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1

Bound states in the continuum in a single-level Fano-Anderson model  

E-print Network

Bound states in the continuum (BIC) are shown to exist in a single-level Fano-Anderson model with a colored interaction between the discrete state and a tight-binding continuum, which may describe mesoscopic electron or photon transport in a semi-infinite one-dimensional lattice. The existence of BIC is explained in the lattice realization as a boundary effect induced by lattice truncation.

Stefano Longhi

2006-12-18

2

Helium II level measurement techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a survey of cryogenic liquid level measurement techniques applicable to superfluid helium (He II) is given. The survey includes both continuous and discrete measurement techniques. A number of different probes and controlling circuits for this purpose have been described in the literature. They fall into one of the following categories: capacitive liquid level gauges, superconducting wire liquid

D Celik; D. K Hilton; T Zhang; S. W Van Sciver

2001-01-01

3

Biosafety Level II Biosafety Level 2  

E-print Network

Laboratory Facilities (Secondary Barriers) n BSL-1 Facilities PLUS: n Autoclave available n Eyewash station 2 Standard Microbiological Practices 2.4 #12;Biosafety Level 2 Safety Equipment (Primary Barriers) n

Collins, Gary S.

4

Timed Common Lisp: Scott D. Anderson  

E-print Network

Timed Common Lisp: Scott D. Anderson Spelman College Atlanta, GA anderson©auc, edu The Duration among AI simu- lators for reai-time planning [1]. Unfortunately, there are problems with using CPU time the increments are determined. 2.1 Low-level Models A "low-level" primitive is a primitive of the Common Lisp

5

Leona Anderson Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Leona Anderson conducted by Rachel Gadd-Nelson in Burdick, Kansas, on September 18, 2009. In this interview, Leona Anderson discusses her experiences as a member of the Missouri Synod Lutheran Church in Lattimer, Kansas...

Anderson, Leona; Gadd-Nelson, Rachel

2009-09-18

6

The Anderson Quin Cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since

J. H. Anderson; W. M. Bilbow

1993-01-01

7

Interaction of Level I and Level II Abilities With Race and Socioeconomic Status.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The two-level theory of mental abilities posits two broad classes of ability: level I (learning and memory) and level II (the "g" factor of intelligence tests, reasoning, abstraction, and problem solving). Levels I and II are hypothesized to interact with SES and/or race such that: (l) SES differences are greater for level II than for I, and (2)…

Jensen, Arthur R.

8

55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with eighty-eight 1-1/2" diameter copper ion return RF balance tube systems. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

9

Electron transitions on deep Dirac levels II  

SciTech Connect

It has been suggested that both the relativistic Schroedinger and Dirac equations allow the existence of so-called {open_quotes}deep Dirac levels{close_quotes} (DDL) in all atoms of the periodic table. An estimate of the size of the DDL atoms is given, and a physics explanation is proposed for exciting the DDL transitions. Possible secondary nuclear reactions of the atoms on the DDLs are suggested, and preliminary experimental results are presented. A search has begun for some direct experimental evidence supporting the proposed DDL model. So far, in electrolytic experiments, only calorimetric evidence was found. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Maly, J.A. [Applied Science Consultants, San Jose, CA (United States); Vavra, J. [Applied Science Consultants, Los Altos, CA (United States)

1995-01-01

10

Universality and the QCD Anderson transition.  

PubMed

We study the Anderson-type transition previously found in the spectrum of the QCD quark Dirac operator in the high-temperature, quark-gluon plasma phase. Using finite size scaling for the unfolded level spacing distribution, we show that in the thermodynamic limit there is a genuine mobility edge, where the spectral statistics changes from Poisson to Wigner-Dyson statistics in a nonanalytic way. We determine the correlation length critical exponent ? and find that it is compatible with that of the unitary Anderson model. PMID:24679282

Giordano, Matteo; Kovács, Tamás G; Pittler, Ferenc

2014-03-14

11

Anderson Localization in Atoms  

E-print Network

A statistical analysis of the ionization yield of one-dimensional, periodically driven hydrogen Rydberg states is provided. We find excellent agreement with predictions for the conductance across an Anderson-localized, quasi one-dimensional, disordered wire, in the semiclassical limit of highly excited atomic initial states.

Sandro Wimberger; Andreas Buchleitner

2002-11-12

12

The Anderson Transition  

Microsoft Academic Search

An outline is given of the electrical properties expected in a disordered solid or fluid which shows a metal-insulator transition of Anderson type. This is one in which the Fermi energy of the electrons passes through a mobility edge separating extended states from states localized by disorder, as the composition or some other parameter is changed. Some of the experimental

Nevill Mott; M. Pepper; S. Pollitt; R. H. Wallis; C. J. Adkins

1975-01-01

13

PUBLICATIONS GREG W. ANDERSON  

E-print Network

PUBLICATIONS GREG W. ANDERSON Books An introduction to random matrices, Cambridge studies University Press 2011 (ISBN 978-0-19-957400-1) Articles in refereed journals (1) Logarithmic derivatives 311 (S´erie I, 1990)469­472. (16) A short proof of Selberg's generalized beta formula. Forum Math. 3

Anderson, Greg W.

14

The Anderson Quin Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

1993-03-18

15

Anderson Localization of Solitons  

SciTech Connect

At low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with an attractive interaction forms a bright soliton. When exposed to a weak and smooth external potential, the shape of the soliton is hardly modified, but its center-of-mass motion is affected. We show that in a spatially correlated disordered potential, the quantum motion of a bright soliton displays Anderson localization. The localization length can be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub [Instytut Fizyki imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego and Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Center, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, UPMC, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Mueller, Cord A. [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, UPMC, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, UPMC, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

2009-11-20

16

Level II Inspection User Guide Respond to Assigned Findings  

E-print Network

assigned directly to them as a result of an environment, health and safety management system Level II that prevents potential contamination of the house vacuum system Rooms: 13-5037 Please correct this finding. -------------------------------------------------- https://insidemit-apps-test.mit.edu/apps/inspection/pr.jsp?key=5838&r3=SF5 If you have any questions

Entekhabi, Dara

17

Home Economics. Sample Test Items. Levels I and II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A sample of behavioral objectives and related test items that could be developed for content modules in Home Economics levels I and II, this book is intended to enable teachers to construct more valid and reliable test materials. Forty-eight one-page modules are presented, and opposite each module are listed two to seven specific behavioral…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Educational Testing.

18

52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch with open port door in radar scanner building 105 showing emanating waveguides from lower switch in vertical run; photograph also shows catwalk to upper scanner switch in upper left side of photograph and structural supports. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

19

54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch at open port door. Note incoming waveguide and control switch at lower left of photograph and note several waveguides leaving top of scanner switch around the circumference of switch. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

20

31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing various electronic central indicator panel to control building air conditioning, steam pressure, supply temperature, discharge temperature, supply pressure, transformer vault status, and radome conditioning system. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

21

Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

1988-01-01

22

Transcript levels and synthesis of photosystem II components in cyanobacterial mutants with inactivated photosystem II genes  

SciTech Connect

After interruption or deletion of the photosystem II genes psbB, psbC, and psbD in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, thylakoids from such mutants were found to be depleted in a number of photosystem II proteins in addition to those for which the gene(s) had been inactivated. Transcript levels of photosystem II genes were measured and protein pulse-labeling was carried out to determine the reason for this effect. Transcripts of all photosystem II genes except the inactivated one(s) were found to be present in the various mutants. In certain cases, inactivation of one photosystem II gene led to overexpression of another. Protein pulse-labeling experiments using {sup 35}S-methionine, in which not only the rapidly turing over D1 protein but also D2, CP43, and CP47 appear to be preferentially labeled, showed that the mutants studied synthesize the D1 protein as well as other photosystem II proteins whose genes were not inactivated. The fact that, in the various mutants, photosystem II proteins for which the gene is not inactivated are synthesized but do not accumulate in the thylakoid indicates that the psbB, psbC, and psbD gene products are all required for a stable assembly of the photosystem II complex.

Jiujiang Yu; Vermaas, W.F.J. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (United States))

1990-04-01

23

The Internal Validation of Level II and Level III Respiratory Therapy Examinations. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This project began with the delineation of the roles and functions of respiratory therapy personnel by the American Association for Respiratory Therapy. In Phase II, The Psychological Corporation used this delineation to develop six proficiency examinations, three at each of two levels. One exam at each level was designated for the purpose of the…

Jouett, Michael L.

24

Entanglement in Anderson Nanoclusters  

E-print Network

We investigate the two-particle spin entanglement in magnetic nanoclusters described by the periodic Anderson model. An entanglement phase diagram is obtained, providing a novel perspective on a central property of magnetic nanoclusters, namely the temperature dependent competition between local Kondo screening and nonlocal Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida spin ordering. We find that multiparticle entangled states are present for finite magnetic field as well as in the mixed valence regime and away from half filling. Our results emphasize the role of charge fluctuations.

Peter Samuelsson; Claudio Verdozzi

2006-07-28

25

Entanglement in Anderson Nanoclusters  

E-print Network

We investigate the two-particle spin entanglement in magnetic nanoclusters described by the periodic Anderson model. An entanglement phase diagram is obtained, providing a novel perspective on a central property of magnetic nanoclusters, namely the temperature dependent competition between local Kondo screening and nonlocal Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida spin ordering. We find that multiparticle entangled states are present for finite magnetic field as well as in the mixed valence regime and away from half filling. Our results emphasize the role of charge fluctuations.

Samuelsson, Peter

2007-01-01

26

CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD (II) LEVELS AND LEAD (II) NEUROTOXICITY?  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafl...

27

Regulation of angiotensin II receptors levels during rat induced pulpitis.  

PubMed

A change in the microcirculatory hemodynamic is one of the most important events in inflammation. In the dental pulp, which is a connective tissue surrounded by a mineralized dentine substrate, disturbance in the blood flow as well as plasma extravasation may increase the pulp pressure and cause local ischemia. The octapeptide angiotensin II (AngII) regulates vascular tone and stimulates the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by acting through the AT1 and AT2 receptors. The AT1 receptor is responsible for the classical effects of AngII. The AT2 receptor is involved in other effects, such as vasodilation. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the role of AT1 and AT2 receptors on the pulpal inflammation. The pulp tissue was mechanically exposed and after different periods the teeth were extracted and submitted to histopathological and RT-PCR analyses. The histological sections showed a number of congested and dilated blood vessels associated with a notable presence of inflammatory cells. RT-PCR data revealed that the AT1 receptor was down-regulated at 24 h after the pulp exposure. The AT2 receptor expression was up-regulated by a 9-hour period, and then decreased between 12- and 24-hour periods. It was demonstrated that the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the pulpal inflammation, with regulation of AngII receptor levels. PMID:17197045

Souza, Pedro P C; Fukada, Sandra Y; Cunha, Fernando Q; Costa, Carlos A S; Costa-Neto, Claudio M

2007-04-01

28

Stream Classification Level IIStream Classification Level II & Departure Analysis& Departure Analysis  

E-print Network

Level IILevel II #12;Does stream type matter?Does stream type matter? If your interested in hydraulic geometry it doesIf your interested in hydraulic geometry it does #12;Age: DavisAge: Davis''s Observations has been manipulated by entities such asmanipulated by entities such as county road departments

29

Concurrent RealTime Music in C++ David P. Anderson yz  

E-print Network

. Layer three provides pitches, scales, notes, rhythm specification, and higher­level musical abstractions pitches, notes, scales, rhythms, and higher­level musical abstractions. Figure 1 shows the MOOD classConcurrent Real­Time Music in C++ David P. Anderson yz !anderson@snow.berkeley.edu? Jeff Bilmes y

Bilmes, Jeff

30

The Anderson Quin Cycle. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since

J. H. Anderson; W. M. Bilbow

1993-01-01

31

The Level-3 Trigger at the CDF Experiment at Tevatron Run II  

E-print Network

-- We describe the filtering and analysis software run- ning in the CDF Run II Level-3 trigger as wellThe Level-3 Trigger at the CDF Experiment at Tevatron Run II Y.S. Chung1, G. De Lentdecker1, S acquisition system of the CDF detector. The Level-3 trigger is responsible for reconstructing the events

Fermilab

32

New levels of Ta II with energies higher than 72,000 cm-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We studied the hyperfine structure of Tantalum lines appearing in a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrum. Hundreds of lines of Ta in this spectrum are still unclassified; most of them, especially in the UV region, belong to Ta II. When investigating such lines we found 14 new levels of Ta II. These new levels are the highest-lying known Ta II levels and do not belong to the already known configurations.

Uddin, Zaheer; Windholz, Laurentius

2014-12-01

33

JESSICA ANDERSON MAISANO February 2008  

E-print Network

JESSICA ANDERSON MAISANO February 2008 Current Position Research Engineer/Scientist Associate III, High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography Facility, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University@mail.utexas.edu Previous Positions 2004-2005 Research Associate, High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography Facility

Yang, Zong-Liang

34

KOAN\\/ANAGRAM II: new tools for device-level analog placement and routing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors describe KOAN and ANAGRAM II, new tools for device-level analog placement and routing. Analog layout tools that merely apply known digital macrocell techniques fall short of achieving the density and performance of handcrafted analog cells. KOAN and ANAGRAM II differ from previous approaches by using general algorithmic techniques to find critical device-level layout optimizations rather than relying on

John M. Cohn; David J. Garrod; Rob A. Rutenbar; L. Richard Carley

1991-01-01

35

America's First Illustrator: Alexander Anderson  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

America has produced many notable wood engravers, but Alexander Anderson is one of the first to have name recognition. Born in 1775, he spent his lifetime crafting illustrations for books, periodicals, newspapers, and other commercial ephemera. This delightful digital collection from the New York Public Library brings together sixteen scrapbooks containing almost 10,000 wood engravings by Anderson. Visitors can click on the "Browse Source Titles" area to view the various volumes, and the subjects covered here are quite diverse. Even a cursory search returns dozens of cat engravings, illustrations of slaves, and lottery advertisements. For anyone with an interest in 19th century material culture, this collection is truly wonderful. It is worth making several return trips to get a full sense of the offerings here, and it is one that will bring new rewards upon each visit.

36

MD Anderson study explains high platelets in ovarian cancer patients; survival reduced  

Cancer.gov

Highly elevated platelet levels fuel tumor growth and reduce the survival of ovarian cancer patients, an international team of researchers led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer center reports in the New England Journal of Medicine.

37

Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that

Frances Szrom; Gerald A. Falo; Gordon M. Lodde; MaryAnn Parkhurst; Eric G. Daxon

2009-01-01

38

Marked decrease in serum pepsinogen II levels resulting from endoscopic resection of a large duodenal tumor.  

PubMed

Studies have indicated that serum pepsinogen (PG) levels are not only markers for chronic atrophic gastritis but also predictive risk factors for gastric cancer. However, serum PG levels can change because of pathological conditions other than gastritis. We report the first case in which abnormally high serum PG II levels (168.8 ng/mL) led to the discovery of a large tumor covering a wide area in the duodenum, and after resection of the tumor, the serum PG II levels markedly decreased. Because endoscopic and histopathological examinations showed no indications of atrophic changes, inflammation of the gastric mucosa, or Helicobacter pylori infection, the serum PG II levels eventually returned to normal (10.1 ng/mL). The preoperative abnormally high PG II levels were probably caused by the large duodenal tumor that prevented PG II (which is produced by the duodenal Brunner's glands) from being secreted into the lumen, a condition that increased the amount transferred to the bloodstream. No previous reports have investigated serum PG II levels before and after resection of a large duodenal tumor. We believe this case provides valuable insight regarding the dynamics of PG II in the body and has important diagnostic implications. PMID:25376543

Yada, Tomoyuki; Ito, Koichi; Suzuki, Keigo; Okubo, Koki; Aoki, Yoichiro; Akazawa, Naoki; Koizuka, Hitohiko; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Uemura, Naomi

2014-12-01

39

Quality assurance plan for the High Level Controller for the CBMS Block II  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document establishes the software Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the High Level Controller for the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II (HLC\\/CBMS-II) project activities under the Computing, Robotics, and Education (CRE) Directorate management. It defines the requirements and assigns responsibilities for ensuring, with a high degree of confidence, that project objectives will be achieved as planned. The CBMS

R. W. Reid; I. F. Robbins; K. A. Stewart; C. L. Terry; R. A. Whitaker; D. A. Wolf; J. C. Zager

1997-01-01

40

Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data  

SciTech Connect

Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

2009-03-01

41

Inhalation and ingestion intakes with associated dose estimates for level II and level III personnel using Capstone study data.  

PubMed

Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone DU Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe-tests samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large-caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h(-1) based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h(-1) based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h(-1) to 38.9 mg h(-1) based on the wipe-tests data including surface-to-glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h(-1) and 1.78 mg h(-1), respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures. PMID:19204492

Szrom, Frances; Falo, Gerald A; Lodde, Gordon M; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Daxon, Eric G

2009-03-01

42

Factorial validity and measurement invariance across intelligence levels and gender of the Overexcitabilities Questionnaire-II (OEQ-II).  

PubMed

The concept of overexcitability, derived from Dabrowski's theory of personality development, offers a promising approach for the study of the developmental dynamics of giftedness. The present study aimed at (a) examining the factorial structure of the Overexcitabilities Questionnaire-II scores (OEQ-II) and (b) testing measurement invariance of these scores across intelligence and gender. A sample of 641 Dutch-speaking adolescents from 11 to 15 years old, 363 girls and 278 boys, participated in this study. Results showed that a model without cross-loadings did not fit the data well (using confirmatory factor analysis), whereas a factor model in which all cross-loadings were included yielded fit statistics that were in support of the factorial structure of the OEQ-II scores (using exploratory structural equation modeling). Furthermore, our findings supported the assumption of (partial) strict measurement invariance of the OEQ-II scores across intelligence levels and across gender. Such levels of measurement invariance allow valid comparisons between factor means and factor relationships across groups. In particular, the gifted group scored significantly higher on intellectual and sensual overexcitability (OE) than the nongifted group, girls scored higher on emotional and sensual OE than boys, and boys scored higher on intellectual and psychomotor OE than girls. PMID:24079958

Van den Broeck, Wim; Hofmans, Joeri; Cooremans, Sven; Staels, Eva

2014-03-01

43

System-Level Design: A Missing Link? Durward K. Sobek, II  

E-print Network

, if designers (expert or otherwise) produce design solutions without ever really spending much time on system is also true. Our problem is compounded in that the real power of system-level design may manifest 1 System-Level Design: A Missing Link? Durward K. Sobek, II Department of Mechanical and Industrial

Sobek II, Durward K.

44

The Heritability of Jensen's Level I and II and Divergent Thinking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research has demonstrated that first, short term memory (Jensen's Level I) has only a moderate index of heritability; second, that the general intellective factor g' (Jensen's Level II) has somewhat high heritability; and third, that no evidence of hereditary variation appeared in the Figural and Verbal Divergent Thinking measures.…

Pezzullo, Thomas R.; And Others

1972-01-01

45

The Heritability of Jensen's Level I and II and Divergent Thinking.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Heritability is defined as the proportion of a manifested trait's varience that is due to genetic variation. Sixty-five pairs of twins were employed to investigate the heritability of: (1) short term memory (Jensen's Level 1), operationalized using of modified "digit span" test; (2) the general intellective factor (Jensen's Level II),…

Pezzullo, Thomas R.; And Others

46

Interview with Philip W. Anderson  

SciTech Connect

Phil Anderson, Professor of Physics at Princeton University, has devoted his career to research in theoretical physics. He is a member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a foreign member of the Royal Society, and a foreign associate of the Accademia Lincei in Rome. The Americal Physical Society awarded him the Oliver E. Buckley Solid State Physics Prize in 1964. In 1977 he won the Nobel Prize in Physics with J.H. van Vleck and N.F. Mott. His work has encompassed a broad range of subjects: quantum theory of condensed matter, broken symmetry, transport theory and localization, random statistical systems, spectral line broadening, superfluidity in helium and neutron stars, magnetism, and superconductivity. His avocations include ''hiking, the game of GO, Romanesque architecture, and the human condition.'' In this interview he explains his RVB theory of the oxide superconductors and its historical context.

Anderson, P.W.

1988-08-01

47

Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases.  

PubMed

Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Salivary melatonin concentration decreased in type II diabetic patients and periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis. PMID:25346835

Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

2014-01-01

48

Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases  

PubMed Central

Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Salivary melatonin concentration decreased in type II diabetic patients and periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis. PMID:25346835

Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

2014-01-01

49

Scaling properties near the Anderson transition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present detailed results of analytical and numerical investigations of the Anderson metal-insulator (MI) transition based on a supersymmetric nonlinear ? model in the effective-medium approximation. We show that in the critical metallic regime the density-of-states correlation function has two characteristic length scales ? and ? which diverge according to a power law but have different critical exponents. Moreover, we derive that the level broadening depends exponentially on the shorter length ? and put forward a physical interpretation that enables us to express the diffusion coefficient in terms of these two lengths. We argue that in the vicinity of the MI transition the properties of the system are determined by the correlation length ?, which is related to the typical size of classically forbidden regions, and the phase-coherence length, which sets the scale for self-averaging of the density-of-states correlator. Relating the level broadening due to tunneling along a distance ? and the Thouless length, we reproduce earlier results on the critical exponential behavior of the diffusion coefficient.

Efetov, K. B.; Viehweger, O.

1992-05-01

50

Universal Fluctuations in Spectra of Disordered Systems at the Anderson Transition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the level-spacing distribution and the total probability function of the numbers of levels in a given energy interval we analyze the crossover of the level statistics between the delocalized and the localized regimes. By numerically calculating the electron spectra of systems of up to 323 lattice sites described by the Anderson Hamiltonian it is shown that the distribution P(s)

Isa Zharekeshev; Bernhard Kramer

1995-01-01

51

Posttranslational modifications in the CP43 subunit of photosystem II  

E-print Network

Posttranslational modifications in the CP43 subunit of photosystem II Lorraine B. Anderson 1, 2002 (received for review May 27, 2002) Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light collision-induced dissociation tryptophan kynurenine photoinhibition Photosystem II (PSII) is a protein

Ouellette, Anthony J. A.

52

Algebra II: Gatekeeper Course--An Examination of CST Proficiency Levels in California and the Bay Area  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the Algebra II course and California Star Test (CST) proficiency levels in the San Francisco Bay Area and in the State of California. CST proficiency levels are examined by grade level for the State and nine counties of the San Francisco Bay Area region. Algebra II is shown to be one of the more complicated courses in the CSU…

Hailer-O'Keefe, Laurie

2012-01-01

53

Spectrofluorimetric determination of picogram level Pb(II) using a dimercaptothiadiazole fluorophore.  

PubMed

This paper describes the spectrofluorimetric determination of picogram level Pb(II) using 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (DMT) as a fluorophore. Excitation of DMT at 330 nm shows an emission maximum at 435 nm. The colorless solution of DMT changes into highly emittive yellow color immediately after the addition of 0.5 ?M Pb(II) and nearly 245-fold increase in emission intensity at 435 nm was observed. These changes were attributed to the complex formation between Pb(II). The emission intensity linearly increases in the concentration range of 10-100 nM Pb(II) and DMT. Based on the fluorescence enhancement, the concentration of Pb(II) was determined. Interestingly, the emission intensity was increased even in the presence of 0.1 pM Pb(II). The fluorophore showed an extreme selectivity towards 100 nM Pb(II) even in the presence of 50,000-fold higher concentrations of common metal ions interferences such as Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Cd(2+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+) and 5000-, 100- and 40-fold of Cu(2+), Hg(2+) and Ag(+) ions, respectively. The lowest detection of 20 pg L(-1) Pb(II) was achieved for the first time using DMT. The proposed method was successfully utilized for the determination of Pb(II) in tap water, polluted river water and industrial waste water samples. The results obtained in the present study were validated with both AAS and ICP-AES methods. PMID:21831701

Vasimalai, N; John, S Abraham

2011-11-01

54

Spectrofluorimetric determination of picogram level Pb(II) using a dimercaptothiadiazole fluorophore  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the spectrofluorimetric determination of picogram level Pb(II) using 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (DMT) as a fluorophore. Excitation of DMT at 330 nm shows an emission maximum at 435 nm. The colorless solution of DMT changes into highly emittive yellow color immediately after the addition of 0.5 ?M Pb(II) and nearly 245-fold increase in emission intensity at 435 nm was observed. These changes were attributed to the complex formation between Pb(II). The emission intensity linearly increases in the concentration range of 10-100 nM Pb(II) and DMT. Based on the fluorescence enhancement, the concentration of Pb(II) was determined. Interestingly, the emission intensity was increased even in the presence of 0.1 pM Pb(II). The fluorophore showed an extreme selectivity towards 100 nM Pb(II) even in the presence of 50,000-fold higher concentrations of common metal ions interferences such as Na +, K +, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Fe 2+, Cd 2+, Cr 3+, Mn 2+, Zn 2+, Co 2+, Ni 2+ and 5000-, 100- and 40-fold of Cu 2+, Hg 2+ and Ag + ions, respectively. The lowest detection of 20 pg L -1 Pb(II) was achieved for the first time using DMT. The proposed method was successfully utilized for the determination of Pb(II) in tap water, polluted river water and industrial waste water samples. The results obtained in the present study were validated with both AAS and ICP-AES methods.

Vasimalai, N.; John, S. Abraham

2011-11-01

55

Thermalization processes in interacting Anderson insulators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes experiments utilizing a unique property of electron glasses to gain information on the fundamental nature of the interacting Anderson-localized phase. The methodology is based on measuring the energy absorbed by the electronic system from alternating electromagnetic fields as a function of their frequency. Experiments on three-dimensional (3D) amorphous indium-oxide films suggest that, in the strongly localized regime, the energy spectrum is discrete and inelastic electron-electron events are strongly suppressed. These results imply that, at low temperatures, electron thermalization and finite conductivity depend on coupling to the phonon bath. The situation is different for samples nearing the metal-insulator transition; in insulating samples that are close to the mobility edge, energy absorption persists to much higher frequencies. Comparing these results with previously studied 2D samples [Ovadyahu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 156602 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.156602] demonstrates that the mean-level spacing (on a single-particle basis) is not the only relevant scale in this problem. The possibility of delocalization by many-body effects and the relevance of a nearby mobility edge (which may be a many-body edge) are discussed.

Ovadyahu, Z.

2015-01-01

56

Interactive Journaling as a Brief Intervention for Level-II DUI and DWI Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study sought to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a brief alcohol intervention in increasing basic alcohol-related knowledge, and the intention to change high-risk drinking behaviors, among a sample of DUI and DWI offenders. Pre- and post-test data, in addition to program evaluation data, from 872 Level-II DUI and DWI offenders…

Scheck, Amy Mary; Hoffmann, Norman G.; Proctor, Steven L.; Couillou,Ryan J.

2013-01-01

57

Guide for the Training and Qualification of Welding Personnel. Level II - Advanced Welders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is designed to help education and training facilities develop and administer competency-based training programs to qualify and certify trainees in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) requirements for level II (advanced) welders. Presented first are the scope, objectives, and requirements of the AWS…

American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

58

Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 2: Locating clouds tops  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comparison is made of the vertical distribution of high-level cloud tops derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements and from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for all Julys and Januarys in 1985 to 1990. The results suggest that ISCCP overestimates the pressure of high-level clouds by up to 50-150 mbar, particularly at low latitudes. This is caused by the frequent presence of clouds with diffuse tops (greater than 50% time when cloudy events are observed). The averaged vertical extent of the diffuse top is about 1.5 km. At midlatitudes where the SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressure agree best, clouds with distinct tops reach a maximum relative proportion of the total level cloud amount (about 30-40%), and diffuse-topped clouds are reduced to their minimum (30-40%). The ISCCP-defined cloud top pressure should be regarded not as the material physical height of the clouds but as the level which emits the same infrared radiance as observed. SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressures agree for clouds with distinct tops. There is also an indication that the cloud top pressures of optically thin clouds not overlying thicker clouds are poorly estimated by ISCCP at middle latitudes. The average vertical extent of these thin clouds is about 2.5 km.

Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

1995-01-01

59

Level II scour analysis for bridge 42 (BAKETH00060042) on Town Highway 6, crossing The Branch, Bakersfield, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BAKETH00060042 on Town Highway 6 crossing The Branch, Bakersfield, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

1998-01-01

60

Nitrogen deprivation strongly aects Photosystem II but not phycoerythrin level in the divinyl-chlorophyll b-containing  

E-print Network

Nitrogen deprivation strongly a¡ects Photosystem II but not phycoerythrin level in the divinyl on Photosystem II (PSII) activities and on phycoerythrin were studied in batch cultures of the marine £uorescence yield; FV, variable £uorescence; FV/FM, yield of Photosystem II photochemistry; FRRf, fast

Claustre, Hervé

61

Arsenic trioxide exposure to ovarian carcinoma cells leads to decreased level of topoisomerase II and cytotoxicity.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) on topoisomerase II levels using western blotting method on MDAH 2774 ovarian carcinoma cell culture. Experimental designs were established to determine the cytotoxic effects of As(2)O(3) on MDAH 2774 cells and the IC50 (fatal dose for the 50% of cells) value. Cytotoxicity experiments were carried out using various concentrations of As(2)O(3). The 2,3-bis[2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) and trypan blue dye-exclusion tests were used to evaluate cytotoxicity. Topoisomerase II expressions were investigated using western blotting method with various concentrations of As(2)O(3). Densitometric analysis of topoisomerase 2 bands was carried out using Quantity One 1-D analysis software (Bio-Rad USA, Life Science Research, Hercules, CA). IC50 value of As(2)O(3) was found to be 5 x 10(-6) M for MDAH 2774 cells. When the bands were evaluated, it was observed that there was a decrease in topoisomerase II levels in MDAH 2774 cells with increasing concentrations of As(2)O(3). It was also observed by the densitometric analysis that topoisomerase II expression ratios of MDAH 2774 cells were decreased by approximately 50% at this concentration. Topoisomerase II levels were significantly decreased with the increasing concentrations of As(2)O(3). Inhibition of topoisomerase II enzyme was one of the antiproliferative influence mechanisms of As(2)O(3). PMID:16884364

Askar, N; Cirpan, T; Toprak, E; Karabulut, B; Selvi, N; Terek, M C; Uslu, R; Sanli, U A; Goker, E

2006-01-01

62

Concurrent Real-Time Music in C++ David P. Anderson yz  

E-print Network

provides pitches, scales, notes, rhythm speci cation, and higher-level musical abstractions. MOOD derives pitches, notes, scales, rhythms, and higher-level musical abstractions. Figure 1 shows the MOOD classConcurrent Real-Time Music in C++ David P. Anderson yz Je Bilmesy

Bilmes, Jeff

63

Anderson localization in QCD-like theories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review the present status of the Anderson transition in the spectrum of the Dirac operator of QCD-like theories on the lattice. Localized modes at the low end of the spectrum have been found in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with overlap and staggered valence fermions as well as in Nf = 2+1 QCD with staggered quarks. We draw an analogy between the transition from localized to delocalized modes in the Dirac spectrum and the Anderson transition in electronic systems. The QCD transition turns out to be in the same universality class as the transition in the corresponding Anderson model. We also speculate on the possible physical relevance of this transition to QCD at high temperature and the possible finite temperature phase transition in QCD-like models with different fermion contents.

Giordano, Matteo; Kovács, Tamás G.; Pittler, Ferenc

2014-10-01

64

Serum uric acid level, blood pressure, and vascular angiotensin II responsiveness in healthy men and women.  

PubMed

Uric acid is associated with hypertension and increased renin-angiotensin system activity, although this relationship diminishes after chronic exposure to high levels. Uric acid is more strongly associated with poor outcomes in women compared to men, although whether this is due to a sex-specific uric acid-mediated pathophysiology or reflects sex differences in baseline uric acid levels remains unknown. We examined the association between uric acid and vascular measures at baseline and in response to angiotensin-II challenge in young healthy humans. Fifty-two subjects (17 men, 35 premenopausal women) were studied in high-salt balance. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in men compared to women (328 ± 14 ?mol/L vs. 248 ± 10 ?mol/L, P < 0.001), although all values were within normal sex-specific range. Men demonstrated no association between uric acid and blood pressure, either at baseline or in response to angiotensin-II. In stark contrast, a significant association was observed between uric acid and blood pressure at baseline (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.005; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.02) and in response to angiotensin-II (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.035; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.056) in women. However, this sex difference lost significance after adjustment for baseline uric acid. When all subjects were stratified according to high (>300 ?mol/L) or low (?300 ?mol/L) uric acid levels, only the low uric acid group showed a positive association between uric acid and measures of vascular tone at baseline and in response to angiotensin-II. Differences in uric acid-mediated outcomes between men and women likely reflect differences in exposure to increased uric acid levels, rather than a sex-specific uric acid-mediated pathophysiology. PMID:25501427

Samimi, Arian; Ramesh, Sharanya; Turin, Tanvir C; MacRae, Jennifer M; Sarna, Magdalena A; Reimer, Raylene A; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Sola, Darlene Y; Ahmed, Sofia B

2014-12-01

65

OPERATIONAL K-THEORY DAVE ANDERSON AND SAM PAYNE  

E-print Network

OPERATIONAL K-THEORY DAVE ANDERSON AND SAM PAYNE Abstract. We study the operational bivariant ANDERSON AND SAM PAYNE plays a central role in one of the classical formulations of Riemann-Roch the- orems

Payne, Sam

66

Alignment of isovalent impurity levels: Oxygen impurity in II-VI semiconductors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The isovalent oxygen impurity levels in the II-VI semiconductors ZnSe:O, ZnTe:O, and CdTe:O are studied using a method based on first-principles total energy and large scale charge patching band structure calculations. We find that, unlike the general expectation that these levels line up in an absolute energy scale, the positions of the isovalent a1 (O) level depend sensitively on the local environment around the impurity, thus, the a1 (O) levels align approximately only in the common-cation systems, whereas in the common-anion systems, the levels do not align. These general chemical trends also apply to other isovalent impurity systems.

Li, Jingbo; Wei, Su-Huai

2006-01-01

67

Supervision of Occupational Therapy Level II Fieldwork Students: Impact on and Predictors of Clinician Productivity.  

PubMed

This study aimed to determine whether a difference in productivity exists between clinicians supervising and not supervising a Level II occupational therapy student and whether factors including clinician years of experience, practice setting, and clinician productivity without a student could predict clinician productivity while supervising a student. We used paired-sample t tests to examine clinician productivity with and without a student in 109 clinician-student encounters and regression analysis to determine factors predictive of clinician productivity with a student. Results indicated no difference in clinician productivity with or without a student. Clinician years of experience, practice area, and productivity without a student were significant predictors of clinician productivity while supervising a student. Study results contradict the belief that supervising Level II fieldwork students lowers clinicians' productivity. Findings suggest that practice area and productivity without a student are important factors influencing the productivity of clinicians supervising a fieldwork student. PMID:25553749

Ozelie, Rebecca; Janow, Janet; Kreutz, Corinne; Mulry, Mary Kate; Penkala, Ashley

2015-01-01

68

Activities and interactions in level II nurseries: a report of an ethnographic study.  

PubMed

This article reports an ethnographic study that examines the context and nature of the interactions between health professionals and parents in two Australian level II nurseries: 724 observations were recorded over an 18-week period. Analysis revealed that although the presence of mothers in the nursery was high, registered nurses remain the primary caretakers of the infants. The interactions between registered nurses and mothers were found to be action- or task-oriented with communication largely being described as "instrumental." The results of this pilot work suggest that the emphasis of clinical practice in level II nurseries remains focused on caring for the infant and teaching the mother. This is in contrast to the current body of literature that identifies the need for a family-centered approach to care that aims to support parents as they develop confidence, attach to their baby, and become skilled in providing care themselves. PMID:10633665

Fenwick, J; Barclay, L; Schmied, V

1999-06-01

69

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MD Anderson) was established by the Texas State Legislature in 1941. In 1971, after the passage of the National Cancer Act, MD Anderson became one of the nation’s first NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers.

70

SAGE II Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties at Non-Volcanic Levels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 2000, stratospheric aerosol levels have been relatively stable and at the lowest levels observed in the historical record. Given the challenges of making satellite measurements of aerosol properties at these levels, we have performed a study of the sensitivity of the product to the major components of the processing algorithm used in the production of SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements and the retrieval process that produces the operational surface area density (SAD) product. We find that the aerosol extinction measurements, particularly at 1020 nm, remain robust and reliable at the observed aerosol levels. On the other hand, during background periods, the SAD operational product has an uncertainty of at least a factor of 2 during due to the lack of sensitivity to particles with radii less than 100 nm.

Thomason, Larry W.; Burton, Sharon P.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Peter, Thomas

2008-01-01

71

Biology Office Shauna C. Anderson, Director  

E-print Network

Biology Biology Office Shauna C. Anderson, Director 375 WIDB, (801) 422-4295 College of Biology program in biology has open enrollment. The Discipline A degree for students who desire a broad approach to biology, the major provides solid preparation for graduate schools in most fields of biology as well

Hart, Gus

72

Visual Absorption Capability1 Lee Anderson  

E-print Network

Visual Absorption Capability1 Lee Anderson 2a/ Jerry Mosier 2b/ Geoffrey Chandler 2c/ 1/ Submitted, Lassen National Forest, Susanville, California. Abstract: Visual absorption capability (VAC) is a tool development which is in harmony with the visual resource vis- ual absorption capability (VAC) is a tool which

Standiford, Richard B.

73

The conductivity measure for the Anderson model  

E-print Network

We study the ac-conductivity in linear response theory for the Anderson tight-binding model. We define the electrical ac-conductivity and calculate the linear-response current at zero temperature for arbitrary Fermi energy. In particular, the Fermi energy may lie in a spectral region where extended states are believed to exist.

Abel Klein; Peter Müller

2007-09-21

74

Updated 3.10.12 Michelle Coulson1 Practical Component for Level II BIOCHEM,  

E-print Network

Biochemistry II: Molecular and Cell Biology BIOCHEM 2502 Biochem II (Biotech): Molecular and Cell Biology BIOCHEM 2504 Biochem II (Mol Biol): Molecular and Cell Biology BIOCHEM 2501 Biochemistry II: Metabolism

75

The Anderson Quin Cycle. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

1993-03-18

76

Precision lifetime measurements of N ii levels with the beam-foil-laser method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Precision lifetime measurements using laser excitation of a fast ion beam preexcited in a carbon foil are reported for two levels in N ii. The cascade-free decays of the fluorescence intensities give lifetimes of 0.249+/-0.004 and 0.267+/-0.010 ns for the N ii 2p3d 1F° and 2p3s 1P° levels, respectively. The lifetime result for the 2p3d 1F° level-which is weakly repopulated by long-lived cascades-is in good agreement with beam-foil values and with the theoretical lifetime of McEachran and Cohen [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 27, 119 (1982)]. The lifetime result for the 2p3s 1P ° level-which is strongly repopulated by cascades-differs significantly from most of the previous experimental values but is in good agreement with the theoretical lifetimes of Luken and Sinanoglu [J. Chem. Phys. 64, 3141 (1976)], Beck and Nicolaides [Phys. Lett. 56A, 265 (1976)], McEachran and Cohen, and Fawcett [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 37, 411 (1987)]. The f-value trend for the 2p2 1D-2p3s 1P° transition along the C i sequence is discussed.

Baudinet-Robinet, Y.; Garnir, H.-P.; Dumont, P.-D.; Résimont, J.

1990-08-01

77

Study led by MD Anderson scientists identifies prostate cancer stem cells among low-PSA cells  

Cancer.gov

Prostate cancer cells that defy treatment and display heightened tumor-generating capacity can be identified by levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) expressed in the tumor cells, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in the May 3 edition of Cell Stem Cell.

78

Experimental Breeder Reactor-II frequency response test measurements via pseudorandom, discrete-level binary and ternary signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The generic technique of applying pseudorandom, discrete-level, periodic reactivity perturbation signals to measure the reactivity-to-power frequency response function was extended to the liquid-metal reactor, Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). This technique was developed in the late 1960s and applied in several reactor designs with extensive testing performed at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment. Signals employed at EBR-II included the pseudorandom binary

W. D. Rhodes; R. V. Furstenau; H. A. Larson

2000-01-01

79

High levels of MHC class II allelic diversity in lake trout from Lake Superior  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sequence variation in a 216 bp portion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II B1 domain was examined in 74 individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from different locations in Lake Superior. Forty-three alleles were obtained which encoded 71-72 amino acids of the mature protein. These sequences were compared with previous data obtained from five Pacific salmon species and Atlantic salmon using the same primers. Although all of the lake trout alleles clustered together in the neighbor-joining analysis of amino acid sequences, one amino acid allelic lineage was shared with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species in another genus which probably diverged from Salvelinus more than 10-20 million years ago. As shown previously in other salmonids, the level of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) exceeded the level of synonymous substitution (d(S)). The level of nucleotide diversity at the MHC class II B1 locus was considerably higher in lake trout than in the Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lake trout colonized Lake Superior from more than one refuge following the Wisconsin glaciation. Recent population bottlenecks may have reduced nucleotide diversity in Pacific salmon populations.

Dorschner, M.O.; Duris, T.; Bronte, C.R.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.; Phillips, R.B.

2000-01-01

80

Language Assessment Scales, Level 2, LAS II, for Grades 6 and Up, English/Spanish. Examiner's Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Language Assessment Scales, Level 2 (LAS II) are used to assess the linguistic proficiency of limited-English-speaking or non-English-speaking adolescents. LAS II, like its predecessor, LAS I, provides a picture of oral linguistic proficiency based on a student's performance across four linguistic subsystems: phonemic, lexical, syntactic and…

Duncan, Sharon E.; De Avila, Edward A.

81

Low level RF system design for the PEP-II B factory  

SciTech Connect

Heavy beam loading in PEP-II has driven the design of the low level RF system to contain feedback loops similar to those used in proton rings. The RF feedback loops control longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities caused by the beam interaction with the accelerating mode of the RF cavities by reducing the cavity impedance observed by the beam. The RF system employs a modular design housed in a VXI environment and uses the EPICS control system. Modem control system design and signal processing is used throughout the system. This paper describes the RF system topology and the signal processing used to fulfill the system requirements.

Corredoura, P.; Claus, R.; Sapozhnikov, L. [and others

1995-10-01

82

Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II.  

E-print Network

Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II. Increased fertilizer use greatly. It was apparent well before the rapid expansion in fertilizer use that inexpensive ways to evaluate the fertility

83

Testimony of James J. Anderson  

E-print Network

in quantitative analyses of factors affecting the decline of salmon and the actions being taken to recover the effectiveness of dam breaching as an action to recover endangered Snake River salmon. My remarks reference, even as four dams were added to the Snake River: The level of juvenile salmon survival migrating

Washington at Seattle, University of

84

Genetic suppression of a phosphomimic myosin II identifies system-level factors that promote myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation.  

PubMed

How myosin II localizes to the cleavage furrow in Dictyostelium and metazoan cells remains largely unknown despite significant advances in understanding its regulation. We designed a genetic selection using cDNA library suppression of 3xAsp myosin II to identify factors involved in myosin cleavage furrow accumulation. The 3xAsp mutant is deficient in bipolar thick filament assembly, fails to accumulate at the cleavage furrow, cannot rescue myoII-null cytokinesis, and has impaired mechanosensitive accumulation. Eleven genes suppressed this dominant cytokinesis deficiency when 3xAsp was expressed in wild-type cells. 3xAsp myosin II's localization to the cleavage furrow was rescued by constructs encoding rcdBB, mmsdh, RMD1, actin, one novel protein, and a 14-3-3 hairpin. Further characterization showed that RMD1 is required for myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation, acting in parallel with mechanical stress. Analysis of several mutant strains revealed that different thresholds of myosin II activity are required for daughter cell symmetry than for furrow ingression dynamics. Finally, an engineered myosin II with a longer lever arm (2xELC), producing a highly mechanosensitive motor, could also partially suppress the intragenic 3xAsp. Overall, myosin II accumulation is the result of multiple parallel and partially redundant pathways that comprise a cellular contractility control system. PMID:25318674

Ren, Yixin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Surcel, Alexandra; Miller, Christopher; Robinson, Douglas N

2014-12-15

85

Development of High Level Trigger Software for Belle II at SuperKEKB  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Belle collaboration has been trying for 10 years to reveal the mystery of the current matter-dominated universe. However, much more statistics is required to search for New Physics through quantum loops in decays of B mesons. In order to increase the experimental sensitivity, the next generation B-factory, SuperKEKB, is planned. The design luminosity of SuperKEKB is 8 x 1035cm-2s-1 a factor 40 above KEKB's peak luminosity. At this high luminosity, the level 1 trigger of the Belle II experiment will stream events of 300 kB size at a 30 kHz rate. To reduce the data flow to a manageable level, a high-level trigger (HLT) is needed, which will be implemented using the full offline reconstruction on a large scale PC farm. There, physics level event selection is performed, reducing the event rate by ~ 10 to a few kHz. To execute the reconstruction the HLT uses the offline event processing framework basf2, which has parallel processing capabilities used for multi-core processing and PC clusters. The event data handling in the HLT is totally object oriented utilizing ROOT I/O with a new method of object passing over the UNIX socket connection. Also under consideration is the use of the HLT output as well to reduce the pixel detector event size by only saving hits associated with a track, resulting in an additional data reduction of ~ 100 for the pixel detector. In this contribution, the design and implementation of the Belle II HLT are presented together with a report of preliminary testing results.

Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Mineo, S.

2011-12-01

86

A Non-invasive Technique for Configuring Low Level RF Feedback Loops in PEP-II  

SciTech Connect

The RF system of the PEP-II collider uses two fast feedback loops around each klystron and set of cavities. These loops reduce the impedance of the fundamental mode of the accelerating cavities seen by the beam, and are necessary to reduce the growth rates of longitudinal modes within the RF system bandwidth. Operation of the accelerator at high beam currents is very sensitive to the configuration of the low-level RF feedback loops. There are 7 loop control parameters that strongly influence the stability of the feedback loops and the achieved level of longitudinal impedance reduction. Diagnostic techniques for the analysis of the RF feedback via closed-loop system transfer function measurements will be presented. The model is fit to the measured closed-loop transfer function data and the extracted parameters are then used to calculate optimal tuning and corrections to the loop control elements in the physical channel. These techniques allow fine-tuning of RF feedback with stored beam as well as diagnosis of misconfigured or malfunctioning elements of the system. Results from PEP-II operation will be presented to illustrate the techniques and their applications.

Teytelman, D; /SLAC

2005-06-22

87

Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 1: Global and zonal mean cloud amounts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Global high-level clouds identified in Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements for January and July in the period 1985 to 1990 are compared with near-nadir-looking observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Global and zonal mean high-level cloud amounts from the two data sets agree very well, if clouds with layer extinction coefficients of less than 0.008/km at 1.02 micrometers wavelength are removed from the SAGE II results and all detected clouds are interpreted to have an average horizontal size of about 75 km along the 200 km transimission path length of the SAGE II observations. The SAGE II results are much more sensitive to variations of assumed cloud size than to variations of detection threshold. The geographical distribution of cloud fractions shows good agreement, but systematic regional differences also indicate that the average cloud size varies somewhat among different climate regimes. The more sensitive SAGE II results show that about one third of all high-level clouds are missed by ISCCP but that these clouds have very low optical thicknesses (less than 0.1 at 0.6 micrometers wavelength). SAGE II sampling error in monthly zonal cloud fraction is shown to produce no bias, to be less than the intraseasonal natural variability, but to be comparable with the natural variability at longer time scales.

Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

1995-01-01

88

ROBERT CORNELL Head and Wilton T. Anderson Chair  

E-print Network

ROBERT CORNELL Head and Wilton T. Anderson Chair BRADLEY BLAYLOCK Assistant Professor RICHARD Professor ANGELA SPENCER Clinical Associate Professor and Haskell Cudd Professor LINDA STONE Administrative

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

89

Commissioning experience with the PEP-II low-level RF system  

SciTech Connect

The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment and supported by EPICS. All signal processing and control is done at baseband using in-phase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. Remotely configurable RF feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to the required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. The system contains a built-in baseband network analyzer which allows remote measurement of the RF feedback loop transfer functions and automated configuration of these loops. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system.

Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

1997-05-01

90

Defect-controlled Anderson localization of light in photonic lattices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The transverse localization of light in a disordered photonic lattice with a central defect is analyzed numerically. The effect of different input beam widths on various regimes of Anderson localization is investigated. The inclusion of a defect enhances the localization of both narrow and broad beams, as compared to the lattice with no defect. But, in the case of a broad beam a higher disorder level is needed to reach the same localization as for a narrow input beam. It is also investigated how the transverse localization of light in such geometries depends on both the strength of disorder and the strength of nonlinearity in the system. While in the linear regime the localization is most pronounced in the lattice with the defect, in the nonlinear regime this is not the case.

Jovi?, Dragana

2013-11-01

91

NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. It is an open structure platform, and we try to provide a narrow API set for client application. With this narrow API, existing applications developed in different language under different architecture could be ported to our platform with small modification. This paper describes system infrastructure design, client API and system integration, and latest progress. As a new 3rd generation synchrotron light source with ultra low emittance, there are new requirements and challenges to control and manipulate the beam. A use case study and a theoretical analysis have been performed to clarify requirements and challenges to the high level applications (HLA) software environment. To satisfy those requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture of the software framework is critical for beam commissioning, study and operation. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating, plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology. The HLA is combination of tools for accelerator physicists and operators, which is same as traditional approach. In NSLS-II, they include monitoring applications and control routines. Scripting environment is very important for the later part of HLA and both parts are designed based on a common set of APIs. Physicists and operators are users of these APIs, while control system engineers and a few accelerator physicists are the developers of these APIs. With our Client/Server mode based approach, we leave how to retrieve information to the developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

2011-03-28

92

Towards a New Proof of Anderson Localization  

E-print Network

The wave function of a non-relativistic particle in a periodic potential admits oscillatory solutions, the Bloch waves. In the presence of a random noise contribution to the potential the wave function is localized. We outline a new proof of this Anderson localization phenomenon in one spatial dimension, extending the classical result to the case of a periodic background potential. The proof makes use of techniques previously developed to study the effects of noise on reheating in inflationary cosmology, employing methods of random matrix theory.

Brandenberger, Robert

2008-01-01

93

Towards a New Proof of Anderson Localization  

E-print Network

The wave function of a non-relativistic particle in a periodic potential admits oscillatory solutions, the Bloch waves. In the presence of a random noise contribution to the potential the wave function is localized. We outline a new proof of this Anderson localization phenomenon in one spatial dimension, extending the classical result to the case of a periodic background potential. The proof makes use of techniques previously developed to study the effects of noise on reheating in inflationary cosmology, employing methods of random matrix theory.

Robert Brandenberger; Walter Craig

2008-05-27

94

Lyapunov Exponents for Unitary Anderson Models  

E-print Network

We study a unitary version of the one-dimensional Anderson model, given by a five diagonal deterministic unitary operator multiplicatively perturbed by a random phase matrix. We fully characterize positivity and vanishing of the Lyapunov exponent for this model throughout the spectrum and for arbitrary distributions of the random phases. This includes Bernoulli distributions, where in certain cases a finite number of critical spectral values, with vanishing Lyapunov exponent, exists. We establish similar results for a unitary version of the random dimer model.

Eman Hamza; Günter Stolz

2006-11-28

95

Visualization on supercomputing platform level II ASC milestone (3537-1B) results from Sandia.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia portion of the ASC Level II Visualization on the platform milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratories. This milestone contains functionality required for performing visualization directly on a supercomputing platform, which is necessary for peta-scale visualization. Sandia's contribution concerns in-situ visualization, running a visualization in tandem with a solver. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors(GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the performance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. Scientific simulation on parallel supercomputers is traditionally performed in four sequential steps: meshing, partitioning, solver, and visualization. Not all of these components are necessarily run on the supercomputer. In particular, the meshing and visualization typically happen on smaller but more interactive computing resources. However, the previous decade has seen a growth in both the need and ability to perform scalable parallel analysis, and this gives motivation for coupling the solver and visualization.

Geveci, Berk (Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Fabian, Nathan; Marion, Patrick (Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Moreland, Kenneth D.

2010-09-01

96

Increased urotensin II plasma levels in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: Vasodilatation – despite activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors – is pronounced in portal hypertension. We therefore investigated the role of Urotensin II (U II), a newly described peptide reported to be a vasoconstrictor in the central arterial compartment and a vasodilator in the splanchnic vasculature.Methods: U II immunoreactivity was measured in 50 patients with cirrhosis and in 15 healthy controls.

Jörg Heller; Michael Schepke; Markus Neef; Rainer Woitas; Christian Rabe; Tilman Sauerbruch

2002-01-01

97

Microwave-Driven Atoms: From Anderson Localization to Einstein's Photoeffect  

E-print Network

We study the counterpart of Anderson localization in driven one-electron Rydberg atoms. By changing the initial Rydberg state at fixed microwave frequency and interaction time, we numerically monitor the crossover from Anderson localization to the photo effect in the atomic ionization signal.

Alexej Schelle; Dominique Delande; Andreas Buchleitner

2009-05-04

98

Participant List and Biographies Cheryl Anderson, canderso@hawaii.edu  

E-print Network

- 92 - APPENDIX A Participant List and Biographies Cheryl Anderson, canderso@hawaii.edu Social Science Research Institute, University of Hawai`i C heryl L. Anderson is a certified planner (AICP), doctoral candidate, and the Director of the Hazards, Climate, and Environment Program, University of Hawai`i

Colorado at Boulder, University of

99

The Economics of Censorship Resistance George Danezis and Ross Anderson  

E-print Network

The Economics of Censorship Resistance George Danezis and Ross Anderson University of Cambridge.Anderson)@cl.cam.ac.uk Abstract. We propose the first economic model of censorship resis- tance. Early peer-to-peer systems Internet. An alternative approach is to encourage nodes to serve re- sources they are interested in. Both

Danezis, George

100

Magnetoresistance of an Anderson Insulator of Bosons Anirban Gangopadhyay,1  

E-print Network

Magnetoresistance of an Anderson Insulator of Bosons Anirban Gangopadhyay,1 Victor Galitski,1 March 2013; published 9 July 2013) We study the magnetoresistance of two-dimensional bosonic Anderson is magnetoresistance (MR). This is because a magnetic field sensitively affects the quantum interference, which in turn

Müller, Markus

101

Dynamical Localization for Unitary Anderson Models  

E-print Network

This paper establishes dynamical localization properties of certain families of unitary random operators on the d-dimensional lattice in various regimes. These operators are generalizations of one-dimensional physical models of quantum transport and draw their name from the analogy with the discrete Anderson model of solid state physics. They consist in a product of a deterministic unitary operator and a random unitary operator. The deterministic operator has a band structure, is absolutely continuous and plays the role of the discrete Laplacian. The random operator is diagonal with elements given by i.i.d. random phases distributed according to some absolutely continuous measure and plays the role of the random potential. In dimension one, these operators belong to the family of CMV-matrices in the theory of orthogonal polynomials on the unit circle. We implement the method of Aizenman-Molchanov to prove exponential decay of the fractional moments of the Green function for the unitary Anderson model in the following three regimes: In any dimension, throughout the spectrum at large disorder and near the band edges at arbitrary disorder and, in dimension one, throughout the spectrum at arbitrary disorder. We also prove that exponential decay of fractional moments of the Green function implies dynamical localization, which in turn implies spectral localization. These results complete the analogy with the self-adjoint case where dynamical localization is known to be true in the same three regimes.

Eman Hamza; Alain Joye; Günter Stolz

2009-02-28

102

Electronic control of optical Anderson localization modes.  

PubMed

Anderson localization of light has been demonstrated in a few different dielectric materials and lithographically fabricated structures. However, such localization is difficult to control, and requires strong magnetic fields or nonlinear optical effects, and electronic control has not been demonstrated. Here, we show control of optical Anderson localization using charge carriers injected into more than 100 submicrometre-scale p-n diodes. The diodes are embedded into the cross-section of the optical waveguide and are fabricated with a technology compatible with the current electronics industry. Large variations in the output signal, exceeding a factor of 100, were measured with 1 V and a control current of 1 mA. The transverse footprint of our device is only 0.125 µm(2), about five orders of magnitude smaller than optical two-dimensional lattices. Whereas all-electronic localization has a narrow usable bandwidth, electronically controlled optical localization can access more than a gigahertz of bandwidth and creates new possibilities for controlling localization at radiofrequencies, which can benefit applications such as random lasers, optical limiters, imagers, quantum optics and measurement devices. PMID:24681777

Mookherjea, Shayan; Ong, Jun Rong; Luo, Xianshu; Guo-Qiang, Lo

2014-05-01

103

The Role of Contrast in the Perception of Achromatic Transparency: Comment on Singh and Anderson (2002) and Anderson (2003)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

M. Singh and B. L. Anderson proposed a perceptual theory of achromatic transparency in which the perceived transmittance of a perceived transparent filter is determined by the ratio of the Michelson contrast seen in the region of transparency to that of the background seen directly. Subsequently, B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and J. Meng proposed that…

Albert, Marc K.

2008-01-01

104

Diagnostics of diapycnal diffusion in z-level ocean models. Part II: 3-Dimensional OGCM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a robust method for diagnosing total diapycnal diffusivities, i.e. explicitly applied plus numerically induced diffusivities, from tracer release experiments in numerical z-level models. To this extent, numerical experiments differing only in the advection scheme used (CTRD using 2nd order centred differences, UPWIND using the upwind/upstream advection scheme, QUICK using the quicker advection scheme after Farrow and Stevens (1995) and FCT after Gerdes et al. (1991)) are analysed and compared. To obtain regionally resolved estimates of diapycnal diffusivities, individual inert dye tracers are released in dynamically different regions of a North Atlantic model, namely (i) in the interior of the subtropical gyre and (ii) in the western boundary current. Diagnosed diffusivities are robust with respect to changes in temporal and spatial sampling of the simulated dye tracer for both advection schemes and for both regions. The numerically induced diffusivity is generally positive, but can become negative for centred differences advection numerics after several months of simulated tracer dispersion.

Getzlaff, Julia; Nurser, George; Oschlies, Andreas

105

SNAP II Index: An Alternative to the COMFORT Scale in Assessing the Level of Sedation in Mechanically Ventilated Pediatric Patients.  

PubMed

Sedation monitoring is essential in pediatric patients on ventilatory support to achieve comfort and safety. The COMFORT scale was designed and validated to assess the level of sedation in intubated pediatric patients. However, it remains unreliable in pharmacologically paralyzed patients. The SNAP II index is calculated using an algorithm that incorporates high-frequency (80-420 Hz) electroencephalogram (EEG) components, known to be useful in discriminating between awake and unconscious states, unlike other measurements that only include low-frequency EEG segments such as the bispectral index score. Previous studies suggested that the SNAP II index is a reliable and sensitive indicator of the level of consciousness in adult patients. Despite its potential, no data are currently available in the pediatric critically ill population on ventilatory support. This is the first pilot study assessing the potential application of the SNAP II index in critically ill pediatric patients by comparing it to the commonly used COMFORT scale. PMID:23753227

Nievas, I Federico Fernandez; Spentzas, Thomas; Bogue, Clifford W

2013-02-01

106

Effects of pravastatin sodium and simvastatin on plasma fibrinogen level and blood rheology in type II hyperlipoproteinemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elevated plasma fibrinogen level is known to progress atherosclerosis and to be one of the risk factors for the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study is to evaluate the changes in plasma fibrinogen level and blood rheology in patients with type II hyperlipoproteinemia before and after random administrations of HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-cocarboxylase-A) reductase inhibitors, pravastatin sodium and simvastatin,

Yoshiyasu Tsuda; Kiyoto Satoh; Masaya Kitadai; Tsutomu Takahashi; Yoshinari Izumi; Naohisa Hosomi

1996-01-01

107

Adaptive unstructured volume remeshing II: Application to two-and three-dimensional level-set simulations  

E-print Network

previously used only in finite-difference calculations [17]. To capture the evolving deformable fluidAdaptive unstructured volume remeshing ­ II: Application to two- and three-dimensional level) with time and position in the computational domain in order to efficiently resolve the relevant physical

Lowengrub, John

108

Evaluation of NOAA Climate Outlooks in Extended Great Lakes Water Levels Forecasts Thomas E. Croley II1  

E-print Network

1 Evaluation of NOAA Climate Outlooks in Extended Great Lakes Water Levels Forecasts Thomas E. Croley II1 Abstract The Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) simulates time series of daily Great Lakes hydrology by first estimating initial hydrological conditions and then using a daily

109

Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1989-1992. Volume III: Level II Model Technology School Projects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report, the third in a series of six, evaluates the 10 school districts that received grants from the California Department of Education to develop Level II Model Technology School (MTS) Projects intended to enhance instruction and student learning through a combination of curriculum improvement and integration of technology within a single…

Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

110

Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 Unraveling the conundrum of river response to rising sea level from  

E-print Network

Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 1 Unraveling the conundrum of river to Sedimentology, May, 2006 2 deltas is adapted to describe the response of the Fly-Strickland River system, Papua of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 3 Pleistocene-Holocene eustatic sea level rise of some 120 m

Parker, Gary

111

The GLAS editing procedures for the FGGE level II-B data collected during SOP-1 and 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The modifications made to the FGGE Level II-b data are discussed and the FORTRAN program developed to perform the modifications is described. It is suggested that the edited database is the most accurate one available for FGGE SOP-1 and 2.

Baker, W.; Edelmann, D.; Carus, H.

1981-01-01

112

Magnetoresistance of an Anderson Insulator of Bosons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the magnetoresistance of two-dimensional bosonic Anderson insulators. We describe the change in spatial decay of localized excitations in response to a magnetic field, which is given by an interference sum over alternative tunneling trajectories. The excitations become more localized with increasing field (in sharp contrast to generic fermionic excitations which get weakly delocalized): the localization length ?(B) is found to change as ?-1(B)-?-1(0)˜B4/5. The quantum interference problem maps onto the classical statistical mechanics of directed polymers in random media (DPRM). We explain the observed scaling using a simplified droplet model which incorporates the nontrivial DPRM exponents. Our results have implications for a variety of experiments on magnetic-field-tuned superconductor-to-insulator transitions observed in disordered films, granular superconductors, and Josephson junction arrays, as well as for cold atoms in artificial gauge fields.

Gangopadhyay, Anirban; Galitski, Victor; Müller, Markus

2013-07-01

113

A struggle for freedom; Maxwell Anderson, 1938-1952  

E-print Network

the Sudetenland to 7William L. Langer and S. Everett Gleason, The Challen e to Isolation: The World Crisis of 1937-1940 and American Forei n Polic (New York, 195Z), 14. 16 Germany in exchange for the Fuhrer's promise to cease demands for more European..., November 2, 1940, XII, I, 25 Anderson to Collier Young, June 30, 1939; Sidney Lipsitch to Anderson, July 3, 1939, MAC, HRC. By late 1942, Anderson was still refusing to apply for social security. See Robert Rice, "Maxwell Ander- son: A Character Study...

Odeski, Thomas Francis

2012-06-07

114

Protein kinase C beta II mRNA levels decrease in the striatum and cortex of transgenic Huntington's disease mice.  

PubMed Central

Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by the inheritance of the huntingtin gene with an expanded CAG repeat. The function of the normal or mutant form of the huntingtin protein remains to be determined. We used differential display to determine differences in steady-state mRNA levels between wild-type and the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of HD. Using this method, we determined that the steady-state mRNA levels of protein kinase C beta II (PKC beta II) subunit are decreased in symptomatic HD mice compared with age-matched wild-type controls. The decrease in PKC beta II mRNA levels occurred in both the striatum and cortex. Previously, it had been demonstrated that PKC beta II immunoreactivity is decreased in the caudate-putamen of patients with Huntington's disease. PKC has been implicated in the long-term potentiation model of brain plasticity and learning, and the loss of PKC may affect information storage in HD. The expression of htt-HD throughout the brain affects the transcription of specific genes in regions not associated with widespread neurodegeneration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:11291528

Harris, A S; Denovan-Wright, E M; Hamilton, L C; Robertson, H A

2001-01-01

115

MD Anderson study finds cancer related pain often undertreated  

Cancer.gov

More than one third of patients with invasive cancer are undertreated for their pain, with minorities twice as likely to not receive analgesics, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

116

Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson - Duration: 2:45.  

NASA Video Gallery

When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

117

Observing transverse Anderson localization in random air line based fiber  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept of Anderson localization has been applied to electromagnetic waves for decades and strong photon localization effect has been observed in many two-dimensional systems including optical lattice and optical fibers. Among different types of optical fibers, both fibers with and without air hole were investigated. Air hole based fiber has significant higher refractive index contrast than other fibers which allow much lower filling fraction in order to observe Anderson localization. In a previous research, Anderson localization was observed near the fiber edge with an air fillfraction of 5.5%. At the fiber center region with only 2.2% air fill-fraction, Anderson localization disappeared. However, we observed Anderson localization in fibers with much lower air fill-fraction. In our experiments, random air line fibers with 150, 250 and 350 ?m diameters were fabricated and characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Averaged air line diameters were 177, 247 and 387 nm for the 150, 250 and 350 ?m diameter fibers, respectively. Air fill-fraction was also measured at fiber center, middle and edge regions. Beam profiles were imaged into a charge couple device (CCD) and Anderson localization was observed. Unlike the previous research in which Anderson localization was only observed at the fiber edge due to non-uniform air line distribution, we observed Anderson localization within the fiber area with air fill-fraction significantly lower than the previous investigation. This is because with smaller air line diameter our fiber has higher air lines density than the previous report.

Chen, Minghan; Li, Ming-Jun

2014-02-01

118

Spectral classification using pattern-recognition techniques. II. Application to curium energy levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Curium energy levels have been classified according to configuration using pattern-recognition techniques. Four features: energy level, Lande g, J, and isotope shift: have been used to describe each level. Forty levels have been assigned with high probability based on consistent results obtained by various pattern recognition techniques. This represents an increase of 9% for even levels and 19% for odd

K. L. Peterson; D. L. Anderson; M. L. Parsons

1978-01-01

119

Dystopian Visions of Global Capitalism: Philip Reeve’s Mortal Engines and M.T Anderson’s Feed  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines Philip Reeve’s novel for children, Mortal Engines, and M.T. Anderson’s young adult novel, Feed, by assessing these dystopias as prototypical texts of what Ulrich Beck calls risk society. Through their visions of a fictional\\u000a future, the two narratives explore the hazards created by contemporary techno-economic progress, predatory global politics\\u000a and capitalist excesses of consumption. They implicitly pose

Elizabeth Bullen; Elizabeth Parsons

2007-01-01

120

PRESTO-II computer code for safety assessment on shallow land disposal of low-level wastes  

SciTech Connect

The PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) computer code has been applied for the following sites; Koteyli, Balikesir and Kozakli, Nevsehir in Turkey. This site selection was based partially on the need to consider a variety of hydrologic and climatic situations, and partially on the availability of data. The results obtained for the operational low-level waste disposal site at Barnwell, South Carolina, are presented for comparison. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Uslu, I.; Fields, D.E.; Yalcintas, M.G.

1987-01-01

121

Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography  

PubMed Central

In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

SHIMA, HIROAKI; KUTOMI, GORO; SATOMI, FUKINO; MAEDA, HIDEKI; TAKAMARU, TOMOKO; KAMESHIMA, HIDEKAZU; OMURA, TOSEI; MORI, MITSURU; HATAKENAKA, MASAMITSU; HASEGAWA, TADASHI; HIRATA, KOICHI

2014-01-01

122

An MCMI-II item-level component analysis: personality and clinical factors.  

PubMed

The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory, Version 2 (MCMI-II) was released to replace the MCMI-I. Research into the factor structure of the items of the MCMI-I showed components consistent with the underlying construction theory. No such work has been done with the new MCMI-II. For this study, we analyzed the personality disorder and clinical syndrome items across two subject samples. For 579 Veterans Administration patients and 492 normal college students, six personality factors were identified. The samples shared Hostility, Histrionic/Schizoid, Dependent, Compulsive, and a Sadistic variant. For the clinical syndrome items, eight factors were isolated for veterans and seven for normals. Depression, Alcohol Abuse, Drug Abuse, Crying, and Mania were shared factors. Most of the factors were found to be highly consistent with MCMI-II scale keyings. PMID:1955978

Retzlaff, P D; Lorr, M; Hyer, L; Ofman, P

1991-10-01

123

The FERRUM project: experimental and theoretical transition rates of forbidden [Sc II] lines and radiative lifetimes of metastable Sc II levels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context: In many plasmas, long-lived metastable atomic levels are depopulated by collisions (quenched) before they decay radiatively. In low-density regions, however, the low collision rate may allow depopulation by electric dipole (E1) forbidden radiative transitions, so-called forbidden lines (mainly M1 and E2 transitions). If the atomic transition data are known, these lines are indicators of physical plasma conditions and used for abundance determination. Aims: Transition rates can be derived by combining relative intensities between the decay channels, so-called branching fractions (BFs), and the radiative lifetime of the common upper level. We use this approach for forbidden [Sc II] lines, along with new calculations. Methods: Neither BFs for forbidden lines, nor lifetimes of metastable levels, are easily measured in a laboratory. Therefore, astrophysical BFs measured in Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra of the strontium filament of Eta Carinae are combined with lifetime measurements using a laser probing technique on a stored ion-beam (CRYRING facility, MSL, Stockholm). These quantities are used to derive the absolute transition rates (A-values). New theoretical transition rates and lifetimes are calulated using the CIV3 code. Results: We report experimental lifetimes of the Sc II levels 3d2 a^3P{0,1,2} with lifetimes 1.28, 1.42, and 1.24 s, respectively, and transition rates for lines from these levels down to 3d4s a^3D in the region 8270-8390 Å. These are the most important forbidden [Sc II] transitions. New calculations for lines and metastable lifetimes are also presented, and are in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Laboratory data is obtained at the CRYRING facility at the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory (MSL), Stockholm University, Sweden.

Hartman, H.; Gurell, J.; Lundin, P.; Schef, P.; Hibbert, A.; Lundberg, H.; Mannervik, S.; Norlin, L.-O.; Royen, P.

2008-03-01

124

COURSE OUTLINE FOR FIRST SIX WEEKS FOR SCIENCE-LEVEL II, TALENT PRESERVATION CLASSES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE FIRST 6-WEEK UNIT CONCERNS ANIMAL LIFE, AND TOPICS INCLUDE PROTOZOA, INVERTEBRATES, AND VERTEBRATES. UNIT II, "THE HUMAN BODY", INCLUDES BODY SYSTEMS, HEALTH, AND SAFETY. TEXTBOOK REFERENCES, CONTENT OUTLINE, TEACHING SUGGESTIONS, REFERENCE READINGS, AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS ARE GIVEN UNDER EACH TOPIC. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT FIRST EXPERIENCES WITH…

Houston Independent School District, TX.

125

THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II  

SciTech Connect

A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

2011-03-28

126

Topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model.  

PubMed

We study the phenomena of Anderson localization in the presence of nonlinear interaction on a lattice. A class of nonlinear Schrödinger models with arbitrary power nonlinearity is analyzed. We conceive the various regimes of behavior, depending on the topology of resonance overlap in phase space, ranging from a fully developed chaos involving Lévy flights to pseudochaotic dynamics at the onset of delocalization. It is demonstrated that the quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. We describe this localization-delocalization transition as a percolation transition on the infinite Cayley tree (Bethe lattice). It is found in the vicinity of the criticality that the spreading of the wave field is subdiffusive in the limit t?+?. The second moment of the associated probability distribution grows with time as a power law ? t^{?}, with the exponent ?=1/3 exactly. Also we find for superquadratic nonlinearity that the analog pseudochaotic regime at the edge of chaos is self-controlling in that it has feedback on the topology of the structure on which the transport processes concentrate. Then the system automatically (without tuning of parameters) develops its percolation point. We classify this type of behavior in terms of self-organized criticality dynamics in Hilbert space. For subquadratic nonlinearities, the behavior is shown to be sensitive to the details of definition of the nonlinear term. A transport model is proposed based on modified nonlinearity, using the idea of "stripes" propagating the wave process to large distances. Theoretical investigations, presented here, are the basis for consistency analysis of the different localization-delocalization patterns in systems with many coupled degrees of freedom in association with the asymptotic properties of the transport. PMID:25019865

Milovanov, Alexander V; Iomin, Alexander

2014-06-01

127

Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

Ma,H.; Rose, J.

2009-05-04

128

Attenuated Topoisomerase II Content Directly Correlates with a Low Level of Drug Resistance in a Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Line1  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new multiple drug-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cell line, ( IK )- SMRs, has been isolated which demonstrates a direct correlation between reduced cellular topoisomerase II activity (5-fold reduction) and a low level of resistance (3- to 7-fold) to topoisomerase II inhibitors. This cell line, initially selected for resistance to 9-(4,6-0-ethylidene-i8-D-gluco- pyranosyl)-4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin, exhibits cross-resistance to other topoisomerase II inhibitors including

Charles D. Webb; Michael D. Latham; Richard B. Lock; Daniel M. Sullivan

1991-01-01

129

Effects of steroid hormones on the Zn, Cu and MTI/II levels in the mouse brain.  

PubMed

The effects of some steroid hormones (corticosterone, hydrocortisone, testosterone and estrone) on the Zn, Cu metabolism and metallothioneins levels in the mouse brain were studied. To administrate the hormones, aqueous suspensions and olive oil solutions injected subcutaneously were used alternatively. The quantification of metals and metallothioneins concentrations in brain homogenates revealed significant alterations of both metal ions and protein expression levels, yet the subcutaneous oil injection increased per se the tissue metallothionein expression and metal content. We have also defined by immunohistochemistry the area-specific distribution of metallothioneins isoforms-I/II and of glial fibrillar acid protein. Upon treatment, corpus callosum, mesencephalon, pons, hippocampus and cerebellum were found to be the areas that increase the protein expression levels, whereas all other brain areas were marginally affected or were unaffected in terms of immunopositive metallothionein reaction. The metallothionein-I/II expression was compared with the immunopositivity of glial fibrillar acid protein and the results are discussed within the framework of the physiological role of corticosteroids and the potential therapeutical importance of sexual hormones. PMID:15196976

Beltramini, Mariano; Zambenedetti, Pamela; Wittkowski, Werner; Zatta, Paolo

2004-07-01

130

Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations in molecular rotation  

E-print Network

We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under quantum resonance conditions. In a rigid rotor the resonance causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that the centrifugal distortion of rotating molecules eventually halts the growth, by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentum -- the Anderson wall. Its position solely depends on the molecular rotational constants and lies in the range of a few tens of hbar. Below the wall, rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at near-ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology.

Johannes Floß; Ilya Sh. Averbukh

2014-05-15

131

The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level II. Books 1-20.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed as supplementary reading materials for Indian and non-Indian children in the primary grades, this series of 10 booklets presents 13 legends and 7 stories of Northwest tribes. Stories in this second level of the six-level series were developed cooperatively by people of the Crow, Muckleshoot, Skokomish, Blackfeet, Northern Cheyenne,…

Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

132

MD Anderson study finds depression and shortened telomeres increase bladder cancer mortality  

Cancer.gov

The combination of shortened telomeres, a biological marker of aging associated with cancer development, and elevated depression significantly impacted bladder cancer mortality, according to data presented at the 11th Annual AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research. As part of an ongoing, large-scale epidemiologic study of bladder cancer, researchers from the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston collected clinical and mental health information on 464 patients with bladder cancer. They assessed patients' depression levels with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale.

133

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (BRNATH00290034) on Town Highway 29, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Town Highway 29 crossing of Locust Creek is a 37-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 32-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 23, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 25 degrees. There was no observable scour protection measure at the site. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E.

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

1996-01-01

134

The second level trigger of the L3 experiment Part II. The event selection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The events recorded by the L3 data acquisition system are selected by three levels of trigger. This paper describes the event filtering performed by software at the second trigger level. First coded off-line in FORTRAN, the filtering software is microcoded for on-line execution in a farm of 3 XOP processors operating in a round-robin mode. It identifies and rejects background events. Depending on running conditions and trigger type, rejection factors of 45-80% are obtained on first level energy, muon and TEC triggers. Selection efficiencies greater than 99.95% are achieved.

Beingessner, S. P.; Blaising, J. J.; Chollet-Leflour, F.; Degré, A.; Dromby, C.; Forcorni, G.; Goy, C.; Lecoq, J.; Morand, R.; Moynot, M.; Perrot, G.; Rosier-Lees, S.

1994-02-01

135

Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches.  

PubMed

Signatures of Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well-defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Quantum interference generates a peak in the forward scattering amplitude which, unlike the common weak localization backscattering peak, is a signature of strong Anderson localization. We present a nonperturbative, and fully time resolved description of the phenomenon, covering the entire diffusion-to-localization crossover. Our results should be observable by present day experiments. PMID:24702342

Micklitz, T; Müller, C A; Altland, A

2014-03-21

136

NUCLEAR MATERIALS CONTROL SYSTEM (NMCS). PHASE II. LIQUID LEVEL INSTRUMENTS FOR A NUCLEAR FUELS REPROCESSING PLANT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Liquid level instrumentation for a nuclear fuels reprocessing plant was ; evaluated for possible application in a Nuclear Materials Control System (NMCS). ; Two basic types of instruments were considered: Pneumatic \\

Rosal

1959-01-01

137

Levels of Family Assessment: II. Impact of Maternal Psychopathology on Family Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association of maternal and contextual risk factors with whole-family, marital, and parent–child levels of family functioning was examined. Maternal mental illness and multiple contextual risk best predicted whole-family functioning, but each was related to marital and parent–child levels as well. Nonspecific indicators of maternal illness, rather than diagnostic category, were the better predictors of family functioning. The multiple contextual

Susan Dickstein; Ronald Seifer; Lisa C. Hayden; Masha Schiller; Arnold J. Sameroff; Gabor Keitner; Ivan Miller; Steven Rasmussen; Marilyn Matzko; Karin Dodge Magee

1998-01-01

138

Level II scour analysis for bridge 35 (BURKTH00310035) on Town Highway 31, crossing the West Branch Passumpsic River, Burke, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BURKTH00310035 on Town Highway 31 crossing the West Branch Passumpsic River, Burke, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

1998-01-01

139

Professions Shannon Anderson, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

) 1 Phys 122 General Physics II Lab 1 #12;Supplementary Courses BIOL 328/9 Human Anatomy..................................................3 BIOL 357 Molecular Genetics................................3 BIOL 361 Human Genetics.............................3 BIOL 612/613 Human Physiology & Lab*..................3/2 BIOL 614 Vertebrate Histology

140

ANDERSON ACCELERATION FOR FIXED-POINT ITERATIONS HOMER F. WALKER AND PENG NI  

E-print Network

ANDERSON ACCELERATION FOR FIXED-POINT ITERATIONS HOMER F. WALKER AND PENG NI Abstract. This paper concerns an acceleration method for fixed-point iterations that originated in work of D. G. Anderson-560], which we accordingly call Anderson acceleration here. This method has enjoyed considerable success

Walker, Homer F.

141

Absence of spontaneous magnetization in low-dimensional Anderson and Kondo lattices  

E-print Network

L-635 Absence of spontaneous magnetization in low-dimensional Anderson and Kondo lattices C, at finite temperature, a one or two dimensional Anderson or Kondo lattice can have no spontaneous lattice Hamiltonians. In this paper we apply Bogoliubov's inequality to the Anderson and Kondo lattices and show

Boyer, Edmond

142

A three-level model for alkali metal vapor lasers. Part II: broadband optical pumping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of pump laser spectral bandwidth on the performance of longitudinally pumped diode-pumped alkali lasers is explored by extending the analytic, three-level model using longitudinally averaged number densities. By assuming a statistical distribution between the upper two levels, the limiting solution for the quasi-two level system is achieved. A second limiting solution is identified for strongly bleached conditions where the atom recycle rate, limited by spin-orbit relaxation, fully specifies the output power. Performance in the intermediate regime depends significantly on the pump bandwidth relative to the atomic absorption line width and requires numerical simulation. The ratio of populations for the two excited, 2P3/2,1/2 states completes an analytic solution and depends primarily on pump laser bandwidth, threshold, and alkali concentration. Absorption well into the wings on the atomic profile can be utilized by increasing alkali concentration, but imposes increased pump intensity threshold.

Hager, Gordon D.; Perram, Glen P.

2013-09-01

143

Neurological complications of Anderson-Fabry disease.  

PubMed

Characteristic clinical manifestations of AFD such as acroparesthesias, angiokeratoma, corneal opacity, hypo/ and anhidrosis, gastrointestinal symptoms, renal and cardiac dysfunctions can occur in male and female patients, although heterozygous females with AFD usually seem to be less severely affected. The most prominent CNS manifestations consist of cerebrovascular events such as transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and (recurrent) strokes. For the most part, CNS complications in AFD have been attributed to cerebral vasculopathy, including anatomical abnormalities. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial accumulation of Gb-3. White matter lesions (WML) on occur MRI. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. Stroke in Anderson-Fabry disease study of 721 patients with cryptogenic stroke, aged 18-55 years, showed a high prevalence of Fabry disease in this group: 5% (21/432) of men and 3% (7/289) of women. Combining results of both sexes showed that 4% of young patients with stroke of previously unknown cause had Fabry disease, corresponding to about 1-2% of the general population of young stroke patients. Cerebral micro- and macro-vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease. Neuronal globotriaosylceramide accumulation in selective cortical and brain stem areas including the hippocampus has been reported by autopsy studies in FD, but clinical surrogates as well as the clinical relevance of these findings have not been investigated so far. Another Neurologic hallmark of Fabry disease (FD) includes small fiber neuropathy as well as cerebral micro- and macroangiopathy with premature stroke. Cranial MRI shows progressive white matter lesions (WML) at an early age, increased signal intensity in the pulvinar, and tortuosity and dilatation of the larger vessels. Conventional MRI shows a progressive load of white matter lesions (WMLs) due to cerebral vasculopathy in the course of FD. Another study has been conducted to quantify brain structural changes in clinically affected male and female patients with FD. The peripheral neuropathy in Fabry disease manifests as neuropathic pain, reduced cold and warm sensation and possibly gastrointestinal disturbances. Patients with Fabry disease begin having pain towards the end of the first decade of life or during puberty. Children as young as 6 years of age have complained of pain often associated with febrile illnesses with reduced heat and exercise tolerance. The patients describe the pain as burning that is often associated with deep ache or paresthesiae. Some patients also have joint pain. A high proportion of patients with Fabry disease is at increased risk of developing neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as depression and neuropsychological deficits. Due to both somatic and psychological impairment, health-related quality of life (QoL) is considerably reduced in patients with Fabry disease. Targeted screening for Fabry disease among young individuals with stroke seems to disclose unrecognized cases and may therefore very well be recommended as routine in the future. Furthermore, ischemic stroke is related to inflammation and arterial stiffness and no study had addressed this relationship in patients with AF disease and cerebrovascular disease, so this topic could represent a possible future research line. PMID:23448452

Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Salvatore; Arnao, Valentina; Licata, Giuseppe; Pinto, Antonio

2013-01-01

144

The Ce 4{ital f} surface shift: A test for the Anderson-impurity Hamiltonian  

SciTech Connect

Evidence is provided of the role of the different hybridization strengths between the surface and the bulk in determining the magnitude of the surface shift for the shallow Ce 4{ital f} levels, with respect to the deeper core levels. This was achieved by comparing the photoemission core levels for a weakly hybridized case (CeAl) to a case of intermediate hybridization ({gamma}-Ce). For CeAl a 4{ital f} surface shift of 0.45 eV was observed, similar to that for the 5{ital p} core level, whereas a smaller (if any) 4{ital f} surface shift was observed for {gamma}-Ce. Model calculations based on the Anderson impurity Hamiltonian are shown to give a correct evaluation of this effect, which can be exploited as a way of testing the results of such a description for the Ce {ital f} states. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Duo, L.; De Rossi, S.; Vavassori, P.; Ciccacci, F. [Istituto Nazionale Fisica della Materia--Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale Fisica della Materia--Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Olcese, G.L. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita di Genova, via Dodecaneso 31, I-16146 Genova (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita di Genova, via Dodecaneso 31, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Chiaia, G.; Lindau, I. [Department of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Soelvegatan 14, S-22362 Lund (Sweden)] [Department of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Soelvegatan 14, S-22362 Lund (Sweden)

1996-12-01

145

Evaluation of College-Level Instruction in Freshman Composition, Part II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To supplement an experiment at the University of Northern Iowa on the effectiveness of college-level instruction in freshman composition, the University of Iowa conducted its own experiment on the evaluation of freshman composition. This experiment was designed to determine (1) which method of rating papers is more reliable--the "general…

Braddock, Richard; Statler, Charles R.

146

Simulation studies of the HADES first level trigger PART II: Performance in hadron induced reactions  

E-print Network

The HADES first level trigger is studied for the system p+Ni at a beam energy of 2 AGeV. The timing properties of the trigger signal are reported. The efficiency loss due to deadtime is specified. A trigger requirement of a time overlap window with the start detector is described. The trigger rates for different overlap windows are given.

R. Schicker; H. Tsertos

1996-10-03

147

Plant and Animal Sciences Val J. Anderson, Chair  

E-print Network

Plant and Animal Sciences Val J. Anderson, Chair 275 WIDB, (801) 422-3527 College of Biology programs in the Department of Plant and Animal Sciences are open enrollment. The Discipline Disciplines in the Department of Plant and Animal Sciences focus on four of the great dilemmas facing mankind in the twenty

Hart, Gus

148

POLAR SEA ICE MAPPING FOR SEAWINDS Hyrum S. Anderson  

E-print Network

POLAR SEA ICE MAPPING FOR SEAWINDS by Hyrum S. Anderson A thesis submitted to the faculty, College of Engineering and Technology #12;viii #12;ABSTRACT POLAR SEA ICE MAPPING FOR SEAWINDS Hyrum S sea ice. Advances in microwave remote sensing technology have allowed a large-scale and detailed study

Long, David G.

149

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and the professionalism of medical publicity  

Microsoft Academic Search

A B S T R A C T • This article examines how early women doctors managed their professional and public images in the second half of the nineteenth century through a case study of the career of the first medical woman to qualify in Britain: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (1836—1917). In fighting for their cause, Victorian women doctors had to

Claire Brock

2008-01-01

150

Nuclear liability and the Price--Anderson Act  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Price-Anderson Act is viewed as meeting public needs in a unique and responsible way, reflecting the far-sightedness of those involved in the early development of nuclear power who saw the importance of building safety into each step of the program. An extension of the Act is advised as a first step in recognizing that many potential and real disasters

2009-01-01

151

SUBSIDY TO NUCLEAR POWER THROUGH PRICE-ANDERSON LIABILITY LIMIT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between 1959 and 1982, the Price-Anderson Act placed a limit of $560 million on the liability of nuclear power plant operators for accidental damages. This limit grew to $7 billion due to the 1988 amendments to the act. This paper using insurance premiums charged for the first $160 million of coverage and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's estimate of the probability

JEFFREY A. DUBIN; GEOFFREY S. ROTHWELL

1990-01-01

152

Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy: prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.  

PubMed

Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by the inappropriate accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in tissues due to a deficiency in the enzyme ?-galactosidase A (?-Gal A). Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is characterized by structural, valvular, vascular and conduction abnormalities, and is now the most common cause of mortality in patients with AFD. Large-scale metabolic and genetic screening studies have revealed AFD to be prevalent in populations of diverse ethnic origins, and the variant form of AFD represents an unrecognized health burden. Anderson-Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder, and genetic testing is critical for the diagnosis of AFD in women. Echocardiography with strain imaging and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late enhancement and T1 mapping are important imaging tools. The current therapy for AFD is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which can reverse or prevent AFD progression, while gene therapy and the use of molecular chaperones represent promising novel therapies for AFD. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially reversible cause of heart failure that involves LVH, increased susceptibility to arrhythmias and valvular regurgitation. Genetic testing and cardiac MRI are important diagnostic tools, and AFD cardiomyopathy is treatable if ERT is introduced early. PMID:25030479

Putko, Brendan N; Wen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard B; Mullen, John; Shanks, Miriam; Yogasundaram, Haran; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

2014-07-17

153

Microdissection: a tool for bee chromosome studies Anderson FERNANDES  

E-print Network

Microdissection: a tool for bee chromosome studies Anderson FERNANDES 1,2 , Patrícia Elda Sobrinho a microdissection protocol for cytogenetic studies in bees. This methodology was first used in these insects and may chromosomes and others. For this study, the centromeric region of chromosomes in the stingless bee

154

Augmenting Depth Camera Output Using Photometric Stereo Robert Anderson  

E-print Network

containing the high frequency information of a normal map and the low frequency information from a depth mapAugmenting Depth Camera Output Using Photometric Stereo Robert Anderson Department of Engineering Department of Engineering University of Cambridge Abstract We present a system for augmenting depth cam- era

Martin, Ralph R.

155

A Genetic Algorithm for Grammars James Anderson and Joe Staines  

E-print Network

A Genetic Algorithm for Grammars James Anderson and Joe Staines July 1, 2010 Background training data. 1 #12;A Genetic Algorithm for Grammars Of course, there are many more grammars than be able to search heuristically. Project Proposal We propose a project which uses a genetic algorithm

Goldschmidt, Christina

156

Measuring the Cost of Cybercrime Ross Anderson 1  

E-print Network

Measuring the Cost of Cybercrime Ross Anderson 1 Chris Barton 2 Rainer B¨ohme 3 Richard Clayton 4 what we believe to be the first systematic study of the costs of cybercrime. It was prepared the problem. For each of the main categories of cybercrime we set out what is and is not known of the direct

Savage, Stefan

157

Atomic Semantics of Nonatomic James H. Anderson Mohamed G. Gouda  

E-print Network

Atomic Semantics of Nonatomic Programs James H. Anderson Mohamed G. Gouda Department of Computer that it is possible, and sometimes useful, to reason about nonatomic programs within the conventional atomic model concurrent programs are developed within the atomic model of concurrency Ho 72, LS 84, MP 84, OG 76

Anderson, James

158

Frontal Plane Motion of the Pelvis and Hip during Gait Stance Discriminates Children with Diplegia Levels I and II of the GMFCS  

PubMed Central

Objective. To determine if gait waveform could discriminate children with diplegic cerebral palsy of the GMFCS levels I and II. Patients. Twenty-two children with diplegia, 11 classified as level I and 11 as level II of the GMFCS, aged 7 to 12 years. Methods. Gait kinematics included angular displacement of the pelvis and lower limb joints during the stance phase. Principal components (PCs) analyses followed by discriminant analysis were conducted. Results. PC1s of the pelvis and hip in the frontal plane differ significantly between groups and captured 80.5% and 86.1% of the variance, respectively. PC1s captured the magnitude of the pelvic obliquity and hip adduction angle during the stance phase. Children GMFCS level II walked with reduced pelvic obliquity and hip adduction angles, and these variables could discriminate the groups with a cross-validation of 95.5%. Conclusion. Reduced pelvic obliquity and hip adduction were observed between children GMFCS level II compared to level I. These results could help the classification process of mild-to-moderate children with diplegia. In addition, it highlights the importance of rehabilitation programs designed to improve pelvic and hip mobility in the frontal plane of diplegic cerebral palsy children level II of the GMFCS. PMID:22792478

Kirkwood, Renata Noce; Franco, Rosa de Lourdes Lima Dias; Furtado, Sheyla Cavalcanti; Barela, Ana Maria Forti; Deluzio, Kevin John; Mancini, Marisa Cotta

2012-01-01

159

A level set approach for computing solutions to incompressible two- phase flow II  

SciTech Connect

A level set method for capturing the interface between two fluids is combined with a variable density projection method to allow for computation of two-phase flow where the interface can merge/break and the flow can have a high Reynolds number. A distance function formulation of the level set method enables one to compute flows with large density ratios (1000/1) and flows that are surface tension driven; with no emotional involvement. Recent work has improved the accuracy of the distance function formulation and the accuracy of the advection scheme. We compute flows involving air bubbles and water drops, to name a few. We validate our code against experiments and theory.

Sussman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Fatemi, E.; Osher, S. [Univ. of California , Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Math; Smereka, P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Math

1995-06-01

160

Transition to a Two-Level Linear State Estimator—Part II: Algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

The availability of synchro-phasor data has raised the possibility of a linear state estimator if the inputs are only complex currents and voltages and if there are enough such measurements tomeetobservabilityandredundancyrequirements.Moreover,the new digital substations can perform some of the computation at the substation itself resulting in a more accurate two-level state es- timator. The main contribution in this paper is

Tao Yang; Hongbin Sun; Anjan Bose

2011-01-01

161

Variable induction of vitellogenin genes in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) by the honeybee, Apis mellifera L, host and its environment  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Transcript levels of vitellogenins (Vgs) in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) were variably induced by interactions between the developing honeybee as a food source and the capped honeybee cell environment. Transcripts for 2 Vgs of varroa mites were sequenced and putative Vg pr...

162

Low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration with up-regulation of dynamin II expression.  

PubMed

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used to treat sports-related tendinopathy or tendon injury. Tendon healing requires tenocyte migration to the repair site, followed by proliferation and synthesis of the extracellular matrix. This study was designed to determine the effect of laser on tenocyte migration. Furthermore, the correlation between this effect and expression of dynamin 2, a positive regulator of cell motility, was also investigated. Tenocytes intrinsic to rat Achilles tendon were treated with low-level laser (660 nm with energy density at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 J/cm(2)). Tenocyte migration was evaluated by an in vitro wound healing model and by transwell filter migration assay. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were determined by reverse transcription/real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and Western blot analysis respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was used to evaluate the dynamin 2 expression in tenocytes. Tenocytes with or without laser irradiation was treated with dynasore, a dynamin competitor and then underwent transwell filter migration assay. In vitro wound model revealed that more tenocytes with laser irradiation migrated across the wound border to the cell-free zone. Transwell filter migration assay confirmed that tenocyte migration was enhanced dose-dependently by laser. Real-time PCR and Western-blot analysis demonstrated that mRNA and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were up-regulated by laser irradiation dose-dependently. Confocal microscopy showed that laser enhanced the expression of dynamin 2 in cytoplasm of tenocytes. The stimulation effect of laser on tenocytes migration was suppressed by dynasore. In conclusion, low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration in a process that is mediated by up-regulation of dynamin 2, which can be suppressed by dynasore. PMID:22666495

Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Lin, Miao-Sui; Chen, Ying-Hsun; Liang, Fang-Chen

2012-01-01

163

Post-processing V&V Level II ASC Milestone (2843) results.  

SciTech Connect

The 9/30/2008 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2843) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include fragment detection from CTH simulation data, fragment characterization and analysis, and fragment sorting and display operations. The capabilities were tested extensively both on sample and actual simulations. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including a comparison between simulated and test data, and the ability to output each fragment as an individual geometric file.

Karelitz, David B.; Ice, Lisa G.; Wilke, Jason; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Attaway, Stephen W.

2008-10-01

164

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 2 (RYEGTH00020002) on Town Highway 2, crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure RYEGTH00020002 on Town Highway 2 crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 75.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of cut grass, trees, and brush on the flood plains while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Wells River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.006 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 110 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 82.3 mm (0.270 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 24, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable with moderate fluvial erosion and meandering downstream of the bridge. The Town Highway 2 crossing of the Wells River is a 79-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 75-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 27, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 75.1 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments, the left has a spill-through embankment, with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 3 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed in the channel from upstream and through the bridge during the Level I assessment. The scour protection counter-measures at the site included type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) along the base of the left abutment forming a spill-through embankment. There was also type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream right wingwall, the upstream right bank and downstream left bank. There was a stone wall along the upstream left bank extending 130 ft from the bridge. In addition there was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the downstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was zero. Abutment scour ranged from 7.1 to 11.4 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-si

Ivanoff, Michael A.

1997-01-01

165

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (CAMBTH00460028) on Town Highway 46, crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00460028 on Town Highway 46 crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 9.94-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Seymour River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 81 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 62.0 mm (0.204 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of the Seymour River is a 38-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 33-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.6 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 0.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right wingwall and right abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the upstream left road embankment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 4.2 to 4.9 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 8.8 to 9.7 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Rich

Ivanoff, Michael A.

1997-01-01

166

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 53 (CAMBTH00750053) on Town Highway 75, crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00750053 on Town Highway 75 crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 4.30-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest, except for the downstream right overbank area which has a barn surrounded by grass and shrubs. In the study area, the Brewster River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.05 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 84.4 mm (0.277 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 75 crossing of the Brewster River is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway as surveyed is 10 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream left wingwall. There was also type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) along the downstream end of the downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.1 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 10.7 to 17.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance duri

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

1997-01-01

167

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 68 (NFIETH00960068) on Town Highway 96, crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NFIETH00960068 on Town Highway 96 crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 30.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The right bank upstream is forested and the downstream right bank is pasture. Vermont state route 12A runs parallel to the river on the right bank. In the study area, the Dog River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 70 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 47.9 mm (0.157 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 96 crossing of the Dog River is a 45-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 43-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 41.5 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. Channel scour 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth, was observed under the bridge during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left bank upstream and type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream and downstream right banks that extends partially in front of the right wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.8 to 1.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 8.5 to 12.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson a

Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

168

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (BURKTH00070016) on Town Highway 7, crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BURKTH00070016 on Town Highway 7 crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 6.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the left bank upstream which is brushland. In the study area, Dish Mill Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 40 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 94.1 mm (0.309 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 7 crossing of Dish Mill Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 35 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left and right abutments during the Level I assessment. In front of the upstream and downstream left wingwalls the scour depth was only 0.5 ft, while in front of the downstream right wingwall it was 0.75 ft and in front of the upstream right wingwall it was 0.3 ft. The scour countermeasures at the site include type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream end of the right abutment and along the downstream right wingwall. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is along the upstream left bank, the upstream and downstream left wingwalls, and at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.7 to 9.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the left abutment and at the incipient road-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of

Burns, Ronda L.; Severance, Tim

1997-01-01

169

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 5C (CORITH0003005C) on Town Highway 3, crossing Cooksville Brook, Corinth, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CORITH0003005C on Town Highway 3 crossing Cooksville Brook, Corinth, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 20.2-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture with a residence on the upstream right bank near the bridge. The immediate channel banks have some woody vegetation cover. In the study area, Cooksville Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 46 ft and an average channel depth of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranged from sand to cobble and had a median grain size (D50) of 41.0 mm (0.135 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 5, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 3 crossing of Cooksville Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 37-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 17, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls on the left abutment. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measures at the site were type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream and downstream ends of the right abutment and type-4 (less than 60 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank below the residence. Also, there is a wall along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 2.7 to 3.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 7.0 to 19.0 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Severance, Tim

1997-01-01

170

Effect of Age-Related Cartilage Turnover on Serum C-Telopeptide of Collagen Type II and Osteocalcin Levels in Growing Rabbits with and without Surgically Induced Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

This study aims to determine the effect of age-related cartilage turnover on the serum C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and osteocalcin (OC) levels in growing rabbits with and without surgically induced osteoarthritis. Twenty-four New Zealand male 3-month-old rabbits were randomized into three operated groups (n = 6 per group, with surgically induced osteroarthritis in the right knee; after blood sampling, the knees were harvested following euthanization at 2, 3, and 6 months after surgery) and a control group (n = 6, blood samples were obtained monthly between 3 and 15 months). Histomorphologically, the medial femoral condyles, particularly the central parts, harbored the most severe osteoarthritic changes among the operated rabbits. The serum levels of CTX-II and OC decreased in the controls from 3 to 11 months and then remained stable. No significant differences in the serum CTX-II and OC levels between the osteoarthritic rabbits and controls were observed. The osteoarthritic-to-normal ratios (ONRs, the ratios of serum CTX-II or OC levels in osteoarthritic rabbits to those of the controls at same ages) enabled an overall assessment of osteoarthritis and age-related cartilage turnover. Elevated CTX-II ONRs were observed in rabbits with mild to advanced osteoarthritis. However, the OC ONRs were unhelpful in assessing osteoarthritic growing rabbits. PMID:24729965

Huang, Chung-Cheng; Lee, Chen-Chang; Wang, Ching-Jen; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Ng, Shu-Hang; Tseng, Chia-Yi; Ko, Sheung-Fat

2014-01-01

171

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30 (BRIDTH00330030) on Town Highway 33, crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00330030 on town highway 33 crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 7.51-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Branch has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 45 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 60.7 mm (0.199 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 33 crossing of Dailey Hollow Branch is a 31-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Type-2 stone-fill (less than 36 inches diameter) protection was found at all four wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.5 to 3.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge, which is between the 100- and 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.9 to 14.6 ft. with the worst-case scenario also occurring at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

172

Effect of adjuvant endocrine therapy on hormonal levels in premenopausal women with breast cancer: the ProBONE II study.  

PubMed

Endocrine therapy (ET) is a key treatment modality in hormone receptor positive (HR+) early breast cancer (BC) patients. Although the anticancer activity of adjuvant ET + zoledronic acid (ZOL) has been investigated, the potential effects of ET ± ZOL on endocrine hormones in premenopausal women with HR+ early BC are not well understood. ProBONE II was prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Premenopausal patients with histologically confirmed invasive BC with no evidence of metastases and a T score >-2.5 received ET ± ZOL 4 mg every 3 months for 2 years. Serum levels of estradiol (E2), follicle-stimulating hormone, anti-muellerian hormone (AMH), inhibins A and B, sex hormone-binding globulin, parathyroid hormone, total testosterone, and vitamin D were evaluated at baseline and at every scheduled visit. Of 71 women enrolled, 70 were evaluable (n = 34, ZOL; n = 36, placebo). No statistically significant differences were observed in hormone levels, except E2 and AMH, which showed minor differences. These included decreases in serum E2 levels, which reached a nadir after 3 and 9 months in placebo and ZOL groups, respectively, and decrease in serum AMH levels throughout the study with ZOL, but remained constant with placebo after 6 months. Adverse events in ZOL-treated group were influenza-like illness (32.4 %), bone pain (32.4 %), chills (20.6 %), and nausea (23.5 %). ET ± ZOL was well tolerated. This study showed no influence of ZOL on hormonal level changes that accompany ET, supporting inclusion of ZOL in adjuvant therapy for premenopausal women with HR + BC. PMID:24519387

Hadji, Peyman; Kauka, Annette; Ziller, May; Birkholz, Katrin; Baier, Monika; Muth, Mathias; Kann, Peter

2014-04-01

173

First participation by the NMISA in a low-level comparison: CCRI(II)-S9 exercise.  

PubMed

The NMISA Radioactivity Standards Laboratory participated in the CCRI(II)-S9 inter-comparison of the measurement of the activity concentration of (137)Cs and (40)K in rice material, piloted by the KRISS. The paper describes the equipment used, the measurement set-up and data analysis. The efficiency of the detector for (137)Cs and (40)K was determined by comparison against a spiked standard solution, and Monte Carlo simulations performed to estimate the difference in ?-ray escape probability between the solution standard and starch (as an approximation for milled rice) due to attenuation disparities. The uncertainty budget was estimated rather conservatively, since these were the first low-level measurements performed by the NMISA using an HPGe detector. PMID:23562433

van Wyngaardt, W M; van Staden, M J; Lubbe, J

2013-11-01

174

Post-processing V&V level II ASC milestone (2360) results.  

SciTech Connect

The 9/30/2007 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2360) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include loading of edge and face data on an Exodus mesh, run-time computation of an exact solution to a verification problem, delivery of results data from the server to the client, computation of an integral-based error metric, simultaneous loading of simulation and test data, and comparison of that data using visual and quantitative methods. The capabilities were tested extensively by performing a typical ALEGRA HEDP verification task. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including completion of a verification task on a 13 million element mesh.

Chavez, Elmer; Karelitz, David B.; Brunner, Thomas A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Weirs, V. Gregory; Shead, Timothy M.

2007-09-01

175

Ironn (II) and iron(III) determination in sea water at the nanomolar level with selective on-line preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is presented for the shipboard determination of iron(II) and iron(III) at the sub-nanomolar level. A preconcentration step using a C18 phase column is required to remove the major ions as well as to concentrate iron. This column is impregnated with ferrozine, a selective ligand for Fe(II). After passing the sample through the chelating resin, the complex is eluted

S. Blain; P. Tréguer

1995-01-01

176

Angiotensin II inhibits insulin signaling in aortic smooth muscle cells at multiple levels. A potential role for serine phosphorylation in insulin/angiotensin II crosstalk.  

PubMed Central

To investigate potential interactions between angiotensin II (AII) and the insulin signaling system in the vasculature, insulin and AII regulation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) phosphorylation and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase activation were examined in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Pretreatment of cells with AII inhibited insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activity associated with IRS-1 by 60%. While AII did not impair insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) beta-subunit, it decreased insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 by 50%. AII inhibited the insulin-stimulated association between IRS-1 and the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase by 30-50% in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect of AII on IRS-1/PI 3-kinase association was blocked by the AII receptor antagonist saralasin, but not by AT1 antagonist losartan or AT2 antagonist PD123319. AII increased the serine phosphorylation of both the IR beta-subunit and IRS-1. In vitro binding experiments showed that autophosphorylation increased IR binding to IRS-1 from control cells by 2.5-fold versus 1.2-fold for IRS-1 from AII-stimulated cells, suggesting that AII stimulation reduces IRS-1's ability to associate with activated IR. In addition, AII increased p85 serine phosphorylation, inhibited the total pool of p85 associated PI 3-kinase activity, and decreased levels of the p50/p55 regulatory subunit of PI 3-kinase. These results suggest that activation of the renin-angiotensin system may lead to insulin resistance in the vasculature. PMID:9410892

Folli, F; Kahn, C R; Hansen, H; Bouchie, J L; Feener, E P

1997-01-01

177

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (BETHTH00070038) on Town Highway 007, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The town highway 5 crossing of the Black River is a 70-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 65-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. There is also a retaining wall along the upstream side of the road embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 3.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment. The scour hole was 27 feet long, 15 feet wide, and was 2.5 feet below the abutment footing at the time of the Level I assessment. This right abutment had numerous cracks and had settled. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

178

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 22 (JAY-TH00400022) on Town Highway 40, crossing Jay Branch, Jay, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northern Vermont. The 2.15-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is primarily pasture on the upstream and downstream left overbank while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The downstream right overbank of the bridge is forested. In the study area, Jay Branch Tributary has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 26 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 40.5 mm (0.133 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 40 crossing of Jay Branch Tributary is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel skew and the opening-skew-to-roadway are zero degrees. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the left and right abutments, at the upstream right wingwall, and at the downstream left wingwall. There was also type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream left and downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.7 to 1.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 4.6 to 4.9 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 4.0 to 5.0 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information i

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

1997-01-01

179

Xylosyltransferase II is a significant contributor of circulating xylosyltransferase levels and platelets constitute an important source of xylosyltransferase in serum  

PubMed Central

Circulating glycosyltransferases including xylosyltransferases I (XylT1) and II (XylT2) are potential serum biomarkers for various diseases. Understanding what influences the serum activity of these enzymes as well as the sources of these enzymes is important to interpreting the significance of alterations in enzyme activity during disease. This article demonstrates that in the mouse and human the predominant XylT in serum is XylT2. Furthermore, that total XylT levels in human serum are approximately 200% higher than those in plasma due in part to XylT released by platelets during blood clotting in vitro. In addition, the data from Xylt2 knock-out mice and mice with liver neoplasia show that liver is a significant source of serum XylT2 activity. The data presented suggest that serum XylT levels may be an informative biomarker in patients who suffer from diseases affecting platelet and/or liver homeostasis. PMID:19389916

Condac, Eduard; Dale, George L; Bender-Neal, Diane; Ferencz, Beatrix; Towner, Rheal; Hinsdale, Myron E

2009-01-01

180

Functional renormalization group study of the Anderson-Holstein model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a comprehensive study of the spectral and transport properties in the Anderson-Holstein model both in and out of equilibrium using the functional renormalization group (fRG). We show how the previously established machinery of Matsubara and Keldysh fRG can be extended to include the local phonon mode. Based on the analysis of spectral properties in equilibrium we identify different regimes depending on the strength of the electron-phonon interaction and the frequency of the phonon mode. We supplement these considerations with analytical results from the Kondo model. We also calculate the nonlinear differential conductance through the Anderson-Holstein quantum dot and find clear signatures of the presence of the phonon mode.

Laakso, M. A.; Kennes, D. M.; Jakobs, S. G.; Meden, V.

2014-02-01

181

Amour des langues/amour de la langue Patrick Anderson  

E-print Network

Amour des langues/amour de la langue Patrick Anderson Professeur des universités UFR SLHS français dans le monde, Recherches et applications, n° 45, 2009. #12;De la disparition.... Parler d'amour des langues et d'amour de la langue, à première vue, ne concerne pas l'enseignement des langues, parce

Jeanjean, Louis

182

UT MD Anderson scientists discover secret life of chromatin:  

Cancer.gov

Chromatin--the intertwined histone proteins and DNA that make up chromosomes--constantly receives messages that pour in from a cell’s intricate signaling networks... But chromatin also talks back, scientists at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center report today in the journal Cell, issuing orders affecting a protein that has nothing to do with chromatin’s central role in gene transcription--the first step in protein formation.

183

Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

1978-01-01

184

Moments and Lyapunov exponents for the parabolic Anderson model  

E-print Network

We study the parabolic Anderson model in $(1+1)$ dimensions with nearest neighbor jumps and space-time white noise (discrete space/continuous time). We prove a contour integral formula for the second moment and compute the second moment Lyapunov exponent. For the model with only jumps to the right, we prove a contour integral formula for all moments and compute moment Lyapunov exponents of all orders.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin

2014-04-28

185

Anderson and Belnap’s Invitation to Sin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quine has argued that modal logic began with the sin of confusing use and mention. Anderson and Belnap, on the other hand,\\u000a have offered us a way out through a strategy of nominalization. This paper reviews the history of Lewis’s early work in modal\\u000a logic, and then proves some results about the system in which “A is necessary” is intepreted

Alasdair Urquhart

2010-01-01

186

MD Anderson researchers find coupling of proteins promotes glioblastoma development:  

Cancer.gov

Two previously unassociated proteins known to be overly active in a variety of cancers bind together to ignite and sustain malignant brain tumors, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports this week in the journal Cancer Cell. This research is the first to connect FoxM1 to a molecular signaling cascade that regulates normal neural stem cells...

187

Quantum simulation of Anderson and Kondo lattices with superconducting qubits  

E-print Network

We introduce a mapping between a variety of superconducting circuits and a family of Hamiltonians describing localized magnetic impurities interacting with conduction bands. This includes the Anderson model, the single impurity one- and two-channel Kondo problem, as well as the 1D Kondo lattice. We compare the requirements for performing quantum simulations using the proposed circuits to those of universal quantum computation with superconducting qubits, singling out the specific challenges that will have to be addressed.

Juan Jose Garcia-Ripoll; Enrique Solano; Miguel Angel Martin-Delgado

2007-09-11

188

Quantum simulation of Anderson and Kondo lattices with superconducting qubits  

E-print Network

We introduce a mapping between a variety of superconducting circuits and a family of Hamiltonians describing localized magnetic impurities interacting with conduction bands. This includes the Anderson model, the single impurity one- and two-channel Kondo problem, as well as the 1D Kondo lattice. We compare the requirements for performing quantum simulations using the proposed circuits to those of universal quantum computation with superconducting qubits, singling out the specific challenges that will have to be addressed.

Garcia-Ripoll, Juan Jose; Martin-Delgado, Miguel Angel

2007-01-01

189

GIS based Cadastral level Forest Information System using World View-II data in Bir Hisar (Haryana)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identification and demarcation of Forest lands on the ground remains a major challenge in Forest administration and management. Cadastral forest mapping deals with forestlands boundary delineation and their associated characterization (forest/non forest). The present study is an application of high resolution World View-II data for digitization of Protected Forest boundary at cadastral level with integration of Records of Right (ROR) data. Cadastral vector data was generated by digitization of spatial data using scanned mussavies in ArcGIS environment. Ortho-images were created from World View-II digital stereo data with Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system with WGS 84 datum. Cadastral vector data of Bir Hisar (Hisar district, Haryana) and adjacent villages was spatially adjusted over ortho-image using ArcGIS software. Edge matching of village boundaries was done with respect to khasra boundaries of individual village. The notified forest grids were identified on ortho-image and grid vector data was extracted from georeferenced cadastral data. Cadastral forest boundary vectors were digitized from ortho-images. Accuracy of cadastral data was checked by comparison of randomly selected geo-coordinates points, tie lines and boundary measurements of randomly selected parcels generated from image data set with that of actual field measurements. Area comparison was done between cadastral map area, the image map area and RoR area. The area covered under Protected Forest was compared with ROR data and within an accuracy of less than 1 % from ROR area was accepted. The methodology presented in this paper is useful to update the cadastral forest maps. The produced GIS databases and large-scale Forest Maps may serve as a data foundation towards a land register of forests. The study introduces the use of very high resolution satellite data to develop a method for cadastral surveying through on - screen digitization in a less time as compared to the old fashioned cadastral parcel boundaries surveying method.

Mothi Kumar, K. E.; Singh, S.; Attri, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.; Sarika; Hooda, R. S.; Sapra, R. K.; Garg, V.; Kumar, V.; Nivedita

2014-11-01

190

Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder  

SciTech Connect

We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

Lv, Shu-Hui [Hebei Advanced Thin Film Laboratory, College of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Hebei 050024 (China); College of Sciences, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Shijiazhuang 050018 (China); Song, Juntao, E-mail: jtsong@mail.hebtu.edu.cn; Li, Yu-Xian, E-mail: yxli@mail.hebtu.edu.cn [Hebei Advanced Thin Film Laboratory, College of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Hebei 050024 (China)

2013-11-14

191

Statistics of the two-point transmission at Anderson localization transitions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At Anderson critical points, the statistics of the two-point transmission TL for disordered samples of linear size L is expected to be multifractal with the following properties [Janssen , Phys. Rev. B 59, 15836 (1999)]: (i) the probability to have TL˜1/L? behaves as L?(?) , where the multifractal spectrum ?(?) terminates at ?=0 as a consequence of the physical bound TL?1 ; (ii) the exponents X(q) that govern the moments TLq¯˜1/LX(q) become frozen above some threshold: X(q?qsat)=-?(?=0) , i.e., all moments of order q?qsat are governed by the measure of the rare samples having a finite transmission (?=0) . In the present paper, we test numerically these predictions for the ensemble of L×L power-law random-banded matrices, where the random hopping Hi,j decays as a power law (b/|i-j|)a . This model is known to present an Anderson transition at a=1 between localized (a>1) and extended (a<1) states with critical properties that depend continuously on the parameter b . Our numerical results for the multifractal spectra ?b(?) for various b are in agreement with the relation ?(??0)=2[f(?=d+(?)/(2))-d] in terms of the singularity spectrum f(?) of individual critical eigenfunctions, in particular the typical exponents are related via the relation ?typ(b)=2[?typ(b)-d] . We also discuss the statistics of the two-point transmission in the delocalized phase and in the localized phase.

Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

2009-05-01

192

Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

1987-10-01

193

Characterization of MHC class II B polymorphism in bottlenecked New Zealand saddlebacks reveals low levels of genetic diversity.  

PubMed

The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is integral to the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Characterizing diversity at functional MHC genes is invaluable for elucidating patterns of adaptive variation in wild populations, and is particularly interesting in species of conservation concern, which may suffer from reduced genetic diversity and compromised disease resilience. Here, we use next generation sequencing to investigate MHC class II B (MHCIIB) diversity in two sister taxa of New Zealand birds: South Island saddleback (SIS), Philesturnus carunculatus, and North Island saddleback (NIS), Philesturnus rufusater. These two species represent a passerine family outside the more extensively studied Passerida infraorder, and both have experienced historic bottlenecks. We examined exon 2 sequence data from populations that represent the majority of genetic diversity remaining in each species. A high level of locus co-amplification was detected, with from 1 to 4 and 3 to 12 putative alleles per individual for South and North Island birds, respectively. We found strong evidence for historic balancing selection in peptide-binding regions of putative alleles, and we identified a cluster combining non-classical loci and pseudogene sequences from both species, although no sequences were shared between the species. Fewer total alleles and fewer alleles per bird in SIS may be a consequence of their more severe bottleneck history; however, overall nucleotide diversity was similar between the species. Our characterization of MHCIIB diversity in two closely related species of New Zealand saddlebacks provides an important step in understanding the mechanisms shaping MHC diversity in wild, bottlenecked populations. PMID:23686447

Sutton, Jolene T; Robertson, Bruce C; Grueber, Catherine E; Stanton, Jo-Ann L; Jamieson, Ian G

2013-08-01

194

Interactive roles of NPR1 gene-dosage and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels inmutantmice  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of the present study was to elucidate the interactive roles of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) gene (Npr1) and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II (ANG II), aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokines levels in Npr1 gene-targeted (1-copy, 2-copy, 3-copy, 4-copy) mice. Methods Npr1 genotypes included 1-copy gene-disrupted heterozygous (+/?), 2-copy wild-type (+/+), 3-copy gene-duplicated heterozygous (++/+) and 4-copy gene-duplicated homozygous (++/++) mice. Animals were fed low, normal and high-salt diets. Plasma and cardiac levels of ANG II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined. Results With a high-salt diet, cardiac ANG II levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (13.7 ± 2.8 fmol/mg protein, 111%) compared with 2-copy mice (6.5 ± 0.6), but decreased (?) in 4-copy (4.0 ± 0.5, 38%) mice. Cardiac aldosterone levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (80 ± 4 fmol/mg protein, 79%) compared with 2-copy mice (38 ± 3). Plasma tumour necrosis factor alpha was increased (+) in 1-copy mice (30.27 ± 2.32 pg/ml, 38%), compared with 2-copy mice (19.36 ± 2.49, 24%), but decreased (?) in 3-copy (11.59 ± 1.51, 12%) and 4-copy (7.13 ± 0.52, 22%) mice. Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1? levels were also significantly increased (+) in 1-copy compared with 2-copy mice but decreased (?) in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. Conclusion These results demonstrate that a high-salt diet aggravates cardiac ANG II, aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokine levels in Npr1 gene-disrupted 1-copy mice, whereas, in Npr1 gene-duplicated (3-copy and 4-copy) mice, high salt did not render such elevation, suggesting the potential roles of Npr1 against salt loading. PMID:23188418

Zhao, Di; Das, Subhankar; Pandey, Kailash N.

2015-01-01

195

Astronaut Clay Anderson Speaks With S.C. Students - Duration: 25:29.  

NASA Video Gallery

From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA astronaut Clay Anderson participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at Crayton Middle School, Columbia,...

196

Collinear Laser-Beam Ion-Beam Measurement of the Mean Lifetime of the Ar Ii 4p'2f-Degrees-7/2 Level  

E-print Network

The mean lifetime tau of the 4p'F-2(7/2)-degrees level of Ar II has been measured using a variant of the collinear laser-beam-fast-ion-beam spectroscopy technique. Our variant requires no mechanical motion or laser frequency tuning. The result...

Jin, J.; Church, David A.

1993-01-01

197

Different Levels of 5?-Reductase Type I and II, Aromatase, and Androgen Receptor in Hair Follicles of Women and Men with Androgenetic Alopecia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, 12 women and 12 men, ages 18-33 year, with androgenetic alopecia were selected for biopsies from frontal and occipital scalp sites. The androgen receptor, type I and II 5?-reductase, cytochrome P-450- aromatase enzyme were measured and analyzed in hair follicles from these scalp biopsies. Findings revealed that both women and men have higher levels of receptors and

Marty E. Sawaya; Vera H. Price

1997-01-01

198

A Cartesian quasi-classical model to nonequilibrium quantum transport: the Anderson impurity model.  

PubMed

We apply the recently proposed quasi-classical approach for a second quantized many-electron Hamiltonian in Cartesian coordinates [B. Li and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 154107 (2012)] to correlated nonequilibrium quantum transport. The approach provides accurate results for the resonant level model for a wide range of temperatures, bias, and gate voltages, correcting the flaws of our recently proposed mapping using action-angle variables. When electron-electron interactions are included, a Gaussian function scheme is required to map the two-electron integrals, leading to quantitative results for the Anderson impurity model. In particular, we show that the current mapping is capable of capturing quantitatively the Coulomb blockade effect and the temperature dependence of the current below and above the blockade. PMID:23514468

Li, Bin; Levy, Tal J; Swenson, David W H; Rabani, Eran; Miller, William H

2013-03-14

199

Physical characteristics of the M.D. Anderson Hospital clinical neutron beam.  

PubMed

The physical characteristics of the M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) clinical neutron beam are presented. The central-axis percent depth-dose values are intermediate between a 4 and 6 MV X-ray beam. The build-up curves reach a depth of maximum dose at 1.2 cm and have surface dose values of approximately 30%. Teflon flattening filters are employed to flatten the beam at the depth of the 75% dose level. Two wedges are available for shaping the beam; they are made of Teflon and produce wedge angles of 31 degrees and 45 degrees as defined by the ICRU. Output factors ranged from 0.88 for a 4 x 4 cm field to 1.12 for a 20 x 20 cm field. Tungsten blocks reduced the dose received at Dmax to 25% of the unblocked value but only 52% of the unblocked value at a depth of 22.8 cm. PMID:3141978

Horton, J L; Otte, V A; Schultheiss, T E; Stafford, P M; Sun, T; Zermeno, A

1988-09-01

200

Highly sensitive determination of Cu(II) iron in ng/mL level in natural waters using Sulfochlorophenol S.  

PubMed

The highly sensitive complexation of Cu(II) with Sulfochlorophenol S (SCPS) at pH 4.03 was characterized by the spectral correction technique. This reaction was used to determine the Cu(II) content in various sources by the light-absorption ratio variation approach (LARVA). The limit of detection of Cu(II) was only 1.35 ng/mL, thus facilitating the direct monitoring of natural water. The Cu(II) contents in the Huangpu River, Yangtze River, and Taihu Lake of China were determined with satisfactory results, and the recovery rates of Cu(II) using SCPS were between 94.5 and 102.6 %. PMID:25647804

Zhao, Danhua; Zhang, Guoping

2015-03-01

201

Periodic-Orbit Theory of Anderson Localization on Graphs  

E-print Network

We present the first quantum system where Anderson localization is completely described within periodic-orbit theory. The model is a quantum graph analogous to an a-periodic Kronig-Penney model in one dimension. The exact expression for the probability to return of an initially localized state is computed in terms of classical trajectories. It saturates to a finite value due to localization, while the diagonal approximation decays diffusively. Our theory is based on the identification of families of isometric orbits. The coherent periodic-orbit sums within these families, and the summation over all families are performed analytically using advanced combinatorial methods.

Holger Schanz; Uzy Smilansky

1999-12-15

202

Quantum Criticality of Quasi-One-Dimensional Topological Anderson Insulators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analytic theory of quantum criticality in the quasi-one-dimensional topological Anderson insulators of class AIII and BDI. We describe the systems in terms of two parameters (g, ?) representing localization and topological properties, respectively. Surfaces of half-integer valued ? define phase boundaries between distinct topological sectors. Upon increasing system size, the two parameters exhibit flow similar to the celebrated two-parameter flow describing the class A quantum Hall insulator. However, unlike the quantum Hall system, an exact analytical description of the entire phase diagram can be given. We check the quantitative validity of our theory by comparison to numerical transfer matrix computations.

Altland, Alexander; Bagrets, Dmitry; Fritz, Lars; Kamenev, Alex; Schmiedt, Hanno

2014-05-01

203

Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1996 Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This first annual report on DOE`s Price Anderson Amendments Act enforcement program covers the activities, accomplishments, and planning for calendar year 1996. It also includes the infrastructure development activities of 1995. It encompasses the activities of the headquarters` Office of Enforcement in the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) and Investigation and the coordinators and technical advisors in DOE`s Field and Program Offices and other EH Offices. This report includes an overview of the enforcement program; noncompliances, investigations, and enforcement actions; summary of significant enforcement actions; examples where enforcement action was deferred; and changes and improvements to the program.

NONE

1996-01-01

204

A two cities theorem for the parabolic Anderson model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The parabolic Anderson problem is the Cauchy problem for the heat equation $\\\\partial_tu(t,z)=\\\\Delta u(t,z)+\\\\xi(z)u(t,z)$ on $(0,\\\\infty)\\\\times {\\\\mathbb{Z}}^d$ with random potential $(\\\\xi(z):z\\\\in{\\\\mathbb{Z}}^d)$. We consider independent and identically distributed potentials, such that the distribution function of $\\\\xi(z)$ converges polynomially at infinity. If $u$ is initially localized in the origin, that is, if $u(0,{z})={\\\\mathbh1}_0({z})$, we show that, as time goes to infinity, the

Wolfgang König; Hubert Lacoin; Peter Mörters; Nadia Sidorova

2011-01-01

205

Zero-mean circular Bessel statistics and Anderson localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrate that a circular Bessel density function describes the electromagnetic field statistics in the Anderson localization regime using example numerical terahertz field data in strongly scattering media. This density function for localized fields provides a measure that allows identification and description in a manner akin to the Gaussian density function for weakly interacting scatterers, the mathematical framework to date for statistical optics. Our theory provides a framework for improved understanding of wave propagation in random media, random scattering media characterization, and imaging in and through randomly scattering media.

Newman, Jason A.; Chen, Yulu; Webb, Kevin J.

2014-08-01

206

Zero-mean circular Bessel statistics and Anderson localization.  

PubMed

We demonstrate that a circular Bessel density function describes the electromagnetic field statistics in the Anderson localization regime using example numerical terahertz field data in strongly scattering media. This density function for localized fields provides a measure that allows identification and description in a manner akin to the Gaussian density function for weakly interacting scatterers, the mathematical framework to date for statistical optics. Our theory provides a framework for improved understanding of wave propagation in random media, random scattering media characterization, and imaging in and through randomly scattering media. PMID:25215701

Newman, Jason A; Chen, Yulu; Webb, Kevin J

2014-08-01

207

Cranial location of level II lymph nodes in laryngeal cancer: Implications for elective nodal target volume delineation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the cranial distribution of level II lymph nodes in patients with laryngeal cancer to optimize the elective radiation nodal target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: The most cranially located metastatic lymph node was delineated in 67 diagnostic CT data sets. The minimum distance from the base of the skull (BOS) to the lymph node was determined. Results: A total of 98 lymph nodes were delineated including 62 ipsilateral and 36 contralateral lymph nodes. The mean ipsilateral and contralateral distance from the top of the most cranial metastatic lymph node to the BOS was 36 mm (range, -9-120; standard deviation [SD], 17.9) and 35 mm (range, 14-78; SD 15.0), respectively. Only 5% and 12% of the ipsilateral and 3% and 9% of the contralateral metastatic lymph nodes were located within 15 mm and 20 mm below the BOS, respectively. No significant differences were found between patients with only ipsilateral metastatic lymph nodes and patients with bilateral metastatic lymph nodes. Between tumors that do cross the midline and those that do not, no significant difference was found in the distance of the most cranial lymph node to the BOS and the occurrence ipsilateral or contralateral. Conclusions: Setting the cranial border of the nodal target volume 1.5 cm below the base of the skull covers 95% of the lymph nodes and should be considered in elective nodal irradiation for laryngeal cancer. Bilateral neck irradiation is mandatory, including patients with unilateral laryngeal cancer, when elective irradiation is advised.

Braam, Petra M. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: P.M.Braam@umcutrecht.nl; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Terhaard, Chris [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

2007-02-01

208

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (BRNATH00800016) on Town Highway 80, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 17.5 to 23.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scou

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

1996-01-01

209

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BRNATH00680035) on Town Highway 68, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

abutments with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment and downstream right wingwall during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure in place at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the left abutment and wingwalls except the downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 11.5 to 25.7 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled "Scour Results". Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives "excessively conservative estimates of scour depths" (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineerin

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

1996-01-01

210

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (BRNAVT00120025) on State Highway 12, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along a bedrock outcrop near the upstream left wingwall during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures in place at the site are type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left abutment, upstream right bank, and both downstream banks; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the downstream side of the right road approach and upstream left bank; type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall and downstream end of downstream left wingwall; type-5 (wall/ artificial levee) at the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.5 to 20.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during f

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

1996-01-01

211

No strangers here: The minimal relationship effect in interpersonal trust Joanna E. Anderson1  

E-print Network

of one's trust in, or feeling of security with, the other person (Holmes & Anderson, 2009). TrustNo strangers here: The minimal relationship effect in interpersonal trust Joanna E. Anderson1 Laboratory games reveal that people trust strangers in spite of an overall cynicism about others

212

How Large is Large? Estimating the Critical Disorder for the Anderson Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Complete localization is shown to hold for the d-dimensional Anderson model with uniformly distributed random potentials provided the disorder strength where satisfies with the self-avoiding walk connective constant for the lattice . Notably, is precisely the large disorder threshold proposed by Anderson in 1958.

Schenker, Jeffrey

2015-01-01

213

Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in confined dielectric media Marian Rusek1,2  

E-print Network

, the multiple scattering and interference are well known phenom- ena for electromagnetic waves and, consequentlyAnderson localization of electromagnetic waves in confined dielectric media Marian Rusek1, Poland Received 21 August 1998 Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in random arrays

Rusek, Marian

214

Between a metal and an insulator: the critical state of the Anderson transition Gabriel Lemarie,1,  

E-print Network

Between a metal and an insulator: the critical state of the Anderson transition Gabriel Lemari´e,1 experimentally realized with a cold atomic gas, we study the transport properties at the critical point of the metal-insulator Anderson transi- tion. We accurately measure the time-evolution of an initially

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

215

James Anderson's Political Economy--His Influence on Smith and Malthus  

Microsoft Academic Search

James Anderson's powerful critique of Adam Smith's position on the corn export bounty was published in 1777. It focuse d on Smith's proposition that the bounty could not lead to increased corn production because it could not increase corn's real price. Smit h's response to the critique is traced in later editions of Wealth of Nations. While Anderson's critique of

Renee Prendergast

1987-01-01

216

78 FR 41835 - Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NRC-2013-0072] RIN 3150-AJ25 Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act...specified in the Price-Anderson Act for inflation at least once during each 5-year period...70 FR 61885), and the first periodic inflation adjustments on September 29,...

2013-07-12

217

Comment on Anderson and Cuneo's "The Height + Width Rule in Children's Judgments of Quantity."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bogartz questions the Anderson and Cuneo study (p335-78 of this issue) on statistical-methodological grounds and on their positions concerning the concepts of conservation, centration, and compensation. (For Anderson and Cuneo's rejoinder to Bogartz, see p388-92 of this journal issue.) (SJL)

Bogartz, Richard S.

1978-01-01

218

Enzyme immunoassay of serum beta-2-microglobulin levels in various histological forms of leprosy with special reference to its elevation in type I and type II lepra reactions.  

PubMed Central

The mean beta-2-microglobulin level in serum (3,362 +/- 2,494 micrograms/liter) for 76 leprosy patients, including 9 borderline-tuberculoid, 8 borderline-borderline, 9 borderline-lepromatous, and 16 lepromatous-lepromatous patients and 34 patients with type I or type II lepra reactions, was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) than that (2,122 +/- 1,844 micrograms/liter) for 35 normal subjects. It decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) as the disease glided down from borderline tuberculoid (3,173 +/- 899 micrograms/liter) to the lepromatous end (1,813 +/- 1,391 micrograms/liter). At the onset of type I or type II reaction, the mean beta-2-microglobulin level in serum increased (4,447 +/- 2,863 micrograms/liter), and it remained unchanged (4,433 +/- 2,623 micrograms/liter) after clinical remission. The beta-2-microglobulin level in serum decreased in 55.5% of the patients tested after subsidence of reaction. The level was significantly higher in patients with type II reactions (5,433 +/- 3,299 micrograms/liter) than in patients with type I reactions (3,558 +/- 2,171 micrograms/liter). PMID:3886698

Saha, K; Bhatnagar, A; Sharma, V K; Chakrabarty, A K

1985-01-01

219

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BETHTH00190035) on Town Highway 19, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream wingwalls, left abutment, and upstream right road embankment; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is at the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 2.1 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 3.9 to 9.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

220

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (BRIDTH00050046) on Town Highway 05, crossing North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

bridge consisting of a 34-ft steel-beam span, supported by vertical abutments with no wingwalls (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The left abutment is stone; the right abutment is log cribwork with type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along its base. Type-2 stone fill has also been placed on the upstream and downstream sides of the road embankments, except the upstream left which has type-3 (less than 48 inches diameter). The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees; the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of these computed results follow. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 5.7 ft to 7.7 ft. with the worst-case abutment scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the computed scour at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 22). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

221

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 31 (BRNATH00470031) on Town Highway 47, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

abutments with concrete wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site were type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on the right and left abutments and all wingwalls. The banks upstream and downstream are not protected. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.6 to 9.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

Boehmler, Erick M.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

1996-01-01

222

Effects of correlated hybridization in the single-impurity Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of new materials often dependents on the theoretical foundations which study the microscopic matter, i.e., the way atoms interact and create distinct configurations. Among the interesting materials, those with partially filled d or f orbitals immersed in nonmagnetic metals have been described by the Anderson model, which takes into account Coulomb correlation (U) when a local level (energy Ed) is doubled occupied, and an electronic hybridization between local levels and conduction band states. In addition, here we include a correlated hybridization term, which depends on the local-level occupation number involved. This term breaks particle-hole symmetry (even when U+2Ed=0), enhances charge fluctuations on local levels and as a consequence strongly modifies the crossover between the Hamiltonian fixed-points, even suppressing one or other. We exemplify these behaviors showing data obtained from the Numerical Renormalization Group (NRG) computation for the impurity temperature-dependent specific heat, entropy and magnetic susceptibility. The interleaving procedure is used to recover the continuum spectrum after the NRG-logarithmic discretization of the conduction band.

Líbero, Valter; Veiga, Rodrigo

2013-03-01

223

Effects of lysine deficiencies on plasma levels of thyroid hormones, insulin-like growth factors I and II, liver and body weights, and feed intake in growing chickens.  

PubMed

Adequate (1.10%) and deficient (0.88, 0.66, and 0.53%) levels of Lys were fed to broiler chicks from 9 to 23 d of age. Groups fed the control diet (1.10% Lys) were also pair-fed daily with each deficient group. Compared with the free-fed control, graded decreases in feed intake occurred as the deficiency worsened, and these were significantly different with 0.66 and 0.53% Lys. Growth decreased significantly with each deficient level of Lys compared with the free-fed control and was always significantly lower than in the pair-fed control groups in each set. Plasma triiodothyronine (T3) was elevated in chicks fed 0.88 and 0.66% lysine but not with 0.53% when compared with the full-fed control treatment. However, in deficient chicks receiving 0.66 and 0.53% Lys, T3 levels were significantly higher compared with their pair-fed controls. Plasma T4 was not significantly different between any treatments. Liver weights decreased significantly at each level of Lys deficiency, but most of the differences disappeared when expressed relative to body weight. Plasma insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I decreased significantly with the most severe Lys deficiency. However, it decreased to a similar degree in the pair-fed controls, showing that this effect was primarily due to the lower feed intake. Plasma IGF-II levels did not differ between any treatments. No correlations were evident between thyroid hormones and IGF-I or IGF-II values. We concluded that the primary effect of Lys deficiency was an elevation in plasma T3 levels without accompanying changes in plasma T4. No effect of the Lys deficiency per se on plasma IGF-I and IGF-II and liver weights relative to body weights was found. PMID:16050121

Carew, L; McMurtry, J; Alster, F

2005-07-01

224

Anderson Localization: Dynamical Cluster Approximation - Typical Medium Theory Perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mean field theories like the coherent potential approximation (CPA) and its cluster extensions, including the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA), fail to describe the Anderson localization transition in disordered systems. This failure is intrinsic to these theories as the algebraically averaged quantities used in them always favor the metallic state, and hence cannot describe the localization transition. Here we extend the Typical Medium Theory (TMT), which replaces the average quantities with their corresponding typical (geometrically averaged) equivalents, to its cluster form such that non-local correlations can be incorporated systematically. We apply our method to study the localization phenomena in various dimensions. Such an approach opens a new avenue to study localization effect both in model and in real materials.

Ekuma, Chinedu; Meng, Ziyang; Terletska, Hanna; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir

2013-03-01

225

Renormalized perturbation theory flow equations for the Anderson impurity model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We apply the renormalized perturbation theory (RPT) to the symmetric Anderson impurity model. Within the RPT framework exact results for physical observables such as the spin and charge susceptibility can be obtained in terms of the renormalized values of the hybridization ? and Coulomb interaction U of the model. The main difficulty in the RPT approach usually lies in the calculation of the renormalized values themselves. In the present work we show how this can be accomplished by deriving differential flow equations describing the evolution of with ?. By exploiting the fact that can be determined analytically in the limit ? ? ? we solve the flow equations numerically to obtain estimates for the renormalized parameters in the range 0 < U/ ??< 3.5.

Pandis, Vassilis

2014-11-01

226

On the mean square distance in the Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this dissertation, we study dynamical localization via the mean square distance traveled by a particle up to time t > 0 in the Anderson model in a d-dimensional lattice Zd . Assuming a common single-site probability distribution mu has a density, using the Heisenberg position and momentum operators, and applying the Trotter product theorem, we formulate our problem in terms of oscillatory integrals in momentum space. Among the results obtained, we prove that a finite Trotter approximation to the averaged mean square distance exhibits, at worst, a diffusive behavior for large t in dimensions d ? 3 provided that the Fourier transform of the single-site probability, m? is in L2( R ).

Suwanna, Sujin

227

Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities in the Department of Energy's Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Enforcement Program in calendar year 1997 and highlights improvements planned for 1998. The DOE Enforcement Program involves the Office of Enforcement and Investigation in the DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health, as well as numerous PAAA Coordinators and technical advisors in DOE Field and Program Offices. The DOE Enforcement Program issued 13 Notices of Violation (NOV`s) in 1997 for cases involving significant or potentially significant nuclear safety violations. Six of these included civil penalties totaling $440,000. Highlights of these actions include: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory Radiological Control Violations / Associated Universities, Inc.; (2) Bioassay Program Violations at Mound / EG and G, Inc.; (3) Savannah River Crane Operator Uptake / Westinghouse Savannah River Company; (4) Waste Calciner Worker Uptake / Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company; and (5) Reactor Scram and Records Destruction at Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin).

NONE

1998-01-01

228

Kondo destruction and valence fluctuations in an Anderson model.  

PubMed

Unconventional quantum criticality in heavy-fermion systems has been extensively analyzed in terms of a critical destruction of the Kondo effect. Motivated by a recent demonstration of quantum criticality in a mixed-valent heavy-fermion system, ?-YbAlB(4), we study a particle-hole-asymmetric Anderson impurity model with a pseudogapped density of states. We demonstrate Kondo destruction at a mixed-valent quantum critical point, where a collapsing Kondo energy scale is accompanied by a singular charge-fluctuation spectrum. Both spin and charge responses scale with energy over temperature (?/T) and magnetic field over temperature (H/T). Implications for unconventional quantum criticality in mixed-valence heavy fermions are discussed. PMID:23002763

Pixley, J H; Kirchner, Stefan; Ingersent, Kevin; Si, Qimiao

2012-08-24

229

Universal Knight shift anomaly in the periodic Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a determinant Quantum Monte Carlo investigation which quantifies the behavior of the susceptibility and the entropy in the framework of the periodic Anderson model, focusing on the evolution with different degree of conduction electron (c )-local moment (f ) hybridization. These results capture the behavior observed in several experiments, including the universal behavior of the NMR Knight shift anomaly below the crossover temperature T*. We find that T* is a measure of the onset of c - f correlations and grows with increasing hybridization. These results suggest that the NMR Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements in non-Fermi-liquid materials are strongly influenced by the temperature dependence of the c - f kinetic energy. Our results provide a microscopic basis for the phenomenological two-fluid model of Kondo lattice behavior, and its evolution with pressure and temperature.

Jiang, M.; Curro, N. J.; Scalettar, R. T.

2014-12-01

230

Evaluation of the influence of blood glucose level on oral candidal colonization in complete denture wearers with Type-II Diabetes Mellitus: An in vivo Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Candidal colonization in complete denture wearers is a commonly encountered condition that worsens in the presence of untreated Diabetes Mellitus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between oral candidiasis in denture-bearing mucosa and elevated blood glucose levels in complete denture wearers and to evaluate the effect of oral hypoglycemic drug therapy in controlling oral candidal colonization in denture-bearing mucosa of complete denture wearers with Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study involved the participation of 15 complete denture wearers with Type II Diabetes Mellitus. The sample collection was made prior and after oral hypoglycaemic drug intervention, by swabbing the rugal surfaces of palatal mucosa, cultured and the density of the candidal colony formed was analyzed and interpreted as colony forming units (CFU) per mL. The candidal samples CFU and corresponding pre- and post-prandial blood glucose levels were estimated, analyzed and compared using Karl Pearson correlation analysis and paired t-test (? = 0.05). Results: The Karl Pearson correlation analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between the blood glucose levels (PPS and FBS) and the candidal colonization (CFU) (P < 0.05). The mean values of all the variables were analyzed using the paired t-test. There was significant reduction in the mean values of blood glucose levels (P < 0.001) and the mean values of the CFU (P < 0.001) following oral hypoglycemic drug therapy. Conclusion: Positive correlation was observed between oral candidiasis in complete denture-bearing mucosa and elevated blood glucose levels and oral hypoglycemic drug therapy has a positive effect in controlling oral candidal colonization in complete denture wearers with Type II Diabetes Mellitus. PMID:23878569

Ganapathy, Dhanraj Muthuveera; Joseph, Sajeesh; Ariga, Padma; Selvaraj, Anand

2013-01-01

231

Some comments on Anderson and Pospahala's correction of bias in line transect sampling  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ANDERSON and POSPAHALA (1970) investigated the estimation of wildlife population size using the belt or line transect sampling method and devised a correction for bias, thus leading to an estimator with interesting characteristics. This work was given a uniform mathematical framework in BURNHAM and ANDERSON (1976). In this paper we show that the ANDERSON-POSPAHALA estimator is optimal in the sense of being the (unique) best linear unbiased estimator within the class of estimators which are linear combinations of cell frequencies, provided certain assumptions are met.

Anderson, D.R.; Burnham, K.P.; Chain, B.R.

1980-01-01

232

Clinical, functional, and radiographic assessments of the conventional and modified Boyd-Anderson surgical procedures for repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical, functional, and radiographic outcomes of the conventional and modified Boyd-Anderson procedures for repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures. Thirteen of 18 men who underwent surgical repair for unilateral distal biceps tendon ruptures at one university center participated in the study. In general, follow-up outcomes were favorable with respect to return to premorbid activity levels, patient satisfaction with surgical outcome, and overall clinical results. Elbow flexion, forearm supination, and upper extremity functional concentric peak torque and range of motion results were not significantly different between the surgical and nonsurgical arms when dominance was controlled as a confounding factor. Radiographic findings revealed no clinically remarkable signs of heterotopic ossification or proximal radioulnar synostosis. Results of the study reveal that the conventional and modified Boyd-Anderson procedures are clinically, functionally, and radiographically efficacious for repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures. PMID:9548120

D'Arco, P; Sitler, M; Kelly, J; Moyer, R; Marchetto, P; Kimura, I; Ryan, J

1998-01-01

233

4-Amino-2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl retinate inhibits the migration of BGC-823 human gastric cancer cells by downregulating the phosphorylation level of MLC II.  

PubMed

4-Amino-2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl retinate (ATPR) is a novel all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) derivative which was reported to have a superior antitumor effect in breast cancer cells. However, little is known about its antitumor effects on human gastric cancer cells and the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The results of the present study suggest that in the human gastric carcinoma cell line BGC-823, ATPR plays a more effective role than ATRA at the same dose in inhibiting proliferation, migration and inducing differentiation after the same treatment time. Furthermore, we investigated the preliminary mechanism of ATPR's anti?migration effect. Immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that claudin-18 positioned from cytoplasm to cell surface following ATPR stimuli. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analyses showed that ATPR had significant effects on downregulation of the phosphorylation level of myosin light chain II (MLC II) by suppressing myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinase (ROCK), as well as its regulation in the protein expression of RAR? and RAR?. Moreover, ATPR increased the activity of myosin phosphatase by inhibiting ROCK. Consequently, ATPR showed more promising antitumor effects than ATRA in BGC-823 in vitro, and it may conduct its anti-migration effects by decreasing the phosphorylation level of MLC II, as well as by regulating MLCK and ROCK as downstream target genes. PMID:25051015

Hu, Anla; Yang, Yanyan; Zhang, Sumei; Zhou, Qing; Wei, Wei; Wang, Yuan

2014-10-01

234

Critical level statistics for weakly disordered graphene.  

PubMed

In two dimensions chaotic level statistics with the Wigner spacing distribution P(S) is expected for massless fermions in the Dirac region. The obtained P(S) for weakly disordered finite graphene samples with zigzag edges turns out, however, to be neither chaotic (Wigner) nor localized (Poisson). It is similar to the intermediate statistics at the critical point of the Anderson metal-insulator transition. The quantum transport of finite graphene for weak disorder, with critical level statistics can occur via edge states as in topological insulators, and for strong disorder, graphene behaves as an ordinary Anderson insulator with Poisson statistics. PMID:24675743

Amanatidis, E; Kleftogiannis, I; Katsanos, D E; Evangelou, S N

2014-04-16

235

Elevated testosterone levels during rat pregnancy cause hypersensitivity to angiotensin II and attenuation of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in uterine arteries.  

PubMed

Elevated testosterone levels increase maternal blood pressure and decrease uterine blood flow in pregnancy, resulting in abnormal perinatal outcomes. We tested whether elevated testosterone alters uterine artery adaptations during pregnancy, and whether these alterations depend on endothelium-derived factors such as nitric oxide, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, and prostacyclin, or endothelium-independent mechanisms such as angiotensin II (Ang-II). Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with vehicle (n=20) or testosterone propionate (0.5 mg/kg per day from gestation day 15 to 19; n=20). Plasma testosterone levels increased 2-fold in testosterone-injected rats compared with controls. Elevated testosterone significantly decreased placental and pup weights compared with controls. In endothelium-intact uterine arteries, contractile responses to thromboxane, phenylephrine, and Ang-II were greater in testosterone-treated rats compared with controls. In endothelium-denuded arteries, contractile responses to Ang-II (pD2=9.1±0.04 versus 8.7±0.04 in controls; P<0.05), but not thromboxane and phenylephrine, were greater in testosterone-treated rats. Ang-II type 1b receptor expression was increased, whereas Ang-II type 2 receptor was decreased in testosterone-exposed arteries. In endothelium-denuded arteries, relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were unaffected. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was significantly lower in arteries from testosterone-treated dams (Emax=51.80±6.9% versus 91.98±1.4% in controls; P<0.05). The assessment of endothelial factors showed that nitric oxide-, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-, and prostacyclin-mediated relaxations were blunted in testosterone-treated dams. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase, small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel-3, and prostacyclin receptor expressions were significantly decreased in arteries from testosterone-treated dams. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1?, Ankrd37, and Egln were significantly increased in testosterone-exposed placentas. These results suggest that elevated maternal testosterone impairs uterine vascular function, which may lead to an increased vascular resistance and a decrease in uterine blood flow. PMID:24842922

Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; Blesson, Chellakkan S; Vincent, Kathleen L; Saade, George R; Hankins, Gary D; Yallampalli, Chandra; Sathishkumar, Kunju

2014-08-01

236

Multipactor experiment on a dielectric surface R. B. Anderson, W. D. Getty,a)  

E-print Network

Multipactor experiment on a dielectric surface R. B. Anderson, W. D. Getty,a) M. L. Brake, Y. Y of excessive noise in communication sat- ellites, detuning of resonant cavities, and increased outgas- sing

Valfells, Ágúst

237

A guide to source materials of the life and work of Lawrence B. Anderson '30  

E-print Network

From 1933 to 1976, Professor Lawrence B. Anderson taught in the MIT Department of Architecture, and from 1947 to 1971, he served as its chairman and dean. Concurrently, from 1937 to 1972 , he was principal partner in the ...

Laguette, Victoria, 1953-

1998-01-01

238

Destruction of Anderson localization by nonlinearity in kicked rotator at different effective dimensions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study numerically the frequency modulated kicked nonlinear rotator with effective dimension d=1,2,3,4. We follow the time evolution of the model up to 109 kicks and determine the exponent ? of subdiffusive spreading which changes from 0.35 to 0.5 when the dimension changes from d = 1 to 4. All results are obtained in a regime of relatively strong Anderson localization well below the Anderson transition point existing for d = 3, 4. We explain that this variation of the exponent is different from the usual d- dimensional Anderson models with local nonlinearity where ? drops with increasing d. We also argue that the renormalization arguments proposed by Cherroret N et al (arXiv:1401.1038) are not valid for this model and the Anderson model with local nonlinearity in d = 3.

Ermann, L.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

2014-08-01

239

MD Anderson studies find proton therapy treatment preserves quality of life for men with prostate cancer  

Cancer.gov

Two studies led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found that proton therapy preserves the quality of life, specifically urinary and bowel function, in men treated with this targeted radiation modality for prostate cancer.

240

MD Anderson researchers find that cancer cells adapt energy needs to spread illness to other organs  

Cancer.gov

Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found that cancer cells traveling to other sites have different energy needs from their “stay-at-home” siblings which continue to proliferate at the original tumor site.

241

MD Anderson researchers discover gene that might predict aggressive prostate cancer at diagnosis  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified a biomarker living next door to the KLK3 gene that could predict which GS7 prostate cancer patients will have a more aggressive form of cancer.

242

75 FR 34170 - Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TA-W-73,230; TA-W-73,230A] Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Troy...March 18, 2010, applicable to workers of Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC,...

2010-06-16

243

M.D. Anderson scientists identify a specialized regulatory T cell that stifles antibody production centers:  

Cancer.gov

A regulatory T cell that expresses three specific genes shuts down the mass production of antibodies launched by the immune system to attack invaders, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported...

244

MD Anderson researchers find that drug combination acts against aggressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

Cancer.gov

A two-prong approach combining ibrutinib and rituximab (Rituxin) to treat aggressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) produced responses with minor side effects in a Phase 2 clinical trial at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

245

What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider? Edward Anderson , Tim Coltman*  

E-print Network

1 What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider? Edward Anderson , Tim Coltman of Economics and Business, University of Sydney, Australia Tim Coltman, Associate Professor, University Byron Keating, Associate Professor, University of Canberra, Australia *Corresponding author: Tim Coltman

Coltman, Tim

246

His Own Synthesis: Corn, Edgar Anderson, and Evolutionary Theory in the 1940s  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tracing the contributions of Edgar Anderson (1897--1969) of the Missouri Botanical Garden to the important discussions in\\u000a evolutionary biology in the 1940s, this paper argues that Anderson turned to corn research rather than play a more prominent\\u000a role in what is now known as the Evolutionary Synthesis. His biosystematic studies of Iris and Tradescantia in the 1930s reflected\\u000a such Synthesis

Kim Kleinman

1999-01-01

247

Room Temperature ppb Level Chlorine Gas Sensor Based on Copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine Films  

SciTech Connect

Spin coating technique has been used to fabricate room temperature chlorine gas sensor based on copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine (CuPc(OBu){sub 8}) films. Gas sensor shows a response of 185% to few parts per billion level of Cl{sub 2} gas with response time of 9.5 minutes at room temperature. The interactions between sensor and analytes followed first order kinetics with rate constant 0.01{<=}k{<=}0.02. The chemiresistive sensor showed very good stability at room temperature over a long period of time.

Bedi, R. K.; Saini, Rajan; Mahajan, Aman [Material Science Laboratory, Department of PhysicsGuru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar-143005 (India)

2010-12-01

248

March 17 - 19, 2004: Low-level processing of proteomics spectra, Kevin Coombes  

Cancer.gov

Low-level processing of proteomics spectra Kevin Coombes Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics UT M.D.Anderson Cancer Center Overview z Background and motivation z Description of data set for methodology development and testing z Wavelet

249

Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude Wc, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, Wc is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan

2014-08-01

250

Kondo hole route to incoherence in the periodic Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interplay of disorder and interactions in strongly correlated electronic systems is a subject of perennial interest. In this work, we have investigated the effect of Kondo-hole type disorder on the dynamics and transport properties of heavy fermion systems. We employ the periodic Anderson model within the framework of coherent potential approximation and dynamical mean field theory. The crossover from lattice coherent behaviour to an incoherent single-impurity behaviour is reflected in all aspects: a highly frequency (?)-dependent hybridization becomes almost flat, the coherence peak in resistivity (per impurity) gives way to a Hammann form that saturates at low temperature (T); the Drude peak and the mid-infrared peak in the optical conductivity vanish almost completely. The zero temperature resistivity can be captured in a closed form expression, and we show how the Nordheim's rule gets strongly modified in these systems. The thermopower exhibits a characteristic peak, which changes sign with increasing disorder, and its location is shown to correspond to the low energy scale of the system (?L). In fact, the thermopower appears to be much more sensitive to disorder variations than the resistivity. A comparison to experiments yields quantitative agreement.

Kumar, Pramod; Vidhyadhiraja, N. S.

2013-03-01

251

Exact interacting Green's function for the Anderson impurity at high bias voltages  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe some exact high-energy properties of a single Anderson impurity connected to two noninteracting leads in a nonequilibrium steady state. In the limit of high bias voltages, and also in the high-temperature limit at thermal equilibrium, the model can be mapped onto an effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian consisting of two sites, which correspond to the original impurity and its image that is defined in a doubled Hilbert space referred to as Liouville-Fock space. For this, we provide a heuristic derivation using a path-integral representation of the Keldysh contour and the thermal field theory, in which the time evolution along the backward contour is replicated by extra degrees of freedom corresponding to the image. We find that the effective Hamiltonian can also be expressed in terms of charges and currents. From this, it can be deduced that the dynamic susceptibilities for the charges and the current fluctuations become independent of the Coulomb repulsion U in the high bias limit. Furthermore, the equations of motion for the Green's function and two other higher-order correlation functions constitute a closed system. The exact solution obtained from the three coupled equations extends the atomic-limit solution such that the self-energy correctly captures the imaginary part caused by the relaxation processes at high energies. The spectral weights of the upper and lower Hubbard levels depend sensitively on the asymmetry in the tunneling couplings to the left and right leads.

Oguri, Akira; Sakano, Rui

2013-10-01

252

Proposed design requirements for high-integrity containers used to store, transport, and dispose of high-specific-activity, low-level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II  

SciTech Connect

This report develops proposed design requirements for high integrity containers used to store, transport and/or dispose of high-activity, low-level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II. The wastes considered are the dewatered resins produced by the EPICOR II waste treatment system used to clean-up the auxiliary building water. The radioactivity level of some of these EPICOR II liners is 1300 curies per container. These wastes may be disposed of in an intermediate depth burial (10 to 20 meter depth) facility. The proposed container design requirements are directed to ensure isolation of the waste and protection of the public health and safety.

Vigil, M.G.; Allen, G.C.; Pope, R.B.

1981-04-01

253

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 CARR, DANIEL ANDERSON, JENNY BANGU, LINA ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA BEHAN, LIAM ANDERSON, ARAN  

E-print Network

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 CARR, DANIEL ANDERSON, JENNY BANGU, LINA ABATE, DYLAN CONNAUGHTON, LARA CLIFFORD, NIAMH ENNIS, SEAN DENNEHY, ROSEMARY DINGEMANS, ALEX HUGHES, ALAN, MICHELLE OBRIEN, DANIEL JORDAN, EMILY MC ELROY, ALEXANDER MC MAHON, MARK MILEY, HUGO MULLIGAN, LIAM PAHUJA

O'Mahony, Donal E.

254

Competency-Based Adult Education Classroom Management Guide for Adult Basic Education Curriculum (Level II, 5-8).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Competency-Based Adult Basic Education (CBABE) Classroom Management Guide was developed to aid the Adult Basic Education (ABE) facilitator in implementing a model CBABE Level 5-8 curriculum. First, introductory material provides background on the CBABE project at Brevard Community College (Florida) and the rationale for the development of the…

Singer, Elizabeth

255

Behavior of mercury in bio-systems. II. Depuration of /sup 203/Hg/sup 2 +/ in various trophic levels  

SciTech Connect

Using radiotracer techniques, the depuration rates for methylmercury at three trophic levels in an aquatic ecosystem are examined. Bacteria (decomposers), mosquito larvae (primary consumers), and fish (secondary consumers) were studied. Results indicated that depuration rates for mercury were temperature dependent - the rate of depuration increased with increase in temperature (up to 45/sup 0/C)

Hamdy, M.K.; Prabhu, N.V.

1984-01-01

256

DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT TOXICITY: II. COMPARISON OF GENERIC BENCHMARK DOSE ESTIMATES WITH NO OBSERVED ADVERSE EFFECT LEVELS  

EPA Science Inventory

Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses (RfDDTS) or reference concentrations (RfCDTS) based on the use of no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELS) divided by uncertainty factors (UFs)The benchmark dose (BUD) has been proposed...

257

One-level modeling for diagnosing surface winds over complex terrain. II - Applicability to short-range forecasting  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Alpert and Getenio (1988) modification of the Mass and Dempsey (1985) one-level sigma-surface model was used to study four synoptic events that included two winter cases (a Cyprus low and a Siberian high) and two summer cases. Results of statistical verification showed that the model is not only capable of diagnosing many details of surface mesoscale flow, but might also be useful for various applications which require operative short-range prediction of the diurnal changes of high-resolution surface flow over complex terrain, for example, in locating wildland fires, determining the dispersion of air pollutants, and predicting changes in wind energy or of surface wind for low-level air flights.

Alpert, P.; Getenio, B.; Zak-Rosenthal, R.

1988-01-01

258

Dietary iodine and selenium affected the mRNA expression levels of skin monodeiodinase (II, III) in Liaoning Cashmere goats.  

PubMed

Livestock are frequently provided nutrient-depleted diets, which can negatively impact animal health and productivity. In our previous trial, we found that iodine (I) supplementation (not selenium (Se)) could increase cashmere production. In order to explore the role of I and Se in cashmere growth, we investigated the effects of dietary I and Se supplementation in Liaoning cashmere goats. Serum thyroid hormone status and the mRNA expression levels of skin monodeiodinase (MDII, MDIII) were measured during the cashmere fiber growth period. Forty-eight 2.5-year-old Liaoning cashmere goats (38.6 ± 2.65 kg BW) were divided into six equal groups, and their diets were supplemented with I (0, 2, or 4 mg/kg DM) and Se (0 or 1 mg/kg DM) in a 2 × 3 factorial treatment design. The six treatment groups were: I(0)Se(0), I(2)Se(0), I(4)Se(0), I(0)Se(1), I(2)Se(1), and I(4)Se(1). Concentrations of I and Se in the basal diet (group I(0)Se(0)) were 0.67 and 0.09 mg/kg DM, respectively. The trial started in September of 2009 and lasted 70 days. For every measured parameter, supplemental Se had no significant effect on thyroid hormones, but improved the mRNA expression levels of skin MDIII (P < 0.01). However, supplemental I increased levels of thyroid hormones (thyroxine and triiodothyronine) and improved the mRNA expression levels of skin MDII (P < 0.05). These results show that the addition of I to cashmere goat feedstock may be an effective means of increasing cashmere production through thyroid hormones regulating the mRNA expression of skin MDII. PMID:23274772

Qin, Feng; Li, Jianyun; Zhu, Xiaoping; Zhou, Jiaping; Yang, Jie; Jia, Zhihai

2013-03-01

259

Modeling Improvements for Air Source Heat Pumps using Different Expansion Devices at Varied Charge Levels Part II  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes steady-state performance simulations performed on a 3-ton R-22 split heat pump in heating mode. In total, 150 steady-state points were simulated, which covers refrigerant charge levels from 70 % to 130% relative to the nominal value, the outdoor temperatures at 17 F (-8.3 C), 35 F (1.7 C) and 47 F (8.3 C), indoor air flow rates

Shen

2011-01-01

260

Modeling Improvements for Air Source Heat Pumps using Different Expansion Devices at Varied Charge Levels Part II  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes steady-state performance simulations performed on a 3-ton R-22 split heat pump in heating mode. In total, 150 steady-state points were simulated, which covers refrigerant charge levels from 70 % to 130% relative to the nominal value, the outdoor temperatures at 17 F (-8.3 C), 35 F (1.7 C) and 47 F (8.3 C), indoor air flow rates from 60% to 150% of the rated air flow rate, and two types of expansion devices (fixed orifice and thermostatic expansion valve). A charge tuning method, which is to calibrate the charge inventory model based on measurements at two operation conditions, was applied and shown to improve the system simulation accuracy significantly in an extensive range of charge levels. In addition, we discuss the effects of suction line accumulator in modeling a heat pump system using either a fixed orifice or thermal expansion valve. Last, we identify the issue of refrigerant mass flow mal-distribution at low charge levels and propose an improved modeling approach.

Shen, Bo [ORNL

2011-01-01

261

A topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model  

E-print Network

We study the phenomena of Anderson localization in the presence of nonlinear interaction on a lattice. A class of nonlinear Schrodinger models with arbitrary power nonlinearity is analyzed. We conceive the various regimes of behavior, depending on the topology of resonance-overlap in phase space, ranging from a fully developed chaos involving Levy flights to pseudochaotic dynamics at the onset of delocalization. It is demonstrated that quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. We describe this localization-delocalization transition as a percolation transition on a Cayley tree. It is found in vicinity of the criticality that the spreading of the wave field is subdiffusive in the limit t\\rightarrow+\\infty. The second moment grows with time as a powerlaw t^\\alpha, with \\alpha = 1/3. Also we find for superquadratic nonlinearity that the analog pseudochaotic regime at the edge of chaos is self-controlling in that it has feedback on the topology of the structure on which the transport processes concentrate. Then the system automatically (without tuning of parameters) develops its percolation point. We classify this type of behavior in terms of self-organized criticality dynamics in Hilbert space. For subquadratic nonlinearities, the behavior is shown to be sensitive to details of definition of the nonlinear term. A transport model is proposed based on modified nonlinearity, using the idea of stripes propagating the wave process to large distances. Theoretical investigations, presented here, are the basis for consistency analysis of the different localization-delocalization patterns in systems with many coupled degrees of freedom in association with the asymptotic properties of the transport.

Alexander V. Milovanov; Alexander Iomin

2014-06-05

262

Sleep-Dependent Synaptic Down-Selection (II): Single-Neuron Level Benefits for Matching, Selectivity, and Specificity  

PubMed Central

In a companion paper (1), we used computer simulations to show that a strategy of activity-dependent, on-line net synaptic potentiation during wake, followed by off-line synaptic depression during sleep, can provide a parsimonious account for several memory benefits of sleep at the systems level, including the consolidation of procedural and declarative memories, gist extraction, and integration of new with old memories. In this paper, we consider the theoretical benefits of this two-step process at the single-neuron level and employ the theoretical notion of Matching between brain and environment to measure how this process increases the ability of the neuron to capture regularities in the environment and model them internally. We show that down-selection during sleep is beneficial for increasing or restoring Matching after learning, after integrating new with old memories, and after forgetting irrelevant material. By contrast, alternative schemes, such as additional potentiation in wake, potentiation in sleep, or synaptic renormalization in wake, decrease Matching. We also argue that, by selecting appropriate loops through the brain that tie feedforward synapses with feedback ones in the same dendritic domain, different subsets of neurons can learn to specialize for different contingencies and form sequences of nested perception-action loops. By potentiating such loops when interacting with the environment in wake, and depressing them when disconnected from the environment in sleep, neurons can learn to match the long-term statistical structure of the environment while avoiding spurious modes of functioning and catastrophic interference. Finally, such a two-step process has the additional benefit of desaturating the neuron’s ability to learn and of maintaining cellular homeostasis. Thus, sleep-dependent synaptic renormalization offers a parsimonious account for both cellular and systems level effects of sleep on learning and memory. PMID:24151486

Hashmi, Atif; Nere, Andrew; Tononi, Giulio

2013-01-01

263

Possible Quantitative Criteria for the Mott and Anderson Transitions in Doped Uncompensated Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Metal-insulator transitions (MITs) in doped uncompensated systems are investigated in the Mott-Hubbard and Anderson impurity models by considering the intercarrier correlation and screening effect of carriers in the same hydrogenic impurity center, the formation of the superlattices with different coordination numbers (z=6, 8 and 12) and by studying the effect of randomness in impurity distribution. We have obtained simple and quite general criteria for the Mott and Anderson transitions and used these criteria to describe quantitatively the correlation and disorder-induced MITs in doped semiconductors and high-Tc cuprates. We examine the validity of the obtained criteria for the Mott and Anderson MITs in these doped systems. It is found that the newly derived criteria for the Mott MIT are well satisfied in doped semiconductors, but they cannot be used to describe the observed MITs in the hole-doped high-Tc cuprates, whereas the newly derived criteria for the Anderson MIT are applicable equally to describe the MITs observed both in doped semiconductors (at weak and intermediate disorders) and in doped cuprates (at intermediate and strong disorders). The new criteria for the Anderson MIT are extended to the polaronic systems in p-type cuprates. Our results are in quantitative agreement with the existing well-established experimental data and shed more light on the different types of MITs that occur in doped uncompensated semiconductors and cuprates.

Dzhumanov, S.; Kurbanov, U. T.; Kurmantayev, A.

264

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (BRIDTH00050033) on Town Highway 5, crossing the North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00050033 on town highway 5 crossing the North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 5.01-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the downstream banks are forested and the upstream banks have dense woody brush; the upstream right overbank is an open field. In the study area, the North Branch Ottauquechee River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.017 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 30 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 83.2 mm (0.273 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 3, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. Also at the time of the site visit, there was considerable backwater at the bridge site due to a three foot tall beaver dam 40 feet downstream. The beaver dam was assumed destroyed by flood flow and was ignored in the analyses. The town highway 5 crossing of the North Branch Ottauquechee Riveris a 25-ft-long, onelane bridge consisting of one 23-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment and upstream right wingwall during the Level I assessment. Scour protection measures at the site include type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the ends of all the wingwalls except the upstream left which has type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter). Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 5.3 to 7.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A crosssection of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour)

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

265

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (CHESVT00110046) on Vermont State Route 11, crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Chester, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESVT00110046 on State Route 11 crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Chester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain and New England Upland sections of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 28.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forested on the upstream left and downstream right overbanks. The upstream right and downstream left overbanks are pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the the Middle Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 81 ft and an average bank height of 11 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 70.7 mm (0.232 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 12, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The State Route 11 crossing of the Middle Branch Williams River is a 118-ft-long, two-lane steel stringer type bridge consisting of a 114-foot steel plate deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 109 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 50 degrees. A scour hole 2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed 128 feet downstream during the Level I assessment. Type-1 (less than 1 foot) stone fill protects the downstream right wingwall. Type-2 (less than 3 ft diameter) stone fill protects the upstream right wingwall, the left and right abutments, the upstream left and right road embankments. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. There was no computed contraction scour for any modelled flows. Abutment scour ranged from 7.0 to 10.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) his

Wild, Emily C.

1997-01-01

266

Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part II: Transport and Diffusion of Tracer under Stable Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Differences in nighttime transport and diffusion of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer in an urban complex-terrain setting (Salt Lake City, Utah) are investigated using surface and Dopplerlidar wind data, and large-scale surface pressure differences. Interacting scales of motion, as studied through the URBAN 2000 field program combined with the Vertical Transport and Mixing Experiment (VTMX), explained the differences in the tracer behavior during three separate Intensive Operating Periods (IOPs). With an emphasis on nighttime stable boundary layer conditions, these field programs were designed to study flow features responsible for the nighttime transport of airborne substances. This transport has implications for air quality, homeland security, and emergency response issues if the airborne substances are hazardous. The important flow features investigated included thermally forced canyon and slope flows and a low-level jet (LLJ) that dominated the basin-scale winds when the surface pressure gradient was weak. The presence of thermally forced flows contributed to the complexity and hindered the predictability of the tracer motion within and beyond the city. When organized thermally forced flows were present, the tracer tended to stay closer to the city for longer periods of time, even though a strong basin-scale LLJ did develop. When thermally forced flows were short-lived or absent, the basin-scale low-level jet dominated the wind field and enhanced the transport of tracer material out of the city.

Darby, Lisa S.; Allwine, K Jerry; Banta, Robert M.

2006-05-01

267

Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part II: Transport and Diffusion of Tracer under Stable Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Differences in nighttime transport and diffusion of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer in an urban complex-terrain setting (Salt Lake City, Utah) are investigated using surface and Doppler lidar wind data and large-scale surface pressure differences. Interacting scales of motion, as studied through the URBAN 2000 field program combined with the Vertical Transport and Mixing (VTMX) experiment, explained the differences in the tracer behavior during three separate intensive operating periods. With an emphasis on nighttime stable boundary layer conditions, these field programs were designed to study flow features responsible for the nighttime transport of airborne substances. This transport has implications for air quality, homeland security, and emergency response if the airborne substances are hazardous. The important flow features investigated included thermally forced canyon and slope flows and a low-level jet (LLJ) that dominated the basin-scale winds when the surface pressure gradient was weak. The presence of thermally forced flows contributed to the complexity and hindered the predictability of the tracer motion within and beyond the city. When organized thermally forced flows were present, the tracer tended to stay closer to the city for longer periods of time, even though a strong basin-scale LLJ did develop. When thermally forced flows were short lived or absent, the basin-scale low-level jet dominated the wind field and enhanced the transport of tracer material out of the city.

Darby, Lisa S.; Allwine, K. Jerry; Banta, Robert M.

2006-05-01

268

Anderson Localization for the Almost Mathieu II: Point Spectrum for ? 2  

E-print Network

is supposed to be ''irrational enough'' since for rational ! the potential is periodic and the spectrum for this belief was that for â?? ? 2 and irrational ! the Lyapunov exponents are positive; that proves the absence address: International Institute of Earthquake Prediction Theory and Mathematical Geo­ physics. Moscow

269

VizieR Online Data Catalog: The HII Region Discovery Survey (HRDS). II. (Anderson+, 2011)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our observations were made with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) 100m telescope from 2008 June through 2010 October. We assembled our target list from the following multi-frequency, large solid angle Galactic surveys: the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) Galactic Plane Survey at 21cm HI and continuum (VGPS: Stil et al. 2006AJ....132.1158S), the NRAO VLA Sky Survey at 20cm continuum (NVSS: Condon et al. 1998, Cat. VIII/65), the Southern Galactic Plane Survey at 21cm HI and continuum (SGPS: Haverkorn et al. 2006ApJS..167..230H), the VLA MAGPIS at 20cm continuum (Helfand et al. 2006, Cat. J/AJ/131/2525), and the Spitzer 24um MIPSGAL survey (Carey et al. 2009PASP..121...76C). Our analysis here also uses 8.0um data from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE: Benjamin et al. 2003PASP..115..953B), which were obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. (4 data files).

Anderson, L. D.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, D. S.; Rood, R. T.

2011-08-01

270

Analysis of Anderson-Grüneisen parameter under high temperature in alkaline earthoxides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Anderson-Grüneisen parameter ( ?) is of considerable importance to Earth scientists because it sets limitations on the thermo-elastic properties of the lower mantle and core. However, there are several formulations on the Grüneisen parameter, which are in frequent use and predict varying dependence of ? as a function of temperature. In this paper, the expressions for thermal expansion, thermal expansion coefficients and bulk modulus are obtained considering the anharmonic dependence on temperature and are applied to study these constants to alkaline earth oxides. Using the derived expressions, we have shown that different parameters on which the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter ( ?) depends are temperature dependent, but above all the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter ( ?) is independent of temperature. The results obtained have been found to be comparable to experimentaldata.

Pandey, Vipra; Gupta, Seema; Tomar, D. S.; Goyal, S. C.

2010-12-01

271

Abrupt physical and chemical changes during 1992-1999, Anderson Springs, SE Geyser Geothermal Field, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Anderson Springs area is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. Patrons drank a variety of cool to hot mineral waters from improved springs, swam in various baths and pools, and hiked in the rugged hills flanking Anderson Creek and its tributaries. In the bluffs to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. By the early 1970s, the higher ridges south and west of Anderson Springs became part of the southeast sector of the greater Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric power plants are built on these ridges, producing energy from a vapor-dominated 240 °C reservoir. Only the main hot spring at Anderson Springs has maintained a recognizable identity since the 1930s. The hot spring is actually a cluster of seeps and springs that issue from a small fault in a ravine southwest of Anderson Creek. Published and unpublished records show that the maximum temperature (Tm) of this cluster fell gradually from 63°C in 1889 to 48°C in 1992. However, Tm of the cluster climbed to 77°C in 1995 and neared boiling (98°C) in 1998. A new cluster of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm = 99.3°C) formed in 1998 about 30 m north of the old spring cluster. Several evergreen trees on steep slopes immediately above these vents apparently were killed by the new activity. Thermal waters at Anderson Hot Springs are mostly composed of near-surface ground waters with some added gases and condensed steam from The Geysers geothermal system. Compared to gas samples from Southeast Geysers wells, the hot spring gases are higher in CO2 and lower in H2S and NH3. As the springs increased in temperature, however, the gas composition became more like the mean composition of steam discharges from the Southeast Geysers. The hot spring waters are low in ions of Cl, B, and Li, but relatively high in HCO3, SO4 and NH4. The stable-isotope compositions (deuterium and oxygen-18) of these waters plot near the global meteoric water line. Geochemical data through time reveal apparent maxima in the concentrations of SO4, Fe, and Mn in 1991 to 1992, before the cluster became hotter. The black-to-gray deposits from the new spring cluster are rich in pyrite and contain anomalous metals. About one-half mile to the east of the hot springs, mineralized water discharges intermittently from an old adit of the Schwartz (Anderson) mine, and enters a tributary of Anderson Creek. This drainage increased substantially in July 1998, and a slurry of mine water and precipitates were transported down the tributary and into Anderson Creek. In December 1998, the adit water was 22°C, and had a chemical composition that was similar to spring waters that once discharged in the ravines surrounding the old Anderson Springs resort. The cause for the abrupt changes that have occurred in thermal features at Anderson Springs is still not resolved. One possibility is that these changes are a response to withdrawal of steam from The Geysers geothermal field over more than 20 years of production. Pressure declines in the geothermal reservoir may have caused a "drying out" of the overlying condensation zone. Induced boiling in this zone and upflow of deep steam to shallower depths would cause heating and vaporization of shallow ground waters. In addition, earthquakes occurring in the vicinity of Anderson Springs have increased significantly after nearby geothermal power plants began operation. These earthquakes may have enhanced surface discharge of thermal fluids along fractures and faults.

Janik, Cathy J.; Goff, Fraser; Walter, Stephen R.; Sorey, Michael L.; Counce, Dale; Colvard, Elizabeth M.

2000-01-01

272

Effects of graded levels of potato by-products in barley- and corn-based beef feedlot diets: II. Palatability.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of barley- or corn-based diets containing 0, 10, or 20% potato by-product (DM basis) on Warner-Bratzler shear force and palatability of beef. One hundred forty-four crossbred beef steers (333+/-.44 kg) were allotted within weight block (3) to a randomized complete block design with a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement of dietary treatments. Main effects were grain (barley or corn) and level of potato by-product (0, 10, or 20% of diet DM). There were a total of 18 pens with eight steers per pen and three pens per treatment. Steers were fed diets containing 83% concentrate (grain plus potato by-product), 10% supplement, and 7% alfalfa (DM basis) for an average of 130 d. Longissimus muscle cuts were used for Warner-Bratzler shear force determination (four steers per pen) and evaluation (two steers per pen) by a 10-member trained laboratory panel, a professional flavor/texture profile panel, and by consumer panels. Diet did not affect (P > .10) Warner-Bratzler shear force or trained laboratory panel tenderness, juiciness, and flavor intensity scores. Flavor/texture profile panel scores indicated feeding a corn-based diet as opposed to barley-based diet produced a more appropriate well-balanced and well-blended beef flavor and texture. However, the magnitudes of the differences were relatively small, and flavor and texture amplitude ratings for both barley- and corn-fed beef were well above average. Beef from steers fed 10 or 20% potato by-product had lower (P < .05) incidences of inappropriate aromatics and aftertastes, which may have a slightly beneficial effect on beef flavor, but flavor amplitude was not affected (P > .05) by level of potato. Moreover, consumer panel overall acceptability scores were not affected by diet. Thus, feedlot diets containing corn or barley with or without potato by-product should result in palatable beef products. PMID:10907825

Busboom, J R; Nelson, M L; Jeremiah, L E; Duckett, S K; Cronrath, J D; Falen, L; Kuber, P S

2000-07-01

273

[Research on low-level Hg(II) removal from water by the heavy metal capturing agent].  

PubMed

Treatment of mercury containing wastewater using conventional approach is considered to be difficult to bring down its concentration to meet the discharge standard. In this study, we utilized dithiocarbamate (DTCR-2), 2,4,6-trimercaptotriazine(TMT-18B), Na2S and Ca(OH)2+ as the advanced treatment agents to remove low-level Hg2+ from water. Due to its better treatment effect, DTCR-2 was finally chosen as the most ideal option. The influence of pH value, dosage of DTCR-2, reaction time, initial Hg2+ concentration as well as other heavy metal ions on the Hg2+ removal were studied. The results showed that DTCR-2 had high removal efficiency under the following conditions: 100 microg x L(-1) of initial Hg2+ concentration, pH 8.0, 1.0 times stoichiometric ratio of DTCR-2 dosage and 10 min of reaction time, leading to 41.36 microg x L(-1) of residual Hg2+ concentration which was below the national discharge standard (50 microg x L(-1)). Moreover, three heavy metal ions including Cd2+, Pb2+ and Cu2+, inhibited the DTCR-2 capturing capacity towards Hg2+ and the inhibition effects followed this order: Cu2+ > Pb2+ > Cd2+, while Zn2+ promoted the Hg2+ removal. From this study, we could provide theoretical support for process design to deal with wastewater containing low mercury concentration using DTCR-2. PMID:24288994

Hu, Yun-jun; Sheng, Tian-tian; Xue, Xiao-qin; Tan, Li-sha; Xu, Xin-hua

2013-09-01

274

Temporal weighting functions for interaural time and level differences. II. The effect of binaurally synchronous temporal jitter  

PubMed Central

Recent work has demonstrated that sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITD) carried by high-rate cochlear implant pulse trains or analogous acoustic signals can be enhanced by imposing random temporal variation on the stimulus rate [see Goupellet al. (2009). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 126, 2511–2521]. The present study characterized the effect of such “temporal jitter” on normal-hearing listeners’ weighting of ITD and interaural level differences (ILD) applied to brief trains of Gabor clicks (4 kHz center frequency) presented at nominal interclick intervals (ICI) of 1.25 and 2.5 ms. Lateral discrimination judgments were evaluated on the basis of the ITD or ILD carried by individual clicks in each train. Random perturbation of the ICI significantly reduced listeners’ weighting of onset cues for both ITD and ILD discrimination compared to corresponding isochronous conditions, consistent with enhanced sensitivity to post-onset binaural cues in jittered stimuli, although the reduction of onset weighting was not statistically significant at 1.25 ms ICI. An additional analysis suggested greater weighting of ITD or ILD presented following lengthened versus shortened ICI, although weights for such “gaps” and “squeezes” were comparable to other post-onset weights. Results are discussed in terms of binaural information available in jittered versus isochronous stimuli. PMID:21303010

Brown, Andrew D.; Stecker, G. Christopher

2011-01-01

275

Temporal weighting functions for interaural time and level differences. II. The effect of binaurally synchronous temporal jitter.  

PubMed

Recent work has demonstrated that sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITD) carried by high-rate cochlear implant pulse trains or analogous acoustic signals can be enhanced by imposing random temporal variation on the stimulus rate [see Goupell et al. (2009). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 126, 2511-2521]. The present study characterized the effect of such "temporal jitter" on normal-hearing listeners' weighting of ITD and interaural level differences (ILD) applied to brief trains of Gabor clicks (4 kHz center frequency) presented at nominal interclick intervals (ICI) of 1.25 and 2.5 ms. Lateral discrimination judgments were evaluated on the basis of the ITD or ILD carried by individual clicks in each train. Random perturbation of the ICI significantly reduced listeners' weighting of onset cues for both ITD and ILD discrimination compared to corresponding isochronous conditions, consistent with enhanced sensitivity to post-onset binaural cues in jittered stimuli, although the reduction of onset weighting was not statistically significant at 1.25 ms ICI. An additional analysis suggested greater weighting of ITD or ILD presented following lengthened versus shortened ICI, although weights for such "gaps" and "squeezes" were comparable to other post-onset weights. Results are discussed in terms of binaural information available in jittered versus isochronous stimuli. PMID:21303010

Brown, Andrew D; Stecker, G Christopher

2011-01-01

276

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW--Due Process and Equal Protection--Price-Anderson Act's $560,000,000 Limit on Liability From A nuclear Power Plant Accident Is Unconstitutional  

Microsoft Academic Search

Article summarizes Carolina Environmental Study Group v United States Atomic Energy Commission and congressional intent of the Price-Anderson Act. Article then speculates that the Price-Anderson Act will be found to be unconstitutional by the Supreme Court

Michael Fitzgerald

1978-01-01

277

Role of RAAS and adipokines in cardiovascular protection: effect of different doses of angiotensin II receptor blocker on adipokines level in hypertensive patients.  

PubMed

The present study was designed to determine the effect of different doses of the angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), candesartan, on circulating adiponectin and leptin levels as well as leptin adiponectin ratio (LAR) in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors.Sixty-nine hypertensive patients were randomized to three groups: group 1 included patients treated with high doses of Candesartan (32 mg); group 2 included patients treated with conventional doses of Candesartan (16 mg); and group 3 included patients that received antihypertensive treatment other than ARBs or angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors. Patients were evaluated for lipid profile, HbA1C, insulin, C-peptide, c-reactive protein, aldosterone, renin, Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, leptin, adiponectin and LAR. Baseline adiponectin, leptin, and LAR levels did not differ significantly between the three groups. After 6 months of treatment, LAR was significantly higher in group 3 than group 1 (P = .007) or group 2 (P = .023). Differences between effects of high (32 mg) and conventional doses (16 mg) of Candesartan on LAR were not observed (P = .678). Marginal across-group differences were detected for posttreatment circulating adiponectin level (P = .064). Univariate general linear model (GLM) analysis of posttreatment LAR detected significant by-group differences even after adjustment for age, gender, baseline values of LAR, and blood pressure. In this model, group was the only significant predictor of LAR after controlling for these variables. Treatment with high doses of the ARB, candesartan, is associated with significantly reduced LAR and marginally increased circulating adiponectin levels in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25418492

Hass, Anat; Oz, Hadar; Mashavi, Margarita; Shargorodsky, Marina

2014-10-01

278

Observation of the Anderson metal-insulator transition with atomic matter waves: Theory and experiment  

SciTech Connect

Using a cold atomic gas exposed to laser pulses - a realization of the chaotic quasiperiodic kicked rotor with three incommensurate frequencies - we study experimentally and theoretically the Anderson metal-insulator transition in three dimensions. Sensitive measurements of the atomic wave function and the use of finite-size scaling techniques make it possible to unambiguously demonstrate the existence of a quantum phase transition and to measure its critical exponents. By taking proper account of systematic corrections to one-parameter scaling, we show the universality of the critical exponent {nu}=1.59{+-}0.01, which is found to be equal to the one previously computed for the Anderson model.

Lemarie, Gabriel; Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Chabe, Julien; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude [Laboratoire PhLAM, , Universite de Lille 1, CNRS, CERLA, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Gremaud, Benoit [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

2009-10-15

279

A report documenting the completion of the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the ASC level II milestone ""Visualization on the supercomputing platform  

SciTech Connect

This report provides documentation for the completion of the Los Alamos portion of the ASC Level II 'Visualization on the Supercomputing Platform' milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The milestone text is shown in Figure 1 with the Los Alamos portions highlighted in boldfaced text. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is the most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors (GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the perfromance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. In conclusion, we improved CPU-based rendering performance by a a factor of 2-10 times on our tests. In addition, we evaluated CPU and CPU-based rendering performance. We encourage production visualization experts to consider using CPU-based rendering solutions when it is appropriate. For example, on remote supercomputers CPU-based rendering can offer a means of viewing data without having to offload the data or geometry onto a CPU-based visualization system. In terms of comparative performance of the CPU and CPU we believe that further optimizations of the performance of both CPU or CPU-based rendering are possible. The simulation community is currently confronting this reality as they work to port their simulations to different hardware architectures. What is interesting about CPU rendering of massive datasets is that for part two decades CPU performance has significantly outperformed CPU-based systems. Based on our advancements, evaluations and explorations we believe that CPU-based rendering has returned as one viable option for the visualization of massive datasets.

Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patchett, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lo, Li - Ta [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mr Marle, David [KITWARE INC.; Brownlee, Carson [UNIV OF UTAH

2011-01-24

280

Linalool decreases HepG2 viability by inhibiting mitochondrial complexes I and II, increasing reactive oxygen species and decreasing ATP and GSH levels.  

PubMed

Coriander is used as an appetizer, a common food seasoning in Mediterranean dishes, and a remedy for many ailments. In this study we tested the biochemical effect of its essential oil components, in particular linalool, its main component. The oil extract was prepared by hydro-distillation of coriander seeds. The various components were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy. The effect of the various oil components on the viability of different cell lines (HepG2, Caco2, NIH3t3, MCF7 and Hek293) was examined using MTT assay. Linalool was the most potent and HepG2 cells the most sensitive. A 50% and 100% decrease in the viability of HepG2 was obtained at 0.4 microM and 2 microM linalool, respectively. Whereas none of the other components exerted a significant effect at concentrations lower than 50 microM, myrcene and nerolidol, the structural analogues of linalool, were more potent at 100 microM than the other components decreasing HepG2 viability to 26%. The biochemical effect of linalool on mitochondria isolated from HepG2 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition in complexes I and II activities of the respiratory chain, and a time-dependent decrease in ATP level. In addition, a time-dependent decrease in glutathione (GSH) level and in the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium was obtained, indicating increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Pretreatment with the antioxidants: N-acetyl cysteine (2mM), Trolox (100 microM) and different flavonoids (50 microM) was partially protective against the linalool-induced cell death; the most effective response was that of rutin and apigenin which restored 91% of HepG2 viability. We hereby report a decrease in cell viability of HepG2 cells by linalool and identify the mitochondria as one possible target for its site of action, inhibiting complexes I and II and decreasing ATP. In addition linalool increased ROS generation and decreased GSH level. PMID:19428344

Usta, Julnar; Kreydiyyeh, Sawsan; Knio, Khuzama; Barnabe, Pascale; Bou-Moughlabay, Yolla; Dagher, Shawki

2009-06-15

281

Induction of a Stem Lexicon for Two-level Morphological Analysis Erika F. de Lima  

E-print Network

!1 II II II II II II I! II II II II II Induction of a Stem Lexicon for Two-level Morphological ac- quire from text corpora a Portuguese stem lex- icon for two-level morphological analysis. It makes use of a lexical transducer to generate all possible stems for a given unknown inflected word form

282

143 nature reports climate change | VOL 3 | DECEMBER 2009 | www.nature.com/reports/climatechange Mark New, DiaNa LiverMaN aND keviN aNDersoN  

E-print Network

the pre-industrial level, and to understand the implications for nature and society. Brave New worLD.nature.com/reports/climatechange Mindthegap Mark New, DiaNa LiverMaN aND keviN aNDersoN R educing greenhouse gas emissions soon and fast essential to explore the terra quasi-incognita of a world in which the average temperature is 4 °C above

283

MD Anderson study finds telomere failure, telomerase activation drive prostate cancer progression  

Cancer.gov

Genomic instability caused by an erosion of the protective caps on chromosomes, followed by activation of an enzyme that reinforces those caps, allows malignant cells to evade destruction and acquire more deadly characteristics, MD Anderson Cancer Center researchers report in an Online Now article at the journal Cell.

284

Mobile Contagion: Simulation of Infection & Defense Everett Anderson Kevin Eustice Shane Markstrum Mark Hansen Peter Reiher  

E-print Network

't go through the firewall, and it is thus free to infect the entire network. Many sites had seriousMobile Contagion: Simulation of Infection & Defense Everett Anderson Kevin Eustice Shane Markstrum can prevent infection of a network from the outside. However, as several recent worms have shown

California at Los Angeles, University of

285

Greg Anderson Bates College click here How to Make Simple Solutions and Dilutions !  

E-print Network

NOTE:.. Greg Anderson Bates College click here How to Make Simple Solutions and Dilutions ! ! Unit # ' 0 ! # ' 9 #12;!# ' 7 ! ! ! .4 #.' ! 8 #.' ! 7 :4 0 0 0 0 # 4 3. Serial Dilution.. serial dilution. Making fixed volumes of specific concentrations from liquid reagents: V1C1=V2C2.. C D + ! + e g , + . V

Ray, David

286

Thomas Young's research on fluid transients: 200 years on Arris S Tijsseling Alexander Anderson  

E-print Network

years ago Thomas Young (1773-1829) published a paper entitled "Hydraulic Investigations, s1 Thomas Young's research on fluid transients: 200 years on Arris S Tijsseling Alexander Anderson The Netherlands United Kingdom ABSTRACT Thomas Young published in 1808 his famous paper (1) in which he derived

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

287

Generation of the S boxes of Tiger Ross Anderson 1 and Eli Biham 2  

E-print Network

Generation of the S boxes of Tiger Ross Anderson 1 and Eli Biham 2 1 Cambridge University, England algorithm of the S boxes of Tiger uses the compression func­ tion of Tiger in order to achieve random the S boxes to the unity columns, and the state to the initial value of the state of Tiger. Then it randomizes

Biham, Eli

288

A Limit Study of JavaScript Parallelism Emily Fortuna Owen Anderson Luis Ceze Susan Eggers  

E-print Network

A Limit Study of JavaScript Parallelism Emily Fortuna Owen Anderson Luis Ceze Susan Eggers Computer://sampa.cs.washington.edu Abstract--JavaScript is ubiquitous on the web. At the same time, the language's dynamic behavior makes on the potential parallelism of JavaScript appli- cations, including popular web pages and standard JavaScript

Anderson, Richard

289

The Implications for Anderson College [South Carolina] of an Administrative Decision on Academic Policy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports a series of events that occurred at Anderson College (South Carolina) as a result of conflict between a college academic policy which allowed students to withdraw from a course without penalty up until the 12th week of a 16 week semester, and a regulation of the state approval agency for veterans education which required that…

Roberts, C. Richard

290

Matter wave transport and Anderson localization in anisotropic three-dimensional disorder  

E-print Network

epl draft Matter wave transport and Anderson localization in anisotropic three-dimensional disorder study quantum transport of matter waves in anisotropic three-dimensional dis- order. First, we show is directly relevant to ultracold-matter waves in optical disorder, and implications on recent experiments

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

291

MD Anderson study finds inflammatory mediator promotes colorectal cancer by stifling protective genes:  

Cancer.gov

Chronic inflammation combines with DNA methylation, a process that shuts down cancer-fighting genes, to promote development of colorectal cancer, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report today in the advance online publication of the journal Nature Medicine.

292

M.D. Anderson study finds previously unconnected molecular networks conspire to promote cancer:  

Cancer.gov

An inflammation-promoting protein triggers deactivation of a tumor-suppressor that usually blocks cancer formation via the NOTCH signaling pathway, a team of researchers led by scientists at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center reports today in Molecular Cell.

293

Large Scale Numerical Analysis of Scaling Behaviour of the Anderson Transition  

E-print Network

Large Scale Numerical Analysis of Scaling Behaviour of the Anderson Transition TOMI OHTSUKI numerical simulations have made this possible. Different Hamiltonians describing the disor- dered electron] and that the theory may be unsound. The above failures of the field theoretical ap- proach mean that numerical

Katsumoto, Shingo

294

Practical Network Support for IP Traceback Stefan Savage, David Wetherall, Anna Karlin and Tom Anderson  

E-print Network

Anderson Department of Computer Science and Engineering University of Washington Seattle, WA, USA Abstract a general purpose traceback mechanism based on prob- abilistic packet marking in the network. Our approach their sites [16]. Even more worrying, recent reports indicate that at- tackers have developed tools

Paxson, Vern

295

Bibliography Anderson, J.R. (1983). Architecture of cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard  

E-print Network

1 Bibliography Anderson, J.R. (1983). Architecture of cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University) "Situated cognition and the role of multi-agent models in explaining language structure." In D. Kudenko, E perspectives. New York: Walter de Gruyter. Brown, J., A. Collins, and P. Duguid. "Situated cognition

Maryland at College Park, University of

296

Gutzwiller variational approximation to the heavy-fermion ground state of the periodic Anderson model  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variational wave function for the Kondo-lattice limit of the periodic Anderson model is evaluated with a Gutzwiller approximation. We obtain a characteristic energy from this coherent wave function of the Kondo form but with a different exponent in the case of finite degeneracy. The effective mass and charge and spin susceptibilities are evaluated, and only in the case of

T. M. Rice; K. Ueda

1985-01-01

297

Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long  

E-print Network

Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long Brigham Young for mapping polar sea ice extent. In this study, a new al- gorithm for polar sea ice mapping is developed of Bayes detection to produce sea ice extent maps. Statistical models for sea ice and ocean are represented

Long, David G.

298

Numerical study of light correlations in a random medium close to the Anderson localization threshold.  

PubMed

We applied a finite-difference time domain algorithm to the study of field and intensity correlations in random media. Close to the onset of Anderson localization, we observe deviations of the correlation functions, in both shape and magnitude, from those predicted by the diffusion theory. Physical implications of the observed phenomena are discussed. PMID:15143626

Chang, Shih-Hui; Taflove, Allen; Yamilov, Alexey; Burin, Aleksander; Cao, Hui

2004-05-01

299

Main-Chain Conformational Tendencies of Amino Acids Robert J. Anderson,1,2  

E-print Network

Main-Chain Conformational Tendencies of Amino Acids Robert J. Anderson,1,2 Zhiping Weng,2 Robert K tendencies of an amino acid. Despite forty years of research, the shape of Ramachandran plots is still tendencies among amino acids, and showed that the conformational relationships of amino ac- ids are well

Weng, Zhiping

300

Tor Instead of IP Vincent Liu, Seungyeop Han, Arvind Krishnamurthy, Thomas Anderson  

E-print Network

Tor Instead of IP Vincent Liu, Seungyeop Han, Arvind Krishnamurthy, Thomas Anderson University, and denial of service. Al- though anonymizing overlays such as Tor [2] provide some help to end users approach: instead of running Tor on top of IP, we propose to run Tor instead of IP. We ask: what might

Krishnamurthy, Arvind

301

MD Anderson-led preclinical research shows normal gene hinders breast cancer chemotherapy  

Cancer.gov

Presence of normal p53, a tumor suppressor gene, instead of a mutated version, makes breast cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin less effective. The preclinical study led by MD Anderson scientists was published today in the journal Cancer Cell. The research, which challenges the existing paradigm, is another step closer to personalized cancer medicine for breast cancer.

302

MD Anderson researchers compare treatments, survival benefits for early-stage lung cancer  

Cancer.gov

Removal of the entire lobe of lung may offer patients with early-stage lung cancer better overall survival when compared with a partial resection, and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) may offer the same survival benefit as a lobectomy for some patients, according to a study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.Click here to read the full press release.

303

SUBSIDY TO NUCLEAR POWER THROUGH PRICE-ANDERSON LIABILITY LIMIT: COMMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dubin and Rothwell (1990) use details of insurance premiums to develop a methodology for inferring the value to nuclear operators of the Price-Anderson liability limit from but misinterpret the terms of the insurance contracts for which the premiums are paid. This leads them to overstate the subsidy due to the limit by a factor of between four and ten. Copyright

ANTHONY G. HEYES; CATHERINE LISTON-HEYES

1998-01-01

304

BSA Supp Price-Anderson (Apr. 2010) 1 of 6 BROOKHAVEN SCIENCE ASSOCIATES, LLC  

E-print Network

AND CONDITIONS PRICE-ANDERSON ACT AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY 1. DEAR 952.250-70 Nuclear Hazards Indemnity protection to cover public liability, as described in paragraph (d)(2) below. DOE may, however, at any time and in such amount as DOE shall determine to be appropriate to cover such public liability, provided that the costs

Ohta, Shigemi

305

Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Author(s): Alan Ross Anderson and Nuel D. Belnap, Jr.  

E-print Network

Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Enthymemes Author(s): Alan Ross Anderson and Nuel D. Belnap, Jr. Source: The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 58, No. 23, American Philosophical Association Eastern Division Fifty: Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2023169 Accessed: 28/05/2009 15

Belnap, Nuel

306

Anderson v. University of Wisconsin: Handicap and Race Discrimination in Readmission Procedures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Anderson v. University of Wisconsin" gives important guidance to universities by detailing the components of race and handicap discrimination claims, and illustrating how these claims can succeed. Readmission procedures that could reduce the likelihood of charges of discrimination are suggested. (Author/MLW)

Smith, Elizabeth R.

1989-01-01

307

CO2 Mitigation Costs for Canada and the Alberta Oil Sands Justin David Anderson  

E-print Network

, alternative to fossil fuels. The results are also dependent, to a lesser extent, on international CO2 policyCO2 Mitigation Costs for Canada and the Alberta Oil Sands By Justin David Anderson Bachelor. Impact and cost assessments aim to alleviate some of these difficulties by attempting to treat the costs

308

Decadal climate cycles and declining Columbia River salmon James J. Anderson  

E-print Network

1 Decadal climate cycles and declining Columbia River salmon James J. Anderson School of Fisheries - This paper explores the effects of the interaction of anthropogenic trends and climate cycles on salmon river salmon production resulted from the interactions of human activities and climatic regime shifts

Washington at Seattle, University of

309

UT MD Anderson study finds metabolic protein plays unexpected role in tumor cell formation and growth:  

Cancer.gov

The embryonic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has a well-established role in metabolism and is highly expressed in human cancers. Now, a team led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in advance online publication of the journal Nature that PKM2 has important non-metabolic functions in cancer formation.

310

PLAYING SMART ANOTHER LOOK AT ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN COMPUTER GAMES Eike F Anderson  

E-print Network

1 PLAYING SMART ­ ANOTHER LOOK AT ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN COMPUTER GAMES Eike F Anderson12 5BB, UK E-mail: eanderson@bournemouth.ac.uk KEYWORDS artificial intelligence, computer games, non intelligence in general and artificial intelligence in the context of its use in modern computer games

Davies, Christopher

311

Engaging with Massive Online Courses Ashton Anderson Daniel Huttenlocher Jon Kleinberg Jure Leskovec  

E-print Network

visible recent developments in education--the deployment of massive open online courses. With their global; online engagement; badges. 1. INTRODUCTION Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, have recently garEngaging with Massive Online Courses Ashton Anderson Daniel Huttenlocher Jon Kleinberg Jure

Thrun, Sebastian

312

Real-Time Character Animation for Computer Games Eike F Anderson  

E-print Network

Real-Time Character Animation for Computer Games Eike F Anderson National Centre for Computer Animation Bournemouth University ABSTRACT The importance of real-time character animation in computer games is continuously growing. This paper will present and discuss various methods of 3D character animation

Davies, Christopher

313

Inference of Tamoxifen's Effects on Prevention of Breast U T M. D. Anderson Cancer Center  

E-print Network

Inference of Tamoxifen's Effects on Prevention of Breast Cancer by Yu Shen U T M. D. Anderson the efficacy of tamoxifen in the prevention of breast cancer among women at high risk of developing the disease. The effect of tamoxifen on the time to diagnosis of the disease over the six-year follow-up of the trial has

Jin, Jiashun

314

The Design of the Mirage Spatial Wiki Nels Anderson, Adam Bender, Carl Hartung,  

E-print Network

The Design of the Mirage Spatial Wiki Nels Anderson, Adam Bender, Carl Hartung, Gaurav Kulkarni of and experience with the Mirage Spatial Wiki. We describe the design decisions that have led to a system with the Mirage Spatial Wiki, a loca- tion based information system that is easy to deploy and use. Location based

Mulligan, Jane

315

Lamport on Mutual Exclusion: 27 Years of Planting Seeds James H. Anderson  

E-print Network

is struck by the many \\seeds" that Lamport ended up plant- ing along the way | seeds that have grownLamport on Mutual Exclusion: 27 Years of Planting Seeds James H. Anderson Department of Computer. This work sparked 15 years of subsequent research within the distributed algorithms community on wait-free

Anderson, James

316

PowerAware Technology Mapping for LUTBased FPGAs Jason H. Anderson and Farid N. Najm  

E-print Network

consumption of FPGAs is beneficial as it leads to lower packaging and cooling costs as well as improvesPower­Aware Technology Mapping for LUT­Based FPGAs Jason H. Anderson and Farid N. Najm Department@eecg.toronto.edu, f.najm@utoronto.ca Abstract We present a new power­aware technology mapping technique for LUT

Najm, Farid N.

317

MD Anderson study finds everolimus prolongs progression-free survival for patients with neuroendocrine tumors:  

Cancer.gov

Combination treatment with everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target rapamycin (mTOR), and octreotide has shown to improve progression-free survival for patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors and a history of carcinoid syndrome, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

318

MD Anderson develops prognostic model for MDS related to prior cancer therapy  

Cancer.gov

A large-scale analysis of patients whose myelodysplastic syndrome is related to earlier cancer treatment overturns the notion that all of them have a poor prognosis, researchers from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

319

MD Anderson researchers find that chemotherapy is as effective before breast cancer surgery as after  

Cancer.gov

Whether chemotherapy is given before or after breast-conserving therapy does not have an impact on long-term local-regional outcomes, suggesting treatment success is due more to biologic factors than chemotherapy timing, according to a study by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

320

MD Anderson study identifies novel therapeutic targets for small cell lung cancer  

Cancer.gov

Newly discovered molecular differences between small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer have revealed PARP1 and EZH2 as potential therapeutic targets for patients with small cell lung cancer, according to the results of a University of Texas MD Anderson study published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

321

Plate Tectonics as a Far-From-Equilibrium Self-Organized System Don L. Anderson  

E-print Network

Plate Tectonics as a Far- From- Equilibrium Self-Organized System By Don L. Anderson Word Count: 3 and other forces at the top. Plate tectonics was once regarded as passive motion of plates on top of mantle convection cells but it now appears that continents and plate tectonics organize the flow in the mantle

Anderson, Don L.

322

MD Anderson scientists discover marker to identify, attack breast cancer stem cells  

Cancer.gov

Breast cancer stem cells wear a cell surface protein that is part nametag and part bull’s eye, identifying them as potent tumor-generating cells and flagging their vulnerability to a drug, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report online in Journal of Clinical Investigation.

323

BRUCE T. ANDERSON Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Environment, Boston University  

E-print Network

's predictability? J. Climate (in review) (6) Anderson, B.T. 2011: Intensification of seasonal extremes given a 2°C-term increase in frequency of seasonal temperature extremes prior to the 2 °C global warming target, Climatic, S.Gopal, and S. Islam, 2010: Observed trends in summertime monsoon precipitation over

Anderson, Bruce

324

BRUCE T. ANDERSON Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Environment, Boston University  

E-print Network

., DOI: 10.1007/s00382-010-0798-y. (9) Anderson, B.T. 2012: Intensification of seasonal extremes given, B.T. 2011: Near-term increase in frequency of seasonal temperature extremes prior to the 2 °C global, S.Gopal, and S. Islam, 2010: Observed trends in summertime monsoon precipitation over

Hutyra, Lucy R.

325

Community of Inquiry in e-Learning: A Critical Analysis of the Garrison and Anderson Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is based on a constructively critical analysis of the "community of inquiry" model developed by Garrison and Anderson (2003) as part of their "e-learning" research. The authors claim that certain collaborative interactions create "distant presence" fostering the emergence of a "community of inquiry" which has a positive influence on…

Jezegou, Annie

2010-01-01

326

SILK { a playful blend of Scheme and Java Kenneth R. Anderson, BBN Technologies, Cambridge, MA  

E-print Network

SILK { a playful blend of Scheme and Java Kenneth R. Anderson, BBN Technologies, Cambridge, MA) interpreter in Java [after [6] p. 176]. Abstract SILK (Scheme in about 50 K) is a compact Scheme imple- mented Scheme in Java, but its access to Java was awkward. The current version has altered SILK's syntax

Strickland, Stevie

327

Calculating Polynomial Runtime Properties Hugh Anderson, Siau-Cheng Khoo, Stefan Andrei and Beatrice Luca  

E-print Network

Calculating Polynomial Runtime Properties Hugh Anderson, Siau-Cheng Khoo, Stefan Andrei programming languages. The same style of analysis is also capable of compactly recording and calculating other. In this paper we show how precise poly- nomial bounds on such costs may be calculated on programs, by a char

Khoo, Siau Cheng

328

Review of Philip Anderson, 2008, The Secret Life of Real Estate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anderson establishes the reality of an 18-year cycle in real estate prices, 1800 to date, emphasizing the land element, mainly urban land and subsoil resources. He relates this to privatization, which he calls “enclosureâ€, although he does not trace the history back to the 16th Century enclosure movement in England, nor recommend undoing privatization. He supports his thesis with a

Mason Gaffney

2009-01-01

329

MD Anderson study finds ovarian cancer patients survive longer with BRCA2 mutated in tumors:  

Cancer.gov

Women with high-grade ovarian cancer live longer and respond better to platinum-based chemotherapy when their tumors have BRCA2 genetic mutations, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Institute for Systems Biology report in the Oct. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

330

Dystopian Visions of Global Capitalism: Philip Reeve's "Mortal Engines" and M.T Anderson's "Feed"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines Philip Reeve's novel for children, "Mortal Engines", and M.T. Anderson's young adult novel, "Feed", by assessing these dystopias as prototypical texts of what Ulrich Beck calls risk society. Through their visions of a fictional future, the two narratives explore the hazards created by contemporary techno-economic progress,…

Bullen, Elizabeth; Parsons, Elizabeth

2007-01-01

331

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

Meuleman, G. Allyn

1987-06-01

332

Direct observation of Anderson localization of matter-waves in an optical disorder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1958, P.W. Anderson predicted the localization^1 of electronic wave functions in disordered crystals, and the resulting absence of diffusion. It has been realized later that Anderson Localization is ubiquitous in wave physics^2, and this has prompted an intense activity to observe it with light, microwaves, sound waves, and electron gases, but to our knowledge there was no direct observation of exponential spatial localization of matter-waves (electrons or others). We have observed directly^3 exponential localization of the wave function of ultracold atoms released into a one-dimensional waveguide in the presence of a controlled disorder created by laser speckle. We will present this work, and the prospects of extending that experimental scheme to quantum gases in higher dimensions (2D and 3D), and with controlled interactions. We will also discuss its significance in the rapidly growing field of quantum simulators. 1 Anderson, P.W. Absence of diffusion in certain random lattices. Phys. Rev. 109, 1492-1505 (1958). 2 Van Tiggelen, B. Anderson localization of waves. In Wave diffusion in complex media 1998, edited by J.P. Fouque, Les Houches Lectures (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1999). 3 Juliette Billy, Vincent Josse, Zhanchun Zuo, Alain Bernard, Ben Hambrecht, Pierre Lugan, David Cl'ement, Laurent Sanchez-Palencia, Philippe Bouyer^ & Alain Aspect. Direct observation of Anderson localization of matter-waves in a controlled disorder Nature, 453, 891 (2008). Work published back to back with a related work in the Inguscio's group in Florence: G. Roati et al., Nature, 453, 895 (2008).

Aspect, Alain

2009-03-01

333

Low-level detections of Sudan I, II, III and IV in spices and Chili-containing foodstuffs using UPLC-ESI-MS/MS.  

PubMed

Sudan dyes are red, synthetic azo dyes that are not allowed in foodstuffs in the European Union (Council Directive 94/36/EC). However, subppm levels of Sudan dye in spices are regularly reported, and it is assumed that these appearances are due to cross-contamination. In this paper, we present a newly developed fast and sensitive method for the quantification of Sudan I, II, III, and IV, using liquid-liquid extraction and UPLC-MS/MS analysis, and giving quantification limits ranging from 2.5 to 200 ?g/kg. The method was applied to 21 samples, and 17 of them contained Sudan dye at low concentrations (3.3-8 709 ?g/kg). Interestingly, it was observed that the distribution of Sudan dye in the sample is not homogeneous, which may lead to false negatives or to overestimations of the concentration, and that the pretreatment (blending or not) of the sample seriously influences the final result of the analysis. PMID:23390927

Schummer, Claude; Sassel, Jeannine; Bonenberger, Pascale; Moris, Gilbert

2013-03-01

334

Changes in the patterns, presentation and management of penetrating chest trauma patients at a level II trauma centre in southern Pakistan over the last two decades.  

PubMed

Penetrating chest trauma can be used as an indicator of violence in the country. We aimed to look at the changes in its incidence and management at a major trauma centre in the country. We also wanted to look at any effect of prehospital time on surgical intervention and outcome of the victim. In this retrospective descriptive study, we observed the presentation and management of 191 penetrating chest injury patients at a level II trauma hospital in Pakistan in the last 20 years. The study sample was divided into two groups: Group 1, 1988-1998 and Group 2, 1999-2009. No significant change in incidence of trauma was observed between the two groups. The delay in the time between event and arrival showed an increase in the number of surgical procedures performed. Also the number of thoracotomies performed went up significantly in the second decade from 5.7 to 16.5% with a P<0.05. Six (3.1%) mortality cases were observed in 20 years. It was seen that the greater the prehospital time, the greater the chances of surgery. Also seen was the increase in mortality as critical cases could make it to the hospital alive in recent times due to improved transportation services. PMID:20923826

Tariq, Umer Muhammad; Faruque, Ahmad; Ansari, Hamza; Ahmad, Mansoor; Rashid, Umar; Perveen, Shazia; Sharif, Hasanat

2011-01-01

335

Abstract. --A lattice defect is characterized by : i) its position and the arrangement of the atoms around it and ii) by its energy levels. We shall consider here only the first point. The atomic defect  

E-print Network

of the atoms around it and ii) by its energy levels. We shall consider here only the first point. The atomic, the characteristics of the X-ray diffraction phenomena are to give only an average view of the environment of the atoms : but recent progresses in the techniques have considerably improved the sensitivity of X-rays

Boyer, Edmond

336

Evidence of non-mean-field-like low-temperature behavior in the Edwards-Anderson spin-glass model.  

PubMed

The three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson and mean-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin glasses are studied via large-scale Monte Carlo simulations at low temperatures, deep within the spin-glass phase. Performing a careful statistical analysis of several thousand independent disorder realizations and using an observable that detects peaks in the overlap distribution, we show that the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and Edwards-Anderson models have a distinctly different low-temperature behavior. The structure of the spin-glass overlap distribution for the Edwards-Anderson model suggests that its low-temperature phase has only a single pair of pure states. PMID:23215219

Yucesoy, B; Katzgraber, Helmut G; Machta, J

2012-10-26

337

Visual test of subparts per billion-level copper(ii) by Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction coupled with a functionalized gold nanoparticle probe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By combining Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction with a gold nanoparticle-based visual test, a novel method was developed for the field assay of Cu(ii) in environmental water at subparts per billion-levels within 30 min. When a 200 mL water sample was treated with 12.5 mg L-1 Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the proposed procedure, the detection limit with the naked eye was 0.2 ?g L-1 Cu(ii). The proposed method is very specific to Cu(ii), with tolerance against at least 100-fold amounts of other environmentally relevant metal ions except for Hg(ii) (25-fold), and was successfully applied to the detection of trace Cu(ii) in tap water, river water, and treated wastewater, and results agreed well with that determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).By combining Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction with a gold nanoparticle-based visual test, a novel method was developed for the field assay of Cu(ii) in environmental water at subparts per billion-levels within 30 min. When a 200 mL water sample was treated with 12.5 mg L-1 Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the proposed procedure, the detection limit with the naked eye was 0.2 ?g L-1 Cu(ii). The proposed method is very specific to Cu(ii), with tolerance against at least 100-fold amounts of other environmentally relevant metal ions except for Hg(ii) (25-fold), and was successfully applied to the detection of trace Cu(ii) in tap water, river water, and treated wastewater, and results agreed well with that determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, synthesis, and characterization of Cys-AuNPs and Fe3O4 NPs, magnetic-solid phase extraction and colorimetric test procedures, and effects of parameters on the extraction efficiency. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31753b

Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Jing-Fu; Jiang, Gui-Bin

2012-10-01

338

Theoretical (in B3LYP/6-3111++G** level), spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and thermogravimetric studies of gentisic acid and sodium, copper(II) and cadmium(II) gentisates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The DFT calculations (B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) mixed with LanL2DZ for transition metals basis sets) for different conformers of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid), sodium 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (gentisate) and copper(II) and cadmium(II) gentisates were done. The proposed hydrated structures of transition metal complexes were based on the results of experimental findings. The theoretical geometrical parameters and atomic charge distribution were discussed. Moreover Na, Cu(II) and Cd(II) gentisates were synthesized and the composition of obtained compounds was revealed by means of elemental and thermogravimetric analyses. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of gentisic acid and gentisates were registered and the effect of metals on the electronic charge distribution of ligand was discussed.

Regulska, E.; Kalinowska, M.; Wojtulewski, S.; Korczak, A.; Sienkiewicz-Gromiuk, J.; Rz?czy?ska, Z.; ?wis?ocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

2014-11-01

339

10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS...Insurance, in Law and Administration in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony...

2011-01-01

340

10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS...Insurance, in Law and Administration in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony...

2010-01-01

341

10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS...Insurance, in Law and Administration in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony...

2012-01-01

342

Chemistry Professor Larry Anderson teaches his students to look at the big picture when it comes to research about  

E-print Network

1982. "Science has almost no impact on public policy. Public policy is politically driven." Yet are global in scope," Anderson says. "My hope is our students will gain valuable international perspective

343

MD Anderson researchers find that breast cancer spread may be tied to cells that regulate blood flow  

Cancer.gov

Scientists at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center believe that targeting blood vessel cells known as pericytes may offer a potential new therapeutic approach when combined with vascular growth factors responsible for cell death.

344

2014 Rice University / UT MD Anderson Med Into Grad Program in Translational Cancer Diagnostics & Therapeutics Research for Bioengineers & Biophysicists  

E-print Network

2014 Rice University / UT MD Anderson Med Into Grad Program in Translational Cancer Diagnostics & Therapeutics Research for Bioengineers & Biophysicists Program Details: Rice University and The University Research for Bioengineers and Biophysicists. Doctoral students from Rice's Bioengineering, Biochemistry

Zhang, David Yu

345

Microscopic level investigation of Ni(II) sorption on Na-rectorite by EXAFS technique combined with statistical F-tests.  

PubMed

Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy combined with statistical F-tests is used to investigate the local atomic structures of Ni(II) adsorbed on Na-rectorite. The EXAFS analysis results of Ni(II) sorption samples indicate that the first coordination shell consists of ~6 O at the Ni-O interatomic distance (R) of ~2.04 ?. The presence of Ni backscattering at R(Ni-Ni) = 3.06 ? in the second coordination shell suggests the formation of Ni(II) precipitate. The results of F-tests show that the Ni(II) precipitate is Ni-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH). Our results demonstrate that Ni(II) ions are retained via different mechanisms depending on solution conditions. At low pH, Ni retention is controlled mainly by the outer-sphere surface complexation. With increasing pH, outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexation dominate Ni uptake. Furthermore, Ni surface loading increases with temperature increasing at pH 6.5 due to the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes and Ni-Al LDH. The formation of Ni-Al LDH becomes the dominate mechanism at the elevated pH and temperature. In the presence of humic substances, the sorption of Ni(II) on Na-rectorite is dominated by the formation of ternary surface complexes. These results are important to understand the physicochemical behavior of Ni(II) in the natural environment. PMID:23500786

Ren, Xuemei; Yang, Shitong; Hu, Fengchun; He, Bo; Xu, Jinzhang; Tan, Xiaoli; Wang, Xiangke

2013-05-15

346

TRIHALOMETHANE LEVELS IN HOME TAP WATER AND SEMEN QUALITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Trihalomethane Levels in Home Tap Water and Semen Quality Laura Fenster, 1 Kirsten Waller, 2 Gayle Windham, 1 Tanya Henneman, 2 Meredith Anderson, 2 Pauline Mendola, 3 James W. Overstreet, 4 Shanna H. Swan5 1California Department of Health Services, Division of Environm...

347

Esr of a Magnetic Probe in the Neighborhood of AN Anderson Impurity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The renormalization group formalism was applied to calculate the spin lattice relaxation rate T1-1 of a magnetic probe located in the neighborhood of a spin degenerate Anderson impurity. In the Kondo regime, T1-1 as a function of the temperature T presents a peak at the Kondo temperature TK. For T?TK, the system behaves as a heavy Fermi liquid, with an enhanced density of states, which increases with the decrease in the Kondo temperature; T1-1T is a universal function of T/?K up to temperatures of the order of 100 ?K, where ?K is the Kondo width for temperatures lower than TK. The spin relaxation rate T1-1 is proportional to the product of the magnetic susceptibility and temperature ?T. Moreover, in the peak, T1-1 at the Kondo temperature decreases with the increase in the distance between the Anderson impurity and the magnetic probe.

Pinto, J. W. M.; Frota, H. O.

348

Local Polarization Distribution and Edwards-Anderson Order Parameter of Relaxor Ferroelectrics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The temperature dependence of the Edwards-Anderson order parameter qEA and the local polarization distribution function W\\\\(p-->\\\\) have been determined in a PMN single crystal via 2D 93Nb NMR. A glasslike freezing of reorientable polar clusters occurs in the temperature range of the diffuse relaxor transition, whereas the NMR spectra corresponding to pinned nanodomains do not change with temperature. The obtained

R. Blinc; J. Dolins Ek; A. Gregorovic; B. Zalar; C. Filipic; Z. Kutnjak; A. Levstik; R. Pirc

1999-01-01

349

Odysseus almost makes it to broadway: The Ulysses Africanus of Kurt Weill and Maxwell Anderson  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between the end of 1938 and the beginning of 1939, Kurt Weill and Maxwell Anderson began working together on a musical comedy\\u000a entitledUlysses Africanus, which was intended to be performed on Broadway. The play tells anOdyssey-like story set in the aftermath of the American Civil War. Various problems attended attempts to stage the play, and the\\u000a project was eventually abandoned.

Robert J. Rabel

2007-01-01

350

Magnetic frustration in the three-band Anderson lattice model for high-temperature superconductors  

SciTech Connect

The three-band Anderson lattice model for the CuO{sub 2} planes in high-{Tc} superconductors is established. Treating this model by perturbation theory, the effective spin interactions are derived. The antiferromagnetic superexchange integrals are calculated as functions of the direct oxygen transfer and the hole concentration. It is found that frustration in the superexchange occurs, even in the undoped case, which increases with oxygen trnasfer and decreases with hole concentration.

Ihle, D.; Kasner, M. (Sektion Physik, Karl-Marx-Universitaet Leipzig, DDR-7010 Leipzig (German Democratic Republic))

1990-09-01

351

Observation of migrating transverse Anderson localizations of light in nonlocal media.  

PubMed

We report the experimental observation of the interaction and attraction of many localized modes in a two-dimensional system realized by a disordered optical fiber supporting transverse Anderson localization. We show that a nonlocal optically nonlinear response of thermal origin alters the localization length by an amount determined by the optical power and also induces an action at a distance between the localized modes and their spatial migration. Evidence of a collective and strongly interacting regime is given. PMID:24877941

Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

2014-05-16

352

MD Anderson study finds qigong improves quality of life for breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy  

Cancer.gov

Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found qigong, an ancient mind-body practice, reduces depressive symptoms and improves quality of life in women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. The study, published in the journal Cancer, is the first to examine qigong in patients actively receiving radiation therapy and includes a follow-up period to assess benefits over time.

353

Step-by-step covalent modification of Cr-templated Anderson-type polyoxometalates.  

PubMed

A series of tripodal alcohols substituted Anderson-type polyoxometalates (POMs) including mono-substituted (compounds and ), asymmetrical bi-substituted (compound ), and symmetrical bi-substituted ones (compounds and ) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions using a pre-designed step-by-step strategy, and compounds , and have been fully characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, ESI-MS, and elemental analysis. PMID:24695647

Lin, Chang-Gen; Chen, Wei; Long, De-Liang; Cronin, Leroy; Song, Yu-Fei

2014-06-21

354

Critical Metal Phase at the Anderson Metal-Insulator Transition with Kondo Impurities  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that magnetic impurities can change the symmetry class of disordered metallic systems by breaking spin and time-reversal symmetry. At low temperature, these symmetries can be restored by Kondo screening. It is also known that at the Anderson metal-insulator transition, wave functions develop multifractal fluctuations with power-law correlations. Here, we consider the interplay of these two effects.

S. Kettemann; E. R. Mucciolo; I. Varga

2009-01-01

355

Critical metal phase at the Anderson metal-insulator transition with Kondo impurities  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that magnetic impurities can change the symmetry class of disordered metallic systems by breaking spin and time-reversal symmetry. At low temperature, these symmetries can be restored by Kondo screening. It is also known that at the Anderson metal-insulator transition, wave functions develop multifractal fluctuations with power-law correlations. Here, we consider the interplay of these two effects.

Eduardo Mucciolo; Stefan Kettemann; Imre Varga

2010-01-01

356

Two length scales near the Anderson transition and the critical diffusive behavior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results of an analytical and numerical investigation of the Anderson metal-insulator transition based on a supersymmetric non-linear ?-model in effective medium approximation. In the critical metallic regime two characteristic length scales exist which diverge according to a power law but have different critical exponents. We put forward a physical picture that enables us to express the diffusion coefficient in terms of these two lengths and to explain its exponential behavior obtained previously.

Viehweger, O.; Efetov, K. B.

357

MD Anderson-led study finds LIFR protein suppresses breast cancer metastasis  

Cancer.gov

A receptor protein suppresses local invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells, the most lethal aspect of the disease, according to a research team headed by scientists from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Reporting in Nature Medicine, the team described using high-throughput RNA sequencing to identify the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) as a novel suppressor of breast cancer metastasis, the spread of the disease to other organs.

358

MD Anderson study finds Black patients with kidney cancer have poorer survival than whites  

Cancer.gov

Among patients with the most common form of kidney cancer, whites consistently have a survival advantage over blacks, regardless of patient and tumor characteristics or surgical treatment. That is the conclusion of a new University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study's results suggest that additional efforts are needed to prolong the survival of all patients with kidney cancer.

359

A note on fractional moments for the one-dimensional continuum Anderson model  

E-print Network

We give a proof of dynamical localization in the form of exponential decay of spatial correlations in the time evolution for the one-dimensional continuum Anderson model via the fractional moments method. This follows via exponential decay of fractional moments of the Green function, which is shown to hold at arbitrary energy and for any single-site distribution with bounded, compactly supported density.

Eman Hamza; Robert Sims; Günter Stolz

2009-07-27

360

Application of light-absorption ratio variation approach as an optimum spectrophotometry to determination of Mn(II) in ng ml -1 level using a competitive replacement complexation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The light-absorption ratio variation approach (LARVA) which produces an outstandingly increasing of analytical sensitivity was applied to the quantitative detection of ultramicro amounts of Mn(II) by light-absorption spectrometry using the competitive replacement complexation among 1,5-di(2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenyl)-3-cyanoformazan (DSPCF), Zn(II) and Mn(II) in the presence of o-phenanthroline (OPTL). Not only masks OPTL foreign metal ions but also seriously sensitize the competitive complexation. All the binary and ternary complexes were characterized by the break point approach. Results have shown that the limit of detection (3 ?) of Mn(II) is only 0.7 ng ml -1. This method has been applied to analysis of water quality with satisfactory results.

Gao, Hong-Wen; Zhang, Sheng-Yi; Wang, Hong-Yan; Xia, Si-Qing; Zhang, Ya-Lei

2005-01-01

361

The 2012 Thomas Hunt Morgan medal: Kathryn V. Anderson.  

PubMed

The Genetics Society of America annually honors members who have made outstanding contributions to genetics. The Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal recognizes a lifetime contribution to the science of genetics. The Genetics Society of America Medal recognizes particularly outstanding contributions to the science of genetics over the past 31 years. The George W. Beadle Medal recognizes distinguished service to the field of genetics and the community of geneticists. The Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education recognizes individuals or groups who have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level, from kindergarten through graduate school and beyond. The Novitski Prize recognizes an extraordinary level of creativity and intellectual ingenuity in solving significant problems in biological research through the application of genetic methods. We are pleased to announce the 2012 awards. PMID:22701044

Wolfner, Mariana F; Schedl, Tim

2012-06-01

362

Fixation techniques for the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: early follow-up. A systematic review of level I and II therapeutic studies.  

PubMed

The purpose of our study was that to systematically review the fixation techniques for the ACL reconstruction and associated clinical outcomes at the early follow-up. Systematic search on three electronic databases (Cochrane register, Medline and Embase) of fixation devices used for primary ACL reconstruction with doubled semitendinosus and gracilis and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts in randomized clinical trials of level I and II of evidence published from January 2001 to December 2011. Therapeutic studies collected were with a minimum 12-month follow-up, and the clinical outcomes were evaluated by at least one of International Knee Documentation Committee, Lysholm and Tegner functional scales and at least one of the following knee stability tests: arthrometric AP tibial translation, Lachman test and pivot-shift test. Nineteen articles met the inclusion criteria. At the femoral side cross-pin, metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable interference screw, and suspensory device were used in 32.3, 27.3, 24.8, 15.5 % of patients, respectively. At the tibial side fixation was achieved with metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable interference screw, screw and plastic sheath, screw post and cross-pin in 38.7, 31, 15.7, 12.8, and 1.7 % of patients, respectively. Side-to-side anterior-posterior tibial translation was 1.9 ± 0.9, 1.5 ± 0.9, 1.5 ± 0.8, 2.2 ± 0.4 mm for metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable screw, cross-pin and suspensory device, respectively. At least two-third of all the patients achieved good-to-excellent clinical outcomes. Rate of failure was 6.1, 3.3, 1.7 and 1.2 % for bioabsorbable interference screw, metallic interference screw, cross-pin and suspensory device, respectively. Clinical outcomes are good to excellent in almost two-third of the patients but several pitfalls that affect the current fixation techniques as graft tensioning such as graft-tunnel motion are still unaddressed. PMID:25269758

Speziali, Andrea; Delcogliano, Marco; Tei, Matteo; Placella, Giacomo; Bartoli, Matteo; Menghi, Amerigo; Cerulli, Giuliano

2014-12-01

363

Response of sensitive and resistant IgM immunocytomas to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) does not correlate with the platination level or with the formation or removal of DNA adducts  

Microsoft Academic Search

An IgM immunocytoma cell line sensitive to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) and a subline with acquired resistance were grown in LOU\\/M rats. In a previous study\\u000a with such rats that had been treated with a high dose of CDDP (10?mg\\/kg) the tumors did not show differences in cellular platinum\\u000a content or DNA-adduct levels, either immediately after treatment or 24?h later. Recently, this

Cornelis P. J. Vendrik; Anne Marie J. Fichtinger-Schepman; Wilhelmina C. M. van Dijk-Knijnenburg; W. H. de Jong; Anke C. E. van der Minnen; Gerard de Groot; Geert Frits Berends; P. A. Steerenberg

1997-01-01

364

Competency-Based Adult Basic Education Manual for Level I (0-4.9) and Level II (5-8). A Training Manual for CBABE Instruction and Program Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This training manual was developed as a source of information about Competency-Based Adult Basic Education (CBABE) for administrators, counselors, and teachers involved in the implementation of a CBABE program. After section I provides an introduction to Brevard Community College's development of CBABE curricula, section II explains the purposes…

Singer, Elizabeth; And Others

365

Intracellular levels of polyamines in Krebs II lymphosarcoma cells in mice fed phytohaemagglutinin-containing diets are coupled with altered tumour growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The number of Krebs II tumour cells recovered from the ascitic fluid of mice fed for 8 days on a lactalbumin (La) control diet was about three times higher than that in animals fed a phytohaemagglutinin-containing (PHA) diet. Feeding a PHA diet for less than 8 days after tumour cell injection also led to a reduction in tumour cell growth.

Susan Bardocz; George Grant; Tracey J Duguid; David S Brown; Arpad Pusztai; Ian F Pryme

1997-01-01

366

Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240°C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85°C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63°C in 1889, 42–52°C from 1974 through 1991, and 77°C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98°C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3°C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring. During August–October 1999, several field trips were conducted in the vicinity of Anderson Springs to continue monitoring and sampling the thermal manifestations. The new fumarolic area had increased in temperature and in discharge intensity since 1998, and a zone of dead trees had developed on the steep bank directly west of the fumaroles. Ground temperatures and diffuse flow of CO2 flow through soils were measured in the area surrounding the main spring and new fumaroles and in the zone of tree-kill.

Janik, C.J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M.L.; Rytuba, J.J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E.M.; Huebner, M.; White, L.D.; Foster, A.

1999-01-01

367

The atomic approach to the Anderson model for the finite U case: application to a quantum dot.  

PubMed

In the present work we apply the atomic approach to the single-impurity Anderson model (SIAM). A general formulation of this approach, that can be applied both to the impurity and to the lattice Anderson Hamiltonian, was developed in a previous work (Foglio et al 2009 arxiv: 0903.0139v2 [cond-mat.str-el]). The method starts from the cumulant expansion of the periodic Anderson model, employing the hybridization as a perturbation. The atomic Anderson limit is analytically solved and its sixteen eigenenergies and eigenstates are obtained. This atomic Anderson solution, which we call the AAS, has all the fundamental excitations that generate the Kondo effect, and in the atomic approach is employed as a 'seed' to generate the approximate solutions for finite U. The width of the conduction band is reduced to zero in the AAS, and we choose its position such that the Friedel sum rule is satisfied, close to the chemical potential mu. We perform a complete study of the density of states of the SIAM over the whole relevant range of parameters: the empty dot, intermediate valence, Kondo and magnetic regimes. In the Kondo regime we obtain a density of states that characterizes well the structure of the Kondo peak. To show the usefulness of the method we have calculated the conductance of a quantum dot, side-coupled to a conduction band. PMID:20571194

Lobo, T; Figueira, M S; Foglio, M E

2010-07-01

368

Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.  

PubMed

For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25507406

O'Connell, William D

2014-11-01

369

Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.  

PubMed

For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25423683

O'Connell, William D

2014-11-01

370

Hydrothermal assembly and luminescence property of lanthanide-containing Anderson polyoxometalates  

SciTech Connect

Two compounds, {l_brace}[Sm(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub 2}(TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}){r_brace}.6H{sub 2}O (1) and {l_brace}[Eu(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}]{sub 2} (TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}){r_brace}.5H{sub 2}O (2) have been synthesized by hydrothermal reactions and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermal stability analyses, X-ray powder diffraction, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 represents the first example of a 2D layer architecture constructed from Anderson-type polyoxoanions [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} and rare-earth ions Ln{sup 3+}. Compound 2 displays a 1D chain structure built up of alternating Anderson-type polyoxoanions [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} and rare-earth ions Eu{sup 3+} along the c-axis. Luminescence measurement of 2 exhibits typical red fluorescent emission of the Eu{sup 3+} ion at room temperature. Furthermore, the emission is intense enough to be observed macroscopically under UV irradiation (365 nm). - Graphical abstract: Two compounds based on Anderson-type polyoxoanion building blocks and rare-earth ions have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Compound 1 exhibits a 2D layer architecture constructed from [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} anions and rare-earth ions Ln{sup 3+}. Compound 2 displays a 1D chain structure and possesses the intense luminescence property.

Liu Ying [Key Laboratory of Polyoxometalates Science of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun City, JiLin 130024 (China); Liu Shuxia [Key Laboratory of Polyoxometalates Science of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun City, JiLin 130024 (China)], E-mail: liusx@nenu.edu.cn; Cao Ruige; Ji Hongmei; Zhang Shiwei; Ren Yuanhang [Key Laboratory of Polyoxometalates Science of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun City, JiLin 130024 (China)

2008-09-15

371

Investigation of Anderson lattice behavior in Yb1-xLuxAl3  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of magnetic susceptibility {chi}(T), specific heat C(T), Hall coefficient R{sub H}(T), and Yb valence {nu} = 2 + n{sub f} [f-occupation number n{sub f} (T) determined from Yb L{sub 3} x-ray absorption measurements] were carried out on single crystals of Yb{sub 1-x}Lu{sub x}Al{sub 3}. The low temperature anomalies observed in {chi}(T) and C(T) corresponding to an energy scale T{sub coh} {approx} 40 K in the intermediate valence, Kondo lattice compound YbAl{sub 3} are suppressed by Lu concentrations as small as 5% suggesting these low-T anomalies are extremely sensitive to disorder and, therefore, are a true coherence effect. By comparing the temperature dependence of various physical quantities to the predictions of the Anderson Impurity Model, the slow crossover behavior observed in YbAl{sub 3}, in which the data evolve from a low-temperature coherent, Fermi-liquid regime to a high temperature local moment regime more gradually than predicted by the Anderson Impurity Model, appears to evolve to fast crossover behavior at x {approx} 0.7 where the evolution is more rapid than predicted. These two phenomena found in Yb{sub 1-x}Lu{sub x}Al{sub 3}, i.e., the low-T anomalies and the slow/fast crossover behavior are discussed in relation to recent theories of the Anderson lattice.

Bauer, E.D.; Booth, C.H.; Lawrence, J.M.; Hundley, M.F.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.; Riseborough, P.S.; Ebihara, T.

2003-10-06

372

Massive bowel resection upregulates the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II and apolipoprotein A-IV and alters the intestinal vitamin A status in rats.  

PubMed

Short bowel (SB) syndrome causes the malabsorption of various nutrients. Among these, vitamin A is important for a number of physiological activities. Vitamin A is absorbed by epithelial cells of the small intestine and is discharged into the lymphatic vessels as a component of chylomicrons and is delivered to the liver. In the present study, we used a rat model of SB syndrome in order to assess its effects on the expression of genes associated with the absorption, transport and metabolism of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II (CRBP II, gene symbol Rbp2) and apolipoprotein A-IV (gene symbol Apoa4) were higher than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by RT-qPCR. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that absorptive epithelial cells stained positive for both CRBP II and lecithin retinol acyltransferase, which are both required for the effective esterification of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the retinol content in the ileum and the retinyl ester content in the jejunum were lower than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by quantitative analysis of retinol and retinyl esters by high performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that the elevated mRNA expression levels of Rbp2 and Apoa4 in the rats with SB contribute to the effective esterification and transport of vitamin A. PMID:25585692

Hebiguchi, Taku; Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Morii, Mayako; Watanabe, Ryo; Yoshikawa, Kiwamu; Miura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Katsuyuki; Senoo, Haruki; Yoshino, Hiroaki

2015-03-01

373

Machine learning for many-body physics: The case of the Anderson impurity model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Machine learning methods are applied to finding the Green's function of the Anderson impurity model, a basic model system of quantum many-body condensed-matter physics. Different methods of parametrizing the Green's function are investigated; a representation in terms of Legendre polynomials is found to be superior due to its limited number of coefficients and its applicability to state of the art methods of solution. The dependence of the errors on the size of the training set is determined. The results indicate that a machine learning approach to dynamical mean-field theory may be feasible.

Arsenault, Louis-François; Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Millis, Andrew J.

2014-10-01

374

Critical State of the Anderson Transition: Between a Metal and an Insulator  

SciTech Connect

Using a three-frequency one-dimensional kicked rotor experimentally realized with a cold atomic gas, we study the transport properties at the critical point of the metal-insulator Anderson transition. We accurately measure the time evolution of an initially localized wave packet and show that it displays at the critical point a scaling invariance characteristic of this second-order phase transition. The shape of the momentum distribution at the critical point is found to be in excellent agreement with the analytical form deduced from the self-consistent theory of localization.

Lemarie, Gabriel; Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Lignier, Hans; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molecules, Universite Lille 1 Sciences et Technologies, UMR CNRS 8523, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France)

2010-08-27

375

Pure point spectrum under 1-parameter perturbations and instability of Anderson localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider a selfadjoint operator, A, and a selfadjoint rank-one projection, P, onto a vector, ?, which is cyclic for A. We study the set of all eigenvalues of the operator A t = A+tP (t??) that belong to its essential spectrum (which does not depend on the parameter t). We prove that this set is empty for a dense set of values of t. Then we apply this result or its idea to questions of Anderson localization for 1-dimensional Schrödinger operators (discrete and continuous).

Gordon, A. Ya.

1994-08-01

376

Conductance fluctuation of edge-disordered graphene nanoribbons: Crossover from diffusive transport to Anderson localization  

SciTech Connect

Conductance fluctuation of edge-disordered graphene nanoribbons (ED-GNRs) is examined using the non-equilibrium Green's function technique combined with the extended Hückel approximation. The mean free path ? and the localization length ? of the ED-GNRs are determined to classify the quantum transport regimes. In the diffusive regime where the length L{sub c} of the ED-GNRs is much longer than ? and much shorter than ?, the conductance histogram is given by a Gaussian distribution function with universal conductance fluctuation. In the localization regime where L{sub c}??, the histogram is no longer the universal Gaussian distribution but a lognormal distribution that characterizes Anderson localization.

Takashima, Kengo [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takahiro, E-mail: takahiro@rs.tus.ac.jp [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Department of Liberal Arts (Physics), Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan)

2014-03-03

377

Transmission Eigenvalues and the Bare Conductance in the Crossover to Anderson Localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We measure the field transmission matrix t for microwave radiation propagating through random waveguides in the crossover to Anderson localization. From these measurements, we determine the dimensionless conductance g and the individual eigenvalues ?n of the transmission matrix tt† whose sum equals g. In diffusive samples, the highest eigenvalue, ?1, is close to unity corresponding to a transmission of nearly 100%, while for localized waves, the average of ?1, is nearly equal to g. We find that the spacing between average values of ln??n is constant and demonstrate that when surface interactions are taken into account it is equal to the inverse of the bare conductance.

Shi, Zhou; Genack, Azriel Z.

2012-01-01

378

Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

2014-06-01

379

Between a metal and an insulator: the critical state of the Anderson transition  

E-print Network

Using a three-frequency one-dimensional kicked rotor experimentally realized with a cold atomic gas, we study the transport properties at the critical point of the metal-insulator Anderson transition. We accurately measure the time-evolution of an initially localized wavepacket and show that it displays at the critical point a scaling invariance characteristic of this second-order phase transition. The shape of the momentum distribution at the critical point is found to be in excellent agreement with the analytical form deduced from self-consistent theory of localization.

Gabriel Lemarié; Hans Lignier; Dominique Delande; Pascal Szriftgiser; Jean Claude Garreau

2010-05-10

380

Anderson localization through Polyakov loops: Lattice evidence and random matrix model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate low-lying fermion modes in SU(2) gauge theory at temperatures above the phase transition. Both staggered and overlap spectra reveal transitions from chaotic (random matrix) to integrable (Poissonian) behavior accompanied by an increasing localization of the eigenmodes. We show that the latter are trapped by local Polyakov loop fluctuations. Islands of such “wrong” Polyakov loops can therefore be viewed as defects leading to Anderson localization in gauge theories. We find strong similarities in the spatial profile of these localized staggered and overlap eigenmodes. We discuss possible interpretations of this finding and present a sparse random matrix model that reproduces these features.

Bruckmann, Falk; Kovács, Tamás G.; Schierenberg, Sebastian

2011-08-01

381

Anisotropic behavior of quantum transport in graphene superlattices: Coexistence of ballistic conduction with Anderson insulating regime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the possibility to generate highly anisotropic quantum conductivity in disordered graphene-based superlattices. Our quantum simulations, based on an efficient real-space implementation of the Kubo-Greenwood formula, show that in disordered graphene superlattices the strength of multiple scattering phenomena can strongly depend on the transport measurement geometry. This eventually yields the coexistence of a ballistic waveguide and a highly resistive channel (Anderson insulator) in the same two-dimensional platform, evidenced by a ?yy/?xx ratio varying over several orders of magnitude, and suggesting the possibility of building graphene electronic circuits based on the unique properties of chiral massless Dirac fermions in graphene.

Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Cummings, Aron W.; Roche, Stephan

2014-04-01

382

MD Anderson study finds blood vessel cells coax colorectal cancer cells into more dangerous state  

Cancer.gov

Blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to tumors can also deliver something else -- a signal that strengthens nearby cancer cells, making them more resistant to chemotherapy, more likely to spread to other organs and more lethal, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report online in Cancer Cell. Working in human colorectal cancer cell lines and tumor samples, as well as mouse models, the researchers found that endothelial cells, which line the inside of blood vessels, can trigger changes in cancer cells without even coming into direct contact with them.

383

MD Anderson study finds metabolic protein launches sugar feast that nurtures brain tumors  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have tracked down a cancer-promoting protein's pathway into the cell nucleus and discovered how, once there, it fires up a glucose metabolism pathway on which brain tumors thrive. They also found a vital spot along the protein's journey that can be attacked with a type of drug not yet deployed against glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and lethal form of brain cancer. Published online by Nature Cell Biology, the paper further illuminates the importance of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) in cancer development and progression.

384

Variational Monte Carlo Study of Anderson Localization in the Hubbard Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have studied the effects of interactions on persistent currents in half-filled and quarter-filled Hubbard models with weak and intermediate strength disorder. Calculations are performed using a variational Gutzwiller ansatz that describes short range correlations near the Mott transition. A persistent current is induced with an Aharonov-Bohm flux, and the Anderson localization length is extracted from the scaling of the current with system size. We find that, at half filling, the localization length grows monotonically with interaction strength, even though the current itself is suppressed by strong correlations. This supports earlier dynamical mean field theory predictions that the elastic scattering rate is reduced near the Mott transition.

Atkinson, William; Farhoodfar, Avid; Gooding, Robert J.

2012-02-01

385

MD Anderson study finds link between statins and improved survival in inflammatory breast cancer  

Cancer.gov

Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found statins, the commonly used drug to lower cholesterol, improved progression-free survival in patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The retrospective study was presented in a poster discussion at the 2012 CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium and follows a previously reported Danish study indicating there is some evidence to suggest the anti-inflammatory properties of statins could reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence. Still, the overall effects of statins have not been examined in relation to IBC.

386

Magnetic field induced quantum phase transitions in the two-impurity Anderson model  

SciTech Connect

In the two-impurity Anderson model, the inter-impurity spin exchange interaction favors a spin singlet state between two impurities leading to the localization of quasiparticles. We show that a local uniform magnetic field can delocalize the quasiparticies to restore the Kondo resonance. This transition is found to be continuous, accompanied by not only the divergence of the staggered (anti ferromagnetic) susceptibility, but also the divergence of the uniform spin susceptibility. This implies that the magnetic field induced quantum phase transitions in Kondo systems are in favor of the local critical type.

Zhu, Lujun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhu, Jian - Xin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-17

387

Zyflamend, a polyherbal mixture, down regulates class I and class II histone deacetylases and increases p21 levels in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Background Zyflamend, a mixture containing extracts of ten herbs, has shown promise in a variety of preclinical cancer models, including prostate cancer. The current experiments were designed to investigate the effects of Zyflamend on the expression of class I and II histone deacetylases, a family of enzymes known to be over expressed in a variety of cancers. Methods CWR22Rv1 cells, a castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell line, were treated with Zyflamend and the expression of class I and II histone deacetylases, along with their downstream target the tumor suppressor gene p21, was investigated. Involvement of p21 was confirmed with siRNA knockdown and over expression experiments. Results Zyflamend down-regulated the expression of all class I and II histone deacetylases where Chinese goldthread and baikal skullcap (two of its components) appear to be primarily responsible for these results. In addition, Zyflamend up regulated the histone acetyl transferase complex CBP/p300, potentially contributing to the increase in histone 3 acetylation. Expression of the tumor suppressor gene p21, a known downstream target of histone deacetylases and CBP/p300, was increased by Zyflamend treatment and the effect on p21 was, in part, mediated through Erk1/2. Knockdown of p21 with siRNA technology attenuated Zyflamend-induced growth inhibition. Over expression of p21 inhibited cell growth and concomitant treatment with Zyflamend enhanced this effect. Conclusions Our results suggest that the extracts of this polyherbal combination increase histone 3 acetylation, inhibit the expression of class I and class II histone deacetylases, increase the activation of CBP/p300 and inhibit cell proliferation, in part, by up regulating p21 expression. PMID:24555771

2014-01-01

388

Switching between control and phytohaemagglutinin-containing diets affects growth of Krebs II ascites cells and produces differences in the levels of putrescine, spermidine and spermine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Almost twice as many ascites tumour cells were recovered from mice pre-fed for 3 days on a lactalbumin (La)-based control diet, injected with Krebs II ascites cells and then maintained on the same diet for a further 8 days, when compared with mice fed on a phytohaemagglutinin-containing (PHA) diet for the whole period. A dietary switch on the day of

Ian F. Pryme; Susan Bardocz; George Grant; Tracey J. Duguid; David S. Brown; Arpad Pusztai

1995-01-01

389

Effect of Cd(II) and Se(IV) exposure on cellular distribution of both elements and concentration levels of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in Lepidium sativum.  

PubMed

In this work, the effect of cadmium (0-5.0 mg L(-1) as cadmium chloride, Cd(II)) and selenium (0-2.0 mg L(-1) as sodium selenite, Se(IV)) was studied in Lepidium sativum with specific focus on glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MGO) and on the cellular distribution of both elements under different exposure conditions. The concentrations of two reactive ?-ketoaldehydes present as natural metabolites and as by-products of lipid peroxidation, were increased in plants treated with Cd(II), providng complementary experimental evidence on element phytotoxicity in garden cress, in terms of oxidative damage. Even though for higher than 1.0 mg L(-1) Se in medium similar adverse effect was found, under simultaneous exposure to both elements the changes in GO and MGO concentrations were clearly attenuated as compared to a single stressor treatment. This effect was accompanied by lower uptake of the two elements, significant decrease of their relative distribution in the fraction containing polar compounds and their increase in fraction corresponding to insoluble cell fragments/components, suggesting that the direct in vivo interaction between two element forms might be involved in the favorable effects of simultaneous treatment with Cd(II) + Se(IV). The fluorescence spectra obtained for biomass extracts corresponding to different exposure conditions suggested possible in vivo formation of CdSe quantum dots; however further studies are needed for ultimate identification and characterization of such nanoparticulate species. PMID:23799538

Gómez Ojeda, Armando; Corrales Escobosa, Alma Rosa; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Yanez Barrientos, Eunice; Wrobel, Katarzyna

2013-09-01

390

Anderson-Gruneisen parameter under high temperature in (Fe,Mn,Co,Mg)2SiO4  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) is of considerable importance to Earth scientists because it sets limitations on the thermo-elastic properties of the lower mantle and core. However, there are several formulations on the Grüneisen parameter, which are in frequent use and predict varying dependence of d as a function of temperature. In this paper, the expressions for thermal expansion, thermal expansion coefficients and bulk modulus are obtained considering the anharmonic dependence on temperature and are applied to study these constants to (Fe,Mn,Co,Mg)2SiO4. Using the derived expressions, we have shown that different parameters on which the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) depends are temperature dependent, but above all the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) is independent of temperature. The results obtained have been found to be comparable to experimental data.

Gupta, S.; Goyal, S. C.

2012-07-01

391

Statistical measurements of quantum emitters coupled to Anderson-localized modes in disordered photonic-crystal waveguides  

E-print Network

Optical nanostructures have proven to be meritorious for tailoring the emission properties of quantum emitters. However, unavoidable fabrication imperfections may represent a nuisance. Quite remarkably, disorder offers new opportunities since light can be efficiently confined by random multiple scattering leading to Anderson localization. Here we investigate the effect of such disorder-induced cavities on the emission dynamics of single quantum dots embedded in disordered photonic-crystal waveguides. We present time-resolved measurements of both the total emission from Anderson-localized cavities and from single emitters that are coupled to the cavities. We observe both strongly inhibited and enhanced decay rates relative to the rate of spontaneous emission in a homogeneous medium. From a statistical analysis, we report an average Purcell factor of 2 in without any control on the quantum dot - cavity detuning. By spectrally tuning individual quantum dots into resonance with Anderson-localized modes, a maximum...

Javadi, Alisa; Sapienza, Luca; Thyrrestrup, Henri; Lodahl, Peter

2013-01-01

392

Vitreous levels of the insulin-like growth factors I and II, and the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 2 and 3, increase in neovascular eye disease. Studies in nondiabetic and diabetic subjects.  

PubMed Central

Retinal capillary nonperfusion results in neovascularization of the eye, which is restricted to the retina in less severe cases and progresses to the anterior chamber and the iris angle in the most advanced case, called rubeosis. This angioneogenesis may be induced by the release of retinal growth factors into the vitreous. This study compared levels of the IGF-I and IGF-II, and of the IGF binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) and IGFBP-3 in vitreous from three groups with different degrees of retinal ischemia, as judged by the extent of neovascularization: a control group without new vessel formation, retinal neovascularization in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and massive ischemia of various causes resulting in rubeosis. IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were increased 10- and 13-fold in rubeosis (P << 0.01) compared with no ischemia (n = 10), while IGF-II and IGFBP-2 were elevated 2.7- and 4.3-fold (P < 0.01). Within the rubeosis group similar changes were observed independently of the cause of ischemia, which was central vein occlusion, ischemic ophthalmopathy, or intraocular tumor in seven cases and diabetic retinopathy in three samples from two patients. Vitreous from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy but without rubeosis (n = 16) contained 2.5- and 2.2-fold elevated levels of IGF-I and of IGFBP-2 (P < 0.05), while IGF-II and IGFBP-3 were increased 1.4- and 1.6-fold, which was not significant. We conclude that: (a) ischemia appears to be a strong stimulus for the local production of IGF-I and -II and of IGFBP-2 and -3 in the eye. (b) Changes in IGF-I and IGFBP-2 in proliferative diabetic retinopathy may be secondary to local ischemia rather than being specific for diabetic retinopathy. (c) IGF-I and IGFBP-3 may play a role in mediating angioneogenesis in the eye. PMID:7504689

Meyer-Schwickerath, R; Pfeiffer, A; Blum, W F; Freyberger, H; Klein, M; Lösche, C; Röllmann, R; Schatz, H

1993-01-01

393

The effect of aluminium-stress and exogenous spermidine on chlorophyll degradation, glutathione reductase activity and the photosystem II D1 protein gene (psbA) transcript level in lichen Xanthoria parietina.  

PubMed

In this study, the effects of short-term aluminium toxicity and the application of spermidine on the lichen Xanthoria parietina were investigated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. Our results suggest that aluminium stress leads to physiological processes in a dose-dependent manner through differences in lipid peroxidation rate, chlorophyll content and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity in aluminium and spermidine treated samples. The expression of the photosystem II D1 protein (psbA) gene was quantified using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Increased glutathione reductase activity and psbA mRNA transcript levels were observed in the X. parietina thalli that were treated with spermidine before aluminium-stress. The results showed that the application of spermidine could mitigate aluminium-induced lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll degradation on lichen X. parietina thalli through an increase in psbA transcript levels and activity of glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes. PMID:24359631

Sen, Gulseren; Eryilmaz, Isil Ezgi; Ozakca, Dilek

2014-02-01

394

ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE  

E-print Network

ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM 589 DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE ANALYSES ACCURATELY QUANTIFY THE CLIMATE IMPACTS OF BIOFUELS-RELATED LAND USE CHANGE? Kristina J. Anderson in determining the sustainability of biofuels. To ensure that legal standards are effective in limiting climate

DeLucia, Evan H.

395

Solving a puzzle in the Anderson transition with long-range correlated potentials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The conditions for an Anderson transition in 1D systems has been an open question since it's discovery a half century ago. Although scaling theory predicts localization in this case, it has been shown that a transition exists in the presence of some form of long-range correlations in the on-site energies. One of the most widely used examples are disorder potentials generated by 1/k^? spectral densities [1] that, with an appropriate short range cutoff, result in vanishing correlation functions in the thermodynamic limit. However, these results are in direct contradiction to work by Kotani et. al. [2] that argues for the existence of a metallic state only when infinite range correlations are non-zero. In this talk we will show that there is no contradiction between the two results as the correlation function generated from numerical techniques is staunchly different from analytic expectations. Furthermore, we will present the exact analytic expression for the correlation function in the thermodynamic limit. Finally, we will discuss the role played by short- and long-range features of the correlation function in the Anderson transition. [4pt] [1] F. Moura and M. Lyra, PRL 81, 3735 (1998)[0pt] [2] S. Kotani and B. Simon Commun. Math. Phys. 112,103 (1985).

Petersen, Greg; Sandler, Nancy

2013-03-01

396

Anderson-Mott transition in arrays of a few dopant atoms in a silicon transistor.  

PubMed

Dopant atoms are used to control the properties of semiconductors in most electronic devices. Recent advances such as single-ion implantation have allowed the precise positioning of single dopants in semiconductors as well as the fabrication of single-atom transistors, representing steps forward in the realization of quantum circuits. However, the interactions between dopant atoms have only been studied in systems containing large numbers of dopants, so it has not been possible to explore fundamental phenomena such as the Anderson-Mott transition between conduction by sequential tunnelling through isolated dopant atoms, and conduction through thermally activated impurity Hubbard bands. Here, we observe the Anderson-Mott transition at low temperatures in silicon transistors containing arrays of two, four or six arsenic dopant atoms that have been deterministically implanted along the channel of the device. The transition is induced by controlling the spacing between dopant atoms. Furthermore, at the critical density between tunnelling and band transport regimes, we are able to change the phase of the electron system from a frozen Wigner-like phase to a Fermi glass by increasing the temperature. Our results open up new approaches for the investigation of coherent transport, band engineering and strongly correlated systems in condensed-matter physics. PMID:22751223

Prati, Enrico; Hori, Masahiro; Guagliardo, Filippo; Ferrari, Giorgio; Shinada, Takahiro

2012-07-01

397

Neurosurgical oncology at the university of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center: its genesis and evolution.  

PubMed

The practice of neurosurgery at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center began in 1944 with one neurosurgeon among the 11 physicians present in a makeshift 16-room outpatient clinic at a temporary location. Neurosurgical oncology evolved as the hospital did, first as a neurosurgery service in 1951, then as the Section of Neurosurgery within the Department of Head and Neck Surgery in 1979, and finally, as the Department of Neurosurgery in 1990. Although M. D. Anderson is now one of the largest institutions in the world devoted exclusively to cancer patient care, research, education, and prevention, it has an unusual history, which is reviewed in terms of the institution's origin in 1941, its development under three presidents, and its fostering of neurosurgical oncology. We chronicle the growth and development of the department from 1990 to 2003 and describe the unique opportunities it presents for surgical innovation, for clinical and basic research, for training residents and fellows, and for multidisciplinary collaboration in neurosurgical oncology. PMID:15792524

Lang, Frederick F; Wildrick, David M; DeMonte, Franco; Sawaya, Raymond

2005-04-01

398

Two new architectures based on Anderson-type polyoxoanions and cadmium fragments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two new hybrid compounds with cadmium cations/coordination complexes as linkers, (C 6H 5NO 2) 4[(H 2O) 14Cd 3(CrMo 6H 6O 24) 2] 1 (C 6H 5NO 2 = pyridine-4-carboxylic acid) and H[(H 2O) 2(C 6H 5NO 2)(C 6H 4NO 2)Cd] 2[CrMo 6H 6O 24]·9H 2O 2 (C 6H 5NO 2, C 6H 4NO 2 = pyridine-3-carboxylic acid), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, TG, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the polar space group Pc and is made up of [CrMo 6H 6O 24] 3- polyoxoanions covalently linked by cadmium cations to yield an unprecedented one-dimensional chain, which represents the first example of one-dimensional assemblies based on Anderson-type POMs and cadmium cations. Adjacent inorganic chains are further in close contact by pyridine-4-carboxylic acid glues to form three-dimensional supramolecular polar networks via strong hydrogen-bonding interactions. Compound 2 exhibits a three-dimensional supramolecular channel framework constructed from cationic cadmium-pyridine-3-carboxylic acid coordination polymer sheets pillared by Anderson-type polyoxoanions, with dissociated water molecules situated in the channels. Furthermore, both of the compounds exhibit photoluminescent properties at ambient temperature.

An, Haiyan; Xu, Tieqi; Jia, Cuiying; Zheng, Hui; Mu, Wensheng

2009-09-01

399

Topology of delocalization in the nonlinear Anderson model and anomalous diffusion on finite clusters  

E-print Network

This study is concerned with destruction of Anderson localization by a nonlinearity of the power-law type. We suggest using a nonlinear Schr\\"odinger model with random potential on a lattice that quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. For super-quadratic nonlinearity the borderline spreading corresponds to diffusion processes on finite clusters. We have proposed an analytical method to predict and explain such transport processes. Our method uses a topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model and, if the exponent of the power nonlinearity is either integer or half-integer, will yield the wanted value of the transport exponent via a triangulation procedure in an Euclidean mapping space. A kinetic picture of the transport arising from these investigations uses a fractional extension of the diffusion equation to fractional derivatives over the time, signifying non-Markovian dynamics with algebraically decaying time correlations.

A. V. Milovanov; A. Iomin

2014-05-29

400

Literacy Behaviors of Kindergarten-Primary Children in High Stimulus-Level Literacy Environments. Part I: The Instruments. Part II: Environments and Literacy Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of patterns of literacy behaviors in high level literacy environments with varying levels of access to the environment began with a study of the instruments involved. Goals were to: (1) examine the reliability of the Survey of Displayed Literacy Stimuli; (2) study the correlation between scores from the Survey of Displayed Literacy Stimuli…

Loughlin, Catherine E.; Ivener, Bonnie L.

401

What's Driving You Crazy? A Question To Drive Collaborative, Inquiry-Based Middle School Reform. Part II: Private and Multi-Level Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how the question "What's driving you crazy?" is used by Hawaii middle-level educators to improve working conditions and meet students' needs by making schools more developmentally responsive. Focuses on the 6-step collaborative, inquiry-based innovation process at two private, multi-level schools embedded within K-8 or 6-12 campuses.…

Deering, Paul D.; And Others

2003-01-01

402

Quantum criticality in the pseudogap Bose-Fermi Anderson and Kondo models: Interplay between fermion- and boson-induced Kondo destruction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We address the phenomenon of critical Kondo destruction in pseudogap Bose-Fermi Anderson and Kondo quantum impurity models. These models describe a localized level coupled both to a fermionic bath having a density of states that vanishes like |?|r at the Fermi energy (?=0) and, via one component of the impurity spin, to a bosonic bath having a sub-Ohmic spectral density proportional to |?|s. Each bath is capable by itself of suppressing the Kondo effect at a continuous quantum phase transition. We study the interplay between these two mechanisms for Kondo destruction using continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo for the pseudogap Bose-Fermi Anderson model with 0

Pixley, J. H.; Kirchner, Stefan; Ingersent, Kevin; Si, Qimiao

2013-12-01

403

Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles Influence Levels of Antibodies to the Plasmodium falciparum Asexual-Stage Apical Membrane Antigen 1 but Not to Merozoite Surface Antigen 2 and Merozoite Surface Protein 1  

PubMed Central

The apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1), merozoite surface antigen 2 (MSA2), and merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) are asexual-stage proteins currently being evaluated for inclusion in a vaccine for Plasmodium falciparum. Accordingly, it is important to understand factors that control antibody responses to these antigens. Antibody levels in plasma from residents of Etoa, Cameroon, between the ages of 5 and 70 years, were determined using recombinant AMA1, MSA2, and the N-terminal region of MSP1 (MSP1-190L). In addition, antibody responses to four variants of the C-terminal region of MSP1 (MSP119) were assessed. Results showed that all individuals produced antibodies to AMA1, MSA2, and MSP1-190L; however, a proportion of individuals never produced antibodies to the MSP119 variants, although the percentage of nonresponders decreased with age. The influence of age and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1/DQB1 alleles on antibody levels was evaluated using two-way analysis of variance. Age was correlated with levels of antibodies to AMA1 and MSP119 but not with levels of antibodies to MSA2 and MSP1-190L. No association was found between a single HLA allele and levels of antibodies to MSA2, MSP1-190L, or any of the MSP119 variants. However, individuals positive for DRB1*1201 had higher levels of antibodies to the variant of recombinant AMA1 tested than did individuals of all other HLA types. Since the effect was seen across all age groups, HLA influenced the level but not the rate of antibody acquisition. This association for AMA1, combined with the previously reported association between HLA class II alleles and levels of antibodies to rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP1) and RAP2, indicates that HLA influences the levels of antibodies to three of the five vaccine candidate antigens that we have evaluated. PMID:15102786

Johnson, Armead H.; Leke, Rose G. F.; Mendell, Nancy R.; Shon, Dewon; Suh, Young Ju; Bomba-Nkolo, Dennis; Tchinda, Viviane; Kouontchou, Samuel; Thuita, Lucy W.; van der Wel, Anne Marie; Thomas, Alan; Stowers, Anthony; Saul, Allan; Zhou, Ainong; Taylor, Diane W.; Quakyi, Isabella A.

2004-01-01

404

Modelling climate change impacts in the Peace and Athabasca Catchment and delta: II - variations in flow and water levels with varying winter severity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As freshwater ice is known to significantly affect flows and water levels within the Peace-Athabasca Delta (PAD), a winter severity sensitivity analysis using a one-dimensional open channel hydraulic model was performed for four climate scenarios (from mild to severe), and was examined under three differing flow conditions (low, average, and high hydraulic regimes), in an effort to better understand the multiple interactions between ice cover and the hydrodynamic regime of this complex system characterized by overbank flooding and flow reversal episodes. In general, a reduction of winter severity lowered lake levels and river flows. While the winter severity effect is of relatively short duration in the rivers, the subsequent reduction in lake levels extends over the summer months. High river flows predispose flow reversal conditions, and water enters the lakes at the outlet as the water levels in the rivers feeding the PAD increase significantly over a short period of time. This flow reversal effect is suppressed during milder winters. Numerical modelling results indicate that extending the ice-cover season (severe winter) by 14 days resulted in an increase of up to 5 cm in water level of large lakes in the PAD, while reducing it by 28 days lowered the levels by almost 10 cm. Short-term variations in river levels reached up to 1.5 m as a result of varying the extent of the ice-cover season. As the simulation runs did not consider ice-jam events and neglected the effect of ice thickness on water levels, the reported quantitative results must be interpreted with prudence. Copyright

Leconte, Robert; Peters, Daniel; Pietroniro, Alain; Prowse, Terry

2006-12-01

405

"Feeling good in your own skin" part II: Idiomatic expressions--the way language connects to the primary levels of mental organization.  

PubMed

After describing the role of sensations in the primary levels of mental organization, this part of the article suggests viewing somatic idioms as the language's way to connect with these levels. We seek to exemplify the qualities, meanings and functioning of idioms, since they serve as a basic key in investigating the different layers of the mind. Examples taken from clinical cases, as well as from universal literary products, such as fairy tales, provide useful contributions to this argument. PMID:21383749

Raufman, Ravit; Yigael, Yoav

2011-03-01

406

Program Spotlight: University of Puerto Rico and MD Anderson Partnership Welcomes Its First Graduates, Dedicated to Researching Cancer Health Disparities  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD joins the Principal Investigators and Diversity Training co-leaders of the University of Puerto Rico and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center U54 Partnership for Excellence in Cancer Research in congratulating its first MDPhD graduates Sergei Gumá-de La Vega and Nahir Cortés-Santiago.

407

MD Anderson researchers find that the number of younger patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer may nearly double by 2030  

Cancer.gov

In the next 15 years, more than one in 10 colon cancers and nearly one in four rectal cancers will be diagnosed in patients younger than the traditional screening age, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

408

COMBINATORIAL PROOFS OF FERMAT'S, LUCAS'S, AND WILSON'S PETER G. ANDERSON, ARTHUR T. BENJAMIN, AND JEREMY A. ROUSE  

E-print Network

COMBINATORIAL PROOFS OF FERMAT'S, LUCAS'S, AND WILSON'S THEOREMS PETER G. ANDERSON, ARTHUR T case where b = 0, it is clear that Vp = ap . Consequently, we have Fermat's Theorem: If p is a prime, then ap a (mod p). This combinatorial proof of Fermat's theorem was originally given in [2]. Next

Anderson, Peter G.

409

THE BROADER BENEFITS OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTUCTURE Ian Sue Wing, William P. Anderson and T.R. Lakshmanan  

E-print Network

1 THE BROADER BENEFITS OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTUCTURE Ian Sue Wing, William P. Anderson and T.R. Lakshmanan Boston University Center for Transportation Studies Abstract Assessments of the economic benefits of transportation infrastructure investments are critical to good policy decisions. At present, most

Wing, Ian Sue

410

Ion-temperature-gradient modes in stellarator geometry (T Rafiq, J Anderson, M Nadeem and M Persson)  

E-print Network

Ion-temperature-gradient modes in stellarator geometry (T Rafiq, J Anderson, M Nadeem and M Persson Göteborg, Sweden) The stability of the ion-temperature gradient mode has been examined in the short radius) effect as well as parallel ion dynamics in the electrostatic limit with Boltzman electrons

411

High-Performance Local Area Communication With Fast Steven H. Rodrigues Thomas E. Anderson David E. Culler  

E-print Network

1993], Myrinet [Seitz 1994], and switched high- speed Ethernet has the potential to dramatically imHigh-Performance Local Area Communication With Fast Sockets Steven H. Rodrigues Thomas E. Anderson with large packets; most network traffic is small. We have devel- oped Fast Sockets, a local

Culler, David E.

412

MD Anderson researchers find that breast cancer patients with BRCA gene are diagnosed almost 8 years earlier than generation before  

Cancer.gov

Women with a deleterious gene mutation are diagnosed with breast cancer almost eight years earlier than relatives of the previous generation who also had the disease and/or ovarian cancer, according to new research from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

413

Background Subtraction and Accessibility Analysis in Evidence Grids Peter Anderson-Sprecher, Reid Simmons, and Daniel Huber  

E-print Network

Background Subtraction and Accessibility Analysis in Evidence Grids Peter Anderson-Sprecher, Reid multiple sensors. Previous attempts at back- ground subtraction within evidence grids either do so prior that must be able to differentiate between occupied and unknown space after background subtraction

Simmons, Reid

414

Nuclear liability insurance: the Price-Anderson reparations system and the claims experience of the nuclear industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The manner in which the Price-Anderson Law operates to provide reparations is reviewed, and the changes made in the law by Congress in 1975 are outlined. Nuclear liability insurers' response to the Three Mile Island accident is described, including emergency assistance funds advanced to qualified evacuees and the claims and litigations that followed. Other nuclear liability claims that have been

Marrone

1983-01-01

415

Statistical measurements of quantum emitters coupled to Anderson-localized modes in disordered photonic-crystal waveguides  

E-print Network

Optical nanostructures have proven to be meritorious for tailoring the emission properties of quantum emitters. However, unavoidable fabrication imperfections may represent a nuisance. Quite remarkably, disorder offers new opportunities since light can be efficiently confined by random multiple scattering leading to Anderson localization. Here we investigate the effect of such disorder-induced cavities on the emission dynamics of single quantum dots embedded in disordered photonic-crystal waveguides. We present time-resolved measurements of both the total emission from Anderson-localized cavities and from single emitters that are coupled to the cavities. We observe both strongly inhibited and enhanced decay rates relative to the rate of spontaneous emission in a homogeneous medium. From a statistical analysis, we report an average Purcell factor of 2 in without any control on the quantum dot - cavity detuning. By spectrally tuning individual quantum dots into resonance with Anderson-localized modes, a maximum Purcell factor of 23.8 is recorded, which lies at the onset of the strong coupling regime. The presented data quantify the potential of naturally occurring Anderson-localized cavities for controlling and enhancing the light-matter interaction strength, which is of relevance not only for cavity quantum-electrodynamics experiments but potentially also for efficient energy harvesting and controllable random lasing.

Alisa Javadi; Pedro D. Garcia; Luca Sapienza; Henri Thyrrestrup; Peter Lodahl

2013-01-02

416

MD Anderson study finds SUMO-snipping protein plays crucial role in T and B cell development  

Cancer.gov

When SUMO grips STAT5, a protein that activates genes, it blocks the healthy embryonic development of immune B cells and T cells unless its nemesis breaks the hold, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in Molecular Cell.

417

MD Anderson preclinical study identifies 'master' proto-oncogene that regulates stress-induced ovarian cancer metastasis  

Cancer.gov

Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered the signaling pathway whereby a master regulator of cancer cell proteins -- known as Src -- leads to ovarian cancer progression when exposed to stress hormones. The researchers report in the current issue of Nature Communications that beta blocker drugs mitigate this effect and reduce cancer deaths by an average of 17 percent.

418

Power-Aware Technology Mapping for LUT-Based FPGAs Jason H. Anderson and Farid N. Najm  

E-print Network

consumption of FPGAs is beneficial as it leads to lower packaging and cooling costs as well as improvesPower-Aware Technology Mapping for LUT-Based FPGAs Jason H. Anderson and Farid N. Najm Department@eecg.toronto.edu, f.najm@utoronto.ca Abstract We present a new power-aware technology mapping technique for LUT

Najm, Farid N.

419

UModelling Leaf Shape Evolution Jotun Hein, Nick Jones, Miltos Tsiantis, James Anderson and John Moriarty. 17.6.2011  

E-print Network

UModelling Leaf Shape Evolution Jotun Hein, Nick Jones, Miltos Tsiantis, James Anderson and John on simple models of shape evolution and their application to leaf shapes. Shape analysis is a well in the Tsiantis group (Piazza et al, 2010; Hay and Tsiantis, 2006). Leaf shape can be described as simple

Goldschmidt, Christina

420

Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle, Alexander Romanovsky  

E-print Network

Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle-The-Shelf) item. The case study used a Simulink model of a steam boiler system together with an OTS PID in practice, employing software models of the PID controller and the steam boiler system rather than

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

421

Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle, Alexander Romanovsky  

E-print Network

1 Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle employing an OTS (Off-The-Shelf) item. The case study used a Simulink model of a steam boiler system, employing software models of the PID controller and the steam boiler system rather than conducting

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

422

MD Anderson study finds drug combination improves progression-free survival for women with metastatic breast cancer:  

Cancer.gov

In an international Phase III randomized study, everolimus, when combined with the hormonal therapy exemestane, has been shown to dramatically improve progression-free survival for women with metastatic breast cancer, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

423

Strong-coupling limit of depleted Kondo-and Anderson-lattice models Irakli Titvinidze, Andrej Schwabe and Michael Potthoff  

E-print Network

Strong-coupling limit of depleted Kondo- and Anderson-lattice models Irakli Titvinidze, Andrej an effective low- energy Hamiltonian for the Kondo-lattice model with a depleted system of localized spins.10.-b, 75.20.Hr, 75.30.Mb I. INTRODUCTION The Kondo-lattice model1­5 is a prototypical model

Potthoff, Michael

424

Identification and Analysis of Learning Preferences of Mentally Ill Adults in Rehabilitative Psychosocial Therapy at the Anderson Mental Health Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study identified and analyzed the learning preferences of 17 seriously and chronically mentally ill adults participating in the rehabilitative psychosocial therapy program at the Toxaway Church Site of the Anderson Mental Health Center. Staff perceived as boring and unfocused the traditional treatment approach that relied mainly upon…

Newman, Michael K.

425

Multiple temperature scales of the periodic Anderson model: Slave boson approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The thermodynamic and transport properties of intermetallic compounds with Ce, Eu, and Yb ions are discussed using the periodic Anderson model with an infinite correlation between f electrons. At high temperatures, these systems exhibit typical features that can be understood in terms of a single-impurity Anderson or Kondo model with Kondo scale TK . At low temperatures, one often finds a normal state governed by the Fermi liquid (FL) laws with characteristic energy scale T0 . The slave boson solution of the periodic model shows that T0 and TK depend not only on the degeneracy and the splitting of the f states, the number of c and f electrons, and their coupling but also on the shape of the conduction-electrons density of states ( c DOS) in the vicinity of the chemical potential ? . The ratio T0/TK depends on the details of the band structure which makes the crossover between the high- and low-temperature regimes system dependent. We show that the c DOS with a sharp peak close to ? yields T0?TK , which explains the “slow crossover” observed in YbAl3 or YbMgCu4 . The c DOS with a minimum or a pseudogap close to ? yields T0?TK ; this leads to an abrupt transition between the high- and low-temperature regimes, as found in YbInCu4 -like systems. In the case of CeCu2Ge2 and CeCu2Si2 , where T0?TK , we show that the pressure dependence of the T2 coefficient of the electrical resistance, A=?(T)/T2 , and the residual resistance are driven by the change in the degeneracy of the f states. The FL laws obtained for T?T0 explain the correlation between the specific-heat coefficient ?=CV/T and the thermopower slope ?(T)/T or between ? and the resistivity coefficient A . The FL laws also show that the Kadowaki-Woods ratio, RKW=A/?2 , and the ratio q=lim{T?0}?/?T assumes nonuniversal values due to different low-temperature degeneracies of various systems. The correlation effects can invalidate the Wiedemann-Franz law and lead to an enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit. They can also enhance (or reduce) the low-temperature response of the periodic Anderson model with respect to the predictions of a single-impurity model with the same high-temperature behavior as the periodic one.

Burdin, S.; Zlati?, V.

2009-03-01

426

Polymorphisms in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Genes Affect the Expression Levels of Membrane-Bound Type I and Type II Receptors  

PubMed Central

The level of TNF receptors on various cells of immune system and its association with the gene polymorphism were investigated. Determining the levels of membrane-bound TNF? receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed by flow cytometry using BD QuantiBRITE calibration particles. Soluble TNF? receptor (sTNFRs) levels were determined by ELISA and genotyping was determined by PCR-RFLP. Homozygous TT individuals at SNP ?609G/T TNFRI (rs4149570) showed lower levels of sTNFRI compared to GG genotype carriers. Homozygous carriers of CC genotype at SNP ?1207G/C TNFRI (rs4149569) had lower expression densities of membrane-bound TNFRI on intact CD14+ monocytes compared to individuals with the GC genotype. The frequency differences in the CD3+ and CD19+ cells expressing TNFRII in relation to SNP ?1709A/T TNFRII (rs652625) in healthy individuals were also determined. The genotype CC in SNP ?3609C/T TNFRII (rs590368) was associated with a lower percentage of CD14+ cells expressing TNFRII compared to individuals with the CT genotype. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had no significant changes in the frequencies of genotypes. Reduced frequency was identified for the combination TNFRI ?609GT + TNFRII ?3609CC only. The polymorphisms in genes represent one of cell type-specific mechanisms affecting the expression levels of membrane-bound TNF? receptors and TNF?-mediated signaling. PMID:24782596

Sennikov, Sergey V.; Vasilyev, Filipp F.; Lopatnikova, Julia A.; Shkaruba, Nadezhda S.; Silkov, Alexander N.

2014-01-01

427

Full dimensional Franck-Condon factors for the acetylene A? (1)Au-X? (1)?(g)(+) transition. II. Vibrational overlap factors for levels involving excitation in ungerade modes.  

PubMed

A full-dimensional Franck-Condon calculation has been applied to the A? (1)Au-X? 1?g+ transition in acetylene in the harmonic normal mode basis. Details of the calculation are discussed in Part I of this series. To our knowledge, this is the first full-dimensional Franck-Condon calculation on a tetra-atomic molecule undergoing a linear-to-bent geometry change. In the current work, the vibrational intensity factors for levels involving excitation in ungerade vibrational modes are evaluated. Because the Franck-Condon integral accumulates away from the linear geometry, we have been able to treat the out-of-plane component of trans bend (?4('')) in the linear X? state in the rotational part of the problem, restoring the ? Euler angle and the a-axis Eckart conditions. A consequence of the Eckart conditions is that the out-of-plane component of ?4('') does not participate in the vibrational overlap integral. This affects the structure of the coordinate transformation and the symmetry of the vibrational wavefunctions used in the overlap integral, and results in propensity rules involving the bending modes of the X? state that were not previously understood. We explain the origin of some of the unexpected propensities observed in IR-UV laser-induced fluorescence spectra, and we calculate emission intensities from bending levels of the A? state into bending levels of the X? state, using normal bending mode and local bending mode basis sets. Our calculations also reveal Franck-Condon propensities for the Cartesian components of the cis bend (?5('')), and we predict that the best A?-state vibrational levels for populating X?-state levels with large amplitude bending motion localized in a single C-H bond (the acetylene?vinylidene isomerization coordinate) involve a high degree of excitation in ?6(') (cis-bend). Mode ?4(') (torsion) populates levels with large amplitude counter-rotational motion of the two hydrogen atoms. PMID:25296804

Park, G Barratt; Baraban, Joshua H; Field, Robert W

2014-10-01

428

An ecological model of the habitat mosaic in estuarine nursery areas: Part II ? Projecting effects of sea level rise on fish production  

EPA Science Inventory

Understanding the response of fish populations to habitat change mediated by sea level rise (SLR) is a key component of ecosystem-based management. Yet, no direct link has been established between habitat change due to SLR and fish population production. Here we take a coupled ...

429

Position Announcement: Graduate Assistant for Rec Clubs This is a 12-month .49 FTE Level I/II Graduate Administrative Assistant (GAA) position.  

E-print Network

Position Announcement: Graduate Assistant for Rec Clubs This is a 12-month .49 FTE Level I contributors to the Portland State and global community. Rec Clubs Mission: Portland State Rec Clubs is a student-led program representing different sports, games, and physical activities. Rec Clubs are organized

430

Results of Arthroscopic Repair of Type II Superior Labral Anterior Posterior Lesions in Overhead Athletes: Assessment of Return to Preinjury Playing Level and Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The majority of the literature on surgical outcomes of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) repairs has focused on short-term follow-up of 1 to 2 years, not allowing adequate time for full rehabilitation and return to maximum level of competition for all types of athletes. Also, previous studies have concentrated on using questionnaires that primarily evaluate patients’ activities of daily

Brian J. Neuman; C. Brittany Boisvert; Brian Reiter; Kevin Lawson; Michael G. Ciccotti; Steven B. Cohen

2011-01-01

431

European Structures of Qualification Levels: Reports on Recent Developments in Germany, Spain, France, the Netherlands and in the United Kingdom (England and Wales). Volume II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains reports on the structures of qualification levels in Germany, Spain, France, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom that were commissioned during a study to identify trends and developments in the European Union related to national certification frameworks. Each country report examines the following topics: the history of…

Westerhuis, Anneke

432

Nonuniversal Intensity Correlations in a Two-Dimensional Anderson-Localizing Random Medium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Complex dielectric media often appear opaque because light traveling through them is scattered multiple times. Although the light scattering is a random process, different paths through the medium can be correlated encoding information about the medium. Here, we present spectroscopic measurements of nonuniversal intensity correlations that emerge when embedding quantum emitters inside a disordered photonic crystal that is found to Anderson-localize light. The emitters probe in situ the microscopic details of the medium, and imprint such near-field properties onto the far-field correlations. Our findings provide new ways of enhancing light-matter interaction for quantum electrodynamics and energy harvesting, and may find applications in subwavelength diffuse-wave spectroscopy for biophotonics.

García, Pedro David; Stobbe, Søren; Söllner, Immo; Lodahl, Peter

2012-12-01

433

Classical mapping for Hubbard operators: Application to the double-Anderson model  

SciTech Connect

A classical Cartesian mapping for Hubbard operators is developed to describe the nonequilibrium transport of an open quantum system with many electrons. The mapping of the Hubbard operators representing the many-body Hamiltonian is derived by using analogies from classical mappings of boson creation and annihilation operators vis-à-vis a coherent state representation. The approach provides qualitative results for a double quantum dot array (double Anderson impurity model) coupled to fermionic leads for a range of bias voltages, Coulomb couplings, and hopping terms. While the width and height of the conduction peaks show deviations from the master equation approach considered to be accurate in the limit of weak system-leads couplings and high temperatures, the Hubbard mapping captures all transport channels involving transition between many electron states, some of which are not captured by approximate nonequilibrium Green function closures.

Li, Bin; Miller, William H. [Department of Chemistry and Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, University of California, and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Levy, Tal J.; Rabani, Eran [School of Chemistry, The Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2014-05-28

434

Numerical study of Anderson localization of terahertz waves in disordered waveguides  

E-print Network

We present a numerical study of electromagnetic wave transport in disordered quasi-one-dimensional waveguides at terahertz frequencies. Finite element method calculations of terahertz wave propagation within LiNbO$_{3}$ waveguides with randomly arranged air-filled circular scatterers exhibit an onset of Anderson localization at experimentally accessible length scales. Results for the average transmission as a function of waveguide length and scatterer density demonstrate a clear crossover from diffusive to localized transport regime. In addition, we find that transmission fluctuations grow dramatically when crossing into the localized regime. Our numerical results are in good quantitative agreement with theory over a wide range of experimentally accessible parameters both in the diffusive and localized regime opening the path towards experimental observation of terahertz wave localization.

Lapointe, C P; Enderli, F; Feurer, T; Skipetrov, S E; Scheffold, F

2014-01-01

435

Classical mapping for Hubbard operators: application to the double-Anderson model.  

PubMed

A classical Cartesian mapping for Hubbard operators is developed to describe the nonequilibrium transport of an open quantum system with many electrons. The mapping of the Hubbard operators representing the many-body Hamiltonian is derived by using analogies from classical mappings of boson creation and annihilation operators vis-à-vis a coherent state representation. The approach provides qualitative results for a double quantum dot array (double Anderson impurity model) coupled to fermionic leads for a range of bias voltages, Coulomb couplings, and hopping terms. While the width and height of the conduction peaks show deviations from the master equation approach considered to be accurate in the limit of weak system-leads couplings and high temperatures, the Hubbard mapping captures all transport channels involving transition between many electron states, some of which are not captured by approximate nonequilibrium Green function closures. PMID:24880265

Li, Bin; Miller, William H; Levy, Tal J; Rabani, Eran

2014-05-28

436

Topologically invariant tensor renormalization group method for the Edwards-Anderson spin glasses model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tensor renormalization group (TRG) method is a real space renormalization group approach. It has been successfully applied to both classical and quantum systems. In this paper, we study a disordered and frustrated system, the two-dimensional Edwards-Anderson model, by a new topological invariant TRG scheme. We propose an approach to calculate the local magnetizations and nearest pair correlations simultaneously. The Nishimori multicritical point predicted by the topological invariant TRG agrees well with the recent Monte Carlo results. The TRG schemes outperform the mean-field methods on the calculation of the partition function. We notice that it might obtain a negative partition function at sufficiently low temperatures. However, the negative contribution can be neglected if the system is large enough. This topological invariant TRG can also be used to study three-dimensional spin glass systems.

Wang, Chuang; Qin, Shao-Meng; Zhou, Hai-Jun

2014-11-01

437

Beyond Anderson Localization in 1D: Anomalous Localization of Microwaves in Random Waveguides.  

PubMed

Experimental evidence demonstrating that anomalous localization of waves can be induced in a controllable manner is reported. A microwave waveguide with dielectric slabs randomly placed is used to confirm the presence of anomalous localization. If the random spacing between slabs follows a distribution with a power-law tail (Lévy-type distribution), unconventional properties in the microwave-transmission fluctuations take place revealing the presence of anomalous localization. We study both theoretically and experimentally the complete distribution of the transmission through random waveguides characterized by ?=1/2 ("Lévy waveguides") and ?=3/4, ? being the exponent of the power-law tail of the Lévy-type distribution. As we show, the transmission distributions are determined by only two parameters, both of them experimentally accessible. Effects of anomalous localization on the transmission are compared with those from the standard Anderson localization. PMID:25526129

Fernández-Marín, A A; Méndez-Bermúdez, J A; Carbonell, J; Cervera, F; Sánchez-Dehesa, J; Gopar, V A

2014-12-01

438

Critical Metal Phase at the Anderson Metal-Insulator Transition with Kondo Impurities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well known that magnetic impurities can change the symmetry class of disordered metallic systems by breaking spin and time-reversal symmetry. At low temperature, these symmetries can be restored by Kondo screening. It is also known that at the Anderson metal-insulator transition, wave functions develop multifractal fluctuations with power-law correlations. Here, we consider the interplay of these two effects. We show that multifractal correlations open local pseudogaps at the Fermi energy at some random positions in space. When dilute magnetic impurities are at these locations, Kondo screening is strongly suppressed. When the exchange coupling J is smaller than a certain value J*, the metal-insulator transition point extends to a critical region in the disorder strength parameter and to a band of critical states.

Kettemann, S.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Varga, I.

2009-09-01

439

Critical metal phase at the Anderson metal-insulator transition with Kondo impurities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well known that magnetic impurities can change the symmetry class of disordered metallic systems by breaking spin and time-reversal symmetry. At low temperature, these symmetries can be restored by Kondo screening. It is also known that at the Anderson metal-insulator transition, wave functions develop multifractal fluctuations with power-law correlations. Here, we consider the interplay of these two effects. We show that multifractal correlations open local pseudogaps at the Fermi energy at some random positions in space. When dilute magnetic impurities are at these locations, Kondo screening is strongly suppressed. When the exchange coupling J is smaller than a certain value J^*, the metal-insulator transition point extends to a critical region in the disorder strength parameter and to a band of critical states. The width of this critical region increases with a power of the concentration of magnetic impurities. [S. Kettemann, E. R. Mucciolo, and I. Varga, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 126401 (2009).

Mucciolo, Eduardo; Kettemann, Stefan; Varga, Imre

2010-03-01

440

Self-Consistent Theory of Anderson Localization in Two Dimensions in View of Exact Transport Equation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Self-consistent theory of Anderson localization of two-dimensional non-interacting electrons is formulated in the context of the exact transport equation and conductivity expression derived by the present authors (YI). The irreducible scattering vertex by Vollhardt and Wölfle (VW) is used in this equation, determining the diffusion coefficient in the scattering vertex self-consistently, through Einstein relation. It predicts a similar localization length to that obtained by VW, but shows that the conductivity evaluated by the Kubo formula decays exponentially, as the system size approaches the localization length. The result is opposed to the prediction by VW, who showed different behaviour of the diffusion coefficient that is equivalent to our conductivity. Our calculation also implies that the localization may be described along with the Landau-Silin theory of Fermi liquid.

Yamane, Y.; Itoh, M.

2012-10-01

441

Intrafamilial phenotypic variability in four families with Anderson-Fabry disease.  

PubMed

We analysed the clinical history of 16 hemizygous males affected by Anderson-Fabry Disease, from four families, to verify their intrafamilial phenotypic variability. Seven male patients, ranging from 26 to 61?years of age, died, whereas nine (age range 23-55) are alive. Eleven patients have undergone enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for a period of 5-10?years. We have found a wide range of intrafamilial phenotypic variability in these families, both in terms of target-organs and severity of the disease. Overall, our findings confirm previous data from the literature showing a high degree of intrafamilial phenotypic variability in patients carrying the same mutation. Furthermore, our results underscore the difficulty in giving accurate prognostic information to patients during genetic counselling, both in terms of rate of disease progression and involvement of different organs, when such prognosis is solely based on the patient's family history. PMID:23980562

Rigoldi, M; Concolino, D; Morrone, A; Pieruzzi, F; Ravaglia, R; Furlan, F; Santus, F; Strisciuglio, P; Torti, G; Parini, R

2014-09-01

442

One-dimensional Anderson Localization: distribution of wavefunction amplitude and phase at the band center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The statistics of normalized wavefunctions in the one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model of localization is considered. It is shown that at any energy that corresponds to a rational filling factor f = p/q there is a statistical anomaly which is seen in expansion of the generating function (GF) to the order q-2 in the disorder parameter. We study in detail the principle anomaly at f = 1/2 that appears in the leading order. The transfer-matrix equation of the Fokker-Planck type with a two-dimensional internal space is derived for GF. It is shown that the zero-mode variant of this equation is integrable and a solution for the generating function is found in the thermodynamic limit.

Kravtsov, V. E.; Yudson, V. I.

2009-05-01

443

Leveraging Anderson Acceleration for improved convergence of iterative solutions to transport systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this note we demonstrate that using Anderson Acceleration (AA) in place of a standard Picard iteration can not only increase the convergence rate but also make the iteration more robust for two transport applications. We also compare the convergence acceleration provided by AA to that provided by moment-based acceleration methods. Additionally, we demonstrate that those two acceleration methods can be used together in a nested fashion. We begin by describing the AA algorithm. At this point, we will describe two application problems, one from neutronics and one from plasma physics, on which we will apply AA. We provide computational results which highlight the benefits of using AA, namely that we can compute solutions using fewer function evaluations, larger time-steps, and achieve a more robust iteration.

Willert, Jeffrey; Taitano, William T.; Knoll, Dana

2014-09-01

444

Magnetic Moments of Chromium-Doped Gold Clusters: The Anderson Impurity Model in Finite Systems  

E-print Network

The magnetic moment of a single impurity atom in a finite free electron gas is studied in a combined x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and density functional theory study of size-selected free chromium-doped gold clusters. The observed size-dependence of the local magnetic moment can essentially be understood in terms of the Anderson impurity model. Electronic shell closure in the host metal minimizes the interaction of localized impurity states with the confined free electron gas and preserves the full magnetic moment of $\\unit[5]{\\mu_B}$ in $\\mathrm{CrAu}_{2}^{+}$ and $\\mathrm{CrAu}_{6}^{+}$ clusters. Even for open-shell species, large local moments are observed that scale with the energy gap of the gold cluster. This indicates that an energy gap in the free electron gas generally stabilizes the local magnetic moment of the impurity.

Hirsch, K; Langenberg, A; Niemeyer, M; Langbehn, B; Möller, T; Terasaki, A; Issendorff, B v; Lau, J T

2013-01-01

445

Modified Anderson-Darling Test-Based Target Detector in Non-Homogenous Environments  

PubMed Central

A constant false alarm rate (CFAR) target detector in non-homogenous backgrounds is proposed. Based on K-sample Anderson-Darling (AD) tests, the method re-arranges the reference cells by merging homogenous sub-blocks surrounding the cell under test (CUT) into a new reference window to estimate the background statistics. Double partition test, clutter edge refinement and outlier elimination are used as an anti-clutter processor in the proposed Modified AD (MAD) detector. Simulation results show that the proposed MAD test based detector outperforms cell-averaging (CA) CFAR, greatest of (GO) CFAR, smallest of (SO) CFAR, order-statistic (OS) CFAR, variability index (VI) CFAR, and CUT inclusive (CI) CFAR in most non-homogenous situations. PMID:25177800

Li, Yang; Wei, Yinsheng; Li, Bingfei; Alterovitz, Gil

2014-01-01

446

Beyond Anderson Localization in 1D: Anomalous Localization of Microwaves in Random Waveguides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental evidence demonstrating that anomalous localization of waves can be induced in a controllable manner is reported. A microwave waveguide with dielectric slabs randomly placed is used to confirm the presence of anomalous localization. If the random spacing between slabs follows a distribution with a power-law tail (Lévy-type distribution), unconventional properties in the microwave-transmission fluctuations take place revealing the presence of anomalous localization. We study both theoretically and experimentally the complete distribution of the transmission through random waveguides characterized by ? =1 /2 ("Lévy waveguides") and ? =3 /4 , ? being the exponent of the power-law tail of the Lévy-type distribution. As we show, the transmission distributions are determined by only two parameters, both of them experimentally accessible. Effects of anomalous localization on the transmission are compared with those from the standard Anderson localization.

Fernández-Marín, A. A.; Méndez-Bermúdez, J. A.; Carbonell, J.; Cervera, F.; Sánchez-Dehesa, J.; Gopar, V. A.

2014-12-01

447

Decay of a nonlinear impurity in a structured continuum from a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model  

SciTech Connect

The decay dynamics of a nonlinear impurity mode embedded in a linear structured continuum is theoretically investigated in the framework of a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model. A gradient flow dynamics for the survival probability is derived in the Van Hove ({lambda}{sup 2}t) limit by a multiple-scale asymptotic analysis, and the role of nonlinearity on the decay law is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the existence of bound states embedded in the continuum acts as transient trapping states which slow down the decay. The dynamical behavior predicted in the {lambda}{sup 2}t limit is studied in detail for a simple tight-binding one-dimensional lattice model, which may describe electron or photon transport in condensed matter or photonic systems. Numerical simulations of the underlying equations confirm, in particular, the trapping effect in the decay process due to bound states embedded in the continuum.

Longhi, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie del CNR, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan (Italy)

2007-05-01

448

LPT. Low power test (TAN640) interior. Basement level. Camera facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

LPT. Low power test (TAN-640) interior. Basement level. Camera facing north. Cable trays and conduit cross tunnel between critical experiment cell and critical experiment control room. Construction 93% complete. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. Date: October 23, 1957. INEEL negative no. 57-5339 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

449

Volcanic ash dispersed in the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed, Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Minerals derived from air-fall volcanic ash were found in two zones in the upper Paleocene Wyodak-Anderson coal bed of the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, and are the first reported evidence of such volcanic material in this thick (> 20 m) coal bed. The volcanic minerals occur in zones that are not visually obvious because they contain little or no clay. These zones were located by geophysical logs of the boreholes and X-ray radiography of the cores. The zones correspond to two of a series of incremental core samples of the coal bed that have anomalous concentrations of Zr, Ba, Nb, Sr, and P2O5. Two suites of minerals were found in both of the high-density zones. A primary suite (not authigenic) consists of silt-sized quartz grains, biotite, and minor zircon. A minor suite consists of authigenic minerals, including calcite, pyrite, kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and an alumino-phosphate (crandallite?). The original volcanic ash is inferred to have consisted of silica glass containing phenocrysts of quartz, biotite, zircon, and possibly, associated feldspars, pyroxenes, and amphiboles. The glass, as well as the less stable minerals, probably dissolved relatively quickly and contributed to the minor authigenic mineral suite or was removed from the peat as a result of the prevailing hydrologic conditions present in a raised peat formation. This type of volcanic ash suggests that suggests that volcanic material could have rained on the peat; this fallout may have also had a fertilizing effect on the peat by providing nutrients essential for plant growth thus contributing to the thick accumulations of the Wyodak-Anderson bed. Notwithstanding, the presence of these minerals provides evidence for the contribution by volcanic sources to the mineral content of coal, but not as tonsteins. ?? 1991.

Triplehorn, D.M.; Stanton, R.W.; Ruppert, L.F.; Crowley, S.S.

1991-01-01

450

Analysis in support of state-level participation in LBG and MBG commercialization. Report on Phase I analysis, areas I, II, and III  

SciTech Connect

This report seeks to provide insights and information which will be of operational use to the Department of Energy's coal gasification resource manager as well as the private project manager. The presentation is structured to reflect a logical progression of issues which would face firms considering new investment ventures in low Btu (LBG) and intermediate Btu (MBG) facilities. The report delineates the federal economic and environmental contexts in which development of LBG/MBG facilities takes place. It also highlights two specific cases of state context - Pennsylvania and Texas. In Chapter I, information on economic conditions which underlie the emerging importance of coal gasification is provided. This introduction is followed by a discussion of strategic issues which, in part, determine whether or not investors will decide to proceed with development of a facility. Through these discussions the rationale for the remainder of the study is established. Chapters II through IV review economic and environmental regulations, incentives, organizational structure of permitting procedures and other relevant factors in a systemized fashion. Chapter V presents strategies appropriate to each of the two states for dealing with the constraints established in the proceeding three chapters, for initiating process change where necessary, and for addressing the key issues identified in Chapter I. The final chapter, Chapter VI - Summary and Conclusions, provides guidance as to the issues/conditions the federal resource managers will face in the refinement of policy on coal gasification.

Not Available

1981-08-01

451

Low density lipoprotein receptor gene Ava II polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations  

PubMed Central

Background Several common genetic polymorphisms in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene have associated with modifications of serum total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, but the results are not consistent in different populations. Bai Ku Yao is a special subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 1024 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 792 participants of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotyping of the LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of serum TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL-C, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and the ratio of ApoA1 to ApoB were lower in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.01 for all). The frequency of A- and A+ alleles was 65.5% and 34.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 80.7% and 19.3% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. The frequency of A-A-, A-A+ and A+A+ genotypes was 42.6%, 45.9% and 11.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 64.9%, 31.6% and 3.5% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. There was also significant difference in the genotypic frequencies between males and females in Bai Ku Yao (P <0.05), and in the genotypic and allelic frequencies between normal LDL-C (? 3.20 mmol/L) and high LDL-C (>3.20 mmol/L) subgroups in Bai Ku Yao (P < 0.05 for each) and between males and females in Han (P < 0.05 for each). The levels of LDL-C in males and TC and HDL-C in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05 for all) in Bai Ku Yao, whereas the levels of HDL-C in males and HDL-C and ApoA1 in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05-0.001) in Han. The subjects with A+A+ genotype had higher serum LDL-C, TC, HDL-C or ApoA1 levels than the subjects with A-A+ and A-A- genotypes. Spearman rank correlation analysis revealed that the levels of LDL-C in Bai Ku Yao and HDL-C in Han were correlated with genotypes (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01; respectively). Conclusions The association of LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism and serum lipid levels is different between the Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. The discrepancy might partly result from different LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism or LDL-R gene-enviromental interactions. PMID:21345210

2011-01-01

452

Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens and levels of interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor, and interleukin-6 in cerebrospinal fluid and serum in Toxoplasma gondii-infected SCID and immunocompetent C.B-17 mice.  

PubMed

In order to investigate activation of the innate immune system in murine toxoplasmosis, T- and B-cell-deficient SCID mice and their co-isogenic immunocompetent C.B-17 counterparts were orally infected with a low-virulent strain of Toxoplasma gondii (DX strain). SCID mice developed a fatal necrotizing toxoplasmosis, whereas CD4+ and CD8+ T cells contributing to inflammatory infiltrates conferred resistance to immunocompetent mice. Significant amounts of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were detectable in SCID mice. The most likely source for this cytokine is activated natural killer (NK) cells. In comparison to immunocompetent mice IFN-gamma levels were reduced in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of SCID mice at days 7 and 14 of disease. Similar amounts of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) were detected in both strains of mice. In addition, immunohistochemistry showed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen expression on SCID and C.B-17 microglial cells and macrophages demonstrating activation of these cells in both strains. However, the up-regulation of MHC class II antigen on microglia was less pronounced in SCID mice, presumably due to reduced levels of IFN-gamma. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in CSF and serum were elevated in both strains and correlated with systemic and intracerebral disease activity. In conclusion, our results demonstrate activation of macrophages and NK cells as the predominant defence mechanisms of the comprised SCID immune system during toxoplasma infection. This implies a major role for the innate immune system during early stages of toxoplasmosis although T cells are necessary to control the infection efficiently. PMID:8478025

Schlüter, D; Deckert-Schlüter, M; Schwendemann, G; Brunner, H; Hof, H

1993-03-01

453

Mössbauer absorption and emission study of dilute Fe2+ impurities in cubic ZnS. Observation of metastable electronic levels. II. Dynamical Jahn-Teller effect study  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Mössbauer source ZnS:57Co the two excited spin-orbit triplets Gamma4 and Gamma5 of Fe2+ behave as metastable levels after being populated by the preceding nuclear decay. They contribute two slow relaxation quadrupole doublets to the emission spectra near zero kelvin. Both quadrupole splittings are reduced by the dynamical Jahn-Teller effect, but in very different ways: the reduction factors are,

P. Bonville; C. Garcin; A. Gérard; P. Imbert; G. Jéhanno

1981-01-01

454

Geologic and hydrologic characterization and evaluation of the Basin and Range Province relative to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Part II. Geologic and hydrologic characterization  

SciTech Connect

The geology and hydrology of the Basin and Range Province of the western conterminous United States are characterized in a series of data sets depicted in maps compiled for evaluation of prospective areas for further study of geohydrologic environments for isolation of high-level radioactive waste. The data sets include: (1) average precipitation and evaporation; (2) surface distribution of selected rock types; (3) tectonic conditions; and (4) surface- and ground-water hydrology and Pleistocene lakes and marshes. Rocks mapped for consideration as potential host media for the isolation of high-level radioactive waste are widespread and include argillaceous rocks, granitic rocks, tuffaceous rocks, mafic extrusive rocks, evaporites, and laharic breccias. The unsaturated zone, where probably as thick as 150 meters (500 feet), was mapped for consideration as an environment for isolation of high-level waste. Unsaturated rocks of various lithologic types are widespread in the Province. Tectonic stability in the Quaternary Period is considered the key to assessing the probability of future tectonism with regard to high-level radioactive waste disposal. Tectonic conditions are characterized on the basis of the seismic record, heat-flow measurements, the occurrence of Quaternary faults, vertical crustal movement, and volcanic features. Tectonic activity, as indicated by seismicity, is greatest in areas bordering the western margin of the Province in Nevada and southern California, the eastern margin of the Province bordering the Wasatch Mountains in Utah and in parts of the Rio Grande valley. Late Cenozoic volcanic activity is widespread, being greatest bordering the Sierra Nevada in California and Oregon, and bordering the Wasatch Mountains in southern Utah and Idaho. 43 refs., 22 figs.

Sargent, K.A.; Bedinger, M.S.

1985-12-31

455

THE EFFECT OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FROM A NOVEL PORTABLE FLUORESCENT LAMP ON SERUM 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D3 LEVELS IN HEALTHY ADULTS WITH FITZPATRICK SKIN TYPES II AND III  

PubMed Central

Background/purpose Ultraviolet B irradiation may provide a safe and effective method to treat vitamin D deficiency. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a novel Sperti D/UV-Fluorescent lamp in converting 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) to previtamin D3 in vitro and in raising serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] in healthy adults. Methods The lamp was assessed in vitro using a 7-DHC solution and a human skin sample. In a prospective cohort study, five healthy adults with skin types II and III were exposed to a 0.75 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UV radiation over ~9% of body surface area 3 times/week for 4 weeks. The main outcomes were percentage of conversion from 7-DHC to previtamin D3 in vitro and changes in serum 25(OH)D3 after irradiation in vivo. Results A dose-response between UV irradiation time and conversion of 7-DHC to previtamin D3 was seen in the 7-DHC solution and surgically obtained human skin. The subjects had a significant increase in mean 25(OH)D3 from 18.4±8.2 to 27.3±7.6 ng/mL (P<0.001) after 4 weeks of irradiation. No adverse events occurred. Conclusion The Sperti D/UV-Fluorescent lamp is effective in converting 7-DHC to previtamin D3 in vitro and in raising serum 25(OH)D3 in healthy adults. PMID:23126292

Dabai, Nicholas S.; Pramyothin, Pornpoj; Holick, Michael F.

2012-01-01

456

Measuring sediment deposition and accretion on anthropogenic marshland - Part II: The adaptation capacity of the North Frisian Halligen to sea level rise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low coastlands, marshlands and islands all over the world are challenged by rising water levels due to climatic changes. The adaptation capacity of such lowlands is based on frequent inundations and according sedimentation processes. Exemplarily, a system of small islands west of Northern Germany was investigated over three years. At three out of ten so-called Halligen located in the Wadden Sea, the adaptation capacity of the anthropogenic marshland was determined. The Halligen Hooge, Langeness and Nordstrandischmoor have surface elevations only a few decimetres above mean high water and have to cope with an inundation frequency of nowadays up to 22 times per year. By use of methods introduced in Schindler et al. (2014, this volume) in combination with a 137Cs and 210Pb dating campaign on 12 sediment cores, vertical accretion rates were measured and detailed sediment accretion patterns presented. A good agreement was found between the used methods to calculate long term and short term marshland accretion rates. Sediment deposition and vertical marshland accretion is mainly controlled by the high tide events (single storm surges). Coastal protection structures, established in the early 20th century, decrease the inundation frequency and hinder the efficiency of the sediment transport by the tidal channel system on the Halligen. Vertical marshland accretion based on 210Pb dating for the time span 1915-2011 (1.0 ± 0.3 mm/a, Hooge, 1.2 ± 0.3 mm/a, Langeness and 2.6 ± 0.9 mm/a, Nordstrandischmoor) is in disequilibrium with the fast increasing mean high water level (MHW, 5.0 ± 0.3 mm/a). Projections until 2100 revealed that the extreme values (highest high waters, HHW) tend to rise much faster than the MHW or relative mean sea level (RMSL). Therefore an increasing hazard potential for the Halligen has to be expected if vertical marshland accretion does not accelerate in the future.

Schindler, Malte; Karius, Volker; Arns, Arne; Deicke, Matthias; von Eynatten, Hilmar

2014-12-01

457

Induction of allograft nonresponsiveness after intrathymic inoculation with donor class I allopeptides. II. Evidence for persistent chronic rejection despite high levels of donor microchimerism.  

PubMed

We have recently demonstrated that three synthetic peptides corresponding to the donor class I RT1.Aa molecule induce long-term survival of cardiac allografts in the PVG.R8-to-PVG.1U rat strain combination (disparate for one isolated class I, RT1.A, molecule) when presented to the recipient immune system in the thymus. Long-term graft survivors had measurable levels of donor-reactive alloantibodies in their serum. In this study, we examined long-term allografts for the presence of chronic rejection and donor microchimerism to assess whether this regimen of immune modulation establishes true tolerance and whether this tolerance is dependent upon the presence of donor-recipient microchimerism. Histological examination of long-term heart grafts (>100 days) demonstrated chronic rejection, including a mild degree of myocardial infiltration by mononuclear cells, mild to moderate myocardial fibrosis, and various vascular changes ranging from focal intimal thickening to total vascular lumen blockade due to smooth muscle cell proliferation. In contrast, long-term syngeneic hearts transplanted under similar experimental conditions lacked these pathological manifestations. Donor microchimerism was analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction with a pair of oligonucleotides specific for the donor class I RT1.Aa gene and genomic DNA harvested from various tissues from graft recipients. We detected high levels of donor microchimerism in the heart, kidney, liver, skin, bone marrow, thymus, and lymph nodes of long-term graft recipients. Donor microchimerism was also detected in unmanipulated control graft recipients at rejection (7 days) and in intrathymically manipulated recipients that rejected allografts in a delayed fashion (12-82 days). These data clearly demonstrate that intrathymic inoculation of donor class I allopeptides induces long-term graft survival but does not prevent chronic rejection. Allograft rejection occurred despite high levels of donor microchimerism, providing direct evidence that donor-recipient microchimerism is not sufficient for the prevention of acute or chronic rejection in this model. PMID:9422400

Shirwan, H; Wu, G D; Barwari, L; Liu, A; Cramer, D V

1997-12-27

458

Mössbauer absorption and emission study of dilute Fe2+ impurities in cubic ZnS. Observation of metastable electronic levels. II. Dynamical Jahn-Teller effect study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the Mössbauer source ZnS:57Co the two excited spin-orbit triplets ?4 and ?5 of Fe2+ behave as metastable levels after being populated by the preceding nuclear decay. They contribute two slow relaxation quadrupole doublets to the emission spectra near zero kelvin. Both quadrupole splittings are reduced by the dynamical Jahn-Teller effect, but in very different ways: the reduction factors are, respectively, q(?4)~=0.92 and q(?5)~=0.40. These factors are interpreted by means of a coherent vibronic model where the low-energy TA(L) phonon of ZnS (??~70 cm-1), which contributes a ?3 vibrational mode, is coupled to the 5E state of Fe2+ with a Jahn-Teller energy EJT~=14 cm-1. The covalency reduction of the spin-orbit parameter ? is found to be less important for Fe2+ in ZnS (?=-88.4+/-1.6 cm-1) than for Fe2+ in CdTe (?~=-79 cm-1). The isomer-shift values of the ?1, ?4, and ?5 contributions are not identical because of different second-order Doppler shift values in these vibronic levels.

Bonville, P.; Garcin, C.; Gérard, A.; Imbert, P.; Jéhanno, G.

1981-05-01

459

Physical illness in patients with severe mental disorders. II. Barriers to care, monitoring and treatment guidelines, plus recommendations at the system and individual level  

PubMed Central

Physical disorders are, compared to the general population, more prevalent in people with severe mental illness (SMI). Although this excess morbidity and mortality is largely due to modifiable lifestyle risk factors, the screening and assessment of physical health aspects remains poor, even in developed countries. Moreover, specific patient, provider, treatment and system factors act as barriers to the recognition and to the management of physical diseases in people with SMI. Psychiatrists can play a pivotal role in the improvement of the physical health of these patients by expanding their task from clinical psychiatric care to the monitoring and treatment of crucial physical parameters. At a system level, actions are not easy to realize, especially for developing countries. However, at an individual level, even simple and very basic monitoring and treatment actions, undertaken by the treating clinician, can already improve the problem of suboptimal medical care in this population. Adhering to monitoring and treatment guidelines will result in a substantial enhancement of physical health outcomes. Furthermore, psychiatrists can help educate and motivate people with SMI to address their suboptimal lifestyle, including smoking, unhealthy diet and lack of exercise. The adoption of the recommendations presented in this paper across health care systems throughout the world will contribute to a significant improvement in the medical and related psychiatric health outcomes of patients with SMI. PMID:21633691

DE HERT, MARC; COHEN, DAN; BOBES, JULIO; CETKOVICH-BAKMAS, MARCELO; LEUCHT, STEFAN; M. NDETEI, DAVID; W. NEWCOMER, JOHN; UWAKWE, RICHARD; ASAI, ITSUO; MÖLLER, HANS-JURGEN; GAUTAM, SHIV; DETRAUX, JOHAN; U. CORRELL, CHRISTOPH

2011-01-01

460

The smart 2-(2-fluorobenzoyl)-N-(2-methoxyphenyl)hydrazinecarbothioamide functionalized as Ni(II) sensor in micromolar concentration level and its application in live cell imaging.  

PubMed

In recent years, fluorescent probes for the detection of environmentally and biologically important metal cations have received extensive attention for designing and development of fluorescent chemosensors. Herein, we report the photophysical results of 2-(2-fluorobenzoyl)-N-(2-methoxyphenyl) hydrazinecarbothioamide (4) functionalized as Ni (II) sensor in micromolar concentration level. Through fluorescence titration at 488 nm, we were confirmed that ligand 4 showed the remarkable emission by complexation between 4 and Ni (II) while it appeared no emission in case of the competitive ions (Cr(3+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ba(2+), Cu(2+), Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), Cu(+), Cs(+)). Furthermore, ligand 4 exhibited no toxicity with precise cell permeability toward normal living cells using L929 cell lines in bio imaging experiment investigated through confocal fluorescence microscope. The non-toxic behavior of ligand 4 (assessed by MTT assay) and its ability to track the Ni(2+) in living cells suggest its possibility to use in biological system as nickel sensor. PMID:24878538

Saleem, Muhammad; Ali, Anser; Choi, Chang-Shik; Park, Bong Joo; Choi, Eun Ha; Lee, Ki Hwan

2014-07-01

461

Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards: Part II. Validation of satellite-derived Volcanic Sulphur Dioxide Levels.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in the spring of 2010 turned the attention of both the public and the scientific community to the susceptibility of the European airspace to the outflows of large volcanic eruptions. The ash-rich plume from Eyjafjallajökull drifted towards Europe and caused major disruptions of European air traffic for several weeks affecting the everyday life of millions of people and with a strong economic impact. This unparalleled situation revealed limitations in the decision making process due to the lack of information on the tolerance to ash of commercial aircraft engines as well as limitations in the ash monitoring and prediction capabilities. The European Space Agency project Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards, was introduced to facilitate the development of an optimal End-to-End System for Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring and Prediction. This system is based on comprehensive satellite-derived ash plume and sulphur dioxide [SO2] level estimates, as well as a widespread validation using supplementary satellite, aircraft and ground-based measurements. The validation of volcanic SO2 levels extracted from the sensors GOME-2/MetopA and IASI/MetopA are shown here with emphasis on the total column observed right before, during and after the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruptions. Co-located ground-based Brewer Spectrophotometer data extracted from the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre, WOUDC, were compared to the different satellite estimates. The findings are presented at length, alongside a comprehensive discussion of future scenarios.

Koukouli, MariLiza; Balis, Dimitris; Dimopoulos, Spiros; Clarisse, Lieven; Carboni, Elisa; Hedelt, Pascal; Spinetti, Claudia; Theys, Nicolas; Tampellini, Lucia; Zehner, Claus

2014-05-01

462

Michael T. Martin, "Madeline Anderson in Conversation: Pioneering an African American Documentary Tradition." Black Camera, An International Film Journal, Vol. 5  

E-print Network

Tradition." Black Camera, An International Film Journal, Vol. 5 No. 1 (Fall 2013), 72­93. Madeline Anderson is lightened #12;74 BLACK CAMERA 5:1 empowerment. And it is here that her contribution to a profoundly human

Indiana University

463

Phase relaxation in slowly changing environments: Evaluation of the Kubo-Anderson model for a continuous-time random walk  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Kubo-Anderson model is a stochastic model of phase relaxation of an ensemble of systems in a fluctuating environment. This model is usually studied under the assumption that the system-environment interaction is a Gaussian stochastic process. This assumption only holds if the environment changes a very large number of times on the time scale of the system's motion. This paper reviews our work on the Kubo-Anderson model for the case where this interaction is a continuous-time random walk. A continuous-time random walk is a simple model for a `slowly changing environment', i.e., one which makes a relatively small number of changes on the time scale of the system's motion. We present the key results from this model and show how to apply them to common problems in magnetic resonance spectroscopy and and non-linear optical spectroscopy.

Packwood, Daniel M.

2013-02-01

464

Influence of avenue-trees on air quality at the urban neighborhood scale. Part II: Traffic pollutant concentrations at pedestrian level.  

PubMed

Flow and dispersion of traffic-emitted pollutants were studied in a generic urban neighborhood for various avenue-tree layouts by employing 3D steady RANS simulations with the realizable k-? turbulence model. In comparison to the tree-free situation quantitative and qualitative changes with flow reversal in the wind field were observed. Low to moderate increases (<13.2%) in the neighborhood-averaged pollutant concentration were found at pedestrian level. An approximately 1% increase in the neighborhood-averaged concentration was obtained with each percent of the street canyon volumes being occupied by vegetation for occupation fractions between 4 and 14%. The overall pattern of concentration changes relative to the tree-free situation was similar for all avenue-tree layouts. However, pronounced locally restricted decreases or increases in concentration (-87 to +1378%) occurred. The results indicate the necessity to account for existing or planned avenue-trees in neighborhood scale dispersion studies. Their consideration is prerequisite for reliable urban air quality assessment. PMID:25463712

Gromke, Christof; Blocken, Bert

2014-10-25

465

Identification of Mott insulators and Anderson insulators in self-assembled gold nanoparticles thin films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

How the interparticle tunnelling affects the charge conduction of self-assembled gold nanoparticles is studied by three means: tuning the tunnel barrier width by different molecule modification and by substrate bending, and tuning the barrier height by high-dose electron beam exposure. All approaches indicate that the metal-Mott insulator transition is governed predominantly by the interparticle coupling strength, which can be quantified by the room temperature sheet resistance. The Hubbard gap, following the prediction of quantum fluctuation theory, reduces to zero rapidly as the sheet resistance decreases to the quantum resistance. At very low temperature, the fate of devices near the Mott transition depends on the strength of disorder. The charge conduction is from nearest-neighbour hopping to co-tunnelling between nanoparticles in Mott insulators whereas it is from variable-range hopping through charge puddles in Anderson insulators. When the two-dimensional nanoparticle network is under a unidirectional strain, the interparticle coupling becomes anisotropic so the average sheet resistance is required to describe the charge conduction.How the interparticle tunnelling affects the charge conduction of self-assembled gold nanoparticles is studied by three means: tuning the tunnel barrier width by different molecule modification and by substrate bending, and tuning the barrier height by high-dose electron beam exposure. All approaches indicate that the metal-Mott insulator transition is governed predominantly by the interparticle coupling strength, which can be quantified by the room temperature sheet resistance. The Hubbard gap, following the prediction of quantum fluctuation theory, reduces to zero rapidly as the sheet resistance decreases to the quantum resistance. At very low temperature, the fate of devices near the Mott transition depends on the strength of disorder. The charge conduction is from nearest-neighbour hopping to co-tunnelling between nanoparticles in Mott insulators whereas it is from variable-range hopping through charge puddles in Anderson insulators. When the two-dimensional nanoparticle network is under a unidirectional strain, the interparticle coupling becomes anisotropic so the average sheet resistance is required to describe the charge conduction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06627d

Jiang, Cheng-Wei; Ni, I.-Chih; Tzeng, Shien-Der; Wu, Cen-Shawn; Kuo, Watson

2014-05-01

466

A new dataset of Wood Anderson magnitude from the Trieste (Italy) seismic station  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The standard torsion Wood Anderson (WA) seismograph owes its fame to the fact that historically it has been used for the definition of the magnitude of an earthquake (Richter, 1935). With the progress of the technology, digital broadband (BB) seismographs replaced it. However, for historical consistency and homogeneity with the old seismic catalogues, it is still important continuing to compute the so called Wood Anderson magnitude. In order to evaluate WA magnitude, the synthetic seismograms WA equivalent are simulated convolving the waveforms recorded by a BB instrument with a suitable transfer function. The value of static magnification that should be applied in order to simulate correctly the WA instrument is debated. The original WA instrument in Trieste operated from 1971 to 1992 and the WA magnitude (MAW) estimates were regularly reported in the seismic station bulletins. The calculation of the local magnitude was performed following the Richter's formula (Richter, 1935), using the table of corrections factor unmodified from those calibrated for California and without station correction applied (Finetti, 1972). However, the WA amplitudes were computed as vector sum rather than arithmetic average of the horizontal components, resulting in a systematic overestimation of approximately 0.25, depending on the azimuth. In this work, we have retrieved the E-W and N-S components of the original recordings and re-computed MAW according to the original Richter (1935) formula. In 1992, the WA recording were stopped, due to the long time required for the daily development of the photographic paper, the costs of the photographic paper and the progress of the technology. After a decade of interruption, the WA was recovered and modernized by replacing the recording on photographic paper with an electronic device and it continues presently to record earthquakes. The E-W and N-S components records were memorized, but not published till now. Since 2004, next to the WA (few decimeters apart), a Guralp 40-T BB seismometer was installed, with a proper period extended to 60 s. Aim of the present work is twofold: from one side to recover the whole data set of MAW values recorded from 1971 until now, with the correct estimate of magnitude, and from the other side to verify the WA static magnification, comparing the real WA data with the ones simulated from broadband seismometer recordings.

Sandron, Denis; Gentile, G. Francesco; Gentili, Stefania; Rebez, Alessandro; Santulin, Marco; Slejko, Dario

2014-05-01

467

The ground state energy of the Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass with a hybrid genetic algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground states of three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson ±J Ising spin glasses were calcul