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1

Interactive Vector Field Feature Identification Joel Daniels II, Erik W. Anderson, Student Member, IEEE,  

E-print Network

Interactive Vector Field Feature Identification Joel Daniels II, Erik W. Anderson, Student Member) of desired feature types. These control points guide a mapping of the vector field points to the interactive of these attributes forms a representation of the vector field samples in the attribute space. We project

Utah, University of

2

Anderson Localization for the Almost Mathieu II: Point Spectrum for ? 2  

E-print Network

Anderson Localization for the Almost Mathieu Equation, II: Point Spectrum for â?? ? 2 Svetlana Ya prove that for any â?? ? 2 and a.e. !; ` the point spectrum of the almost Mathieu operator (H(`)\\Psi) n attack on the almost­Mathieu operator on ` 2 (Z) : (H(`)\\Psi) n = \\Psi n\\Gamma1 + \\Psi n+1 + â?? cos(2Ã?

3

Model for a random-matrix description of the energy-level statistics of disordered systems at the Anderson transition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider a family of random-matrix ensembles (RME's) invariant under similarity transformations and described by the probability density P(H)=exp[-TrV(H)]. Dyson's mean-field theory (MFT) of the corresponding plasma model of eigenvalues is generalized to the case of weak confining potential, V(?)~(A/2)ln2(?). The eigenvalue statistics derived from MFT are shown to deviate substantially from the classical Wigner-Dyson statistics when A<1. By performing systematic Monte Carlo simulations on the plasma model, we compute all the relevant statistical properties of the RME's with weak confinement. For Ac~=0.4 the distribution function of the energy-level spacings (LSDF) of this RME coincides in a large energy window with the LSDF of the three-dimensional Anderson model at the metal-insulator transition. For the same Ac, the variance of the number of levels, -2, in an interval containing levels on average, grows linearly with , and its slope is equal to 0.32+/-0.02, which is consistent with the value found for the Anderson model at the critical point.

Canali, C. M.

1996-02-01

4

The Anderson Quin Cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since

J. H. Anderson; W. M. Bilbow

1993-01-01

5

CHINESE-MANDARIN, LEVEL II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

DESIGNED FOR USE BY 10TH GRADE STUDENTS AFTER COMPLETION OF THE LEVEL I TEXT, THIS VOLUME ALSO COMPRISES 15 LESSON UNITS PLUS APPENDED INDEXES AND A SECTION ON WRITING NEW CHINESE CHARACTERS. THESE MATERIALS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDING TO THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON CHINESE LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION IN CALIFORNIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS. ACCORDING TO THEIR…

HSU, KAI-YU; AND OTHERS

6

Professions Shannon Anderson, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

230 Science Concepts (Intro Bio I) 1 Biol 240 Introductory Biology II & Lab 5 Sci 240 Science ConceptsHealth Professions at SFSU #12;Shannon Anderson, Ph.D. Instructor, Biology Department Health Assistant Nurse-Practitioner Dental Hygiene Veterinary Medicine Allied Health Careers #12;Sneak

7

55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with eighty-eight 1-1/2" diameter copper ion return RF balance tube systems. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

8

Bioinformatics Robert Anderson1  

E-print Network

Bioinformatics Robert Anderson1 and Zhiping Weng1,2 1. Bioinformatics Program 2. Department of Biomedical Engineering Boston University 44 Cummington Street Boston, MA 02215 What is Bioinformatics? Bioinformatics is the study of applying computational methods to large amount of biological information in order

Weng, Zhiping

9

The Anderson Quin Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

1993-03-18

10

Interaction of Level I and Level II abilities with race and socioeconomic status  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypothesizes 2 levels of mental abilities which interact with socioeconomic status and\\/or race in such a way that (a) socioeconomic status differences are greater for Level II than for Level I abilities, and (b) the correlation between Levels I and II and the regression of Level I upon Level II are greater in upper than in lower socioeconomic status populations.

Arthur R. Jensen

1974-01-01

11

Review Meeting of Level II Inspections Spring 2012  

E-print Network

of permanent wiring). (Electrical Safety) #12;Level II Inspection Findings and Correction Finding 2 44506: ES-1 Safety) #12;Level II Inspection Findings and Correction Finding 3 44507: ES-4: Access to an electrical panel was obstructed. (Electrical Safety) #12;Level II Inspection Findings and Correction Finding 3

Cohen, Robert E.

12

Interaction of Level I and Level II Abilities With Race and Socioeconomic Status.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The two-level theory of mental abilities posits two broad classes of ability: level I (learning and memory) and level II (the "g" factor of intelligence tests, reasoning, abstraction, and problem solving). Levels I and II are hypothesized to interact with SES and/or race such that: (l) SES differences are greater for level II than for I, and (2)…

Jensen, Arthur R.

13

John Anderson Campus UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS  

E-print Network

John Anderson Campus UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS 1 McCance Building 2 Collins Building 3 Livingstone Tower Colville Building 21 John Anderson Building 22 Lord Hope Building 23 Curran Building (Library) 24 Birbeck Street NorthPortlandStreet George Street Martha St Cochrane St Ingram St George Street Bath Street

Mottram, Nigel

14

Testimony of James J. Anderson  

E-print Network

research over the past two decades has involved Columbia River salmon and the influence of the hydrosystem River salmon (Anderson 1995). That spring the salmon run in the Columbia River was the lowest ever and status of the fish populations of the Columbia River System. #12;2 My name is James Anderson; I am

Washington at Seattle, University of

15

Gravitational Anderson localization.  

PubMed

We present a higher dimensional model where gravity is bound to a brane due to Anderson localization. The extra dimensions are taken to be a disordered crystal of branes, with randomly distributed tensions of order the fundamental scale. Such geometries bind the graviton and thus allow for arbitrarily large extra dimensions even when the curvature is small. Thus this model is quite distinct from that of Randall and Sundrum where localization is a consequence of curvature effects in the bulk. The hierarchy problem can be solved by having the standard model brane live a distance away from the brane on which the graviton is localized. The statistical properties of the system are worked out and it is shown that the scenario leads to a continuum of four dimensional theories with differing strengths of gravitational interactions. We live on one particular brane whose gravitational constant is G(N). PMID:23383775

Rothstein, Ira Z

2013-01-01

16

Quantifying Anderson's fault types  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anderson [1905] explained three basic types of faulting (normal, strike-slip, and reverse) in terms of the shape of the causative stress tensor and its orientation relative to the Earth's surface. Quantitative parameters can be defined which contain information about both shape and orientation [Célérier, 1995], thereby offering a way to distinguish fault-type domains on plots of regional stress fields and to quantify, for example, the degree of normal-faulting tendencies within strike-slip domains. This paper offers a geometrically motivated generalization of Angelier's [1979, 1984, 1990] shape parameters ? and ? to new quantities named A? and A?. In their simple forms, A? varies from 0 to 1 for normal, 1 to 2 for strike-slip, and 2 to 3 for reverse faulting, and A?/ranges from 0° to 60°, 60° to 120°, and 120° to 180°, respectively. After scaling, A? and A? agree to within 2% (or 1°), a difference of little practical significance, although A? has smoother analytical properties. A formulation distinguishing horizontal axes as well as the vertical axis is also possible, yielding an A? ranging from -3 to +3 and A? from -180° to +180°. The geometrically motivated derivation in three-dimensional stress space presented here may aid intuition and offers a natural link with traditional ways of plotting yield and failure criteria. Examples are given, based on models of Bird [1996] and Bird and Kong [1994], of the use of Anderson fault parameters A? and A? for visualizing tectonic regimes defined by regional stress fields.

Simpson, Robert W.

1997-08-01

17

THE MARTIN ANDERSON-GRACIA ANDERSON ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP  

E-print Network

: ________________________________________________________ _____________________________________ Telephone: ( ) ________________ E-Mail_________________ City State Zip Code EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION Are you-Gracia Anderson Endowed Scholarship at UCF. Finaid.ucf.edu UCF Television Friend/Family UCF Newspaper

Van Stryland, Eric

18

Universality and the QCD Anderson Transition  

E-print Network

We study the Anderson-type transition previously found in the spectrum of the QCD quark Dirac operator in the high temperature, quark-gluon plasma phase. Using finite size scaling for the unfolded level spacing distribution, we show that in the thermodynamic limit there is a genuine mobility edge, where the spectral statistics changes from Poisson to Wigner-Dyson statistics in a non-analytic way. We determine the correlation length critical exponent, $\

Matteo Giordano; Tamas G. Kovacs; Ferenc Pittler

2013-12-04

19

Anderson localization in active arrays  

E-print Network

In a dissipationless linear lattice, spatial disorder induces localization of the lattice eigenstates and blocks spreading of wave packets. The addition of nonlinearity to the lattice Hamiltonian causes interaction between the eigenstates, which results in a slow packet spreading. We go beyond the disipationless limit and consider nonlinear disordered arrays that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the treshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multipeak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices and cavity-QED arrays.

T. V. Laptyeva; A. A. Tikhomirov; O. I. Kanakov; M. V. Ivanchenko

2014-10-22

20

31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing various electronic central indicator panel to control building air conditioning, steam pressure, supply temperature, discharge temperature, supply pressure, transformer vault status, and radome conditioning system. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

21

Level I and Level II Intelligence in Inuit and White Children from Similar Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The participants in this study consisted of 239 children residing in four communities on the coast of Labrador-63 lnuit and 176 White subjects. The Level I and Level II intelligence measures were a series of digit span tests and Raven's progressive matrices, respectively. The results indicated some differences between the Inuit and White sample in Level I measures, decreasing with

Lorne J. Taylor; Graham R. Skanes

1976-01-01

22

M D Anderson Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

This proposal will establish a Small Animal Imaging Research Program (SAIRP) at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The proposed SAIRP will complement the existing institutional facility that provides small animal imaging services to NIH funded investigators. The broad goal of this SAIRP is to develop novel imaging approaches to solve cancer related biological questions and evaluate new cancer therapies.

23

Significant Dates 1796 Death of John Anderson  

E-print Network

Significant Dates 1796 Death of John Anderson Anderson's Institution founded 1823 Glasgow Mechanics the Scottish College, the two open books. In addition to the two books in chief there is a symbol new. To mark the bicentenary of the death of John Anderson and the birth of the institution, the University

Mottram, Nigel

24

The Anderson Quin Cycle. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since

J. H. Anderson; W. M. Bilbow

1993-01-01

25

Transcript levels and synthesis of photosystem II components in cyanobacterial mutants with inactivated photosystem II genes  

SciTech Connect

After interruption or deletion of the photosystem II genes psbB, psbC, and psbD in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, thylakoids from such mutants were found to be depleted in a number of photosystem II proteins in addition to those for which the gene(s) had been inactivated. Transcript levels of photosystem II genes were measured and protein pulse-labeling was carried out to determine the reason for this effect. Transcripts of all photosystem II genes except the inactivated one(s) were found to be present in the various mutants. In certain cases, inactivation of one photosystem II gene led to overexpression of another. Protein pulse-labeling experiments using {sup 35}S-methionine, in which not only the rapidly turing over D1 protein but also D2, CP43, and CP47 appear to be preferentially labeled, showed that the mutants studied synthesize the D1 protein as well as other photosystem II proteins whose genes were not inactivated. The fact that, in the various mutants, photosystem II proteins for which the gene is not inactivated are synthesized but do not accumulate in the thylakoid indicates that the psbB, psbC, and psbD gene products are all required for a stable assembly of the photosystem II complex.

Jiujiang Yu; Vermaas, W.F.J. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (United States))

1990-04-01

26

America's First Illustrator: Alexander Anderson  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

America has produced many notable wood engravers, but Alexander Anderson is one of the first to have name recognition. Born in 1775, he spent his lifetime crafting illustrations for books, periodicals, newspapers, and other commercial ephemera. This delightful digital collection from the New York Public Library brings together sixteen scrapbooks containing almost 10,000 wood engravings by Anderson. Visitors can click on the "Browse Source Titles" area to view the various volumes, and the subjects covered here are quite diverse. Even a cursory search returns dozens of cat engravings, illustrations of slaves, and lottery advertisements. For anyone with an interest in 19th century material culture, this collection is truly wonderful. It is worth making several return trips to get a full sense of the offerings here, and it is one that will bring new rewards upon each visit.

27

Early onset neonatal septicaemia in a level II nursery.  

PubMed

A prospective study of 486 high risk neonates admitted to a level II nursery in a relatively poor and rural area of Malaysia was carried out to determine the incidence, the spectrum of micro-organisms and predisposing factors in relation to early onset septicaemia. The incidence of proven or probable septicaemia was 57.61 per 1000 high risk newborns over 1.5 kg. The case fatality was 10.71 per cent. Coagulase negative staphylococci, Streptococcus Group B and Klebsiella species were the most commonly isolated organisms. Meconium staining of liquor was the most common risk factor for admission to the nursery, and prematurity was the most significant risk factor for early neonatal infection (P < 0.005) followed by small for gestational age (P < 0.04). Although the incidence of septicaemia was quite high in the level II nursery, the mortality rate was comparable to established figures. PMID:8057985

Malik, A S; Pennie, R A

1994-03-01

28

Angiotensin II infusion increases plasma erythropoietin levels via an angiotensin II type 1 receptor-dependent pathway  

Microsoft Academic Search

Angiotensin II infusion increases plasma erythropoietin levels via an angiotensin II type 1 receptor-dependent pathway.BackgroundAngiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) have been shown to lower hematocrit and erythropoietin (EPO), but a direct link between angiotensin II (Ang II) and EPO in humans has not been shown.MethodsPlacebo or Ang II was infused for six hours in nine healthy male volunteers with and without

Jan Gossmann; Ralf Burkhardt; Sebastian Harder; Tomas Lenz; Annette Sedlmeyer; Ute Klinkhardt; Helmut Geiger; Ernst-Heinrich Scheuermann

2001-01-01

29

MD Anderson study explains high platelets in ovarian cancer patients; survival reduced  

Cancer.gov

Highly elevated platelet levels fuel tumor growth and reduce the survival of ovarian cancer patients, an international team of researchers led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer center reports in the New England Journal of Medicine.

30

Influence of the steady background turbulence level on second sound dynamics in He II II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report complementary results to our previous publication [Dalban-Canassy M, Hilton DK, Van Sciver SW. Influence of the steady background turbulence level on second sound dynamics in He II. Adv Cryo Eng 2006;51:371-8], both of which are aimed at determining the influence of background turbulence on the breakpoint energy of second sound pulses in He II. The apparatus consists of a channel 175 mm long and 242 mm 2 in cross section immersed in a saturated bath of He II at 1.7 K. A heater at the bottom end generates both background turbulence, through a low level steady heat flux (up to qs = 2.6 kW/m 2), and high intensity square second sound pulses ( qp = 100 or 200 kW/m 2) of variable duration ? t0 (up to 1 ms). Two superconducting filament sensors, located 25.4 mm and 127 mm above the heater, measure the temperature profiles of the traveling pulses. We present here an analysis of the measurements gathered on the top sensor, and compare them to similar results for the bottom sensor [1]. The strong dependence of the breakpoint energy on the background heat flux previously illustrated is also observed on the top sensor. The present work shows that the ratio of energy received at the top sensor to that at the bottom sensor diminishes with increasing background heat flux.

Dalban-Canassy, M.; Hilton, D. K.; Sciver, S. W. Van

2007-01-01

31

Mortality Benefit of Transfer to Level I versus Level II Trauma Centers for Head-Injured Patients  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether head-injured patients transferred to level I trauma centers have reduced mortality relative to transfers to level II trauma centers. Data Source/Study Setting Retrospective cohort study of 542 patients with head injury who initially presented to 1 of 31 rural trauma centers in Oregon and Washington, and were transferred from the emergency department to 1 of 15 level I or level II trauma centers, between 1991 and 1994. Study Design A bivariate probit, instrumental variables model was used to estimate the effect of transfer to level I versus level II trauma centers on 30-day postdischarge mortality. Independent variables included age, gender, Injury Severity Scale (ISS), other indicators of injury severity, and a dichotomous variable indicating transfer to a level I trauma center. The differential distance between the nearest level I and level II trauma centers was used as an instrument. Principal Findings Patients transferred to level I trauma centers differ in unmeasured ways from patients transferred to level II trauma centers, biasing estimates based on standard statistical methods. Transfer to a level I trauma center reduced absolute mortality risk by 10.1% (95% confidence interval 0.3%, 22.2%) compared with transfer to level II trauma centers. Conclusions Patients with severe head injuries transferred from rural trauma centers to level I centers are likely to have improved survival relative to transfer to level II centers. PMID:15762901

McConnell, K John; Newgard, Craig D; Mullins, Richard J; Arthur, Melanie; Hedges, Jerris R

2005-01-01

32

Materials balance for benzene: Level II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A Level II materials balance was performed on benzene. Data are reported for benzene production from petroleum by four processes (catalytic reformation, toluene dealkylation, toluene disproportionation, and isolation from pyrolysis gasoline) for production from coal during coking. Amounts of benzene consumed for the synthesis of eight direct derivatives (ethylbenzene, cumene, cyclohexane, nitrobenzene, maleic anhydride, mono- and dichlorobenzene, alkylbenzenes, and biphenyl) and exports are presented. These uses constitute approximately 99 percent of total benzene usage. Nonconsumptive uses (solvents and pesticide component) are also tabulated. Releases due to each of the above processes are reported or estimated where possible using published and unpublished data. In addition, releases due to indirect production (refinery operation, coke oven operations, oil spills, non-ferrous metals manufacturing, ore mining, wood processing, coal mining, and two phases of the textile industry) are presented. Production of benzene as a component of gasoline and releases due to all phases of gasoline use are estimated. Locations of sites with high levels of benzene releases due to production and use are tabulated: the major 'hotspots' are Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Houston/Galveston, Texas; Midland, Michigan; and Puerto Rico. The uncertainty ranges of all numbers used or derived in this report are evaluated when possible and tabulated. Data gaps are evaluated and general recommendations are presented. The results of the report are summarized in two figures: the Environmental Flow Diagram for benzene in Appendix A, and the Materials Balance Flow Diagram in the Executive Summary.

Hall, R.L.; Burger, R.; Montecalvo, F.

1980-05-01

33

Adatoms and Anderson localization in graphene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We address the nature of the disordered state that results from the adsorption of adatoms in graphene. For adatoms that sit at the center of the honeycomb plaquette, as in the case of most transition metals, we show that the ones that form a zero-energy resonant state lead to Anderson localization in the vicinity of the Dirac point. Among those, we show that there is a symmetry class of adatoms where Anderson localization is suppressed, leading to an exotic metallic state with large and rare charge droplets, that localizes only at the Dirac point. We identify the experimental conditions for the observation of the Anderson transition for adatoms in graphene.

García, Jose H.; Uchoa, Bruno; Covaci, Lucian; Rappoport, Tatiana G.

2014-08-01

34

Dirac eigenmodes at the QCD Anderson transition  

E-print Network

Recently we found an Anderson-type localization-delocalization transition in the QCD Dirac spectrum at high temperature. Using spectral statistics we obtained a critical exponent compatible with that of the corresponding Anderson model. Here we study the spatial structure of the eigenmodes both in the localized and the transition region. Based on previous studies in the Anderson model, at the critical point, the eigenmodes are expected to have a scale invariant multifractal structure. We verify the scale invariance of Dirac eigenmodes at the critical point.

Matteo Giordano; Tamas G. Kovacs; Ferenc Pittler; Laszlo Ujfalusi; Imre Varga

2014-10-30

35

Light focusing in the Anderson regime.  

PubMed

Anderson localization is a regime in which diffusion is inhibited and waves (also electromagnetic waves) get localized. Here we exploit adaptive optics to achieve focusing in disordered optical fibres in the Anderson regime. By wavefront shaping and optimization, we observe the generation of a propagation-invariant beam, where light is trapped transversally by disorder, and show that Anderson localizations can be also excited by extended speckled beams. We demonstrate that disordered fibres allow a more efficient focusing action with respect to standard fibres in a way independent of their length, because of the propagation-invariant features and cooperative action of transverse localizations. PMID:25072204

Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

2014-01-01

36

Level I-Level II abilities as they affect performance of three races in the college classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypothesized that multiple-choice exams load higher on Level II ability (g) than on Level I ability (rote memory). Study 1 confirmed this notion by correlating multiple-choice exams with the Cognitive Abilities Test, Nonverbal Battery (CAT; ^h r?=?.35), ^H an index of Level II, and the Forward Digit Span Test (FDS; ^h r?=?.17), ^H and index of Level I. Large racial

Langdon E. Longstreth

1978-01-01

37

Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson  

NASA Video Gallery

When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

38

Post-Transcriptional Regulation of RNA Polymerase II Levels in Caenorhabditis Elegans  

PubMed Central

To investigate the regulation of RNA polymerase II levels in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have constructed nematode strains having one, two, or three copies of ama-1, the gene for the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Steady-state levels of RNA polymerase II polypeptides and solubilized enzyme activity are invariant with gene dosage, indicating regulatory compensation. However, steady-state levels of ama-1 mRNA are directly proportional to gene dosage. These results imply that RNA polymerase II levels in C. elegans are regulated post-transcriptionally. PMID:8436272

Dalley, B. K.; Rogalski, T. M.; Tullis, G. E.; Riddle, D. L.; Golomb, M.

1993-01-01

39

Anderson localization in QCD-like theories  

E-print Network

We review the present status of the Anderson transition in the spectrum of the Dirac operator of QCD-like theories on the lattice. Localized modes at the low-end of the spectrum have been found in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with overlap and staggered valence fermions as well as in Nf=2+1 QCD with staggered quarks. We draw an analogy between the transition from localized to delocalized modes in the Dirac spectrum and the Anderson transition in electronic systems. The QCD transition turns out to be in the same universality class as the transition in the corresponding Anderson model. We also speculate on the possible physical relevance of this transition to QCD at high temperature and the possible finite temperature phase transition in QCD-like models with different fermion contents.

Matteo Giordano; Tamas G. Kovacs; Ferenc Pittler

2014-09-18

40

Anderson localization in QCD-like theories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review the present status of the Anderson transition in the spectrum of the Dirac operator of QCD-like theories on the lattice. Localized modes at the low end of the spectrum have been found in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with overlap and staggered valence fermions as well as in Nf = 2+1 QCD with staggered quarks. We draw an analogy between the transition from localized to delocalized modes in the Dirac spectrum and the Anderson transition in electronic systems. The QCD transition turns out to be in the same universality class as the transition in the corresponding Anderson model. We also speculate on the possible physical relevance of this transition to QCD at high temperature and the possible finite temperature phase transition in QCD-like models with different fermion contents.

Giordano, Matteo; Kovács, Tamás G.; Pittler, Ferenc

2014-10-01

41

Aakre Caitlyn Elementary Education Anderson Courtney Elementary Education  

E-print Network

EDUCATION Aakre Caitlyn Elementary Education Anderson Courtney Elementary Education Anderson Sarah Elementary Education Bailey Molly Elementary Education Barber Elizabeth Elementary Education Bechtold Ryan Elementary Education Bigelow Katrina Elementary Education Bigelow Katrina Elementary Education Bradford

Maxwell, Bruce D.

42

ANDERSON LOCALIZATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES IN CONFINED DISORDERED DIELECTRIC MEDIA  

E-print Network

ANDERSON LOCALIZATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES IN CONFINED DISORDERED DIELECTRIC MEDIA MARIAN RUSEK, Poland 1. Introduction Scattering of electromagnetic waves from varoius kind of obstacles is rich experimental demonstration that Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves is possible in three

Rusek, Marian

43

N. Charles Anderson Detroit Urban League, Inc.  

E-print Network

N. Charles Anderson Detroit Urban League, Inc. C. Patrick Babcock Class of 1969 W.K. Kellogg Children's Hospital of Michigan Louise Guyton Comerica, Inc. Paul L. Hubbard Class of 1971 Angela Kennedy Class of 1966 Guadalupe G. Lara Class of 1976 Mohamed Okdie Class of 1985 President, Mental Health Board

Cinabro, David

44

N. Charles Anderson Detroit Urban League, Inc.  

E-print Network

N. Charles Anderson Detroit Urban League, Inc. C. Patrick Babcock Class of 1969 W.K. Kellogg Children's Hospital of Michigan Louise Guyton Comerica, Inc. Paul L. Hubbard Class of 1971 Dennis R. Jacobs, PhD Pres. and Chief Exec. Officer NewPASSAGES Angela Kennedy Class of 1966 Guadalupe G. Lara Class

Cinabro, David

45

N. Charles Anderson Detroit Urban League, Inc.  

E-print Network

Louise Guyton Comerica, Inc. Paul L. Hubbard Class of 1971 Angela Kennedy Class of 1966 Guadalupe G. LaraN. Charles Anderson Detroit Urban League, Inc. C. Patrick Babcock Class of 1969 W.K. Kellogg of Social Work Board of Visitors Paul E. Massaron Annetta Miller Jacquelin E. Washington Irvin D. Reid, ex

Cinabro, David

46

Administration Noma Bennett Anderson, PhD  

E-print Network

D Department of Occupational Therapy Chair (Interim) Ann Nolen, PsyD Vice Chair Lawrence Faulkner, PhAdministration Dean Noma Bennett Anderson, PhD Assistant Deans Faculty and Academic Affairs RebeccaD Department of Physical Therapy Chair and Program Director CarolCountLikens,PT,PhD,MBA Department of Physician

Cui, Yan

47

Anderson-Gruneisen parameter for ionic solids  

Microsoft Academic Search

The isothermal Anderson-Gruneisen parameter delta T has been investigated for some ionic crystals employing the interaction approach. The necessary general expression has been developed in terms of various thermodynamic properties of ionic crystals and tested with the help of the well established Born-Mayer potential energy function. The results are compared with indirect experimental values of delta T available in the

M. N. Sharma; C. L. Gupta; A. K. Bhattacharya

1980-01-01

48

Low shear viscosity due to Anderson localization  

SciTech Connect

We study the Anderson localization effect on the shear viscosity in a system with random medium by Kubo formula. We show that this effect can suppress nonperturbatively the shear viscosity and other transport coefficients. The possible relevancy of such a suppression to the near perfect fluid behavior of the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

Giannakis, Ioannis [Physics Department, Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, New York 10021-6399 (United States); Hou Defu; Ren Haicang [Physics Department, Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, New York 10021-6399 (United States); Institute of Particle Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan, 430079 (China); Li Jiarong [Institute of Particle Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan, 430079 (China)

2008-01-15

49

The Anderson Quin Cycle. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

1993-03-18

50

Estimation of Failure Frequency for Type I and II High Level Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The failure frequency of Type I and Type II High Level Waste tanks was calculated. The degradation mechanism that could lead to large break failure and the credits taken for steps taken to prevent large break failure were considered.

Subramanian, K.H.

2001-05-15

51

Annexin II binds to SHP2 and this interaction is regulated by HSP70 levels.  

PubMed

The protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 is a positive effector of EGFR signaling. To improve our understanding of SHP2's function, we searched for additional binding proteins of SHP2. We found that Annexin II is an SHP2-binding protein. Physical interactions of SHP2 with Annexin II were confirmed in vivo. Furthermore, binding of SHP2 with Annexin II was regulated somewhat by EGF treatment and the extracellular Ca2+ chelator, EGTA. Previously, we reported that HSP70 levels can influence the binding of SHP2 with EGFR. Interestingly, increased HSP70 levels also inhibited the binding of SHP2 with Annexin II after EGF treatment in vivo. In addition, immunostaining experiments indicated that a fraction of SHP2 and Annexin II co-localized in the cell membrane region after EGF treatment. Our findings indicate that Annexin II is binding partner of SHP2 and the binding of SHP2 with Annexin II is affected by EGF stimulation, extracellular calcium levels, and the levels of HSP70. PMID:17395158

Yoo, Jae Cheal; Hayman, Michael J

2007-05-18

52

Image transport through a disordered optical fibre mediated by transverse Anderson localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transverse Anderson localization of light allows localized optical-beam-transport through a transversely disordered and longitudinally invariant medium. Its successful implementation in disordered optical fibres recently resulted in the propagation of localized beams of radii comparable to that of conventional optical fibres. Here we demonstrate optical image transport using transverse Anderson localization of light. The image transport quality obtained in the polymer disordered optical fibre is comparable to or better than some of the best commercially available multicore image fibres with less pixelation and higher contrast. It is argued that considerable improvement in image transport quality can be obtained in a disordered fibre made from a glass matrix with near wavelength-size randomly distributed air-holes with an air-hole fill-fraction of 50%. Our results open the way to device-level implementation of the transverse Anderson localization of light with potential applications in biological and medical imaging.

Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J.; Koch, Karl W.; Hawkins, Thomas; Ballato, John; Mafi, Arash

2014-02-01

53

Critical behaviour in the QCD Anderson transition  

E-print Network

We study the Anderson-type localisation-delocalisation transition found previously in the QCD Dirac spectrum at high temperature. Using high statistics QCD simulations with $N_f=2+1$ flavours of staggered quarks, we discuss how the change in the spectral statistics depends on the volume, the temperature and the lattice spacing, and we speculate on the possible universality of the transition from Poisson to Wigner-Dyson in the spectral statistics. Moreover, we show that the transition is a genuine phase transition: at the mobility edge, separating localised and delocalised modes, quantities characterising the spectral statistics become non-analytic in the thermodynamic limit. Using finite size scaling we also determine the critical exponent of the correlation length, and we speculate on possible extensions of the universality of Anderson transitions.

Matteo Giordano; Tamas G. Kovacs; Ferenc Pittler

2013-12-06

54

Factorial validity and measurement invariance across intelligence levels and gender of the Overexcitabilities Questionnaire-II (OEQ-II).  

PubMed

The concept of overexcitability, derived from Dabrowski's theory of personality development, offers a promising approach for the study of the developmental dynamics of giftedness. The present study aimed at (a) examining the factorial structure of the Overexcitabilities Questionnaire-II scores (OEQ-II) and (b) testing measurement invariance of these scores across intelligence and gender. A sample of 641 Dutch-speaking adolescents from 11 to 15 years old, 363 girls and 278 boys, participated in this study. Results showed that a model without cross-loadings did not fit the data well (using confirmatory factor analysis), whereas a factor model in which all cross-loadings were included yielded fit statistics that were in support of the factorial structure of the OEQ-II scores (using exploratory structural equation modeling). Furthermore, our findings supported the assumption of (partial) strict measurement invariance of the OEQ-II scores across intelligence levels and across gender. Such levels of measurement invariance allow valid comparisons between factor means and factor relationships across groups. In particular, the gifted group scored significantly higher on intellectual and sensual overexcitability (OE) than the nongifted group, girls scored higher on emotional and sensual OE than boys, and boys scored higher on intellectual and psychomotor OE than girls. PMID:24079958

Van den Broeck, Wim; Hofmans, Joeri; Cooremans, Sven; Staels, Eva

2014-03-01

55

Study led by MD Anderson scientists identifies prostate cancer stem cells among low-PSA cells  

Cancer.gov

Prostate cancer cells that defy treatment and display heightened tumor-generating capacity can be identified by levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) expressed in the tumor cells, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in the May 3 edition of Cell Stem Cell.

56

Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data  

SciTech Connect

Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

2009-03-01

57

Regulation of synaptic connectivity: levels of Fasciclin II influence synaptic growth in the Drosophila CNS.  

PubMed

Much of our understanding of synaptogenesis comes from studies that deal with the development of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Although well studied, it is not clear how far the NMJ represents an adequate model for the formation of synapses within the CNS. Here we investigate the role of Fasciclin II (Fas II) in the development of synapses between identified motor neurons and cholinergic interneurons in the CNS of Drosophila. Fas II is a neural cell adhesion molecule homolog that is involved in both target selection and synaptic plasticity at the NMJ in Drosophila. In this study, we show that levels of Fas II are critical determinants of synapse formation and growth in the CNS. The initial establishment of synaptic contacts between these identified neurons is seemingly independent of Fas II. The subsequent proliferation of these synaptic connections that occurs postembryonically is, in contrast, significantly retarded by the absence of Fas II. Although the initial formation of synaptic connectivity between these neurons is seemingly independent of Fas II, we show that their formation is, nevertheless, significantly affected by manipulations that alter the relative balance of Fas II in the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. Increasing expression of Fas II in either the presynaptic or postsynaptic neurons, during embryogenesis, is sufficient to disrupt the normal level of synaptic connectivity that occurs between these neurons. This effect of Fas II is isoform specific and, moreover, phenocopies the disruption to synaptic connectivity observed previously after tetanus toxin light chain-dependent blockade of evoked synaptic vesicle release in these neurons. PMID:12151538

Baines, Richard A; Seugnet, Laurent; Thompson, Annemarie; Salvaterra, Paul M; Bate, Michael

2002-08-01

58

Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases  

PubMed Central

Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Salivary melatonin concentration decreased in type II diabetic patients and periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis. PMID:25346835

Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

2014-01-01

59

Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases.  

PubMed

Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Salivary melatonin concentration decreased in type II diabetic patients and periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis. PMID:25346835

Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

2014-01-01

60

ENERGY LEVELS AND SPECTRAL LINES OF SINGLY IONIZED MANGANESE (Mn II)  

SciTech Connect

This compilation revises the previously recommended list of energy levels of singly ionized manganese (Mn II) and provides a comprehensive list of observed spectral lines and transition probabilities in this spectrum. The new level optimization takes into account critically assessed uncertainties of measured wavelengths and includes about a hundred high-precision wavelengths determined by laser spectroscopy and Fourier transform techniques. Uncertainties of 63% of energy levels and 74% of Ritz wavelengths are reduced by a factor of three on average.

Kramida, Alexander; Sansonetti, Jean E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

2013-04-01

61

REDUCED ANGIOTENSIN II LEVELS CAUSE GENERALIZED VASCULAR DYSFUNCTION VIA OXIDANT STRESS IN HAMSTER CHEEK POUCH ARTERIOLES  

PubMed Central

Objectives We investigated the effect of suppressing plasma angiotensin II (ANG II) levels on arteriolar relaxation in the hamster cheek pouch. Methods Arteriolar diameters were measured via television microscopy during short-term (3–6 days) high salt (HS; 4% NaCl) diet and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition with captopril (100 mg/kg/day). Results ACE inhibition and/or HS diet eliminated endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation to acetylcholine, endothelium-independent dilation to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside, the prostacyclin analogues carbacyclin and iloprost, and the KATP channel opener cromakalim; and eliminated arteriolar constriction during KATP channel blockade with glibenclamide. Scavenging of superoxide radicals and low dose ANG II infusion (25 ng/kg/min, subcutaneous) reduced oxidant stress and restored arteriolar dilation in arterioles of HS-fed hamsters. Vasoconstriction to topically-applied ANG II was unaffected by HS diet while arteriolar responses to elevation of superfusion solution PO2 were unaffected (5% O2, 10% O2) or reduced (21% O2) by HS diet. Conclusions These findings indicate that sustained exposure to low levels of circulating ANG II leads to widespread dysfunction in endothelium-dependent and independent vascular relaxation mechanisms in cheek pouch arterioles by increasing vascular oxidant stress, but does not potentiate O2- or ANG II-induced constriction of arterioles in the distal microcirculation of normotensive hamsters. PMID:23628292

Priestley, Jessica R. C.; Buelow, Matthew W.; McEwen, Scott T.; Weinberg, Brian D.; Delaney, Melanie; Balus, Sarah F.; Hoeppner, Carlyn; Dondlinger, Lynn; Lombard, Julian H.

2013-01-01

62

Spectrofluorimetric determination of picogram level Pb(II) using a dimercaptothiadiazole fluorophore  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the spectrofluorimetric determination of picogram level Pb(II) using 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (DMT) as a fluorophore. Excitation of DMT at 330 nm shows an emission maximum at 435 nm. The colorless solution of DMT changes into highly emittive yellow color immediately after the addition of 0.5 ?M Pb(II) and nearly 245-fold increase in emission intensity at 435 nm was observed. These changes were attributed to the complex formation between Pb(II). The emission intensity linearly increases in the concentration range of 10-100 nM Pb(II) and DMT. Based on the fluorescence enhancement, the concentration of Pb(II) was determined. Interestingly, the emission intensity was increased even in the presence of 0.1 pM Pb(II). The fluorophore showed an extreme selectivity towards 100 nM Pb(II) even in the presence of 50,000-fold higher concentrations of common metal ions interferences such as Na +, K +, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Fe 2+, Cd 2+, Cr 3+, Mn 2+, Zn 2+, Co 2+, Ni 2+ and 5000-, 100- and 40-fold of Cu 2+, Hg 2+ and Ag + ions, respectively. The lowest detection of 20 pg L -1 Pb(II) was achieved for the first time using DMT. The proposed method was successfully utilized for the determination of Pb(II) in tap water, polluted river water and industrial waste water samples. The results obtained in the present study were validated with both AAS and ICP-AES methods.

Vasimalai, N.; John, S. Abraham

2011-11-01

63

Water pair potential of near spectroscopic accuracy. II. Vibrationrotationtunneling levels of the water dimer  

E-print Network

Water pair potential of near spectroscopic accuracy. II. Vibration­rotation­tunneling levels of the rotational quantum numbers J and K 2 show that the SAPT-5s water pair potential presented in the preceding of the water dimer G. C. Groenenboom, P. E. S. Wormer, and A. van der Avoird Institute of Theoretical Chemistry

64

Low level RF system design for the PEP-II B factory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heavy beam loading in PEP-II has driven the design of the low level RF system to contain feedback loops similar to those used in proton rings. The RF feedback loops control longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities caused by the beam interaction with the accelerating mode of the RF cavities by reducing the cavity impedance observed by the beam. The RF system employs

P. Corredottra; R. Claus; L F Sapozhnikov; H. Schwarz; R J Tighe; C D Ziomek

1995-01-01

65

Hypercoagulability and high lipoprotein(a) levels in patients with type II diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes mellitus is associated with disturbances in hemostasis that could contribute to the development of diabetic vascular disease. We investigated the changes in parameters of blood coagulation and the fibrinolytic system and in plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) in 124 patients with type II diabetes mellitus and 44 healthy control subjects matched for age and body mass index (BMI) to

Eriko Morishita; Hidesaku Asakura; Hiroshi Jokaji; Masanori Saito; Chika Uotani; Ichiro Kumabashiri; Masahide Yamazaki; Keiji Aoshima; Takuma Hashimoto; Tamotsu Matsuda

1996-01-01

66

Natural convective behavior of EBR-II following a loss of flow from decay heat levels  

SciTech Connect

Eight loss-of-flow transients were conducted at initial decay heat levels of 0.75 to 1.6% of the rated EBR-II power. The data indicate that the natural convective flow was adequate to remove the decay heat without overheating the reactor core. Good agreement with NATDEMO and HOTCHAN predictions was obtained. (DLC)

Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Betten, P.R.; Planchon, H.P.

1985-01-01

67

SEL/Project Language. Level II, Kindergarten. Criterion-Referenced Test.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Criterion-Referenced Test is designed to be used in conjunction with the SEL/Project Language, Level II, Kindergarten program. The test consists of 28 items to which the child responds verbally or nonverbally. The examiner records and tallies correct responses to obtain the child's total score. To administer this test, the examiner must have…

Southeastern Education Lab., Atlanta, GA.

68

Annual Level Donald Aoki  

E-print Network

Brenda Su Wang Ken Wichers Dean's Level Donors Charles Jay Abronson Gordon Anderson Rosemary L. Anderson Margaret Alice Hartley Frances J. Hewitt Julie R. Hill Ernest Hix Robert J. Hoffman Richard Hunsaker Paul Gerald Kohlenberger Les Kranhold Dyung Kwak Walter G. Lake Grayson Lane Ronald Leon Lash Anthony Derek

Wang, Hai

69

Algebra II: Gatekeeper Course--An Examination of CST Proficiency Levels in California and the Bay Area  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the Algebra II course and California Star Test (CST) proficiency levels in the San Francisco Bay Area and in the State of California. CST proficiency levels are examined by grade level for the State and nine counties of the San Francisco Bay Area region. Algebra II is shown to be one of the more complicated courses in the CSU…

Hailer-O'Keefe, Laurie

2012-01-01

70

Microwave-Driven Atoms: From Anderson Localization to Einstein's Photoeffect  

SciTech Connect

We study the counterpart of Anderson localization in driven one-electron Rydberg atoms. By changing the initial Rydberg state at fixed microwave frequency and interaction time, we numerically monitor the crossover from Anderson localization to the photoeffect in the atomic ionization signal.

Schelle, Alexej [Physikalisches Institut der Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4, Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4, Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Buchleitner, Andreas [Physikalisches Institut der Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

2009-05-08

71

Paul J. Anderson Kodiak Laboratory. Alaska Fisheries Science Center  

E-print Network

Paul J. Anderson Kodiak Laboratory. Alaska Fisheries Science Center National Marine Fisheries of one of the world's major shrimp fisheries in the 1970s (Anderson and Gaffney 1977). A significant (ADF&G) has collected species and size-composition data from commercial landings since the beginning

72

14. 1903 View south along Anderson Street, Bracken Hotel shows ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. 1903 View south along Anderson Street, Bracken Hotel shows at far end of left-hand block. (Note: Despite reversed wording on print, this is printed correctly.) - John M. Bracken Hotel, 100-104 Anderson Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

73

The Economics of Censorship Resistance George Danezis and Ross Anderson  

E-print Network

The Economics of Censorship Resistance George Danezis and Ross Anderson University of Cambridge.Anderson)@cl.cam.ac.uk Abstract. We propose the first economic model of censorship resis- tance. Early peer-to-peer systems Internet. An alternative approach is to encourage nodes to serve re- sources they are interested in. Both

Danezis, George

74

EFFECT OF APPLE ON FASTING BLOOD SUGAR AND PLASMA LIPIDS LEVELS IN TYPE II DIABETES  

E-print Network

Apple products have been shown to prevent skin, mammary gland and colon carcinogenesis in animal models. Epidemiological observations indicate that regular consumption of one or more apples a day may reduce the risk for lung and colon cancer. The present study investigated the potential effects of apples on fasting blood sugar and lipid parameters in Type II diabetics ’ patients.Study includes 98 Type II diabetics ’ patients attending diabetic OPD, which was divided into two groups. Type II diabetic (n=54) who were willing to take an apple in the diet daily, consider as subjects and remaining (n=44) Type II diabetics taken as controls. FBS and lipid profile were measured at baseline and after four weeks and compared to that of controls.FBS levels highly significant (papple. Present study revealed that one medium size apple in diet of Type II diabetics reduces the fasting blood sugar levels and lipid parameters which are beneficial for normal health of diabetics along with anti-diabetic drugs.

N. S. Dange; Kedar Deshpande

75

Anderson localization in quark-gluon plasma.  

PubMed

At low temperature the low end of the QCD Dirac spectrum is well described by chiral random matrix theory. In contrast, at high temperature there is no similar statistical description of the spectrum. We show that at high temperature the lowest part of the spectrum consists of a band of statistically uncorrelated eigenvalues obeying essentially Poisson statistics and the corresponding eigenvectors are extremely localized. Going up in the spectrum the spectral density rapidly increases and the eigenvectors become more and more delocalized. At the same time the spectral statistics gradually crosses over to the bulk statistics expected from the corresponding random matrix ensemble. This phenomenon is reminiscent of Anderson localization in disordered conductors. Our findings are based on staggered Dirac spectra in quenched lattice simulations with the SU(2) gauge group. PMID:21231163

Kovács, Tamás G; Pittler, Ferenc

2010-11-01

76

Anderson Localization in Quark-Gluon Plasma  

SciTech Connect

At low temperature the low end of the QCD Dirac spectrum is well described by chiral random matrix theory. In contrast, at high temperature there is no similar statistical description of the spectrum. We show that at high temperature the lowest part of the spectrum consists of a band of statistically uncorrelated eigenvalues obeying essentially Poisson statistics and the corresponding eigenvectors are extremely localized. Going up in the spectrum the spectral density rapidly increases and the eigenvectors become more and more delocalized. At the same time the spectral statistics gradually crosses over to the bulk statistics expected from the corresponding random matrix ensemble. This phenomenon is reminiscent of Anderson localization in disordered conductors. Our findings are based on staggered Dirac spectra in quenched lattice simulations with the SU(2) gauge group.

Kovacs, Tamas G.; Pittler, Ferenc [Department of Physics, University of Pecs, H-7624 Pecs Ifjusag utja 6 (Hungary)

2010-11-05

77

Anderson Localization in Quark-Gluon Plasma  

E-print Network

At low temperature the low end of the QCD Dirac spectrum is well described by chiral random matrix theory. In contrast, at high temperature there is no similar statistical description of the spectrum. We show that at high temperature the lowest part of the spectrum consists of a band of statistically uncorrelated eigenvalues obeying essentially Poisson statistics and the corresponding eigenvectors are extremely localized. Going up in the spectrum the spectral density rapidly increases and the eigenvectors become more and more delocalized. At the same time the spectral statistics gradually crosses over to the bulk statistics expected from the corresponding random matrix ensemble. This phenomenon is reminiscent of Anderson localization in disordered conductors. Our findings are based on staggered Dirac spectra in quenched SU(2) lattice simulations.

Tamas G. Kovacs; Ferenc Pittler

2010-06-07

78

The Anderson Reservoir seismic gap - Induced aseismicity?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A persistent 10-km seismicity gap along the Calaveras fault appears to be related to the presence of the Leroy Anderson Reservoir in the Calaveras-Silver Creek fault zones southeast of San Jose, California. A magnitude-4.7 earthquake occurred at a depth of 5 km in the centre of the gap on October 3, 1973. The sequence of immediate aftershocks usually accompanying shallow earthquakes of this magnitude in central California did not occur. A bridge crossing the reservoir near its southeast end has been severely deformed, apparently the result of tectonic creep on the Calaveras fault. The occurrence of creep and absence of small earthquakes along the Calaveras in the vicinity of the reservoir suggest a transition from stick slip to stable sliding, possibly brought about by increased pore pressure. ?? 1976.

Bufe, C. G.

1976-01-01

79

Arc Detection and Interlock Module for the PEP II Low Level RF System  

SciTech Connect

A new arc detection and interlock generating module for the SLAC PEP-II low-level RF VXI-based system has been developed. The system is required to turn off the RF drive and high voltage power supply in the event of arcing in the cavity windows, klystron window, or circulator. Infrared photodiodes receive arc signals through radiation resistant optical fibers. Gain and bandwidth are selectable for each channel to allow tailoring response. The module also responds to interlock requests from other modules in the VXI system and communicates with the programmable logic controller (PLC) responsible for much of the low-level RF system's interlock functionality.

Tighe, R.; /SLAC

2011-08-31

80

Quality assurance plan for the High Level Controller for the CBMS Block II  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the software Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the High Level Controller for the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II (HLC/CBMS-II) project activities under the Computing, Robotics, and Education (CRE) Directorate management. It defines the requirements and assigns responsibilities for ensuring, with a high degree of confidence, that project objectives will be achieved as planned. The CBMS Program was awarded to ORNL by the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to design the next version (Block II) mass spectrometer for the detection and identification of chemical and biological warfare agents, to fabricate four engineering prototypes, and to construct eight preproduction units. Section 1 of this document provides an introduction to the HLC/CBMS-II project QAP. Sections 2 and 3 describe the specific aspects of quality assurance as applicable to the project. Section 4 reviews the project approach to risk management. The Risk Management Matrix given in Appendix A is a tool to assess, prioritize, and prevent problems before they occur; therefore, the matrix will be reviewed and revised on a periodic basis. Appendix B shows the quality assurance criteria of the DOE Order 5700.6C and their applicability to this project.

Reid, R.W.; Robbins, I.F.; Stewart, K.A.; Terry, C.L.; Whitaker, R.A.; Wolf, D.A.; Zager, J.C.

1997-09-01

81

The FERRUM project: Experimental transition probabilities from highly excited even 5s levels in Cr ii  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report lifetime measurements of the five levels in the 3d4(a5D)5s e6D term in Cr ii at an energy around 83 000 cm-1, and log(gf) values for 38 transitions from the investigated levels. The lifetimes are obtained using time-resolved, laser-induced fluorescence on ions from a laser-produced plasma. Since the levels have the same parity as the low-lying states directly populated in the plasma, we used a two-photon excitation scheme. This process is greatly facilitated by the presence of the 3d4(a5D)4p z6F levels at roughly half the energy difference. The f-values are obtained by combining the experimental lifetimes with branching fractions derived using relative intensities from a hollow cathode lamp recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer.

Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.; Nilsson, H.; Hartman, H.; Bäckström, E.

2014-10-01

82

Segregating Planners and Their Environments Scott D. Anderson  

E-print Network

Segregating Planners and Their Environments Scott D. Anderson Paul R. Cohen Experimental Knowledge strive towards, is illustrated in g- ure 1(b), where both the planner and agent inter- face to a domain

Southern California, University of

83

MD Anderson study finds cancer related pain often undertreated  

Cancer.gov

More than one third of patients with invasive cancer are undertreated for their pain, with minorities twice as likely to not receive analgesics, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

84

Topology, Delocalization via Average Symmetry and the Symplectic Anderson Transition  

E-print Network

A field theory of the Anderson transition in two-dimensional disordered systems with spin-orbit interactions and time-reversal symmetry is developed, in which the proliferation of vortexlike topological defects is essential ...

Fu, Liang

85

Localization of Classical Waves II: Electromagnetic Waves.  

E-print Network

Localization of Classical Waves II: Electromagnetic Waves. Alexander Figotin \\Lambda Department We consider electromagnetic waves in a medium described by a position dependent dielectric constant at all times. Localization of electromagnetic waves is a consequence of Anderson localization

86

Anderson-Fabry disease in children.  

PubMed

Although clinical evidence of major organ damage is typical of adulthood, many of the signs and symptoms of Anderson Fabry Disease (AFD) occur frequently in childhood. The clinical phenotype of AFD in pediatric patients has been described in several studies which show a higher incidence and an earlier onset of symptoms in male patients than in females. These include neurological manifestations (acroparaesthesias, chronic neuropathic pain, hypo-anhidrosis, tinnitus, hearing, loss), gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (abdominal pain and diarrhea), angiokeratomas, ocular abnormalities (cornea verticillata, tortuous retinal vessels and subcapsular cataracts). Such manifestations may impair quality of life and, because of their unspecific nature, rarely lead to an early diagnosis. In addition, signs of major organ damage (microalbuminuria or proteinuria, urinary hyperfiltration, impaired heart rate variability, left ventricular hypertrophy, stroke) are encountered in children with AFD. Clinical trials of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with agalsidase alfa and agalsidase beta have been conducted in children, with clinical and pharmacodinamc effects proved by both enzyme formulations, whereas differences in safety profile and administration were found. Although several studies suggest that ERT should be started before irreversible damage in critical organs have occurred, the issue of when to initiate it has not yet been resolved. More controlled trials must be done in order to demonstrate that an early start of ERT could prevent adult complications and to assess the optimal timing of treatment in children with AFD. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding for a better approach of pediatric AFD. PMID:23448455

Sestito, Simona; Ceravolo, Ferdinando; Concolino, Daniela

2013-01-01

87

UNIFORM APPROXIMATION BY bHARMONIC FUNCTIONS JOHN T. ANDERSON  

E-print Network

32A26. 1 #12;2 JOHN T. ANDERSON As a function of z K, the integral over the complement of K in (1{ - gK : g R(K)} C/zK · m(K) with C = 2/ . In particular, (1.4) gives an easy proof of the HartogsUNIFORM APPROXIMATION BY b­HARMONIC FUNCTIONS JOHN T. ANDERSON Abstract. The Mergelyan and Ahlfors

Anderson, John T.

88

Operator interface for the PEP-II low level RF control system  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on the operational aspects of the low level RF control system being built for the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. Subsystems requiring major operational considerations include displays for monitor and control from UNIX workstations, slow feedback loops and control sequences residing on microprocessors, and various client applications in the existing SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) control system. Since commissioning of PEP-II RF is currently in-progress, only those parts of the control system used during this phase are discussed in detail. Based on past experience with the SLC control system, it is expected that effort expended during commissioning on a solid user interface will result in smoother transition to full reliable 24-hour-a-day operation.

Allison, S.; Claus, R.

1997-05-01

89

AMERICAN COLLEGE OF SURGEONS TRAUMA CENTER VERIFICATION VERSUS STATE DESIGNATION: ARE LEVEL II CENTERS SLIPPING THROUGH THE CRACKS?  

PubMed Central

Objectives Single center experience has shown that American College of Surgeons (ACS) trauma verification can improve outcomes. The current objective was to compare mortality between ACS verified and State designated centers in a national sample. Methods Subjects ?16yr from ACS verified or State designated level I and II centers were identified in the NTDB 2007–08. A predictive mortality model was constructed using TQIP methodology. Imputation was used for missing data. Probability of mortality in the model determined expected deaths. Observed to expected (O/E) mortality ratios with 90%CI and outliers (90%CI above or below 1.0) were compared across ACS and State level I and II centers. The mortality model was repeated with ACS vs. State included. Results There were 900,274 subjects. The model had an AUC of 0.92 to predict death. Level I ACS centers had a lower median O/E ratio than State (0.95 [IQR 0.82–1.05] vs 1.02 [0.87–1.15], p<0.01), with no difference in level II centers. Level II State centers had more high O/E outliers (Table). ACS verification was an independent predictor of survival in level II centers (OR 1.26; 95%CI 1.20–1.32, p<0.01), but not in level I centers (p=0.84). Conclusions Level II centers have a disproportionate number of high mortality outliers and ACS verification is a predictor of survival. Level I ACS centers have lower O/E ratios overall but no difference in outliers. ACS verification appears beneficial. This data suggests that level II centers benefit most, and promoting level II ACS verification may be an opportunity for improved outcomes. Level of Evidence: III PMID:23778437

Brown, Joshua B.; Watson, Gregory A.; Forsythe, Raquel M.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Bauza, Graciela; Murdock, Alan D.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Sperry, Jason L.

2013-01-01

90

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Does Not Suppress Renal Angiotensin II Levels in Angiotensin I-Infused Rats  

PubMed Central

Angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion into rats elevates local angiotensin II levels through an AT1 receptor–dependent pathway in the kidney. We examined whether treatment with an angio-tensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, temocapril, or an AT1-receptor blocker, olmesartan, prevented elevation of Ang II levels in the kidney of angiotensin I (Ang I)-infused rats. Rats were infused with Ang I (100 ng/min) and treated with temocapril (30 mg/kg per day, n = 10) or olmesartan (10 mg/kg per day, n = 9) for 4 weeks. Ang I infusion significantly elevated blood pressure compared with vehicle-infused rats (n = 6). Treatment with temocapril or olmesartan suppressed Ang I–induced hypertension. Temocapril suppressed both plasma and renal ACE activity. Ang I infusion increased Ang II content in the kidney. Interestingly, temocapril failed to reduce the level of Ang II in the kidney, while olmesartan markedly suppressed an increase in renal Ang II levels. These results suggest a limitation of temocapril and a benefit of olmesartan to inhibit the renal renin–angiotensin system and suggest the possible existence of an ACE inhibitor–insensitive pathway that increases Ang II levels in rat kidney. PMID:23698111

Ohnishi, Keisuke; Murase, Miki; Nakano, Daisuke; Pelisch, Nicolas; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ohmori, Koji; Kohno, Masakazu; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Nishiyama, Akira

2013-01-01

91

EPICOR-II resin\\/liner investigation: Low-level waste data base development program for fiscal year 1990  

Microsoft Academic Search

The EPICOR-II Resin\\/Liner Investigation: Low-Level Waste Database Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of tests procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position of Waste Forms to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c)

J. W. Jr. McConnell; R. D. Rogers; D. A. Johnson; J. D. Jastrow; D. S. Wickliff

1990-01-01

92

Abnormally elevated serum transcobalamin II levels in patients with cerebral malaria.  

PubMed

Transcobalamin II (TCII) levels have been reported to be elevated in patients with many clinical conditions including proliferative reticuloendothelial system. As reactive macrophage hyperplasia frequently occurs in patients with malaria, the objective of the present study was to determine TCII in patients with Plasmodium falciparum with cerebral symptoms. The studies were performed on 14 cerebral malaria patients as well as 60 normal subjects. The mean values of serum vitamin B12 and TCII levels were significantly higher in the patient group and 6 and 7 patients had serum vitamin B12 and TCII levels higher than the normal values. There was direct relationship between serum TCII levels and BUN or creatinine levels. These findings indicated that raised serum TCII level occurred only in patients with renal insufficiency. A decreased glomerular fiLtration rate reduced the amount of vitamin B12 and TCII-B12 that filtered through the glomeruli resulting in the reduced proximal tubular cells uptake and its degradation of TCII. This reduced lysosomal enzyme activity, therefore, prolongs the intravascular TCII survival and increased secretion of TCII into the circulation. Therefore, serum TCII levels were elevated in these cerebral malaria patients. PMID:7759977

Areekul, S; Churdchu, K; Thanomsak, W; Cheeramakara, C; Wilairatana, P; Charoenlarp, P

1994-12-01

93

Dystopian Visions of Global Capitalism: Philip Reeve’s Mortal Engines and M.T Anderson’s Feed  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines Philip Reeve’s novel for children, Mortal Engines, and M.T. Anderson’s young adult novel, Feed, by assessing these dystopias as prototypical texts of what Ulrich Beck calls risk society. Through their visions of a fictional\\u000a future, the two narratives explore the hazards created by contemporary techno-economic progress, predatory global politics\\u000a and capitalist excesses of consumption. They implicitly pose

Elizabeth Bullen; Elizabeth Parsons

2007-01-01

94

High levels of MHC class II allelic diversity in lake trout from Lake Superior  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sequence variation in a 216 bp portion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II B1 domain was examined in 74 individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from different locations in Lake Superior. Forty-three alleles were obtained which encoded 71-72 amino acids of the mature protein. These sequences were compared with previous data obtained from five Pacific salmon species and Atlantic salmon using the same primers. Although all of the lake trout alleles clustered together in the neighbor-joining analysis of amino acid sequences, one amino acid allelic lineage was shared with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species in another genus which probably diverged from Salvelinus more than 10-20 million years ago. As shown previously in other salmonids, the level of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) exceeded the level of synonymous substitution (d(S)). The level of nucleotide diversity at the MHC class II B1 locus was considerably higher in lake trout than in the Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lake trout colonized Lake Superior from more than one refuge following the Wisconsin glaciation. Recent population bottlenecks may have reduced nucleotide diversity in Pacific salmon populations.

Dorschner, M.O.; Duris, T.; Bronte, C.R.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.; Phillips, R.B.

2000-01-01

95

Yeast cells expressing differential levels of human or yeast DNA topoisomerase II: a potent tool for identification and characterization of topoisomerase II-targeting antitumour agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To identify and characterize the specificity and potency of topoisomerase II-interacting antitumour drugs in an in vivo\\u000a model utilizing the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Methods: Four yeast transformants were selected for the expression of either human or yeast DNA topoisomerase II at different, biologically\\u000a relevant, levels under the tight control of promoters of various strengths. Results: Analyses of 24 drugs

Benoît van Hille; Bridget T. Hill

1998-01-01

96

Topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the phenomena of Anderson localization in the presence of nonlinear interaction on a lattice. A class of nonlinear Schrödinger models with arbitrary power nonlinearity is analyzed. We conceive the various regimes of behavior, depending on the topology of resonance overlap in phase space, ranging from a fully developed chaos involving Lévy flights to pseudochaotic dynamics at the onset of delocalization. It is demonstrated that the quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. We describe this localization-delocalization transition as a percolation transition on the infinite Cayley tree (Bethe lattice). It is found in the vicinity of the criticality that the spreading of the wave field is subdiffusive in the limit t ?+?. The second moment of the associated probability distribution grows with time as a power law ? t?, with the exponent ? =1/3 exactly. Also we find for superquadratic nonlinearity that the analog pseudochaotic regime at the edge of chaos is self-controlling in that it has feedback on the topology of the structure on which the transport processes concentrate. Then the system automatically (without tuning of parameters) develops its percolation point. We classify this type of behavior in terms of self-organized criticality dynamics in Hilbert space. For subquadratic nonlinearities, the behavior is shown to be sensitive to the details of definition of the nonlinear term. A transport model is proposed based on modified nonlinearity, using the idea of "stripes" propagating the wave process to large distances. Theoretical investigations, presented here, are the basis for consistency analysis of the different localization-delocalization patterns in systems with many coupled degrees of freedom in association with the asymptotic properties of the transport.

Milovanov, Alexander V.; Iomin, Alexander

2014-06-01

97

A Non-invasive Technique for Configuring Low Level RF Feedback Loops in PEP-II  

SciTech Connect

The RF system of the PEP-II collider uses two fast feedback loops around each klystron and set of cavities. These loops reduce the impedance of the fundamental mode of the accelerating cavities seen by the beam, and are necessary to reduce the growth rates of longitudinal modes within the RF system bandwidth. Operation of the accelerator at high beam currents is very sensitive to the configuration of the low-level RF feedback loops. There are 7 loop control parameters that strongly influence the stability of the feedback loops and the achieved level of longitudinal impedance reduction. Diagnostic techniques for the analysis of the RF feedback via closed-loop system transfer function measurements will be presented. The model is fit to the measured closed-loop transfer function data and the extracted parameters are then used to calculate optimal tuning and corrections to the loop control elements in the physical channel. These techniques allow fine-tuning of RF feedback with stored beam as well as diagnosis of misconfigured or malfunctioning elements of the system. Results from PEP-II operation will be presented to illustrate the techniques and their applications.

Teytelman, D; /SLAC

2005-06-22

98

Alterative LEU designs for the FRM-II with power levels of 20-22 MW.  

SciTech Connect

Alternative LEU Designs for the FRM-II have been developed by the RERTR Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the request of an FRM-II Expert Group established by the German Federal Government in January 1999 to evaluate the options for using LEU fuel instead of HEU fuel in cores with power levels of 20 MW. The ANL designs would use the same building structure and maintain as many of the HEU design features as practical. The range of potential LEU fuels was expanded from previous studies to include already-tested silicide fuels with uranium densities up to 6.7 g/cm{sup 3} and the new U-Mo fuels that show excellent prospects for achieving uranium densities in the 8-9 g/cm{sup 3} range. For each of the LEU cores; the design parameters were chosen to match the 50 day cycle length of the HEU core and to maximize the thermal neutron flux in the Cold Neutron Source and beam tubes. The studies concluded that an LEU core with a diameter of about 29 cm instead of 24 cm in HEU design and operating at a power level of 20 MW would have thermal neutron fluxes that are 0.85 times that of the HEU design at the center of the Cold Neutron Source. With a potential future upgrade to a power of 22 MW, this ratio would increase to 0.93.

Hanan, N. A.; Smith, R. S.; Matos, J. E.

1999-09-27

99

BRCA1 can modulate RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain phosphorylation levels.  

PubMed

A high incidence of breast and ovarian cancers has been linked to mutations in the BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 has been shown to be involved in both positive and negative regulation of gene activity as well as in numerous other processes such as DNA repair and cell cycle regulation. Since modulation of the RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation levels could constitute an interface to all these functions, we wanted to directly test the possibility that BRCA1 might regulate the phosphorylation state of the CTD. We have shown that the BRCA1 C-terminal region can negatively modulate phosphorylation levels of the RNA polymerase II CTD by the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) in vitro. Interestingly, the BRCA1 C-terminal region can directly interact with CAK and inhibit CAK activity by competing with ATP. Finally, we demonstrated that full-length BRCA1 can inhibit CTD phosphorylation when introduced in the BRCA1(-/-) HCC1937 cell line. Our results suggest that BRCA1 could play its ascribed roles, at least in part, by modulating CTD kinase components. PMID:15282296

Moisan, Annie; Larochelle, Chantal; Guillemette, Benoît; Gaudreau, Luc

2004-08-01

100

Development of High Level Trigger Software for Belle II at SuperKEKB  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Belle collaboration has been trying for 10 years to reveal the mystery of the current matter-dominated universe. However, much more statistics is required to search for New Physics through quantum loops in decays of B mesons. In order to increase the experimental sensitivity, the next generation B-factory, SuperKEKB, is planned. The design luminosity of SuperKEKB is 8 x 1035cm-2s-1 a factor 40 above KEKB's peak luminosity. At this high luminosity, the level 1 trigger of the Belle II experiment will stream events of 300 kB size at a 30 kHz rate. To reduce the data flow to a manageable level, a high-level trigger (HLT) is needed, which will be implemented using the full offline reconstruction on a large scale PC farm. There, physics level event selection is performed, reducing the event rate by ~ 10 to a few kHz. To execute the reconstruction the HLT uses the offline event processing framework basf2, which has parallel processing capabilities used for multi-core processing and PC clusters. The event data handling in the HLT is totally object oriented utilizing ROOT I/O with a new method of object passing over the UNIX socket connection. Also under consideration is the use of the HLT output as well to reduce the pixel detector event size by only saving hits associated with a track, resulting in an additional data reduction of ~ 100 for the pixel detector. In this contribution, the design and implementation of the Belle II HLT are presented together with a report of preliminary testing results.

Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Mineo, S.

2011-12-01

101

Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II.  

E-print Network

Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II. Increased fertilizer use greatly. It was apparent well before the rapid expansion in fertilizer use that inexpensive ways to evaluate the fertility

102

UPR-Induced Resistance to Etoposide Is Downstream of PERK and Independent of Changes in Topoisomerase II? Levels  

PubMed Central

Background The unfolded protein response (UPR) is regulated by three ER-localized, transmembrane signal transducers that control distinct aspects of the UPR. We previously reported that both increased resistance to etoposide and a reduction in Topoisomerase II? protein levels were a direct response of UPR activation, and the latter occurred independent of changes in Topo II? mRNA levels. We have now examined the contribution of each of the three up-stream transducers of the UPR, as well as some of their downstream targets in affecting decreased expression of Topo II? protein and increased drug resistance. Principal Findings Our data revealed that while Ire1 activation led to Topo II? loss at the protein level it did not contribute to changes in sensitivity to etoposide. The decreased expression of Topo II? protein was not downstream of XBP-1, in keeping with the fact that Topo II? transcription was not affected by ER stress. Conversely, PERK activation did not contribute to changes in Topo II? protein levels, but it did play a significant role in the UPR-induced decreased sensitivity to etoposide. Several cellular responses downstream of PERK were examined for their potential to contribute to resistance. The ATF6 arm of the UPR did not significantly contribute to etoposide resistance within the time frame of our experiments. Conclusions and Significance In toto, our data demonstrate that UPR-induced changes in Topo II? protein levels are not responsible for resistance to etoposide as has been previously hypothesized, and instead demonstrate that the PERK branch plays a Topo II?-independent role in altered sensitivity to this drug. PMID:23144714

Mann, Melissa J.; Pereira, Ethel R.; Liao, Nan; Hendershot, Linda M.

2012-01-01

103

Efficacy of hydrosurgical debridement and nanocrystalline silver dressings for infection prevention in type II and III open injuries.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and culture-positive infection rates of open Gustilo/Anderson type II and III fractures using a protocol nanocrystalline silver wound dressing and hydrosurgical debridement. Retrospective case series through chart review on all type II and III open fractures were treated using a novel protocol from December 2005 to March 2008 (N = 17). All Gustilo/Anderson grade II and III open fractures were treated with a novel protocol at a Level I trauma centre. Open Gustilo/Anderson grade II and III fractures were acutely stabilised in the trauma centre/emergency department, while a nanocrystalline silver dressing was placed within the wound. Debridement using a hydrosurgical scalpel and gravity irrigation was performed within 6-8 hours of injury. Cultures were obtained prior to definitive fixation. The primary outcome measurements were positive cultures and clinical infection rates. Seventeen patients met inclusion criteria. Mean age (33·5) and injury severity score (12·7) were gathered. There were 4 grade II open fractures (23·5%), 11 grade IIIA (64·7%) and 2 grade IIIB open fractures (11·8%). The mean time to intravenous antibiotics was 61·5 minutes. The mean time to initial debridement/irrigation was 222·1 minutes. The average number of surgical procedures was 2·35 with a mean length of stay of 11·8 days. Six patients developed positive cultures from the traumatic wounds, five were contaminants. One clinical infection was found (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). The overall clinical infection rate in this series was 5·9% (1/17). The only infection was in a Gustilo/Anderson grade II fracture. There were no infections in the more high-energy Gustilo/Anderson grade IIIA and IIIB fractures compared with the Gustilo/Anderson control of 4-42%. We conclude that this novel protocol for open-fracture treatment is a promising intervention. A further prospective randomised clinical study is warranted. PMID:22074560

Keen, Jeffrey S; Desai, Pratik P; Smith, Christopher S; Suk, Michael

2012-02-01

104

Understanding localisation in QCD through an Ising-Anderson model  

E-print Network

Above the QCD chiral crossover temperature, the low-lying eigenmodes of the Dirac operator are localised, while moving up in the spectrum states become extended. This localisation/delocalisation transition has been shown to be a genuine second-order phase transition, in the same universality class as that of the 3D Anderson model. The existence of localised modes and the effective dimensional reduction can be tentatively explained as a consequence of local fluctuations of the Polyakov loop, that provide 3D on-site disorder, in analogy to the on-site disorder of the Anderson model. To test the viability of this explanation we study a 3D effective, Anderson-like model, with on-site disorder provided by the spins of a spin model, which mimics the Polyakov loop dynamics. Our preliminary results show that localised modes are present in the ordered phase, thus supporting the proposed mechanism for localisation in QCD.

Matteo Giordano; Tamas G. Kovacs; Ferenc Pittler

2014-10-23

105

Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations in molecular rotation  

E-print Network

We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under quantum resonance conditions. In a rigid rotor the resonance causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that the centrifugal distortion of rotating molecules eventually halts the growth, by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentum -- the Anderson wall. Its position solely depends on the molecular rotational constants and lies in the range of a few tens of hbar. Below the wall, rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology.

Floß, Johannes

2014-01-01

106

Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations in molecular rotation  

E-print Network

We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under quantum resonance conditions. In a rigid rotor the resonance causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that the centrifugal distortion of rotating molecules eventually halts the growth, by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentum -- the Anderson wall. Its position solely depends on the molecular rotational constants and lies in the range of a few tens of hbar. Below the wall, rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at near-ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology.

Johannes Floß; Ilya Sh. Averbukh

2014-03-10

107

Anderson wall and BLOCH oscillations in molecular rotation.  

PubMed

We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under quantum resonance conditions. In a rigid rotor, the resonance causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that the centrifugal distortion of rotating molecules eventually halts the growth, by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentum--the Anderson wall. Its position solely depends on the molecular rotational constants and lies in the range of a few tens of ?. Below the wall, rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at near-ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology. PMID:25105614

Floß, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

2014-07-25

108

Anderson Wall and Bloch Oscillations in Molecular Rotation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under quantum resonance conditions. In a rigid rotor, the resonance causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that the centrifugal distortion of rotating molecules eventually halts the growth, by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentum—the Anderson wall. Its position solely depends on the molecular rotational constants and lies in the range of a few tens of ?. Below the wall, rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at near-ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology.

Floß, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

2014-07-01

109

Evaluation of Phase II glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

A vendor glass formulation study was carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), supporting the Phase I and Phase II melter vendor testing activities for Westinghouse Hanford Company. This study is built upon the LLW glass optimization effort that will be described in a separate report. For Phase I vendor melter testing, six glass formulations were developed at PNL and additional were developed by Phase I vendors. All the doses were characterized in terms of viscosity and chemical durability by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. Twelve Phase II glass formulations (see Tables 3.5 and 3.6) were developed to accommodate 2.5 wt% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 1.0 wt% S0{sub 3} without significant processing problems. These levels of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SO{sub 3} are expected to be the highest possible concentrations from Hanford Site LLW streams at 25 wt% waste loading in glass. The Phase H compositions formulated were 6 to 23 times more durable than the environmental assessment (EA) glass. They melt within the temperature range of 1160{degrees} to 1410{degrees}C to suit different melting technologies. The composition types include boron-free for volatilization sensitive melters; boron-containing glasses for coId-cap melters; Zr-containing, glasses for enhanced Iong-term durability; and Fe-containing glasses for reducing melting temperature and melt volatility while maintaining chemical durability.

Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J. [and others

1996-03-01

110

Low level waste data base development - EPICOR-II resin/liner investigation. Program review  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the titled program and gives the status of the work on resin degradation, resin solidification, and field testing of solidified samples. A brief discussion of some recent results is also included. Resin materials from EPICOR-II prefilters used in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being examined to (1) develop a low level waste data base and (2) obtain information on survivability of waste forms composed of ion exchange media loaded with radionuclides and solidified in matrices of cement and Dow polymer. An unusual aspect of this investigation is the use of commercial grade resins which have been loaded with over five times the radioactivity normally seen in a commercial application. That dramatically increases the total radiation dose to the resins. 18 refs., 8 figs.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.

1985-09-10

111

Low-level waste data base development - EPICOR II resin/liner investigation - a program review  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the titled program and gives the status of the work on resin degradation, resin solidification, and field testing of solidified samples. A brief discussion of some recent results also is included. Resin materials from EPICOR-II prefilters used during cleanup of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being examined to (a) develop a data base for low-level waste and (b) obtain information on survivability of waste forms composed of ion exchange media loaded with radionuclides and solidified in matrices of cement and Dow polymer. An unusual aspect of the investigation is the use of commercial grade resins which have been loaded with over five times the radioactivity normally seen in a commercial application. That dramatically increases the total radiation dose to the resins. 21 refs., 8 figs.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Reno, H.W.; Schmitt, R.C.; Ayers, A.L. Jr.

1986-01-01

112

Prelabour rupture of membranes and neonatal morbidity in level II nursery in Kelantan.  

PubMed

In view of controversial reports about the role of prelabour rupture of foetal membranes (PROM) in neonatal morbidity and to study the association of PROM with infections and meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS), a prospective case control study was conducted in a level II nursery of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan. Of the 111 neonates with PROM studied, 18 developed clinical problems (septicaemia and other specific problems such as pneumonia, omphalitis, skin infection and MAS) while 5/56 of the control group developed similar problems. The difference between the two groups was not significant (p < 0.30). There was no neonatal death. It is concluded that PROM is not associated with neonatal morbidity. Neonates with this problem alone do not need to be admitted to the neonatal nursery. PMID:8057984

Malik, A S

1994-03-01

113

Use of enteral nutritional supplementation: a survey of level II and III neonatal units in England.  

PubMed

Enteral nutritional supplementation is widely used in preterm babies on Neonatal Units (NNUs). There is little published evidence on appraising their long-term efficacy. We evaluated the current practice of enteral nutritional supplementation in 96 level II and III NNUs in England. 96%, 98%, 98% and 56% units use breast milk fortification (BMF), iron, multivitamins and folic acid supplementation respectively. Iron, multivitamins and folic acid supplements are routinely commenced in babies < 35 weeks gestation by 73%, 68% and 39% NNUs respectively. Seventy eight percent NNUs only use BMF for babies that are not gaining weight. Continuing variable practice of enteral nutritional supplementation and current use of anecdotal evidence and best guess recommendations highlights the need for a unified approach and collaborative multinational research to produce standardised guidelines. PMID:24034203

Ahmed, Mansoor; Brent, Julie; Ginn, Emma

2013-09-01

114

Commissioning experience with the PEP-II low-level RF system  

SciTech Connect

The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment and supported by EPICS. All signal processing and control is done at baseband using in-phase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. Remotely configurable RF feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to the required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. The system contains a built-in baseband network analyzer which allows remote measurement of the RF feedback loop transfer functions and automated configuration of these loops. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system.

Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

1997-05-01

115

Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches.  

PubMed

Signatures of Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well-defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Quantum interference generates a peak in the forward scattering amplitude which, unlike the common weak localization backscattering peak, is a signature of strong Anderson localization. We present a nonperturbative, and fully time resolved description of the phenomenon, covering the entire diffusion-to-localization crossover. Our results should be observable by present day experiments. PMID:24702342

Micklitz, T; Müller, C A; Altland, A

2014-03-21

116

Strong Anderson Localization in Cold Atom Quantum Quenches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Signatures of Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well-defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Quantum interference generates a peak in the forward scattering amplitude which, unlike the common weak localization backscattering peak, is a signature of strong Anderson localization. We present a nonperturbative, and fully time resolved description of the phenomenon, covering the entire diffusion-to-localization crossover. Our results should be observable by present day experiments.

Micklitz, T.; Müller, C. A.; Altland, A.

2014-03-01

117

Increased circulating levels of transcobalamin II in malarial patients with renal involvement.  

PubMed

Vitamin B12 and its binding proteins were measured in the serum and urine of four patients with Plasmodium falciparum who had renal insufficiency. The results showed that these patients had elevated serum transcobalamin II (TCII) levels which decreased to the normal level after recovery from azotaemia. There were direct relationships between serum TCII levels and blood urea-nitrogen or creatinine concentrations. The clearance and urinary excretion of vitamin B12 and TCII were significantly lower in the patients' group than in normal subjects. All these findings indicated that elevated serum TCII could occur in P. falciparum patients with renal insufficiency. This is probably caused by a reduction in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), secondary to a low or ineffective blood volume. The reduced GFR, in turn, reduces the TCII-B12 that filters through the glomeruli, resulting in decreased TCII-B12 uptake by the renal tubules, and thus slows down the TCII degradation by lysosomal enzymes. The decreased TCII catabolism therefore prolongs the TCII survival in the circulation and probably stimulates TCII synthesis and secretion in a feedback mechanism. PMID:8346988

Areekul, S; Churdchu, K; Wilairatana, P; Charoenlarp, P

1993-02-01

118

CORE-II Virtual Special Issue An assessment of global and regional sea level for years 19932007  

E-print Network

this period, though with the global mean thermosteric sea level rise biased low relative to observationCORE-II Virtual Special Issue An assessment of global and regional sea level for years 1993), Melbourne, Australia h Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS), Florida State University

Drange, Helge

119

NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. It is an open structure platform, and we try to provide a narrow API set for client application. With this narrow API, existing applications developed in different language under different architecture could be ported to our platform with small modification. This paper describes system infrastructure design, client API and system integration, and latest progress. As a new 3rd generation synchrotron light source with ultra low emittance, there are new requirements and challenges to control and manipulate the beam. A use case study and a theoretical analysis have been performed to clarify requirements and challenges to the high level applications (HLA) software environment. To satisfy those requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture of the software framework is critical for beam commissioning, study and operation. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating, plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology. The HLA is combination of tools for accelerator physicists and operators, which is same as traditional approach. In NSLS-II, they include monitoring applications and control routines. Scripting environment is very important for the later part of HLA and both parts are designed based on a common set of APIs. Physicists and operators are users of these APIs, while control system engineers and a few accelerator physicists are the developers of these APIs. With our Client/Server mode based approach, we leave how to retrieve information to the developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

2011-03-28

120

New assay for the rapid determination of plasma holotranscobalamin II levels: preliminary evaluation in cancer patients.  

PubMed

We describe a new and rapid assay for the measurement of plasma B12 bound to transcobalamin II (holotranscobalamin II) using the property of adsorption of the polypeptides of apotranscobalamin II and holotranscobalamin II to the hydrophobic surface of microfine glass particles. Acid-washed microfine glass was used to separate vitamin B12 bound to the glycoproteins transcobalamin I and transcobalamin III (haptocorrin or R binder) from that bound to transcobalamin II. Sephadex gel filtration separation of 57Co-labelled vitamin B12 binders confirmed that > 90% of holotranscobalamin II can be removed from plasma holohaptocorrin by adsorption to microfine glass particles. Since only holotranscobalamin II is capable of delivering vitamin B12 to metabolizing cells, plasma holotranscobalamin II content reflects the availability of B12 to cells. Use of this test in cancer patients undergoing either chemotherapy or radiation therapy revealed evidence of early negative B12 balance that in some instances was induced by the treatment itself. PMID:8438881

Vu, T; Amin, J; Ramos, M; Flener, V; Vanyo, L; Tisman, G

1993-02-01

121

Bootstrap multiscale analysis and localization for multi-particle continuous Anderson Hamiltonians  

E-print Network

We extend the bootstrap multiscale analysis developed by Germinet and Klein to the multi-particle continuous Anderson Hamiltonian, obtaining Anderson localization with finite multiplicity of eigenvalues, decay of eigenfunction correlations, and a strong form of dynamical localization.

Abel Klein; Son Nguyen

2013-11-17

122

REVIEW OF D-T RESULTS FROM TFTR K.M. McGuire, H. Adler, P. Alling, C. Ancher, H. Anderson, J.L. Anderson,1 J.W. Anderson,  

E-print Network

.L. Anderson,1 J.W. Anderson, V. Arunasalam, G. Ascione, D. Ashcroft, Cris.W. Barnes,1 G. Barnes, S. Batha,2 G. Parks,6 S.F. Paul, G. Pearson, E. Perry, R. Persing, M. Petrov,16 C.K. Phillips, M. Phillips,11 SREVIEW OF D-T RESULTS FROM TFTR K.M. McGuire, H. Adler, P. Alling, C. Ancher, H. Anderson, J

123

17?-Estradiol Alters Rat Type-II Alveolar Cell Recovery from High Levels of Ozone  

PubMed Central

Respiratory health is negatively impacted by exposure to ozone or to estrogens. Increasingly, individuals have simultaneous environmental exposure to both compounds. Characterizing the cellular responses stimulated by the combination of ozone and estrogens, therefore, is crucial to our complete understanding of the compounds' environmental health impacts. Our work introduces an alveolar cell culture model with defined media that provides evidence of ozone damage and determines sex hormones alter the cells' susceptibility to oxidative damage. Specifically, we investigated the individual and combined effects of environmentally relevant levels of ozone and 17?-estradiol on non-cancerous rat, type-II alveolar cells by examining biomarkers of cellular health and redox balance. The data reveal a complex role for 17?-estradiol in cellular recovery from 1 hr exposure to high ozone levels. At 0.5 hr post-ozone necrosis and inflammation markers show 17?-estradiol augments the detrimental effects of 350 ppb ozone, but after 24 hr of recovery, steroid treatment alters glutathione redox ratio and allows cellular proliferation. PMID:24599035

Chalfant, Madeleine; Bernd, Karen K.

2014-01-01

124

Anderson Hamiltonian description of the experimental electronic structure and magnetic interactions of copper oxide superconductors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe valence-band and core-level photoemission data for copper oxide superconductors using the Anderson Hamiltonian applied to an impurity-cluster configuration-interaction model. We obtain experimental values of the parameters of the model the copper oxygen charge transfer energy Delta~0.4 eV, the d-d Coulomb interaction U~6 eV, and the ligand-d hybridization T~2.4 eV. Using these parameters, we evaluate the linear Cu-O-Cu superexchange

Zhi-Xun Shen; J. W. Allen; J. J. Yeh; J.-S. Kang; W. Ellis; W. Spicer; I. Lindau; M. B. Maple; Y. D. Dalichaouch; M. S. Torikachvili; J. Z. Sun; T. Geballe

1987-01-01

125

Preliminary Results from Pyroelectric Crystal Accelerator Tom Anderson1  

E-print Network

Preliminary Results from Pyroelectric Crystal Accelerator Tom Anderson1 , Ronald Edwards1 , Kevin and Nuclear Engineering at USMA are using pyroelectric crystals to ionize and accelerate residual gas trapped: Pyroelectric Crystal Accelerator, Educational Accelerator, Nuclear Fusion, Neutrons PACS: 24.90+d INTRODUCTION

Danon, Yaron

126

POLAR SEA ICE MAPPING FOR SEAWINDS Hyrum S. Anderson  

E-print Network

POLAR SEA ICE MAPPING FOR SEAWINDS by Hyrum S. Anderson A thesis submitted to the faculty, College of Engineering and Technology #12;viii #12;ABSTRACT POLAR SEA ICE MAPPING FOR SEAWINDS Hyrum S sea ice. Advances in microwave remote sensing technology have allowed a large-scale and detailed study

Long, David G.

127

Parabolic Anderson model with a finite number of moving catalysts  

E-print Network

Parabolic Anderson model with a finite number of moving catalysts F. Castell, O. G¨un and G- actant" u under the influence of a "catalyst" . In the present paper we focus on the case where of particles A and B. A-particles represent "catalysts", B-particles represent "reactants" and the dynamics

Maillard, Grégory

128

Partitions of trees and ACA0 Bernard A. Anderson  

E-print Network

Partitions of trees and ACA0 Bernard A. Anderson Jeffry L. Hirst Appalachian State University is equivalent to the subsystem ACA0 of reverse mathemat- ics. In [1], a version of Ramsey's theorem for trees of Ramsey's theorem are also equivalent. Because there are so few examples of proofs involving ACA0

Hirst, Jeff

129

Key Infection: Smart Trust for Smart Dust Ross Anderson  

E-print Network

Key Infection: Smart Trust for Smart Dust Ross Anderson University of Cambridge Ross sensor networks are becoming increasingly im- portant for a wide variety of applications such as factory technology is given by the `Smart Dust' project which is developing tiny sensors [9]. Its goal is to make

Perrig, Adrian

130

Atomic Semantics of Nonatomic James H. Anderson Mohamed G. Gouda  

E-print Network

Atomic Semantics of Nonatomic Programs James H. Anderson Mohamed G. Gouda Department of Computer that it is possible, and sometimes useful, to reason about nonatomic programs within the conventional atomic model concurrent programs are developed within the atomic model of concurrency Ho 72, LS 84, MP 84, OG 76

Anderson, James

131

GEOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF INTERMITTENCY IN THE PARABOLIC ANDERSON MODEL  

E-print Network

, as t , the overwhelming contribution to the total mass x u(t, x) comes from a slowly increasing number of `islands' which are located far from each other. These `islands' are local regions of those high exceedances of the field and phrases. Parabolic Anderson problem, intermittency, random environment, quenched asymptotics, heat

König, Wolfgang

132

A TWO CITIES THEOREM FOR THE PARABOLIC ANDERSON MODEL  

E-print Network

¨orters Nadia Sidorova Abstract: The parabolic Anderson problem is the Cauchy problem for the heat equation tu the heat equation with random potential on the integer lattice Zd and study the Cauchy problem number of spatially separated regions of small diameter, which are often called the relevant islands

133

Anderson Productions Cruisin' Oklahoma US 66 video archive Transcripts  

E-print Network

. Paye, Randy Weaver, 2 maps, Unity race, Miami bridge. · Phillips Petroleum Company video services. #12Anderson Productions ­ Cruisin' Oklahoma US 66 video archive Transcripts Handwritten note reads: 1 are Hi8 video, ¾", or BetaSP. 1 TC 000000 ­ 00:31:00 from Hi8 #1. See ¾" #A. 2 TC 00:31:21:15 ­ 1

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

134

Exploring the retinal connectome James R. Anderson,1  

E-print Network

Exploring the retinal connectome James R. Anderson,1 Bryan W. Jones,1 Carl B. Watt,1 Margaret V. Shaw,1 Jia-Hui Yang,1 David DeMill,1 James S. Lauritzen,1 Yanhua Lin,1 Kevin D. Rapp,1 David distinct signaling modes, including ribbon synapse inputs from OFF bipolar cells, wide-field ON cone

Utah, University of

135

Introduction to Genetic Algorithms Peter G. Anderson, Computer Science Department  

E-print Network

#12;1 Introduction to Genetic Algorithms Peter G. Anderson, Computer Science Department Rochester, selective breeding, "survival of the fittest." We will present the fundamental algorithms and present Computers To... Synchronize like the fireflies. Discover FSMs given the sentences. Control robots. 2000/05/0

Anderson, Peter G.

136

Anderson Localization for the Almost Mathieu Equation: A Nonperturbative Proof.  

E-print Network

Anderson Localization for the Almost Mathieu Equation: A Nonperturbative Proof. Svetlana Ya prove that for any diophantine rotation angle ! and a.e. phase ` the almost Mathieu operator (H­ physics. Moscow, Russia . 1 #12; 1. INTRODUCTION In this paper we study localization for the almost­Mathieu

137

Measuring the Cost of Cybercrime Ross Anderson 1  

E-print Network

Measuring the Cost of Cybercrime Ross Anderson 1 Chris Barton 2 Rainer B¨ohme 3 Richard Clayton 4 what we believe to be the first systematic study of the costs of cybercrime. It was prepared the problem. For each of the main categories of cybercrime we set out what is and is not known of the direct

Savage, Stefan

138

What Do Consumers Believe About Future Gasoline Soren T. Anderson  

E-print Network

What Do Consumers Believe About Future Gasoline Prices? Soren T. Anderson Michigan State University November 3, 2010 PRELIMINARY DRAFT: PLEASE DO NOT CITE WITHOUT PERMISSION Abstract How do consumers form to this question is key to an ongoing debate regarding the "energy paradox" ­ which stipulates that consumers

Silver, Whendee

139

Plant and Animal Sciences Val J. Anderson, Chair  

E-print Network

Plant and Animal Sciences Val J. Anderson, Chair 275 WIDB, (801) 422-3527 College of Biology programs in the Department of Plant and Animal Sciences are open enrollment. The Discipline Disciplines in the Department of Plant and Animal Sciences focus on four of the great dilemmas facing mankind in the twenty

Hart, Gus

140

Poisson statistics of eigenvalues in the hierarchical Anderson model  

E-print Network

We study the eigenvalue statistics for the hieracharchial Anderson model of Molchanov. We prove Poisson fluctuations at arbitrary disorder, when the the model has spectral dimension d<1. The proof is based on Minami's technique and we give an elementary exposition of the probabilistic arguments.

Evgenij Kritchevski

2007-10-13

141

J and the Traveling Salesman Peter G. Anderson,  

E-print Network

mutate the new population. pg. 6 #12;Test Plan N randomly chosen cities. N � M cities in a grid (N · M of Technology, Rochester, New York anderson@cs.rit.edu http://www.cs.rit.edu/ June 11, 2003 pg. 1 #12;Abstract list and distance matrix. Run the GA with specified population size and number of generations. pg. 15

Anderson, Peter G.

142

1\\/f colouring of white noise by Anderson localization  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new mechanism for the appearance of 1\\/f noise in the phase of the reflection coefficient is described for disordered systems. It relies on the (1\\/d)-distribution of energy widths for Anderson localized states which is derived heuristically. Provided the incident wave packet is incoherent on a nonvanishing band width, the phase of the reflected wave exhibits intermittency with “bursts” characterized

D. Sornette

1987-01-01

143

Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Si II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energies for the lowest 56 levels, belonging to the 3s2 3p, 3s 3p2, 3p3, 3s2 3d, 3s 3p 3d, 3s2 4? and 3s2 5? configurations of Si II, are calculated using the General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package (GRASP) code. Analogous calculations have also been performed (for up to 175 levels) using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). Furthermore, radiative rates are calculated for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions. Extensive comparisons are made with available theoretical and experimental energy levels, and the accuracy of the present results is assessed to be better than 0.1 Ryd. Similarly, the accuracy for radiative rates (and subsequently lifetimes) is estimated to be better than 20 per cent for most of the (strong) transitions. Electron impact excitation collision strengths are also calculated, with the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC), over a wide energy range up to 13 Ryd. Finally, to determine effective collision strengths, resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. These collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and results listed over a wide range of temperatures, up to 105.5 K. Our data are compared with earlier R-matrix calculations and differences noted, up to a factor of 2, for several transitions. Although scope remains for improvement, the accuracy for our results of collision strengths and effective collision strengths is assessed to be about 20 per cent for a majority of transitions.

Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

2014-07-01

144

Urotensin-II and endothelin-I levels after contrast media administration in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions  

PubMed Central

Background: Contrast induced kidney injury is an acute renal dysfunction that is secondary to the administration of radio contrast media. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the levels of urotensin-II (UT-II) and endothelin-I (ET-I) after contrast media administration in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. Materials and Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we evaluated 78 patients with coronary artery disease who were scheduled for and ultimately underwent percutaneous coronary interventions. As a contrast material, nonionic contrast media was used in various amounts (70-480 mL). Blood and urine samples were obtained to measure U-II, ET-I just before and at the twenty-fourth hour of percutaneous coronary interventions. Results: Compared to baseline, twenty-fourth hour creatinine levels were significantly increased (P < 0.001). The twenty-fourth hour serum and urine levels of both UT-II and ET-I were also significantly increased compared to baseline (P < 0.001 for all) and 24th hour serum and urine UT-II (r = 0.322, P = 0.004; r = 0.302, P = 0.007 respectively), ET-I (r = 0.511, P < 0.001; r = 0.266, P = 0.019 respectively) levels were significantly correlated with the amount of contrast media. Conclusion: Our study indicates that; increased UT-II and ET-I levels seem to be a consequence of hazardous effects of contrast media on blood vessels and the kidney. PMID:23930116

Ulas, Turgay; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan; Dal, Mehmet S.; Kirhan, Idris; Kaya, Zekeriya; Demir, Mehmet E.; Tursun, Irfan; Eren, Mehmet A.; Aydogan, Timucin; Sezen, Yusuf; Aksoy, Nurten

2013-01-01

145

FY 2011-2012 Annual Level Donors  

E-print Network

's Level Donors Charles Jay Abronson Terry Scot Adams Craig & Rosemary Anderson Gordon & Liz Anderson Rudy Julie R. Hill Ernest Hix Robert J. Hoffman Ming Hsieh Jen-Hsun Huang Richard Hunsaker Paul Edward Iacono Klein Marie Knowles Gerald Kohlenberger Les Kranhold Dyung Kwak Wood-Hung Kwan Walter G. Lake Kwan Lam

Wang, Hai

146

Annual Level Donors Charles and Donna Altmann  

E-print Network

Dean's Level Donors Charles Jay Abronson Gordon Anderson Rosemary L. Anderson Hassan Sonny Astani Doris R. Hill Ernest Hix Robert J. Hoffman Richard Hunsaker Paul Edward Iacono Henry T. Iida Daphne H Kwak Walter G. Lake Grayson Lane Ronald Leon Lash Anthony Derek Lazzaro Jun Lee Robert Lee Edith Leonis

Wang, Hai

147

Regulation of Synaptic Connectivity: Levels of Fasciclin II Influence Synaptic Growth in the Drosophila CNS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much of our understanding of synaptogenesis comes from studies that deal with the development of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Although well studied, it is not clear how far the NMJ represents an adequate model for the formation of syn- apses within the CNS. Here we investigate the role of Fasciclin II (Fas II) in the development of synapses between identified

Richard A. Baines; Laurent Seugnet; Annemarie Thompson; Paul M. Salvaterra; Michael Bate

2002-01-01

148

The Importance of the Level of the Lip Line and Resting Lip Pressure in Class II, Division 2 Malocclusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many clinicians hypothesize that retroclination of the maxillary central incisors in Class II, Division 2 malocclusion is caused by increased resting lip pressure against these teeth. The purpose of this study was (1) to verify this assumption by means of simultaneous lip-pressure measurements at two different levels on the maxillary central incisor crowns, and (2) to examine factors that could

B. G. Lapatki; A. S. Mager; J. Schulte-Moenting; I. E. Jonas

2002-01-01

149

Mutations in RNA Polymerase II and Elongation Factor SII Severely Reduce mRNA Levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elongation factor SII interacts with RNA polymerase II and enables it to transcribe through arrest sites in vitro. The set of genes dependent upon SII function in vivo and the effects on RNA levels of mutations in different components of the elongation machinery are poorly understood. Using yeast lacking SII and bearing a conditional allele of RPB2, the gene encoding

J. CALE; LENNON III; MEGAN WIND; LAURA SAUNDERS; M. BENJAMIN HOCK; DANIEL REINES

1998-01-01

150

Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 Unraveling the conundrum of river response to rising sea level from  

E-print Network

Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 1 Unraveling the conundrum of river to Sedimentology, May, 2006 2 deltas is adapted to describe the response of the Fly-Strickland River system, Papua of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 3 Pleistocene-Holocene eustatic sea level rise of some 120 m

Parker, Gary

151

Evaluation of NOAA Climate Outlooks in Extended Great Lakes Water Levels Forecasts Thomas E. Croley II1  

E-print Network

1 Evaluation of NOAA Climate Outlooks in Extended Great Lakes Water Levels Forecasts Thomas E. Croley II1 Abstract The Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) simulates time series of daily Great Lakes hydrology by first estimating initial hydrological conditions and then using a daily

152

NCDC the "One Stop Shop" for all WSR-88D Level II Data Services Stephen A. Del Greco*  

E-print Network

system. To date, 59 of the 158 WSR-88D sites are transmitting level II data in real time to NCDC (Figure Service (NWS), 12 Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and 26 Department of Defense (DOD) sites on 8mm tape or online [3]. The NCDC robotic mass storage system warehouses approximately 900 terabytes

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

153

Tactical\\/execution level coordination for hover control of the NPS AUV II using onboard sonar servoing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes work with the NPS AUV II vehicle in the further development of the execution level software to incorporate hover control behavior in the NPS hover tank. Of particular interest is the use of the ST 1000 and ST 725 high frequency sonars to provide data about the environment. Thus positioning can be accomplished without the use of

A. J. Healey; D. B. Marco; R. B. McGhee; D. P. Brutzman; R. Cristi; F. A. Papoulias; S. H. Kwak

1994-01-01

154

UT MD Anderson scientists discover secret life of chromatin:  

Cancer.gov

Chromatin--the intertwined histone proteins and DNA that make up chromosomes--constantly receives messages that pour in from a cell’s intricate signaling networks... But chromatin also talks back, scientists at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center report today in the journal Cell, issuing orders affecting a protein that has nothing to do with chromatin’s central role in gene transcription--the first step in protein formation.

155

A struggle for freedom; Maxwell Anderson, 1938-1952  

E-print Network

, dirty marines who relate their battle experiences and the continuous parade of wounded soldiers across the stage, all combined effectively to bring out "the misery and bitterness and havoc of war. " This realistic portrayal of battle zone life... performances. Perhaps the play, with its emphasis on individual faith and ideals, was completely out of touch with the sentiments of the American people. The failure of the production had a sobering effect on Anderson. Financially, he was in desperate...

Odeski, Thomas Francis

2012-06-07

156

Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

1978-01-01

157

A density functional that works for transport through Anderson junction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transport through an Anderson junction can be exactly described by density functional theory, at zero temperature and in the linear response regime. Using Bethe ansatz, we calculate the exact Kohn-Sham potential delivering the exact transmission. We propose a simple parametrization for the Kohn-Sham potential, using a known exact condition. Our parametrization faithfully reproduces numerical results, including the gradual development of the derivative discontinuity that is essential in describing Coulomb blockade correctly.

Liu, Zhenfei; Bergfield, Justin; Burke, Kieron; Stafford, Charles

2012-02-01

158

Accuracy of density functionals for molecular electronics: The Anderson junction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The exact ground-state exchange-correlation functional of Kohn-Sham density functional theory yields the exact transmission through an Anderson junction at zero bias and temperature. The exact impurity charge susceptibility is used to construct the exact exchange-correlation potential. We analyze the successes and limitations of various types of approximations, including smooth and discontinuous functionals of the occupation, as well as symmetry-broken approaches.

Liu, Zhen-Fei; Bergfield, Justin P.; Burke, Kieron; Stafford, Charles A.

2012-04-01

159

STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson suits up for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson completes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

2002-01-01

160

Moments and Lyapunov exponents for the parabolic Anderson model  

E-print Network

We study the parabolic Anderson model in $(1+1)$ dimensions with nearest neighbor jumps and space-time white noise (discrete space/continuous time). We prove a contour integral formula for the second moment and compute the second moment Lyapunov exponent. For the model with only jumps to the right, we prove a contour integral formula for all moments and compute moment Lyapunov exponents of all orders.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin

2012-11-30

161

MD Anderson researchers find coupling of proteins promotes glioblastoma development:  

Cancer.gov

Two previously unassociated proteins known to be overly active in a variety of cancers bind together to ignite and sustain malignant brain tumors, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports this week in the journal Cancer Cell. This research is the first to connect FoxM1 to a molecular signaling cascade that regulates normal neural stem cells...

162

Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder  

SciTech Connect

We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

Lv, Shu-Hui [Hebei Advanced Thin Film Laboratory, College of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Hebei 050024 (China); College of Sciences, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Shijiazhuang 050018 (China); Song, Juntao, E-mail: jtsong@mail.hebtu.edu.cn; Li, Yu-Xian, E-mail: yxli@mail.hebtu.edu.cn [Hebei Advanced Thin Film Laboratory, College of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Hebei 050024 (China)

2013-11-14

163

Anderson Localization Enhanced Spin Selective Transport of Electrons in DNA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent experiments revealed the unusual strong spin effects with high spin selective transmission of electrons in double-stranded DNA. We propose a new mechanism that the strong spin effects could be understood in terms of the combination of the chiral structure, spin-orbit coupling, and especially spin-dependent Anderson localization. The presence of chiral structure and spin-orbit coupling of DNA induce weak Fermi energy splitting between two spin polarization states. The intrinsic Anderson localization in generic DNA molecules may result in remarkable enhancement of the spin selective transport. In particular, these two spin states with energy splitting have different localization lengths. Spin up/down channel may have shorter/longer localization length so that relatively less/more spin up/down electrons may tunnel through the system. In addition, the strong length dependence of spin selectivity observed in experiments can be naturally understood. Anderson localization enhanced spin selectivity effect may provide a deeper understanding of spin-selective processes in molecular spintronics and biological systems.

Zhao, Fang; Meng, Qing-Qiang; Chen, Yan

2014-06-01

164

Reduced levels of topoisomerase II? and II? in a multidrug-resistant lung-cancer cell line  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have previously shown that the doxorubicinselected multidrug-resistant small-cell lung-cancer cell line H69AR is resistant to VP-16-induced single-strand DNA breaks as compared with its parental H69 cell line. Levels of immunoreactive topoisomerase IIa are also reduced in H69AR cells. In the present study, we found that cleaved complex formation in the presence of VP-16 was decreased in H69AR cells as

Cindy D. Evans; Shelagh E. L. Mirski; Mary K. Danks; Susan P. C. Cole

1994-01-01

165

Fabrication and characterization of disordered polymer optical fibers for transverse Anderson localization of light.  

PubMed

We develop and characterize a disordered polymer optical fiber that uses transverse Anderson localization as a novel waveguiding mechanism. The developed polymer optical fiber is composed of 80,000 strands of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) that are randomly mixed and drawn into a square cross section optical fiber with a side width of 250 ?m. Initially, each strand is 200 ?m in diameter and 8-inches long. During the mixing process of the original fiber strands, the fibers cross over each other; however, a large draw ratio guarantees that the refractive index profile is invariant along the length of the fiber for several tens of centimeters. The large refractive index difference of 0.1 between the disordered sites results in a small localized beam radius that is comparable to the beam radius of conventional optical fibers. The input light is launched from a standard single mode optical fiber using the butt-coupling method and the near-field output beam from the disordered fiber is imaged using a 40X objective and a CCD camera. The output beam diameter agrees well with the expected results from the numerical simulations. The disordered optical fiber presented in this work is the first device-level implementation of 2D Anderson localization, and can potentially be used for image transport and short-haul optical communication systems. PMID:23929276

Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J; Mirr, Craig R; Koch, Karl W; Mafi, Arash

2013-01-01

166

In situ hybridization: mRNA levels of secretogranin II, VGF and peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase in brain of salt-loaded rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mRNA levels of secretogranin II (SgII), VGF and peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) were studied in brains of salt loaded rats by in situ hybridization. In these rats the levels of the message for secretogranin II and VGF were increased in the paraventricular, supraoptic and retrochiasmatic nuclei and in the subfornical organ. The increases ranged from 416 to 721% for

S. K. Mahata; M. Mahata; R. Fischer-Colbrie; H. Winkler

1993-01-01

167

The Development of a Computer-Directed Training Subsystem and Computer Operator Training Material for the Air Force Phase II Base Level System. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The design, development, and evaluation of an integrated Computer-Directed Training Subsystem (CDTS) for the Air Force Phase II Base Level System is described in this report. The development and evaluation of a course to train computer operators of the Air Force Phase II Base Level System under CDTS control is also described. Detailed test results…

System Development Corp., Santa Monica, CA.

168

Baseline Glutamate Levels Affect Group I and II mGluRs in Layer V Pyramidal Neurons of Rat Sensorimotor Cortex  

E-print Network

Baseline Glutamate Levels Affect Group I and II mGluRs in Layer V Pyramidal Neurons of Rat glutamate levels affect group I and II mGluRs in layer V Pyramidal neurons of rat sensorimotor cortex. J explored. To determine whether this endogenous glutamate acts on metabotropic glutamate receptors (m

Huguenard, John R.

169

Anderson-Fabry disease: a multiorgan disease.  

PubMed

Fabry disease (FD) is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme ?-galactosidase A. FD causes glycolipids, such as globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), to accumulate in the vascular endothelium of several organs (Fig. 2), including the skin, kidneys, nervous system, and heart, thereby triggering inflammation and fibrosis. These processes generally result in organ dysfunction, which is usually the first clinical evidence of FD. Patients with classic FD have various symptoms, eg, acroparesthesias, hypohidrosis, angiokeratomas, corneal opacities, cerebrovascular lesions, cardiac disorders, andrenal dysfunction.However, evolving knowledge about the natural course of disease suggests that it is more appropriate to describe FD as a disease with a wide spectrum of heterogeneously progressive clinical phenotypes. Indeed, most female heterozygotes develop symptoms due to yet undetermined mechanisms and a high percentage of females develops vital organ involvement including the kidneys, heart and/or brain about a decade later than males. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. The principal clinical manifestations in Fabry disease consist of artery associated complications (such as cerebral disease and nephropathy), but the pathophysiology of this specific vasculopathy is unclear. Several studies indicate that the specific vascular lesions that are present in Fabry disease occur as a result of vascular dysfunction with major components being endothelial dysfunction, alterations in cerebral perfusion and a pro-thrombotic phenotype. Fabry cardiac involvement has several clinical manifestations (Table 10): concentric left ventricular hypertrophy without left ventricular dilation and severe loss of left ventricular systolic function, mitral and aortic valvulopathy, disorders of the atrioventricular conduction or repolarization, and compromised diastolic function. The neurological manifestations of Fabry disease include both peripheral nervous system and CNS involvement, with globotriaosylceramide accumulation found in Schwann cells and dorsal root ganglia together with deposits in CNS neurones. The main involvement of the CNS is attributable to cerebrovasculopathy, with an increased incidence of stroke. The abnormal neuronal accumulation of glycosphingolipid appears to have little clinical effect on the natural history of Fabry disease, with the possible exception of some reported mild cognitive abnormalities. The pathogenesis of Fabry vasculopathy remains poorly understood, but probably relates, in part, to abnormal functional control of the vessels, secondary to endothelial dysfunction as a consequence of ?-galactosidase A deficiency. The diagnosis of Fabry disease is made in hemizygous males after the detection of the presence of angiokeratomas (Fig. 19 A, B), irregularities in sweating, edema, scant body hair, painful sensations, and of cardiovascular, intestinal, renal, ophthalmologic, phlebologic, and respiratory involvement. A deficiency of alpha-gal A in serum, leukocytes, tears, tissue specimens, or cultured skin fibroblasts further supports the diagnosis in male patients. Since heterozygous women show angiokeratomas in only about 30% of cases and may have alpha-gal A levels within normal range, genetic analysis is recommended. The resultant storage of undegraded glycolipids leads to the progressive development of potentially life-threatening man

Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Salvatore; Pinto, Antonio; Licata, Giuseppe

2013-01-01

170

Statistics of the two-point transmission at Anderson localization transitions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At Anderson critical points, the statistics of the two-point transmission TL for disordered samples of linear size L is expected to be multifractal with the following properties [Janssen , Phys. Rev. B 59, 15836 (1999)]: (i) the probability to have TL˜1/L? behaves as L?(?) , where the multifractal spectrum ?(?) terminates at ?=0 as a consequence of the physical bound TL?1 ; (ii) the exponents X(q) that govern the moments TLq¯˜1/LX(q) become frozen above some threshold: X(q?qsat)=-?(?=0) , i.e., all moments of order q?qsat are governed by the measure of the rare samples having a finite transmission (?=0) . In the present paper, we test numerically these predictions for the ensemble of L×L power-law random-banded matrices, where the random hopping Hi,j decays as a power law (b/|i-j|)a . This model is known to present an Anderson transition at a=1 between localized (a>1) and extended (a<1) states with critical properties that depend continuously on the parameter b . Our numerical results for the multifractal spectra ?b(?) for various b are in agreement with the relation ?(??0)=2[f(?=d+(?)/(2))-d] in terms of the singularity spectrum f(?) of individual critical eigenfunctions, in particular the typical exponents are related via the relation ?typ(b)=2[?typ(b)-d] . We also discuss the statistics of the two-point transmission in the delocalized phase and in the localized phase.

Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

2009-05-01

171

Low-level waste data base development - EPICOR II resin\\/liner investigation - a program review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an overview of the titled program and gives the status of the work on resin degradation, resin solidification, and field testing of solidified samples. A brief discussion of some recent results also is included. Resin materials from EPICOR-II prefilters used during cleanup of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being examined to (a) develop a data

J. W. Jr. McConnell; H. W. Reno; R. C. Schmitt; A. L. Jr. Ayers

1986-01-01

172

Low level waste data base development - EPICOR-II resin\\/liner investigation. Program review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an overview of the titled program and gives the status of the work on resin degradation, resin solidification, and field testing of solidified samples. A brief discussion of some recent results is also included. Resin materials from EPICOR-II prefilters used in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being examined to (1) develop

J. W. Jr

1985-01-01

173

BRCA1 Can Modulate RNA Polymerase II Carboxy-Terminal Domain Phosphorylation Levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

A high incidence of breast and ovarian cancers has been linked to mutations in the BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 has been shown to be involved in both positive and negative regulation of gene activity as well as in numerous other processes such as DNA repair and cell cycle regulation. Since modulation of the RNA polymerase II carboxy- terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation

Annie Moisan; Chantal Larochelle; Benoît Guillemette; Luc Gaudreau

2004-01-01

174

Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography  

PubMed Central

In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

SHIMA, HIROAKI; KUTOMI, GORO; SATOMI, FUKINO; MAEDA, HIDEKI; TAKAMARU, TOMOKO; KAMESHIMA, HIDEKAZU; OMURA, TOSEI; MORI, MITSURU; HATAKENAKA, MASAMITSU; HASEGAWA, TADASHI; HIRATA, KOICHI

2014-01-01

175

Strong coupling to two-dimensional Anderson localized modes.  

PubMed

We use a scattering formalism to derive a condition of strong coupling between a resonant scatterer and an Anderson localized mode for electromagnetic waves in two dimensions. The strong coupling regime is demonstrated based on exact numerical simulations, in perfect agreement with theory. The strong coupling threshold can be expressed in terms of the Thouless conductance and the Purcell factor. This connects key concepts in transport theory and cavity quantum electrodynamics, and provides a practical tool for the design or analysis of experiments. PMID:23952400

Cazé, A; Pierrat, R; Carminati, R

2013-08-01

176

Kubo-Anderson oscillator and NMR of solid state.  

PubMed

The analytical solution for the Kubo-Anderson oscillator with a fluctuating frequency omega for arbitrary distribution function p(omega) has been obtained. The obtained theoretical expression has been applied to consideration of some dynamical problems of solid state NMR, namely (1) dynamical transformation of NMR line shape and spin-echo signal and (2) the temperature transformation of the second moment of NMR line for the case, when the potential barrier for the mobility of magnetic nuclei is a stochastic function of time. PMID:18783926

Sergeev, N A; Olszewski, M

2008-10-01

177

Three-dimensional Anderson localization of ultracold matter.  

PubMed

Anderson localization (AL) is a ubiquitous interference phenomenon in which waves fail to propagate in a disordered medium. We observe three-dimensional AL of noninteracting ultracold matter by allowing a spin-polarized atomic Fermi gas to expand into a disordered potential. A two-component density distribution emerges consisting of an expanding mobile component and a nondiffusing localized component. We extract a mobility edge that increases with the disorder strength, whereas the thermally averaged localization length is shown to decrease with disorder strength and increase with particle energy. These measurements provide a benchmark for more sophisticated theories of AL. PMID:21980104

Kondov, S S; McGehee, W R; Zirbel, J J; DeMarco, B

2011-10-01

178

Nonreciprocal Anderson Localization in Magneto-Optical Random Structures  

E-print Network

We study, both analytically and numerically, disorder-induced localization of light in random layered structures with magnetooptical materials. The Anderson localization in such structures demonstrates nonreciprocal features in both the averaged localization length and individual transmission resonances. We employ short-wavelength approximation where the localization effects are strong, and consider both the Faraday and Voigt magnetooptical geometries. In the Faraday geometry, the transmission is strongly nonreciprocal for the circularly polarized waves, whereas in the Voigt geometry, the nonreciprocity is much weaker, and it may appear only for the individual transmission resonances of the TM-polarized waves.

Bliokh, K Y; Rajan, P; Shadrivov, I V; Kivshar, Y S

2011-01-01

179

Quantum Criticality of Quasi-One-Dimensional Topological Anderson Insulators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analytic theory of quantum criticality in the quasi-one-dimensional topological Anderson insulators of class AIII and BDI. We describe the systems in terms of two parameters (g, ?) representing localization and topological properties, respectively. Surfaces of half-integer valued ? define phase boundaries between distinct topological sectors. Upon increasing system size, the two parameters exhibit flow similar to the celebrated two-parameter flow describing the class A quantum Hall insulator. However, unlike the quantum Hall system, an exact analytical description of the entire phase diagram can be given. We check the quantitative validity of our theory by comparison to numerical transfer matrix computations.

Altland, Alexander; Bagrets, Dmitry; Fritz, Lars; Kamenev, Alex; Schmiedt, Hanno

2014-05-01

180

Zero-mean circular Bessel statistics and Anderson localization.  

PubMed

We demonstrate that a circular Bessel density function describes the electromagnetic field statistics in the Anderson localization regime using example numerical terahertz field data in strongly scattering media. This density function for localized fields provides a measure that allows identification and description in a manner akin to the Gaussian density function for weakly interacting scatterers, the mathematical framework to date for statistical optics. Our theory provides a framework for improved understanding of wave propagation in random media, random scattering media characterization, and imaging in and through randomly scattering media. PMID:25215701

Newman, Jason A; Chen, Yulu; Webb, Kevin J

2014-08-01

181

STS-118 Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Clay Anderson Perform EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist Rick Mastracchio was anchored on the foot restraint of the Canadarm2 as he participated in the third session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. Assisting Mastracchio was Expedition 15 flight engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame). During the 5 hour, 28 minute space walk, the two relocated the S-band Antenna Sub-Assembly from the Port 6 (P6) truss to the Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1 and retrieved the P6 transponder.

2007-01-01

182

Neonatal mechanical ventilation—Experience at a level II care centre  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred and fifty nine neonates were ventilated over a period of one year of whom 74 (46.54%) survived. This study aims\\u000a to analyse the indications, complications and outcome of babies requiring mechanical ventilation. The early outcome measures\\u000a were (i) survival rate with respect to birth weight, gestation and indication of ventilation, and (ii) Complications of assisted\\u000a ventilation. One hundred

Sushma Nangia; Arvind Saili; A. K. Dutta; Vani Gaur; Meeta Singh; Anju Seth; S. Kumari

1998-01-01

183

A Level Set Algorithm for Tracking Discontinuities in Hyperbolic Conservation Laws II: Systems of Equations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A level set algorithm for tracking discontinuities in hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. The algorithm uses a simple finite difference approach, analogous to the method of lines scheme presented in [36]. The zero of a level set function is used to specify the location of the discontinuity. Since a level set function is used to describe the front location, no

Tariq D. Aslam

2003-01-01

184

Lifetime measurement for the (23537)°9\\/2 level of NdII using the collinear ion beam-laser interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The collinear fast ion beam-laser spectroscopy has been used to measure the radiative lifetime of the (23537)°9\\/2 level of the rare earth ions NdII. The measurement was carried out by the interaction between the 30keV NdII ion beam and tunable collinear dye laser which resonantly excited a metastable level to the (23537)°9\\/2 level, and by the observation of its time-resolved

Fuquan Lu; Songmao Wu; Wei Shi; Peixong Shi; Jianjun Yang; Linggen Song; Jiayong Tang; Fujia Yang

1989-01-01

185

Chiral Condensate and Mott-Anderson Freeze-Out  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the idea of a Mott-Anderson freeze-out that suggests a key role of the localization of the hadron wave functions when traversing the hadronization transition. The extension of hadron wave functions in dense matter is governed by the behavior of the chiral quark condensate such that its melting at finite temperatures and chemical potentials entails an increase of the size of hadrons and thus their geometrical strong interaction cross sections. It is demonstrated within a schematic resonance gas model, that a kinetic freeze-out condition reveals a correlation with the reduction of the chiral condensate in the phase diagram up to 50% of its vacuum value. Generalizing the description of the chiral condensate by taking into account a full hadron resonance gas such correlation gets distorted. We discuss, that this may be due to our approximations in calculating the chiral condensate which disregard both, in-medium effects on hadron masses and hadron-hadron interactions. The latter, in particular due to quark exchange reactions, could lead to a delocalization of the hadron wave functions in accordance with the picture of a Mott-Anderson transition.

Blaschke, D.; Berdermann, J.; Cleymans, J.; Redlich, K.

2012-07-01

186

Evidence for linkage of the apolipoprotein A-II locus to plasma apolipoprotein A-II and free fatty acid levels in mice and humans  

SciTech Connect

Although it has been hypothesized that the synteny between mouse and human genes provides an approach to the localization of genes that determine quantitative traits in humans, this has yet to be demonstrated. The authors tested this approach with two quantitative traits, plasma apolipoprotein A-II (apoAII) and free fatty acid (FFA) levels. ApoAII is the second most abundant protein of high density lipoprotein particles, but its function remains largely unknown. The authors show that, in a backcross between strains Mus spretus and C56BL/6J, apoAII levels correlate with plasma FFA concentrations on both chow (P<0.0001) and high-fat (P < 0.0003) diets and that apoAII levels are linked to the apoAII gene (P<0.0002). To test whether variations of the apoAII gene influence plasma lipid metabolism in humans, the authors studied 306 individuals in 25 families enriched for coronary artery disease. The segregation of the apoAII gene was followed by using an informative simple sequence repeat in the second intron of the gene and two nearby genetic markers. Robust sib-pair linkage analysis was performed on members of these families using the SAGE linkage programs. The results suggest linkage between the human apoAII gene and a gene controlling plasma apoAII levels (P = 0.03). Plasma apoAII levels were also significantly correlated with plasma FFA levels (P = 0.007). Moreover, the apoAII gene exhibited linkage with a gene controlling FFA levels (P = 0.003). Evidence for nonrandom segregation was seen with markers as far as 6-12 centimorgans from the apoAII structural locus. These data provide evidence, in two species, that the apoAII gene is linked to a gene that controls plasma apoAII levels and that apoAII influences, by an unknown mechanism, plasma FFA level. The results illustrate the utility of animal studies for analysis of complex traits.

Warden, C.H.; Daluiski, A.; Purcell-Huynh, D.A.; De Meester, C.; Shieh, B.H.; Lusis, A.J.; Puppione, D.L. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Bu, Xiangdong; Gray, R.M.; Rotter, J.I. (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)) (and others)

1993-11-15

187

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (HANCTH00010010) on Town Highway 1, crossing the White River, Hancock, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HANCTH00010010 on town highway 1 crossing the White River, Hancock, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province of central Vermont. The 59.8-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is primarily grass with trees and brush on the immediate channel banks. In the study area, the White River has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 104 ft and an average channel depth of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 98.9 mm (0.325 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 15, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 1 crossing of the White River is a 91-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 89-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 26, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 feet. Abutment scour ranged from 13.1 to 17.1 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

1996-01-01

188

The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level II. Books 1-20.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed as supplementary reading materials for Indian and non-Indian children in the primary grades, this series of 10 booklets presents 13 legends and 7 stories of Northwest tribes. Stories in this second level of the six-level series were developed cooperatively by people of the Crow, Muckleshoot, Skokomish, Blackfeet, Northern Cheyenne,…

Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

189

Teaching Games Level Design Using the StarCraft II Editor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Level design is often characterised as "where the rubber hits the road" in game development. It is a core area of games design, alongside design of game rules and narrative. However, there is a lack of literature dedicated to documenting teaching games design, let alone the more specialised topic of level design. Furthermore, there…

Sweetser, Penelope

2013-01-01

190

Climate change and sea level rise in Bangladesh, part II: Effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global climate is changing as a consequence of global warming clue to industrial, agricultural, and other human activities. The major effects of global warming are changes in the hydrological cycle and rise in sea level. Bangladesh is most vulnerable to the effects of climate change and sea level rise due to the low elevation of the land areas, the low

Selina Begum; George Fleming

1997-01-01

191

Flexible Binary Space Partitioning for Robotic Rescue Jacky Baltes and John Anderson  

E-print Network

Flexible Binary Space Partitioning for Robotic Rescue Jacky Baltes and John Anderson Autonomous for flexible binary space partitioning designed to serve as a basis for path planning in uncertain dynamic do such an ap- proach (Baltes & Anderson, 2002). This experience has taught us that at absolute minimum

Baltes, Jacky

192

Localization and universality of Poisson statistics for the multidimensional Anderson model at weak disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   We prove Anderson localization with the mean-field Lyapunov exponent and Poisson statistics for eigenvalue spacing for the\\u000a multi-dimensional Anderson model at weak disorder. These results are obtained by developing the supersymmetric formalism initiated\\u000a in [W1] (see also [SjW]).\\u000a rid

Wei-Min Wang

2001-01-01

193

Three-dimensional Anderson transition for two electrons in two dimensions D. L. Shepelyansky  

E-print Network

localized states in, e.g., the 2D Anderson model, 2 l1 4 /V is the density of two-particle states directlyThree-dimensional Anderson transition for two electrons in two dimensions D. L. Shepelyansky Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, UMR 5626 du CNRS, Universite´ Paul Sabatier, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 4

Shepelyansky, Dima

194

Situated Privacies: Do you know where your mother [trucker] is? Ken Anderson  

E-print Network

Corporation 2111 NE 25th Ave, MS:JF3-377 Hillsboro, OR 97124/USA ken.anderson@intel.com Paul Dourish DonaldSituated Privacies: Do you know where your mother [trucker] is? Ken Anderson Intel Research Intel into the information age. In contrast to others who have looked at privacy practices on a national scale (e.g., nation

Dourish,Paul

195

The MITLL/AFRL MT System Wade Shen, Brian Delaney, and Tim Anderson  

E-print Network

The MITLL/AFRL MT System Wade Shen, Brian Delaney, and Tim Anderson MIT Lincoln Laboratory 244. WrightPatterson AFB, OH 45433 Timothy.Anderson@wpafb.af.mil Abstract The MITLL/AFRL MT system for SpeechtoSpeech MT applications. This paper will discuss the architecture of the MITLL/AFRL MT

196

Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Adam K. Anderson  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adam K. Anderson, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for his outstanding contribution to understanding the representation of emotion and its influence on cognition. By combining psychological and neuroscience techniques with rigorous and creative experimental designs, Anderson has…

American Psychologist, 2009

2009-01-01

197

Melinda's Closet: Trauma and the Queer Subtext of Laurie Halse Anderson's Speak  

Microsoft Academic Search

Speak, Laurie Halse Anderson’s Michael L. Printz Honor Book, can be read as a coming-out story. The novel tells the story of Melinda Sordino, who, during the summer before her freshman year in high school, is raped at a party by an older boy who goes to the same school Melinda will attend in the fall. After the attack, Melinda,

Don Latham

2007-01-01

198

Biotransformation of PCBs in Arctic seabirds: characterization of phase I and II pathways at transcriptional, translational and activity levels.  

PubMed

Arctic seabirds are exposed to a wide range of halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs). Exposure occurs mainly through food intake, and many pollutants accumulate in lipid-rich tissues. Little is known about how HOCs are biotransformed in arctic seabirds. In this study, we characterized biotransformation enzymes in chicks of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) and black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) from Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway). Phase I and II enzymes were analyzed at the transcriptional, translational and activity levels. For gene expression patterns, quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), using gene-sequence primers, were performed. Protein levels were analyzed using immunochemical assays of western blot with commercially available antibodies. Liver samples were analyzed for phase I and II enzyme activities using a variety of substrates including ethoxyresorufin (cytochrome (CYP)1A1/1A2), pentoxyresorufin (CYP2B), methoxyresorufin (CYP1A), benzyloxyresorufin (CYP3A), testosterone (CYP3A/CYP2B), 1-chloro-2,4-nitrobenzene (CDNB) (glutathione S-transferase (GST)) and 4-nitrophenol (uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT)). In addition, the hydroxylated (OH-) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were analyzed in the blood, liver and brain tissue, whereas the methylsulfone (MeSO(2)-) PCBs were analyzed in liver tissue. Results indicated the presence of phase I (CYP1A4/CYP1A5, CYP2B, and CYP3A) and phase II (GST and UDPGT) enzymes at the activity, protein and/or mRNA level in both species. Northern fulmar chicks had higher enzyme activity than black-legged kittiwake chicks. This in combination with the higher SigmaOH-PCB to parent PCB ratios suggests that northern fulmar chicks have a different biotransformation capacity than black-legged kittiwake chicks. PMID:20176133

Helgason, Lisa B; Arukwe, Augustine; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Harju, Mikael; Hegseth, Marit N; Heimstad, Eldbjørg S; Jørgensen, Even H; Mortensen, Anne S; Wolkers, Johannes

2010-06-01

199

Common polymorphism in H19associated with birthweight and cord blood IGF-II levels in humans  

E-print Network

in South Devon-Dexter crosses. Journal of Agricultural Science 1958, 51:325-341. 4. Ong KK, Ahmed ML, Emmett PM, Preece MA, Dunger DB, the- ALSPAC-Study-Team: Association between postnatal catch-up growth and obesity in childhood: prospective cohort study... in first pregnancies. BMC Genetics 2005, 6:22 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2156/6/22 slower rates of weight gain during this period (Table 5). As with birthweight and IGF-II levels, the H19 2992 geno- type associations with postnatal weight gain were...

Petry, Clive J; Ong, Ken K; Barratt, Bryan J; Wingate, Diane; Cordell, Heather J; Ring, Susan M; Pembrey, Marcus E; ALSPAC Study Team; Reik, Wolf; Todd, John A; Dunger, David B

2005-05-10

200

Hemispheric differences in protein kinase C ?II levels in the rat amygdala: Baseline asymmetry and lateralized changes associated with cue and context in a classical fear conditioning paradigm  

Microsoft Academic Search

The amygdala is critically important for fear learning, and specific kinases have been implicated as contributors to the mechanisms that underlie learning. We examined levels of protein kinase C ?II (PKC ?II) in the left and right lateral and basolateral nuclei (LA\\/BLA) of the amygdala from animals that were classically fear conditioned with tones as cues and footshocks. Groups consisted

R. Orman; M. Stewart

2007-01-01

201

Grey-level hit-or-miss transforms—part II: Application to angiographic image processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hit-or-miss transform (HMT) is a fundamental operation on binary images, widely used since 40 years. As it is not increasing, its extension to grey-level images is not straightforward, and very few authors have considered it. Moreover, despite its potential usefulness, very few applications of the grey-level HMT have been proposed until now. Part I of this paper (B. Naegel,

Benoît Naegel; Nicolas Passat; Christian Ronse

202

Is Dicroglossidae Anderson, 1871 (Amphibia, Anura) an available nomen?  

PubMed

Anderson (1871a: 38) mentioned the family nomen Dicroglossidae, without any comment, in a list of specimens of the collections of the Indian Museum of Calcutta (now the Zoological Survey of India). He referred to this family a single species, Xenophrys monticola, a nomen given by Günther (1864) to a species of Megophryidae from Darjeeling and Khasi Hills (India) which has a complex nomenclatural history (Dubois 1989, 1992; Deuti et al. submitted). Dubois (1987: 57), considering that the nomen Dicroglossidae had been based on the generic nomen Dicroglossus Günther, 1860, applied it to a family group taxon, the tribe Dicroglossini, for which he proposed a diagnosis. The genus Dicroglossus had been erected by Günther (1860), 11 years before Anderson's (1871a) paper, for the unique species Dicroglossus adolfi. Boulenger (1882: 17) stated that this specific nomen was a subjective junior synonym of Rana cyanophlyctis Schneider, 1799, and therefore Dicroglossus a subjective junior synonym of Rana Linnaeus, 1758 (Boulenger, 1882: 7). The synonymy of these two species nomina has been accepted as valid until now by all authors, and we here confirm it, having examined the symphoronts (syntypes) of Rana cyanophlyctis (ZMB 3198, adult female, SVL 50.0 mm; ZMB 3197, adult female, SVL 44.7 mm) and of Dicroglossus adolfi (BMNH 1947.2.4.60, adult female, SVL 38.6 mm; BMNH 1947.2.4.61, adult male, SVL 33.1 mm; BMNH 1947.2.25.46, adult male, SVL 39.0 mm). Dubois (1980: 158, 1981: 238) referred the species cyanophlyctis to the genus Euphlyctis Fitzinger, 1843, where is still stands nowadays (Frost et al. 2006; Joshy et al. 2009). The nomen Dicroglossini was subsequently upgraded to the rank subfamily, as Dicroglossinae (Dubois 1992: 309, 313; Roelants et al. 2004: 732), then to the rank family, as Dicroglossidae (Frost et al. 2006: 241). The taxon at stake is currently recognized as valid by most authors, as the family Dicroglossidae Anderson, 1871 (Roelants et al. 2007; Fei et al. 2010: 25; Blackburn & Wake 2011: 42; Pyron & Wiens 2011: 579; Fei et al. 2012: 436; Vitt & Caldwell 2014: 510).  PMID:25081801

Ohler, Annemarie; Dubois, Alain

2014-01-01

203

Transport across an Anderson quantum dot in the intermediate coupling regime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe linear and nonlinear transport across a strongly interacting single impurity Anderson model quantum dot with intermediate coupling to the leads, i.e. with tunnel coupling ? of the order of the thermal energy k B T. The coupling is large enough that sequential tunneling processes (second order in the tunneling Hamiltonian) alone do not suffice to properly describe the transport characteristics. Upon applying a density matrix approach, the current is expressed in terms of rates obtained by considering a very small class of diagrams which dress the sequential tunneling processes by charge fluctuations. We call this the "dressed second order" (DSO) approximation. One advantage of the DSO is that, still in the Coulomb blockade regime, it can describe the crossover from thermally broadened to tunneling broadened conductance peaks. When the temperature is decreased even further ( k B T < ?), the DSO captures Kondesque behaviours of the Anderson quantum dot qualitatively: we find a zero bias anomaly of the differential conductance versus applied bias, an enhancement of the conductance with decreasing temperature as well as universality of the shape of the conductance as function of the temperature. We can without complications address the case of a spin degenerate level split energetically by a magnetic field. In case spin dependent chemical potentials are assumed and only one of the four chemical potentials is varied, the DSO yields in principle only one resonance. This seems to be in agreement with experiments with pseudo spin [U. Wilhelm, J. Schmid, J. Weis, K.V. Klitzing, Physica E 14, 385 (2002)]. Furthermore, we get qualitative agreement with experimental data showing a cross-over from the Kondo to the empty orbital regime.

Kern, Johannes; Grifoni, Milena

2013-09-01

204

Electron localization in liquid hydrocarbons: The Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anderson's model is applied for initial localization in liquid hydrocarbons (particularly n-alkanes) in conjunction with certain results of scaling theory. Medium connectivity is calculated using experimental X-ray data on liquid structure, from which critical disorder ( W/ V) c is computed, where W is diagonal disorder and V is the transfer energy. Actual W prevailing in the liquid is computed from anisotropic molecular polarizability. V is estimated by a heuristic procedure originating in scaling theory. These values are used to compute the percentage of initially delocalized states available for low-energy electrons in alkane liquids. This percentage decreases monotonically from methane (100%) to n-pentane and beyond (0%). In ethane and propane, the initial states are highly delocalized (97.6% and 83.9%, respectively). Subsequent trapping changes the situation as evidenced in mobility studies. Butane presents a partially, intermediate delocalized case (53.2%).

Hug, Gordon L.; Mozumder, A.

2008-10-01

205

Three-dimensional Anderson localization in variable scale disorder.  

PubMed

We report on the impact of variable-scale disorder on 3D Anderson localization of a noninteracting ultracold atomic gas. A spin-polarized gas of fermionic atoms is localized by allowing it to expand in an optical speckle potential. Using a sudden quench of the localized density distribution, we verify that the density profile is representative of the underlying single-particle localized states. The geometric mean of the disordering potential correlation lengths is varied by a factor of 4 via adjusting the aperture of the speckle focusing lens. We observe that the root-mean-square size of the localized gas increases approximately linearly with the speckle correlation length, in qualitative agreement with the scaling predicted by weak scattering theory. PMID:24138250

McGehee, W R; Kondov, S S; Xu, W; Zirbel, J J; DeMarco, B

2013-10-01

206

Multiterminal Anderson impurity model in nonequilibrium: Analytical perturbative treatment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the nonequilibrium spectral function of the single-impurity Anderson model connecting with multiterminal leads. The full dependence on frequency and bias voltage of the nonequilibrium self-energy and spectral function is obtained analytically up to the second-order perturbation regarding the interaction strength U. High- and low-bias voltage properties are analyzed for a generic multiterminal dot, showing a crossover from the Kondo resonance to the Coulomb peaks with increasing bias voltage. For a dot where the particle-hole symmetry is not present, we construct a current-preserving evaluation of the nonequilibrium spectral function for arbitrary bias voltage. It is shown that finite-bias voltage does not split the Kondo resonance in this order, and no specific structure due to multiple leads emerges. Overall bias dependence is quite similar to finite-temperature effect for a dot with or without the particle-hole symmetry.

Taniguchi, Nobuhiko

2014-09-01

207

Classification and symmetry properties of scaling dimensions at Anderson transitions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop a classification of composite operators without gradients at Anderson-transition critical points in disordered systems. These operators represent correlation functions of the local density of states (or of wave-function amplitudes). Our classification is motivated by the Iwasawa decomposition for the field of the pertinent supersymmetric ? model: The scaling operators are represented by “plane waves” in terms of the corresponding radial coordinates. We also present an alternative construction of scaling operators by using the notion of highest-weight vector. We further argue that a certain Weyl-group invariance associated with the ?-model manifold leads to numerous exact symmetry relations between the scaling dimensions of the composite operators. These symmetry relations generalize those derived earlier for the multifractal spectrum of the leading operators.

Gruzberg, I. A.; Mirlin, A. D.; Zirnbauer, M. R.

2013-03-01

208

Anderson localization casts clouds over adiabatic quantum optimization  

E-print Network

Understanding NP-complete problems is a central topic in computer science. This is why adiabatic quantum optimization has attracted so much attention, as it provided a new approach to tackle NP-complete problems using a quantum computer. The efficiency of this approach is limited by small spectral gaps between the ground and excited states of the quantum computer's Hamiltonian. We show that the statistics of the gaps can be analyzed in a novel way, borrowed from the study of quantum disordered systems in statistical mechanics. It turns out that due to a phenomenon similar to Anderson localization, exponentially small gaps appear close to the end of the adiabatic algorithm for large random instances of NP-complete problems. This implies that unfortunately, adiabatic quantum optimization fails: the system gets trapped in one of the numerous local minima.

Boris Altshuler; Hari Krovi; Jeremie Roland

2009-12-03

209

Three-Dimensional Anderson Localization of Ultracold Fermionic Matter  

E-print Network

Anderson localization (AL) is an interference phenomenon in which waves fail to propagate in a disordered medium. We observe three-dimensional AL of non-interacting ultracold matter by allowing a spin-polarized atomic Fermi gas to expand into a disordered potential. Localization is characterized by the emergence of a two-component density distribution consisting of an expanding mobile component and a non-diffusing localized component. The behavior of the gas is qualitatively consistent with several features of 3D AL and is shown to be incompatible with simple trapping and classical diffusion. As predicted for 3D AL, we demonstrate that a mobility edge exists that increases with the disorder strength. Also, the thermally averaged localization length is shown to decrease with disorder strength and increase with particle energy.

Kondov, S S; Zirbel, J J; DeMarco, B

2011-01-01

210

Renormalized perturbation theory flow equations for the Anderson impurity model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We apply the renormalized perturbation theory (RPT) to the symmetric Anderson impurity model. Within the RPT framework exact results for physical observables such as the spin and charge susceptibility can be obtained in terms of the renormalized values of the hybridization ? and Coulomb interaction U of the model. The main difficulty in the RPT approach usually lies in the calculation of the renormalized values themselves. In the present work we show how this can be accomplished by deriving differential flow equations describing the evolution of with ?. By exploiting the fact that can be determined analytically in the limit ? ? ? we solve the flow equations numerically to obtain estimates for the renormalized parameters in the range 0 < U/ ??< 3.5.

Pandis, Vassilis

2014-11-01

211

Examinations of identity invariance in facial expression adaptation Melissa Ellamil, Joshua M. Susskind and Adam K. Anderson  

E-print Network

. Susskind and Adam K. Anderson Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Running head: Facial expression adaptation Address correspondence to: Adam K. Anderson Department of Psychology University of Toronto 100 St. George Street Toronto, ON MS5 3G3, Canada e-mail: anderson@psych.utoronto.ca Phone: (416

Toronto, University of

212

PRESTO-II: a low-level waste environmental transport and risk assessment code  

SciTech Connect

PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed for the evaluation of possible health effects from shallow-land and, waste-disposal trenches. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal operations. Human exposure scenarios considered include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and limited site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include ground-water transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, suspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, external exposure, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Both population doses and individual doses, as well as doses to the intruder and farmer, may be calculated. Cumulative health effects in terms of cancer deaths are calculated for the population over the 1000-year period using a life-table approach. Data are included for three example sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. A code listing and example input for each of the three sites are included in the appendices to this report.

Fields, D.E.; Emerson, C.J.; Chester, R.O.; Little, C.A.; Hiromoto, G.

1986-04-01

213

MARVEL: Measured active rotational-vibrational energy levels. II. Algorithmic improvements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When determining energy levels from several, in cases many, measured and assigned high-resolution molecular spectra according to the Ritz principle, it is advantageous to investigate the spectra via the concept of spectroscopic networks (SNs). Experimental SNs are finite, weighted, undirected, multiedge, rooted graphs, whereby the vertices are the energy levels, the edges are the transitions, and the weights are provided by transition intensities. A considerable practical problem arises from the fact that SNs can be very large for isotopologues of molecules widely studied; for example, the experimental dataset for the H2 16O molecule contains some 160,000 measured transitions and 20,000 energy levels. In order to treat such large SNs and extract the maximum amount of information from them, sophisticated algorithms are needed when inverting the transition data. To achieve numerical effectiveness, we found the following efficient algorithms applicable to very large SNs: reading the input data employs hash codes, building the components of the SN utilizes a recursive depth-first search algorithm, solving the linear least-squares problem is via the conjugate gradient method, and determination of the uncertainties of the energy levels takes advantage of the robust reweighting algorithm.

Furtenbacher, Tibor; Császár, Attila G.

2012-07-01

214

Community-Based Career Guidance Practices. Vol. II--Secondary Level.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of eighty-six secondary level career guidance practices contains the following nine types of activities: novel practices such as games and role enactments, volunteering, field trips, special career emphases, intern/extern practices, work experience and exploration practices, exchanges, mobile practices, and educator in-services. A…

Manatee Junior Coll., Bradenton, FL.

215

Finite-size scaling of entanglement entropy at the Anderson transition with interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the Anderson transition with interactions in one dimension from the perspective of quantum entanglement. Extensive numerical calculations of the entanglement entropy (EE) of the systems are carried out through the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. We demonstrate that the EE can be used for the finite-size scaling (FSS) to characterize the Anderson transition in both noninteracting and interacting systems. From the FSS analysis we can obtain a precise estimate of the critical parameters of the transition. The method can be applied to various one-dimensional models, either interacting or noninteracting, to quantitatively characterize the Anderson transitions.

Zhao, An; Chu, Rui-Lin; Shen, Shun-Qing

2013-05-01

216

Typical medium dynamical cluster approximation for the study of Anderson localization in three dimensions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop a systematic typical medium dynamical cluster approximation that provides a proper description of the Anderson localization transition in three dimensions (3D). Our method successfully captures the localization phenomenon both in the low and large disorder regimes, and allows us to study the localization in different momenta cells, which renders the discovery that the Anderson localization transition occurs in a cell-selective fashion. As a function of cluster size, our method systematically recovers the reentrance behavior of the mobility edge and obtains the correct critical disorder strength for Anderson localization in 3D.

Ekuma, C. E.; Terletska, H.; Tam, K.-M.; Meng, Z.-Y.; Moreno, J.; Jarrell, M.

2014-02-01

217

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 2 (RYEGTH00020002) on Town Highway 2, crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure RYEGTH00020002 on Town Highway 2 crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 75.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of cut grass, trees, and brush on the flood plains while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Wells River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.006 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 110 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 82.3 mm (0.270 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 24, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable with moderate fluvial erosion and meandering downstream of the bridge. The Town Highway 2 crossing of the Wells River is a 79-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 75-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 27, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 75.1 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments, the left has a spill-through embankment, with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 3 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed in the channel from upstream and through the bridge during the Level I assessment. The scour protection counter-measures at the site included type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) along the base of the left abutment forming a spill-through embankment. There was also type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream right wingwall, the upstream right bank and downstream left bank. There was a stone wall along the upstream left bank extending 130 ft from the bridge. In addition there was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the downstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was zero. Abutment scour ranged from 7.1 to 11.4 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-si

Ivanoff, Michael A.

1997-01-01

218

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 68 (NFIETH00960068) on Town Highway 96, crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NFIETH00960068 on Town Highway 96 crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 30.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The right bank upstream is forested and the downstream right bank is pasture. Vermont state route 12A runs parallel to the river on the right bank. In the study area, the Dog River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 70 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 47.9 mm (0.157 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 96 crossing of the Dog River is a 45-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 43-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 41.5 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. Channel scour 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth, was observed under the bridge during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left bank upstream and type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream and downstream right banks that extends partially in front of the right wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.8 to 1.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 8.5 to 12.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson a

Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

219

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (HARDELMSTR0042) on Elm Street, crossing Cooper Brook, Hardwick, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HARDELMSTR0042 on Elm Street crossing Cooper Brook, Hardwick, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in north-central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the overbanks are primarily grass covered with some brush along the immediate channel banks except the upstream right bank and overbank which is forested and the downstream left overbank which has a lumberyard. In the study area, Cooper Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 50 ft and an average channel depth of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are sand and gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 1.25 mm (0.00409 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 24, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Elm Street crossing of Cooper Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 37-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 17, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. On August 17, 1995 the site was revisited to investigate the effect of the August 4-5, 1995 flood on the structure. Channel features such as scour holes and point bars were shifted by the high flow event. Details of these changes can be found in the Level I data form in Appendix E. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and G. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 7.1 to 10.4 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the

Olson, Scott A.

1996-01-01

220

Post-processing V&V level II ASC milestone (2360) results.  

SciTech Connect

The 9/30/2007 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2360) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include loading of edge and face data on an Exodus mesh, run-time computation of an exact solution to a verification problem, delivery of results data from the server to the client, computation of an integral-based error metric, simultaneous loading of simulation and test data, and comparison of that data using visual and quantitative methods. The capabilities were tested extensively by performing a typical ALEGRA HEDP verification task. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including completion of a verification task on a 13 million element mesh.

Chavez, Elmer; Karelitz, David B.; Brunner, Thomas A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Weirs, V. Gregory; Shead, Timothy M.

2007-09-01

221

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 43 (BENNCYDEPO0043) on Depot Street, crossing the Walloomsac River, Bennington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BENNCYDEPO0043 on the Depot Street crossing of the Walloomsac River, Bennington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southwestern Vermont. The 30.1-mi2 drainage area is a predominantly rural and forested basin. The bridge site is located within an urban setting in the Town of Bennington with buildings and parking lots on overbanks. In the study area, the Walloomsac River has a straight channel with constructed channel banks through much of the reach. The channel is located on a delta and has a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 48 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed material is cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 108 mm (0.356 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 5, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Depot Street crossing of the Walloomsac River is a 46-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 40-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 13, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. Scour countermeasures at the site include type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream right wing wall and type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the base of the upstream left wing wall. Downstream banks are protected by concrete and stone walls. The upstream right bank is protected by alternating type-2 stone fill and masonry walls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour computed for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 4.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Computed right abutment scour ranged from 2.9 to 13.4 ft. with the worst-case scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Computed left abutment scour ranged from 5.6 to 16.3 ft. with the worst-case scour also occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combinat

Olson, Scott A.

1997-01-01

222

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 54 (RANDTH00BR0054) on Brook Street, crossing Thayer Brook, Randolph, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure RANDTH00BR0054 on Brook Street crossing Thayer Brook, Randolph, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic division of central Vermont in the town of Randolph. The 5.39-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the immediate banks are forested. In the study area, Thayer Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 60 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 42.4 mm or 0.139 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visits on August 3, 1994 and December 5, 1994, indicated that the reach was vertically and laterally unstable. This assessment was due to the extreme channel misalignment with the bridge opening and the presence of a drop structure downstream of the bridge protecting against channel degradation. The Brook Street crossing of Thayer Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. Streamflow attacks the upstream right wingwall and has undermined the upstream end of the right abutment. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) exists only on the upstream and downstream sides of the left road embankment. No other protection was noted. The bank full channel skew at the bridge face is approximately 20 degrees; the opening-skew-to-roadway is also 20 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.3 to 2.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 5.3 to 15.1 ft. and the worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the con

Olson, Scott A.

1996-01-01

223

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30 (BRIDTH00330030) on Town Highway 33, crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00330030 on town highway 33 crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 7.51-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Branch has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 45 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 60.7 mm (0.199 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 33 crossing of Dailey Hollow Branch is a 31-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Type-2 stone-fill (less than 36 inches diameter) protection was found at all four wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.5 to 3.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge, which is between the 100- and 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.9 to 14.6 ft. with the worst-case scenario also occurring at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

224

Toward the emergence of nanoneurosurgery: part II--nanomedicine: diagnostics and imaging at the nanoscale level.  

PubMed

THE NOTION OF nanotechnology has evolved since its inception as a fantastic conceptual idea to its current position as a mainstream research initiative with broad applications among all divisions of science. In the first part of this series, we reviewed the structures and principles that comprise the main body of knowledge of nanoscience and nanotechnology (58). This article reviews and discusses the applications of nanotechnology to biological systems that will undoubtedly transform the foundations of disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention in the future. Specific attention is given to developments in diagnostics and imaging at the nanoscale level. The use of nanoparticles and nanomaterials as biodetection agents for deoxyribonucleic acid and proteins is presented. In addition, nanodevices, such as nanowires, nanotubes, and nanocantilevers, can be combined with nanoarrays and nanofluidics to create integrated and automated nanodetection platforms. Molecular imaging modalities based on quantum dots and magnetic nanoparticles are also discussed. This technology has been extended to the imaging of intracranial neoplasms. Further innovation within these disciplines will form the basis for the development of mature nanomedicine. The final article of the series will focus on additional advancements in nanomedicine, namely nanotherapy and nanosurgery, and will cover the innovations that will lead to the eventual realization of nanoneurosurgery. PMID:16639314

Leary, Scott P; Liu, Charles Y; Apuzzo, Michael L J

2006-05-01

225

Theory of single-photon transport in a single-mode waveguide. II. Coupling to a whispering-gallery resonator containing a two-level atom  

E-print Network

Theory of single-photon transport in a single-mode waveguide. II. Coupling to a whispering- gallery resonator containing a two-level atom Jung-Tsung Shen ( * and Shanhui Fan ( Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford interacting with a two-level atom. The single-photon transport properties such as the transmission

Fan, Shanhui

226

Diagnostic Value of Serum Level of Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor II? in Egyptian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background: The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unfavorable and needs serum markers that could detect it early to start therapy at a potentially curable phase. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the value of serum soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-II? (sTNFR-II?) in diagnosis of HCC in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Patients and Methods: The study was performed on 110 subjects who were classified into five groups. Group I included 20 patients with chronic noncirrhotic HCV infection and persistently normal transaminases for ?6 months. Group II included 20 patients with chronic noncirrhotic HCV infection and elevated transaminases. Group III included 20 patients with Chronic HCV infection and liver cirrhosis. Group IV included 20 patients with chronic HCV infection with liver cirrhosis and HCC. Group V included 30 healthy age and sex-matched controls. Medical history was taken from all participants and they underwent clinical examination and abdominal ultrasonography. in addition, the following laboratory tests were requested: liver function tests, complete blood count, HBsAg, anti-HCVAb, HCV-RNA by qualitative PCR, and serum levels of ?-fetoprotein (AFP) and sTNFR-II?. Results: The serum level of sTNFR-II? was significantly higher in patients with HCC in comparison to the other groups. A positive correlation was found between the serum levels of sTNFR-II? and AST and ALT in patients of group-II. Diagnosis of HCC among patients with HCV infection and cirrhosis could be ascertained when sTNFR-II? is assessed at a cutoff value of ? 250 pg/mL. Conclusions: Serum sTNFR-II? could be used as a potential serum marker in diagnosing HCC among patients with HCV infection. PMID:25386197

Fouad, Shawky A; Elsaaid, Nehal H; Mohamed, Nagwa A; Abutaleb, Osama M

2014-01-01

227

A guide to source materials of the life and work of Lawrence B. Anderson '30  

E-print Network

From 1933 to 1976, Professor Lawrence B. Anderson taught in the MIT Department of Architecture, and from 1947 to 1971, he served as its chairman and dean. Concurrently, from 1937 to 1972 , he was principal partner in the ...

Laguette, Victoria, 1953-

1998-01-01

228

Fourier-PARMA Models and Their Application to River Flows Paul L. Anderson  

E-print Network

Fourier-PARMA Models and Their Application to River Flows Paul L. Anderson , Yonas Gebeyehu Tesfaye, it is sometimes useful to generate high- resolution (e.g., weekly) synthetic river flows. Periodic autoregressive

Meerschaert, Mark M.

229

MD Anderson researchers find that drug combination acts against aggressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

Cancer.gov

A two-prong approach combining ibrutinib and rituximab (Rituxin) to treat aggressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) produced responses with minor side effects in a Phase 2 clinical trial at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

230

Anderson, Denise M., Associate Professor, Parks, Recreation & Tourism Management. BA, Illinois Wesleyan University, 1992;  

E-print Network

231 Faculty Anderson, Denise M., Associate Professor, Parks, Recreation & Tourism Management. BA, Forest, & Environmental Sciences. BS, Texas A&M University, 1993; MS, Oklahoma State University, 1995; Ph, Ali, Adjunct Assistant Professor, School of Agricultural, Forest, & Environmental Sciences. BS, Iran

Stuart, Steven J.

231

Composite pairing in a mixed-valent two-channel Anderson model  

E-print Network

Using a two-channel Anderson model, we develop a theory of composite pairing in the 115 family of heavy fermion superconductors that incorporates the effects of f-electron valence fluctuations. Our calculations introduce ...

Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.

232

Didactique des langues, constitution de la parole et subjectivation Pr. Patrick Anderson  

E-print Network

2013 2014 Didactique des langues, constitution de la parole et subjectivation Pr. Patrick Anderson inconsistance (de Munck, Castoriadis, Le Goff, Castel), déliquescence (Mattéi, Henry, Gauchet), société de l

Jeanjean, Louis

233

MD Anderson researchers discover gene that might predict aggressive prostate cancer at diagnosis  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified a biomarker living next door to the KLK3 gene that could predict which GS7 prostate cancer patients will have a more aggressive form of cancer.

234

MD Anderson researchers find that cancer cells adapt energy needs to spread illness to other organs  

Cancer.gov

Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found that cancer cells traveling to other sites have different energy needs from their “stay-at-home” siblings which continue to proliferate at the original tumor site.

235

MD Anderson study finds fetal exposure to radiation increases risk of testicular cancer  

Cancer.gov

Male fetuses of mothers that are exposed to radiation during early pregnancy may have an increased chance of developing testicular cancer, according to a study in mice at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

236

Parabolic Anderson model with a finite number of moving catalysts  

E-print Network

We consider the parabolic Anderson model (PAM) which is given by the equation $\\partial u/\\partial t = \\kappa\\Delta u + \\xi u$ with $u\\colon\\, \\Z^d\\times [0,\\infty)\\to \\R$, where $\\kappa \\in [0,\\infty)$ is the diffusion constant, $\\Delta$ is the discrete Laplacian, and $\\xi\\colon\\,\\Z^d\\times [0,\\infty)\\to\\R$ is a space-time random environment that drives the equation. The solution of this equation describes the evolution of a ``reactant'' $u$ under the influence of a ``catalyst'' $\\xi$. In the present paper we focus on the case where $\\xi$ is a system of $n$ independent simple random walks each with step rate $2d\\rho$ and starting from the origin. We study the \\emph{annealed} Lyapunov exponents, i.e., the exponential growth rates of the successive moments of $u$ w.r.t.\\ $\\xi$ and show that these exponents, as a function of the diffusion constant $\\kappa$ and the rate constant $\\rho$, behave differently depending on the dimension $d$. In particular, we give a description of the intermittent behavior of the sys...

Castell, Fabienne; Maillard, Grégory

2010-01-01

237

Image transport using Anderson localized modes in disordered optical fibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An optical fiber with a transversely disordered yet longitudinally invariant refractive index profile can propagate a beam of light using transverse Anderson localization. A launched beam of light into the disordered optical fiber expands till it reaches its localization radius beyond which it propagates without further expansion. In contrast to a conventional single-core optical fiber in which a propagating beam of light can only couple to and propagate in the core, the beam of light can be coupled to any point at the tip of the disordered fiber. This property originated from the localized highly multimodal property of disordered optical fibers that can be used for high quality optical image transport. We experimentally compare the quality of the transported images in the disordered polymer optical fibers with those transported through the multicore imaging fibers, as well as conventional single core fibers. The impacts of source wavelength and refractive index difference between the disordered sites on the quality of the transported images in the disordered optical fibers is studied numerically. The role of randomness in improving the quality of transported images is investigated by comparing the full vectorial modes of a disordered fiber with those in a periodic multicore fiber.

Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J.; Koch, Karl W.; Hawkins, Thomas; Ballato, John; Mafi, Arash

2014-03-01

238

Health assessment for Anderson Development Company, Adrian, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID002931228. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Anderson Development Company (ADC) site has been placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). From approximately 1968 to 1979 ADC manufactured 4,4'-methylene-bis(2-chloroaniline) (MBOCA), also known under the trademark names of MOCA and Curene 422. In 1978 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommended that MBOCA be regulated as a human carcinogen. Discharges of waste waters and air emissions from ADC during the production of MBOCA eventually caused contamination in company lagoons, sludges, and effluents; in municipal sewer influent, effluent, and sludges; in surface-water drains and the Raisin River; and in soil, street sweepings, and residences within a 1-mile radius of the plant. In 1979 and 1980, detectable levels of MBOCA were found in urine specimens collected from ADC and user-plant employees and members of their families. MBOCA may have been carried out of the manufacturing plant on the shoes and clothing of the employees and deposited in their residence. Detectable concentrations of MBOCA were also found in urine specimens of some children living near the site. Because the documented contamination created a continuing potential for environment and human exposure, comprehensive remedial measures were implemented during 1980 and 1981. The site is of potential public health concern because a risk to human health may exist from possible exposure to a hazardous substance at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time; human exposure to MBOCA has occurred/may be still occurring via contaminated soil and garden sources of food.

Not Available

1989-03-10

239

Experimental and analytical study of loss-of-flow transients in EBR-II occurring at decay power levels  

SciTech Connect

A series of eight loss-of-flow (LOF) tests have been conducted in EBR-II to study the transition between forced and natural convective flows following a variety of loss-of-primary-pumping power conditions from decay heat levels. Comparisons of measurements and pretest/posttest predictions were made on a selected test. Good agreements between measurements and predictions was found prior to and just after the flow reaching its minimum, but the agreement is not as good after that point. The temperatures are consistent with the flow response and the assumed decay power. The measured results indicate that the flows of driver and the instrumented subassemblies are too much in the analytical model in the natural convective region. Although a parametric study on secondary flow, turbulent-laminar flow transition, heat transfer ability of the intermediate heat exchange at low flow and flow mixing in the primary tank has been performed to determine their effects on the flow, the cause of the discrepancy at very low flow level is still unknown.

Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Betten, P.R.; Planchon, H.P.

1985-01-01

240

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (BETHTH00070038) on Town Highway 007, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The town highway 5 crossing of the Black River is a 70-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 65-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. There is also a retaining wall along the upstream side of the road embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 3.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment. The scour hole was 27 feet long, 15 feet wide, and was 2.5 feet below the abutment footing at the time of the Level I assessment. This right abutment had numerous cracks and had settled. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

241

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 22 (JAY-TH00400022) on Town Highway 40, crossing Jay Branch, Jay, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northern Vermont. The 2.15-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is primarily pasture on the upstream and downstream left overbank while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The downstream right overbank of the bridge is forested. In the study area, Jay Branch Tributary has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 26 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 40.5 mm (0.133 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 40 crossing of Jay Branch Tributary is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel skew and the opening-skew-to-roadway are zero degrees. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the left and right abutments, at the upstream right wingwall, and at the downstream left wingwall. There was also type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream left and downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.7 to 1.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 4.6 to 4.9 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 4.0 to 5.0 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information i

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

1997-01-01

242

Reduction in Hexokinase II Levels Results in Decreased Cardiac Function and Altered Remodeling after Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury  

PubMed Central

Rationale Cardiomyocytes switch substrate utilization from fatty acid to glucose under ischemic conditions, however, it is unknown how perturbations in glycolytic enzymes affect cardiac response to ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Hexokinase (HK) II is a HK isoform that is expressed in the heart and it can bind to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Objective We sought to define how HKII and its binding to mitochondria play a role in cardiac response and remodeling after I/R. Methods and Results We first showed that HKII levels and its binding to mitochondria are reduced 2 days after I/R. We then subjected the hearts of wild type and heterozygote HKII knockout (HKII+/?) mice to I/R by coronary ligation. At baseline, HKII+/? mice have normal cardiac function, however, they display lower systolic function after I/R compared to wild type animals. The mechanism appears to be through an increase in cardiomyocyte death and fibrosis and a reduction in angiogenesis, the latter is through a decrease in HIF-dependent pathway signaling in cardiomyocytes. HKII mitochondrial binding is also critical for cardiomyocyte survival, as its displacement in tissue culture with a synthetic peptide increases cell death. Our results also suggest that HKII may be important for the remodeling of the viable cardiac tissue as its modulation in vitro alters cellular energy levels, O2 consumption and contractility. Conclusions These results suggest that reduction in HKII levels causes altered remodeling of the heart in I/R by increasing cell death and fibrosis and reducing angiogenesis, and that mitochondrial binding is needed for protection of cardiomyocytes. PMID:21071708

Wu, Rongxue; Smeele, Kirsten M.; Wyatt, Eugene; Ichikawa, Yoshihiko; Eerbeek, Otto; Sun, Lin; Chawla, Kusum; Hollmann, Markus W.; Nagpal, Varun; Heikkinen, Sami; Laakso, Markku; Jujo, Kentaro; Wasserstrom, J. Andrew; Zuurbier, Coert J.; Ardehali, Hossein

2010-01-01

243

A topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model  

E-print Network

We study the phenomena of Anderson localization in the presence of nonlinear interaction on a lattice. A class of nonlinear Schrodinger models with arbitrary power nonlinearity is analyzed. We conceive the various regimes of behavior, depending on the topology of resonance-overlap in phase space, ranging from a fully developed chaos involving Levy flights to pseudochaotic dynamics at the onset of delocalization. It is demonstrated that quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. We describe this localization-delocalization transition as a percolation transition on a Cayley tree. It is found in vicinity of the criticality that the spreading of the wave field is subdiffusive in the limit t\\rightarrow+\\infty. The second moment grows with time as a powerlaw t^\\alpha, with \\alpha = 1/3. Also we find for superquadratic nonlinearity that the analog pseudochaotic regime at the edge of chaos is self-controlling in that it has feedback on the topology of the structure on which the transport processes concentrate. Then the system automatically (without tuning of parameters) develops its percolation point. We classify this type of behavior in terms of self-organized criticality dynamics in Hilbert space. For subquadratic nonlinearities, the behavior is shown to be sensitive to details of definition of the nonlinear term. A transport model is proposed based on modified nonlinearity, using the idea of stripes propagating the wave process to large distances. Theoretical investigations, presented here, are the basis for consistency analysis of the different localization-delocalization patterns in systems with many coupled degrees of freedom in association with the asymptotic properties of the transport.

Alexander V. Milovanov; Alexander Iomin

2014-06-03

244

Doxorubicin and ? rays increase the level of DNA topoisomerase II? in nuclei of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA topoisomerase II? was monitored with the monoclonal antibody Ki-S1 in human fibroblasts after irradiation of cells with\\u000a ? rays from a 137Cs source or treatment with the DNA topoisomerase II inhibitor doxorubicin. DNA topoisomerase II? was localized immunohistochemically\\u000a as bright fluorescent dots in the karyoplasm. The fibroblasts investigated originated from normal human donors and a xeroderma\\u000a pigmentosum (XP) patient

Heinz Walter Thielmann; Odilia Popanda

1998-01-01

245

Gene Expression, Function and Ischemia Tolerance in Male and Female Rat Hearts After Sub-Toxic Levels of Angiotensin II  

Microsoft Academic Search

To examine the response to chronic high-dose angiotensin II (Ang II) and a proposed milder response in female hearts with\\u000a respect to gene expression and ischemic injury. Female and male litter–matched rats were treated with 400 ng kg?1 min?1 Ang II for 14 days. Hearts were isolated, subjected to 30-min ischemia and 30-min reperfusion in combination with functional\\u000a monitoring and thereafter harvested for gene

M. B. Aljabri; T. Lund; A. C. Höper; T. V. Andreasen; S. Al-Saad; S. Lindal; K. Ytrehus

2011-01-01

246

Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

1987-10-01

247

Evolution in Complex Systems PAUL E. ANDERSON,1  

E-print Network

behavior of type II superconductors and biological macroevolution. Each system is metastable when observed macroevolution, for example, in the form of a slowly decreasing extinction rate [8]. Similar ef- fects are one

Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

248

Asbestos Previous Exposure Form This form is to be used by employees who wish to document previous Asbestos Level II exposure at the University of  

E-print Network

Asbestos Previous Exposure Form This form is to be used by employees who wish to document previous Asbestos Level II exposure at the University of Maryland. Employees who intentionally removed, encapsulated, cut, drilled, sanded, broken or otherwise disturbed regulated asbestos-containing materials (i

Rubloff, Gary W.

249

Collinear Laser-Beam Ion-Beam Measurement of the Mean Lifetime of the Ar Ii 4p'2f-Degrees-7/2 Level  

E-print Network

The mean lifetime tau of the 4p'F-2(7/2)-degrees level of Ar II has been measured using a variant of the collinear laser-beam-fast-ion-beam spectroscopy technique. Our variant requires no mechanical motion or laser frequency tuning. The result...

Jin, J.; Church, David A.

1993-01-01

250

Optical isotope shift measurements using collinear ion beam laser spectroscopy and the configuration of the NdII(23537)9\\/20 level  

Microsoft Academic Search

The optical isotope shifts of five even isotopes of neodymium have been measured by using collinear ion beam laser spectroscopy (CIBLS). Isotopically pure NdII ions with energy of 30ke V from an isotope separator were collinearly interacted with light from a tunable dye laser and selectively excited from a metastable level of 4f4 5d6 K9\\/2 to the (23537)9\\/20 level by

Fuquan Lu; Songmao Wu; Yansen Wang; Wei Shi; Peixiong Shi; Linggen Song; Jianjun Yang; Jiayong Tang; Fujia Yang

1990-01-01

251

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 49 (BENNCYHUNT0049) on Hunt Street, crossing the Walloomsac River, Bennington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

2 stone fill also protects the channel banks upstream and downstream of the bridge for a minimum distance of 17 feet from the respective bridge faces. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour computed for all modelled flows ranged from 0.9 to 5.0 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Computed left abutment scour ranged from 15.3 to 16.5 ft. with the worst-case scour occurring at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Computed right abutment scour ranged from 6.0 to 8.7 ft. with the worst-case scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardso

Olson, Scott A.; Medalie, Laura

1997-01-01

252

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 39 (LOWETH00080039) on Town Highway 8, crossing Potter Brook, Lowell, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A scour hole 2.0 feet deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. There were no scour protection measures evident at the site. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 1.8 to 5.5 feet. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT m

Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

1997-01-01

253

Non monotonic influence of Hubbard interaction on the Anderson localization of two-electron wavepackets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show that the Hubbard-like interaction between two electrons moving in a random one-dimensional potential landscape has a non monotonic influence on the Anderson localization phenomenon. Within a tight-binding approach, we follow the time-evolution of initially localized two-electron wavepackets and compute the participation number of all two-particle eigenstates. We evidence that the coupling between bounded and unbounded two-particle states leads to an overall weakening of Anderson localization of the predominant unbounded states. However, such coupling becomes ineffective in the regime of large interaction strengths on which the energy bands corresponding to these two classes of eigenstates become quite detached. We unveil that these two competing effects are at the origin of the non monotonic influence of the inter-particle interaction on Anderson localization.

Dias, W. S.; Lyra, M. L.

2014-10-01

254

Abrupt physical and chemical changes during 1992-1999, Anderson Springs, SE Geyser Geothermal Field, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Anderson Springs area is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. Patrons drank a variety of cool to hot mineral waters from improved springs, swam in various baths and pools, and hiked in the rugged hills flanking Anderson Creek and its tributaries. In the bluffs to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. By the early 1970s, the higher ridges south and west of Anderson Springs became part of the southeast sector of the greater Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric power plants are built on these ridges, producing energy from a vapor-dominated 240 °C reservoir. Only the main hot spring at Anderson Springs has maintained a recognizable identity since the 1930s. The hot spring is actually a cluster of seeps and springs that issue from a small fault in a ravine southwest of Anderson Creek. Published and unpublished records show that the maximum temperature (Tm) of this cluster fell gradually from 63°C in 1889 to 48°C in 1992. However, Tm of the cluster climbed to 77°C in 1995 and neared boiling (98°C) in 1998. A new cluster of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm = 99.3°C) formed in 1998 about 30 m north of the old spring cluster. Several evergreen trees on steep slopes immediately above these vents apparently were killed by the new activity. Thermal waters at Anderson Hot Springs are mostly composed of near-surface ground waters with some added gases and condensed steam from The Geysers geothermal system. Compared to gas samples from Southeast Geysers wells, the hot spring gases are higher in CO2 and lower in H2S and NH3. As the springs increased in temperature, however, the gas composition became more like the mean composition of steam discharges from the Southeast Geysers. The hot spring waters are low in ions of Cl, B, and Li, but relatively high in HCO3, SO4 and NH4. The stable-isotope compositions (deuterium and oxygen-18) of these waters plot near the global meteoric water line. Geochemical data through time reveal apparent maxima in the concentrations of SO4, Fe, and Mn in 1991 to 1992, before the cluster became hotter. The black-to-gray deposits from the new spring cluster are rich in pyrite and contain anomalous metals. About one-half mile to the east of the hot springs, mineralized water discharges intermittently from an old adit of the Schwartz (Anderson) mine, and enters a tributary of Anderson Creek. This drainage increased substantially in July 1998, and a slurry of mine water and precipitates were transported down the tributary and into Anderson Creek. In December 1998, the adit water was 22°C, and had a chemical composition that was similar to spring waters that once discharged in the ravines surrounding the old Anderson Springs resort. The cause for the abrupt changes that have occurred in thermal features at Anderson Springs is still not resolved. One possibility is that these changes are a response to withdrawal of steam from The Geysers geothermal field over more than 20 years of production. Pressure declines in the geothermal reservoir may have caused a "drying out" of the overlying condensation zone. Induced boiling in this zone and upflow of deep steam to shallower depths would cause heating and vaporization of shallow ground waters. In addition, earthquakes occurring in the vicinity of Anderson Springs have increased significantly after nearby geothermal power plants began operation. These earthquakes may have enhanced surface discharge of thermal fluids along fractures and faults.

Janik, Cathy J.; Goff, Fraser; Walter, Stephen R.; Sorey, Michael L.; Counce, Dale; Colvard, Elizabeth M.

2000-01-01

255

Applicability of bosonization and the Anderson-Yuval methods at the strong-coupling limit of quantum impurity problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The applicability of bosonization and the Anderson-Yuval (AY) approach at strong coupling is investigated by considering two generic impurity models: the interacting resonant-level model and the anisotropic Kondo model. The two methods differ in the renormalization of the conduction-electron density of states (DOS) near the impurity site. Reduction in the DOS, absent in bosonization but accounted for in the AY approach, is shown to be vital in some models yet superfluous in others. The criterion is the stability of the strong-coupling fixed point. Renormalization of the DOS is essential for an unstable fixed point but superfluous when a decoupled entity with local dynamics is formed. This rule can be used to boost the accuracy of both methods at strong coupling.

Borda, L.; Schiller, A.; Zawadowski, A.

2008-11-01

256

Transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor by enhanced levels of endogenous angiotensin II contributes to the overexpression of Gi? proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells from SHR.  

PubMed

We earlier showed that the increased expression of Gi proteins exhibited by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) was attributed to the enhanced levels of endogenous endothelin. Since the levels of angiotensin II (Ang II) are also enhanced in VSMC from SHR, the present study was undertaken to examine the role of enhanced levels of endogenous Ang II in the overexpression of Gi? proteins in VSMC from SHR and to further explore the underlying mechanisms responsible for this increase. The enhanced expression of Gi?-2 and Gi?-3 proteins in VSMC from SHR compared to WKY was attenuated by the captopril, losartan and AG1478, inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme, AT(1) receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) respectively as well as by the siRNAs of AT1, cSrc and EGFR. The enhanced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity by low concentrations of GTP?S (receptor-independent functions) and of inhibitory responses of hormones on adenylyl cyclase activity (receptor-dependent functions) in VSMC from SHR was also attenuated by losartan. Furthermore, the enhanced phosphorylation of EGFR in VSMC from SHR was also restored to control levels by captopril, losartan, PP2, a c-Src inhibitor and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) scavenger, whereas enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated by captopril and losartan. Furthermore, NAC also restored the enhanced phosphorylation of c-Src in SHR to control levels. These results suggest that the enhanced levels of endogenous Ang II in VSMC from SHR, transactivate EGFR, which through MAP kinase signaling, enhance the expression of Gi? proteins and associated adenylyl cyclase signaling. PMID:21712088

Sandoval, Yessica-Haydee Gomez; Li, Yuan; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

2011-11-01

257

Observation of the Anderson metal-insulator transition with atomic matter waves: Theory and experiment  

SciTech Connect

Using a cold atomic gas exposed to laser pulses - a realization of the chaotic quasiperiodic kicked rotor with three incommensurate frequencies - we study experimentally and theoretically the Anderson metal-insulator transition in three dimensions. Sensitive measurements of the atomic wave function and the use of finite-size scaling techniques make it possible to unambiguously demonstrate the existence of a quantum phase transition and to measure its critical exponents. By taking proper account of systematic corrections to one-parameter scaling, we show the universality of the critical exponent {nu}=1.59{+-}0.01, which is found to be equal to the one previously computed for the Anderson model.

Lemarie, Gabriel; Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Chabe, Julien; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude [Laboratoire PhLAM, , Universite de Lille 1, CNRS, CERLA, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Gremaud, Benoit [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

2009-10-15

258

The large connectivity limit of the Anderson model on tree graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider the Anderson localization problem on the infinite regular tree. Within the localized phase, we derive a rigorous lower bound on the free energy function recently introduced by Aizenman and Warzel. Using a finite volume regularization, we also derive an upper bound on this free energy function. This yields upper and lower bounds on the critical disorder such that all states at a given energy become localized. These bounds are particularly useful in the large connectivity limit where they match, confirming the early predictions of Abou-Chacra, Anderson, and Thouless.

Bapst, Victor

2014-09-01

259

Espanol para alumnos hispanohablantes: Niveles I y II de secundaria (Spanish for Spanish-Speaking Students: Secondary Levels I and II).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A curriculum guide for secondary levels 1 and 2 offers a linguistic and cultural program for native speakers of Spanish. Designed especially for bilingual students in Texas, the guide recognizes the high level of linguistic achievement of the Spanish-speaking pupils, and stresses an appreciation of Hispanic culture. The bulletin provides…

Arce, Eugene; And Others

260

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE COMPUTER LABORATORY Computer Science Tripos Parts IA, IB, and II  

E-print Network

and mobile systems. Thomson. [**, II] Aho, A.V., Sethi, R. & Ullman, J.D. (2007). Compilers: principles, techniques and tools. Addison-Wesley (2nd ed.). [**, IB, II] Anderson, R. (2008). Security engineering. Wiley). Introduction to compiling techniques: a first course using ANSI C, LEX and YACC. McGraw-Hill. [**, IB] ­ 1

Steiner, Ullrich

261

Example of self-averaging in three dimensions: Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in random distributions of pointlike scatterers  

E-print Network

Example of self-averaging in three dimensions: Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves is used to study Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in three-dimensional disordered dielectric of localized electromagnetic waves, emerging in the limit of an infinite system, is numerically observed. S1063

Rusek, Marian

262

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 9 (BARRUSO3020009) on U.S. Route 302, crossing Jail Branch, Barre, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

skew-to-roadway. There is evidence of channel scour along the right bank from 190 feet upstream of the bridge and extending through the bridge along the right abutment. Under the bridge, the scour depth is approximately 0.5 feet below the mean thalweg depth. Scour protection measures at the site include type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the right bank extending from the bridge to 192 feet upstream. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is along the right abutment and the right downstream bank to 205 feet downtream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 4.3 to 7.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Computed scour for the 100-year event does not go below the abutment footings. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive m

Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

1997-01-01

263

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (BRIDTH00050046) on Town Highway 05, crossing North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

bridge consisting of a 34-ft steel-beam span, supported by vertical abutments with no wingwalls (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The left abutment is stone; the right abutment is log cribwork with type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along its base. Type-2 stone fill has also been placed on the upstream and downstream sides of the road embankments, except the upstream left which has type-3 (less than 48 inches diameter). The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees; the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of these computed results follow. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 5.7 ft to 7.7 ft. with the worst-case abutment scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the computed scour at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 22). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

264

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BETHTH00190035) on Town Highway 19, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream wingwalls, left abutment, and upstream right road embankment; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is at the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 2.1 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 3.9 to 9.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

265

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW--Due Process and Equal Protection--Price-Anderson Act's $560,000,000 Limit on Liability From A nuclear Power Plant Accident Is Unconstitutional  

Microsoft Academic Search

Article summarizes Carolina Environmental Study Group v United States Atomic Energy Commission and congressional intent of the Price-Anderson Act. Article then speculates that the Price-Anderson Act will be found to be unconstitutional by the Supreme Court

Michael Fitzgerald

1978-01-01

266

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 51 (RANDTH00SC0051) on School Street, crossing Thayer Brook, Randolph, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ft, an average channel top width of 36 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 58.2 mm or 0.191 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visits on August 4, 1994 and December 8, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The School Street crossing of Thayer Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 35-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the downstream left bank was the only existing protection. The approach channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the bridge face; the opening-skew-to-roadway is also 45 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.0 to 2.2 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.2 to 12.0 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.

1996-01-01

267

Mercaptoacetamide-based class II HDAC inhibitor lowers A? levels and improves learning and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease  

PubMed Central

Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) alter gene expression epigenetically by interfering with the normal functions of HDAC. Given their ability to decrease A? levels, HDACIs area potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is unclear how HDACIs alter A? levels. We developed two novel HDAC inhibitors with improved pharmacological properties, such as a longer half-life and greater penetration of the blood-brain barrier: mercaptoacetamide-based class II HDACI (coded as W2) and hydroxamide-based class I and IIHDACI (coded as I2) and investigated how they affect A? levels and cognition. HDACI W2 decreased A?40 and A?42 in vitro. HDACI I2 also decreased A?40, but not A?42. We systematically examined the molecular mechanisms by which HDACIs W2 and I2 can decrease A? levels. HDACI W2 decreased gene expression of ?-secretase components and increased the A? degradation enzyme Mmp2. Similarly, HDACI I2 decreased expression of ?- and ?-secretase components and increased mRNA levels of A? degradation enzymes. HDACI W2 also significantly decreased A? levels and rescued learning and memory deficits in aged hAPP 3x Tg AD mice. Furthermore, we found that the novel HDACI W2 decreased tau phosphorylation at Thr181, an effect previously unknown for HDACIs. Collectively, these data suggest that class II HDACls may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:23063601

Sung, You Me; Lee, Taehee; Yoon, Hyejin; DiBattista, Amanda Marie; Song, JungMin; Sohn, Yoojin; Moffat, Emily Isabella; Turner, R. Scott; Jung, Mira; Kim, Jungsu; Hoe, Hyang-Sook

2013-01-01

268

Mercaptoacetamide-based class II HDAC inhibitor lowers A? levels and improves learning and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) alter gene expression epigenetically by interfering with the normal functions of HDAC. Given their ability to decrease A? levels, HDACIs are a potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is unclear how HDACIs alter A? levels. We developed two novel HDAC inhibitors with improved pharmacological properties, such as a longer half-life and greater penetration of the blood-brain barrier: mercaptoacetamide-based class II HDACI (coded as W2) and hydroxamide-based class I and IIHDACI (coded as I2) and investigated how they affect A? levels and cognition. HDACI W2 decreased A?40 and A?42 in vitro. HDACI I2 also decreased A?40, but not A?42. We systematically examined the molecular mechanisms by which HDACIs W2 and I2 can decrease A? levels. HDACI W2 decreased gene expression of ?-secretase components and increased the A? degradation enzyme Mmp2. Similarly, HDACI I2 decreased expression of ?- and ?-secretase components and increased mRNA levels of A? degradation enzymes. HDACI W2 also significantly decreased A? levels and rescued learning and memory deficits in aged hAPP 3xTg AD mice. Furthermore, we found that the novel HDACI W2 decreased tau phosphorylation at Thr181, an effect previously unknown for HDACIs. Collectively, these data suggest that class II HDACls may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:23063601

Sung, You Me; Lee, Taehee; Yoon, Hyejin; DiBattista, Amanda Marie; Song, Jung Min; Sohn, Yoojin; Moffat, Emily Isabella; Turner, R Scott; Jung, Mira; Kim, Jungsu; Hoe, Hyang-Sook

2013-01-01

269

Evaluation of the modified Anderson sampler for determining particle size distributions and respirable concentrations of particulate matter present in the working environment of cottonseed oil mills  

E-print Network

particle sizing head. By equipping an Anderson sampler with an inline air filter, lint particles were effectively removed and particulate matter samples collected without the normal problem of cotton lint particles plugging jets of the Anderson sampler... problem that has occurred with the Anderson sampler, but this has been eliminated by using fiber glass impaction surfaces to hold the particles and reduce re-entrainment (Byers, 1973). The Anderson particle sizing head, as with all multistage jet...

Matlock, Stanley Wayne

2012-06-07

270

Anderson's disease/chylomicron retention disease in a Japanese patient with uniparental disomy 7 and a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence  

PubMed Central

Background Anderson's Disease (AD)/Chylomicron Retention Disease (CMRD) is a rare hereditary hypocholesterolemic disorder characterized by a malabsorption syndrome with steatorrhea, failure to thrive and the absence of chylomicrons and apolipoprotein B48 post-prandially. All patients studied to date exhibit a mutation in the SAR1B gene, which codes for an essential component of the vesicular coat protein complex II (COPII) necessary for endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. We describe here a patient with AD/CMRD, a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence and maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7). Methods and Results The patient, one of two siblings of a Japanese family, had diarrhea and steatorrhea beginning at five months of age. There was a white duodenal mucosa upon endoscopy. Light and electron microscopy showed that the intestinal villi were normal but that they had lipid laden enterocytes containing accumulations of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm and lipoprotein-size particles in membrane bound structures. Although there were decreased amounts in plasma of total- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoproteins AI and B and vitamin E levels, the triglycerides were normal, typical of AD/CMRD. The presence of low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein B in the plasma, although in decreased amounts, ruled out abetalipoproteinemia. The parents were asymptomatic with normal plasma cholesterol levels suggesting a recessive disorder and ruling out familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. Sequencing of genomic DNA showed that the 8 exons of the SAR1B gene were normal. Whole genome SNP analysis and karyotyping revealed matUPD7 with a normal karyotype. In contrast to other cases of AD/CMRD which have shown catch-up growth following vitamin supplementation and a fat restricted diet, our patient exhibits continued growth delay and other aspects of the matUPD7 and Silver-Russell Syndrome phenotypes. Conclusions This patient with AD/CMRD has a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence which suggests that factors other than the SAR1B protein may be crucial for chylomicron secretion. Further, this patient exhibits matUPD7 with regions of homozygosity which might be useful for elucidating the molecular basis of the defect(s) in this individual. The results provide novel insights into the relation between phenotype and genotype in these diseases and for the mechanisms of secretion in the intestine. PMID:22104167

2011-01-01

271

Dystopian Visions of Global Capitalism: Philip Reeve's "Mortal Engines" and M.T Anderson's "Feed"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines Philip Reeve's novel for children, "Mortal Engines", and M.T. Anderson's young adult novel, "Feed", by assessing these dystopias as prototypical texts of what Ulrich Beck calls risk society. Through their visions of a fictional future, the two narratives explore the hazards created by contemporary techno-economic progress,…

Bullen, Elizabeth; Parsons, Elizabeth

2007-01-01

272

Effects of User Similarity in Social Media Ashton Anderson Daniel Huttenlocher Jon Kleinberg Jure Leskovec  

E-print Network

Effects of User Similarity in Social Media Ashton Anderson Daniel Huttenlocher Jon Kleinberg Jure of a social media applica- tion provide evaluations of one another. In a variety of domains, mechanisms- fects. Among other consequences, we find that evaluations are less status-driven when users are more

Thrun, Sebastian

273

MD Anderson study identifies novel therapeutic targets for small cell lung cancer  

Cancer.gov

Newly discovered molecular differences between small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer have revealed PARP1 and EZH2 as potential therapeutic targets for patients with small cell lung cancer, according to the results of a University of Texas MD Anderson study published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

274

No strangers here: The minimal relationship effect in interpersonal trust Joanna E. Anderson1  

E-print Network

with others are an essential aspect of life. Parents, peers, authority figures, friends, and romantic partnersNo strangers here: The minimal relationship effect in interpersonal trust Joanna E. Anderson1' trustworthiness. In three studies of the minimal relationship hypothesis, we test an important boundary condition

275

MD Anderson study finds telomere failure, telomerase activation drive prostate cancer progression  

Cancer.gov

Genomic instability caused by an erosion of the protective caps on chromosomes, followed by activation of an enzyme that reinforces those caps, allows malignant cells to evade destruction and acquire more deadly characteristics, MD Anderson Cancer Center researchers report in an Online Now article at the journal Cell.

276

Senate Bills, Anderson Majority Leadership S-669: January 6, 1971; Temporary State Commission on Higher Education  

E-print Network

1 Senate Bills, Anderson Majority Leadership S-669: January 6, 1971; Temporary State Commission/22/1971 Martha Peterson 2/3/1971 Duane A. Dittman 2/4/1971 Frank P. Piskor 2/5/1971 Outgoing: John E. Corbally/8/1971 Martha Peterson 2/16/1971 Earl W. Brydges 5

Suzuki, Masatsugu

277

MD Anderson researchers compare treatments, survival benefits for early-stage lung cancer  

Cancer.gov

Removal of the entire lobe of lung may offer patients with early-stage lung cancer better overall survival when compared with a partial resection, and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) may offer the same survival benefit as a lobectomy for some patients, according to a study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.Click here to read the full press release.

278

MD Anderson scientists discover marker to identify, attack breast cancer stem cells  

Cancer.gov

Breast cancer stem cells wear a cell surface protein that is part nametag and part bull’s eye, identifying them as potent tumor-generating cells and flagging their vulnerability to a drug, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report online in Journal of Clinical Investigation.

279

Generation of the S boxes of Tiger Ross Anderson 1 and Eli Biham 2  

E-print Network

Generation of the S boxes of Tiger Ross Anderson 1 and Eli Biham 2 1 Cambridge University, England algorithm of the S boxes of Tiger uses the compression func­ tion of Tiger in order to achieve random the S boxes to the unity columns, and the state to the initial value of the state of Tiger. Then it randomizes

Biham, Eli

280

An Expressive Text-Driven 3D Talking Head Robert Anderson1  

E-print Network

An Expressive Text-Driven 3D Talking Head Robert Anderson1 , Bj¨orn Stenger2 , Vincent Wan2 multiview and photometric stereo we obtain a set of training samples with both depth and normal maps (b). Depth and normals are mapped to the existing AAM, allowing the same synthesis pipeline used for the 2D

Cipolla, Roberto

281

Discrete Scale Spaces via Heat Equation ANDERSON CUNHA, RALPH TEIXEIRA AND LUIZ VELHO  

E-print Network

Discrete Scale Spaces via Heat Equation ANDERSON CUNHA, RALPH TEIXEIRA AND LUIZ VELHO IMPA­Instituto de Matem´atica Pura e Aplicada, mayrink|ralph|lvelho @visgraf.impa.br Abstract. Scale spaces allow us to organize, compare and analyse differently sized structures of an object. The linear scale space

282

The Performance of the Container Shipping I/O System Eric W. Anderson  

E-print Network

Containers) is mapped in and out of process address spaces. Copy elimination provides a large reductionThe Performance of the Container Shipping I/O System Eric W. Anderson Joseph Pasquale {ewa not perform unnecessary memory mappings or copy­on­write operations. Container Shipping unconditionally

Polyzos, George C.

283

Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long  

E-print Network

Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long Brigham Young for mapping polar sea ice extent. In this study, a new al- gorithm for polar sea ice mapping is developed of Bayes detection to produce sea ice extent maps. Statistical models for sea ice and ocean are represented

Long, David G.

284

Kondo screening cloud in the single-impurity Anderson model: A density matrix renormalization group study  

E-print Network

Kondo screening cloud in the single-impurity Anderson model: A density matrix renormalization group cloud when computed from a lattice model.8,9,11,16,17 While there has been experimental progress toward moment in a metal or in a quantum dot is, at low temperatures, screened by the conduction electrons

von Delft, Jan

285

Re ections on \\On the Phonetic Rules of Russian" Stephen R. Anderson  

E-print Network

Re ections on \\On the Phonetic Rules of Russian" Stephen R. Anderson Dept. of Linguistics, Yale as the participants in the second Royaumont conference on Current Trends in Phonology, including Paul Kiparsky the following word begins with a voiced obstruent, in which case they are voiced. E.g., m'ok l,i] `was (he

Goldsmith, John A.

286

MOOD: A Concurrent C++-Based Music Language David Anderson Jeff Bilmes  

E-print Network

MOOD: A Concurrent C++-Based Music Language David Anderson Jeff Bilmes of Technology San Rafael, CA 94901 Cambridge, MA 02139 Introduction MOOD (Musical Object-Oriented Dialect of musical actions. Process Scheduling MOOD provides lightweight processes sharing a single address space

Noble, William Stafford

287

MOOD: A Concurrent C++Based Music Language David Anderson Jeff Bilmes  

E-print Network

MOOD: A Concurrent C++­Based Music Language David Anderson Jeff Bilmes of Technology San Rafael, CA 94901 Cambridge, MA 02139 Introduction MOOD (Musical Object­Oriented Dialect of musical actions. Process Scheduling MOOD provides lightweight processes sharing a single address space

Bilmes, Jeff

288

THE STATIC EXTENSION PROBLEM IN GENERAL RELATIVITY MICHAEL T. ANDERSON AND MARCUS A. KHURI  

E-print Network

THE STATIC EXTENSION PROBLEM IN GENERAL RELATIVITY MICHAEL T. ANDERSON AND MARCUS A. KHURI Abstract. We develop a framework for understanding the existence of asymptotically flat solutions to the static result is obtained, giving a partial resolution of a conjecture of Bartnik on such static vacuum

Anderson, Michael

289

THE STATIC EXTENSION PROBLEM IN GENERAL RELATIVITY MICHAEL T. ANDERSON AND MARCUS A. KHURI  

E-print Network

THE STATIC EXTENSION PROBLEM IN GENERAL RELATIVITY MICHAEL T. ANDERSON AND MARCUS A. KHURI Abstract. We develop a framework for understanding the existence of asymptotically flat solutions to the static existence result is obtained, giving a partial resolution of a conjecture of Bartnik on such static vacuum

Anderson, Michael

290

LEGO MindStorms: Not Just for K-12 Anymore Frank Klassner, Scott D. Anderson  

E-print Network

LEGO MindStorms: Not Just for K-12 Anymore Frank Klassner, Scott D. Anderson Department the possibility of using the Lego Mindstorms robots to support the ACM Computing Curriculum 2001, using them 2001, curriculum development, robotics, Lego Mindstorms Introduction The fields of Robotics

Klassner, Frank

291

In Search of a Statistically Valid Volatility Risk Factor Robert M. Anderson  

E-print Network

Berkeley. We thank Peter Bickel, Robert Korajczyk, James Sefton, Roger Stein and James Xiong for insightfulIn Search of a Statistically Valid Volatility Risk Factor Robert M. Anderson Stephen W. Bianchi discussions about the material in this article. We gratefully acknowledge comments from Andrew Ang, Robert J

Anderson, Robert M.

292

M.D. Anderson study finds previously unconnected molecular networks conspire to promote cancer:  

Cancer.gov

An inflammation-promoting protein triggers deactivation of a tumor-suppressor that usually blocks cancer formation via the NOTCH signaling pathway, a team of researchers led by scientists at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center reports today in Molecular Cell.

293

UT MD Anderson study finds advances in breast cancer don't extend to older women:  

Cancer.gov

The survival rates for older women with breast cancer lag behind younger women diagnosed with the disease, indicating that the elder population may be missing out on improvements in treatment and detection, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

294

Anderson localization in a two-particle continuous model with an alloy-type external potential  

E-print Network

We establish exponential localization for a two-particle Anderson model in a Euclidean space ${\\mathbb R}^{d}$, $d\\ge 1$, in presence of a non-trivial short-range interaction and a random external potential of the alloy type. Specifically, we prove that all eigenfunctions with eigenvalues near the lower edge of the spectrum decay exponentially in $L^2$-norm.

A. Boutet de Monvel; V. Chulaevsky; P. Stollmann; Y. Suhov

2009-07-09

295

PROOF COPY [BS7335] 068124PRB Hopping perturbation treatment the periodic Anderson model around atomic limit  

E-print Network

model #PAM# #Ref. one main models studying strongly correlated electrons heavy­fermion systems, mixed Anderson model with strongly correlated subsystems of d f electrons on­site hybridization is investigated, system correlated d f electrons be treated exactly. The delocalization of electrons corresponding

Entel, P.

296

MD Anderson study finds inflammatory mediator promotes colorectal cancer by stifling protective genes:  

Cancer.gov

Chronic inflammation combines with DNA methylation, a process that shuts down cancer-fighting genes, to promote development of colorectal cancer, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report today in the advance online publication of the journal Nature Medicine.

297

MD Anderson develops prognostic model for MDS related to prior cancer therapy  

Cancer.gov

A large-scale analysis of patients whose myelodysplastic syndrome is related to earlier cancer treatment overturns the notion that all of them have a poor prognosis, researchers from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

298

MD Anderson study finds tamoxifen causes significant side effects in male breast cancer patients:  

Cancer.gov

About half of male breast cancer patients who take the drug tamoxifen to prevent their disease from returning report side effects such as weight gain and sexual dysfunction, which prompts more than 20 percent of them to discontinue treatment, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

299

Real-Time Character Animation for Computer Games Eike F Anderson  

E-print Network

three-dimensional game characters which are real-time animated inside the virtual environment into the virtual environment that are non-essential for the game itself, but which will be recognisable as naturalReal-Time Character Animation for Computer Games Eike F Anderson National Centre for Computer

Davies, Christopher

300

PLAYING SMART ANOTHER LOOK AT ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN COMPUTER GAMES Eike F Anderson  

E-print Network

controlled NPCs (non-player characters = virtual entities) in the game does not "feel right". The behaviour1 PLAYING SMART ­ ANOTHER LOOK AT ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN COMPUTER GAMES Eike F Anderson12 5BB, UK E-mail: eanderson@bournemouth.ac.uk KEYWORDS artificial intelligence, computer games, non

Davies, Christopher

301

Anderson Localization for the Almost Mathieu Equation, III. SemiUniform Localization, Continuity of  

E-print Network

Anderson Localization for the Almost Mathieu Equation, III. Semi­Uniform Localization, Continuity Mathieu operator, (H !;â??;` \\Psi)(n) = \\Psi(n + 1) + \\Psi(n \\Gamma 1) +â?? cos(Ã?!n + `)\\Psi(n), has semi Introduction In this paper we study localization for the almost Mathieu operator H !;â??;` acting on ` 2 (Z): (H

302

Affective Influences on the Attentional Dynamics Supporting Awareness Adam K. Anderson  

E-print Network

Affective Influences on the Attentional Dynamics Supporting Awareness Adam K. Anderson University expe- rience (e.g., Ochsner, 2000), its shaping of initial perceptual experience is less appreciated on the allocation of attention (e.g., Joseph, Chun, & Nakayama, 1997; Mack & Rock, 1998; Ross & Jolicoeur, 1999

Toronto, University of

303

Comprehensive proofs of localization in Anderson models with interaction. I. Two-particle localization estimates  

E-print Network

We discuss the techniques and results of the multi-particle Anderson localization theory for disordered quantum systems with nontrivial interaction. After a detailed presentation of the approach developed earlier by Aizenman and Warzel, we extend their results to the models with exponentially decaying, infinite-range interaction.

Victor Chulaevsky

2014-10-04

304

Plate Tectonics as a Far-From-Equilibrium Self-Organized System Don L. Anderson  

E-print Network

Plate Tectonics as a Far- From- Equilibrium Self-Organized System By Don L. Anderson Word Count: 3 and other forces at the top. Plate tectonics was once regarded as passive motion of plates on top of mantle convection cells but it now appears that continents and plate tectonics organize the flow in the mantle

Anderson, Don L.

305

MD Anderson study finds side effects, complications, and mastectomy are more likely after partial breast irradiation:  

Cancer.gov

Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) brachytherapy, the localized form of radiation therapy growing increasingly popular as a treatment choice for women with early-stage breast cancer, is associated with higher rate of later mastectomy, increased radiation-related toxicities and post-operative complications, compared to traditional whole breast irradiation (WBI), according to researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

306

Shouting to be Heard in Advertising Simon P. Anderson and Andr de Palma  

E-print Network

Shouting to be Heard in Advertising Simon P. Anderson and André de Palma July 2011 revised October 2012 Abstract Advertising competes for scarce consumer attention, so more profitable advertisers send of loud shouters or large range of quiet whisperers. All advertisers prefer there to be less shouting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

307

Age of Acquisition in Connectionist Networks Karen L. Anderson (kanders@cs.ucsd.edu)  

E-print Network

A is a stronger predictor of final Sum Squared Error than frequency. In this paper, we replicate Smith et al as a direct measure of AoA in connectionist networks, Smith, Cottrell & Anderson (in press) have shown that Ao determines AoA? We have found that even very weak pattern similarity structure is a strong predictor of Ao

Cottrell, Garrison W.

308

Climate Indicators of Salmon Survival12 James J. Anderson3 and Richard A. Hinrichsen2  

E-print Network

1 Climate Indicators of Salmon Survival12 James J. Anderson3 and Richard A. Hinrichsen2 School the Columbia River, salmon survival and catch measures were correlated with several Pacific Northwest climate indices. Spring chinook survival rate and catch were varied with the Pacific Northwest climate index (PNI

Washington at Seattle, University of

309

MD Anderson study finds everolimus prolongs progression-free survival for patients with neuroendocrine tumors:  

Cancer.gov

Combination treatment with everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target rapamycin (mTOR), and octreotide has shown to improve progression-free survival for patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors and a history of carcinoid syndrome, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

310

On the Stability of Web Crawling and Web Reid Anderson1  

E-print Network

On the Stability of Web Crawling and Web Search Reid Anderson1 , Christian Borgs1 , Jennifer Chayes moti- vated by web crawling. We introduce a notion of stable cores, which is the set of web pages that are usually contained in the crawling buffer when the buffer size is smaller than the total number of web

Chaudhuri, Surajit

311

Economic Impact of the 32nd Annual Peter Anderson Arts and Crafts Festival, Ocean Springs, Mississippi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluating the Economic Impact of Festivals and Special Events: Lessons From the 32st Annual Peter Anderson Arts and Crafts Festival in Ocean Springs, Mississippi Background: Festivals are an integral part of the economies of most communities in Mississippi. The economic benefits of festivals can be assigned a dollar value, but no amount of money will accurately reflect the personal and

Albert E. Myles; Rachael Carter

2011-01-01

312

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power

Meuleman; G. Allyn

1987-01-01

313

UT MD Anderson study finds metabolic protein plays unexpected role in tumor cell formation and growth:  

Cancer.gov

The embryonic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has a well-established role in metabolism and is highly expressed in human cancers. Now, a team led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in advance online publication of the journal Nature that PKM2 has important non-metabolic functions in cancer formation.

314

Ac-conductivity and electromagnetic energy absorption for the Anderson model in linear response theory  

E-print Network

We continue our study of the ac-conductivity in linear response theory for the Anderson model using the conductivity measure. We establish further properties of the conductivity measure, including nontriviality at nonzero temperature, the high temperature limit, and asymptotics with respect to the disorder. We also calculate the electromagnetic energy absorption in linear response theory in terms of the conductivity measure.

Abel Klein; Peter Müller

2014-03-03

315

BLACK, WHITE, AND SHADES OF GREY (AND BROWN AND YELLOW) Margo Anderson  

E-print Network

BLACK, WHITE, AND SHADES OF GREY (AND BROWN AND YELLOW) Margo Anderson Department of History that investigates the alleged differences in ``intelligence'' among population groups, such as in Herrnstein about whether, for example, differences in intelligence, however measured, are related to differences

316

An assessment of global and regional sea level for years 1993-2007 in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We provide an assessment of sea level simulated in a suite of global ocean-sea ice models using the interannual CORE atmospheric state to determine surface ocean boundary buoyancy and momentum fluxes. These CORE-II simulations are compared amongst themselves as well as to observation-based estimates. We focus on the final 15 years of the simulations (1993-2007), as this is a period where the CORE-II atmospheric state is well sampled, and it allows us to compare sea level related fields to both satellite and in situ analyses. The ensemble mean of the CORE-II simulations broadly agree with various global and regional observation-based analyses during this period, though with the global mean thermosteric sea level rise biased low relative to observation-based analyses. The simulations reveal a positive trend in dynamic sea level in the west Pacific and negative trend in the east, with this trend arising from wind shifts and regional changes in upper 700 m ocean heat content. The models also exhibit a thermosteric sea level rise in the subpolar North Atlantic associated with a transition around 1995/1996 of the North Atlantic Oscillation to its negative phase, and the advection of warm subtropical waters into the subpolar gyre. Sea level trends are predominantly associated with steric trends, with thermosteric effects generally far larger than halosteric effects, except in the Arctic and North Atlantic. There is a general anti-correlation between thermosteric and halosteric effects for much of the World Ocean, associated with density compensated changes.

Griffies, Stephen M.; Yin, Jianjun; Durack, Paul J.; Goddard, Paul; Bates, Susan C.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus W.; Bozec, Alexandra; Chassignet, Eric; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Domingues, Catia M.; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Holland, David M.; Ilicak, Mehmet; Large, William G.; Lorbacher, Katja; Lu, Jianhua; Marsland, Simon J.; Mishra, Akhilesh; George Nurser, A. J.; Salas y Mélia, David; Palter, Jaime B.; Samuels, Bonita L.; Schröter, Jens; Schwarzkopf, Franziska U.; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Treguier, Anne Marie; Tseng, Yu-heng; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Winton, Michael; Zhang, Xuebin

2014-06-01

317

There is evidence for a positive correlation between the level of Varroa desructor Anderson  

E-print Network

study was designed to test if brood attraction also can be affected by the chemotherapeutic history prior to the start of the experi- ment and fed sugar syrup until colonies had similar reserves of food the antibiotics. Fumidil B was delivered in 1:1 sugar syrup and Terramycin was delivered in pow- dered sugar, both

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

The effects of add-on low-dose memantine on cytokine levels in bipolar II depression: a 12-week double-blind, randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

Memantine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist with a mood-stabilizing effect, and an association between bipolar disorder and proinflammatory cytokine levels have been reported. Whether adding-on memantine would reduce cytokine levels and is more effective than valproic acid (VPA) alone in bipolar II disorder was investigated. A randomized, double-blind, controlled, 12-week study was conducted. Patients undergoing regular VPA treatments were randomly assigned to a group: VPA + memantine (5 mg/d) (n = 106) or VPA + placebo (n = 108). The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were used to evaluate clinical response. Symptom severity, plasma tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?), interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, and IL-1 levels were examined during weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. To adjust within-subject dependence over repeated assessments, multiple linear regressions with generalized estimating equation methods were used to examine the therapeutic effect. Tumor necrosis factor ? levels were significantly lower in the VPA + memantine group than in the VPA + placebo group (P = 0.013). Posttreatment HDRS and YMRS scores decreased significantly in both groups, but not significant, nor was the other between-group cytokine level difference pretreatment and posttreatment. The HDRS score changes were significantly associated with IL-6 (P = 0.012) and IL-1 (P = 0.005) level changes and changes in YMRS score changes with TNF-? (P = 0.005) level changes. Treating bipolar II depression with VPA + memantine may improve the plasma TNF-? level. However, adding-on memantine may not improve clinical symptoms or cytokine levels other than TNF-?. Clinical symptoms may be correlated with certain cytokines. PMID:24717258

Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Po See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Yu-Shan; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I Hui; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

2014-06-01

319

GGT levels in type II diabetic patients with acute coronary syndrome (does diabetes have any effect on GGT levels in acute coronary syndrome?).  

PubMed

Elevated gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) level is independently correlated with conditions associated with increased atherosclerosis, such as obesity, elevated serum cholesterol, high blood pressure and myocardial infarction. It is demonstrated that serum GGT activity is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction and cardiac death in patients with coronary artery disease. Diabetes is also a well-known cardiovascular risk factor and an equivalent of coronary artery disease. Although the relationship between GGT and coronary artery disease has been reported, there are limited data exploring the changes of GGT in acute coronary syndromes, especially in patients with diabetes. So, this study aimed to determine changes in GGT level in diabetic and non-diabetic acute coronary syndromes. This trial was carried out at Kosuyolu Cardiovascular Training and Research Hospital and Van Yuksek Ihtisas Hospital, Turkey. A total of 219 patients (177 men and 42 women) presenting with acute coronary syndrome) and 51 control subjects between September 2007 and September 2008 were included in the study. Serum ?-glutamyltransferase and serum lipoprotein levels were determined. The resuls indicated that serum GGT levels were higher in acute coronary syndrome patients compared with control. In subgroup analyses, there was no difference between diabetic and non-diabetic subgroups. There was also weak correlation between GGT and blood glucose levels. There was no correlation between GGT and serum lipoprotein levels. In conclusion, serum GGT levels were higher in acute coronary syndrome patients. In subgroup analyses, There was no difference between diabetic and non diabetic subgroup. PMID:20625912

Emiroglu, Mehmet Yunus; Esen, Ozlem Batukan; Bulut, Mustafa; Karapinar, Hekim; Kaya, Zekeriya; Akcakoyun, Mustafa; Kargin, Ramazan; Aung, Soe Moe; Alizade, Elnur; Pala, Selcuk; Esen, Ali Metin

2013-02-01

320

Results of a nationwide screening for Anderson-Fabry disease among dialysis patients.  

PubMed

Anderson-Fabry disease is possibly underdiagnosed in patients with end-stage renal disease. Nationwide screening was therefore undertaken for Anderson-Fabry disease among dialysis patients in Austria. Screening for alpha-galactosidase A (AGAL) deficiency was performed by a blood spot test. In patients with a positive screening test, AGAL activity in leukocytes was determined. Individuals with decreased leukocyte AGAL activity were subjected to mutation testing in the GLA gene. Fifty (90.9%) of 55 Austrian hemodialysis centers participated in this study; 2480 dialysis patients (80.1% of the Austrian dialysis population) were screened. In 85 patients, the screening test was positive (85 of 2480, 3.42%; women, 3.32%; men, 3.50%). Among these 85 patients, 4 men (in 3 of whom Anderson-Fabry disease was already known before screening) had a severely decreased and 11 subjects had a borderline low AGAL activity. Genetic testing revealed mutations associated with Fabry disease in all four men with severely decreased AGAL activity resulting in a prevalence of 0.161% for the entire study population. A nationwide screening of dialysis patients permitted detection of a hitherto unknown man with Anderson-Fabry disease. The overall prevalence among dialysis patients was at least ten times higher as compared with recent registry data. Screening programs among patients with end-stage renal disease, especially men, should be put in place to identify families with Anderson-Fabry disease who probably may benefit from specific clinical care, and perhaps from enzyme replacement therapy. In dialysis patients, however, there is no evidence to support enzyme replacement therapy at present. PMID:15100373

Kotanko, Peter; Kramar, Reinhard; Devrnja, Danijela; Paschke, Eduard; Voigtländer, Till; Auinger, Martin; Pagliardini, Severo; Spada, Marco; Demmelbauer, Klaus; Lorenz, Matthias; Hauser, Anna-Christine; Kofler, Hans-Jörg; Lhotta, Karl; Neyer, Ulrich; Pronai, Wolfgang; Wallner, Manfred; Wieser, Clemens; Wiesholzer, Martin; Zodl, Herbert; Födinger, Manuela; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

2004-05-01

321

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

Meuleman, G. Allyn

1987-06-01

322

Combined linkage and association studies show that HLA class II variants control levels of antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus antigens.  

PubMed

Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA) or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p?=?5×10(-5) for rs9268403). The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p?=?0.02). In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL. PMID:25025336

Pedergnana, Vincent; Syx, Laurène; Cobat, Aurélie; Guergnon, Julien; Brice, Pauline; Fermé, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Le-Pendeven, Catherine; Amiel, Corinne; Taoufik, Yassine; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Theodorou, Ioannis; Besson, Caroline; Abel, Laurent

2014-01-01

323

Combined Linkage and Association Studies Show that HLA Class II Variants Control Levels of Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens  

PubMed Central

Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA) or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p?=?5×10–5 for rs9268403). The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p?=?0.02). In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL. PMID:25025336

Cobat, Aurelie; Guergnon, Julien; Brice, Pauline; Ferme, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Pendeven, Catherine Le-; Amiel, Corinne; Taoufik, Yassine; Alcais, Alexandre; Theodorou, Ioannis; Besson, Caroline; Abel, Laurent

2014-01-01

324

Uniform N-particle Anderson localization and unimodal eigenstates in deterministic disordered media without induction on the number of particles  

E-print Network

We present the first rigorous result on Anderson localization for interacting systems of quantum particles subject to a deterministic (e.g., almost periodic) disordered external potential. For a particular class of deterministic, fermionic, Anderson-type Hamiltonians on the lattice of an arbitrary dimension, and for a large class of underlying dynamical systems generating the external potential, we prove that the spectrum is pure point, all eigenstates are unimodal and feature a uniform exponential decay. In contrast to all prior mathematical works on multi-particle Anderson localization, we do not use the induction on the number of particles.

Victor Chulaevsky

2014-02-27

325

Evidence of non-mean-field-like low-temperature behavior in the Edwards-Anderson spin-glass model.  

PubMed

The three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson and mean-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin glasses are studied via large-scale Monte Carlo simulations at low temperatures, deep within the spin-glass phase. Performing a careful statistical analysis of several thousand independent disorder realizations and using an observable that detects peaks in the overlap distribution, we show that the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and Edwards-Anderson models have a distinctly different low-temperature behavior. The structure of the spin-glass overlap distribution for the Edwards-Anderson model suggests that its low-temperature phase has only a single pair of pure states. PMID:23215219

Yucesoy, B; Katzgraber, Helmut G; Machta, J

2012-10-26

326

Mercury and selected pesticide levels in fish and wildlife of Utah: II. levels of mercury, DDT, DDE, dieldrin and PCB in chukars, pheasants and waterfowl  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Levels of mercury and selected pesticides were determined in muscle tissue of chukars, pheasants and waterfowl collected from various regions within the state of Utah. None of the chukar tissue 6% of the pheasant tissue and 4% of the waterfowl tissue analyzed contained mercury concentrations greater than the FDA limit of 0.5 ppm. None of the chukars or pheasants

F. A. Smith; R. P. Sharma; R. I. Lynn; J. B. Low

1974-01-01

327

Characterization of human metal ESD reference discharge event and correlation of generator parameters to failure levels-part II: correlation of generator parameters to failure levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most electrostatic discharge (ESD) generators are built in accordance with the IEC 61000-4-2 specifications. It is shown, that the voltage induced in a small loop correlates with the failure level observed in an ESD failure test on the systems comprised of fast CMOS devices, while rise time and derivative of the discharge current did not correlate well. The electric parameters

Kai Wang; David Pommerenke; Ramachandran Chundru; Tom Van Doren; Federico Pio Centola; Jiu Sheng Huang

2004-01-01

328

March 17 - 19, 2004: Low-level processing of proteomics spectra, Kevin Coombes  

Cancer.gov

Low-level processing of proteomics spectra Kevin Coombes Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics UT M.D.Anderson Cancer Center Overview z Background and motivation z Description of data set for methodology development and testing z Wavelet

329

Elevated testosterone levels during rat pregnancy cause hypersensitivity to angiotensin II and attenuation of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in uterine arteries.  

PubMed

Elevated testosterone levels increase maternal blood pressure and decrease uterine blood flow in pregnancy, resulting in abnormal perinatal outcomes. We tested whether elevated testosterone alters uterine artery adaptations during pregnancy, and whether these alterations depend on endothelium-derived factors such as nitric oxide, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, and prostacyclin, or endothelium-independent mechanisms such as angiotensin II (Ang-II). Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with vehicle (n=20) or testosterone propionate (0.5 mg/kg per day from gestation day 15 to 19; n=20). Plasma testosterone levels increased 2-fold in testosterone-injected rats compared with controls. Elevated testosterone significantly decreased placental and pup weights compared with controls. In endothelium-intact uterine arteries, contractile responses to thromboxane, phenylephrine, and Ang-II were greater in testosterone-treated rats compared with controls. In endothelium-denuded arteries, contractile responses to Ang-II (pD2=9.1±0.04 versus 8.7±0.04 in controls; P<0.05), but not thromboxane and phenylephrine, were greater in testosterone-treated rats. Ang-II type 1b receptor expression was increased, whereas Ang-II type 2 receptor was decreased in testosterone-exposed arteries. In endothelium-denuded arteries, relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were unaffected. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was significantly lower in arteries from testosterone-treated dams (Emax=51.80±6.9% versus 91.98±1.4% in controls; P<0.05). The assessment of endothelial factors showed that nitric oxide-, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-, and prostacyclin-mediated relaxations were blunted in testosterone-treated dams. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase, small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel-3, and prostacyclin receptor expressions were significantly decreased in arteries from testosterone-treated dams. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1?, Ankrd37, and Egln were significantly increased in testosterone-exposed placentas. These results suggest that elevated maternal testosterone impairs uterine vascular function, which may lead to an increased vascular resistance and a decrease in uterine blood flow. PMID:24842922

Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; Blesson, Chellakkan S; Vincent, Kathleen L; Saade, George R; Hankins, Gary D; Yallampalli, Chandra; Sathishkumar, Kunju

2014-08-01

330

Characteristics of annual laminae gray level variations in a stalagmite from Shihua Cave, Beijing and its climatic significance (II)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The annual laminae gray level variations in the stalagmite TS9501 of Shihua Cave, Beijing are studied in detail. The environmental\\u000a factors influencing the laminae gray level are also analyzed. The following conditions may be necessary to the study on the\\u000a lamina gray level. A) The seasonal differences of climate in the studied area are strong. B) The cave has a

Xiaoguang Qin; Ming Tan; Dongsheng Liu; Tungsheng Liu; Xianfeng Wang; Tieying Li; Jinpo Lü

2000-01-01

331

Superexchange in magnetic insulators: an interpretation of the metal-metal charge transfer energy in the Anderson theory.  

PubMed

The superexchange interactions in four three-center model systems A-L-B, for A and B being paramagnetic centers and L a diamagnetic bridging ligand, are analyzed by valence bond configuration interaction models in combination with fourth-order perturbation theory. We analyze the four distinct cases where a bridging ligand orbital simultaneously interacts with half-filled orbitals localized on A and B (case i), a half-filled orbital localized on A and an empty orbital localized on B (case ii), a full orbital localized on A and a half-filled orbital localized on B (case iii), and finally a full orbital localized on A and an empty orbital localized on B (case iv). In all four cases we compare our new results using localized orbitals with the equivalent results obtained using the Anderson ansatz of delocalized (magnetic) orbitals. The effective metal-to-metal electron transfer energy Ueff in the old formalism with delocalized orbitals is expressed in terms of the metal-to-metal electron transfer energy U and the ligand-to-metal electron transfer energy delta using localized orbitals. We find that the old formalism containing only Ueff is in general not sufficient. For cases i and ii we show that Ueff can be regarded as an effective U strongly reduced with respect to the free ion as a result of hybridization effects, whereas the same reduction of U for the cases iii and iv is not possible. The relevance and applicability of our theoretical results is demonstrated on magnetochemical data from the literature. PMID:12526436

Weihe, H; Güdel, H U; Toftlund, H

2000-04-01

332

Sound levels forecasting for city-centers Part II: effect of source model parameters on sound level in built-up area  

Microsoft Academic Search

To control an environmental noise the simulation programs are the best tools. The computer simulation program PROP5, that allows predicting the time-average sound level within an urban system, contains road traffic as noise source. In the applied source model a road is represented by a sum of the sound exposures due to individual vehicle drive-by. The PROP5 allows the multi-lanes

E. Walerian; R. Janczur; M. Czechowicz

2001-01-01

333

Configuration mixing of the level (23 537)o9\\/2 in Nd II deduced from the optical isotope shifts by collinear fast-ion-beam laser spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The optical isotope shifts in the transition 4f4 5d 6 K9\\/2 -(23 537)9\\/20 (5702 ) of Nd II by collinear fast-ion-beam laser spectroscopy have been used to deduce for the first time that the mixing probabilities of the configurations 4f3 5d2 , 4f4 6p and 4f3 5d6s of the level (23 537)9\\/20 are 0.84, 0.15 and 0.01 respectively.

Wang Yansen; Lu Fuquan; Wy Songmao; Shi Wei; Song Linggen; Tang Jiayong; Yang Fujia

1991-01-01

334

Growth Hormone Concentration and Disappearance Rate, Insulin-Like Growth Factors I and II and Insulin Levels in Iron-Deficient Veal Calves  

Microsoft Academic Search

In calves with severe iron (Fe) deficiency, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels and IGF-I responses to exogenous growth hormone (GH) are reduced, while insulin-dependent glucose utilization is enhanced. Blood plasma concentrations of im-munoreactive insulin (IRI), IGF-I, IGF-II and GH, and the half-life of blood plasma GH [after an i.v. injection of recom-binant bovine GH (rbGH; 100 ?g rbGH\\/kg body weight)

Anne Ceppi; Primus E. Mullis; Ernst Eggenberger; Jürg W. Blum

1994-01-01

335

Statistical theory of a quantum emitter strongly coupled to Anderson-localized modes  

E-print Network

A statistical theory of the coupling between a quantum emitter and Anderson-localized cavity modes is presented based on a dyadic Green's function formalism. The probability of achieving the strong light-matter coupling regime is extracted for an experimentally realistic system composed of InAs quantum dots embedded in a disordered photonic crystal waveguide. We demonstrate that by engineering the relevant parameters that define the quality of light confinement, i.e. the light localization length and the loss length, strong coupling between a single quantum dot and an Anderson-localized cavity is within experimental reach. As a consequence of disorder-induced light confinement provides a novel platform for quantum electrodynamics experiments.

Henri Thyrrestrup; Stephan Smolka; Luca Sapienza; Peter Lodahl

2011-12-23

336

Statistical theory of a quantum emitter strongly coupled to Anderson-localized modes  

E-print Network

A statistical theory of the coupling between a quantum emitter and Anderson-localized cavity modes is presented based on a dyadic Green's function formalism. The probability of achieving the strong light-matter coupling regime is extracted for an experimentally realistic system composed of InAs quantum dots embedded in a disordered photonic crystal waveguide. We demonstrate that by engineering the relevant parameters that define the quality of light confinement, i.e. the light localization length and the loss length, strong coupling between a single quantum dot and an Anderson-localized cavity is within experimental reach. As a consequence of disorder-induced light confinement provides a novel platform for quantum electrodynamics experiments.

Thyrrestrup, Henri; Sapienza, Luca; Lodahl, Peter

2011-01-01

337

Statistical theory of a quantum emitter strongly coupled to Anderson-localized modes.  

PubMed

A statistical theory of the coupling between a quantum emitter and Anderson-localized cavity modes is presented based on a dyadic Green's function formalism. The probability of achieving the strong light-matter coupling regime is extracted for an experimentally realistic system composed of InAs quantum dots embedded in a disordered photonic crystal waveguide. We demonstrate that by engineering the relevant parameters that define the quality of light confinement, i.e., the light localization length and the loss length, strong coupling between a single quantum dot and an Anderson-localized cavity is within experimental reach. As a consequence, confining light by disorder provides a novel platform for quantum electrodynamics experiments. PMID:22540472

Thyrrestrup, Henri; Smolka, Stephan; Sapienza, Luca; Lodahl, Peter

2012-03-16

338

Mild solution to parabolic Anderson model in Gaussian and Poisson potential  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider the parabolic Anderson model in a special random homogeneous potential that is generated by the Gaussian and Poisson random medium together. In our model, the coefficient V(x) is not Hölder continuous with positive probability, and thus the model is unlikely to have a path-wise solution. We construct a mild solution for the parabolic Anderson model with random potential of the form -V(x)=-int _{{R}^d}K(y-x)[? (dy)+W(dy)], where ? and W denote the independent standard Poisson point process and centred Gaussian field, respectively. The case where the potential switches in sign and the Poisson field is absent is handled as well.

Han, Yuecai; Zhang, Liwei

2013-10-01

339

Suicide risk assessment and risk formulation part II: Suicide risk formulation and the determination of levels of risk.  

PubMed

The suicide risk formulation (SRF) is dependent on the data gathered in the suicide risk assessment. The SRF assigns a level of suicide risk that is intended to inform decisions about triage, treatment, management, and preventive interventions. However, there is little published about how to stratify and formulate suicide risk, what are the criteria for assigning levels of risk, and how triage and treatment decisions are correlated with levels of risk. The salient clinical issues that define an SRF are reviewed and modeling is suggested for an SRF that might guide clinical researchers toward the refinement of an SRF process. PMID:24286521

Berman, Alan L; Silverman, Morton M

2014-08-01

340

Absolutely continuous spectrum for the Anderson model on a product of a tree with a finite graph  

E-print Network

We prove the almost sure existence of absolutely continuous spectrum at low disorder for the Anderson model on the simplest example of a product of a regular tree with a finite graph. This graph contains loops of unbounded size.

Richard Froese; Florina Halasan; David Hasler

2010-08-17

341

Accounting for Interrupts in Multiprocessor RealTime Systems # Bj orn B. Brandenburg, Hennadiy Leontyev, and James H. Anderson  

E-print Network

Accounting for Interrupts in Multiprocessor Real­Time Systems # BjË? orn B. Brandenburg, Hennadiy Leontyev, and James H. Anderson The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Abstract The importance

Anderson, James

342

10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS...Insurance, in Law and Administration in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony...

2011-01-01

343

10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS...Insurance, in Law and Administration in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony...

2010-01-01

344

10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS...Insurance, in Law and Administration in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony...

2012-01-01

345

77 FR 72906 - Chessie Logistics Co., LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FD 35700] Chessie Logistics Co., LLC--Acquisition and...Anderson & Son, Inc. Chessie Logistics Co., LLC (Chessie), a noncarrier...Erbacher, Legal Counsel, Chessie Logistics Co., LLC, 1001 Green Bay Rd., Unit 204,...

2012-12-06

346

Observation of migrating transverse Anderson localizations of light in nonlocal media.  

PubMed

We report the experimental observation of the interaction and attraction of many localized modes in a two-dimensional system realized by a disordered optical fiber supporting transverse Anderson localization. We show that a nonlocal optically nonlinear response of thermal origin alters the localization length by an amount determined by the optical power and also induces an action at a distance between the localized modes and their spatial migration. Evidence of a collective and strongly interacting regime is given. PMID:24877941

Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

2014-05-16

347

Greek M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory: Validation and Utility in Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) is a brief assessment of the severity and impact of cancer-related symptoms. The purpose of this study was the translation and validation of the questionnaire in Greek (G-MDASI). Methods: The translation and validation of the assessment took place at a Pain Relief and Palliative Care Unit. The final validation sample included 150 cancer

Kyriaki Mystakidou; Charles Cleeland; Eleni Tsilika; Emmanuela Katsouda; Aphrodite Primikiri; Efi Parpa; Lambros Vlahos; Tito Mendoza

2004-01-01

348

Direct observation of Anderson localization of matter waves in a controlled disorder.  

PubMed

In 1958, Anderson predicted the localization of electronic wavefunctions in disordered crystals and the resulting absence of diffusion. It is now recognized that Anderson localization is ubiquitous in wave physics because it originates from the interference between multiple scattering paths. Experimentally, localization has been reported for light waves, microwaves, sound waves and electron gases. However, there has been no direct observation of exponential spatial localization of matter waves of any type. Here we observe exponential localization of a Bose-Einstein condensate released into a one-dimensional waveguide in the presence of a controlled disorder created by laser speckle. We operate in a regime of pure Anderson localization, that is, with weak disorder-such that localization results from many quantum reflections of low amplitude-and an atomic density low enough to render interactions negligible. We directly image the atomic density profiles as a function of time, and find that weak disorder can stop the expansion and lead to the formation of a stationary, exponentially localized wavefunction-a direct signature of Anderson localization. We extract the localization length by fitting the exponential wings of the profiles, and compare it to theoretical calculations. The power spectrum of the one-dimensional speckle potentials has a high spatial frequency cutoff, causing exponential localization to occur only when the de Broglie wavelengths of the atoms in the expanding condensate are greater than an effective mobility edge corresponding to that cutoff. In the opposite case, we find that the density profiles decay algebraically, as predicted in ref. 13. The method presented here can be extended to localization of atomic quantum gases in higher dimensions, and with controlled interactions. PMID:18548065

Billy, Juliette; Josse, Vincent; Zuo, Zhanchun; Bernard, Alain; Hambrecht, Ben; Lugan, Pierre; Clément, David; Sanchez-Palencia, Laurent; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain

2008-06-12

349

Multi-particle dynamical localization in a continuous Anderson model with an alloy-type potential  

E-print Network

This paper is a complement to our earlier work \\cite{BCSS10b}. With the help of the multi-scale analysis, we derive, from estimates obtained in \\cite{BCSS10b}, dynamical localization for a multi-particle Anderson model in a Euclidean space $\\D{R}^{d}$, $d\\geq 1$, with a short-range interaction, subject to a random alloy-type potential.

Victor Chulaevsky; Anne Boutet de Monvel; Yuri Suhov

2010-07-22

350

COMPLETE LOCALISATION IN THE PARABOLIC ANDERSON MODEL WITH PARETO-DISTRIBUTED POTENTIAL  

E-print Network

for the heat equation tu(t, z) = u(t, z) + (z)u(t, z) on (0, ) � Zd with random potential ((z): z Zd ). We and main results 1.1 The parabolic Anderson model and intermittency We consider the heat equation, Feynman-Kac formula. 1 #12;2 WOLFGANG K¨ONIG, PETER M¨ORTERS, AND NADIA SIDOROVA islands. This effect

351

Psychiatric and cognitive profile in Anderson-Fabry patients: a preliminary study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked inherited lysosomal storage disorder disease caused by a deficiency in the activity\\u000a of the ?-galactosidase enzyme. We investigated neuropsychological and psychiatric function in AFD patients. We studied 16\\u000a AFD patients, aged 7 to 61 years. Intelligence, language, vision-spatial abilities, memory, sensorimotor abilities, and attention\\u000a and executive functions were tested with a computerized test battery as

Perri Segal; Yoav Kohn; Yehuda Pollak; Gheona Altarescu; Esti Galili-Weisstub; Annick Raas-Rothschild

2010-01-01

352

Cellular dynamical mean-field theory of the periodic Anderson model  

Microsoft Academic Search

We develop a cluster dynamical mean-field theory of the periodic Anderson model in three dimensions, taking a cluster of two sites as a basic reference frame. The mean-field theory displays the basic features of the Doniach phase diagram: a paramagnetic Fermi liquid state, an antiferromagnetic state, and a transition between them. In contrast with spin-density wave theories, the transition is

Lorenzo de Leo; Marcello Civelli; Gabriel Kotliar

2008-01-01

353

Natural history of the respiratory involvement in Anderson–Fabry disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary\\u000a Background:  Anderson–Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked disorder caused by deficient activity of enzyme ?-galactosidase A, resulting in\\u000a the accumulation of glycosphingolipids within lysosomes. Pulmonary involvement in AFD has previously been documented, but\\u000a until now has been studied only in a few series of patients without any longitudinal follow-up. The aim of this study was\\u000a to compare spirometric changes in

S. Magage; J.-C. Lubanda; Z. Susa; J. Bultas; D. Karetová; R. Dobrovolný; M. H?ebí?ek; D. P. Germain; A. Linhart

2007-01-01

354

Long wavelength optical mode frequencies and the Anderson-Gruneisen parameter for alkali halide crystals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relation between long wavelength optical mode frequencies and the Anderson-Gruneisen parameter delta for alkali halides studied by Madan suffers from a mathematical error which is rectified in the present communication. A theoretical analysis of delta is presented adopting six potential functions for the short range repulsion energy. Values of delta and gammaTO calculated from the Varshni-Shukla potential are found

A. P. Gupta; Jai Shanker

1980-01-01

355

Are the phases in the Anderson model long-range correlated?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the local cumulative phases at single sites of the lattice for time-dependent wave functions in the Anderson model in d=2 and 3. In addition to a local linear trend, the phases exhibit some fluctuations. We study the time correlations of these fluctuations using detrended fluctuation analysis. Our results suggest that the phase fluctuations are long-range correlated, decaying as

Jan W. Kantelhardt; Richard Berkovits; Shlomo Havlin; Armin Bunde

1999-01-01

356

Efficient localization bounds in a continuous multi-particle Anderson model with long-range interaction  

E-print Network

We establish strong dynamical localization for a class of multi-particle Anderson models in a Euclidean space with an alloy-type random potential and a sub-exponentially decaying interaction of infinite range. For the first time in the mathematical literature, the uniform decay bounds on the eigenfunction correlators at low energies are proved, in the multi-particle continuous configuration space, in the norm-distance and not in the Hausdorff pseudo-metric.

Victor Chulaevsky

2014-07-17

357

Many electron variational ground state of the two dimensional Anderson lattice  

SciTech Connect

A variational upper bound of the ground state energy of two dimensional finite Anderson lattices is determined as a function of lattice size (up to 16 x 16). Two different sets of many-electron basis vectors are used to determine the ground state for all values of the coulomb integral U. This variational scheme has been successfully tested for one dimensional models and should give good estimates in two dimensions.

Zhou, Y.; Bowen, S.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials Science Div.; Mancini, J.D. [Fordham Univ., Bronx, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

1991-02-01

358

MD Anderson-led study finds LIFR protein suppresses breast cancer metastasis  

Cancer.gov

A receptor protein suppresses local invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells, the most lethal aspect of the disease, according to a research team headed by scientists from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Reporting in Nature Medicine, the team described using high-throughput RNA sequencing to identify the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) as a novel suppressor of breast cancer metastasis, the spread of the disease to other organs.

359

Characterization of diffuse emissions from the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico  

E-print Network

CHARACTERIZATION OF DIFFUSE EMISSIONS FROM THE CLINTON P. ANDERSON MESON PHYSICS FACILITY (LAMPF), LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY, NEW MEXICO A Thesis by NOEL DAVIS MONTGOMERY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1993 Major Subject: Health Physics CHARACTERIZATION OF DIFFUSE EMISSIONS FROM THE CLINTON P. ANDERSON MESON PHYSICS FACILITY (LAMPF), LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL...

Montgomery, Noel Davis

2012-06-07

360

Approximation of modified Anderson-Darling test statistics for extreme value distributions with unknown shape parameter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies of the goodness-of-fit test, which describes how well a model fits a set of observations with an assumed distribution, have long been the subject of statistical research. The selection of an appropriate probability distribution is generally based on goodness-of-fit tests. This test is an effective means of examining how well a sample data set agrees with an assumed probability distribution that represents its population. However, the empirical distribution function test gives equal weight to the differences between the empirical and theoretical distribution functions corresponding to all observations. The modified Anderson-Darling test, suggested by Ahmad et al. (1988), uses a weight function that emphasizes the tail deviations at the upper or lower tails. In this study, we derive new regression equation forms of the critical values for the modified Anderson-Darling test statistics considering the effect of unknown shape parameters. The regression equations are derived using simulation experiments for extreme value distributions such as the log-Gumbel, generalized Pareto, GEV, and generalized logistic models. In addition, power test and at-site frequency analyses are performed to evaluate the performance and to explain the applicability of the modified Anderson-Darling test.

Heo, Jun-Haeng; Shin, Hongjoon; Nam, Woosung; Om, Juseong; Jeong, Changsam

2013-08-01

361

Involvement of Difference in Decrease of Hemoglobin Level in Poor Prognosis of Stage I and II Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Implication in Outcome of Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the effect of hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and the difference in its decrease during treatment on outcome of radiotherapy (RT) alone for patients with Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 572 patients with Stage I-II nasopharyngeal carcinoma with RT alone between January 2001 and December 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. Patient characteristics, tumor variables, and Hb level, including pre-RT Hb, mid-RT Hb, and dynamic change of Hb between pre- and post- RT and its difference in decrease ( White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb) were subjected to univariate and multivariable analysis to identify factors that predict disease-specific survival (DSS), local regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS). Results: The 5-year DSS was poorer in the Hb continuous decrease group than in the Hb noncontinuous decrease group (84% vs. 89%; p = 0.008). There was poorer 5-year DSS in patients with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of >11.5 g/L than in those with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of {<=}11.5 g/L (82% vs. 89%; p = 0.001), and poorer LRFS (79% vs. 83%; p = 0.035). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that Hb decrease difference with greater than 11.5 g/L was an independent prognostic factor for DSS and LRFS. Conclusions: The difference in decrease of Hb level during the course of radiation treatment appeared as a poor prognostic factor in Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

Gao Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Anhui provincial hospital, Hefei (China); Tao Yalan; Li Guo; Yi Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xia Yunfei, E-mail: xiayf@sysucc.org.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

2012-03-15

362

The periodic Anderson model: Symmetry-based results and some exact solutions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The topic “magnetic impurities in metals” is certainly one of the most studied problems of the solid-state physics in the last years. The interest toward this argument relies on the fact that the interaction between the magnetic moment of the impurities and the conduction electrons of the host metal, is responsible for a large variety of physical phenomena. The simplest model that captures the essential physics of the systems previously mentioned is certainly the periodic Anderson model. This model appeared in the literature for the first time in 1961 in a paper by P.W. Anderson as an attempt to describe in a simplified way the effects of correlations for d-electrons in transition metals. The Hamiltonian of this model cannot be exactly solved in general. Nevertheless, exact results are known in some special cases. The argument of this review is the discussion of some of these exact solutions and the symmetry properties exhibited by the microscopic model Hamiltonian. The review has been organized in such a way that an introductory material is presented to make the main points intelligible to a non-specialist reader even though very recent developments on this topic are also presented. In particular, we will discuss special solutions of the model, holding in any dimension, when one of the interacting couplings of the model vanishes. We want to mention that, in spite of the crudeness of the models so derived, some physical insights can be derived from these simplified versions of the Anderson Hamiltonian. The impossibility of ordering, magnetic or superconducting, will be also discussed. These results hold for any temperature, electron filling and any strength of the parameters of the model,but are confined to low-dimensional cases and are based on the application of the Bogoliubov's inequality. It is also discussed the T=0 version of the Bogoliubov's inequality and it is shown that quantum effects disorder the system, at least in one dimension. Recent studies of the Anderson model showing exact solutions holding for specific values of the microscopic parameters and/or for special filling will be also analyzed. These results are based on the application of spin reflection positivity and on symmetry properties exhibited by Anderson Hamiltonian. Some results in the U=? limit are also presented; namely, we discuss the conditions under which a ferromagnetic ground state is established in one dimension when the number of electrons exceeds by one the number of sites and then, for decorated lattices, we derive the ground-state energy and we construct the corresponding eigenstate. Finally, a simple theorem on the total momentum of the ground state of the symmetric version of the Hamiltonian is presented.

Noce, Canio

2006-08-01

363

DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT TOXICITY: II. COMPARISON OF GENERIC BENCHMARK DOSE ESTIMATES WITH NO OBSERVED ADVERSE EFFECT LEVELS  

EPA Science Inventory

Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses (RfDDTS) or reference concentrations (RfCDTS) based on the use of no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELS) divided by uncertainty factors (UFs)The benchmark dose (BUD) has been proposed...

364

New Ways in Teaching English at the Secondary Level. New Ways in TESOL Series II: Innovative Classroom Techniques.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The book offers an international collection of best practices that address the particular interests and demands of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) and English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) teaching at the secondary school level. It includes instructional activities that are created by ESL and EFL teachers and are classroom-tested and…

Short, Deborah J., Ed.

365

A Study of Twelve Southern California Communities with Differing Levels and Types of Air Pollution II. Effects on Pulmonary Function  

Microsoft Academic Search

To study the possible chronic respiratory effects of air pollutants, we designed and initiated a 10-yr prospective study of Southern California public schoolchildren living in 12 communities with differ- ent levels and profiles of air pollution. The design of the study, exposure assessment methods, and survey methods and results related to respiratory symptoms and conditions are described in the ac-

JOHN M. PETERS; EDWARD AVOL; W. JAMES GAUDERMAN; WILLIAM S. LINN; WILLIAM NAVIDI; STEPHANIE J. LONDON; HELENE MARGOLIS; EDWARD RAPPAPORT; HITA VORA; HENRY GONG; DUNCAN C. THOMAS

366

Behavior of mercury in bio-systems. II. Depuration of /sup 203/Hg/sup 2 +/ in various trophic levels  

SciTech Connect

Using radiotracer techniques, the depuration rates for methylmercury at three trophic levels in an aquatic ecosystem are examined. Bacteria (decomposers), mosquito larvae (primary consumers), and fish (secondary consumers) were studied. Results indicated that depuration rates for mercury were temperature dependent - the rate of depuration increased with increase in temperature (up to 45/sup 0/C)

Hamdy, M.K.; Prabhu, N.V.

1984-01-01

367

The National Council for Geographic Education Competency-Based Geography Test. Secondary Level. Form I. Parts I, II, and III.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 3-part test measures the geography knowledge, skills, and understanding of secondary level students. Part 1, map skills and location, contains 20 questions involving the use of three maps: an imaginary sketch map, a contour map, and a political map of the world. Part 2 consists of 20 questions covering physical geography. Students analyze…

Kurfman, Dana G.; And Others

368

Dried sausages fermented with Staphylococcus xylosus at different temperatures and with different ingredient levels — Part II. Volatile components  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sausages, with added Staphylococcus xylosus, were fermented at different temperatures and with different added levels of salt, glucose, nitrite, nitrate and Pediococcus pentosaceus in accordance with a six factor fractional design. The volatile compounds from the sausages were collected by dynamic headspace sampling and quantified and identified by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The effects of temperature and different

L. H. Stahnke

1995-01-01

369

Dietary iodine and selenium affected the mRNA expression levels of skin monodeiodinase (II, III) in Liaoning Cashmere goats.  

PubMed

Livestock are frequently provided nutrient-depleted diets, which can negatively impact animal health and productivity. In our previous trial, we found that iodine (I) supplementation (not selenium (Se)) could increase cashmere production. In order to explore the role of I and Se in cashmere growth, we investigated the effects of dietary I and Se supplementation in Liaoning cashmere goats. Serum thyroid hormone status and the mRNA expression levels of skin monodeiodinase (MDII, MDIII) were measured during the cashmere fiber growth period. Forty-eight 2.5-year-old Liaoning cashmere goats (38.6 ± 2.65 kg BW) were divided into six equal groups, and their diets were supplemented with I (0, 2, or 4 mg/kg DM) and Se (0 or 1 mg/kg DM) in a 2 × 3 factorial treatment design. The six treatment groups were: I(0)Se(0), I(2)Se(0), I(4)Se(0), I(0)Se(1), I(2)Se(1), and I(4)Se(1). Concentrations of I and Se in the basal diet (group I(0)Se(0)) were 0.67 and 0.09 mg/kg DM, respectively. The trial started in September of 2009 and lasted 70 days. For every measured parameter, supplemental Se had no significant effect on thyroid hormones, but improved the mRNA expression levels of skin MDIII (P < 0.01). However, supplemental I increased levels of thyroid hormones (thyroxine and triiodothyronine) and improved the mRNA expression levels of skin MDII (P < 0.05). These results show that the addition of I to cashmere goat feedstock may be an effective means of increasing cashmere production through thyroid hormones regulating the mRNA expression of skin MDII. PMID:23274772

Qin, Feng; Li, Jianyun; Zhu, Xiaoping; Zhou, Jiaping; Yang, Jie; Jia, Zhihai

2013-03-01

370

Profile of iodine content of salt at trader level in the selected districts of India: Part II - Haryana.  

PubMed

Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) are endemic in Haryana state. Since consuming iodized salt is the best way to prevent IDD, the government of Haryana under the National Iodine Deficiency Disorder Control Program (NIDDCP) has followed a policy of universal salt iodization (USI) since 1986, under which the state's population receives only iodized salt. However, despite this policy, the prevalence of IDD remains high in Haryana. UNICEF-PAMM-MI-WHO-ICCIDD recently recommended monitoring the iodine content of salt at the trader level as a means of assessing the quality of salt being consumed by the population. The authors assessed the iodine content and types of iodized salt being sold by traders in 13 of Haryana's 16 districts. Analysis of a total 117 salt samples from 117 traders using the standard iodometric titration method found all but one sample to contain some iodine. 20% of the traders, however, were selling salt containing less than 15 ppm of iodine, below the state government recommended minimum level of salt iodization for the retail level. PMID:12292802

Kapil, U; Nayar, D; Singh, C

1997-01-01

371

Modeling Improvements for Air Source Heat Pumps using Different Expansion Devices at Varied Charge Levels Part II  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes steady-state performance simulations performed on a 3-ton R-22 split heat pump in heating mode. In total, 150 steady-state points were simulated, which covers refrigerant charge levels from 70 % to 130% relative to the nominal value, the outdoor temperatures at 17 F (-8.3 C), 35 F (1.7 C) and 47 F (8.3 C), indoor air flow rates from 60% to 150% of the rated air flow rate, and two types of expansion devices (fixed orifice and thermostatic expansion valve). A charge tuning method, which is to calibrate the charge inventory model based on measurements at two operation conditions, was applied and shown to improve the system simulation accuracy significantly in an extensive range of charge levels. In addition, we discuss the effects of suction line accumulator in modeling a heat pump system using either a fixed orifice or thermal expansion valve. Last, we identify the issue of refrigerant mass flow mal-distribution at low charge levels and propose an improved modeling approach.

Shen, Bo [ORNL

2011-01-01

372

Sleep-Dependent Synaptic Down-Selection (II): Single-Neuron Level Benefits for Matching, Selectivity, and Specificity  

PubMed Central

In a companion paper (1), we used computer simulations to show that a strategy of activity-dependent, on-line net synaptic potentiation during wake, followed by off-line synaptic depression during sleep, can provide a parsimonious account for several memory benefits of sleep at the systems level, including the consolidation of procedural and declarative memories, gist extraction, and integration of new with old memories. In this paper, we consider the theoretical benefits of this two-step process at the single-neuron level and employ the theoretical notion of Matching between brain and environment to measure how this process increases the ability of the neuron to capture regularities in the environment and model them internally. We show that down-selection during sleep is beneficial for increasing or restoring Matching after learning, after integrating new with old memories, and after forgetting irrelevant material. By contrast, alternative schemes, such as additional potentiation in wake, potentiation in sleep, or synaptic renormalization in wake, decrease Matching. We also argue that, by selecting appropriate loops through the brain that tie feedforward synapses with feedback ones in the same dendritic domain, different subsets of neurons can learn to specialize for different contingencies and form sequences of nested perception-action loops. By potentiating such loops when interacting with the environment in wake, and depressing them when disconnected from the environment in sleep, neurons can learn to match the long-term statistical structure of the environment while avoiding spurious modes of functioning and catastrophic interference. Finally, such a two-step process has the additional benefit of desaturating the neuron’s ability to learn and of maintaining cellular homeostasis. Thus, sleep-dependent synaptic renormalization offers a parsimonious account for both cellular and systems level effects of sleep on learning and memory. PMID:24151486

Hashmi, Atif; Nere, Andrew; Tononi, Giulio

2013-01-01

373

The effects of omega-3 on blood pressure and the relationship between serum visfatin level and blood pressure in patients with type II diabetes  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Hypertension is a condition normally detected in people with type II diabetes.It eventually leads to cardiovascular diseases in the patient. Visfatin is an adipocytokine which issecreted from adipose tissue and can affect the inflammatory reaction and also serum lipidlevels. Additionally, omega-3 inhibits the accumulation of fat and formation of insulinresistance. The current study tried to investigate the effects of omega-3 on blood pressurecompared to placebo and the relationship between serum visfatin levels and blood pressure. METHODS A total number of 71 women with type II diabetes were randomly assigned to2 groups to receive either omega-3 capsules or placebo capsules. In the first step, aquestionnaire consisting age, height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, and systolic anddiastolic blood pressure was filled out for each subject. Blood samples were then collected forlaboratory tests. The next step was to conduct 8 weeks of intervention. All variables, except age,were measured again after the intervention. Hip circumference was considered as the maximumcircumference of the buttocks. Waist circumference was measured by placing a tape horizontallyacross the abdomen at the end of a normal exhalation. Laboratory tests included the assessmentof visfatin, glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations. Lipid profile, i.e. lowdensity lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglyceride (TG), and cholesterol,was also assessed. Using SPSS18, data obtained from the study was analyzed by a variety ofappropriate statistical tests. RESULTS There was a significant change in mean differences of systolic and diastolic bloodpressure. Blood pressure showed a significant reduction in the omega-3 group compared to theplacebo group. However, no significant changes were observed in systolic and diastolic bloodpressure before and after the intervention (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION Based on the results of this study, a daily consumption of omega-3 is suggestedfor patients with type II diabetes. PMID:23056097

Hosseinzadeh Atar, Mohammad Javad; Hajianfar, Hossein; Bahonar, Ahmad

2012-01-01

374

Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part II: Transport and Diffusion of Tracer under Stable Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Differences in nighttime transport and diffusion of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer in an urban complex-terrain setting (Salt Lake City, Utah) are investigated using surface and Dopplerlidar wind data, and large-scale surface pressure differences. Interacting scales of motion, as studied through the URBAN 2000 field program combined with the Vertical Transport and Mixing Experiment (VTMX), explained the differences in the tracer behavior during three separate Intensive Operating Periods (IOPs). With an emphasis on nighttime stable boundary layer conditions, these field programs were designed to study flow features responsible for the nighttime transport of airborne substances. This transport has implications for air quality, homeland security, and emergency response issues if the airborne substances are hazardous. The important flow features investigated included thermally forced canyon and slope flows and a low-level jet (LLJ) that dominated the basin-scale winds when the surface pressure gradient was weak. The presence of thermally forced flows contributed to the complexity and hindered the predictability of the tracer motion within and beyond the city. When organized thermally forced flows were present, the tracer tended to stay closer to the city for longer periods of time, even though a strong basin-scale LLJ did develop. When thermally forced flows were short-lived or absent, the basin-scale low-level jet dominated the wind field and enhanced the transport of tracer material out of the city.

Darby, Lisa S.; Allwine, K Jerry; Banta, Robert M.

2006-05-01

375

Low level of baseline circulating VEGF-A is associated with better outcome in patients with vascular sarcomas receiving sorafenib: an ancillary study from a phase II trial.  

PubMed

We have carried out a stratified phase II study of sorafenib (So) in patients with advanced angiosarcoma (n?=?32) and epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (n?=?13). This report concerns the correlative analysis of the predictive values of circulating pro/anti-angiogenetic biomarkers. Using the ELISA method (R&D Systems), circulating biomarkers (VEGF-A, in picograms per milliliter), thrombospondin-1 (TSP1, in micrograms per milliliter), stem cell factor (SCF, in picograms per milliliter), placental growth factor (PlGF, in picograms per milliliter), VEGF-C (in picograms per milliliter), and E-selectin (in nanograms per milliliter) were measured before So treatment and after 7 days. VEGF-A (mean value 475 vs. 541, p?=?0.002), TSP1 (16 vs. 24, p?=?0.0002), and PlGF (20.9 vs. 40.7, p?=?0.0001) significantly increased during the treatment. Treatment did not affect the levels of SCF, VEGF-C, and E-selectin. Only two biomarkers were associated with better outcome as follows: VEGF-A and PlGF. Best objective response and non-progression at 180 days were associated with low level of VEGF-A at baseline (p?=?0.04 and 0.03, respectively). There was a correlation between the circulating level of VEGF-A and time to progression (TTP) (r?=?-0.47, p?=?0.001). Best objective response and non-progression at 180 days were not associated with baseline level of PIGF, but there was a correlation between the circulating level of PIGF at baseline and TTP. Low level of VEGF-A at baseline (<500) was significantly associated with better outcome. PMID:24218035

Penel, Nicolas; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Bal-Mahieu, Christine; Chevreau, Christine; Le Cesne, Axel; Italiano, Antoine; Bompas, Emmanuelle; Clisant, Stéphanie; Baldeyrou, Brigitte; Lansiaux, Amélie; Robin, Yves-Marie; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Blay, Jean-Yves; Fournier, Charles

2014-09-01

376

A novel magnetic ion imprinted nano-polymer for selective separation and determination of low levels of mercury(II) ions in fish samples.  

PubMed

In this work a novel ion imprinted polymer (IIP) based on N-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethenamine (V-Pic) was coated on Fe3O4 nano-particles and characterized by thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), IR spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and also elemental analysis. The application of this novel magnetic sorbent was investigated in rapid extraction, preconcentration and also determination of trace amounts of Hg(II) ions by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Effect of various parameters such as sample pH, adsorption time and desorption time, maximum capacity and also eluent type and concentration was investigated in this study. The relative standard deviation (RSD%) and limit of detection (LOD) of the method were found to be 1.47% and 0.03 ng mL(-1), respectively. The amounts of mercury in some standard reference materials was Also determined using this sorbent in order to confirm the accuracy of this method. Finally, this sorbent was successfully applied for determination of low levels of Hg(II) ions in various fish samples. PMID:23993582

Najafi, Ezzatolla; Aboufazeli, Forouzan; Zhad, Hamid Reza Lotfi; Sadeghi, Omid; Amani, Vahid

2013-12-15

377

Fasting-induced increase in type II iodothyronine deiodinase activity and messenger ribonucleic acid levels is not reversed by thyroxine in the rat hypothalamus.  

PubMed

The importance of local formation of T3 in the feedback effect of the thyroid gland on hypothalamic TRH-producing cells has been established. Primary failure of the thyroid gland results in a fall in circulating T4 and T3 levels, leading to an elevation in the production and release of TRH in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. In contrast, during short term fasting, declining plasma levels of thyroid hormones coincide with suppressed TRH production and release. In the brain, the prevalent enzyme that converts T4 to T3 is type II iodothyronine deiodinase (DII). The present study was undertaken to determine whether a differential hypothalamic expression of type II deiodinase may exist in fasted rats and in animals that are hypothyroid due to the failure of the thyroid gland. Using in situ hybridization, we assessed type II deiodinase messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in the hypothalamus of rats that were control euthyroid, hyperthyroid (T4), hypothyroid induced by propylthiouracil (PTU), and fasted. A group of fasted rats also received exogenous T4. DII mRNA was detected around the third ventricle, including the ependymal layer and adjacent periventricular regions as well as in the arcuate nucleus and the external layer of the median eminence. Quantitative in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that PTU treatment and short term fasting resulted in significant elevations in DII messenger levels compared with those in euthyroid controls. Three weeks of PTU administration induced a consistent decline in circulating T3 and undetectable T4 levels, whereas 3 days of fasting resulted in only a 50% fall in the concentration of serum thyroid hormones. Interestingly, however, the expression of the DII mRNA was more than 2-fold higher in fasted animals compared with the values in PTU-treated rats. Furthermore, although T4 administration repressed DII mRNA expression in euthyroid animals, the same treatment had no effect on the fasting-induced elevations of DII message. To assess whether DII enzymatic activity is also affected during food deprivation, hypothalami were dissected out, and DII activity was measured in control euthyroid, fasted, and fasted plus T4-treated rats. To determine whether comparable changes in plasma thyroid hormone levels induced by fasting and PTU treatment could have affected DII enzymatic activity in a similar manner, animals were injected ip with PTU for 5 days to decrease plasma thyroid hormones to levels similar to those caused by fasting. DII enzymatic assay showed a significant increase in DII activity in fasted and fasted plus T4-treated animals compared with those in euthyroid controls and PTU-treated rats. No significant changes were found in PTU-treated rats compared with euthyroid animals. These data indicate that during short term fasting, a signal of nonthyroid origin underlies the robust elevation of DII production and activity in the hypothalamus. Thus, we propose that during the initial phase of food deprivation, an increased negative thyroid feedback exists on the hypothalamus due to locally formed T3. This local hyperthyroidism may, in turn, induce the suppression of TRH under these conditions. PMID:9607797

Diano, S; Naftolin, F; Goglia, F; Horvath, T L

1998-06-01

378

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (BRIDTH00050033) on Town Highway 5, crossing the North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00050033 on town highway 5 crossing the North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 5.01-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the downstream banks are forested and the upstream banks have dense woody brush; the upstream right overbank is an open field. In the study area, the North Branch Ottauquechee River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.017 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 30 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 83.2 mm (0.273 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 3, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. Also at the time of the site visit, there was considerable backwater at the bridge site due to a three foot tall beaver dam 40 feet downstream. The beaver dam was assumed destroyed by flood flow and was ignored in the analyses. The town highway 5 crossing of the North Branch Ottauquechee Riveris a 25-ft-long, onelane bridge consisting of one 23-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment and upstream right wingwall during the Level I assessment. Scour protection measures at the site include type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the ends of all the wingwalls except the upstream left which has type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter). Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 5.3 to 7.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A crosssection of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour)

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

379

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 39 (ANDOVT00110039) on State Route 11, crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOVT00110039 on State Route 11 crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southern Vermont. The 5.75-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest on the upstream left bank and downstream right bank. The surface cover on the upstream right and downstream left banks is brush. In the study area, the Middle Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 58 ft and an average bank height of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 96.8 mm (0.317 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 9, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The State Route 11 crossing of the Middle Branch Williams River is a 43-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 41-foot concrete-beam span and two additional steel beams on the upstream face (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. The only scour protection measures at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.9 to 11.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measu

Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

1997-01-01

380

Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI  

SciTech Connect

Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

Abou El-Maaref, A., E-mail: aahmh@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Uosif, M.A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt)] [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M. [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)] [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

2012-07-15

381

Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.  

PubMed

For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25423683

O'Connell, William D

2014-11-01

382

Growth hormone concentration and disappearance rate, insulin-like growth factors I and II and insulin levels in iron-deficient veal calves.  

PubMed

In calves with severe iron (Fe) deficiency, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels and IGF-I responses to exogenous growth hormone (GH) are reduced, while insulin-dependent glucose utilization is enhanced. Blood plasma concentrations of immunoreactive insulin (IRI), IGF-I, IGF-II and GH, and the half-life of blood plasma GH [after an i.v. injection of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH; 100 micrograms rbGH/kg body weight)] were measured in 20 calves at body weights between 160 and 190 kg. Calves were fed milk replacers containing 50 or 10 mg Fe/kg (groups Fe50 and Fe10, respectively). Daily weight gain and feed utilization were similar in both groups. Group Fe10 developed mild Fe deficiency anemia and blood plasma urea-nitrogen concentrations were higher (p < 0.05) than in group Fe50. IGF-I and IGF-II concentrations did not vary consistently over a 10-hour period and were not significantly influenced by different Fe intakes. The IRI concentration increased transiently (p < 0.05) after feed intake, but the total response was (not significantly) smaller in Fe-deficient calves. Plasma GH concentration changed episodically and was similar in both groups. Loss of GH from the circulation after i.v. rbGH injection, estimated by biexponential analysis, during the distribution or alpha phase (first 16 min) was similar in both groups, but during the beta phase was shorter (p < 0.05) in group Fe10 than in group Fe50 (29.9 and 34.2 min, respectively). The increased disappearance rate of GH, seen even in mild Fe deficiency, may contribute to reduced GH levels and IGF-I responses to GH in severe Fe deficiency. PMID:7710263

Ceppi, A; Mullis, P E; Eggenberger, E; Blum, J W

1994-01-01

383

Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240°C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85°C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63°C in 1889, 42–52°C from 1974 through 1991, and 77°C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98°C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3°C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring. During August–October 1999, several field trips were conducted in the vicinity of Anderson Springs to continue monitoring and sampling the thermal manifestations. The new fumarolic area had increased in temperature and in discharge intensity since 1998, and a zone of dead trees had developed on the steep bank directly west of the fumaroles. Ground temperatures and diffuse flow of CO2 flow through soils were measured in the area surrounding the main spring and new fumaroles and in the zone of tree-kill.

Janik, C. J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M. L.; Rytuba, J. J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E. M.; Huebner, M.; White, L. D.; Foster, A.

1999-01-01

384

Critical State of the Anderson Transition: Between a Metal and an Insulator  

SciTech Connect

Using a three-frequency one-dimensional kicked rotor experimentally realized with a cold atomic gas, we study the transport properties at the critical point of the metal-insulator Anderson transition. We accurately measure the time evolution of an initially localized wave packet and show that it displays at the critical point a scaling invariance characteristic of this second-order phase transition. The shape of the momentum distribution at the critical point is found to be in excellent agreement with the analytical form deduced from the self-consistent theory of localization.

Lemarie, Gabriel; Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Lignier, Hans; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molecules, Universite Lille 1 Sciences et Technologies, UMR CNRS 8523, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France)

2010-08-27

385

Observation of the Anderson Metal-Insulator Transition with Atomic Matter Waves: Theory and Experiment  

E-print Network

Using a cold atomic gas exposed to laser pulses -- a realization of the chaotic quasiperiodic kicked rotor with three incommensurate frequencies -- we study experimentally and theoretically the Anderson metal-insulator transition in three dimensions. Sensitive measurements of the atomic wavefunction and the use of finite-size scaling techniques make it possible to unambiguously demonstrate the existence of a quantum phase transition and to measure its critical exponents. By taking proper account of systematic corrections to one-parameter scaling, we show the universality of the critical exponent $\

Gabriel Lemarié; Julien Chabé; Pascal Szriftgiser; Jean-Claude Garreau; Benoît Grémaud; Dominique Delande

2009-07-20

386

Coalescence of Anderson-localized modes at an exceptional point in 2D random media  

E-print Network

In non-hermitian systems, the particular position at which two eigenstates coalesce under a variation of a parameter in the complex plane is called an exceptional point. A non-perturbative theory is proposed which describes the evolution of modes in 2D open dielectric systems when permittivity distribution is modified. We successfully test this theory in a 2D disordered system to predict the position in the parameter space of the exceptional point between two Anderson-localized states. We observe that the accuracy of the prediction depends on the number of localized states accounted for. Such an exceptional point is experimentally accessible in practically relevant disordered photonic systems

Bachelard, Nicolas; Arlandis, Julien; Touzani, Rachid; Sebbah, Patrick

2014-01-01

387

Machine learning for many-body physics: The case of the Anderson impurity model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Machine learning methods are applied to finding the Green's function of the Anderson impurity model, a basic model system of quantum many-body condensed-matter physics. Different methods of parametrizing the Green's function are investigated; a representation in terms of Legendre polynomials is found to be superior due to its limited number of coefficients and its applicability to state of the art methods of solution. The dependence of the errors on the size of the training set is determined. The results indicate that a machine learning approach to dynamical mean-field theory may be feasible.

Arsenault, Louis-François; Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Millis, Andrew J.

2014-10-01

388

Measurement-based tailoring of Anderson localization of partially coherent light  

E-print Network

We put forward an experimental configuration to observe transverse Anderson localization of partially coherent light beams with a tunable degree of first-order coherence. The scheme makes use of entangled photons propagating in disordered waveguide arrays, and is based on the unique relationship between the degree of entanglement of a pair of photons and the coherence properties of the individual photons constituting the pair. The scheme can be readily implemented with current waveguide-on-a-chip technology, and surprisingly, the tunability of the coherence properties of the individual photons is done at the measurement stage, without resorting changes of the light source itself.

Ji?í Svozilík; Jan Pe?ina Jr.; Juan P. Torres

2014-03-12

389

Critical exponent for the Anderson transition in the three-dimensional orthogonal universality class  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a careful finite size scaling study of the metal-insulator transition in Anderson's model of localization. We focus on the estimation of the critical exponent ? that describes the divergence of the localization length. We verify the universality of this critical exponent for three different distributions of the random potential: box, normal and Cauchy. Our results for the critical exponent are consistent with the measured values obtained in experiments on the dynamical localization transition in the quantum kicked rotor realized in a cold atomic gas.

Slevin, Keith; Ohtsuki, Tomi

2014-01-01

390

Anderson transition on the Cayley tree as a traveling wave critical point for various probability distributions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For Anderson localization on the Cayley tree, we study the statistics of various observables as a function of the disorder strength W and the number N of generations. We first consider the Landauer transmission TN. In the localized phase, its logarithm follows the traveling wave form \\ln T_N \\simeq \\overline{\\ln T_N} + \\ln t^* where (i) the disorder-averaged value moves linearly \\overline{\\ln (T_N)} \\simeq - \\frac{N}{\\xi_loc} and the localization length diverges as \\xi_loc \\sim (W-W_c)^{-\

Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

2009-02-01

391

Modified grüneisen and anderson-grüneisen relations for quasispherical molecular liquids  

Microsoft Academic Search

The validity of the expression for the Grüneisen parameter of liquids has been tested by obtaining expressions for the heat\\u000a capacity ratio, isothermal and adiabatic Anderson-Grüneisen parameters,C\\u000a 1-parameter, Rao’s acoustical parameter, Beyer’s non-linearity parameter, and relate them to the Grüneisen parameter. The calculated\\u000a values for five liquefied gases comparising of quasi-spherical molecules are reasonably satisfactory and explain the experimental\\u000a results

B K Sharma

1983-01-01

392

Anderson Localization of Expanding Bose-Einstein Condensates in Random Potentials  

SciTech Connect

We show that the expansion of an initially confined interacting 1D Bose-Einstein condensate can exhibit Anderson localization in a weak random potential with correlation length {sigma}{sub R}. For speckle potentials the Fourier transform of the correlation function vanishes for momenta k>2/{sigma}{sub R} so that the Lyapunov exponent vanishes in the Born approximation for k>1/{sigma}{sub R}. Then, for the initial healing length of the condensate {xi}{sub in}>{sigma}{sub R} the localization is exponential, and for {xi}{sub in}<{sigma}{sub R} it changes to algebraic.

Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Clement, D.; Lugan, P.; Bouyer, P.; Aspect, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique, CNRS and Univ. Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau cedex (France); Shlyapnikov, G. V. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, Univ. Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay cedex (France); Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, Univ. Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65/67, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2007-05-25

393

The Anderson-Darling test of fit for the power law distribution from left censored samples  

E-print Network

Maximum likelihood estimation and a test of fit based on the Anderson-Darling statistic is presented for the case of the power law distribution when the parameters are estimated from a left-censored sample. Expressions for the maximum likelihood estimators and tables of asymptotic percentage points for the A^2 statistic are given. The technique is illustrated for data from the Dow Jones Industrial Average index, an example of high theoretical and practical importance in Econophysics, Finance, Physics, Biology and, in general, in other related Sciences such as Complexity Sciences.

Coronel-Brizio, H F

2010-01-01

394

MD Anderson study finds link between statins and improved survival in inflammatory breast cancer  

Cancer.gov

Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found statins, the commonly used drug to lower cholesterol, improved progression-free survival in patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The retrospective study was presented in a poster discussion at the 2012 CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium and follows a previously reported Danish study indicating there is some evidence to suggest the anti-inflammatory properties of statins could reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence. Still, the overall effects of statins have not been examined in relation to IBC.

395

Singular behavior of Anderson-localized wave functions for a two-site model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show analytically that the apparent nonanalyticity discovered recently in the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the eigenstates in Anderson's model of localization is also present in a simple two-site model, along with a concurrent nonanalyticity in the density of states (DOS) at the same energy. We demonstrate its evolution from two sites to the thermodynamic limit by numerical methods. For the two-site model, nonanalyticity in higher derivatives of the DOS and IPR is also proven to exist for all bounded distributions of disorder.

Johri, Sonika; Bhatt, R. N.

2012-09-01

396

Measurement-based tailoring of Anderson localization of partially coherent light  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We put forward an experimental configuration to observe transverse Anderson localization of partially coherent light beams with a tunable degree of first-order coherence. The scheme makes use of entangled photons propagating in disordered waveguide arrays and is based on the unique relationship between the degree of entanglement of a pair of photons and the coherence properties of the individual photons constituting the pair. The scheme can be readily implemented with current waveguide-on-a-chip technology, and surprisingly the tunability of the coherence properties of the individual photons is done at the measurement stage, without resorting to changes of the light source itself.

Svozilík, Ji?í; Pe?ina, Jan; Torres, Juan P.

2014-05-01

397

Anisotropic behavior of quantum transport in graphene superlattices: Coexistence of ballistic conduction with Anderson insulating regime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the possibility to generate highly anisotropic quantum conductivity in disordered graphene-based superlattices. Our quantum simulations, based on an efficient real-space implementation of the Kubo-Greenwood formula, show that in disordered graphene superlattices the strength of multiple scattering phenomena can strongly depend on the transport measurement geometry. This eventually yields the coexistence of a ballistic waveguide and a highly resistive channel (Anderson insulator) in the same two-dimensional platform, evidenced by a ?yy/?xx ratio varying over several orders of magnitude, and suggesting the possibility of building graphene electronic circuits based on the unique properties of chiral massless Dirac fermions in graphene.

Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Cummings, Aron W.; Roche, Stephan

2014-04-01

398

Magnetic field induced quantum phase transitions in the two-impurity Anderson model  

SciTech Connect

In the two-impurity Anderson model, the inter-impurity spin exchange interaction favors a spin singlet state between two impurities leading to the localization of quasiparticles. We show that a local uniform magnetic field can delocalize the quasiparticies to restore the Kondo resonance. This transition is found to be continuous, accompanied by not only the divergence of the staggered (anti ferromagnetic) susceptibility, but also the divergence of the uniform spin susceptibility. This implies that the magnetic field induced quantum phase transitions in Kondo systems are in favor of the local critical type.

Zhu, Lujun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhu, Jian - Xin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-17

399

STS-118 Astronaut Williams and Expedition 15 Engineer Anderson Perform EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 Astronaut Dave Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, participated in the fourth and final session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). During the 5 hour space walk, Williams and Expedition 15 engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame) installed the External Wireless Instrumentation System Antenna, attached a stand for the shuttle robotic arm extension boom, and retrieved the two Materials International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) for return to Earth. MISSE collects information on how different materials weather in the environment of space.

2007-01-01

400

MD Anderson study finds blood vessel cells coax colorectal cancer cells into more dangerous state  

Cancer.gov

Blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to tumors can also deliver something else -- a signal that strengthens nearby cancer cells, making them more resistant to chemotherapy, more likely to spread to other organs and more lethal, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report online in Cancer Cell. Working in human colorectal cancer cell lines and tumor samples, as well as mouse models, the researchers found that endothelial cells, which line the inside of blood vessels, can trigger changes in cancer cells without even coming into direct contact with them.

401

Steady-state and dynamical Anderson localization of counterpropagating beams in two-dimensional photonic lattices  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate Anderson localization of mutually incoherent counterpropagating beams in an optically induced two-dimensional photonic lattice. The effect is displayed in a system of two broad probe beams propagating head-on through a fixed disordered photonic lattice recorded in a photorefractive crystal. In addition to the steady-state localization, we also observe the dynamical localization; that is, the localization of time-changing beams. As compared to the localization of single beams, in which there exist no dynamical effects, the localization of counterpropagating beams is more pronounced and prone to instabilities.

Jovic, Dragana M. [Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Texas A and M University at Qatar, P. O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Belic, Milivoj R. [Texas A and M University at Qatar, P. O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar)

2010-02-15

402

STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson during TCDT M113 training activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson takes a break during training on the operation of an M113 armored personnel carrier during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia.

2002-01-01

403

Large-disorder renormalization group study of the Anderson model of localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a large-disorder renormalization group (LDRG) method for the Anderson model of localization in one dimension which decimates eigenstates based on the size of their wave functions rather than their energy. We show that our LDRG scheme flows to infinite disorder, and thus becomes asymptotically exact. We use it to obtain the disorder-averaged inverse participation ratio (IPR) and density of states (DOS) for the entire spectrum. A modified scheme is formulated for higher dimensions, which is found to be less efficient, but capable of improvement.

Johri, Sonika; Bhatt, R. N.

2014-08-01

404

The atomic approach to the Anderson model for the finite U case: application to a quantum dot  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present work we apply the atomic approach to the single-impurity Anderson model (SIAM). A general formulation of this approach, that can be applied both to the impurity and to the lattice Anderson Hamiltonian, was developed in a previous work (Foglio et al 2009 arxiv: 0903.0139v2 [cond-mat.str-el]). The method starts from the cumulant expansion of the periodic Anderson model, employing the hybridization as a perturbation. The atomic Anderson limit is analytically solved and its sixteen eigenenergies and eigenstates are obtained. This atomic Anderson solution, which we call the AAS, has all the fundamental excitations that generate the Kondo effect, and in the atomic approach is employed as a 'seed' to generate the approximate solutions for finite U. The width of the conduction band is reduced to zero in the AAS, and we choose its position such that the Friedel sum rule is satisfied, close to the chemical potential ?. We perform a complete study of the density of states of the SIAM over the whole relevant range of parameters: the empty dot, intermediate valence, Kondo and magnetic regimes. In the Kondo regime we obtain a density of states that characterizes well the structure of the Kondo peak. To show the usefulness of the method we have calculated the conductance of a quantum dot, side-coupled to a conduction band.

Lobo, T.; Figueira, M. S.; Foglio, M. E.

2010-07-01

405

In vivo modulation of extracellular hippocampal glutamate and GABA levels and limbic seizures by group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands.  

PubMed

The effects of several metabotropic receptor (mGluR) ligands on baseline hippocampal glutamate and GABA overflow in conscious rats and the modulation of limbic seizure activity by these ligands were investigated. Intrahippocampal mGluR group I agonist perfusion via a microdialysis probe [1 mm (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine] induced seizures and concomitant augmentations in amino acid dialysate levels. The mGlu1a receptor antagonist LY367385 (1 mm) decreased baseline glutamate but not GABA concentrations, suggesting that mGlu1a receptors, which regulate hippocampal glutamate levels, are tonically activated by endogenous glutamate. This decrease in glutamate may contribute to the reported LY367385-mediated anticonvulsant effect. The mGlu5 receptor antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (50 mg/kg) also clearly abolished pilocarpine-induced seizures. Agonist-mediated actions at mGlu2/3 receptors by LY379268 (100 microm, 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) decreased basal hippocampal GABA but not glutamate levels. This may partly explain the increased excitation following systemic LY379268 administration and the lack of complete anticonvulsant protection within our epilepsy model with the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist. Group II selective mGluR receptor blockade with LY341495 (1-10 microm) did not alter the rats' behaviour or hippocampal amino acid levels. These data provide a neurochemical basis for the full anticonvulsant effects of mGlu1a and mGlu5 antagonists and the partial effects observed with mGlu2/3 agonists in vivo. PMID:15009663

Smolders, Ilse; Lindekens, Hilde; Clinckers, Ralph; Meurs, Alfred; O'Neill, Michael J; Lodge, David; Ebinger, Guy; Michotte, Yvette

2004-03-01

406

Polymorphisms of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing and DNA repair genes and in vitro N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced O6-ethylguanine levels in human lymphocytes  

PubMed Central

This study tested the hypothesis that genetic variants of phase II detoxification enzymes and DNA repair proteins affect individual response to DNA damage from alkylating agents. In 171 healthy individuals, an immunoslot blot assay was used to measure O6-ethylguanosine (O6-EtGua) adduct levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes treated with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) in vitro. The genotypes of GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 I105V and A114V, MGMT L84F and I143V, XPD D312N and K751Q, and XRCC3 T241M were determined. Demographic and exposure information was collected by in-person interview. Student’s t test, analysis of (co)variance, and multiple linear regression models were used in statistical analyses. The mean and median (range) O6-EtGua levels were 94.6 and 84.8 (3.2–508.1) fmol/g DNA, respectively. The adduct level was significantly lower in people who smoked ? 25 years than that in never-smokers (square-root transformed mean values 8.20 versus 9.37, P = 0.03). Multiple linear regression models revealed that GSTT1 (? = ?2.36, P = 0.009) polymorphism was a significant predictor of the level of adducts in 82 never-smokers, whereas the number of years smoked (? = ?0.08, P = 0.005) and XRCC3 T241M (? = 2.22, P = 0.007) in 89 ever-smokers. The association between GSTP1 I105V, MGMT I143V, and XPD D312N with the level of adducts was not conclusive. Each polymorphism could explain 2% to 10% of the variation of the adduct level. These observations suggest that GSTT1 null and XRCC3 T241M polymorphism may have some functional significance in modulating the level of ENU-induced DNA damage and these effects are smoking-dependent. Results from this exploratory study need to be confirmed in other experimental systems. PMID:17158087

Jiao, Li; Chang, Ping; Firozi, Pervez F.; Lai, Dejian; Abbruzzese, James L; Li, Donghui

2007-01-01

407

Anderson-Gruneisen parameter under high temperature in (Fe,Mn,Co,Mg)2SiO4  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) is of considerable importance to Earth scientists because it sets limitations on the thermo-elastic properties of the lower mantle and core. However, there are several formulations on the Grüneisen parameter, which are in frequent use and predict varying dependence of d as a function of temperature. In this paper, the expressions for thermal expansion, thermal expansion coefficients and bulk modulus are obtained considering the anharmonic dependence on temperature and are applied to study these constants to (Fe,Mn,Co,Mg)2SiO4. Using the derived expressions, we have shown that different parameters on which the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) depends are temperature dependent, but above all the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter (?) is independent of temperature. The results obtained have been found to be comparable to experimental data.

Gupta, S.; Goyal, S. C.

2012-07-01

408

A report documenting the completion of the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the ASC level II milestone ""Visualization on the supercomputing platform  

SciTech Connect

This report provides documentation for the completion of the Los Alamos portion of the ASC Level II 'Visualization on the Supercomputing Platform' milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The milestone text is shown in Figure 1 with the Los Alamos portions highlighted in boldfaced text. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is the most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors (GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the perfromance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. In conclusion, we improved CPU-based rendering performance by a a factor of 2-10 times on our tests. In addition, we evaluated CPU and CPU-based rendering performance. We encourage production visualization experts to consider using CPU-based rendering solutions when it is appropriate. For example, on remote supercomputers CPU-based rendering can offer a means of viewing data without having to offload the data or geometry onto a CPU-based visualization system. In terms of comparative performance of the CPU and CPU we believe that further optimizations of the performance of both CPU or CPU-based rendering are possible. The simulation community is currently confronting this reality as they work to port their simulations to different hardware architectures. What is interesting about CPU rendering of massive datasets is that for part two decades CPU performance has significantly outperformed CPU-based systems. Based on our advancements, evaluations and explorations we believe that CPU-based rendering has returned as one viable option for the visualization of massive datasets.

Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patchett, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lo, Li - Ta [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mr Marle, David [KITWARE INC.; Brownlee, Carson [UNIV OF UTAH

2011-01-24

409

Nutritional influences on early white matter development: response to Anderson and Burggren.  

PubMed

Does breastfeeding alter early brain development? In a recent retrospective study, our group examined the cross-sectional relationship between early infant feeding practice and white matter maturation and cognitive development. In groups matched for child and mother age, gestation duration, birth weight, gender distribution, and socio-economic status; we observed that children who were breastfed exclusively for at least 3 months showed, on average, increased white matter myelin development compared to children who either were exclusively formula-fed, or received a mixture of breast milk and formula. In secondary analysis on sub-sets of these children, again matched for important confounding variables, we found improved cognitive test scores of receptive language in the exclusively breast-fed children compared to formula or formula+breast-fed children; and that prolonged breastfeeding was associated with increased motor, language, and visual functioning in exclusively breast-fed children. In response to this work, Anderson and Burggren have questioned our methodology and, by association, our findings. Further, they use their critique as a platform for advancing an alternative interpretation of our findings: that observed results were not associated with prolonged breast-feeding, but rather delayed the introduction of cow's milk. In this response, we address and clarify some of the misconceptions presented by Anderson and Burggren. PMID:25064669

Deoni, Sean C L; Dean, Douglas C; Walker, Lindsay; Dirks, Holly; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan

2014-10-15

410

Topology of delocalization in the nonlinear Anderson model and anomalous diffusion on finite clusters  

E-print Network

This study is concerned with destruction of Anderson localization by a nonlinearity of the power-law type. We suggest using a nonlinear Schr\\"odinger model with random potential on a lattice that quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. For super-quadratic nonlinearity the borderline spreading corresponds to diffusion processes on finite clusters. We have proposed an analytical method to predict and explain such transport processes. Our method uses a topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model and, if the exponent of the power nonlinearity is either integer or half-integer, will yield the wanted value of the transport exponent via a triangulation procedure in an Euclidean mapping space. A kinetic picture of the transport arising from these investigations uses a fractional extension of the diffusion equation to fractional derivatives over the time, signifying non-Markovian dynamics with algebraically decaying time correlations.

A. V. Milovanov; A. Iomin

2014-05-29

411

Anderson-Mott transition in arrays of a few dopant atoms in a silicon transistor.  

PubMed

Dopant atoms are used to control the properties of semiconductors in most electronic devices. Recent advances such as single-ion implantation have allowed the precise positioning of single dopants in semiconductors as well as the fabrication of single-atom transistors, representing steps forward in the realization of quantum circuits. However, the interactions between dopant atoms have only been studied in systems containing large numbers of dopants, so it has not been possible to explore fundamental phenomena such as the Anderson-Mott transition between conduction by sequential tunnelling through isolated dopant atoms, and conduction through thermally activated impurity Hubbard bands. Here, we observe the Anderson-Mott transition at low temperatures in silicon transistors containing arrays of two, four or six arsenic dopant atoms that have been deterministically implanted along the channel of the device. The transition is induced by controlling the spacing between dopant atoms. Furthermore, at the critical density between tunnelling and band transport regimes, we are able to change the phase of the electron system from a frozen Wigner-like phase to a Fermi glass by increasing the temperature. Our results open up new approaches for the investigation of coherent transport, band engineering and strongly correlated systems in condensed-matter physics. PMID:22751223

Prati, Enrico; Hori, Masahiro; Guagliardo, Filippo; Ferrari, Giorgio; Shinada, Takahiro

2012-07-01

412

Damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and photosystem II after water shortage and high-temperature stress in two lines of maize which differ in endogenous levels of abscisic acid and drought resistance  

SciTech Connect

This study examines damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and photosystem II (PS II), and the rate of CO{sub 2} fixation after exposure to 7-d water shortage followed by 6-h (WTS-6) or 24-h (WTS-24) high temperature (45C) stress in the high-level. Abscisic acid (ABA) drought-resistant (DR) line of maize ZPBL 1304 and the low-level ABA drought-sensitive line ZPL 389. Seven-day water shortage followed by 6-h high-temperature stress slightly damaged PS II in the DR line ZPBL 1304. The DS line ZPL 389 was affected by WTS-6 to a great extent; however, the stress-caused damage to this line was reversible. Exposure to WTS-24 caused reversible damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and PS II in DR line. The DS line was not capable of withstanding severe stress conditions; WTS-24 killed almost all the plants. The results on the rate of CO{sub 2} fixation were in agreement with those on the damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and PS II. Considerable drought and heat resistance was apparent in the line (ZPBL 1304) which synthesizes a unique band of heat-shock protein(s) of 45 KDa. In conclusion, the high-level ABA DR line ZPBL 1304 showed much greater capability of withstanding WTS than the low-level ABA DS line ZPL 389.

Ristic, Z.; Cass, D.D. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

1991-05-01

413

Michael T. Martin, "Madeline Anderson in Conversation: Pioneering an African American Documentary Tradition." Black Camera, An International Film Journal, Vol. 5  

E-print Network

Tradition." Black Camera, An International Film Journal, Vol. 5 No. 1 (Fall 2013), 72­93. Madeline Anderson, including Eloyce Gist and ethnographers Zora Neale Hurston and Eslanda Goode Robeson. What follows is a con to make films "useful to improve our people" and conviction eloquently evinced by Anderson in these words

Indiana University

414

ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE  

E-print Network

ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM 589 DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE ANALYSES ACCURATELY QUANTIFY THE CLIMATE IMPACTS OF BIOFUELS-RELATED LAND USE CHANGE? Kristina J. Anderson in determining the sustainability of biofuels. To ensure that legal standards are effective in limiting climate

DeLucia, Evan H.

415

Patriot Games: Yes, Indeed, the British Are Coming! But M. T. Anderson's Revolutionary War Novel Is Unlike Anything You've Ever Read  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an interview with 38-year-old writer Matthew Tobin Anderson. In the interview, Anderson talks about his experiences, passion for writing, teenage interests, and his relation to the distinguished writer Mark Twain. He also states the importance of liberty and what it takes to be a patriot and a loyalist. Furthermore, Matthew…

Horning, Kathleen

2006-01-01

416

Simultaneous trace-levels determination of Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions in various samples using a modified carbon paste electrode based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a new synthesized Schiff base.  

PubMed

A modified carbon paste electrode based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and 3-(4-methoxybenzylideneamino)-2-thioxothiazolodin-4-one as a new synthesized Schiff base was constructed for the simultaneous determination of trace amounts of Hg(II) and Pb(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The modified electrode showed an excellent selectivity and stability for Hg(II) and Pb(II) determinations and for accelerated electron transfer between the electrode and the analytes. The electrochemical properties and applications of the modified electrode were studied. Operational parameters such as pH, deposition potential and deposition time were optimized for the purpose of determination of traces of metal ions at pH 3.0. Under optimal conditions the limits of detection, based on three times the background noise, were 9.0×10(-4) and 6.0×10(-4) ?mol L(-1) for Hg(II) and Pb(II) with a 90 s preconcentration, respectively. In addition, the modified electrode displayed a good reproducibility and selectivity, making it suitable for the simultaneous determination of Hg(II) and Pb(II) in real samples such as sea water, waste water, tobacco, marine and human teeth samples. PMID:22975186

Afkhami, Abbas; Bagheri, Hasan; Khoshsafar, Hosein; Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Tabatabaee, Masoumeh; Shirzadmehr, Ali

2012-10-01

417

Molecular analysis and intestinal expression of SAR1 genes and proteins in Anderson's disease (Chylomicron retention disease)  

PubMed Central

Background Anderson's disease (AD) or chylomicron retention disease (CMRD) is a very rare hereditary lipid malabsorption syndrome. In order to discover novel mutations in the SAR1B gene and to evaluate the expression, as compared to healthy subjects, of the Sar1 gene and protein paralogues in the intestine, we investigated three previously undescribed individuals with the disease. Methods The SAR1B, SAR1A and PCSK9 genes were sequenced. The expression of the SAR1B and SAR1A genes in intestinal biopsies of both normal individuals and patients was measured by RTqPCR. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies to recombinant Sar1 protein was used to evaluate the expression and localization of the Sar1 paralogues in the duodenal biopsies. Results Two patients had a novel SAR1B mutation (p.Asp48ThrfsX17). The third patient, who had a previously described SAR1B mutation (p.Leu28ArgfsX7), also had a p.Leu21dup variant of the PCSK9 gene. The expression of the SAR1B gene in duodenal biopsies from an AD/CMRD patient was significantly decreased whereas the expression of the SAR1A gene was significantly increased, as compared to healthy individuals. The Sar1 proteins were present in decreased amounts in enterocytes in duodenal biopsies from the patients as compared to those from healthy subjects. Conclusions Although the proteins encoded by the SAR1A and SAR1B genes are 90% identical, the increased expression of the SAR1A gene in AD/CMRD does not appear to compensate for the lack of the SAR1B protein. The PCSK9 variant, although reported to be associated with low levels of cholesterol, does not appear to exert any additional effect in this patient. The results provide further insight into the tissue-specific nature of AD/CMRD. PMID:21235735

2011-01-01

418

Differences in strength and conditioning coach self-perception of leadership style behaviors at the National Basketball Association, Division I-A, and Division II levels.  

PubMed

Leader behaviors have been found to vary by competitive level (6,9,11,26). Similar differences based on the competitive environment have been reported with strength coaches and their training emphases (15,28) but not their leadership style behaviors. This latter area is important to explore because strength coach leader behaviors may result in enhanced cooperation, improved communication, and improved athlete psychological and emotional well-being (14,23,25,27). Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to examine the differences in self-perceived leadership styles of National Basketball Association, Division I-A (DI-A) men's basketball, and Division II (DII) men's basketball strength and conditioning coaches. The self-perceived leadership styles of 145 men's basketball strength coaches (National Basketball Association [NBA]=22, DI-A=92, and DII=31) were obtained using the Revised Leadership Scale for Sport (26,41). Frequency data about demographics and training methods were also collected. No significant differences were reported for positive feedback. Otherwise, NBA strength coaches reported more democratic leadership style behaviors than DI-A strength coaches. Division I-A strength coaches were found to be more autocratic than NBA or DII strength coaches. Both NBA and DI-A strength coaches indicated a higher level of training and instruction than did DII strength coaches. National Basketball Association strength coaches also reported engaging in more situational and socially supportive leader behaviors than DI-A and DII strength coaches. Leader behaviors can positively and negatively impact an athlete (23); thus, strength coaches need to evaluate their competitive environment and reflect on the impact of their behaviors and how their approach to leading athletes may need to vary based on the situation. PMID:20453682

Magnusen, Marshall J

2010-06-01

419

Retrospective assessment of asbestos exposure--II. At the job level: complementarity of job-specific questionnaire and job exposure matrices.  

PubMed

Retrospective assessment of asbestos exposure--II. At the job level: Complementarity of job-specific questionnaire and job exposure matrices. International Journal of Epidemiology 1993; 22 (Suppl. 2): S96-S105. The assessments of asbestos exposure by two a priori job exposure matrices (JEM) and by a job-specific questionnaire (SQ) are compared at job level. The data used for the comparison were generated by an ongoing case-control study on lung cancer in a region of northern Germany with a relatively high past prevalence of asbestos exposure. Among job periods assessed as unexposed by either JEM, 96% are recognized as such by the SQ. Discrepancies between the SQ and JEM were observed in jobs rated potentially exposed by the JEM. Despite varying estimates, the JEM and SQ were consistent as regards the relative classification of job periods by probability of exposure. The concordance of the methods, estimated by Kappa statistics, was stronger for the two JEM than for either of the JEM and the SQ. The identification of specific occupation/industry combinations in which discrepancies were most frequent and the comparison with expert ratings in some jobs yield insights into the sources of the disagreement between the methods. The misclassification of exposure by the JEM usually results in an overestimation of exposure. This is essentially related to loss of information due to the use of job codes as surrogates for job task descriptions and to the insufficiency of published data on asbestos exposure in different industries. As regards the SQ, two main sources of potential loss of sensitivity were identified: 1) possible omission of indirect sources of exposure by this method, 2) possible incompleteness of the SQ. The present comparison of methods of asbestos exposure assessment does not allow any one approach to be considered superior to another. Indeed, as proposed by Ahrens et al. in Part I of the study, both should be used to ensure optimal epidemiological performance. PMID:8132399

Orlowski, E; Pohlabeln, H; Berrino, F; Ahrens, W; Bolm-Audorff, U; Grossgarten, K; Iwatsubo, Y; Jöckel, K H; Brochard, P

1993-01-01

420

COMBINATORIAL PROOFS OF FERMAT'S, LUCAS'S, AND WILSON'S PETER G. ANDERSON, ARTHUR T. BENJAMIN, AND JEREMY A. ROUSE  

E-print Network

COMBINATORIAL PROOFS OF FERMAT'S, LUCAS'S, AND WILSON'S THEOREMS PETER G. ANDERSON, ARTHUR T of the form {x, f(x), . . . , fp-1 (x)}. Since p is prime, each set either has size one or size p. The Lucas numbers, 2, 1, 3, 4, 7, 11, 18, 29, 47, . . . , named in honor of Edouard Lucas (1842-1891), are defined

Anderson, Peter G.

421

Coordinating Multiple Spacecraft in Joint Science Campaigns Tara Estlin, Steve Chien, Rebecca Castano, Joshua Doubleday, Daniel Gaines, Robert C. Anderson,  

E-print Network

Castano, Joshua Doubleday, Daniel Gaines, Robert C. Anderson, Charles de Granville, Russell Knight, Gregg rapid data collection from multiple craft on dynamic events such as new Mars dark slope streaks, dust-situ characterization of ice geysers, trace gases, seismic events, and surface changes, such as new gullies and dark

Schaffer, Steven

422

1124 Version of Record (identical to print version). TAXON 61 (5) October 2012: 11241125Anderson & Davis (2091) Conserve Mascagnia  

E-print Network

& Davis · (2091) Conserve Mascagnia (2091) Proposal to conserve the name Mascagnia against Triopterys (Malpighiaceae) William R. Anderson1 & Charles C. Davis2 1 University of Michigan Herbarium, 3600 Varsity Drive Vienna Code Art. 33.3 (McNeill & al. in Regnum Veg. 146. 2006). The generic name was lectotypified

423

EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP1, RYOKI FUKUSHIMA2 AND WOLFGANG KNIG3,4  

E-print Network

EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP1, RYOKI FUKUSHIMA2. Biskup, R. Fukushima and W. K�nig. Reproduction, by any means, of the entire article for non-commercial purposes is permitted without charge. 1 #12;2 BISKUP, FUKUSHIMA, K�NIG where (d) is the standard lattice

König, Wolfgang

424

EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP 1 , RYOKI FUKUSHIMA 2 AND WOLFGANG KNIG 3,4  

E-print Network

EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP 1 , RYOKI FUKUSHIMA 2. Fukushima and W. K�nig. Reproduction, by any means, of the entire article for non�commercial purposes is permitted without charge. 1 #12; 2 BISKUP, FUKUSHIMA, K�NIG where # (d) is the standard lattice Laplacian

König, Wolfgang

425

MD Anderson preclinical study identifies 'master' proto-oncogene that regulates stress-induced ovarian cancer metastasis  

Cancer.gov

Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered the signaling pathway whereby a master regulator of cancer cell proteins -- known as Src -- leads to ovarian cancer progression when exposed to stress hormones. The researchers report in the current issue of Nature Communications that beta blocker drugs mitigate this effect and reduce cancer deaths by an average of 17 percent.

426

Working Group E: What is climate? Richard Chandler (Chair), Paul Williams (Rapporteur), Clive Anderson, Daan Crommelin, Chris Farmer,  

E-print Network

Working Group E: What is climate? Richard Chandler (Chair), Paul Williams (Rapporteur), Clive Anderson, Daan Crommelin, Chris Farmer, Hermann Held, John Huthnance, Tim Jupp, David Stainforth, Simon and assumptions (e.g. ergodicity) are required to compute climate as defined above · Suggestions for the Newton

Williams, Paul

427

MD Anderson study finds drug combination improves progression-free survival for women with metastatic breast cancer:  

Cancer.gov

In an international Phase III randomized study, everolimus, when combined with the hormonal therapy exemestane, has been shown to dramatically improve progression-free survival for women with metastatic breast cancer, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

428

Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle, Alexander Romanovsky  

E-print Network

1 Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle employing an OTS (Off-The-Shelf) item. The case study used a Simulink model of a steam boiler system, employing software models of the PID controller and the steam boiler system rather than conducting

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

429

Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle, Alexander Romanovsky  

E-print Network

Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle-The-Shelf) item. The case study used a Simulink model of a steam boiler system together with an OTS PID in practice, employing software models of the PID controller and the steam boiler system rather than

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

430

Skrjabinoclava inornatae Wong & Anderson, 1987 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea) as a sporadic parasite of the greater yellowlegs Tringa melanoleuca Gmelin (Aves: Scolopacidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Skrjabinoclava inornatae Wong & Anderson, 1987 was found in one of five adult greater yellowlegs Tringa melanoleuca collected near Framboise, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada. This is the first report of a member of the genus in this host. The infection is regarded as sporadic and a further indication that the host distribution of members of Skrjabinoclava may be determined

R. C. Anderson; C. M. Bartlett

1996-01-01

431

Stevens, Lanning, Anderson, Jacoby, and Chornet Volume 48 October 1998 Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 979  

E-print Network

Stevens, Lanning, Anderson, Jacoby, and Chornet Volume 48 October 1998 Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 979 ISSN 1047-3289 J. Air & Waste Manage. Assoc. 48:979-984 Copyright 1998 Air & Waste such as potassium perman- ganate. Electronic air cleaners utilize high voltages to pro- duce ions or ozone to carry

432

Wegner-type bounds for a two-particle continuous Anderson model with an alloy-type external potential  

E-print Network

We consider a two-particle quantum systems in a d-dimensional Euclidean space with interaction and in presence of a random external potential (a continuous two-particle Anderson model). We establish Wegner-type estimates (inequalities) for such models, assessing the probability that random spectra of Hamiltonians in finite volumes intersect a given set.

A. Boutet de Monvel; V. Chulaevsky; P. Stollmann; Y. Suhov

2008-12-14

433

Energy current imaging method for time reversal in elastic media Brian E. Anderson,1,2,a  

E-print Network

Energy current imaging method for time reversal in elastic media Brian E. Anderson,1,2,a Robert A as others for fluid media, could benefit from using a higher resolution imaging method, as the one proposed 16 July 2009 An energy current imaging method is presented for use in locating sources of wave energy

434

MD Anderson study finds SUMO-snipping protein plays crucial role in T and B cell development  

Cancer.gov

When SUMO grips STAT5, a protein that activates genes, it blocks the healthy embryonic development of immune B cells and T cells unless its nemesis breaks the hold, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in Molecular Cell.

435

[Comment on ``Mechanical Properties and Processes in the Mantle'' by Sykes, Kay and Anderson] Disagreement With Terms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attention is invited to the misuse of the word `rheology' by some of your writers. See, for example, `Mechanical Properties and Processes in the Mantle,' by Sykes, Kay, and Anderson, in the December issue of EOS.The word `rheology,' as defined in Dictionary of Geological Terms, Dolphin, 1962, page 423; and Glossary of Geology and Earth Sciences with Supplement, American Geological

J. H. Tatsch

1971-01-01

436

Identification and Analysis of Learning Preferences of Mentally Ill Adults in Rehabilitative Psychosocial Therapy at the Anderson Mental Health Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study identified and analyzed the learning preferences of 17 seriously and chronically mentally ill adults participating in the rehabilitative psychosocial therapy program at the Toxaway Church Site of the Anderson Mental Health Center. Staff perceived as boring and unfocused the traditional treatment approach that relied mainly upon…

Newman, Michael K.

437

Ecient Pure-bu er Algorithms for Real-time Systems 1 James H. Anderson and Philip Holman  

E-print Network

EÃ?cient Pure-bu#11;er Algorithms for Real-time Systems 1 James H. Anderson and Philip Holman for implementing multi-writer read/write pure-bu#11;ers in multiprocessor real-time systems. Such bu#11;ers are commonly used when existing data is overwritten as newly-produced data becomes available. Pure-bu#11;er

Anderson, James

438

Anderson-Gruneisen parameter under high temperature in (Fe,Mn,Co,Mg)2SiO4  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Anderson–Grüneisen parameter (?) is of considerable importance to Earth scientists because it sets limitations on the thermo-elastic properties of the lower mantle and core. However, there are several formulations on the Grüneisen parameter, which are in frequent use and predict varying dependence of d as a function of temperature. In this paper, the expressions for thermal expansion, thermal expansion

S Gupta; S C Goyal

2012-01-01

439

A novel single-side azobenzene-grafted Anderson-type polyoxometalate for recognition-induced chiral migration.  

PubMed

A three-component supramolecular hybrid system based on host-guest recognition and electrostatic interaction has been developed for a consecutive chiral transfer from an alpha-cyclodextrin to cationic dyes via the bridge of a new azobenzene-grafted Anderson-type polyoxometalate cluster. PMID:25089807

Zhang, Bin; Yue, Liang; Wang, Yang; Yang, Yang; Wu, Lixin

2014-09-25

440

Proposal for Themester 2012: Good Behavior, Bad Behavior Instructor: Penelope Anderson, Assistant Professor of English [pea@indiana.edu  

E-print Network

1 Proposal for Themester 2012: Good Behavior, Bad Behavior Instructor: Penelope Anderson, Assistant Professor of English [pea@indiana.edu] Course: English L313, Early Plays of Shakespeare Special topic currently teaching this course (see syllabus below), and am particularly eager to teach it again within

Indiana University

441

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 87, 045116 (2013) Anderson localization versus charge-density-wave formation in disordered electron systems  

E-print Network

localized for arbitrary energies and arbitrarily weak disorder. This holds for Anderson's noninteracting An understanding of how disorder and interaction act together is of vital importance not only to discuss the metal disorder and bosonic degrees of freedom are of importance. Regarding interacting bosons, ultracold atoms

Fehske, Holger

442

Will Dreams Come True? Review of The Atomic Components of Thought, by John R. Anderson and Christian Lebiere  

Microsoft Academic Search

John R. Anderson is a distinguished researcher of cognitive psychology and cognitive science, whose work has helped shape these fields for more than 20 years. He is the Walter VanDyke Bingham Professor of Cognitive Science and a professor in the Department of Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, where he has taught since 1978. He received a Ph.D. from

Franz Schmalhofer

2001-01-01

443

MD Anderson researchers find that the number of younger patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer may nearly double by 2030  

Cancer.gov

In the next 15 years, more than one in 10 colon cancers and nearly one in four rectal cancers will be diagnosed in patients younger than the traditional screening age, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

444

Design of a Small-Scale Biodiesel Production System Jeffrey Anderson, Jessica Caceres, Ali Khazaei, Jedidiah Shirey  

E-print Network

Design of a Small-Scale Biodiesel Production System Jeffrey Anderson, Jessica Caceres, Ali Khazaei acreage and biodiesel output. Monte Carlo Simulation Objective: 1) Biodiesel Production Simulation: Determines biodiesel yield and Net Energy Ration of each crop alternative 1) Business Simulation: Determines

445

Random walk approach to the analytic solution of random systems with multiplicative noise—The Anderson localization problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss here in detail a new analytical random walk approach to calculating the phase diagram for spatially extended systems with multiplicative noise. We use the Anderson localization problem as an example. The transition from delocalized to localized states is treated as a generalized diffusion with a noise-induced first-order phase transition. The generalized diffusion manifests itself in the divergence of

V. N. Kuzovkov; W. von Niessen

2006-01-01

446

Kondo Stripes in an Anderson-Heisenberg Model of Heavy Fermion Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the interplay between the spin-liquid and Kondo physics, as related to the nonmagnetic part of the phase diagram of heavy fermion materials. Within the unrestricted mean-field treatment of the infinite-U 2D Anderson-Heisenberg model, we find that there are two topologically distinct nondegenerate uniform heavy Fermi liquid states that may form as a consequence of the Kondo coupling between spinons and conduction electrons. For certain carrier concentrations, the uniform Fermi liquid becomes unstable with respect to the formation of a new kind of anharmonic “Kondo stripe” state with inhomogeneous Kondo screening strength and the charge density modulation. These features are experimentally measurable and thus may help to establish the relevance of the spin-liquid correlations to heavy fermion materials.

Zhu, Jian-Xin; Martin, I.; Bishop, A. R.

2008-06-01

447

Leveraging Anderson Acceleration for improved convergence of iterative solutions to transport systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this note we demonstrate that using Anderson Acceleration (AA) in place of a standard Picard iteration can not only increase the convergence rate but also make the iteration more robust for two transport applications. We also compare the convergence acceleration provided by AA to that provided by moment-based acceleration methods. Additionally, we demonstrate that those two acceleration methods can be used together in a nested fashion. We begin by describing the AA algorithm. At this point, we will describe two application problems, one from neutronics and one from plasma physics, on which we will apply AA. We provide computational results which highlight the benefits of using AA, namely that we can compute solutions using fewer function evaluations, larger time-steps, and achieve a more robust iteration.

Willert, Jeffrey; Taitano, William T.; Knoll, Dana

2014-09-01

448

Probing Anderson localization of light by weak non-linear effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Breakdown of wave transport due to strong disorder is a universal phenomenon known as Anderson localization (AL). It occurs because of the macroscopic population of reciprocal multiple scattering paths, which in three dimensional systems happens at a critical scattering strength. Intensities on these random loops should thus be highly increased relative to those of a diffusive sample. In order to highlight localized modes of light, we exploit the optical nonlinearities of TiO2. Power dependent and spectrally resolved time of flight distribution measurements in transmission through slabs of TiO2 powders at various turbidities reveal that mostly long loops are affected by nonlinearities and that the deviations from diffusive transport observed at long times are due to these localized modes. Our data are a first step in the experimental investigation of the interplay between nonlinear effects and AL in 3D.

Sperling, T.; Bührer, W.; Ackermann, M.; Aegerter, C. M.; Maret, G.

2014-11-01

449

Modified Anderson-Darling Test-Based Target Detector in Non-Homogenous Environments  

PubMed Central

A constant false alarm rate (CFAR) target detector in non-homogenous backgrounds is proposed. Based on K-sample Anderson-Darling (AD) tests, the method re-arranges the reference cells by merging homogenous sub-blocks surrounding the cell under test (CUT) into a new reference window to estimate the background statistics. Double partition test, clutter edge refinement and outlier elimination are used as an anti-clutter processor in the proposed Modified AD (MAD) detector. Simulation results show that the proposed MAD test based detector outperforms cell-averaging (CA) CFAR, greatest of (GO) CFAR, smallest of (SO) CFAR, order-statistic (OS) CFAR, variability index (VI) CFAR, and CUT inclusive (CI) CFAR in most non-homogenous situations. PMID:25177800

Li, Yang; Wei, Yinsheng; Li, Bingfei; Alterovitz, Gil

2014-01-01

450

Numerical study of Anderson localization of terahertz waves in disordered waveguides  

E-print Network

We present a numerical study of electromagnetic wave transport in disordered quasi-one-dimensional waveguides at terahertz frequencies. Finite element method calculations of terahertz wave propagation within LiNbO$_{3}$ waveguides with randomly arranged air-filled circular scatterers exhibit an onset of Anderson localization at experimentally accessible length scales. Results for the average transmission as a function of waveguide length and scatterer density demonstrate a clear crossover from diffusive to localized transport regime. In addition, we find that transmission fluctuations grow dramatically when crossing into the localized regime. Our numerical results are in good quantitative agreement with theory over a wide range of experimentally accessible parameters both in the diffusive and localized regime opening the path towards experimental observation of terahertz wave localization.

Lapointe, C P; Enderli, F; Feurer, T; Skipetrov, S E; Scheffold, F

2014-01-01

451

Modified Anderson-Darling test-based target detector in non-homogenous environments.  

PubMed

A constant false alarm rate (CFAR) target detector in non-homogenous backgrounds is proposed. Based on K-sample Anderson-Darling (AD) tests, the method re-arranges the reference cells by merging homogenous sub-blocks surrounding the cell under test (CUT) into a new reference window to estimate the background statistics. Double partition test, clutter edge refinement and outlier elimination are used as an anti-clutter processor in the proposed Modified AD (MAD) detector. Simulation results show that the proposed MAD test based detector outperforms cell-averaging (CA) CFAR, greatest of (GO) CFAR, smallest of (SO) CFAR, order-statistic (OS) CFAR, variability index (VI) CFAR, and CUT inclusive (CI) CFAR in most non-homogenous situations. PMID:25177800

Li, Yang; Wei, Yinsheng; Li, Bingfei; Alterovitz, Gil

2014-01-01

452

Self-Consistent Theory of Anderson Localization in Two Dimensions in View of Exact Transport Equation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Self-consistent theory of Anderson localization of two-dimensional non-interacting electrons is formulated in the context of the exact transport equation and conductivity expression derived by the present authors (YI). The irreducible scattering vertex by Vollhardt and Wölfle (VW) is used in this equation, determining the diffusion coefficient in the scattering vertex self-consistently, through Einstein relation. It predicts a similar localization length to that obtained by VW, but shows that the conductivity evaluated by the Kubo formula decays exponentially, as the system size approaches the localization length. The result is opposed to the prediction by VW, who showed different behaviour of the diffusion coefficient that is equivalent to our conductivity. Our calculation also implies that the localization may be described along with the Landau-Silin theory of Fermi liquid.

Yamane, Y.; Itoh, M.

2012-10-01

453

Beyond Anderson Localization in 1D: Anomalous Localization of Microwaves in Random Waveguides  

E-print Network

Experimental evidence demonstrating that anomalous localization of waves can be induced in a controllable manner is reported. A microwave waveguide with dielectric slabs randomly placed is used to confirm the presence of anomalous localization. If the random spacing between slabs follows a distribution with a power-law tail (L\\'evy-type distribution), unconventional properties in the microwave-transmission fluctuations take place revealing the presence of anomalous localization. We study both theoretically and experimentally the complete distribution of the transmission through random waveguides characterized by $\\alpha=1/2$ ("L\\'evy waveguides") and $\\alpha=3/4$, $\\alpha$ being the exponent of the power-law tail of the L\\'evy-type distribution. As we show, the transmission distributions are determined by only two parameters, both of them experimentally accessible. Effects of anomalous localization on the transmission are compared with those from the standard Anderson localization.

Fernández-Marín, A A; Carbonell, J; Cervera, F; Sánchez-Dehesa, J; Gopar, V A

2014-01-01

454

One-dimensional Anderson Localization: distribution of wavefunction amplitude and phase at the band center  

SciTech Connect

The statistics of normalized wavefunctions in the one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model of localization is considered. It is shown that at any energy that corresponds to a rational filling factor f = (p/q) there is a statistical anomaly which is seen in expansion of the generating function (GF) to the order q-2 in the disorder parameter. We study in detail the principle anomaly at f = (1/2) that appears in the leading order. The transfer-matrix equation of the Fokker-Planck type with a two-dimensional internal space is derived for GF. It is shown that the zero-mode variant of this equation is integrable and a solution for the generating function is found in the thermodynamic limit.

Kravtsov, V. E. [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, P.O.B. 586, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Yudson, V. I. [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, 2 Kosygina St., 117940 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-05-14

455

Pu 4f XPS spectra analyzed in the Anderson impurity model  

SciTech Connect

X-ray photoemission spectra of the {alpha},{beta},{gamma}, and {delta} phases of Pu have been analyzed using the Gunnarsson-Schonhammer implementation of the Anderson impurity model. Changes in the relative intensities of the two spectral features representing mixed f{sup 5} and f{sup 6} final states are in reasonable agreement with the model`s predictions. The coulomb terms, U{sub ff} and U{sub fc}, are quite consistent with those derived from atomic and LDA calculations. Multiplet structure, which agrees with atomic calculations for 4f{sup 13}5f{sup 5}, strongly suggests 5f localization in the final state.

Cox, L.E.; Peek, J.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Materials Technology Div.; Allen, J.W. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

1998-05-09

456

JZGOU, A.. Community of Inquiry in E-learning: A Critical Analysis of the Garrison and Anderson Model. The Journal of Distance Education / Revue de l'ducation Distance,  

E-print Network

JéZéGOU, A.. Community of Inquiry in E-learning: A Critical Analysis of the Garrison and Anderson. COMMUNITY OF INQUIRY IN E-LEARNING: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THE GARRISON AND ANDERSON MODEL (Editor's note by Garrison and Anderson (2003) as part of their e-learning research. The authors claim that certain

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

457

Theoretical (in B3LYP/6-3111++G** level), spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and thermogravimetric studies of gentisic acid and sodium, copper(II) and cadmium(II) gentisates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The DFT calculations (B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) mixed with LanL2DZ for transition metals basis sets) for different conformers of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid), sodium 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (gentisate) and copper(II) and cadmium(II) gentisates were done. The proposed hydrated structures of transition metal complexes were based on the results of experimental findings. The theoretical geometrical parameters and atomic charge distribution were discussed. Moreover Na, Cu(II) and Cd(II) gentisates were synthesized and the composition of obtained compounds was revealed by means of elemental and thermogravimetric analyses. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of gentisic acid and gentisates were registered and the effect of metals on the electronic charge distribution of ligand was discussed.

Regulska, E.; Kalinowska, M.; Wojtulewski, S.; Korczak, A.; Sienkiewicz-Gromiuk, J.; Rz?czy?ska, Z.; ?wis?ocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

2014-11-01

458

Effects of Methionine Deficiencies on Plasma Levels of Thyroid Hormones, Insulin-like Growth Factors-I and -II, Liver and Body Weights, and Feed Intake in Growing Chickens  

Microsoft Academic Search

We showed previously that Met deficiency at 0.25% of the diet causes elevations in plasma triiodothy- ronine (T3) in broilers. In the present study, plasma levels of thyroid hormones as well as insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II were measured in chicks fed 3 deficient levels of total Met. Control (0.5%) and Met-deficient diets (0.4, 0.3, and 0.2%) were fed

L. B. Carew; J. P. McMurtry; F. A. Alster

459

Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) inhibit in vivo proliferation of experimental pancreatic cancers and decrease IGF-II levels in tumours  

Microsoft Academic Search

Insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) are implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma. Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) suppress the GH-RH–GH–IGF-I axis and also act directly on tumours to reduce production of IGF-I or II. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two potent GH-RH antagonists in two experimental models of pancreatic cancer. Syrian

K. Szepeshazi; A. V. Schally; K. Groot; P. Armatis; F. Hebert; G. Halmos

2000-01-01

460

Lifetime measurement of the T=23 537 cm-1, J=9\\/2 odd-parity level in Nd ii using time-resolved collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Time-resolved collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy has been used to measure the lifetime of the T=23 537 cm-1, J=9\\/2 odd-parity [abbreviated as (23 537)°9\\/2] level in Nd ii. Nanosecond pulsed excitation was achieved with the Doppler switching technique. The fast ions were selectively excited from the metastable 4f45d 6K9\\/2 level to the (23 537)°9\\/2 level by the light of a cw

Shi Wei; Lu Fuquan; Wu Songmao; Shi Peixiong; Yang Jianjun; Song Linggen; Tang Jiayong; Yang Fujia

1991-01-01

461

Lifetime measurement of the T =23 537 cm sup minus 1 , J =9\\/2 odd-parity level in Nd II using time-resolved collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Time-resolved collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy has been used to measure the lifetime of the {ital T}=23 537 cm⁻¹, {ital J}=9\\/2 odd-parity (abbreviated as (23 537)°ââ) level in Nd II. Nanosecond pulsed excitation was achieved with the Doppler switching technique. The fast ions were selectively excited from the metastable 4{ital f}⁴5{ital d} ⁶{ital K}ââ level to the (23 537)°ââ level by

S. Wei; Lu Fuquan; Wu Songmao; Shi Peixiong; Yang Jianjun; Song Linggen; T. Jiayong; Y. Fujia

1991-01-01

462

Regulation of Electron Transport in Photosystems I and II in C3, C3-C4, and C4 Species of Panicum in Response to Changing Irradiance and O2 Levels.  

PubMed

Regulation of the quantum yields of linear electron transport and photosystem II photochemistry ([phi]II) with changing irradiance and gas-phase O2 concentration was studied in leaf tissue from Panicum bi