) transition (x<0.22, or x>0.78) but also it equally well yields the spin-glass to paramagnetic (SP) transition (0.22

  3. Advanced Anderson-Fabry disease presenting with left ventricular apical aneurysm and ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Marie-France; Shah, Alap; Trohman, Richard G; Madias, Christopher

    2015-06-16

    A 54-year-old female with Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD)-R342Q missense mutation on exon 7 in alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) gene - presented with sustained ventricular tachycardia. Imaging confirmed the presence of a new left ventricular apical aneurysm (LVAA) and a significantly reduced intra-cavitary gradient compared to two years prior. AFDcv is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by GLA enzyme deficiency. The phenotypic expression of AFD in the heart is not well described. Cardiac involvement can include left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), which is typically symmetric, but can also mimic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Left ventricular apical aneurysm is a rare finding in HCM. We suggest a shared mechanism of LVAA formation in AFD and HCM, independent of the underlying cardiomyopathy. Mechanisms of LVAA formation in HCM include genetic predisposition and long-standing left ventricular wall stress from elevated intra-cavitary systolic pressures due to mid-cavitary obstruction. Both mechanisms are supported in this patient (a brother with AFD also developed a small LVAA). Screening for AFD should be considered in cases of unexplained LVH, particularly in patients with the aneurysmal variant of HCM. PMID:26090373

  4. Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in randomly-stratified magnetodielectric media with uniform impedance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kihong

    2015-06-01

    The propagation and the Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in a randomly-stratified slab, where both the dielectric permittivity and the magnetic permeability depend on one spatial coordinate in a random manner, is theoretically studied. The case where the wave impedance is uniform, while the refractive index is random, is considered in detail. The localization length and the disorder-averaged transmittance of s and p waves incident obliquely on the slab are calculated as a function of the incident angle ? and the strength of randomness in a numerically precise manner, using the invariant imbedding method. It is found that the waves incident perpendicularly on the slab are delocalized, while those incident obliquely are localized. As the incident angle increases from zero, the localization length decreases from infinity monotonically to some finite value. The localization length is found to depend on the incident angle as ?-4 and a simple analytical formula, which works quite well for weak disorder and small incident angles, is derived. The localization length does not depend on the wave polarization, but the disorder-averaged transmittance generally does. PMID:26072812

  5. Advanced Anderson-Fabry disease presenting with left ventricular apical aneurysm and ventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Marie-France; Shah, Alap; Trohman, Richard G; Madias, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old female with Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD)-R342Q missense mutation on exon 7 in alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) gene - presented with sustained ventricular tachycardia. Imaging confirmed the presence of a new left ventricular apical aneurysm (LVAA) and a significantly reduced intra-cavitary gradient compared to two years prior. AFDcv is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by GLA enzyme deficiency. The phenotypic expression of AFD in the heart is not well described. Cardiac involvement can include left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), which is typically symmetric, but can also mimic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Left ventricular apical aneurysm is a rare finding in HCM. We suggest a shared mechanism of LVAA formation in AFD and HCM, independent of the underlying cardiomyopathy. Mechanisms of LVAA formation in HCM include genetic predisposition and long-standing left ventricular wall stress from elevated intra-cavitary systolic pressures due to mid-cavitary obstruction. Both mechanisms are supported in this patient (a brother with AFD also developed a small LVAA). Screening for AFD should be considered in cases of unexplained LVH, particularly in patients with the aneurysmal variant of HCM.

  6. Measurement of the Probability Distribution of Optical Transmittance on the Crossover to Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhou; Wang, Jing; Genack, Azriel

    2012-02-01

    We report measurements of spectra of the field transmission matrix t for microwave radiation propagating through waveguide filled with randomly positioned dielectric scattering spheres in the Anderson localization transition. Diagonalizing the matrix product tt^ gives the transmission eigenvalues ?n, which yields the optical transmittance, T=?a,b=1^N | tba |^2 =?n=1^N ?n . The ensemble average of the transmittance is equal to the dimensionless conductance, g=. We show the probability distribution of transmittance P(T) changes from Gaussian to log-normal as the value of g decreases. The distribution P(T) is analyzed in terms of the underlying transmission eigenvalues ?n. For random samples with g˜3.9, we found P(T) follows a Gaussian distribution. For g˜0.37, we observe a highly asymmetric distribution for --lnT. The sharp drop for high values of T is attributed to the restriction that ?n<1 and the repulsion between transmission eigenvalues even for localized samples. For g˜0.04, the distribution of transmittance is nearly log-normal. The variance of -lnT, ?^2, scales linearly with <-lnT> as predicted by single parameter scaling even for weakly localized waves.

  7. Response to the commentaries of Melissa S Anderson and Murray J Dyck.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Jozsef

    2013-08-01

    Anderson and Dyck claim that the current trend of almost exclusively using citation-based evaluative metrics to assess the research output of scholars is unsound. I agree with them in this, but I feel that, for practical reasons, this system will not disappear in the near future, so we must concentrate on making it fairer. Both commentators doubt whether numerically expressing each contributor's relative contribution is feasible. I admit that an important precondition for this task is the possibility of an informed, democratic debate among equals about the relative contribution of each contributor to the article. Mechanisms should be established to protect vulnerable researchers in the academic field in the same way as safeguards exist today to protect vulnerable research participants. Theoretically, however, I think that the fair allocation of authorship credit is possible, and much of this task is already being performed routinely when contributors determine the order of their names in the byline, being well aware of the widespread assumption that this order mostly mirrors the order of their relative contributions. All they would have to do as an additional task is to express this order in numbers. If they cannot reach a consensus, they could always choose not to express their relative contribution in numbers, in which case the presumption would be that they contributed equally. My proposal could, at best, make the system fairer and, at worst, not reduce the options that evaluators already have. PMID:23038802

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo investigation of Knight shift anomaly in Periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mi; Curro, Nicholas; Scalettar, Richard; UC Davis Team; UC Davis Team

    2014-03-01

    We report a Determinant Quantum Monte Carlo investigation of the Knight shift anomaly observed in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of heavy fermion materials. As opposed to normal Fermi liquids, the Knight shift in heavy fermion materials deviates from the total susceptibility ? below a crossover temperature T*. This deviation is believed to originate in the different temperature dependence of the conduction electron and local moment components of the total susceptibility ?. Here we quantify the behavior of ?cc(T) ,?cf(T) , and ?ff(T) in the framework of periodic Anderson model (PAM), focussing on the evolution with different degree of conduction electron-local moment hybridization. These results confirm several predictions of the two-fluid theory of the Knight shift anomaly, including the demonstration of a universal logarithmic divergence of the contribution of the heavy electrons to the Knight shift. This universal behavior, which occurs with decreasing temperature below T* in the paramagnetic state, agrees well with experimental findings, and indicates that different heavy fermion materials exhibit a common scaling, differing only in the coherence temperature scale, T*.

  9. Micro Level Data Analysis in Continuous Commissioning®: A Case Study

    E-print Network

    Khan, S.; Bible, M.

    2012-01-01

    E:\\ICEBO 2012\\1FINAL PAPERS\\22 Anderson CC ICEBO Paper (REV 02 8.10.12).docx Micro Level Data Analysis in Continuous Commissioning?: A Case Study Saleem Khan1 and Mitch Bible1 1 Texas Energy Engineering Services, Inc. 1301 Capital of Texas...1 International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations (ICEBO) 2012 Manchester, England Micro Level Data Analysis in Continuous Commissioning? : A Case Study Saleem Khan, P.E. (TEESI) 1301 S. Capital of Texas Hwy., Suite B-325 Austin...

  10. Carl J. Rothfels*, Michael A. Sundue*, Li-Yaung Kuo, Anders Larsson, Masahiro Kato, Eric Schuettpelz & Kathleen M. Pryer. A revised family-level classification for eupolypod II ferns (Polypodiidae: Polypodiales). Taxon.

    E-print Network

    Lintilhac, Philip M.

    for eupolypod II ferns (Polypodiidae: Polypodiales). Taxon. (*equally contributing). Sundue, a new genus of grammitid fern segregated from Terpsichore (Polypodiaceae). Systematic. Cryptochlorophyllous Spores in Ferns: Nongreen Spores that Contain Chlorophyll. International

  11. Amoxycillin levels in sputum, serum, and saliva

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Sheila M.; Anderson, Isobel M. E.; Jones, G. R.; Calder, Margaret A.; Pratt, C.; Malcolm, Margaret G. G.

    1974-01-01

    Stewart, Sheila M., Anderson, Isobel M. E., Jones, G. R., and Calder, Margaret A. (1974).Thorax, 29, 110-114. Amoxycillin levels in sputum, serum, and saliva. The levels of amoxycillin in sputum, saliva, and serum from 22 patients were estimated. Fifteen patients had pneumonia and seven had acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. The drug was given orally in a dose of 500 mg four times daily. There was considerable variation in the levels in specimens from different patients. The mean sputum levels two to three hours and six hours after the dose were 0·52 and 0·53 ?g/ml respectively. The mean two-hour saliva level was 0·32 ?g/ml. The mean serum levels two and six hours after the test dose were 11·0 and 3·5 ?g/ml respectively. The higher levels of amoxycillin were usually associated with the presence of more pus in the sputum. The mean levels of amoxycillin at comparable times were significantly greater than those found in a previous study after the same dose of ampicillin. Clinical response to treatment occurred more rapidly in those patients with sputum levels of 0·25 ?g amoxycillin per ml or above than in those with lower levels. The time taken to clear potential pathogens from the sputum was related to the pathogen rather than to the amoxycillin level, Haemophilus influenzae persisting for longer than Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:4545190

  12. Personalized Medicine in a Phase I Clinical Trials Program: The MD Anderson Cancer Center Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria; Iskander, Nancy G.; Hong, David S.; Wheler, Jennifer J.; Falchook, Gerald S.; Fu, Siqing; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Naing, Aung; Janku, Filip; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Ye, Yang; Wen, Sijin; Berry, Donald; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We initiated a personalized medicine program in the context of early clinical trials, using targeted agents matched with tumor molecular aberrations. Herein, we report our observations. Patient and Methods Patients with advanced cancer were treated in the Clinical Center for Targeted Therapy. Molecular analysis was conducted in the MD Anderson Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) -certified laboratory. Patients whose tumors had an aberration were treated with matched targeted therapy, when available. Treatment assignment was not randomized. The clinical outcomes of patients with molecular aberrations treated with matched targeted therapy were compared with those of consecutive patients who were not treated with matched targeted therapy. Results Of 1,144 patients analyzed, 460 (40.2%) had 1 or more aberration. In patients with 1 molecular aberration, matched therapy (n = 175) compared with treatment without matching (n = 116) was associated with a higher overall response rate (27% vs. 5%; P < 0.0001), longer time-to-treatment failure (TTF; median, 5.2 vs. 2.2 months; P< 0.0001), and longer survival (median, 13.4 vs. 9.0 months; P= 0.017). Matched targeted therapy was associated with longer TTF compared with their prior systemic therapy in patients with 1 mutation (5.2 vs. 3.1 months, respectively; P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis in patients with 1 molecular aberration, matched therapy was an independent factor predicting response (P = 0.001) and TTF (P = 0.0001). Conclusion Keeping in mind that the study was not randomized and patients had diverse tumor types and a median of 5 prior therapies, our results suggest that identifying specific molecular abnormalities and choosing therapy based on these abnormalities is relevant in phase I clinical trials. PMID:22966018

  13. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; Cox, James [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); McMaken, Bruce [Sanders Morris Harris, Houston, TX 77002 (United States); Styles, John [Styles Company, Houston, TX 77098 (United States)

    2003-08-26

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week.

  14. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  15. Role of serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide measurement in diagnosis of cardiac involvement in patients with anderson-fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Coats, Caroline J; Parisi, Valentina; Ramos, Monica; Janagarajan, Kalaiarasi; O'Mahony, Constantinos; Dawnay, Anne; Lachmann, Robin H; Murphy, Elaine; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn; Elliott, Perry M

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy has the potential to delay or reverse adverse cardiac remodeling in Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD); however, the current indications for enzyme replacement therapy rely on detecting relatively advanced features of the disease. We aimed to determine the relation between the serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentration and cardiac abnormalities in patients with AFD. We hypothesized that it might help to detect early disease. NT-proBNP was measured under at rest conditions in 117 patients with AFD (age 48 ± 15 years, 46.2% men). All patients underwent clinical evaluation with electrocardiography and echocardiography. The median NT-proBNP concentration was 24 pmol/L (range <5 to 6,059). Of the 117 patients, 67 (57%) had elevated, age-corrected, NT-proBNP levels. In the 56 patients (48%) with normal echocardiographic findings, the NT-proBNP levels were greater than the age-predicted cutoffs in 10 of 25 patients with abnormal electrocardiographic findings and 3 of 31 patients with normal electrocardiographic findings (p <0.05). On multiple regression analysis, age, creatinine, left atrial volume index, E/Ea, and the presence of abnormal electrocardiographic findings were independently associated with log NT-proBNP (R(2) = 0.67, p <0.05). In conclusion, NT-proBNP concentrations were elevated in patients with AFD and early cardiac involvement, suggesting its measurement could assist in decisions regarding the timing of enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:23040658

  16. Ferromagnetic ordering in Mn-doped quantum wells GaAs-AlGaAs resulting from the virtual Anderson transition

    SciTech Connect

    Agrinskaya, N. V.; Berezovets, V. A.; Bouravlev, A.; Kozub, V. I. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-20

    We present our results obtained for Mn-doped GaAs quantum wells where the evidences of the ferromagnetic transition at relatively high temperatures were found at unusually small Mn concentrations. The observed values of hopping resistance at small temperatures evidenced that the samples are deep in the insulating regime. Thus the corresponding estimates of the overlapping integrals can hardly explain the large values of Curie temperatures T{sub c} ? 100 K. We develop a theoretical model qualitatively explaining the experimental results basing on the concept of virtual Anderson transition.

  17. A review of "Bradford’s Books: Of Plymouth Plantation and the Printed Word." by Douglas Anderson

    E-print Network

    William J. Scheick

    2003-01-01

    and sober men, may well evince the vanity of that conceit of Plato?s ? that the taking away of property and bringing in community into a com- monwealth would make them happy and flourishing.? Plato would never have been the authority behind the Pilgrim...- though Anderson rightly connects this appended commentary with a passage by John Robinson, in this instance he misses its key intertextual link to Bradford?s own writing. The image in the ad- dendum most invested with emotion here is an elaborate conceit...

  18. H. R. 3653: a Bill to amend the Price-Anderson provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to extend and improve procedures for liability and indemnification for nuclear incidents. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, October 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 1985 extends the coverage from August 1, 1987 to August 1, 1997 and improves liability and indemnification procedures. It establishes premium amounts and limits annual levels to $10 million. The aggregate liability for a single nuclear incident is set at $500 million plus the cost of nuclear insurance required for the licensee as a function of the rated electrical capacity. A commission to administer compensation will function following an incident and until dissolved by the president. The bill also provides for the consolidation of claims from a single incident.

  19. Conserving slave boson approximations for the Anderson model beyond NCA J. Kroha a \\Lambda \\Lambda y , P. W olfle, ayy T. A. Costi, ay , P. J. Hirschfeld b and K. A. Muttalib by

    E-print Network

    Buse, Karsten

    Conserving slave boson approximations for the Anderson model beyond NCA J. Kroha a \\Lambda \\Lambda to construct conserving slave boson approximations for the single--impurity Anderson model beyond the noncrossing approximation (NCA). The pseudofermion and slave boson spectral functions are computed

  20. APOLLO II

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Mondot, J.; Stankovski, Z.; Cossic, A.; Zmijarevic, I.

    1988-11-01

    APOLLO II is a new, multigroup transport code under development at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The code has a modular structure and uses sophisticated software for data structuralization, dynamic memory management, data storage, and user macrolanguage. This paper gives an overview of the main methods used in the code for (a) multidimensional collision probability calculations, (b) leakage calculations, and (c) homogenization procedures. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the potential of the modular structure of the code and the novel multilevel flat-flux representation used in the calculation of the collision probabilities.

  1. Price-Anderson Act Amendments Act of 1986. A report submitted to the Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, May 21, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The report on proposed legislation (S. 1225) to amend the Price-Anderson Act provisions of the Atomic Energy Act to extend and improve the procedures for compensating the public in the event of a nuclear accident is favorable, but suggest some changes. The bill reauthorizes the Price-Anderson indemnification system for 25 years, increases funds available for victim compensation, and expedites congressional procedures for responding with additional action as needed in the event of the theft or an accident involving nuclear materials. The report outlines the background and need for the legislation, gives a section-by-section analysis, and presents additional views and statements of committee members.

  2. A review of "Translating Investments: Metaphor and the Dynamic of Cultural Change in Tudor-Stuart England." by Judith H. Anderson 

    E-print Network

    Ira Clark

    2006-01-01

    all, William Browne?s epitaph on her death in 1621 explicitly refers to her as ?Sidney?s sister, Pembroke?s mother.? For, of course, both men were named Philip. Judith H. Anderson. Translating Investments: Metaphor and the Dynamic of Cultural Change... in Tudor-Stuart England. New York: Fordham University Press, 2005. xi + 324 pp. $55.00. Review by IRA CLARK, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. Translating Investments puns in multiple ways that Judith H. Anderson ex- plores through her investigation of metaphor?s...

  3. Tris-functionalized hybrid Anderson polyoxometalates: synthesis, characterization, hydrolytic stability and inversion of protein surface charge.

    PubMed

    Blazevic, Amir; Al-Sayed, Emir; Roller, Alexander; Giester, Gerald; Rompel, Annette

    2015-03-16

    Single- and double-sided functionalized hybrid organic-inorganic Anderson polyoxomolybdates with Ga(III) and Fe(III) positioned as central heteroatoms have been synthesized in a mild, two-step synthesis in an aqueous medium. Compounds 1-4 were isolated as hydrated salts, [TBA]3[GaMo6O18(OH)3{(OCH2)3CCH2OH}]×12?H2O (1) (TBA = tetrabutylammonium), Na3[FeMo6O18{(OCH2)3CCH2OH}2]×11?H2O (2), [TMA]2[GaMo6O18(OH)3{(OCH2)3CNH3}]×7?H2O (3) (TMA = tetramethylammonium), and Na[TMA]2[FeMo6O18(OH)3{(OCH2)3CNH3}](OH)×6?H2O (4). All the compounds were characterized based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD), FTIR, UV/Vis, thermogravimetric, ESI-MS, NMR, and elemental analyses. Compound 1 was also crystallized with two smaller organic cations, giving [TMA]3[GaMo6O18(OH)3{(OCH2)3CCH2OH}]×n?H2O (5) and [GDM]3[GaMo6O18(OH)3{(OCH2)3CCH2OH}]×n?H2O (6) (GDM = guanidinium) and were characterized based on UV/Vis, NMR, FTIR, and elemental analyses. The use of these compounds as additives in macromolecular crystallography was investigated by examining their hydrolytic stability by using ESI-MS in a pH range of 4 to 9. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed that BSA remains intact in a solution containing up to 100?equivalents of 1 or 4 over more than four days at 20?°C. Zeta potential measurements demonstrate that 1-4 induce charge inversions on the positively charged surface of BSA (1?mg?mL(-1)) with concentrations starting as low as 1.29?mM for compounds 1 and 2, which have the highest negative surface charge. PMID:25677371

  4. Surgical Results of Anderson-Hynes Dismembered Pyeloplasty Without Internal Drainage in Adults With Ureteroplevic Junction Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohamadi, Aliasghar; Saeedi, Parisa; Hoghabrosadat, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anderson-Hynes dismembered pyeloplasty is the gold standard therapeutic approach to ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Use of a drainage method to protect the suture line from leakage is a matter of controversy. Objectives: We have compared the surgical outcome of Anderson-Hynes dismembered pyeloplasty for UPJO repair, with or without internal stenting. Patients and Methods: Eighty-two patients with UPJO were evaluated from 1996 to 2002. Complicated or emergent cases were excluded. Classic standard dismembered pyeloplasty was performed. Internal drainage, with a double j catheter, was performed in several patients, randomly. Another drain was also placed in the retroperitoneal space. The follow-up of patients was planned weekly, with patient visits and urine analysis and intravenous pyelography (IVP) and diethylene-triamine-pentaacetate (DTPA) scan after one month. Results: The study group consisted of 51 male and 31 female patients, who were mostly in the age range of 20 - 40 years. Comparing the two techniques of pyeloplasty with or without internal drainage, there was no significant difference between groups regarding extravasation and anastomosis complications, such as leakage, stenosis, urinoma formation or evidence of obstruction on postoperative IVP or DTPA scan. However, a higher incidence of catheter related urinary symptoms and flank pain was reported among those with internal stent. Conclusions: Pyeloplasty, with adequate spatulation, hemostasis and a watertight anastomosis, represents the mainstay of successful pyeloplasty and there may be no significant benefit for urethral stenting, especially in non-complicated cases.

  5. Preliminary report on coal resources of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Margaret S.; Gunther, Gregory L.; Flores, Romeo M.; Ochs, Allen M.; Stricker, Gary D.; Roberts, Steven B.; Taber, Thomas T.; Bader, Lisa R.; Schuenemeyer, John H.

    1998-01-01

    The National Coal Resource Assessment (NCRA) project by the U.S. Geological Survey is designed to assess US coal with the greatest potential for development in the next 20 to 30 years. Coal in the Wyodak-Anderson (WA) coal zone in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana is plentiful, clean, and compliant with EPA emissions standards. This coal is considered to be very desirable for development for use in electric power generation. The purpose of this NCRA study was to compile all available data relating to the Wyodak- Anderson coal, correlate the beds that make up the WA coal zone, create digital files pertaining to the study area and the WA coal, and produce a variety of reports on various aspects of the assessed coal unit. This report contains preliminary calculations of coal resources for the WA coal zone and is one of many products of the NCRA study. Coal resource calculations in this report were produced using both public and confidential data from many sources. The data was manipulated using a variety of commercially available software programs and several custom programs. A general description of the steps involved in producing the resource calculations is described in this report.

  6. Nailing the coffin shut on doubts that violent video games stimulate aggression: comment on Anderson et al. (2010).

    PubMed

    Huesmann, L Rowell

    2010-03-01

    Over the past half century the mass media, including video games, have become important socializers of children. Observational learning theory has evolved into social-cognitive information processing models that explain that what a child observes in any venue has both short-term and long-term influences on the child's behaviors and cognitions. C. A. Anderson et al.'s (2010) extensive meta-analysis of the effects of violent video games confirms what these theories predict and what prior research about other violent mass media has found: that violent video games stimulate aggression in the players in the short run and increase the risk for aggressive behaviors by the players later in life. The effects occur for males and females and for children growing up in Eastern or Western cultures. The effects are strongest for the best studies. Contrary to some critics' assertions, the meta-analysis of C. A. Anderson et al. is methodologically sound and comprehensive. Yet the results of meta-analyses are unlikely to change the critics' views or the public's perception that the issue is undecided because some studies have yielded null effects, because many people are concerned that the implications of the research threaten freedom of expression, and because many people have their identities or self-interests closely tied to violent video games. PMID:20192555

  7. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-09-28

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

  8. Chemistry 211 General Chemistry Laboratory II

    E-print Network

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    Chemistry 211 General Chemistry Laboratory II Fall 2014 Instructor Dr. Michelle Greene Office: Neckers 295 Office Hours: by appointment Phone: TBA E-mail: mgreene@chem.siu.edu Text Chemistry 211 University Carbondale) Course Description "General Chemistry Laboratory II" is an introductory level

  9. Modeling distributed hybrid systems in Ptolemy II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jie Liu; Xiaojun Liu; Edward A. Lee

    2001-01-01

    We present Ptolemy II as a modeling and simulation environment for distributed hybrid systems. In Ptolemy II, a distributed hybrid system is specified as a hierarchy of models: an event-based top level and distributed islands of hybrid systems. Each hybrid system is in turn a hierarchy of continuous-time models and finite state machines. A variety of models of computation was

  10. Case 22:Type II diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. It is composed of two types depending on the pathogenesis. Type I diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency and usually has its onset during childhood or teenage years. This is also called ketosis-prone diabetes. Type II diab...

  11. Midinfrared scattering and absorption in Ge powder close to the Anderson localization transition J. Gomez Rivas, R. Sprik, and A. Lagendijk

    E-print Network

    Sprik, Rudolf

    medium where the scat- tering is efficient enough to induce localization has been the reason why only few characterization of the scattering and absorption is needed to understand the transport of light in strongly scat of the scat- tering properties and the optical absorption in Ge powders close to the Anderson localization

  12. WebOS: Operating System Services for Wide Area Applications \\Lambda Amin Vahdat y Thomas Anderson z Michael Dahlin x Eshwar Belani y David Culler y

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Tom

    , authentication, and security. On a single machine, appli­ cation developers can rely on the local operating scalable, and dy­ namically reconfigurable. Experience with a number of ap­ plications developed under Web Microsystems, Cal­ ifornia MICRO, Novell, Hewlett Packard, Intel, Microsoft, and Mit­ subishi. Anderson

  13. WebOS: Operating System Services for Wide Area Applications Amin Vahdat, Paul Eastham, Chad Yoshikawa, Eshwar Belani, Thomas Anderson, David Culler

    E-print Network

    Dahlin, Michael D.

    , and security. On a single machine, application developers can rely on the local operating system to provide that are geographically distributed, highly available, incrementally scalable, and dynamically reconfiguring. Experience MICRO, Novell, Hewlett Packard, Intel, Microsoft, and Mitsubishi. Anderson was also supported

  14. INTEGRATION OF SQUID l/f NOISE AND ITS APPLICATION TO A SUPERCONDUCTING GYROSCOPE J.T. Anderson and B. Cabrera

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INTEGRATION OF SQUID l/f NOISE AND ITS APPLICATION TO A SUPERCONDUCTING GYROSCOPE J.T. Anderson Abstract.- SQUID noise in the 1/f noise region was integrated for 140 hours in a narrow frequency band. INTRODUCTION.- SQUID magnetometers exhibit increa- sing noise power at low frequencies /l/ which tends to rise

  15. Prof. Stuart C. Allen Associate Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering 1953-1971 Dr. Jean A. Anderson Associate Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering 1955-1983

    E-print Network

    Endres. William J.

    Prof. Stuart C. Allen Associate Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering 1953-1971 Dr. Jean A. Anderson Associate Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering 1955-1983 Dr. Oner Arici Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering 1981-2005 Prof. Richard Bayer, P.E. (Deceased) Professor Emeritus of Mechanical

  16. Enhancement of thermal transport in the degenerate periodic Anderson model V. Zlati,1,2 R. Monnier,3 and J. K. Freericks4

    E-print Network

    Freericks, Jim

    indicate that the renormalization of the thermal conductivity and of the Seebeck coefficient can lead= 2 kB 2 /3e2 is the Fermi-liquid FL Lorenz number. When the WF law holds, metals must haveEnhancement of thermal transport in the degenerate periodic Anderson model V. Zlati,1,2 R. Monnier

  17. A new species of gall midge associated with Diplopterys pubipetala (A.Juss.) Anderson and Davis (Malpighiaceae) from Altinópolis, São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Urso-Guimarães, M V; Carmo-Neto, A M

    2015-01-01

    Clinodiplosis bellum sp. nov. associated with Diplopterys pubipetala (A.Juss.) Anderson and Davis (Malpighiaceae) from Brazil are described. This is the first species of Clinodiplosis described to State of São Paulo and the first formal description of Diplopterys pubipetala (Malpighiaceae) as host plant of Cecidomyiidae species. Description and illustration of the Clinodiplosis bellum sp. nov. (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) are given. PMID:25945635

  18. The Distribution of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Cramer-von Mises, and Anderson-Darling Test Statistics for Exponential Populations with Estimated Parameters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane L. Evans; John H. Drew; Lawrence M. Leemis

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a derivation of the distribution of the Kolmogorov–Smirnov, Cramer–von Mises, and Anderson–Darling test statistics in the case of exponential sampling when the parameters are unknown and estimated from sample data for small sample sizes via maximum likelihood.

  19. Preliminary report on methodology for calculating coal resources of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Margaret S.; Gunther, Gregory L.; Flores, Romeo M.; Stricker, Gary D.; Ochs, Allan M.; Schuenemeyer, John H.

    1998-01-01

    The National Coal Resource Assessment of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone includes reports on the geology, stratigraphy, quality, and quantity of coal. The calculation of resources is only one aspect of the assessment. Without thorough documentation of the coal resource study and the methods used, the results of our study could be misinterpreted. The task of calculating coal resources included many steps, the use of several commercial software programs, and the incorporation of custom programs. The methods used for calculating coal resources for the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone vary slightly from the methods used in other study areas, and by other workers in the National Coal Resource Assessment. The Wyodak-Anderson coal zone includes up to 10 coal beds in any given location. The net coal thickness of the zone at each data point location was calculated by summing the thickness of all of the coal beds that were greater than 2.5 ft thick. The amount of interburden is not addressed or reported in this coal resource assessment. The amount of overburden reported is the amount of rock above the stratigraphically highest coal bed in the zone. The resource numbers reported do not include coal within mine or lease areas, in areas containing mapped Wyodak-Anderson clinker, or in areas where the coal is extrapolated to be less than 2.5 ft thick. The resources of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone are reported in Ellis and others (1998). A general description of how the resources were calculated is included in that report. The purpose of this report is to document in more detail some of the parameters and methods used, define our spatial data, compare resources calculated using different grid options and calculation methods, and explain the application of confidence limits to the resource calculation.

  20. Transport properties of Floquet topological superconductors at the transition from the topological phase to the Anderson localized phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Sun, Qing-feng; Xie, X. C.

    2014-10-01

    The Floquet topological superconducting state is a nonequilibrium time-periodic state hosting Majorana fermions. We study its transport properties by using the Kitaev model with time-periodic incommensurate potentials, which experiences phase transition from the Floquet topological superconducting phase to the Anderson localized phase with increasing driving strength. We study both the real time dynamics of the current and the nonanalytic behavior of the tunneling conductance at the transition. Especially, we find that the tunneling conductance changes continuously at the transition, being a finite value in the presence of Floquet-Majorana fermions, but drops to zero as the Majorana fermions vanish. For a special choice of parameters, the Majorana fermions revive at a larger driving strength, accompanied by the revival of conductances.

  1. Z2 topological term, the global anomaly, and the two-dimensional symplectic symmetry class of Anderson localization.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shinsei; Mudry, Christopher; Obuse, Hideaki; Furusaki, Akira

    2007-09-14

    We discuss, for a two-dimensional Dirac Hamiltonian with a random scalar potential, the presence of a Z2 topological term in the nonlinear sigma model encoding the physics of Anderson localization in the symplectic symmetry class. The Z2 topological term realizes the sign of the Pfaffian of a family of Dirac operators. We compute the corresponding global anomaly, i.e., the change in the sign of the Pfaffian by studying a spectral flow numerically. This Z2 topological effect can be relevant to graphene when the impurity potential is long ranged and, also, to the two-dimensional boundaries of a three-dimensional lattice model of Z2 topological insulators in the symplectic symmetry class. PMID:17930456

  2. Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 1986. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session. August 5, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The committee recommends several amendments to H.R. 3653, a bill designed to improve nuclear insurance procedures. Among the amendments are the inclusion of storage, handling, transportation, treatment, or disposal of, or research and development on and changes dealing with reimbursement procedures and limits. The bill reauthorizes the Price-Anderson Act, but limits liability and creates industry-wide liability in the event of a major accident. The report covers background information and hearings, summarizes the 15 amendments and each section how the bill will effect relevant changes in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. Dissenting views argue against setting a liability cap on nuclear waste accidents because it discourages safety consciousness on the part of contractors and because there is no precedent in liability insurance for limiting liability.

  3. Giant Fluctuations of Local Magnetoresistance of Organic Spin Valves and the Non-Hermitian 1D Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Nemirovsky, D.; Kagalovsky, V.; Raikh, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, where the tunnel magnetoresitance (TMR) of a spin valve was measured locally, we theoretically study the distribution of TMR along the surface of magnetized electrodes. We show that, even in the absence of interfacial effects (like hybridization due to donor and acceptor molecules), this distribution is very broad, and the portion of area with negative TMR is appreciable even if on average the TMR is positive. The origin of the local sign reversal is quantum interference of subsequent spin-rotation amplitudes in the course of incoherent transport of carriers between the source and the drain. We find the distribution of local TMR exactly by drawing upon formal similarity between evolution of spinors in time and of the reflection coefficient along a 1D chain in the Anderson model. The results obtained are confirmed by the numerical simulations.

  4. Abnormal anti-Stokes Raman scattering and coherent backscattering as manifestation of Anderson localization of light in nonlinear mesoscopic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaranda, Ion; Mihut, Lucian; Baibarac, Mihaela; Baltog, Ioan; Lefrant, Serge

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate that under continuous single-beam excitation, one can generate an abnormal anti-Stokes Raman emission (AASRE) whose properties are similar to a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The effect has been observed in mesoscopic materials, which possess intrinsically nonlinear properties [lithium niobate (LiNbO3), bismuth germanium oxide (Bi12GeO20; BGO), bismuth silicon oxide (Bi12GeO20; BSO)], which have a nonzero electric susceptibility of the third order, ?(3)?0. Corroborated Raman and coherent backscattering studies demonstrate that the occurrence of both effects is conditioned by the existence of a mesoscopic morphology of the sample, which is able to ensure efficient transport of the light inside the sample through a multiple light scattering mechanism. In this context, both AASRE and coherent backscattering effects are because of the Anderson localization of the light.

  5. A central limit theorem for products of random matrices and GOE statistics for the Anderson model on long boxes

    E-print Network

    Christian Sadel; Bálint Virág

    2014-11-04

    We consider products of random matrices that are small, independent identically distributed perturbations of a fixed matrix $T_0$. Focusing on the eigenvalues of $T_0$ of a particular size we obtain a limit to a SDE in a critical scaling. Previous results required $T_0$ to be a (conjugated) unitary matrix so it could not have eigenvalues of different modulus. From the result we can also obtain a limit SDE for the Markov process given by the action of the random products on the flag manifold. Applying the result to random Schr\\"odinger operators we can improve some result by Valko and Virag showing GOE statistics for the rescaled eigenvalue process of a sequence of Anderson models on long boxes. In particular we solve a problem posed in their work.

  6. Anderson lattice with explicit Kondo coupling revisited: metamagnetism and the field-induced suppression of the heavy fermion state.

    PubMed

    Howczak, Olga; Spa?ek, Jozef

    2012-05-23

    We apply the extended (statistically consistent, SCA) Gutzwiller-type approach to the periodic Anderson model (PAM) in an applied magnetic field and in the strong-correlation limit. The finite-U corrections are included systematically by transforming the PAM into the form with the Kondo-type interaction and the residual hybridization, both appearing at the same time and on equal footing. This effective Hamiltonian represents the essence of our Anderson-Kondo lattice model. We show that in ferromagnetic phases the low-energy single-particle states are strongly affected by the presence of the applied magnetic field. We also find that for large values of hybridization strength the system enters the so-called locked heavy fermion state introduced earlier. In this state the chemical potential lies in the majority-spin hybridization gap and, as a consequence, the system evolution is insensitive to further increase of the applied field. However, for a sufficiently strong magnetic field, the system transforms from the locked state to the fully spin-polarized phase. This is accompanied by a metamagnetic transition, as well as by a drastic reduction of the effective mass of the quasiparticles. In particular, we observe no effective mass enhancement in the fully polarized state. The findings are in overall agreement with experimental results for the Ce compounds in high magnetic fields. The mass enhancement for the spin-minority electrons may also diminish with the increasing field, unlike for the quasiparticle states in a single narrow band in the same limit of strong correlations. PMID:22510783

  7. Effet de l'interaction coulombienne sur la localisation d'Anderson dans le gaz bidimensionnel d'électrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, G.

    2010-09-01

    Nous étudions l’effet des interactions coulombiennes sur la localisation d’Anderson dans le gaz bidimensionnel d’électrons désordonné. L’objectif est de statuer sur la question de l’existence de métaux à deux dimensions. En l’absence d’interaction, la théorie d’échelle de la localisation prédit qu’un désordre infinitésimal suffit à localiser la fonction d’onde électronique et donc à rendre le système isolant à température nulle (Abrahams et al., 1979). Dans certaines limites extrêmes, les interactions peuvent être prises en compte et l’on aboutit également à un état isolant. Cependant, aucune théorie analytique ne permet de traiter le régime quantique non-perturbatif où désordre et interaction sont intermédiaires. Expérimentalement, il est possible de l’explorer dans des échantillons de haute mobilité et basse densité. Depuis 1994, des comportements métalliques inexpliqués y ont été observés (Kravchenko et al., 1994). Nous avons mis au point une méthode numérique permettant d’étudier le problème couplé de la localisation d’Anderson en présence d’interaction. Cette méthode mêle Monte Carlo quantique à température nulle et théorie d’échelle pour la conductance de Thouless. Nous trouvons que la théorie d’échelle de la localisation est préservée en présence d’interaction et donc que le gaz bidimensionnel, même corrélé, est isolant à température nulle. Nos résultats montrent de plus que les interactions délocalisent le gaz bidimensionnel et que cet effet de délocalisation est accru en présence de dégénérescence de vallées. Ils nous permettent de proposer un mécanisme simple rendant compte des principales caractéristiques des comportements métalliques observés expérimentalement.

  8. The optimal level of copyright protection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kiho Yoon

    2002-01-01

    We specify the optimal level of copyright protection for an individual producer and the society as a whole. For an individual producer, the optimal level is (i) no protection, (ii) the level under which the producer’s overall profit net of the development cost is zero, or (iii) full protection. The optimal level for the society, on the other hand, critically

  9. The endocrine control of reproduction and molt in male and female emperor (Aptenodytes forsteri) and adelie (Pygoscelis adeliae) penguins. II. Annual changes in plasma levels of thyroxine and triiodothyronine.

    PubMed

    Groscolas, R; Leloup, J

    1986-08-01

    Changes in plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels were studied during a breeding season and in more detail during the postbreeding molt in male and female emperor (Aptenodytes forsteri) and adelie (Pygoscelis adeliae) penguins under natural conditions in the Antarctic. During the 4-month natural fast that accompanies courtship and incubation in male emperors, plasma T4 and T3 levels were maintained around 11 and 0.6 ng/ml, respectively. In courting, fasting female emperors plasma T4 levels were maintained around 10 ng/ml for more than 1 month; plasma T3 levels were around 0.8 ng/ml but were markedly depressed (0.1 ng/ml) at the time of copulation although they increased again (2.2 ng/ml) at oviposition. During the 5-month period of chick rearing, plasma T3 (males and females) and T4 (females) were maintained at the same levels as during courtship and incubation, but plasma T4 levels in male emperors were slightly lower (7 ng/ml). Similar plasma T4 and T3 levels were observed in breeding adelie penguins. These results do not provide any convincing evidence for thyroid-gonadal interrelations in breeding penguins, but demonstrate their capacity to maintain plasma thyroid hormone levels during very prolonged natural fasts. During the heavy postnuptial molt when the birds were fasting, in both species and sexes, marked but separate peaks in plasma T4 and T3 levels occurred concurrently with the initial growth of the new feathers, and with the subsequent shedding of the old plumage, respectively. Peak plasma T4 levels were observed at the time of the emergence of the new feathers out of the skin, and peak plasma T3 levels were roughly concurrent with the maximum daily body weight loss. This is the first strong evidence that increases in plasma T4 and T3 levels are correlated with different stages of molt in a wild seabird. Increased plasma T4 but not T3 levels at the time of feather papilla eruption suggest that T4 is concerned with feather growth, but is not exclusive of a role of T3. Increased plasma T3 but not T4 levels during the reduction in thermal insulation in molting penguins suggest that this hormone rather than T4 might be active in energy metabolism in penguins. PMID:3781233

  10. An Examination of the Validity of the Family Affluence Scale II (FAS II) in a General Adolescent Population of Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Brock; Poulin, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the performance of the FAS II in a general population of 17,545 students in grades 7, 9, 10 and 12 in the Atlantic provinces of Canada. The FAS II was assessed against two other measures of socioeconomic status: mother's highest level of education and family structure. Our study found that the FAS II reduces the likelihood of…

  11. https://ehs.mit.edu/site/content/inspections-level-i-level-ii Level I Guidance Documentation

    E-print Network

    Entekhabi, Dara

    "); (3) the hazard classification associated with the waste (e.g. "TOXIC"). EMP provides red HW tags Environmental: Hazardous Waste: Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAA) 1. Is all hazardous waste stored. Are the SAAs located at or near the point of hazardous waste generation and under the control of a responsible

  12. 40 CFR 63.1334 - Parameter monitoring levels and excursions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...high-level adjustments; (B) Start-ups; (C) Shutdowns; (D) Malfunctions...high-level adjustments; (2 ) Start-ups; (3 ) Shutdowns; or (4 ) Malfunctions...high-level adjustments; (ii) Start-ups; (iii) Shutdowns; (iv)...

  13. Simultaneous determination of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) by derivative stripping chronopotentiometry in Pittosporum tobira leaves: a measurement of local atmospheric pollution in Messina (Sicily, Italy)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosina Matarese Palmieri; Lara La Pera; Giuseppa Di Bella; Giacomo Dugo

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the bio-accumulation of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) in Pittosporum tobira (Thunb.) Aiton leaves sampled in different zones of Messina, in order to assess the level of atmospheric metal deposition in correlation with the traffic volume. Derivative stripping chronopotentiometry was used as a practical, precise and sensitive technique to determine simultaneously Cd,

  14. Odorization II

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.G.; Attari, A.A. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    Odorization is a small-scale but vital gas industry operation because of its important contribution to the safe use of gas. It is a field with complex technical problems related to the detection and behavior of the odorant materials used. In the 1987 symposium, a wide range of odorization topics was covered from the behavior of the human olfactory system to odorant handling equipment. Legal considerations and litigation were also included and, for the first time, presentations of LP gas odorization were given. The base of these proceedings is the speakers papers presented at the 1987 symposium supplemented with a number of unpublished papers from the 1984 session. In an effort to provide a comprehensive reference on the fundamentals and current practical technology of odorization in a single volume, a number of papers included in the 1980 symposium are also re-published here as well as one previously unpublished paper from the 1976 symposium. The volume is divided into the following nine sections: Introduction; Odorant Materials; Measurement of odor level; Measurement of odorant level; Automated odorization; LP gas odorization; Supplemental odorization; Odorization research; and Litigation. Forty-one papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Enrichment and determinations of nickel(II), cadmium(II), copper(II), cobalt(II) and lead(II) ions in natural waters, table salts, tea and urine samples as pyrrolydine dithiocarbamate chelates by membrane filtration–flame atomic absorption spectrometry combination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ibrahim Narin; Mustafa Soylak

    2003-01-01

    A membrane filtration procedure for the preconcentration of nickel(II), cadmium(II), copper(II), cobalt(II) and lead(II) ions has been established. The analytes were adsorbed on cellulose nitrate membrane filter as their ammonium pyrrolydine dithiocarbamate (APDC) complexes. Then membrane filter was dissolved by using nitric acid. The levels of the analytes in the final solutions were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS).

  16. The one-two punch: knocking out angiotensin II in the heart.

    PubMed

    Zablocki, Daniela; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2010-04-01

    Ang II plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors lower Ang II levels by inhibiting conversion of Ang I to Ang II, but Ang II levels have been shown to return to normal with chronic ACE inhibitor treatment. In this issue of the JCI, Wei et al. show that ACE inhibition induces an increase in chymase activity in cardiac interstitial fluid, providing an alternate pathway for Ang II generation. PMID:20335650

  17. The one-two punch: knocking out angiotensin II in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Zablocki, Daniela; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2010-01-01

    Ang II plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors lower Ang II levels by inhibiting conversion of Ang I to Ang II, but Ang II levels have been shown to return to normal with chronic ACE inhibitor treatment. In this issue of the JCI, Wei et al. show that ACE inhibition induces an increase in chymase activity in cardiac interstitial fluid, providing an alternate pathway for Ang II generation. PMID:20335650

  18. H. R. 1102: This Act may be cited as the Price-Anderson Financial Accountability Amendments of 1989. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, February 23, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    H.R. 1102 is a bill to amend the Price-Anderson provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to provide for the financial accountability of certain contractors of the Department of Energy, and for other purposes.

  19. CINTRAFOR's Executive Board: Peter Anderson, President, Anderson & Anderson Architecture

    E-print Network

    's Mission: The Center for International Trade in Forest Products (CINTRAFOR) addresses opportunities, Japan's request for emergency Safeguard measures under the World Trade Organization (WTO) prompted and Mgmt. Training Center, Bates Technical College Bruce Lippke, Professor, College of Forest Resources, UW

  20. Expression of DNA topoisomerase II-?: Clinical significance in laryngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Zhang, Haili; Gao, Wei; Wen, Shuxin; Huangfu, Hui; Sun, Ruifang; Bai, Wei; Wang, Binquan

    2014-10-01

    DNA topoisomerase II-? (Topo II-?) is essential for numerous cell processes, including DNA replication, transcription, recombination, and chromosome separation and condensation. Altered Topo II-? expression may lead to carcinogenesis and cancer progression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between Topo II-? expression levels and clinicopathological data from laryngeal cancer patients. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze Topo II-? expression in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and distant healthy tissues obtained from 70 patients. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to detect Topo II-? amplification and chromosome 17 ploidy using a laryngeal cancer tissue microarray. The expression of Topo II-? protein was detected in 71.43% (50/70) of laryngeal carcinoma tissues, in contrast to 9% of healthy tissues (2/22). Furthermore, the expression of Topo II-? protein was found to be associated with tumor de-differentiation and advanced tumor T stage. However, the expression of Topo II-? protein was not identified to be associated with Topo II-? amplification in laryngeal carcinoma, although was found to positively correlate with chromosome 17 aneuploidy (P<0.05). A higher aneuploidy rate contributed to increased expression levels of Topo II-? protein. Aberrant Topo II-? expression and chromosome 17 aneuploidy contributed to the development and progression of laryngeal cancer, indicating that targeting Topo II-? may provide a treatment strategy for patients with laryngeal cancer. PMID:25202370

  1. Accurate Lifetimes and Absolute Transition Rates for Ultraviolet Transitions from 3D5(4G) 4P and 3D5(4P) 4P levels in MN II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Rainer; Schnabel, Roman; Griesmann, Ulf

    2001-05-01

    A recently developed, laser-induced fluorescence technique was used to measure the lifetimes of 14 3d5(4G)4p and 3d5(4P)4p levels in the Mn+ ion. Branching fractions for electric dipole transitions from these levels were measured with a vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer, using a hollow-cathode lamp and a Penning discharge source. Based on these new measurements, absolute electric dipole transition rates for about 170 spectral lines in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet were determined. The uncertainty of the transition rates is less than 5% for the strong transitions.

  2. Role of Asymmetric Dimethylarginine in Inflammatory Reactions by Angiotensin II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mei-Fang Chen; Xiu-Mei Xie; Tian-Lun Yang; Yong-Jin Wang; Xiao-Hong Zhang; Bai-Lin Luo; Yuan-Jian Li

    2007-01-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that angiotensin (Ang) II induces inflammatory reactions and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous NOS inhibitor, might be a novel inflammatory factor. Endothelial cell activation was induced by incubation with Ang II or ADMA. Incubation with Ang II (10–6M) for 24 h elevated the levels of ADMA and decreased the levels of nitrite\\/nitrate concomitantly with a significant

  3. Life Functions and Cells: Level II, Unit 7, Lesson 1; Cell Structure: Lesson 2; Tissues, Organs, Systems: Lesson 3; Growth and Nutrition: Lesson 4; Metabolism: Lesson 5. Advanced General Education Program. A High School Self-Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for high-school level contains lessons on: Life Functions and Cells; Cell Structure; Tissues, Organs, Systems; Growth and Nutrition; and Metabolism. Each of the lessons concludes with a Mastery Test to be completed by the student. (DB)

  4. Preferential Elevation of Protein Kinase C Isoform betaII and Diacylglycerol Levels in the Aorta and Heart of Diabetic Rats: Differential Reversibility to Glycemic Control by Islet Cell Transplantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toyoshi Inoguchi; Ruggero Battan; Eugene Handler; J. Richard Sportsman; William Heath; George L. King

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we have measured protein kinase C (PKC) specific activities and total diacylglycerol (DAG) level in the aorta and heart of rats, which showed that after 2 weeks of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, membranous PKC specific activity and total DAG content were increased significantly by 88% and 40% in the aorta and by 21% and 72% in the

  5. Effects of enzyme-replacement therapy in patients with Anderson–Fabry disease: a prospective long-term cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Imbriaco; A Pisani; L Spinelli; A Cuocolo; G Messalli; E Capuano; M Marmo; R Liuzzi; B Visciano; B Cianciaruso; M Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    Background:Anderson–Fabry disease is a multisystem X linked disorder of lipid metabolism frequently associated with cardiac symptoms, including left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy gradually impairing cardiac function. Evidence showing that enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) can be effective in reducing LV hypertrophy and improving myocardial function in the long term is limited.Objective:This study aimed to assess the long-term effects of ERT with recombinant ?-galactosidase

  6. Guest Expert August 2011: Karen Anderson—How Do You Keep Participants on Long Term Follow-Up? | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Please welcome our guest expert for August, Karen Anderson of Cancer Research And Biostatistics. Karen worked as a Retention Manager on the Carotene and Retinol (vitamin A) Efficacy Trial (CARET) at the Coordinating Center for 12 years. CARET, a lung cancer prevention trial, had six study sites that recruited over 18,000 male and female adult participants who were either heavy smokers or had asbestos exposure.

  7. Specific Heat and Magnetisation of Impurity Anderson Model with Non-Kramers Doublet Lowest State Subject to the Tetragonal Crystalline Electric Field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yukihiro Shimizu; Alex Hewson; Osamu Sakai

    1999-01-01

    The specific heat and the magnetisation of an impurity Anderson model,which has a non-Kramers doublet lowest state of an f 2 configurationsubject to the tetragonal crystalline electric field,are investigated using the numerical renormalization group method.We examine two cases where the ground states of the system arenon-Fermi-liquid (NFL) of two-channel Kondo type modeland local-Fermi-liquid (LFL), respectively.In the former case the temperature

  8. Relationship between the indices of intelligence derived from the Kuhlmann-Anderson intelligence tests for grade I and the same tests for grade IV

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Allen

    1945-01-01

    The scores of Kuhlmann-Anderson tests given to 327 pupils in the first grade and again in the fourth grade showed retest correlations of .51 for MA, .69 for IQ, and .65 for Pc. Av. (percent of average). These comparatively low relationships may be due to the fact that the first-grade battery is nonverbal, while the fourth-grade battery includes verbal material.

  9. 63. View of Klystron tube cutaway exhibit located at mezzanine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. View of Klystron tube cut-away exhibit located at mezzanine level transmitter building no. 102, directly above RF power generation systems located on first floor. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  10. 61. View of TR spiral access stair system from transmitter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. View of TR spiral access stair system from transmitter building no. 102 mezzanine level; note elevator door on right. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  11. 33. View of data converter and power supply for TR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. View of data converter and power supply for TR system in transmitter building no. 102, mezzanine level. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  12. 60. View of radome hydraulic module control center in mezzanine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. View of radome hydraulic module control center in mezzanine level in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  13. Much ado about nothing: the misestimation and overinterpretation of violent video game effects in eastern and western nations: comment on Anderson et al. (2010).

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Christopher J; Kilburn, John

    2010-03-01

    The issue of violent video game influences on youth violence and aggression remains intensely debated in the scholarly literature and among the general public. Several recent meta-analyses, examining outcome measures most closely related to serious aggressive acts, found little evidence for a relationship between violent video games and aggression or violence. In a new meta-analysis, C. A. Anderson et al. (2010) questioned these findings. However, their analysis has several methodological issues that limit the interpretability of their results. In their analysis, C. A. Anderson et al. included many studies that do not relate well to serious aggression, an apparently biased sample of unpublished studies, and a "best practices" analysis that appears unreliable and does not consider the impact of unstandardized aggression measures on the inflation of effect size estimates. They also focused on bivariate correlations rather than better controlled estimates of effects. Despite a number of methodological flaws that all appear likely to inflate effect size estimates, the final estimate of r = .15 is still indicative of only weak effects. Contrasts between the claims of C. A. Anderson et al. (2010) and real-world data on youth violence are discussed. PMID:20192554

  14. Collaborators: Paul Anderson, Kim Christensen, Simone A di Collobiano, Matt Hall,

    E-print Network

    Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    ;from reproduction probability 1 Henrik Jeldtoft Jensen Imperial College London #12;Asexual reproduction #12;Motivation: How far can a minimal model go? Input: mutation prone reproduction at level Imperial College London #12;Reproduction: Choose indiv. at random Determine occupancy at the location

  15. 2-(4-(7-Chloro-2-quinoxalinyloxyphenoxy)-propionic Acid (XK469), an Inhibitor of Topoisomerase (Topo) II, Up-Regulates Topo II and Enhances Topo II-mediated Cytotoxicity1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edith J. Mensah-Osman; Ayad M. Al-Katib; Hai-Young Wu; Nadir I. Osman; Ramzi M. Mohammad

    Topoisomerase (Topo) II has proven to be an adequate anticancer target for tumors expressing this enzyme. In this study, we elucidated the effect of 2-(4- (7-chloro-2-quinoxalinyloxyphenoxy)-propionic acid (XK469; a new Topo II inhibitor) in the modulation of Topo II levels and sensitivity to Topo II poisons. We demonstrate by Western blot analysis that indolent B- cell tumors express undetectable levels

  16. Abney Level

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A pocket instrument used in surveying which consists of a fixed sighting tube, a movable spirit level connected to a pointing arm and an arced scale graduated 0 to 90º in both directions. When correctly used, the Abney Level is an accurate surveying tool used to measure degrees, percent of grade and...

  17. Basal ACTH, Corticosterone and Corticosterone-Binding Globulin Levels over the Diurnal Cycle, and Age-Related Changes in Hippocampal Type I and Type II Corticosteroid Receptor Binding Capacity in Young and Aged, Handled and Nonhandled Rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Meaney; David H. Aitken; Shakti Sharma; Victor Viau

    1992-01-01

    Basal corticosterone (B) levels increase with age in the rat, a result of decreased negative-feedback inhibition of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity. Postnatal handling increases CNS negative-feedback sensitivity and appears to attenuate some of the changes occurring in the HPA axis in later life. In the experiments described here, we have examined basal HPA function in young (6-8 months) and old (22

  18. Variational ground state for the periodic Anderson model with an indirect hybridization. II. The Kondo-type singlet state compared with the magnetic state

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zheng Hang

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we extend our previously developed theory to consider the problems of phase stabilization and phase transition in the variational ground state of our model system. We have constructed a complex Bogoliubov transformation for the electron subsystem and found that through the electron-phonon interaction the f-f Hubbard-U term could play an important role in stabilizing the Kondo-type singlet

  19. Belle II distributing computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokovny, P.

    2015-05-01

    The next generation B factory experiment Belle II will collect huge data samples which are a challenge for the computing system. To cope with the high data volume and rate, Belle II is setting up a distributed computing system based on existing technologies and infrastructure, plus Belle II specific extensions for workflow abstraction. This paper describes the highlights of the Belle II computing and the current status. We will also present the experience of the latest MC production campaign in 2014.

  20. BEATRIX-II, phase II: Data summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1996-05-01

    The BEATRIX-II experimental program was an International Energy Agency sponsored collaborative effort between Japan, Canada, and the United States to evaluate the performance of ceramic solid breeder materials in a fast-neutron environment at high burnup levels. This report addresses the Phase II activities, which included two in situ tritium-recovery canisters: temperature-change and temperature-gradient. The temperature-change canister contained a Li{sub 2}O ring specimen that had a nearly uniform temperature profile and was capable of temperature changes between 530 and 640{degrees}C. The temperature-gradient canister contained a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebble bed operating under a thermal gradient of 440 to 1100{degrees}C. Postirradiation examination was carried out to characterize the Phase II in situ specimens and a series of nonvented capsules designed to address the compatibility of beryllium with lithium-ceramic solid-breeder materials. The results of the BEATRIX-II, Phase II, irradiation experiment provided an extensive data base on the in situ tritium-release characteristics of Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} for lithium burnups near 5%. The composition of the sweep gas was found to be a critical parameter in the recovery of tritium from both Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Tritium inventories measured confirmed that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} exhibited very low tritium retention during the Phase II irradiation. Tritium inventories in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} after Phase II tended to be larger than those found for Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in other in situ experiments, but the larger values may reflect the larger generation rates in BEATRIX-II. A series of 20 capsules was irradiated to determine the compatibility of lithium ceramics and beryllium under conditions similar to a fusion blanket. It is concluded that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} should remain leading candidates for use in a solid-breeder fusion-blanket application.

  1. How the Edwards-Anderson Model reaches its Mean-Field Limit; Simulations in d=3,...,7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Falkner, Stefan

    2012-02-01

    Extensive computations of ground state energies of the Edwards-Anderson spin glass on bond-diluted, hypercubic lattices are conducted in dimensions d=3,,. Results are presented for bond-densities exactly at the percolation threshold, p=pc, and deep within the glassy regime, p>pc, where finding ground-states becomes a hard combinatorial problem. The ``stiffness'' exponent y that controls the formation of domain wall excitations at low temperatures is determined in all dimensions. Finite-size corrections of the form 1/N^? are shown to be consistent throughout with the prediction ?=1-y/d. At p=pc, an extrapolation for d->? appears to match our mean-field results for these corrections. In the glassy phase, ? does not approach the value of 2/3 for large d predicted from simulations of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass. However, the value of ? reached at the upper critical dimension does match certain mean-field spin glass models on sparse random networks of regular degree called Bethe lattices.[4pt] [1] S. Boettcher and S. Falkner, arXiv:1110.6242;[2] S. Boettcher and E. Marchetti, PRB77, 100405 (2008);[3] S. Boettcher, PRL95, 197205 (2005).

  2. Anderson transition at 2 dimensional growth rate on antitrees and spectral theory for operators with one propagating channel

    E-print Network

    Christian Sadel

    2015-06-15

    We show that the Anderson model has a transition from localization to delocalization at exactly 2 dimensional growth rate on antitrees with normalized edge weights which are certain discrete graphs. The kinetic part has a one-dimensional structure allowing a description through transfer matrices which involve some Schur complement. For such operators we introduce the notion of having one propagating channel and extend theorems from the theory of one-dimensional Jacobi operators that relate the behavior of transfer matrices with the spectrum. These theorems are then applied to the considered model. In essence, in a certain energy region the kinetic part averages the random potentials along shells and the transfer matrices behave similar as for a one-dimensional operator with random potential of decaying variance. At $d$ dimensional growth for $d>2$ this effective decay is strong enough to obtain absolutely continuous spectrum, whereas for some uniform $d$ dimensional growth with $dspectrum in this energy region. At exactly uniform $2$ dimensional growth also some singular continuous spectrum appears, at least at small disorder. As a corollary we also obtain a change from singular spectrum ($d\\leq 2$) to absolutely continuous spectrum ($d\\geq 3)$ for random operators of the type $\\mathcal{P}_r \\Delta_d \\mathcal{P}_r+\\lambda \\mathcal{V}$ on $\\mathbb{Z}^d$, where $\\mathcal{P}_r$ is an orthogonal radial projection, $\\Delta_d$ the discrete adjacency operator (Laplacian) on $\\mathbb{Z}^d$ and $\\lambda \\mathcal{V}$ a random potential.

  3. Bose/Anderson glass and re-entrant superfluidity in strongly correlated bosons in a disordered optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscilde, Tommaso; Cirac, Ignacio

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model in presence of a random bimodal on-site chemical potential, modeling strongly correlated bosons in an optical lattice in presence of a second species of bosons randomly frozen in the minima of the optical potential [U. Gavish and Y. Castin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 020401 (2005)]. Making use of quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate both the strongly and the weakly interacting regime. In the strongly interacting case, superfluidity is found to be robust against disorder, due to effective screening of the disorder potential. Close to commensurate filling disorder is seen to promote superfluidity vs. Mott insulating behavior, leading to re-entrant superfluid order. Moreover the presence of disorder introduces a disordered Anderson-glass phase for small interparticle repulsion and a Bose-glass phase for large repulsion, separated by the superfluid phase. Clear signature of these phases are observed on realistic sizes (˜60 lattice sites) making the above scenario amenable to experimental realization.

  4. Field-controlled magnetic order with insulator-metal transitions in a periodic Anderson-like organic polymer.

    PubMed

    Ding, L J; Yao, K L; Fu, H H

    2011-01-01

    The zero- and low-temperature behaviors of a quasi-one-dimensional organic polymer proposed as a symmetrical periodic Anderson-like chain model, in which the localized f orbitals hybridize with the conduction orbitals at even sites, are investigated by means of many-body Green's function theory. In the absence of magnetic field, the ground state of the system turns out to be ferrimagnetic. The temperature-induced phase diagrams have been explored, where the competition between the Hubbard repulsion U on the localized f orbital and the hybridization strength V makes an important impact on the transition temperature. In a magnetic field, it is found that a 1/3 magnetization plateau appears and two critical fields indicating the insulator-metal transitions at zero temperature emerge, which are closely related to the energy bands. Furthermore, the single-site entanglement entropy is a good indicator of quantum phase transitions. The temperature-field-induced phase diagram has also been attained, wherein the magnetization plateau state, the gapless phase and the spin polarized state are revealed. The temperature dependence of thermodynamic quantities such as the magnetization, susceptibility and specific heat are calculated to characterize the corresponding phases. It is also found that the up-spin and down-spin hole excitations are responsible for the thermodynamic properties. PMID:21031205

  5. Dynamics of the Anderson model for dilute magnetic alloys: A quantum Monte Carlo and maximum entropy study

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, R.N.; Gubernatis, J.E.; Sivia, D.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Jarrell, M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    In this article we describe the results of a new method for calculating the dynamical properties of the Anderson model. QMC generates data about the Matsubara Green's functions in imaginary time. To obtain dynamical properties, one must analytically continue these data to real time. This is an extremely ill-posed inverse problem similar to the inversion of a Laplace transform from incomplete and noisy data. Our method is a general one, applicable to the calculation of dynamical properties from a wide variety of quantum simulations. We use Bayesian methods of statistical inference to determine the dynamical properties based on both the QMC data and any prior information we may have such as sum rules, symmetry, high frequency limits, etc. This provides a natural means of combining perturbation theory and numerical simulations in order to understand dynamical many-body problems. Specifically we use the well-established maximum entropy (ME) method for image reconstruction. We obtain the spectral density and transport coefficients over the entire range of model parameters accessible by QMC, with data having much larger statistical error than required by other proposed analytic continuation methods.

  6. Microwave conductance in random waveguides in the cross-over to Anderson localization and single-parameter scaling

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhou; Wang, Jing; Genack, Azriel Z.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of transport of electrons and classical waves in disordered systems depends upon the proximity to the Anderson localization transition between freely diffusing and localized waves. The suppression of average transport and the enhancement of relative fluctuations in conductance in one-dimensional samples with lengths greatly exceeding the localization length, , are related in the single-parameter scaling (SPS) theory of localization. However, the difficulty of producing an ensemble of statistically equivalent samples in which the electron wave function is temporally coherent has so-far precluded the experimental demonstration of SPS. Here we demonstrate SPS in random multichannel systems for the transmittance T of microwave radiation, which is the analog of the dimensionless conductance. We show that for , a single eigenvalue of the transmission matrix (TM) dominates transmission, and the distribution of the is Gaussian with a variance equal to the average of , as conjectured by SPS. For samples in the cross-over to localization, , we find a one-sided distribution for . This anomalous distribution is explained in terms of a charge model for the eigenvalues of the TM ? in which the Coulomb interaction between charges mimics the repulsion between the eigenvalues of TM. We show in the localization limit that the joint distribution of T and the effective number of transmission eigenvalues determines the probability distributions of intensity and total transmission for a single-incident channel. PMID:24516156

  7. Local and Regional Staging of Invasive Breast Cancer With Sonography: 25 Years of Practice at MD Anderson Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    At The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, we have used sonography (US) extensively for more than 2 decades to refine the local and regional staging of invasive breast cancer. Although magnetic resonance imaging is superior to all other imaging modalities in the measurement of the primary tumor and detection of additional foci of malignancy, in our experience US has shown sufficient accuracy in clinical practice to stage most invasive breast cancers. The exceptions are ill-defined tumors such as invasive lobular cancers and tumors in breasts containing extensive diffuse benign disease. An advantage of US is that multifocality or multicentricity can be confirmed via US-guided fine-needle aspiration within 15 minutes and the information shared immediately with the patient and the breast surgeon or medical oncologist. US has also proved indispensable in the evaluation of lymphatic spread because it can evaluate more nodal basins (e.g., the supraclavicular fossa and low neck) than magnetic resonance imaging can and because it can guide needle biopsy to confirm the status of any indeterminate node (including internal mammary nodes) within minutes. PMID:24309983

  8. -PTOLEMY II -HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT

    E-print Network

    -PTOLEMY II - HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT MODELING AND DESIGN IN JAVA John Davis, II Mudit Goel University of California at Berkeley http://ptolemy.eecs.berkeley.edu Memorandum UCB/ERL M99/40 Document Contents Part 1: Using Ptolemy II 1. Introduction 1-1 1.1.Modeling and Design 1-1 1.2.Architecture Design 1

  9. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 8. Impacts of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on agricultural growing seasons and crop water use efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    The researchable areas addressed relate to the possible impacts of climate change on agricultural growing seasons and crop adaptation responses on a global basis. The research activities proposed are divided into the following two main areas of investigation: anticipated climate change impacts on the physical environmental characteristics of the agricultural growing seasons and, the most probable food crop responses to the possible changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels in plant environments. The main physical environmental impacts considered are the changes in temperature, or more directly, thermal energy levels and the growing season evapotranspiration-precipitation balances. The resulting food crop, commercial forest and rangeland species response impacts addressed relate to potential geographical shifts in agricultural growing seasons as determined by the length in days of the frost free period, thermal energy changes and water balance changes. In addition, the interaction of possible changes in plant water use efficiencies during the growing season in relationship to changing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations, is also considered under the scenario of global warming due to increases in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. These proposed research investigations are followed by adaptive response evaluations.

  10. High-loop perturbative renormalization constants for Lattice QCD (II): three-loop quark currents for tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and n_f=2 Wilson fermions

    E-print Network

    Michele Brambilla; Francesco Di Renzo

    2013-10-18

    Numerical Stochastic Perturbation Theory was able to get three- (and even four-) loop results for finite Lattice QCD renormalization constants. More recently, a conceptual and technical framework has been devised to tame finite size effects, which had been reported to be significant for (logarithmically) divergent renormalization constants. In this work we present three-loop results for fermion bilinears in the Lattice QCD regularization defined by tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and n_f=2 Wilson fermions. We discuss both finite and divergent renormalization constants in the RI'-MOM scheme. Since renormalization conditions are defined in the chiral limit, our results also apply to Twisted Mass QCD, for which non-perturbative computations of the same quantities are available. We emphasize the importance of carefully accounting for both finite lattice space and finite volume effects. In our opinion the latter have in general not attracted the attention they would deserve.

  11. Characteristics of He II Proximity Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Syphers, David; Meiksin, Avery; Kriss, Gerard A.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.; Anderson, Scott F.

    2015-06-01

    The proximity profile in the spectra of z? 3 quasars, where fluxes extend blueward of the He ii Ly? wavelength 304 (1+z) Å, is one of the most important spectral features in the study of the intergalactic medium (IGM). Based on the Hubble Space Telescope spectra of 24 He ii quasars, we find that the majority of them display a proximity profile, corresponding to an ionization radius as large as 20 Mpc in the source's rest frame. In comparison with those in the H i spectra of the quasars at z ? 6, the He ii proximity effect is more prominent and is observed over a considerably longer period of reionization. The He ii proximity zone sizes decrease at higher redshifts, particularly at z\\gt 3.3. This trend is similar to that for H i, signaling an onset of He ii reionization at z? 4. For quasar SDSS1253+6817 (z = 3.48), the He ii absorption trough displays a gradual decline and serves as a good case for modeling the He ii reionization. To model such a broad profile requires a quasar radiation field whose energy distribution between 4 and 1 Rydberg is considerably harder than normally assumed. The UV continuum of this quasar is indeed exceptionally steep, and the He ii ionization level in the quasar vicinity is higher than the average level in the IGM. These results are evidence that a very hard EUV continuum from this quasar produces a large ionized zone around it. Distinct exceptions are the two brightest He ii quasars at z ? 2.8, for which no significant proximity profile is present, probably implying that they are very young.

  12. Indirect Oxidation of Co(II) in the Presence of the Marine Mn(II)-Oxidizing Bacterium Bacillus Sp. Strain SG-1

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.J.; Webb, S.M.; Bargar, J.R.; Tebo, B.M.; /Scripps Inst. Oceanography /SLAC, SSRL /Oregon Health Sci. U.

    2009-04-29

    Cobalt(II) oxidation in aquatic environments has been shown to be linked to Mn(II) oxidation, a process primarily mediated by bacteria. This work examines the oxidation of Co(II) by the spore-forming marine Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Bacillus sp. strain SG-1, which enzymatically catalyzes the formation of reactive nanoparticulate Mn(IV) oxides. Preparations of these spores were incubated with radiotracers and various amounts of Co(II) and Mn(II), and the rates of Mn(II) and Co(II) oxidation were measured. Inhibition of Mn(II) oxidation by Co(II) and inhibition of Co(II) oxidation by Mn(II) were both found to be competitive. However, from both radiotracer experiments and X-ray spectroscopic measurements, no Co(II) oxidation occurred in the complete absence of Mn(II), suggesting that the Co(II) oxidation observed in these cultures is indirect and that a previous report of enzymatic Co(II) oxidation may have been due to very low levels of contaminating Mn. Our results indicate that the mechanism by which SG-1 oxidizes Co(II) is through the production of the reactive nanoparticulate Mn oxide.

  13. FINE-STRUCTURE Fe II* EMISSION AND RESONANT Mg II EMISSION IN z {approx} 1 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kornei, Katherine A.; Shapley, Alice E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90025 (United States); Martin, Crystal L. [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Coil, Alison L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Lotz, Jennifer M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    We present a study of the prevalence, strength, and kinematics of ultraviolet Fe II and Mg II emission lines in 212 star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 selected from the DEEP2 survey. We find Fe II* emission in composite spectra assembled on the basis of different galaxy properties, indicating that Fe II* emission is common at z {approx} 1. In these composites, Fe II* emission is observed at roughly the systemic velocity. At z {approx} 1, we find that the strength of Fe II* emission is most strongly modulated by dust attenuation, and is additionally correlated with redshift, star formation rate, and [O II] equivalent width, such that systems at higher redshifts with lower dust levels, lower star formation rates, and larger [O II] equivalent widths show stronger Fe II* emission. We detect Mg II emission in at least 15% of the individual spectra and we find that objects showing stronger Mg II emission have higher specific star formation rates, smaller [O II] linewidths, larger [O II] equivalent widths, lower dust attenuations, and lower stellar masses than the sample as a whole. Mg II emission strength exhibits the strongest correlation with specific star formation rate, although we find evidence that dust attenuation and stellar mass also play roles in the regulation of Mg II emission. Future integral field unit observations of the spatial extent of Fe II* and Mg II emission in galaxies with high specific star formation rates, low dust attenuations, and low stellar masses will be important for probing the morphology of circumgalactic gas.

  14. Prevention of HIV/AIDS Education in Rural Communities II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torabi, Mohammad R., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This second special issue of the Health Education Monograph Series on HIV/AIDS Prevention in Rural Communities presents seven articles: (1) "Preventing Maternal-Infant Transmission of HIV: Social and Ethical Issues" (James G. Anderson, Marilyn M. Anderson, and Tara Booth); (2) "HIV Infection in Diverse Rural Population: Migrant Farm Workers in…

  15. 5 CFR 319.401 - Senior-level positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT IN SENIOR-LEVEL AND SCIENTIFIC AND...Examination § 319.401 Senior-level positions. (a... (i) Evidence of unequal treatment of candidates; or (ii...Publication in OPM's listing of Senior Executive Service and...

  16. Reauthorization of the Price-Anderson Act. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Nuclear Regulation of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on S. 445, S. 1225, and S. 1761, October 22 and 23, 1985, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Part I of the hearing record covers testimony on three bills (S. 445, S. 1225, and S. 1761) amending the Price-Anderson Act. Witnesses on the first day of the hearing represented the nuclear industry, waste management offices of DOE, and state governments. At issue was liability insurance for DOE civilian and defense activities involving radioactive materials and the balancing of goals with risks in the storage of high-level radioactive wastes. The amendments address the issues of liability limits and the efficient handling of victim compensation. The texts of the three bills follow the testimony of 11 witnesses and opening statements by four senators. Testimony on the second day of the hearing was by Nunzio Palladino of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, other regulators, insurers, and utility representatives.

  17. Leveling Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bautista, Nazan

    2014-01-01

    A national survey reports that 42% of mainstream teachers have English language learners (ELLs) in their classrooms, but only 12.5% say they have been prepared to work with them (National Center for Education Statistics 2002). This article supplies a framework to address the cognitive demands of ELLs with varying proficiency levels, guided by the…

  18. Determination of Pb(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Co(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry in food and water samples after preconcentration by coprecipitation with Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Tufekci, Mehmet; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Elvan, Hamide; Ozdes, Duygu; Soylak, Mustafa; Duran, Celal

    2013-02-01

    A new, simple, and rapid separation and preconcentration procedure, for determination of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions in environmental real samples, has been developed. The method is based on the combination of coprecipitation of analyte ions by the aid of the Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate-(Mo(VI)-DDTC) precipitate and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations. The effects of experimental conditions like pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of DDTC and Mo(VI), standing time, centrifugation rate and time, sample volume, etc. and also the influences of some foreign ions were investigated in detail on the quantitative recoveries of the analyte ions. The preconcentration factors were found to be 150 for Pb(II), Zn(II) and Co(II), and 200 for Cd(II) ions. The detection limits were in the range of 0.1-2.2 ?g L(-1) while the relative standard deviations were found to be lower than 5 % for the studied analyte ions. The accuracy of the method was checked by spiked/recovery tests and the analysis of certified reference material (CRM TMDW-500 Drinking Water). The procedure was successfully applied to seawater and stream water as liquid samples and baby food and dried eggplant as solid samples in order to determine the levels of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions. PMID:22527456

  19. PTOLEMY II HETEROGENEOUS

    E-print Network

    ­PTOLEMY II ­ HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT MODELING AND DESIGN IN JAVA John Davis, II Ron Galicia Mudit University of California at Berkeley http://ptolemy.eecs.berkeley.edu Document Version 0.1.1 February 12 Syntaxes 1­6 1.5. Ptolemy II 1­7 1.5.1. Package Structure 1­7 1.5.2. Overview of Key Classes 1­9 1

  20. -PTOLEMY II -HETEROGENEOUS

    E-print Network

    -PTOLEMY II - HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT MODELING AND DESIGN IN JAVA John Davis, II Ron Galicia Mudit University of California at Berkeley http://ptolemy.eecs.berkeley.edu Document Version 0.1.1 February 12.2.8. Timed CSP and Timed PN 1-5 1.3.Choosing Models of Computation 1-6 1.4.Visual Syntaxes 1-6 1.5.Ptolemy II