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Sample records for anderson level ii

  1. Surface hopping with a manifold of electronic states. II. Application to the many-body Anderson-Holstein model.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenjie; Nitzan, Abraham; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-02-28

    We investigate a simple surface hopping (SH) approach for modeling a single impurity level coupled to a single phonon and an electronic (metal) bath (i.e., the Anderson-Holstein model). The phonon degree of freedom is treated classically with motion along--and hops between--diabatic potential energy surfaces. The hopping rate is determined by the dynamics of the electronic bath (which are treated implicitly). For the case of one electronic bath, in the limit of small coupling to the bath, SH recovers phonon relaxation to thermal equilibrium and yields the correct impurity electron population (as compared with numerical renormalization group). For the case of out of equilibrium dynamics, SH current-voltage (I-V) curve is compared with the quantum master equation (QME) over a range of parameters, spanning the quantum region to the classical region. In the limit of large temperature, SH and QME agree. Furthermore, we can show that, in the limit of low temperature, the QME agrees with real-time path integral calculations. As such, the simple procedure described here should be useful in many other contexts. PMID:25725715

  2. Surface hopping with a manifold of electronic states. II. Application to the many-body Anderson-Holstein model

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2015-02-28

    We investigate a simple surface hopping (SH) approach for modeling a single impurity level coupled to a single phonon and an electronic (metal) bath (i.e., the Anderson-Holstein model). The phonon degree of freedom is treated classically with motion along–and hops between–diabatic potential energy surfaces. The hopping rate is determined by the dynamics of the electronic bath (which are treated implicitly). For the case of one electronic bath, in the limit of small coupling to the bath, SH recovers phonon relaxation to thermal equilibrium and yields the correct impurity electron population (as compared with numerical renormalization group). For the case of out of equilibrium dynamics, SH current-voltage (I-V) curve is compared with the quantum master equation (QME) over a range of parameters, spanning the quantum region to the classical region. In the limit of large temperature, SH and QME agree. Furthermore, we can show that, in the limit of low temperature, the QME agrees with real-time path integral calculations. As such, the simple procedure described here should be useful in many other contexts.

  3. The Anderson Quin Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

    1993-03-18

    The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

  4. 30. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing control transmitter electronic cabinets and control modules. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. 53. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with incoming waveguide and control switch. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. 55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with eighty-eight 1-1/2" diameter copper ion return RF balance tube systems. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. Ground State of Anderson Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Norio; Okiji, Ayao

    1982-04-01

    Following the Wiegmann approach the exact expression of the ground state energy for the symmetric Anderson Hamiltonian was obtained. In this paper the calculation is done for the asymmetric Anderson Hamiltonian, of the ground state energy, of the average number of localized electrons and of the charge susceptibility.

  8. Anderson attractors in active arrays.

    PubMed

    Laptyeva, Tetyana V; Tikhomirov, Andrey A; Kanakov, Oleg I; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V

    2015-01-01

    In dissipationless linear media, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of matter, light, and sound waves. The addition of nonlinearity causes interaction between the eigenmodes, which results in a slow wave diffusion. We go beyond the dissipationless limit of Anderson arrays and consider nonlinear disordered systems that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess specific excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the threshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multi-peak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices, active waveguide or cavity-QED arrays. PMID:26304462

  9. Anderson attractors in active arrays

    PubMed Central

    Laptyeva, Tetyana V.; Tikhomirov, Andrey A.; Kanakov, Oleg I.; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V.

    2015-01-01

    In dissipationless linear media, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of matter, light, and sound waves. The addition of nonlinearity causes interaction between the eigenmodes, which results in a slow wave diffusion. We go beyond the dissipationless limit of Anderson arrays and consider nonlinear disordered systems that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess specific excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the threshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multi-peak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices, active waveguide or cavity-QED arrays. PMID:26304462

  10. Gravitational Anderson localization.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Ira Z

    2013-01-01

    We present a higher dimensional model where gravity is bound to a brane due to Anderson localization. The extra dimensions are taken to be a disordered crystal of branes, with randomly distributed tensions of order the fundamental scale. Such geometries bind the graviton and thus allow for arbitrarily large extra dimensions even when the curvature is small. Thus this model is quite distinct from that of Randall and Sundrum where localization is a consequence of curvature effects in the bulk. The hierarchy problem can be solved by having the standard model brane live a distance away from the brane on which the graviton is localized. The statistical properties of the system are worked out and it is shown that the scenario leads to a continuum of four dimensional theories with differing strengths of gravitational interactions. We live on one particular brane whose gravitational constant is G(N). PMID:23383775

  11. Anderson's Orthogonality Catastrophe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebert, Martin; Kttler, Heinrich; Mller, Peter

    2014-08-01

    We give an upper bound on the modulus of the ground-state overlap of two non-interacting fermionic quantum systems with N particles in a large but finite volume L d of d-dimensional Euclidean space. The underlying one-particle Hamiltonians of the two systems are standard Schrdinger operators that differ by a non-negative compactly supported scalar potential. In the thermodynamic limit, the bound exhibits an asymptotic power-law decay in the system size L, showing that the ground-state overlap vanishes for macroscopic systems. The decay exponent can be interpreted in terms of the total scattering cross section averaged over all incident directions. The result confirms and generalises P. W. Anderson's informal computation (Phys. Rev. Lett. 18:1049-1051, 1967).

  12. Anderson localization of light near boundaries of disordered photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Jovic, Dragana M.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Denz, Cornelia; Belic, Milivoj R.

    2011-03-15

    We study numerically the effect of boundaries on Anderson localization of light in truncated two-dimensional photonic lattices in a nonlinear medium. We demonstrate suppression of Anderson localization at the edges and corners, so that stronger disorder is needed near the boundaries to obtain the same localization as in the bulk. We find that the level of suppression depends on the location in the lattice (edge vs corner), as well as on the strength of disorder. We also discuss the effect of nonlinearity on various regimes of Anderson localization.

  13. Price-Anderson Law - reports on Price-Anderson issues

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Five of the six papers in this study are by experts outside the nuclear industry, and deal with fear, risk, and risk management as they apply to the review of the Price-Anderson Act. The purpose of the Act is to encourage private enterprise to develop a reliable source of electric power and to protect the public from the financial consequences of injury or damage that may occur during the process. The titles of the five papers are: (1) the effects of ionizing radiation on human health, (2) proof of causation through expert opinion evidence in low-level radiation cases, (3) a critical review of the probability of causation method, (4) the nuclear liability claims experience of the nuclear insurance pools, (5) review of nuclear liability compensation systems applicable to reactors outside the United States, and (6) the economic foundations of limited liability for nuclear reactor accidents. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the papers for EDB, EPA, and INS.

  14. Paired-Associate Learning at Three Imagery Levels in Level I and Level II Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prawat, Richard S.

    Two views of paired-associate learning were examined by assessing the paired-associate learning efficiency of eighth grade samples identified by digit span and IQ test performance as Jensen-type Level I and Level II learners. Eighty eighth grade students ranging in age from 13 years 3 months to 14 years 10 months were selected as subjects. Three

  15. 10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING NORTHEAST (BUILDINGS 131, 130, 129, and 128 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  16. 6. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY NEAR BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY NEAR BUILDING 132, FACING SOUTHEAST (BUILDINGS 124, 122, 120, and 118 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  17. 9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING WEST (BUILDINGS 126, 128, 129, 130, and 131 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  18. Red light for Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipetrov, S. E.; Page, J. H.

    2016-02-01

    During the last 30 years, the search for Anderson localization of light in three-dimensional (3D) disordered samples yielded a number of experimental observations that were first considered successful, then disputed by opponents, and later refuted by their authors. This includes recent results for light in TiO2 powders that Sperling et al now show to be due to fluorescence and not to Anderson localization (2016 New J. Phys. 18 013039). The difficulty of observing Anderson localization of light in 3D may be due to a number of factors: insufficient optical contrast between the components of the disordered material, near-field effects, etc. The way to overcome these difficulties may consist in using partially ordered materials, complex structured scatterers, or clouds of cold atoms in magnetic fields.

  19. M D Anderson Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    This proposal will establish a Small Animal Imaging Research Program (SAIRP) at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The proposed SAIRP will complement the existing institutional facility that provides small animal imaging services to NIH funded investigators. The broad goal of this SAIRP is to develop novel imaging approaches to solve cancer related biological questions and evaluate new cancer therapies.

  20. Individualized Testing System: Performance Objectives, ISCS Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation material for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program. The manual contains a composite list of selected measurable objectives for Level II of the ISCS program. It is

  1. Comments About a Chameleon Theory: Level I/Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, John; Stankov, Lazar

    1982-01-01

    Jensen's ideas about two levels of intellectual abilities are criticized as being oversimplified. More than two levels of intellectual abilities and relationships between variables reflecting more than racial and socioeconomic status (SES) differences are suggested, arguing that Jensen's statements about race and SES differences are not properly

  2. Anderson testifies on Planet Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainger, Lisa A.

    AGU president Don Anderson joined former astronaut Sally Ride and National Aeronautics and Space Administration official Lennard Fisk March 8 in testifying before the Senate committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. The three had been asked to speak on the future of the Mission to Planet Earth, proposed both in a National Academy of Sciences report and a NASA study.Anderson was chairman of the National Academy of Science's Task Group on Earth Sciences, which prepared the report Mission to Planet Earth as part of the series Space Science in the Twenty-First Century. In his testimony, Anderson highlighted parts of the report and quoted the frontispiece We now have the technology and the incentive to move boldly forward on a Mission to Planet Earth. We call on the nation to implement an integrated global program using both spaceborne and earth-based instrumentation for fundamental research on the origin, evolution and nature of our planet, its place in our solar system, and its interaction with living things, including mankind.

  3. Phase Structure of the Topological Anderson Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongwei; Sacksteder, Vincent E.; Qi, Junjie; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Hua; Xie, X. C.

    2012-02-01

    We report the phase structure of disordered HgTe topological Anderson insulator in a 2-D geometry. We use exact diagonalization to calculate the spectrum and eigenstate structure, and recursive green's functions to calculate the conductance. All observables are measured at several system sizes, allowing us to determine phase transitions and two critical points. The quantized-conductance TAI phase contains two phases: TAI-I lying in a bulk band gap, and TAI-II where bulk states exist but are localized. We find that the TAI-II phase persists at disorder strengths where there is no bulk band gap; a bulk band gap is not necessary to obtain conductance quantization. In a previous work the weak-disorder edge of the TAI phase was explained as a transition into the bulk gap (TAI-I), but we find also a direct transition into the ungapped (TAI-II) quantized phase. Effective medium theory (SCBA) predicts well the boundaries and interior of the TAI-I phase, but fails at larger disorders including the interior of the TAI-II phase. When the system size is smaller than the bulk localization length, the quantized TAI region is bounded by either the bulk band edge or the localization length, but when the system size is large it is bounded by a transition of edge states.

  4. Culture Curriculum for German, Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oetiker, Rosemary

    This teacher's guide to cultural instruction in a level-2 German course is designed to be used with the text "Deutsch, Erstes Buch, Erster Teil." Instructional observations pertain to the seventh through the 12th lessons and comprise the major portion of this text including: )1) die Eisenbahn, (2) Reisen und Essen in Deutschland, (3) die Familie,…

  5. New Fe ii energy levels from stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, F.; Kurucz, R. L.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: The spectra of B-type and early A-type stars show numerous unidentified lines in the whole optical range, especially in the 5100-5400 Å interval. Because Fe ii transitions to high energy levels should be observed in this region, we used semiempirical predicted wavelengths and gf-values of Fe ii to identify unknown lines. Methods: Semiempirical line data for Fe ii computed by Kurucz are used to synthesize the spectrum of the slow-rotating, Fe-overabundant CP star HR 6000. Results: We determined a total of 109 new 4f levels for Fe ii with energies ranging from 122 324 cm-1 to 128 110 cm-1. They belong to the Fe ii subconfigurations 3d6(3P)4f (10 levels), 3d6(3H)4f (36 levels), 3d6(3F)4f (37 levels), and 3d6(3G)4f (26 levels). We also found 14 even levels from 4d (3 levels), 5d (7 levels), and 6d (4 levels) configurations. The new levels have allowed us to identify more than 50% of the previously unidentified lines of HR 6000 in the wavelength region 3800-8000 Å. Tables listing the new energy levels are given in the paper; tables listing the spectral lines with log gf ≥ -1.5 that are transitions to the 4f energy levels are given in the Online Material. These new levels produce 18 000 lines throughout the spectrum from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Tables 6-9 are also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/520/A57

  6. 54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch at open port door. Note incoming waveguide and control switch at lower left of photograph and note several waveguides leaving top of scanner switch around the circumference of switch. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. 31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing various electronic central indicator panel to control building air conditioning, steam pressure, supply temperature, discharge temperature, supply pressure, transformer vault status, and radome conditioning system. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  8. 52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch with open port door in radar scanner building 105 showing emanating waveguides from lower switch in vertical run; photograph also shows catwalk to upper scanner switch in upper left side of photograph and structural supports. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  9. Anderson and Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    The legacy of P. W. Anderson, perhaps the most fertile and influential condensed matter physicist of the second half of the twentieth century, is briefly mentioned here. I note three pervasive values. They are: emergence with its constant tendency to surprise us and to stretch our imagination, the Baconian emphasis on the experimental moorings of modern science, and mechanism as the explanatory core. Out of his work, which is spread over more than six decades and in many ways has charted modern condensed matter physics, nearly a dozen seminal contributions, chosen idiosyncratically, are mentioned at the risk of leaving out many which may also have started subfields. Some of these are: antiferromagnestism and broken symmetry, superexchange and strong electron correlations, localization in disordered systems, gauge invariance and mass, and the resonating valence bond in magnetic systems as well as in high-temperature superconductivity...

  10. Test Item Pool, Level II, Unit 1, Individualized Teacher Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Dept. of Science Education.

    This publication provides examples of test items which can be used to test the performance of students after completing activities of Unit 1, Level II, in the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) materials. A total of 30 performance-based objectives are listed by several question items. Correct answers are provided. The publication is

  11. Home Economics. Sample Test Items. Levels I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Educational Testing.

    A sample of behavioral objectives and related test items that could be developed for content modules in Home Economics levels I and II, this book is intended to enable teachers to construct more valid and reliable test materials. Forty-eight one-page modules are presented, and opposite each module are listed two to seven specific behavioral

  12. Transcript levels and synthesis of photosystem II components in cyanobacterial mutants with inactivated photosystem II genes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiujiang Yu; Vermaas, W.F.J. )

    1990-04-01

    After interruption or deletion of the photosystem II genes psbB, psbC, and psbD in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, thylakoids from such mutants were found to be depleted in a number of photosystem II proteins in addition to those for which the gene(s) had been inactivated. Transcript levels of photosystem II genes were measured and protein pulse-labeling was carried out to determine the reason for this effect. Transcripts of all photosystem II genes except the inactivated one(s) were found to be present in the various mutants. In certain cases, inactivation of one photosystem II gene led to overexpression of another. Protein pulse-labeling experiments using {sup 35}S-methionine, in which not only the rapidly turing over D1 protein but also D2, CP43, and CP47 appear to be preferentially labeled, showed that the mutants studied synthesize the D1 protein as well as other photosystem II proteins whose genes were not inactivated. The fact that, in the various mutants, photosystem II proteins for which the gene is not inactivated are synthesized but do not accumulate in the thylakoid indicates that the psbB, psbC, and psbD gene products are all required for a stable assembly of the photosystem II complex.

  13. Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

  14. Early onset neonatal septicaemia in a level II nursery.

    PubMed

    Malik, A S; Pennie, R A

    1994-03-01

    A prospective study of 486 high risk neonates admitted to a level II nursery in a relatively poor and rural area of Malaysia was carried out to determine the incidence, the spectrum of micro-organisms and predisposing factors in relation to early onset septicaemia. The incidence of proven or probable septicaemia was 57.61 per 1000 high risk newborns over 1.5 kg. The case fatality was 10.71 per cent. Coagulase negative staphylococci, Streptococcus Group B and Klebsiella species were the most commonly isolated organisms. Meconium staining of liquor was the most common risk factor for admission to the nursery, and prematurity was the most significant risk factor for early neonatal infection (P < 0.005) followed by small for gestational age (P < 0.04). Although the incidence of septicaemia was quite high in the level II nursery, the mortality rate was comparable to established figures. PMID:8057985

  15. The Internal Validation of Level II and Level III Respiratory Therapy Examinations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jouett, Michael L.

    This project began with the delineation of the roles and functions of respiratory therapy personnel by the American Association for Respiratory Therapy. In Phase II, The Psychological Corporation used this delineation to develop six proficiency examinations, three at each of two levels. One exam at each level was designated for the purpose of the

  16. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD (II) LEVELS AND LEAD (II) NEUROTOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafl...

  17. Coherent Backscattering Reveals the Anderson Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Delande, D.; Miniatura, C.; Cherroret, N.

    2015-11-01

    We develop an accurate finite-time scaling analysis of the angular width of the coherent backscattering (CBS) peak for waves propagating in 3D random media. Applying this method to ultracold atoms in optical speckle potentials, we show how to determine both the mobility edge and the critical exponent of the Anderson transition from the temporal behavior of the CBS width. Our method could be used in experiments to fully characterize the 3D Anderson transition.

  18. Thermalization processes in interacting Anderson insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovadyahu, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes experiments utilizing a unique property of electron glasses to gain information on the fundamental nature of the interacting Anderson-localized phase. The methodology is based on measuring the energy absorbed by the electronic system from alternating electromagnetic fields as a function of their frequency. Experiments on three-dimensional (3D) amorphous indium-oxide films suggest that, in the strongly localized regime, the energy spectrum is discrete and inelastic electron-electron events are strongly suppressed. These results imply that, at low temperatures, electron thermalization and finite conductivity depend on coupling to the phonon bath. The situation is different for samples nearing the metal-insulator transition; in insulating samples that are close to the mobility edge, energy absorption persists to much higher frequencies. Comparing these results with previously studied 2D samples [Ovadyahu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 156602 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.156602] demonstrates that the mean-level spacing (on a single-particle basis) is not the only relevant scale in this problem. The possibility of delocalization by many-body effects and the relevance of a nearby mobility edge (which may be a many-body edge) are discussed.

  19. Wavelengths, energy levels and hyperfine structure of Mn II and Sc II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Pickering, Juliet C.; Townley-Smith, Keeley I. M.; Hala, .

    2015-08-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Groups at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Imperial College London (ICL) have measured atomic data of astronomical interest. Our spectrometers include Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers at NIST and ICL covering the region 1350 Å to 5.5 μm and a 10.7-m grating spectrometer at NIST covering wavelengths from 300 - 5000 Å. Sources for these spectra include high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) lamps, Penning discharges, and sliding spark discharges. Recent work has focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure (HFS) constants for iron-group elements. The analysis of FT spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn II is being led by ICL and is described in a companion poster [1]. Current work being led by NIST includes the analysis of HFS in Mn II, analysis of Mn II in the vacuum ultraviolet, and a comprehensive analysis of Sc II.Comprehensive HFS constants for Mn II are needed for the interpretation of stellar spectra and incorrect abundances may be obtained when HFS is omitted. Holt et al. [2] have measured HFS constants for 59 levels of Mn II using laser spectroscopy. We used FT spectra of Mn/Ni and Mn/Cu HCLs covering wavelength ranges from 1350 Å to 5.4 μm to confirm 26 of the A constants of Holt et al. and obtain values for roughly 40 additional levels. We aim to obtain HFS constants for the majority of lines showing significant HFS that are observed in chemically-peculiar stars.Spectra of Sc HCLs have been recorded from 1800 - 6700 Å using a vacuum ultraviolet FT spectrometer at NIST. Additional measurements to cover wavelengths above 6700 Å and below 1800 Å are in progress. The spectra are being analyzed by NIST and Alighar Muslim University, India in order to derive improved wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters.This work was partially supported by NASA, the STFC and PPARC (UK), the Royal Society of the UK, and the Leverhulme Trust.[1] J. C. Pickering, F. Liggins, C. Clear, M. Ruffoni, G. Nave, C. Sansonetti (this meeting)[2] R. A. Holt, T. J. Scholl & S. D. Rosner, MNRAS 306, 107 (1999)

  20. Polarons in ?-Conjugated Polymers: Anderson or Landau?

    PubMed

    Barford, William; Marcus, Max; Tozer, Oliver Robert

    2016-02-01

    Using both analytical expressions and the density matrix renormalization group method, we study the fully quantized disordered Holstein model to investigate the localization of charges and excitons by vibrational or torsional modes-i.e., the formation of polarons-in conformationally disordered ?-conjugated polymers. We identify two distinct mechanisms for polaron formation, namely Anderson localization via disorder (causing the formation of Anderson polarons) and self-localization by self-trapping via normal modes (causing the formation of Landau polarons). We identify the regimes where either description is more valid. The key distinction between Anderson and Landau polarons is that for the latter the particle wave function is a strong function of the normal coordinates, and hence the "vertical" and "relaxed" wave functions are different. This has theoretical and experimental consequences for Landau polarons. Theoretically, it means that the Condon approximation is not valid, and so care needs to be taken when evaluating transition rates. Experimentally, it means that the self-localization of the particle as a consequence of its coupling to the normal coordinates may lead to experimental observables, e.g., ultrafast fluorescence depolarization. We apply these ideas to poly(p-phenylenevinylene). We show that the high frequency C-C bond oscillation only causes Landau polarons for a very narrow parameter regime; generally we expect disorder to dominate and Anderson polarons to be a more applicable description. Similarly, for the low frequency torsional fluctuations we show that Anderson polarons are expected for realistic parameters. PMID:26756225

  1. 4. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY, FACING SOUTH/SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY, FACING SOUTH/SOUTHWEST. (BUILDINGS 126, 124, 122, 120, and 114 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  2. Low shear viscosity due to Anderson localization

    SciTech Connect

    Giannakis, Ioannis; Hou Defu; Ren Haicang; Li Jiarong

    2008-01-15

    We study the Anderson localization effect on the shear viscosity in a system with random medium by Kubo formula. We show that this effect can suppress nonperturbatively the shear viscosity and other transport coefficients. The possible relevancy of such a suppression to the near perfect fluid behavior of the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  3. The Anderson Quin Cycle. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

    1993-03-18

    The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

  4. Quantum phase transitions in a pseudogap Anderson-Holstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Mengxing; Ingersent, Kevin

    2013-02-01

    We study a pseudogap Anderson-Holstein model of a magnetic impurity level that hybridizes with a conduction band whose density of states vanishes in power-law fashion at the Fermi energy, and couples, via its charge, to a nondispersive bosonic mode (e.g., an optical phonon). The model, which we treat using poor-man's scaling and the numerical renormalization group, exhibits quantum phase transitions of different types depending on the strength of the impurity-boson coupling. For weak impurity-boson coupling, the suppression of the density of states near the Fermi energy leads to quantum phase transitions between strong-coupling (Kondo) and local-moment phases. For sufficiently strong impurity-boson coupling, however, the bare repulsion between a pair of electrons in the impurity level becomes an effective attraction, leading to quantum phase transitions between strong-coupling (charge Kondo) and local-charge phases. Even though the Hamiltonian exhibits different symmetries in the spin and charge sectors, the thermodynamic properties near the two types of quantum phase transition are closely related under spin-charge interchange. Moreover, the critical responses to a local magnetic field (for small impurity-boson coupling) and to an electric potential (for large impurity-boson coupling) are characterized by the same exponents, whose values place these quantum-critical points in the universality class of the pseudogap Anderson model. One specific case of the pseudogap Anderson-Holstein model may be realized in a double-quantum-dot device, where the quantum phase transitions manifest themselves in the finite-temperature linear electrical conductance.

  5. Anderson transition in systems with chiral symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garca-Garca, Antonio M.; Cuevas, Emilio

    2006-09-01

    Anderson localization is a universal quantum feature caused by destructive interference. On the other hand chiral symmetry is a key ingredient in different problems of theoretical physics: from nonperturbative QCD to highly doped semiconductors. We investigate the interplay of these two phenomena in the context of a three-dimensional disordered system. We show that chiral symmetry induces an Anderson transition (AT) in the region close to the band center. Typical properties at the AT such as multifractality and critical statistics are quantitatively affected by this additional symmetry. The origin of the AT has been traced back to the power-law decay of the eigenstates; this feature may also be relevant in systems without chiral symmetry.

  6. Anderson localization for chemically realistic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terletska, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Disorder which is ubiquitous for most materials can strongly effect their properties. It may change their electronic structures or even cause their localization, known as Anderson localization. Although, substantial progress has been achieved in the description of the Anderson localization, a proper mean-field theory of this phenomenon for more realistic systems remains elusive. Commonly used theoretical methods such as the coherent potential approximation and its cluster extensions fail to describe the Anderson transition, as the average density of states (DOS) employed in such theories is not critical at the transition. However, near the transition, due to the spatial confinement of carriers, the local DOS becomes highly skewed with a log-normal distribution, for which the most probable and the typical values differ noticeably from the average value. Dobrosavljevic et.al., incorporated such ideas in their typical medium theory (TMT), and showed that the typical (not average) DOS is critical at the transition. While the TMT is able to capture the localized states, as a local single site theory it still has several drawbacks. For the disorder Anderson model in three dimension it underestimates the critical disorder strength, and fails to capture the re-entrance behavior of the mobility edge. We have recently developed a cluster extension of the TMT, which addresses these drawbacks by systematically incorporating non-local corrections. This approach converges quickly with cluster size and allows us to incorporate the effect of interactions and realistic electronic structure. As the first steps towards realistic material modeling, we extended our TMDCA formalisms to systems with the off diagonal disorder and multiple bands structures. We also applied our TMDCA scheme to systems with both disorder and interactions and found that correlations effects tend to stabilize the metallic behavior even in two dimensions. This work was supported by DOE SciDAC Grant No. DE-FC02-10ER25916 and BES CMCSN Grant No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  7. Universal mechanism for Anderson and weak localization

    PubMed Central

    Filoche, Marcel; Mayboroda, Svitlana

    2012-01-01

    Localization of stationary waves occurs in a large variety of vibrating systems, whether mechanical, acoustical, optical, or quantum. It is induced by the presence of an inhomogeneous medium, a complex geometry, or a quenched disorder. One of its most striking and famous manifestations is Anderson localization, responsible for instance for the metal-insulator transition in disordered alloys. Yet, despite an enormous body of related literature, a clear and unified picture of localization is still to be found, as well as the exact relationship between its many manifestations. In this paper, we demonstrate that both Anderson and weak localizations originate from the same universal mechanism, acting on any type of vibration, in any dimension, and for any domain shape. This mechanism partitions the system into weakly coupled subregions. The boundaries of these subregions correspond to the valleys of a hidden landscape that emerges from the interplay between the wave operator and the system geometry. The height of the landscape along its valleys determines the strength of the coupling between the subregions. The landscape and its impact on localization can be determined rigorously by solving one special boundary problem. This theory allows one to predict the localization properties, the confining regions, and to estimate the energy of the vibrational eigenmodes through the properties of one geometrical object. In particular, Anderson localization can be understood as a special case of weak localization in a very rough landscape. PMID:22927384

  8. Transverse Anderson localization of light near Dirac points of photonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hanying; Chen, Xianfeng; Malomed, Boris A; Panoiu, Nicolae C; Ye, Fangwei

    2015-01-01

    We perform a comparative study of the Anderson localization of light beams in disordered layered photonic nanostructures that, in the limit of periodic layer distribution, possess either a Dirac point or a Bragg gap in the spectrum of the wavevectors. In particular, we demonstrate that the localization length of the Anderson modes increases when the width of the Bragg gap decreases, such that in the vanishingly small bandgap limit, namely when a Dirac point is formed, even extremely high levels of disorder are unable to localize the optical modes residing near the Dirac point. A comparative analysis of the key features of the propagation of Anderson modes formed in the Bragg gap or near the Dirac point is also presented. Our findings could provide valuable guidelines in assessing the influence of structural disorder on the functionality of a broad array of optical nanodevices. PMID:26498634

  9. Transverse Anderson localization of light near Dirac points of photonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hanying; Chen, Xianfeng; Malomed, Boris A.; Panoiu, Nicolae C.; Ye, Fangwei

    2015-10-01

    We perform a comparative study of the Anderson localization of light beams in disordered layered photonic nanostructures that, in the limit of periodic layer distribution, possess either a Dirac point or a Bragg gap in the spectrum of the wavevectors. In particular, we demonstrate that the localization length of the Anderson modes increases when the width of the Bragg gap decreases, such that in the vanishingly small bandgap limit, namely when a Dirac point is formed, even extremely high levels of disorder are unable to localize the optical modes residing near the Dirac point. A comparative analysis of the key features of the propagation of Anderson modes formed in the Bragg gap or near the Dirac point is also presented. Our findings could provide valuable guidelines in assessing the influence of structural disorder on the functionality of a broad array of optical nanodevices.

  10. Transverse Anderson localization of light near Dirac points of photonic nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hanying; Chen, Xianfeng; Malomed, Boris A.; Panoiu, Nicolae C.; Ye, Fangwei

    2015-01-01

    We perform a comparative study of the Anderson localization of light beams in disordered layered photonic nanostructures that, in the limit of periodic layer distribution, possess either a Dirac point or a Bragg gap in the spectrum of the wavevectors. In particular, we demonstrate that the localization length of the Anderson modes increases when the width of the Bragg gap decreases, such that in the vanishingly small bandgap limit, namely when a Dirac point is formed, even extremely high levels of disorder are unable to localize the optical modes residing near the Dirac point. A comparative analysis of the key features of the propagation of Anderson modes formed in the Bragg gap or near the Dirac point is also presented. Our findings could provide valuable guidelines in assessing the influence of structural disorder on the functionality of a broad array of optical nanodevices. PMID:26498634

  11. Integrals of motion for one-dimensional Anderson localized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Ranjan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Yuzbashyan, Emil A.; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2016-03-01

    Anderson localization is known to be inevitable in one-dimension for generic disordered models. Since localization leads to Poissonian energy level statistics, we ask if localized systems possess ‘additional’ integrals of motion as well, so as to enhance the analogy with quantum integrable systems. We answer this in the affirmative in the present work. We construct a set of nontrivial integrals of motion for Anderson localized models, in terms of the original creation and annihilation operators. These are found as a power series in the hopping parameter. The recently found Type-1 Hamiltonians, which are known to be quantum integrable in a precise sense, motivate our construction. We note that these models can be viewed as disordered electron models with infinite-range hopping, where a similar series truncates at the linear order. We show that despite the infinite range hopping, all states but one are localized. We also study the conservation laws for the disorder free Aubry–Andre model, where the states are either localized or extended, depending on the strength of a coupling constant. We formulate a specific procedure for averaging over disorder, in order to examine the convergence of the power series. Using this procedure in the Aubry–Andre model, we show that integrals of motion given by our construction are well-defined in localized phase, but not so in the extended phase. Finally, we also obtain the integrals of motion for a model with interactions to lowest order in the interaction.

  12. Irisin levels are associated with urotensin II levels in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Wan-Yu; Bai, Qiong; A, La-Ta; Tang, Chao-Shu; Zhang, Ai-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Irisin is a newly identified myokine that can promote energy expenditure. Previous studies showed that circulating urotensin II (UII) levels were increased in diabetes, and UII could inhibit the glucose transport in skeletal muscle in diabetic mice and aggravated insulin resistance. We presumed that irisin levels are associated with UII in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods A total of 71 patients with type 2 diabetes and 40 healthy subjects were recruited. Blood and urinary irisin concentrations were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and UII concentrations were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Every participant's body composition was analyzed by bioelectrical impedance. Results The serum irisin levels were significantly lower in diabetic patients than that of controls, whereas serum UII levels were significantly higher in diabetic patients than that in that of controls. Serum irisin levels were negatively associated with circulating UII, hemoglobin A1c and the natural logarithm transformation of urinary albumin excretion, whereas serum irisin was positively associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and urinary irisin were positively associated with urinary UII. Furthermore, circulating irisin is positively associated with muscle mass, whereas circulating UII is negatively associated with muscle mass in diabetic patients. Hemoglobin A1c and circulating UII are independent determinants of circulating irisin by multiple regression analysis. Conclusions The present results provide the clinical evidence of an association between irisin and UII in diabetic patients. Hemoglobin A1c and circulating UII are independent determinants of circulating irisin. Our results hint that UII and high glucose might inhibit the release of irisin from skeletal muscle in diabetic patients. PMID:26417416

  13. Financial analysis of potential retrospective premium assessments under the Price-Anderson system

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.S.

    1985-04-01

    Ten representative nuclear utilities have been analyzed over the period 1981 to 1983 to evaluate the effects of three levels of retrospective premiums on various financial indicators. This analysis continues and expands on earlier analyses prepared as background for deliberations by the US Congress for possible extension or modification of the Price-Anderson Act.

  14. Phil Anderson's Magnetic Ideas in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Piers

    In Philip W. Anderson's research, magnetism has always played a special role, providing a prism through which other more complex forms of collective behavior and broken symmetry could be examined. I discuss his work on magnetism from the 1950s, where his early work on antiferromagnetism led to the pseudospin treatment of superconductivity -- to the 1970s and 1980s, highlighting his contribution to the physics of local magnetic moments. Phil's interest in the mechanism of moment formation, and screening evolved into the modern theory of the Kondo effect and heavy fermions.

  15. Anderson transition for Google matrix eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a number of random matrix models describing the Google matrix G of directed networks. The properties of their spectra and eigenstates are analyzed by numerical matrix diagonalization. We show that for certain models it is possible to have an algebraic decay of PageRank vector with the exponent similar to real directed networks. At the same time the spectrum has no spectral gap and a broad distribution of eigenvalues in the complex plain. The eigenstates of G are characterized by the Anderson transition from localized to delocalized states and a mobility edge curve in the complex plane of eigenvalues.

  16. Resonant Anderson localization in segmented wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estarellas, Cristian; Serra, Llorenç

    2016-03-01

    We discuss a model of random segmented wire, with linear segments of two-dimensional wires joined by circular bends. The joining vertices act as scatterers on the propagating electron waves. The model leads to resonant Anderson localization when all segments are of similar length. The resonant behavior is present with one and also with several propagating modes. The probability distributions evolve from diffusive to localized regimes when increasing the number of segments in a similar way for long and short localization lengths. As a function of the energy, a finite segmented wire typically evolves from localized to diffusive to ballistic behavior in each conductance plateau.

  17. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level II, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part two of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level II of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.

  18. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level II, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part one of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level II of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.

  19. Superfluidity and Symmetry Breaking -- An Anderson Living Legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    This is an eclectic survey of concepts around superfluidity and symmetry breaking, prepared for the celebration of Phil Anderson's 90th birthday in October 2013. I emphasize, through major examples, that the concepts Anderson pioneered in this field have very wide scope, penetrating in particular into many central issues of high energy physics: electroweak symmetry breaking, confinement, chiral symmetry breaking, and Majorana mass. I also illustrate how Anderson's pseudospin method can be used to exemplify breaking of time translation symmetry...

  20. Rituximab plus hyper-CVAD alternating with MTX/Ara-C in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma: 15-year follow-up of a phase II study from the MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Dai; Cheah, Chan Y; Westin, Jason R; Fayad, Luis E; Rodriguez, Maria A; Hagemeister, Fredrick B; Pro, Barbara; McLaughlin, Peter; Younes, Anas; Samaniego, Felipe; Goy, Andre; Cabanillas, Fernando; Kantarjian, Hagop; Kwak, Larry W; Wang, Michael L; Romaguera, Jorge E

    2016-01-01

    Intensive chemotherapy regimens containing cytarabine have substantially improved remission durability and overall survival in younger adults with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). However, there have been no long-term follow-up results for patients treated with these regimens. We present long-term survival outcomes from a pivotal phase II trial of rituximab, hyper-fractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone alternating with methotrexate and cytarabine (R-HCVAD/MA). At 15years of follow-up (median: 134years), the median failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients was 48years and 107years, respectively. The FFS seems to have plateaued after 10years, with an estimated 15-year FFS of 30% in younger patients (?65years). Patients who achieved complete response (CR) after 2 cycles had a favourable median FFS of 88years. Six patients developed myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukaemia (MDS/AML) whilst in first CR. The 10-year cumulative incidence of MDS/AML of patients in first remission was 62% (95% confidence interval: 25-122%). In patients with newly diagnosed MCL, R-HCVAD/MA showed sustained efficacy, with a median OS exceeding 10years in all patients and freedom from disease recurrence of nearly 15years in almost one-third of the younger patients (?65years). PMID:26648336

  1. Dynamical Localization for Unitary Anderson Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Eman; Joye, Alain; Stolz, Günter

    2009-11-01

    This paper establishes dynamical localization properties of certain families of unitary random operators on the d-dimensional lattice in various regimes. These operators are generalizations of one-dimensional physical models of quantum transport and draw their name from the analogy with the discrete Anderson model of solid state physics. They consist in a product of a deterministic unitary operator and a random unitary operator. The deterministic operator has a band structure, is absolutely continuous and plays the role of the discrete Laplacian. The random operator is diagonal with elements given by i.i.d. random phases distributed according to some absolutely continuous measure and plays the role of the random potential. In dimension one, these operators belong to the family of CMV-matrices in the theory of orthogonal polynomials on the unit circle. We implement the method of Aizenman-Molchanov to prove exponential decay of the fractional moments of the Green function for the unitary Anderson model in the following three regimes: In any dimension, throughout the spectrum at large disorder and near the band edges at arbitrary disorder and, in dimension one, throughout the spectrum at arbitrary disorder. We also prove that exponential decay of fractional moments of the Green function implies dynamical localization, which in turn implies spectral localization. These results complete the analogy with the self-adjoint case where dynamical localization is known to be true in the same three regimes.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: New MnII energy levels (Castelli+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, F.; Kurucz, R. L.; Cowley, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    New MnII energy levels were determined from the analysis of an ultraviolet HST-STIS spectrum and a UVES optical spectrum. For each new level, the most significant lines from the level are listed in tablea1.dat. For each new line the wavelength, the computed loggf value, and the upper and lower energy levels are given. tablea2.dat tabulates the MnII lines in the 2400-3040 interval that are listed in the NIST database, observed in the spectrum, but not predicted by the MnII line list computed by Kurucz for this paper. (2 data files).

  3. A Fine Balance of Synaptophysin Levels Underlies Efficient Retrieval of Synaptobrevin II to Synaptic Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sarah L; Harper, Callista B; Smillie, Karen J; Cousin, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Synaptobrevin II (sybII) is a vesicular soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein that is essential for neurotransmitter release, and thus its correct trafficking to synaptic vesicles (SVs) is critical to render them fusion competent. The SV protein synaptophysin binds to sybII and facilitates its retrieval to SVs during endocytosis. Synaptophysin and sybII are the two most abundant proteins on SVs, being present in a 1:2 ratio. Synaptophysin and sybII are proposed to form a large multimeric complex, and the copy number of the proteins in this complex is also in a 1:2 ratio. We investigated the importance of this ratio between these proteins for the localisation and trafficking of sybII in central neurons. SybII was overexpressed in mouse hippocampal neurons at either 1.6 or 2.15-2.35-fold over endogenous protein levels, in the absence or presence of varying levels of synaptophysin. In the absence of exogenous synaptophysin, exogenous sybII was dispersed along the axon, trapped on the plasma membrane and retrieved slowly during endocytosis. Co-expression of exogenous synaptophysin rescued all of these defects. Importantly, the expression of synaptophysin at nerve terminals in a 1:2 ratio with sybII was sufficient to fully rescue normal sybII trafficking. These results demonstrate that the balance between synaptophysin and sybII levels is critical for the correct targeting of sybII to SVs and suggests that small alterations in synaptophysin levels might affect the localisation of sybII and subsequent presynaptic performance. PMID:26871701

  4. A Fine Balance of Synaptophysin Levels Underlies Efficient Retrieval of Synaptobrevin II to Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Sarah L.; Harper, Callista B.; Smillie, Karen J.; Cousin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptobrevin II (sybII) is a vesicular soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein that is essential for neurotransmitter release, and thus its correct trafficking to synaptic vesicles (SVs) is critical to render them fusion competent. The SV protein synaptophysin binds to sybII and facilitates its retrieval to SVs during endocytosis. Synaptophysin and sybII are the two most abundant proteins on SVs, being present in a 1:2 ratio. Synaptophysin and sybII are proposed to form a large multimeric complex, and the copy number of the proteins in this complex is also in a 1:2 ratio. We investigated the importance of this ratio between these proteins for the localisation and trafficking of sybII in central neurons. SybII was overexpressed in mouse hippocampal neurons at either 1.6 or 2.15–2.35-fold over endogenous protein levels, in the absence or presence of varying levels of synaptophysin. In the absence of exogenous synaptophysin, exogenous sybII was dispersed along the axon, trapped on the plasma membrane and retrieved slowly during endocytosis. Co-expression of exogenous synaptophysin rescued all of these defects. Importantly, the expression of synaptophysin at nerve terminals in a 1:2 ratio with sybII was sufficient to fully rescue normal sybII trafficking. These results demonstrate that the balance between synaptophysin and sybII levels is critical for the correct targeting of sybII to SVs and suggests that small alterations in synaptophysin levels might affect the localisation of sybII and subsequent presynaptic performance. PMID:26871701

  5. Anderson localization of matter waves in quantum-chaos theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, E.; Pilati, S.

    2015-06-01

    We study the Anderson localization of atomic gases exposed to three-dimensional optical speckles by analyzing the statistics of the energy-level spacings. This method allows us to consider realistic models of the speckle patterns, taking into account the strongly anisotropic correlations which are realized in concrete experimental configurations. We first compute the mobility edge Ec of a speckle pattern created using a single laser beam. We find that Ec drifts when we vary the anisotropy of the speckle grains, going from higher values when the speckles are squeezed along the beam propagation axis to lower values when they are elongated. We also consider the case where two speckle patterns are superimposed, forming interference fringes, and we find that Ec is increased compared to the case of idealized isotropic disorder. We discuss the important implications of our findings for cold-atom experiments.

  6. Heavy-fermion state in the Anderson lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, T.; Tachiki, M.

    1986-09-01

    To investigate theoretically the heavy-fermion state in cerium and uranium compounds, the low-energy excited states in an Anderson lattice are studied at absolute zero. The coupled Dyson equations for both the Green's functions of the f-italic electron and the spin fluctuations are set up in the case of the finite correlation interaction energy. The vertex functions are approximately determined to fulfill the Ward-Takahashi relations which originate from the spin-rotational invariance, in the low-energy region. In the spectral density of the f-italic-electron Green's function which is numerically calculated, it is found that a sharp peak corresponding to the state of quasifermions with heavy masses appears near the Fermi level, and a broad peak similar to the resonance peak in Kondo impurity systems appears in a relatively-high-energy region. As the temperature increases, the quasifermion peak diminishes and changes to the resonance peak.

  7. Two-impurity Anderson model: A variational study

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, L.C. , PHB-Ecublens, CH-1015 Lausanne Dipartimento di Fisica A. Volta,'' Universita di Pavia, via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia ); Beck, H. )

    1993-09-01

    A comprehensive variational study of the two-impurity Anderson model is presented. First a lowest-order basis is introduced, which does not contain electronic excitations above the Fermi level: in this basis, the indirect [ital f]-[ital f] interaction of the form [minus][ital J][bold S][sub 1][center dot][bold S][sub 2] is not generated but is added by hand. The effect of electron-hole (EH) excitations is also studied. A suitable discretization of the continuous band spectrum allows us to obtain all eigenvalues and eigenvectors and to calculate finite-temperature magnetic properties. For a distance [ital R][gt][ital R][sub [ital c

  8. Metrics for Good Measure. Level II. Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S.; And Others

    Designed for adult basic education students at the grade 4, 5, or 6 level, this student workbook and accompanying instructor's guide (separate document) comprise the Adult Basic Education Level III package on the metric system. The content of this workbook is occupationally oriented. (There are references to measurement tasks used within 31…

  9. Magnetic field effects for the asymmetric Anderson Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvati?, B.; Zlati?, V.

    1984-12-01

    Perturbation expansion for the asymmetric single-orbital Anderson Hamiltonian is extended to the case with finite magnetic field, and the self-energy part of the d-electron Green function is calculated up to the second order in u=U ?? for arbitrary asymmetry ?=12+?dU and magnetic field h. Zero-temperature density of localized states ?d?(?), magnetic moment m and static spin susceptibility ?, and low-temperature specific heat Cv=?T and magnetoresistance D of a dilute alloy are evaluated within the u2 approximation. Plausible arguments are given (which become exact in the symmetric case) that the higher-order terms do not change the qualitative features of our results. For large enough u the many-body (MB) effects give rise to three different types of behavior, depending on the value of asymmetry: (i) spin-fluctuation behavior for ?<12, with large fluctuations of the d-level magnetization; (ii) mixed-valence behavior for ?~=12, with large fluctuations of the d-level occupation; (iii) essentially mean-field behavior for ?>12, where the MB effects are negligible even for u>>1. Thus both ? and ? at h=0 are enhanced by the increase of u for ?<12, reduced for ?>12, and practically unaffected at ?~=12. As functions of ? for a fixed u, ? and ? have a maximum at ?=0 and decrease monotonously with increasing ?, and do so more steeply the higher the u. For h?0 and ?<=12, ? and ? decrease monotonously with increasing h, the decrease being quicker for higher u and slower for higher ?. For ?>12, both ? and ? exhibit a broad maximum at medium h values, which becomes better pronounced with increasing u. The low-T magnetoresistance D=-D0[1-13D2(?kB T?)2] is negative, with D0~h2 for small h and D0-->1 for large h. D2 has a maximum at h=0 and drops down quickly with increasing h. Both D0 and D2 are enhanced by u for ?<12 and reduced for ?>12. In the low-h limit and for ?<12, D assumes a universal form for u>>uc, with both low-T and low-h behavior scaled by the same characteristic temperature ?m. The density of localized states at T=h=0 is single peaked for u<~uc and triple peaked for u>>uc if ?<12, with uc increasing with ?. For ?>=12 it is single peaked for any finite u. For ?<12 and u>>uc the increasing h splits ?d? and ?d?, suppresses the narrow MB central peak above Th, and restores the "magnetic" Hartree-Fock situation above h0. Both Th and h0 increase with increasing ?. For u<~uc, Th~h0~?.

  10. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MD Anderson) was established by the Texas State Legislature in 1941and is a free-standing, degree-granting health institution within The University of Texas System. Mission areas include patient care, research, education, and prevention.

  11. Anderson's disease: genetic exclusion of the apolipoprotein-B gene in two families.

    PubMed Central

    Pessah, M; Benlian, P; Beucler, I; Loux, N; Schmitz, J; Junien, C; Infante, R

    1991-01-01

    Anderson's disease is a recessive disorder characterized by intestinal fat malabsorption, absence of postprandial chylomicrons, and reduced levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and apoproteins B, AI, and C. We have studied two families with, respectively, three and two children with Anderson's disease. Intestinal apo-B and apo-AIV mRNAs from two Anderson's patients were normal in size but their concentration was decreased fivefold compared with controls. After DNA digestion with seven restriction enzymes, restriction fragment length polymorphisms of apo-B gene did not show conclusive information except for Xba1, which revealed a lack of cosegregation between the restriction fragment length polymorphism and the Anderson's phenotype. Linkage analysis was performed using the polymorphism of the apo-B gene 3'minisatellite. Genomic DNA from parents and children was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using oligonucleotide primers flanking the apo-B gene 3'hypervariable locus. In both families each child inherited different apo-B alleles from at least one parent. According to the recessive mode of transmission of the disease, our results are incompatible with the involvement of the apo-B gene. More likely a posttranslational defect or a mutation in another gene encoding a protein essential for lipoprotein assembly or secretion may be involved. Images PMID:1985110

  12. The Role of Contrast in the Perception of Achromatic Transparency: Comment on Singh and Anderson (2002) and Anderson (2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Marc K.

    2008-01-01

    M. Singh and B. L. Anderson proposed a perceptual theory of achromatic transparency in which the perceived transmittance of a perceived transparent filter is determined by the ratio of the Michelson contrast seen in the region of transparency to that of the background seen directly. Subsequently, B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and J. Meng proposed that

  13. Career Portfolio for Learning Support Students. Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youshock, Joseph; And Others

    This second level of a portfolio for learners with special needs is intended for grades 9-10. A discussion of its conceptual design describes the four educational content areas from which it was developed (career development assessment, curriculum-based vocational assessment, community-referenced assessment, and work habits assessment) and four

  14. Specification for Qualification and Certification for Level II - Advanced Welders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

    This document defines the requirements and program for the American Welding Society (AWS) to certify advanced-level welders through an evaluation process entailing performance qualification and practical knowledge tests requiring the use of advanced reading, computational, and manual skills. The following items are included: statement of the

  15. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and complex II levels are associated with the outcome of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WU, JIANHUA; ZHAO, FEI; ZHAO, YUFEI; GUO, ZHANJUN

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, two oxidative stress parameters, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial respiratory complex II, were evaluated in the mitochondria of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells to determine the association between these parameters and the carcinogenesis and clinical outcome of HCC. High levels of ROS and low levels of complex II were found to be associated with reduced post-operative survival in HCC patients using the log-rank test. Furthermore, multivariate analysis confirmed that the levels of ROS [relative risk (RR)=2.867; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0627.737; P=0.038] and complex II (RR=5.422; 95% CI, 1.27323.088; P=0.022) were independent predictors for the survival of patients with HCC. Therefore, the analysis of ROS and complex II levels may provide a useful research and therapeutic tool for the prediction of HCC prognosis and treatment. PMID:26622849

  16. Estimation of Failure Frequency for Type I and II High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K.H.

    2001-05-15

    The failure frequency of Type I and Type II High Level Waste tanks was calculated. The degradation mechanism that could lead to large break failure and the credits taken for steps taken to prevent large break failure were considered.

  17. Identification of new fluorescence processes in the UV spectra of cool stars from new energy levels of Fe II and Cr II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Two fluorescence processes operating in atmospheres of cool stars, symbiotic stars, and the Sun are presented. Two emission lines, at 1347.03 and 1360.17 A, are identified as fluorescence lines of Cr II and Fe II. The lines are due to transitions from highly excited levels, which are populated radiatively by the hydrogen Lyman alpha line due to accidental wavelength coincidences. Three energy levels, one in Cr II and two in Fe II, are reported.

  18. Analysis of sub-ppb levels of Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) by electrokinetic supercharging preconcentration, CZE separation, and in-capillary derivatization.

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Marek; Delaunay, Nathalie; Michel, Rgis; Varenne, Anne; Gareil, Pierre

    2007-10-01

    The analysis of sub-ppb levels of Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) in heat exchanger fluids of nuclear power plants is needed to monitor corrosion. A method involving preconcentration with electrokinetic supercharging (electrokinetic injection with transient ITP), CZE separation, and in-capillary derivatization with ortho-phenanthroline (o-Phe) for direct UV detection was thus developed. First, a multizone BGE was loaded into the capillary by successive hydrodynamic introduction of zones of (i) o-Phe-containing BGE, (ii) BGE for the zonal separation, and (iii) ammonium-based leading electrolyte. Metal cations were electrokinetically injected and stacked at the capillary inlet behind this last leading zone. Finally, a terminating electrolyte zone was hydrodynamically introduced. When a constant voltage was applied, metal ions kept on concentrating isotachophoretically, then separated in CZE mode, were complexed by migrating through an o-Phe zone, and finally detected by direct absorbance. To detect extremely thin peaks, it was attempted for the first time to focus the derivatization reagent by inducing a second transient ITP, before labeling analytes, already separated in CZE mode. With this arrangement, LODs were about 30 ppt in pure water. In heat exchanger fluid matrices containing 1000 ppm bore and 2 ppm lithium, only Fe(II) cation was detected among the three cations of interest at the 1 ppb level using the present method, and its LOD was about ten times higher, due to the lower loading rate during electrokinetic injection. PMID:17941123

  19. The chromospheric Ca II and Mg II radiative losses in late-type stars: a computational comparison between two-level and multi-level atomic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawzy, Diaa E.

    2015-06-01

    In the current study we present radiation correction factors to compute the radiative losses by Mg II and Ca II ions during the process of constructing theoretical models for the chromospheres in late-type stars (spectral type in the range F5V-K8V). We combine the two-level atom approach with the multi-level atom method to accurately compute the radiation correction factors. The procedure is fast and reasonably accurate to be implemented in the time-dependent computations. In the current computations we implement what is called pseudo-partial frequency redistribution and the time-dependent ionization in regard to hydrogen. The radiative correction factors for Mg II show very slight variation for the different spectral types with average value of 1.5. The values we obtained for Ca II show very strong dependence on spectral types and the basic parameters, with values range between 5.58 to 4.22 for F5V and K8V spectral types, respectively. The obtained results accelerate the process of constructing theoretical model chromospheres based on mechanical heating by monochromatic and wave spectra. The current study is an initial step in establishing hybrid multi-dimensional models of stellar chromospheres.

  20. Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data

    SciTech Connect

    Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

    2009-03-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

  1. Inhalation and ingestion intakes with associated dose estimates for level II and level III personnel using Capstone study data.

    PubMed

    Szrom, Frances; Falo, Gerald A; Lodde, Gordon M; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Daxon, Eric G

    2009-03-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone DU Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe-tests samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large-caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h(-1) based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h(-1) based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h(-1) to 38.9 mg h(-1) based on the wipe-tests data including surface-to-glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h(-1) and 1.78 mg h(-1), respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures. PMID:19204492

  2. University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Physical Activity Skin Safety HPV Family History Family History Learning about your family’s health history can help ... Program About MD Anderson Home Facts & History Facts & History Meet our leaders, read our institutional profile and ...

  3. Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Salivary melatonin concentration decreased in type II diabetic patients and periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis. PMID:25346835

  4. Anderson localization of multichannel excitations in disordered two-dimensional waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, V. E.; Borovkova, O. V.; Vysloukh, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    We considered the transfer of multi-spot optical patterns through disordered two-dimensional waveguide arrays with shallow refractive index modulation. In computer simulations, it was uncovered that statistically averaged output intensity distributions of complex inputs retain their structural features for suitable disorder strengths due to the Anderson-like localization of light. To characterize the quality of the input-output pattern similarity, we introduced corresponding criteria and analyzed their variations with the disorder level.

  5. Gutzwiller wave-function solution for Anderson lattice model: Emerging universal regimes of heavy quasiparticle states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysoki?ski, Marcin M.; Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Spa?ek, Jozef

    2015-09-01

    The recently proposed diagrammatic expansion (DE) technique for the full Gutzwiller wave function (GWF) is applied to the Anderson lattice model. This approach allows for a systematic evaluation of the expectation values with full Gutzwiller wave function in finite-dimensional systems. It introduces results extending in an essential manner those obtained by means of the standard Gutzwiller approximation (GA), which is variationally exact only in infinite dimensions. Within the DE-GWF approach we discuss the principal paramagnetic properties and their relevance to heavy-fermion systems. We demonstrate the formation of an effective, narrow f band originating from atomic f -electron states and subsequently interpret this behavior as a direct itineracy of f electrons; it represents a combined effect of both the hybridization and the correlations induced by the Coulomb repulsive interaction. Such a feature is absent on the level of GA, which is equivalent to the zeroth order of our expansion. Formation of the hybridization- and electron-concentration-dependent narrow f band rationalizes the common assumption of such dispersion of f levels in the phenomenological modeling of the band structure of CeCoIn5. Moreover, it is shown that the emerging f -electron direct itineracy leads in a natural manner to three physically distinct regimes within a single model that are frequently discussed for 4 f - or 5 f -electron compounds as separate model situations. We identify these regimes as (i) the mixed-valence regime, (ii) Kondo/almost-Kondo insulating regime, and (iii) the Kondo-lattice limit when the f -electron occupancy is very close to the f -state half filling, ?1 . The nonstandard features of the emerging correlated quantum liquid state are stressed.

  6. Critically Evaluated Energy Levels and Spectral Lines of Singly Ionized Indium (In II)

    PubMed Central

    Kramida, A

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive list of the best measured wavelengths in the In II spectrum has been compiled. Uncertainties of the wavelength measurements have been analyzed, and existing inconsistencies have been resolved. An optimized set of fine-structure energy levels that fits all observed wavelengths has been derived. Uncertainties of the energy level values have been reduced by an order of magnitude. An improved value of the ionization limit of In II has been determined by fitting quantum-defect and polarization formulas for several series of levels. Intensities of lines observed by different authors have been analyzed and converted to a uniform scale. A set of recommended values of radiative transition rates has been critically compiled, and uncertainties of these rates have been estimated. The hyperfine structure interval in the 5s 2S ground state of In III has been determined from the measurements of the 5sng and 5snh series in In II. PMID:26401424

  7. ENERGY LEVELS AND SPECTRAL LINES OF SINGLY IONIZED MANGANESE (Mn II)

    SciTech Connect

    Kramida, Alexander; Sansonetti, Jean E.

    2013-04-01

    This compilation revises the previously recommended list of energy levels of singly ionized manganese (Mn II) and provides a comprehensive list of observed spectral lines and transition probabilities in this spectrum. The new level optimization takes into account critically assessed uncertainties of measured wavelengths and includes about a hundred high-precision wavelengths determined by laser spectroscopy and Fourier transform techniques. Uncertainties of 63% of energy levels and 74% of Ritz wavelengths are reduced by a factor of three on average.

  8. Anderson localization in optical lattices with correlated disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, E.; Pilati, S.

    2015-12-01

    We study the Anderson localization of atomic gases exposed to simple-cubic optical lattices with a superimposed disordered speckle pattern. The two mobility edges in the first band and the corresponding critical filling factors are determined as a function of the disorder strength, ranging from vanishing disorder up to the critical disorder intensity where the two mobility edges merge and the whole band becomes localized. Our theoretical analysis is based both on continuous-space models that take into account the details of the spatial correlation of the speckle pattern, and also on a simplified tight-binding model with an uncorrelated distribution of the on-site energies. The mobility edges are computed via the analysis of the energy-level statistics, and we determine the universal value of the ratio between consecutive level spacings at the mobility edge. We analyze the role of the spatial correlation of the disorder, and we also discuss a qualitative comparison with available experimental data for interacting atomic Fermi gases obtained in the moderate interaction regime.

  9. Splicing inhibition decreases phosphorylation level of Ser2 in Pol II CTD.

    PubMed

    Koga, Mitsunori; Hayashi, Megumi; Kaida, Daisuke

    2015-09-30

    Phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), especially Ser2 and Ser5 residues, plays important roles in transcription and mRNA processing, including 5' end capping, splicing and 3' end processing. These phosphorylation events stimulate mRNA processing, however, it is not clear whether splicing activity affects the phosphorylation status of Pol II. In this study, we found that splicing inhibition by potent splicing inhibitors spliceostatin A (SSA) and pladienolide B or by antisense oligos against snRNAs decreased phospho-Ser2 level, but had little or no effects on phospho-Ser5 level. In contrast, transcription and translation inhibitors did not decrease phospho-Ser2 level, therefore inhibition of not all the gene expression processes cause the decrease of phospho-Ser2. SSA treatment caused early dissociation of Pol II and decrease in phospho-Ser2 level of chromatin-bound Pol II, suggesting that splicing inhibition causes downregulation of phospho-Ser2 through at least these two mechanisms. PMID:26202968

  10. Splicing inhibition decreases phosphorylation level of Ser2 in Pol II CTD

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Mitsunori; Hayashi, Megumi; Kaida, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), especially Ser2 and Ser5 residues, plays important roles in transcription and mRNA processing, including 5′ end capping, splicing and 3′ end processing. These phosphorylation events stimulate mRNA processing, however, it is not clear whether splicing activity affects the phosphorylation status of Pol II. In this study, we found that splicing inhibition by potent splicing inhibitors spliceostatin A (SSA) and pladienolide B or by antisense oligos against snRNAs decreased phospho-Ser2 level, but had little or no effects on phospho-Ser5 level. In contrast, transcription and translation inhibitors did not decrease phospho-Ser2 level, therefore inhibition of not all the gene expression processes cause the decrease of phospho-Ser2. SSA treatment caused early dissociation of Pol II and decrease in phospho-Ser2 level of chromatin-bound Pol II, suggesting that splicing inhibition causes downregulation of phospho-Ser2 through at least these two mechanisms. PMID:26202968

  11. An Explanation of "Levels" of Competence in Foreign Language Learning: Russian, Levels I, II, III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Kurt A.; Merriman, Derald

    This report, based on the recommendations of the Illinois Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages and intended to improve articulation, discusses the basic elements of each of the first three levels of foreign language learning. Desired student performance at the completion of levels 1, 2, and 3 of

  12. An Explanation of "Levels" of Competence in Foreign Language Learning; French, Levels I, II, III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Pat; And Others

    This report of a two-day meeting at Bloomington, Illinois in April 1969 discusses the basic elements of each of the first three levels of foreign language learning. Desired student performance at the completion of levels 1, 2, and 3 of French is enumerated for listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, grammar, and culture. Suggested

  13. An Explanation of "Levels" of Competence in Foreign Language Learning; German, Levels I, II, III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Pat; And Others

    This report of a two-day meeting at Bloomington, Illinois in April 1969 discusses the basic elements of each of the first three levels of foreign language learning. Desired student performance at the completion of levels 1, 2, and 3 of German is enumerated for listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, grammar, and culture. Suggested

  14. An Explanation of "Levels" of Competence in Foreign Language Learning; Spanish, Levels I, II, III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Pat; And Others

    This report of a two-day meeting at Bloomington, Illinois in April 1969 discusses the basic elements of each of the first three levels of foreign language learning. Desired student performance at the completion of levels 1, 2, and 3 of Spanish is enumerated for listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, grammar, and culture. Suggested

  15. Anderson's impurity-model analysis on CeO1-xFxBiS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Takuya; Joseph, Boby; Paris, Eugenio; Iadecola, Antonella; Demura, Satoshi; Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu; Takano, Yoshihiko; Mizokawa, Takashi; Saini, Naurang L.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the impact of F-doing on CeO1-xFxBiS2 in terms of the electronic-structural parameters of Anderson's impurity-model analysis. It was recently reported using Ce L3-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) that CeOBiS2 falls in the Ce valence fluctuation regime and the F-doping drives the system into the Kondo regime. The Ce L3- edge XAS spectra with the various F-doping levels can be reproduced by adjusting the transfer integral in the Anderson's impurity model. The present analysis indicates that the F-doping to the system corresponds to the decrease of the Ce-Bi transfer integral.

  16. Anderson localization of electrons in single crystals: LixFe7Se8

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianping; Gu, Yueqiang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Xinbo; Jin, Shifeng; Zhao, Linlin; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Anderson (disorder-induced) localization, proposed more than half a century ago, has inspired numerous efforts to explore the absence of wave diffusions in disordered media. However, the proposed disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT), associated with the nonpropagative electron waves, has hardly been observed in three-dimensional (3D) crystalline materials, let alone single crystals. We report the observation of an MIT in centimeter-size single crystals of LixFe7Se8 induced by lattice disorder. Both specific heat and infrared reflectance measurements reveal the presence of considerable electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level when the MIT occurs, suggesting that the transition is not due to Coulomb repulsion mechanism. The 3D variable range hopping regime evidenced by electrical transport measurements at low temperatures indicates the localized nature of the electronic states on the Fermi level. Quantitative analyses of carrier concentration, carrier mobility, and simulated density of states (DOS) fully support that LixFe7Se8 is an Anderson insulator. On the basis of these results, we provide a unified DOS picture to explain all the experimental results, and a schematic diagram for finding other potential Anderson insulators. This material will thus serve as a rich playground for both theoretical and experimental investigations on MITs and disorder-induced phenomena. PMID:26989781

  17. Thermalization and dynamics in the single-impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Ireneusz; von Delft, Jan; Weichselbaum, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the process of thermalization, dynamics, and the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) for the single-impurity Anderson model, focusing on the Kondo regime. For this we construct the complete eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian using the numerical renormalization group (NRG) method in the language of the matrix product states. It is a peculiarity of the NRG that while the Wilson chain is supposed to describe a macroscopic bath, very few single-particle excitations already suffice to essentially thermalize the impurity system at finite temperature, which amounts to having added a macroscopic amount of energy. Thus, given an initial state of the system such as the ground state together with microscopic excitations, we calculate the spectral function of the quantum impurity using the microcanonical and diagonal ensembles. These spectral functions are compared to the time-averaged spectral function obtained by time evolving the initial state according to the full Hamiltonian, and to the spectral function calculated using the thermal density matrix. By adding or removing particles at a certain Wilson energy shell on top of the ground state, we find qualitative agreement between the resulting spectral functions calculated for different ensembles. This indicates that the system thermalizes in the long-time limit, and can be described by an appropriate statistical-mechanical ensemble. Moreover, by calculating static quantities such as the impurity spectral density at the Fermi level as well as the dot occupancy for energy eigenstates relevant for microcanonical ensemble, we find good support for the ETH. The ultimate mechanism responsible for this effective thermalization within the NRG can be identified as Anderson orthogonality: the more charge that needs to flow to or from infinity after applying a local excitation within the Wilson chain, the more the system looks thermal afterwards at an increased temperature. For the same reason, however, thermalization fails if charge rearrangement after the excitation remains mostly local. In these cases, the different statistical ensembles lead to different results. Their behavior needs to be understood as a microscopic quantum quench only.

  18. Le Passage du Niveau I au Niveau II (The Transition from Level One to Level Two)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porquier, Remy; Vives, Robert

    1977-01-01

    The second in a series of articles evaluating three texts which use the audiovisual method. Level Two is studied in this article with particular emphasis on the role and presentation of grammar in each unit. The treatment of conditional sentences is used as an example. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  19. Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 2: Locating clouds tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

    1995-01-01

    A comparison is made of the vertical distribution of high-level cloud tops derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements and from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for all Julys and Januarys in 1985 to 1990. The results suggest that ISCCP overestimates the pressure of high-level clouds by up to 50-150 mbar, particularly at low latitudes. This is caused by the frequent presence of clouds with diffuse tops (greater than 50% time when cloudy events are observed). The averaged vertical extent of the diffuse top is about 1.5 km. At midlatitudes where the SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressure agree best, clouds with distinct tops reach a maximum relative proportion of the total level cloud amount (about 30-40%), and diffuse-topped clouds are reduced to their minimum (30-40%). The ISCCP-defined cloud top pressure should be regarded not as the material physical height of the clouds but as the level which emits the same infrared radiance as observed. SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressures agree for clouds with distinct tops. There is also an indication that the cloud top pressures of optically thin clouds not overlying thicker clouds are poorly estimated by ISCCP at middle latitudes. The average vertical extent of these thin clouds is about 2.5 km.

  20. Guide for the Training and Qualification of Welding Personnel. Level II - Advanced Welders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

    This guide is designed to help education and training facilities develop and administer competency-based training programs to qualify and certify trainees in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) requirements for level II (advanced) welders. Presented first are the scope, objectives, and requirements of the AWS…

  1. SEL/Project Language. Level II, Kindergarten. Criterion-Referenced Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeastern Education Lab., Atlanta, GA.

    The Criterion-Referenced Test is designed to be used in conjunction with the SEL/Project Language, Level II, Kindergarten program. The test consists of 28 items to which the child responds verbally or nonverbally. The examiner records and tallies correct responses to obtain the child's total score. To administer this test, the examiner must have…

  2. Modified Anderson ModelDynamics of Brittle Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, H.

    2014-12-01

    Anderson's model has been a basic theory of fault mechanical analysis in one century. However, because of the assumptions, there are some major limitations in Anderson model, and it does not account for frequently observed oblique slips, complicated fault cases in nature and the slips occurring on pre-existing planes of weakness. On the basis of Reactivation Tendency Analysis theory proposed by Tong and Yin (2011), we proposed Modified Anderson model and extended Anderson model from 1) homogeneous media to Inhomogeneous media with pre-existing weakness(es); 2) Andersonian stress state to arbitrary stress state; 3) transient activity trend analysis to fault formation and evolution, and verified with sandbox experiments and natural cases. With Modified Anderson model, we can predict 1) the sequence of fault formation; 2) fault orientations and distribution; 3) slip directions (dip slip, oblique-dip slip, oblique slip, oblique strike slip and strike sip) of different fault when the directions of principal stress, orientations and mechanical properties (cohesion and frictional coefficient) of pre-existing weakness(es) are given. The origin of the complicated fault systems in nature can be explained reasonably. There will be a wide applications for oil and gas exploration and development, coal mining, earthquake risk evaluation, etc.

  3. Factors influencing serum CA125II levels in healthy postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Pauler, D K; Menon, U; McIntosh, M; Symecko, H L; Skates, S J; Jacobs, I J

    2001-05-01

    Our objective was to identify factors that correlate with CA125 concentrations in healthy postmenopausal women and to introduce recommendations for reporting and interpreting individual CA125 assay results. We analyzed repeated serum CA125 levels, as measured by the CA125II assay, in 18,748 postmenopausal women who participated in the ST: Bartholomew's/Royal London Hospital Ovarian Cancer screening trial from 1986 to 1994 and were not diagnosed with ovarian cancer during the 12-year follow-up period. We found that race is a substantial predictor of normal levels of CA125, with average CA125II concentration from African (median, 9.0; 95% range, 4.0-26.0 units/ml) and Asian women (median, 13.0; range, 5.9-33.3 units/ml) lower than that in Caucasian women (median, 14.2; range, 6.0-41.0 units/ml; P < 0.001). Women with a hysterectomy have lower CA125II values (median, 13.6; range 5.5-39.0 units/ml; P < 0.001), and women with a prior cancer diagnosis other than ovarian cancer have higher levels of CA125 II (median, 16.0; range, 6.0-49.0 units/ml; P < 0.003). Regular smoking and caffeine consumption decrease CA125 levels (P < 0.001). A woman's age, age at menarche, age at menopause, and history of a previous ovarian cyst (P < 0.05) are also predictive of baseline CA125 levels. Parity, history of hormone replacement therapy or unilateral oopherectomy, and previous use of oral contraceptives or talcum powder are not significant predictors of CA125 concentrations (P > 0.05). We concluded that clinically significant differences in individual patient characteristics need to be reflected in the screening algorithms that use CA125II so that designed performance characteristics (sensitivity and specificity) are maintained in practice. PMID:11352859

  4. Admittance of the SU(2) and SU(4) Anderson quantum RC circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippone, Michele; Le Hur, Karyn; Mora, Christophe

    2013-07-01

    We study the Anderson model as a description of the quantum RC circuit for spin-1/2 electrons and a single level connected to a single lead. Our analysis relies on the Fermi liquid nature of the ground state, which fixes the form of the low-energy effective model. The constants of this effective model are extracted from a numerical solution of the Bethe ansatz equations for the Anderson model. They allow us to compute the charge relaxation resistance Rq in different parameter regimes. In the Kondo region, the peak in Rq as a function of the magnetic field is recovered and proven to be in quantitative agreement with previous numerical renormalization group results. In the valence-fluctuation region, the peak in Rq is shown to persist, with a maximum value of h/2e2, and an analytical expression is obtained using perturbation theory. We extend our analysis to the SU(4) Anderson model where we also derive the existence of a giant peak in the charge relaxation resistance.

  5. Algebra II: Gatekeeper Course--An Examination of CST Proficiency Levels in California and the Bay Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailer-O'Keefe, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the Algebra II course and California Star Test (CST) proficiency levels in the San Francisco Bay Area and in the State of California. CST proficiency levels are examined by grade level for the State and nine counties of the San Francisco Bay Area region. Algebra II is shown to be one of the more complicated courses in the CSU…

  6. Animal model of Sar1b deficiency presents lipid absorption deficits similar to Anderson disease.

    PubMed

    Levic, Daniel S; Minkel, J R; Wang, Wen-Der; Rybski, Witold M; Melville, David B; Knapik, Ela W

    2015-02-01

    Anderson disease (ANDD) or chylomicron retention disease (CMRD) is a rare, hereditary lipid malabsorption syndrome associated with mutations in the SAR1B gene that is characterized by failure to thrive and hypocholesterolemia. Although the SAR1B structure has been resolved and its role in formation of coat protein II (COPII)-coated carriers is well established, little is known about the requirement for SAR1B during embryogenesis. To address this question, we have developed a zebrafish model of Sar1b deficiency based on antisense oligonucleotide knockdown. We show that zebrafish sar1b is highly conserved among vertebrates; broadly expressed during development; and enriched in the digestive tract organs, brain, and craniofacial skeleton. Consistent with ANDD symptoms of chylomicron retention, we found that dietary lipids in Sar1b-deficient embryos accumulate in enterocytes. Transgenic expression analysis revealed that Sar1b is required for growth of exocrine pancreas and liver. Furthermore, we found abnormal differentiation and maturation of craniofacial cartilage associated with defects in procollagen II secretion and absence of select, neuroD-positive neurons of the midbrain and hindbrain. The model presented here will help to systematically dissect developmental roles of Sar1b and to discover molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to organ-specific ANDD pathology. Key messages: Sar1b depletion phenotype in zebrafish resembles Anderson disease deficits. Sar1b deficiency results in multi-organ developmental deficits. Sar1b is required for dietary cholesterol uptake into enterocytes. PMID:25559265

  7. Anderson localization effects near the Mott metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragana, Helena; Aguiar, M. C. O.; Vu?i?evi?, J.; Tanaskovi?, D.; Dobrosavljevi?, V.

    2015-09-01

    The interplay between Mott and Anderson routes to localization in disordered interacting systems gives rise to different transitions and transport regimes. Here, we investigate the phase diagram at finite temperatures using dynamical mean-field theory combined with typical medium theory, which is an effective theory of the Mott-Anderson metal-insulator transition. We mainly focus on the properties of the coexistence region associated with the Mott phase transition. For weak disorder, the coexistence region is found to be similar to that in the clean case. However, as we increase disorder, Anderson localization effects are responsible for shrinking the coexistence region, and at sufficiently strong disorder (approximately equal to twice the bare bandwidth) it drastically narrows, the critical temperature Tc abruptly goes to zero, and we observe a phase transition in the absence of a coexistence of the metallic and insulating phases. In this regime, the effects of interaction and disorder are found to be of comparable importance for charge localization.

  8. Anderson Wall and Bloch Oscillations in Molecular Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flo, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under quantum resonance conditions. In a rigid rotor, the resonance causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that the centrifugal distortion of rotating molecules eventually halts the growth, by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentumthe Anderson wall. Its position solely depends on the molecular rotational constants and lies in the range of a few tens of ?. Below the wall, rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at near-ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology.

  9. The M. D. Anderson proton therapy system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Gillin, Michael; Bues, Martin; Zhu, X. Ronald; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Mohan, Radhe; Woo, Shiao; Lee, Andrew; Komaki, Ritsko; Cox, James; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishida, Takayuki; Sasaki, Toshie; Matsuda, Koji

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe University of Texas M. D. Anderson proton therapy system (PTC-H) including the accelerator, beam transport, and treatment delivery systems, the functionality and clinical parameters for passive scattering and pencil beam scanning treatment modes, and the results of acceptance tests. Methods: The PTC-H has a synchrotron (70-250 MeV) and four treatment rooms. An overall control system manages the treatment, physics, and service modes of operation. An independent safety system ensures the safety of patients, staff, and equipment. Three treatment rooms have isocentric gantries and one room has two fixed horizontal beamlines, which include a large-field treatment nozzle, used primarily for prostate treatments, and a small-field treatment nozzle for ocular treatments. Two gantry treatment rooms and the fixed-beam treatment room have passive scattering nozzles. The third gantry has a pencil beam scanning nozzle for the delivery of intensity modulated proton treatments (IMPT) and single field uniform dose (SFUD) treatments. The PTC-H also has an experimental room with a fixed horizontal beamline and a passive scattering nozzle. The equipment described above was provided by Hitachi, Ltd. Treatment planning is performed using the Eclipse system from Varian Medical Systems and data management is handled by the MOSAIQ system from IMPAC Medical Systems, Inc. The large-field passive scattering nozzles use double scattering systems in which the first scatterers are physically integrated with the range modulation wheels. The proton beam is gated on the rotating range modulation wheels at gating angles designed to produce spread-out-Bragg peaks ranging in size from 2 to 16 g/cm{sup 2}. Field sizes of up to 25x25 cm{sup 2} can be achieved with the double scattering system. The IMPT delivery technique is discrete spot scanning, which has a maximum field size of 30x30 cm{sup 2}. Depth scanning is achieved by changing the energy extracted from the synchrotron (energy can be changed pulse to pulse). The PTC-H is fully integrated with DICOM-RT ION interfaces for imaging, treatment planning, data management, and treatment control functions. Results: The proton therapy system passed all acceptance tests for both passive scattering and pencil beam scanning. Treatments with passive scattering began in May 2006 and treatments with the scanning system began in May 2008. The PTC-H was the first commercial system to demonstrate capabilities for IMPT treatments and the first in the United States to treat using SFUD techniques. The facility has been in clinical operation since May 2006 with up-time of approximately 98%. Conclusions: As with most projects for which a considerable amount of new technology is developed and which have duration spanning several years, at project completion it was determined that several upgrades would improve the overall system performance. Some possible upgrades are discussed. Overall, the system has been very robust, accurate, reproducible, and reliable. The authors found the pencil beam scanning system to be particularly satisfactory; prostate treatments can be delivered on the scanning nozzle in less time than is required on the passive scattering nozzle.

  10. Exercise intensity modulates capillary perfusion in correspondence with ACE I/D modulated serum angiotensin II levels

    PubMed Central

    van Ginkel, Sander; de Haan, Arnold; Woerdeman, Jorn; Vanhees, Luc; Sern, Erik; de Koning, Jos; Flck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    During exercise the reninangiotensin system is stimulated. We hypothesized that the increase in serum angiotensin II (AngII) levels after exercise is dependent on exercise intensity and duration and secondly that people with the ACE-II genotype will show a higher increase in AngII serum levels. We also assumed that perfusion of upper limbs is transiently reduced with maximal cycling exercise and that subjects with the ACE-II compared to the ACE-ID/DD genotype will have a higher capillary perfusion due to lower AngII levels. Ten healthy subjects completed a maximal exercise test, a 12-min exercise test at ventilatory threshold and a 3-min test at the respiratory compensation point. AngII serum levels and capillary recruitment of the skin in the third finger were measured before and after exercise and breath-by-breath gas exchange during exercise was assessed. Baseline levels of AngII levels were lower prior to the 3-min test which took place on average 5days after the last exercise. A two-fold increase compared to baseline levels was found for AngII only immediately after the 3-min test and not after the maximal exercise test and 12-min of exercise. Subjects without the I allele showed a decrease in AngII values after the maximal test in contrast to subjects with the ACE-II/ID genotype. Subjects with the ACE-II genotype had a 1.8 times significant higher capillary perfusion in the finger after exercise. A trend was observed for a 34.3% decreased capillary recruitment in the ACE-ID/DD genotype after exercise. We conclude that the rise in AngII after exercise is intensity dependent and that variability in serum AngII and capillary perfusion is related to the ACE I/D polymorphism. PMID:26937347

  11. Level II scour analysis for bridge 2 (WODFTH00010002) on Town Highway 1, crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODFTH00010002 on Town Highway 1 crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  12. Ergodicity and dynamical localization for Delone-Anderson operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germinet, Franois; Mller, Peter; Rojas-Molina, Constanza

    2015-11-01

    We study the ergodic properties of Delone-Anderson operators, using the framework of randomly colored Delone sets and Delone dynamical systems. In particular, we show the existence of the integrated density of states and, under some assumptions on the geometric complexity of the underlying Delone sets, we obtain information on the almost-sure spectrum of the family of random operators. We then exploit these results to study the Lifshitz-tail behavior of the integrated density of states of a Delone-Anderson operator at the bottom of the spectrum. Furthermore, we use Lifshitz-tail estimates as an input for the multi-scale analysis to prove dynamical localization.

  13. Highly effective biosorption of Sr(II) from low level radioactive wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Hu, Wenyuan; Huang, Xiaojun; Deng, Hongquan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis was first used to remove Sr(II) from low-level radioactive wastewater. Influence parameters, biosorption kinetics and biosorption equilibrium were investigated. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity of Sr(II) at over 2,000 mg g(-1) by Bacillus subtilis was higher than for other biosorbents. At pH 6.3, Sr(II) concentration of 15 mg L(-1), biomass dosage of 0.3 g L(-1) and temperature of 20 C, the maximum removal efficiency was as high as 96.3% at 1,440 minutes. The biosorption kinetics and the equilibrium isotherm data can be described by the pseudo-second-order equation and Freundlich isotherm equation, respectively. The negative values of ?G and the positive values of ?H implied that Sr(II) biosorption on Bacillus subtilis was a spontaneous and endothermic process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that the functional groups, hydroxyl, carboxylate and amide groups, might participate in the interaction between Sr(II) and Bacillus subtilis. PMID:26038939

  14. Serum uric acid level, blood pressure, and vascular angiotensin II responsiveness in healthy men and women

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Arian; Ramesh, Sharanya; Turin, Tanvir C.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Sarna, Magdalena A.; Reimer, Raylene A.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Sola, Darlene Y.; Ahmed, Sofia B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Uric acid is associated with hypertension and increased reninangiotensin system activity, although this relationship diminishes after chronic exposure to high levels. Uric acid is more strongly associated with poor outcomes in women compared to men, although whether this is due to a sex?specific uric acid?mediated pathophysiology or reflects sex differences in baseline uric acid levels remains unknown. We examined the association between uric acid and vascular measures at baseline and in response to angiotensin?II challenge in young healthy humans. Fifty?two subjects (17 men, 35 premenopausal women) were studied in high?salt balance. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in men compared to women (328 14 ?mol/L vs. 248 10 ?mol/L, P < 0.001), although all values were within normal sex?specific range. Men demonstrated no association between uric acid and blood pressure, either at baseline or in response to angiotensin?II. In stark contrast, a significant association was observed between uric acid and blood pressure at baseline (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.005; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.02) and in response to angiotensin?II (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.035; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.056) in women. However, this sex difference lost significance after adjustment for baseline uric acid. When all subjects were stratified according to high (>300 ?mol/L) or low (?300 ?mol/L) uric acid levels, only the low uric acid group showed a positive association between uric acid and measures of vascular tone at baseline and in response to angiotensin?II. Differences in uric acid?mediated outcomes between men and women likely reflect differences in exposure to increased uric acid levels, rather than a sex?specific uric acid?mediated pathophysiology. PMID:25501427

  15. Relationship of blood lead levels and blood pressure in NHANES II: additional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Gartside, P.S.

    1988-06-01

    In performing research for associations and relationships among the data thus far published from the NHANES II survey, only the data for the 64 communities involved may be used. The simple omission of a few essential data makes impossible any valid analysis from the data for the 20,325 individual respondents. In this research for associations between blood lead levels and blood pressure in NHANES II, the method of forward stepwise regression was used. This avoids the problem of inflated error rates for blood lead, maximizes the number of data analyzed, and minimizes the number of independent variables entered into the regression model, thus avoiding the pitfalls that previous NHANES II research of blood lead and blood pressure has fallen into when using backward stepwise regression. The results of this research for white male adults, white female adults, and black adults were contradictory and lacked consistency and reliability. In addition, the overall average association between blood lead level and blood pressure was so minute that the only rational conclusion is that there is no evidence for this association to be found in the NHANES II data.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio observations of Galactic WISE HII regions (Anderson+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, D. S.; Wenger, T. V.; Cunningham, V.

    2016-01-01

    We draw our targets from the MIR objects in the WISE catalog of Anderson+, 2014, J/ApJS/212/1. We also include in our sample Sharpless H II regions (Sharpless 1959, VII/20). See section 2 for further details. Our observations were made with the GBT 100m telescope from 2012 July through 2014 August. There are seven radio recombination lines (RRLs) that can be cleanly observed simultaneously with the GBT in the X-band: H87α to H93α. We average these seven RRLs (each at two orthogonal polarizations) to create a single average RRL spectrum. We followed the same GBT observational procedure as in the original HRDS (Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS; Bania et al. 2010ApJ...718L.106B). (3 data files).

  17. Review of the Constellation Level II Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Documents during Participation in the Constellation Level II SR&QA Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Kenneth D.; Gentz, Steven J.; Beil, Robert J.; Minute, Stephen A.; Currie, Nancy J.; Scott, Steven S.; Thomas, Walter B., III; Smiles, Michael D.; Schafer, Charles F.; Null, Cynthia H.; Bay, P. Michael

    2009-01-01

    At the request of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and the Constellation Program (CxP) Safety, Reliability; and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Director, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) participated in the Cx SR&QA Requirements forum. The Requirements Forum was held June 24-26; 2008, at GRC's Plum Brook Facility. The forums purpose was to gather all stakeholders into a focused meeting to help complete the process of refining the CxP to refine its Level II SR&QA requirements or defining project-specific requirements tailoring. Element prime contractors had raised specific questions about the wording and intent of many requirements in areas they felt were driving costs without adding commensurate value. NESC was asked to provide an independent and thorough review of requirements that contractors believed were driving Program costs, by active participation in the forum. This document contains information from the forum.

  18. Polaronic conduction and Anderson localization in reduced strontium barium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandeneau, Christopher S.; Yang, YiHsun; Olmstead, Marjorie A.; Bordia, Rajendra K.; Ohuchi, Fumio S.

    2015-12-01

    Electron transport mechanisms in reduced Sr0.5Ba0.5Nb2O6 (SBN50) are investigated from ˜100 to 955 K through an analysis of the electrical conductivity (σ) and the Seebeck coefficient (S) with respect to temperature (T). Notably, experimental evidence is presented that supports a scenario of Anderson localization below 600 K and carrier excitation across a mobility edge at higher temperature. As a relaxor ferroelectric, stoichiometric SBN has intrinsic disorder associated with both the distribution of Sr/Ba vacancies and the formation of polarized nanoregions. The removal of oxygen through reduction generates conduction electrons in SBN. At the lowest temperatures measured (100-155 K), the electrical conductivity exhibits a temperature dependence characteristic of variable range hopping, followed by a transition to small polaron hopping at intermediate temperatures (250-545 K). In both the variable range and small polaron hopping regimes, a semiconductor-like temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity (dσ/dT > 0) was observed. However, above 615 K, dσ/dT decreases dramatically and eventually becomes metal-like (dσ/dT < 0). Concomitantly, the Seebeck coefficient exhibits a linear dependence on lnT from 615 to 955 K with the same slope (˜104 μ V/K) for both polycrystalline SBN50 and single crystalline SBN61 (both reduced), indicating a similar, constant density of states near the Fermi level for both compositions. The application of Seebeck coefficient theory to this inherently disordered material reveals that the excitation of carriers across a mobility edge is likely responsible for the change in dσ/dT at high temperature. Such findings may have a significant impact in the field of conductive ferroelectrics.

  19. Interpolation Processes in Object Perception: Reply to Anderson (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellman, Philip J.; Garrigan, Patrick; Shipley, Thomas F.; Keane, Brian P.

    2007-01-01

    P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, & T. F. Shipley presented a theory of 3-D interpolation in object perception. Along with results from many researchers, this work supports an emerging picture of how the visual system connects separate visible fragments to form objects. In his commentary, B. L. Anderson challenges parts of that view, especially the idea

  20. Markovian Anderson Model: Bounds for the Rate of Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcheremchantsev, Serguei

    We consider the Anderson model in with potentials whose values at any site of the lattice are Markovian independent random functions of time. For solutions to the time-dependent Schrdinger equation we show under some conditions that with probability 1 where for d=1,2 and for .

  1. COMPREHENSIVE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND IMPROVED ENERGY LEVELS FOR SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph; Kerber, Florian

    2012-10-15

    We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 A. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

  2. Arc Detection and Interlock Module for the PEP II Low Level RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    A new arc detection and interlock generating module for the SLAC PEP-II low-level RF VXI-based system has been developed. The system is required to turn off the RF drive and high voltage power supply in the event of arcing in the cavity windows, klystron window, or circulator. Infrared photodiodes receive arc signals through radiation resistant optical fibers. Gain and bandwidth are selectable for each channel to allow tailoring response. The module also responds to interlock requests from other modules in the VXI system and communicates with the programmable logic controller (PLC) responsible for much of the low-level RF system's interlock functionality.

  3. Quality assurance plan for the High Level Controller for the CBMS Block II

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.W.; Robbins, I.F.; Stewart, K.A.; Terry, C.L.; Whitaker, R.A.; Wolf, D.A.; Zager, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    This document establishes the software Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the High Level Controller for the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II (HLC/CBMS-II) project activities under the Computing, Robotics, and Education (CRE) Directorate management. It defines the requirements and assigns responsibilities for ensuring, with a high degree of confidence, that project objectives will be achieved as planned. The CBMS Program was awarded to ORNL by the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to design the next version (Block II) mass spectrometer for the detection and identification of chemical and biological warfare agents, to fabricate four engineering prototypes, and to construct eight preproduction units. Section 1 of this document provides an introduction to the HLC/CBMS-II project QAP. Sections 2 and 3 describe the specific aspects of quality assurance as applicable to the project. Section 4 reviews the project approach to risk management. The Risk Management Matrix given in Appendix A is a tool to assess, prioritize, and prevent problems before they occur; therefore, the matrix will be reviewed and revised on a periodic basis. Appendix B shows the quality assurance criteria of the DOE Order 5700.6C and their applicability to this project.

  4. SAGE II Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties at Non-Volcanic Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Burton, Sharon P.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Peter, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Since 2000, stratospheric aerosol levels have been relatively stable and at the lowest levels observed in the historical record. Given the challenges of making satellite measurements of aerosol properties at these levels, we have performed a study of the sensitivity of the product to the major components of the processing algorithm used in the production of SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements and the retrieval process that produces the operational surface area density (SAD) product. We find that the aerosol extinction measurements, particularly at 1020 nm, remain robust and reliable at the observed aerosol levels. On the other hand, during background periods, the SAD operational product has an uncertainty of at least a factor of 2 during due to the lack of sensitivity to particles with radii less than 100 nm.

  5. Anderson transition in low-dimensional disordered systems driven by long-range nonrandom hopping.

    PubMed

    Rodrguez, A; Malyshev, V A; Sierra, G; Martn-Delgado, M A; Rodrguez-Laguna, J; Domnguez-Adame, F

    2003-01-17

    The single-parameter scaling hypothesis predicts the absence of delocalized states for noninteracting quasiparticles in low-dimensional disordered systems. We show analytically, using a supersymmetric method combined with a renormalization group analysis, as well as numerically that extended states may occur in the one- and two-dimensional Anderson model with a nonrandom hopping falling off as some power of the distance between sites. The different size scaling of the bare level spacing and the renormalized magnitude of the disorder seen by the quasiparticles finally results in the delocalization of states at one of the band edges of the quasiparticle energy spectrum. PMID:12570579

  6. Genetic suppression of a phosphomimic myosin II identifies system-level factors that promote myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yixin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Surcel, Alexandra; Miller, Christopher; Robinson, Douglas N

    2014-12-15

    How myosin II localizes to the cleavage furrow in Dictyostelium and metazoan cells remains largely unknown despite significant advances in understanding its regulation. We designed a genetic selection using cDNA library suppression of 3xAsp myosin II to identify factors involved in myosin cleavage furrow accumulation. The 3xAsp mutant is deficient in bipolar thick filament assembly, fails to accumulate at the cleavage furrow, cannot rescue myoII-null cytokinesis, and has impaired mechanosensitive accumulation. Eleven genes suppressed this dominant cytokinesis deficiency when 3xAsp was expressed in wild-type cells. 3xAsp myosin II's localization to the cleavage furrow was rescued by constructs encoding rcdBB, mmsdh, RMD1, actin, one novel protein, and a 14-3-3 hairpin. Further characterization showed that RMD1 is required for myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation, acting in parallel with mechanical stress. Analysis of several mutant strains revealed that different thresholds of myosin II activity are required for daughter cell symmetry than for furrow ingression dynamics. Finally, an engineered myosin II with a longer lever arm (2xELC), producing a highly mechanosensitive motor, could also partially suppress the intragenic 3xAsp. Overall, myosin II accumulation is the result of multiple parallel and partially redundant pathways that comprise a cellular contractility control system. PMID:25318674

  7. Genetic suppression of a phosphomimic myosin II identifies system-level factors that promote myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yixin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Surcel, Alexandra; Miller, Christopher; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2014-01-01

    How myosin II localizes to the cleavage furrow in Dictyostelium and metazoan cells remains largely unknown despite significant advances in understanding its regulation. We designed a genetic selection using cDNA library suppression of 3xAsp myosin II to identify factors involved in myosin cleavage furrow accumulation. The 3xAsp mutant is deficient in bipolar thick filament assembly, fails to accumulate at the cleavage furrow, cannot rescue myoII-null cytokinesis, and has impaired mechanosensitive accumulation. Eleven genes suppressed this dominant cytokinesis deficiency when 3xAsp was expressed in wild-type cells. 3xAsp myosin II's localization to the cleavage furrow was rescued by constructs encoding rcdBB, mmsdh, RMD1, actin, one novel protein, and a 14-3-3 hairpin. Further characterization showed that RMD1 is required for myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation, acting in parallel with mechanical stress. Analysis of several mutant strains revealed that different thresholds of myosin II activity are required for daughter cell symmetry than for furrow ingression dynamics. Finally, an engineered myosin II with a longer lever arm (2xELC), producing a highly mechanosensitive motor, could also partially suppress the intragenic 3xAsp. Overall, myosin II accumulation is the result of multiple parallel and partially redundant pathways that comprise a cellular contractility control system. PMID:25318674

  8. A local-magnitude scale for Mt. Vesuvius from synthetic Wood-Anderson seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pezzo, Edoardo; Petrosino, Simona

    The Local-Magnitude scale actually in use at Vesuvius Observatory is basedon the measure of seismogram coda duration, and calibrated with data fromIrpinia aftershocks. A recent study on local seismic attenuation at Mt.Vesuvius reveals coda shapes highly different from those from Irpiniaaftershocks, and a very low quality factor, if compared to the average Qof the region, indicating the necessity of the revision of the Magnitudescale, in order to better compare the seismic energy associated to the localseismicity of Mt. Vesuvius to that of other active volcanoes. Being theseismic attenuation parameters known in the area, we could correct theseismic amplitudes for the path effect to obtain precise estimates of theamplitude level of the displacement spectrum. Hence we estimated theMoment-Magnitude, M W, for a set of well recorded micro-earthquakes.To use the Richter formulaM L =log10 A max -log A0(R)we estimated the log Amplitude-Distance correction curve, - log A0(R),numerically synthesizing an S-wave-packet and letting it propagate in aearth medium with the same attenuation properties of those measured at Mt.Vesuvius. Then we synthesized the Wood-Anderson equivalent seismogram forthe same data set and used the distance correction in order to calculate theWood-Anderson Magnitude.This Magnitude scale was normalized in order to fit the Richter formulavalid for Southern California at a distance ? of 10 km, and resultsto be M WA =log A + 1.34log(R) -1.10. The comparison of the Wood-Anderson scale with the Duration-Magnitude scalein routine use at Vesuvius Observatory indicates that care must be takenwhen the estimate of the Duration-Magnitude is carried out for smallearthquakes recorded at a site characterized by a high level of seismicnoise.

  9. Effect of dietary fiber on the level of free angiotensin II receptor blocker in vitro.

    PubMed

    Iwazaki, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Tamezane, Yui; Tanaka, Kenta; Nakagawa, Minami; Imai, Kimie; Nakanishi, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers (ARBs), such as losartan potassium (LO), candesartan (CA), and telmisartan (TE), and dietary fiber was studied as to the level of free ARB in vitro. When ARB was incubated with soluble (sodium alginate, pectin, and glucomannan) or insoluble (cellulose and chitosan) dietary fiber, the levels of free LO, TE, and CA decreased. This resulted only from mixing the dietary fiber with the ARBs and differed among the types of dietary fiber, and the pH and electrolytes in the mixture. The levels of free LO and TE tended to decrease with a higher concentration of sodium chloride in pH 1.2 fluid. These results suggest that it is important to pay attention to the possible interactions between ARBs and dietary fiber. PMID:24790001

  10. High levels of MHC class II allelic diversity in lake trout from Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorschner, M.O.; Duris, T.; Bronte, C.R.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.; Phillips, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Sequence variation in a 216 bp portion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II B1 domain was examined in 74 individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from different locations in Lake Superior. Forty-three alleles were obtained which encoded 71-72 amino acids of the mature protein. These sequences were compared with previous data obtained from five Pacific salmon species and Atlantic salmon using the same primers. Although all of the lake trout alleles clustered together in the neighbor-joining analysis of amino acid sequences, one amino acid allelic lineage was shared with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species in another genus which probably diverged from Salvelinus more than 10-20 million years ago. As shown previously in other salmonids, the level of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) exceeded the level of synonymous substitution (d(S)). The level of nucleotide diversity at the MHC class II B1 locus was considerably higher in lake trout than in the Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lake trout colonized Lake Superior from more than one refuge following the Wisconsin glaciation. Recent population bottlenecks may have reduced nucleotide diversity in Pacific salmon populations.

  11. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Physiological Free Cu(II) Levels in Live Cells with a Cu(II)-Selective Carbonic Anhydrase-Based Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    McCranor, Bryan J.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Zeng, Hui Hui; Stoddard, A.K.; Hurst, Tamiika; Fierke, Carol A.; Lakowicz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a required trace element that plays key roles in a number of human enzymes, such that copper deficiency or genetic defects in copper transport lead to serious or fatal disease. Rae, et al., had famously predicted that free copper ion levels in the cell cytoplasm were extremely low, typically too low to be observable. We recently developed a variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase II for sensing metal ions that exhibits 25-fold better selectivity for Cu(II) over Zn(II) than the wild type protein, enabling us to accurately measure Cu(II) in the presence of ordinary cellular (picomolar) concentrations of free zinc. We inserted a fluorescent labeled Cu(II)-specific variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase into PC-12 cells and found that the levels are indeed extremely low (in the femtomolar range). We imaged the free Cu(II) levels in living cells by means of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy. Implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:24671220

  12. Anderson localization on the Bethe lattice: nonergodicity of extended States.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Altshuler, B L; Kravtsov, V E; Scardicchio, A

    2014-07-25

    Statistical analysis of the eigenfunctions of the Anderson tight-binding model with on-site disorder on regular random graphs strongly suggests that the extended states are multifractal at any finite disorder. The spectrum of fractal dimensions f(α) defined in Eq. (3) remains positive for α noticeably far from 1 even when the disorder is several times weaker than the one which leads to the Anderson localization; i.e., the ergodicity can be reached only in the absence of disorder. The one-particle multifractality on the Bethe lattice signals on a possible inapplicability of the equipartition law to a generic many-body quantum system as long as it remains isolated. PMID:25105646

  13. STS-107 Crew Interviews: Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    STS-107 Mission Specialist 3 and Payload Commander Michael Anderson is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting onboard science experiments. He discusses the following instruments and sets of experiments in detail: CM2 (Combustion Module 2), FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enabling Science Technology and Research, MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) and MGM (Mechanics of Granular Materials). Anderson also mentions on-board activities and responsibilities during launch and reentry, mission training, and microgravity research. In addition, he touches on the dual work-shift nature of the mission, the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety during training and the value of international cooperation.

  14. Anderson localization of light in disordered superlattices containing graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, A. J.; Peres, N. M. R.; Pinheiro, F. A.

    2015-11-01

    We perform a theoretical investigation of light propagation and Anderson localization in one-dimensional disordered superlattices composed of dielectric stacks with graphene sheets in between. Disorder is introduced either on graphene material parameters (e.g., Fermi energy) or on the widths of the dielectric stacks. We derive an analytic expression for the localization length ? , and we compare it to numerical simulations using the transfer-matrix technique; a very good agreement is found. We demonstrate that the presence of graphene may strongly attenuate the anomalously delocalized Brewster modes, and it is at the origin of a periodic dependence of ? on frequency, in contrast to the usual asymptotic decay, ? ??-2 . By unveiling the effects of graphene on Anderson localization of light, we pave the way for new applications of graphene-based, disordered photonic devices in the THz spectral range.

  15. STS-107 Crew Interviews: Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-107 Mission Specialist 3 and Payload Commander Michael Anderson is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting onboard science experiments. He discusses the following instruments and sets of experiments in detail: CM2 (Combustion Module 2), FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enabling Science Technology and Research, MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) and MGM (Mechanics of Granular Materials). Anderson also mentions on-board activities and responsibilities during launch and reentry, mission training, and microgravity research. In addition, he touches on the dual work-shift nature of the mission, the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety during training and the value of international cooperation.

  16. Expression levels of urotensin II are associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress in patients with severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    He, W-Y; Chen, G-J; Lai, X; Wu, F; Tang, C-S; Zhang, A-H

    2016-02-01

    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain a leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. We aim to study urotensin II (UII) and its association with the markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in placentas of patients with severe preeclampsia (SPE). Thirty-three patients with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and twenty-two healthy pregnant women designated as healthy controls were recruited. Expression levels of UII, UII receptor (GPR14) and the markers of ERS in placenta specimens of patients were performed. Plasma and urinary UII levels were measured by radioimmunoassay method. Our study showed that the plasma levels of UII in patients with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy were significantly higher than that of the healthy control group. However, the urinary levels of UII had no difference in two groups. The expression level of mRNA and protein of UII, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose regulation protein 78 in placentas of SPE was significantly increased. Immunohistochemical analyses show that the expression levels of UII and ERS markers were mainly located in the cytoplasm of placental trophoblastic cells. Moreover, expression level of UII mRNA and protein was positively correlated with that of the markers of ERS. The positive correlation between UII and ERS markers expression level also corresponded with the level of patient's systolic blood pressure and proteinuria. In conclusion, we first verify that expression of UII is associated with ERS in patients with SPE. Our results indicate that UII may trigger ERS in placental trophoblastic cells in patients with preeclampsia. PMID:25880595

  17. Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

  18. Electronic State and Magnetic Susceptibility in Orbitally Degenerate ( J=5/2) Periodic Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontani, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kosaku

    1997-08-01

    Magnetic susceptibility in a heavy fermion systemis composed of the Pauli term (χ P) and the Van-Vleck term (χ V).The latter comes from the interband excitation,where f-orbital degeneracy is essential.In this work, we study χ P and χ Vin the orbitally degenerate (J=5/2) periodic Anderson modelfor both the metallic and insulating cases.The effect of the correlation between f-electrons is investigatedusing the self-consistent second-order perturbation theory.The main results are as follows. (i) Sixfold degenerate model:both χ P and χ V are enhanced by a factor of 1/z(z is the renormalization constant).(ii) Nondegenerate model: only χ P is enhanced by 1/z.Thus, orbital degeneracy is indispensable for the enhancement of χ V.Moreover, orbital degeneracy reduces the Wilson ratioand stabilizes the nonmagnetic Fermi liquid state.

  19. Application of PC's and Linux to the CDF Run II level-3 trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Fromm et al.

    1998-12-01

    For Run II, the CDF Level-3 trigger must provide a sustained input bandwidth of at least 45 MBytes/set and will require processing power of at least 45000 MIPS to perform the necessary reconstruction and filtering of events. We present a distributed, scalable architecture using commod- ity hardware running the Linux operating system. I/O and CPU intensive functions are separated into two types of nodes; ?converter? nodes receive event fragments via ATM from Level 2 computers and distribute complete events to ?processor? nodes via multiple fast ethernets. We present re- sults from a small-scale prototype roughly equivalent to a 1/16th vertical slice of the final system. With this hardware we have demonstrated the capability of sustained I/O rates of 15 MBytes/set, more then three times the required baseline performance. We discuss PC hardware and Linux software issues and modifications for real time performance.

  20. Operator Interface for the PEP-II Low Level RF Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Stephanie; Claus, Richard

    1997-05-01

    We describe the operator interface for the Low Level RF Control System being built for the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The operator interface consists of displays for monitor and control from UNIX workstations, slow feedback loops and control sequences residing on microprocessors running the VxWorks real time operating system, and an interface to the existing SLAC Linear Collider control system for archiving, alarming, message logging, configuration, correlations, and multiknobs. The displays, database, and slower controls and monitoring are implemented using the EPICS control system package. Control sequences include the cavity tuner loop, automatic processing, klystron voltage loop, and RF station state control. Monitored subsystems include the machine protection system and low level RF. Challenges encountered in the operator interface design consist of the interface to a legacy control system, ability to change hardware and databases with minimal software impact and quick turnaround, intuitive user displays and tools, and reliable, bumpless, 24 hour a day operation.

  1. Variational exact diagonalization method for Anderson impurity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schler, M.; Renk, C.; Wehling, T. O.

    2015-06-01

    We describe a variational approach to solving Anderson impurity models by means of exact diagonalization. Optimized parameters of a discretized auxiliary model are obtained on the basis of the Peierls-Feynman-Bogoliubov principle. Thereby, the variational approach resolves ambiguities related to the bath discretization, which is generally necessary to make Anderson impurity models tractable by exact diagonalization. The choice of variational degrees of freedom made here allows systematic improvements of total energies over mean-field decouplings like Hartree-Fock. Furthermore, our approach allows us to embed arbitrary bath discretization schemes in total-energy calculations and to systematically optimize and improve on traditional routes to the discretization problem such as fitting of hybridization functions on Matsubara frequencies. Benchmarks in terms of a single orbital Anderson model demonstrate that the variational exact diagonalization method accurately reproduces free energies as well as several single- and two-particle observables obtained from an exact solution. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of the variational exact diagonalization approach to realistic five-orbital problems with the example system of Co impurities in bulk Cu and compare it to continuous-time Monte Carlo calculations. The accuracy of established bath discretization schemes is assessed in the framework of the variational approach introduced here.

  2. Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Shu-Hui; Song, Juntao Li, Yu-Xian

    2013-11-14

    We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

  3. Level II Milestone Review of LLNL Program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, M F; Benson, D J; Yip, S

    2003-01-14

    This document describes an evaluation of the Level II Milestone achievements of the LLNL program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives on January 14, 2003. ''The Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives Program'' is a mixture of advanced computational methodology and physico-chemical theory applied to understanding deflagration and detonation of plastic-bonded explosives from the nano to the macro scales. At many points, the modeling is tied directly to experiments within the precisions of both. Advances are needed in the experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of detonations. Work reported in this review represents significant, cross-pollinating advances in each area. The team successfully carried out ALE-3D simulations of deflagration in PBX with grain scale effects. (Milestone requirements 1 and 2), interpreted experimental data on flame speed vs. pressure and sensitivity to global kinetics in terms of ALE-3D simulations (Milestone requirement 3), and used the results of these simulations to develop a continuum reactive flow model that captures some of these effects (Milestone requirement 4). By comparing experiments and detonation velocities in small diameter, unconfined explosives, they found non-idealities that remain at intermediate diameters (ca. 1.5 mm) that require further analysis. In all of these areas, the project team has met, indeed exceeded, their Level II Milestone goals.

  4. Development of High Level Trigger Software for Belle II at SuperKEKB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Mineo, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Belle collaboration has been trying for 10 years to reveal the mystery of the current matter-dominated universe. However, much more statistics is required to search for New Physics through quantum loops in decays of B mesons. In order to increase the experimental sensitivity, the next generation B-factory, SuperKEKB, is planned. The design luminosity of SuperKEKB is 8 x 1035cm-2s-1 a factor 40 above KEKB's peak luminosity. At this high luminosity, the level 1 trigger of the Belle II experiment will stream events of 300 kB size at a 30 kHz rate. To reduce the data flow to a manageable level, a high-level trigger (HLT) is needed, which will be implemented using the full offline reconstruction on a large scale PC farm. There, physics level event selection is performed, reducing the event rate by ~ 10 to a few kHz. To execute the reconstruction the HLT uses the offline event processing framework basf2, which has parallel processing capabilities used for multi-core processing and PC clusters. The event data handling in the HLT is totally object oriented utilizing ROOT I/O with a new method of object passing over the UNIX socket connection. Also under consideration is the use of the HLT output as well to reduce the pixel detector event size by only saving hits associated with a track, resulting in an additional data reduction of ~ 100 for the pixel detector. In this contribution, the design and implementation of the Belle II HLT are presented together with a report of preliminary testing results.

  5. Association between paternally inherited haplotypes upstream of the insulin gene and umbilical cord IGF-II levels.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Ronald M; Fain, John N; Krushkal, Julia; Klauser, Chad K; Magann, Everett F; Morrison, John C

    2007-10-01

    The insulin (INS) and IGF 2 (IGF2) genes are in close proximity to each other and undergo maternal imprinting during fetal growth. We investigated the association between maternal and umbilical cord IGF 2 protein (IGF-II) levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the INS and IGF2 genes in 207 healthy African-American mother-newborn pairs. No association was found between maternal IGF-II levels and polymorphism in the INS-IGF2 locus. A significant association was found between newborn IGF-II levels and two SNPs (rs3842738 and rs689) at the 5' end of the INS-IGF2 locus. Analyses of haplotypes inferred from these two SNPs demonstrate a significant relationship between paternally transmitted haplotypes and newborn IGF-II levels, but no association with maternally transmitted haplotypes. PMID:17667841

  6. Electrons and photons at High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anuar, Afiq A.

    2015-12-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to keep the HLT output rate manageable while maintaining thresholds low enough to cover physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the ingredients that have been successfully applied in the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. Improvements in HLT electron and photon definitions will be presented, focusing in particular on: updated clustering algorithm and the energy calibration procedure, new Particle-Flow-based isolation approach and pileup mitigation techniques, and the electron-dedicated track fitting algorithm based on Gaussian Sum Filter.

  7. Direct determination of the timing of sea level change during termination II.

    PubMed

    Gallup, Christina D; Cheng, H; Taylor, F W; Edwards, R L

    2002-01-11

    An outcrop within the last interglacial terrace on Barbados contains corals that grew during the penultimate deglaciation, or Termination II. We used combined 230Th and 231Pa dating to determine that they grew 135.8 +/- 0.8 thousand years ago, indicating that sea level was 18 +/- 3 meters below present sea level at the time. This suggests that sea level had risen to within 20% of its peak last-interglacial value by 136 thousand years ago, in conflict with Milankovitch theory predictions. Orbital forcing may have played a role in the deglaciation, as may have isostatic adjustments due to large ice sheets. Other corals in the same outcrop grew during oxygen isotope (delta18O) substage 6e, indicating that sea level was 38 +/- 5 meters below present sea level, about 168.0 thousand years ago. When compared to the delta18O signal in the benthic V19-30/V19-28 record at that time, the coral data extend to the previous glacial cycle the conclusion that deep-water temperatures were colder during glacial periods. PMID:11786639

  8. The Ce 4{ital f} surface shift: A test for the Anderson-impurity Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Duo, L.; De Rossi, S.; Vavassori, P.; Ciccacci, F.; Olcese, G.L.; Chiaia, G.; Lindau, I.

    1996-12-01

    Evidence is provided of the role of the different hybridization strengths between the surface and the bulk in determining the magnitude of the surface shift for the shallow Ce 4{ital f} levels, with respect to the deeper core levels. This was achieved by comparing the photoemission core levels for a weakly hybridized case (CeAl) to a case of intermediate hybridization ({gamma}-Ce). For CeAl a 4{ital f} surface shift of 0.45 eV was observed, similar to that for the 5{ital p} core level, whereas a smaller (if any) 4{ital f} surface shift was observed for {gamma}-Ce. Model calculations based on the Anderson impurity Hamiltonian are shown to give a correct evaluation of this effect, which can be exploited as a way of testing the results of such a description for the Ce {ital f} states. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Oxidative Modification in Human Hair: The Effect of the Levels of Cu (II) Ions, UV Exposure and Hair Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Grosvenor, Anita J; Marsh, Jennifer; Thomas, Ancy; Vernon, James A; Harland, Duane P; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2016-01-01

    Protein oxidative degradation is implicated in a wide range of deleterious effects. For human hair, this oxidative damage can lead to significant observable changes in fiber physical and visual properties. A redox proteomic approach was applied to map molecular modification in human hair proteins and correlate this modification with the abundance of copper (II) ions, the levels of UV exposure and the general level of hair pigmentation. An increase in oxidative modification was observed with increasing copper (II) ion levels, regardless of the pigmentation level. Significantly, increased protein oxidative modification was also observed to occur in both lightly and darkly pigmented hair tresses even in the absence of irradiation, albeit at lower relative levels. Modification levels increased with increased copper (II) ion concentration. This new finding indicates that the level of copper (II) ions in human hair plays a key role in mediating protein oxidation, with or without exposure to UV light. Overall, these results strongly suggest that minimization of the level of copper (II) ions in human hair will mitigate and/or slow protein oxidative modification and therefore lower overall hair damage. PMID:26451514

  10. Evaluation of Phase II glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A vendor glass formulation study was carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), supporting the Phase I and Phase II melter vendor testing activities for Westinghouse Hanford Company. This study is built upon the LLW glass optimization effort that will be described in a separate report. For Phase I vendor melter testing, six glass formulations were developed at PNL and additional were developed by Phase I vendors. All the doses were characterized in terms of viscosity and chemical durability by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. Twelve Phase II glass formulations (see Tables 3.5 and 3.6) were developed to accommodate 2.5 wt% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 1.0 wt% S0{sub 3} without significant processing problems. These levels of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SO{sub 3} are expected to be the highest possible concentrations from Hanford Site LLW streams at 25 wt% waste loading in glass. The Phase H compositions formulated were 6 to 23 times more durable than the environmental assessment (EA) glass. They melt within the temperature range of 1160{degrees} to 1410{degrees}C to suit different melting technologies. The composition types include boron-free for volatilization sensitive melters; boron-containing glasses for coId-cap melters; Zr-containing, glasses for enhanced Iong-term durability; and Fe-containing glasses for reducing melting temperature and melt volatility while maintaining chemical durability.

  11. The Influence of Alcoholic Liver Disease on Serum PIVKA-II Levels in Patients without Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kang, Seong Hee; Lee, Beom Jae; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Prothrombin induced by vitamin K deficiency or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) is a widely used diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We evaluated the correlation between alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and serum PIVKA-II levels in chronic liver disease (CLD) patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 2,528 CLD patients without HCC. Among these patients, 76 exhibited serum high PIVKA-II levels of >125 mAU/mL (group 1). We categorized 76 control patients matched by age, sex, and the presence of liver cirrhosis from the remaining patients who were negative for serum PIVKA-II (group 2). Results Group 1 revealed increased antibiotic usage (23.7% vs 2.6%, p<0.001) and incidence of ALD (60.5% vs 14.5%, p<0.001) as well as elevated aspartate aminotransferase (52.5 IU/L vs 30.5 IU/L, p=0.025) and γ glutamyl transpeptidase (67.5 IU/L vs 36.5 IU/L, p=0.005) levels compared with group 2. Further, group 1 was significantly associated with a worse Child-Pugh class than group 2. In the multivariate analysis, ALD (odds ratio [OR], 7.151; p<0.001) and antibiotic usage (OR, 5.846; p<0.001) were significantly associated with positive PIVKA-II levels. Conclusions Our study suggests that ALD and antibiotics usage may be confounding factors when interpreting high serum PIVKA-II levels in patients without HCC. Therefore, serum PIVKA-II levels in patients with ALD or in patients administered antibiotics should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25473073

  12. Fabrication and characterization of disordered polymer optical fibers for transverse Anderson localization of light.

    PubMed

    Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J; Mirr, Craig R; Koch, Karl W; Mafi, Arash

    2013-01-01

    We develop and characterize a disordered polymer optical fiber that uses transverse Anderson localization as a novel waveguiding mechanism. The developed polymer optical fiber is composed of 80,000 strands of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) that are randomly mixed and drawn into a square cross section optical fiber with a side width of 250 μm. Initially, each strand is 200 μm in diameter and 8-inches long. During the mixing process of the original fiber strands, the fibers cross over each other; however, a large draw ratio guarantees that the refractive index profile is invariant along the length of the fiber for several tens of centimeters. The large refractive index difference of 0.1 between the disordered sites results in a small localized beam radius that is comparable to the beam radius of conventional optical fibers. The input light is launched from a standard single mode optical fiber using the butt-coupling method and the near-field output beam from the disordered fiber is imaged using a 40X objective and a CCD camera. The output beam diameter agrees well with the expected results from the numerical simulations. The disordered optical fiber presented in this work is the first device-level implementation of 2D Anderson localization, and can potentially be used for image transport and short-haul optical communication systems. PMID:23929276

  13. Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 1: Global and zonal mean cloud amounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

    1995-01-01

    Global high-level clouds identified in Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements for January and July in the period 1985 to 1990 are compared with near-nadir-looking observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Global and zonal mean high-level cloud amounts from the two data sets agree very well, if clouds with layer extinction coefficients of less than 0.008/km at 1.02 micrometers wavelength are removed from the SAGE II results and all detected clouds are interpreted to have an average horizontal size of about 75 km along the 200 km transimission path length of the SAGE II observations. The SAGE II results are much more sensitive to variations of assumed cloud size than to variations of detection threshold. The geographical distribution of cloud fractions shows good agreement, but systematic regional differences also indicate that the average cloud size varies somewhat among different climate regimes. The more sensitive SAGE II results show that about one third of all high-level clouds are missed by ISCCP but that these clouds have very low optical thicknesses (less than 0.1 at 0.6 micrometers wavelength). SAGE II sampling error in monthly zonal cloud fraction is shown to produce no bias, to be less than the intraseasonal natural variability, but to be comparable with the natural variability at longer time scales.

  14. Commissioning experience with the PEP-II low-level RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

    1997-05-01

    The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment and supported by EPICS. All signal processing and control is done at baseband using in-phase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. Remotely configurable RF feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to the required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. The system contains a built-in baseband network analyzer which allows remote measurement of the RF feedback loop transfer functions and automated configuration of these loops. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system.

  15. Commissioning Experience with the PEP-II Low Level RF System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

    1997-05-01

    The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment. Remotely configurable feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. An adaptive technique is used to generate the station RF reference which tracks the ion clearing gap induced cavity transients. All RF signal processing and measurements are done using inphase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system.

  16. Software Architecture of the PEP-II Low Level RF Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claus, R.; Allison, S. A.

    1997-05-01

    We describe the software architecture of the Low Level RF Control System being built for the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. This VXI based system utilizes a commercially available embedded CPU controller board running the VxWorks real time operating system for each RF station. The operator interface and slower data processing are implemented using the EPICS control system package. The embedded processors are used to load, calibrate, monitor and diagnose various components of the system. The system consists of custom hardware modules containing fixed algorithm DSPs with programmable coefficients to implement FIR and DDF filters, and software programmable DSPs to implement the line supply ripple cancelation feedback loop and the ion clearing gap adaptation algorithm. Machine protection is implemented using a PLC based platform.

  17. NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

    2011-03-28

    The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. It is an open structure platform, and we try to provide a narrow API set for client application. With this narrow API, existing applications developed in different language under different architecture could be ported to our platform with small modification. This paper describes system infrastructure design, client API and system integration, and latest progress. As a new 3rd generation synchrotron light source with ultra low emittance, there are new requirements and challenges to control and manipulate the beam. A use case study and a theoretical analysis have been performed to clarify requirements and challenges to the high level applications (HLA) software environment. To satisfy those requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture of the software framework is critical for beam commissioning, study and operation. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating, plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology. The HLA is combination of tools for accelerator physicists and operators, which is same as traditional approach. In NSLS-II, they include monitoring applications and control routines. Scripting environment is very important for the later part of HLA and both parts are designed based on a common set of APIs. Physicists and operators are users of these APIs, while control system engineers and a few accelerator physicists are the developers of these APIs. With our Client/Server mode based approach, we leave how to retrieve information to the developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

  18. Examining the role of foraging and malvolio in host-finding behavior in the honey bee parasite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When a female varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), invades a honey bee brood cell, the physiology rapidly changes from the feeding phoretic to reproductive. Changes in the foraging and malvolio transcript levels in the brain have been associated with modulated intra-specific food sea...

  19. Variable induction of vitellogenin genes in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) by the honeybee, Apis mellifera L, host and its environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcript levels of vitellogenins (Vgs) in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) were variably induced by interactions between the developing honeybee as a food source and the capped honeybee cell environment. Transcripts for 2 Vgs of varroa mites were sequenced and putative Vg pr...

  20. Nutritional Restriction and Levels of Muscle IGF-II MRNA in Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth hormone-insulin like growth factor (GH-IGF) axis plays an important role in the endocrine control of fish growth. We have previously reported differential expression of insulin like growth factor-II (IGF-II) in faster growing channel catfish families, but IGF-IIs role during nutritional...

  1. Radiative lifetime measurements of some Tm I and Tm II levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Xinghao; Yu, Qi; Li, Yongfan; Gao, Yang; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 88 levels of Tm I in the energy range 22 791.176-48 547.98 cm-1 and 29 levels of Tm II in the range 27 294.79-65 612.85 cm-1 were measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-ablation plasma. The lifetime values obtained are in the range from 15.4 to 7900 ns for Tm I and from 36.5 to 1000 ns for Tm II. To the best of our knowledge, 77 lifetimes of Tm I and 22 lifetimes of Tm II are reported for the first time. Good agreements between the present results and the previous experimental values were achieved for both Tm I and Tm II.

  2. The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Simões, A. S. R.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and a weak delocalization of the 5f-electrons. We calculate the Kondo and Curie temperatures and we can account for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of UTe.

  3. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment during training at SPACEHAB. STS-107 is a research mission. The primary payload is the first flight of the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM). The experiments range from material sciences to life sciences (many rats). Also part of the payload is the Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research (FREESTAR) that incorporates eight high priority secondary attached shuttle experiments. STS-107 is scheduled to launch July 11, 2002

  4. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson suits up for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson smiles as he undergoes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

  5. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method

    SciTech Connect

    Sabik, A. Gołek, F.; Antczak, G.

    2015-05-15

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (Δϕ) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present Δϕ of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers.

  6. Critical phenomena of dynamical delocalization in a quantum Anderson map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroaki S.; Matsui, Fumihiro; Ikeda, Kensuke S.

    2015-12-01

    Using a quantum map version of the one-dimensional Anderson model, the localization-delocalization transition of quantum diffusion induced by coherent dynamical perturbation is investigated in comparison with the quantum standard map. Existence of critical phenomena, which depends on the number of frequency component M , is demonstrated. Diffusion exponents agree with theoretical prediction for the transition, but the critical exponent of the localization length deviates from it with increase in the M . The critical power ɛc of the normalized perturbation at the transition point remarkably decreases as ɛc˜(M-1 ) -1 .

  7. Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1996 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This first annual report on DOE`s Price Anderson Amendments Act enforcement program covers the activities, accomplishments, and planning for calendar year 1996. It also includes the infrastructure development activities of 1995. It encompasses the activities of the headquarters` Office of Enforcement in the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) and Investigation and the coordinators and technical advisors in DOE`s Field and Program Offices and other EH Offices. This report includes an overview of the enforcement program; noncompliances, investigations, and enforcement actions; summary of significant enforcement actions; examples where enforcement action was deferred; and changes and improvements to the program.

  8. STS-118 Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Clay Anderson Perform EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist Rick Mastracchio was anchored on the foot restraint of the Canadarm2 as he participated in the third session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. Assisting Mastracchio was Expedition 15 flight engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame). During the 5 hour, 28 minute space walk, the two relocated the S-band Antenna Sub-Assembly from the Port 6 (P6) truss to the Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1 and retrieved the P6 transponder.

  9. Kubo-Anderson Mixing in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Brink, A. Maassen Van Den

    A novel ab initio analysis of the Reynolds stress is presented in order to model non-local turbulence transport. The theory involves a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. A scaling relation maps the path space onto the boundary layer. Analytical sampling rates are shown to model mixing by exchange. Nonlocal mixing involves a scaling exponent ɛ≈0.58 (ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit). The resulting transport equation represents a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process.

  10. Anderson impurities in a transition metal superconductor. Kondo effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.M.; Roongkeadsakoon, S.

    1984-06-01

    Using the approach of Matsuura, Ichinose, and Nagaoka to treat Anderson impurities dissolved in a transition metal superconductor, the Kondo effect in a two-band superconductor is studied. It is found that the two-particle propagators for the superconductor are coupled to each other through the s- and d-electron vertex functions, which are obtained as solutions to a set of coupled Bethe-Salpeter equations. By rearranging some of the terms in the two-particle propagators, the pair-breaking parameters for the s and d electrons are obtained. An expression for the decrease in the transition temperature due to the Kondo scattering is obtained.

  11. Influence of luminosity leveling on the CDF-II B-Physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Matthew; Lewis, Jonathan; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The effective bandwidth of the CDF-II level 1 trigger is approximately 25 kHz. Some of this bandwidth is used to record events that form the data sets used by the high p{sub T} physics analyses. The remaining bandwidth is used by triggers that are sensitive to hadronic B decays and provide one of the most important samples used for the study of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. At high luminosities, the hadronic B triggers have rates that greatly exceed the available bandwidth. Rather than incur large dead-times associated with these excessive rates, these B triggers are prescaled to limit the total trigger rate to the effective level 1 trigger bandwidth. The prescales are dynamically adjusted as the store progresses so that all of the bandwidth that is not used for the high p{sub T} physics program is used to record hadronic B triggers. In principle, the luminosity could be held at a more constant level throughout the store in such a way that the integrated luminosity would be the same as that obtained from a normal store. It has been suggested that this would allow B triggers to be recorded with lower prescales and consequently with higher B{sub s}{sup 0} signal efficiencies. This note describes a parametric model of the high p{sub T} and hadronic B triggers used by CDF and compares the yields of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} decays that would result with and without luminosity leveling.

  12. Visualization on supercomputing platform level II ASC milestone (3537-1B) results from Sandia.

    SciTech Connect

    Geveci, Berk; Fabian, Nathan; Marion, Patrick; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2010-09-01

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia portion of the ASC Level II Visualization on the platform milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratories. This milestone contains functionality required for performing visualization directly on a supercomputing platform, which is necessary for peta-scale visualization. Sandia's contribution concerns in-situ visualization, running a visualization in tandem with a solver. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors(GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the performance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. Scientific simulation on parallel supercomputers is traditionally performed in four sequential steps: meshing, partitioning, solver, and visualization. Not all of these components are necessarily run on the supercomputer. In particular, the meshing and visualization typically happen on smaller but more interactive computing resources. However, the previous decade has seen a growth in both the need and ability to perform scalable parallel analysis, and this gives motivation for coupling the solver and visualization.

  13. [Level of knowledge of patients with type II diabetes mellitus in primary care].

    PubMed

    Pieiro Chonsa, F; Lara Valdivielso, E; Muoz Cacho, P; Herrera Plaza, T; Rodrguez Cordero, R; Mayo Alastrey, M A

    1991-01-01

    A personal interview to 148 patients was carried out with the aim of getting to know the level of information of type II diabetic patients at an Urban Health Center in Santander. A validated questionnaire made up of 14 questions on general aspects of diabetis, dietetic habits and capability to handle complications was used. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of questionnaire was 0.69. The correct answer average was 6.3 (IC = 5.9-6.5). Patients were best informed about general aspects and had much less information with regard to the handling of complications and to their diet. The differences among these three sections of questions were significative (p less than 0.001). The patients under diet treatment obtained worse results than those treated with oral hipoglucemiants and insulin. Our results are worse than those reported by other similar populations at a national level. Also, and due to the differences in knowledge within this group, we believe that the establishment of groups and subgroups when educating diabetic patients is possible and also highly recommended. PMID:1917331

  14. Spectrum and energy levels of singly ionized cesium. II. Interpretation of fine and hyperfine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, C.J.; Andrew, K.L.; Wyart, J.

    1988-10-01

    The theoretical interpretation of Cs II has been extended and now includes the 5p/sup 5/ns (n = 6--12), 5p/sup 5/np (n = 6--8), 5p/sup 5/nd (n = 5--11), 5p/sup 5/nf (n = 4--8), 5p/sup 5/ng (n = 5--10), and 5p/sup 5/nh (n = 6--8) configurations. Most levels are well represented in the single-configuration approximation when far configuration interactions are included through effective electrostatic parameters. Explicit interactions of low-lying 5p/sup 5/nd+5p/sup 5/(n+1)s configurations have been determined. For most configurations, good jK coupling is found. Purities of the levels in jK coupling and the LS composition of the eigenvectors are given. The intermediate-coupling eigenvectors have been used to calculate magnetic-dipole hyperfine-splitting factors, and these are compared with 167 experimentally determined values from our earlier work.

  15. Experimental Observation of Two-Dimensional Anderson Localization with the Atomic Kicked Rotor.

    PubMed

    Manai, Isam; Clment, Jean-Franois; Chicireanu, Radu; Hainaut, Clment; Garreau, Jean Claude; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Delande, Dominique

    2015-12-11

    Dimension 2 is expected to be the lower critical dimension for Anderson localization in a time-reversal-invariant disordered quantum system. Using an atomic quasiperiodic kicked rotor-equivalent to a two-dimensional Anderson-like model-we experimentally study Anderson localization in dimension 2 and we observe localized wave function dynamics. We also show that the localization length depends exponentially on the disorder strength and anisotropy and is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the self-consistent theory for the 2D Anderson localization. PMID:26705619

  16. Experimental Observation of Two-Dimensional Anderson Localization with the Atomic Kicked Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manai, Isam; Clément, Jean-François; Chicireanu, Radu; Hainaut, Clément; Garreau, Jean Claude; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Delande, Dominique

    2015-12-01

    Dimension 2 is expected to be the lower critical dimension for Anderson localization in a time-reversal-invariant disordered quantum system. Using an atomic quasiperiodic kicked rotor—equivalent to a two-dimensional Anderson-like model—we experimentally study Anderson localization in dimension 2 and we observe localized wave function dynamics. We also show that the localization length depends exponentially on the disorder strength and anisotropy and is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the self-consistent theory for the 2D Anderson localization.

  17. Astronaut Clay Anderson Speaks With S.C. Students - Duration: 25 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA astronaut Clay Anderson participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at Crayton Middle School, Columbia,...

  18. Anderson localization transition in thin films of gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, R.; Hebard, A. F.; Muttalib, K. A.; Woelfle, P.

    2009-03-01

    In situ temperature-dependent transport studies have been performed on a series of gadolinium (Gd) films deposited onto sapphire substrates having sheet resistance R0 ? Rxx(5K) varying over the range 4011 ? (35) to 132 K? (< 20 ). The disorder strength, as measured by R0, is sufficiently high so that quantum corrections to the classical Boltzmann conductivity are no longer observed. In this region of moderately strong disorder, we find a temperature-dependent conductivity of the form ?(T) = A +BT^p where A and B are disorder-dependent constants and p is a power with value 0.4. We find that A is proportional to (1-R0/Rc)^s where the conductivity exponent s =1 and the critical resistance Rc = 22.7 k?. This change in sign of A with unity exponent at critical disorder describes the critical regime of an Anderson localization transition[1] with the temperature-dependent localization length sufficiently small so that the Gd films can be considered to be in the 3D regime, rather than the 2D regime where metallic behavior does not occur [2]. [1] Lee & Ramakrishnan, RMP 57, 287 (1985); Belitz & Kirkpatrick, RMP 66, 261 (1994) [2] Abrahams, Anderson, Licciardello & Ramakrishnan, PRL 42, 673 (1979)

  19. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    PubMed Central

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  20. Block Lanczos density-matrix renormalization group method for general Anderson impurity models: Application to magnetic impurity problems in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Tomonori; Yunoki, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a block Lanczos (BL) recursive technique to construct quasi-one-dimensional models, suitable for density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations, from single- as well as multiple-impurity Anderson models in any spatial dimensions. This new scheme, named BL-DMRG method, allows us to calculate not only local but also spatially dependent static and dynamical quantities of the ground state for general Anderson impurity models without losing elaborate geometrical information of the lattice. We show that the BL-DMRG method can be easily extended to treat a multiorbital Anderson impurity model where not only inter- and intraorbital Coulomb interactions but also Hund's coupling and pair hopping interactions are included. We also show that the symmetry adapted BL bases can be utilized, when it is appropriate, to reduce the computational cost. As a demonstration, we apply the BL-DMRG method to three different models for graphene with a structural defect and with a single hydrogen or fluorine absorbed, where a single Anderson impurity is coupled to conduction electrons in the honeycomb lattice. These models include (i) a single adatom on the honeycomb lattice, (ii) a substitutional impurity in the honeycomb lattice, and (iii) an effective model for a single carbon vacancy in graphene. Our analysis of the local dynamical magnetic susceptibility and the local density of states at the impurity site reveals that, for the particle-hole symmetric case at half-filling of electron density, the ground state of model (i) behaves as an isolated magnetic impurity with no Kondo screening, while the ground state of the other two models forms a spin-singlet state where the impurity moment is screened by the conduction electrons. We also calculate the real-space dependence of the spin-spin correlation functions between the impurity site and the conduction sites for these three models. Our results clearly show that, reflecting the presence or absence of unscreened magnetic moment at the impurity site, the spin-spin correlation functions decay as ? r-3, differently from the noninteracting limit (? r-2), for model (i) and as ? r-4, exactly the same as the noninteracting limit, for models (ii) and (iii) in the asymptotic r , where r is the distance between the impurity site and the conduction site. Finally, based on our results, we shed light on recent experiments on graphene where the formation of local magnetic moments as well as the Kondo-like behavior have been observed.

  1. Animal model of Sar1b deficiency presents lipid absorption deficits similar to Anderson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Levic, Daniel S.; Minkel, JR; Wang, Wen-Der; Rybski, Witold M.; Melville, David B.; Knapik, Ela W.

    2015-01-01

    Anderson Disease (ANDD) or Chylomicron Retention Disease (CMRD) is a rare, hereditary lipid malabsorption syndrome associated with mutations in the SAR1B gene that is characterized by failure to thrive and hypocholesterolemia. Although the SAR1B structure has been resolved and its role in formation of coat protein II (COPII) coated carriers is well established, little is known about the requirement for SAR1B during embryogenesis. To address this question, we have developed a zebrafish model of Sar1b deficiency based on antisense oligonucleotide knockdown. We show that zebrafish sar1b is highly conserved among vertebrates, broadly expressed during development, and enriched in the digestive tract organs, brain and craniofacial skeleton. Consistent with ANDD symptoms of chylomicron retention, we found that dietary lipids in Sar1b deficient embryos accumulate in enterocytes. Transgenic expression analysis revealed that Sar1b is required for growth of exocrine pancreas and liver. Furthermore, we found abnormal differentiation and maturation of craniofacial cartilage associated with defects in procollagen II secretion, and absence of select, neuroD-positive neurons of the midbrain and hindbrain. The model presented here will help to systematically dissect developmental roles of Sar1b and to discover molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to organ-specific ANDD pathology. PMID:25559265

  2. High levels of Nrf2 determine chemoresistance in type II endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Chen, Ning; Zhao, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Kong, Beihua; Zheng, Wenxin; Zhang, Donna D.

    2010-01-01

    Type II endometrial cancer, which mainly presents as serous and clear cell types, has proved to be the most malignant and recurrent carcinoma among various female genital malignancies. The transcription factor, Nrf2, was first described as having chemopreventive activity. Activation of the Nrf2-mediated cellular defense response protects cells against the toxic and carcinogenic effects of environmental insults by upregulating an array of genes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS) and restore cellular redox homeostasis. However, the cancer-promoting role of Nrf2 has recently been revealed. Nrf2 is constitutively upregulated in several types of human cancer tissues and cancer cell lines. Furthermore, inhibition of Nrf2 expression sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, the constitutive level of Nrf2 was compared in different types of human endometrial tumors. It was found that Nrf2 was highly expressed in endometrial serous carcinoma (ESC), whereas complex hyperplasia (CH) and endometrial endometrioid carcinoma (EEC) had no or marginal expression of Nrf2. Likewise, the ESC derived SPEC-2 cell line had a higher level of Nrf2 expression and was more resistant to the toxic effects of cisplatin and paclitaxel than that of the Ishikawa cell line, which was generated from EEC. Silencing of Nrf2 rendered SPEC-2 cells more susceptible to chemotherapeutic drugs while it had a limited effect on Ishikawa cells. Inhibition of Nrf2 expression by overexpressing Keap1 sensitized SPEC-2 cells or SPEC-2-derived xenografts to chemotherapeutic treatments using both cell culture and SCID mouse models. Collectively, we provide a molecular basis for the use of Nrf2 inhibitors to increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs and to combat chemoresistance, the biggest obstacle in chemotherapy. PMID:20530669

  3. Quantum phase transition in a gapped Anderson model: A numerical renormalization group study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moca, C. P.; Roman, A.

    2010-06-01

    We use the numerical renormalization group method to investigate the spectral properties of a single-impurity Anderson model with a gap ? across the Fermi level in the conduction-electron spectrum. For any finite ?>0 , at half filling the ground state of the system is always a doublet. Away from half filling a quantum phase transition (QPT) occurs as function of the gap value ? , and the system evolves from the strong-coupling (SC) Kondo-type state, corresponding to ??C . The opening of the gap leads to the formation of one (two) bound states when the system is in the SC (LM) regime. The evolution across the QPT of their positions and the corresponding weights together with the dynamic properties of the model are investigated.

  4. Tunable Anderson metal-insulator transition in quantum spin-Hall insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chui-Zhen; Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-feng; Wang, Ziqiang; Xie, X. C.

    2015-06-01

    We numerically study disorder effects in the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang (BHZ) model, and we find that the Anderson transition of a quantum spin-Hall insulator (QSHI) is determined by model parameters. The BHZ Hamiltonian is equivalent to two decoupled spin blocks that belong to the unitary class. In contrast to the common belief that a two-dimensional unitary system scales to an insulator except at certain critical points, we find, through calculations scaling properties of the localization length, level statistics, and participation ratio, that a possible exotic metallic phase emerges between the QSHI and normal insulator phases in the InAs/GaSb-type BHZ model. On the other hand, direct transition from a QSHI to a normal insulator is found in the HgTe/CdTe-type BHZ model. Furthermore, we show that the metallic phase originates from the Berry phase and can survive both inside and outside the gap.

  5. Urotensin-II and endothelin-I levels after contrast media administration in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ulas, Turgay; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan; Dal, Mehmet S.; Kirhan, Idris; Kaya, Zekeriya; Demir, Mehmet E.; Tursun, Irfan; Eren, Mehmet A.; Aydogan, Timucin; Sezen, Yusuf; Aksoy, Nurten

    2013-01-01

    Background: Contrast induced kidney injury is an acute renal dysfunction that is secondary to the administration of radio contrast media. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the levels of urotensin-II (UT-II) and endothelin-I (ET-I) after contrast media administration in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. Materials and Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we evaluated 78 patients with coronary artery disease who were scheduled for and ultimately underwent percutaneous coronary interventions. As a contrast material, nonionic contrast media was used in various amounts (70-480 mL). Blood and urine samples were obtained to measure U-II, ET-I just before and at the twenty-fourth hour of percutaneous coronary interventions. Results: Compared to baseline, twenty-fourth hour creatinine levels were significantly increased (P < 0.001). The twenty-fourth hour serum and urine levels of both UT-II and ET-I were also significantly increased compared to baseline (P < 0.001 for all) and 24th hour serum and urine UT-II (r = 0.322, P = 0.004; r = 0.302, P = 0.007 respectively), ET-I (r = 0.511, P < 0.001; r = 0.266, P = 0.019 respectively) levels were significantly correlated with the amount of contrast media. Conclusion: Our study indicates that; increased UT-II and ET-I levels seem to be a consequence of hazardous effects of contrast media on blood vessels and the kidney. PMID:23930116

  6. Several Cytokines and Protein C Levels with the Apache II Scoring System for Evaluation of Patients with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kartal, Elif Doyuk; Karka, Emine; Glba?, Zafer; Alpat, Sayg?n Nayman; Erben, Nurettin; olak, Ertu?rul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether determination IL-6, IL-8, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha at baseline, total protein C (PC) levels at time of admission and 48 hours after initiation could complement the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scoring system to identify patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock for clinical outcome. Material and Methods: The study was carried out prospectively. 60 consecutive patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock were included. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and 48 hours after initiation. Cytokines and PC levels in plasma were measured with an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). APACHE II score was calculated on admission. Results: Baseline IL-6 levels and PC levels 48 hours after initiation were predictive of increased mortality (p=0.016, p=0.044 respectively). Baseline IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha baseline levels correlate with the severity of physiologic insult, as determined by the APACHE II score. However, our multiple logistic regression analysis of these did not reveal any predictive value in combination with the APACHE II score. Conclusion: Determination of baseline IL-6 and PC 48 hours after initiation were of predictive value for prognostic evaluation of septic patients, but did not significantly increase predictive power of the APACHE scoring system to identify patients with sepsis for fatal clinical outcome. PMID:25206990

  7. The role of the UTS2 gene polymorphisms and plasma Urotensin-II levels in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yumrutas, Onder; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Bykhatipoglu, Hakan; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Igci, Yusuf Ziya; Bagis, Haydar; Cevik, M Ozgur; Kalender, M Emin; Eslik, Zeynep; Arslan, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy predominantly affecting women. To date, numerous numbers of studies were reported novel genetic contributors with diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic potential for the breast carcinogenesis. However, the role of urotensin-II in breast carcinogenesis has not been elucidated yet. Urotensin-II is a somatostatin-like cyclic tiny peptide identified by its potent vasoconstrictor activity. Soon after its discovery, its involvement in many disease states as well as its expression in various tissues including the tumors have been demonstrated. Moreover, there is strong evidence that suggest urotensin-II as the significant contributor of angiogenesis as well as cell proliferation and tumor biology. In this study, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were used to evaluate plasma levels of urotensin-II and Thr21Met and Ser89Asn polymorphisms of UTS2 gene in breast cancer patients. In the present case-control study, we noticed a significant decrease in the levels of urotensin-II protein in the plasma of the breast cancer patients (p??0.05). In addition, we demonstrated the gradual decreasing of urotensin-II protein levels from TT and TM to MM genotypes. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that urotensin-II could contribute to breast carcinogenesis and Thr21Met polymorphism can be an important risk factor in developing breast tumors. PMID:25604143

  8. Fermi-liquid theory for the single-impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Christophe; Moca, C?t?lin Pa?cu; von Delft, Jan; Zarnd, Gergely

    2015-08-01

    We generalize Nozires' Fermi-liquid theory for the low-energy behavior of the Kondo model to that of the single-impurity Anderson model. In addition to the electrons' phase shift at the Fermi energy, the low-energy Fermi-liquid theory is characterized by four Fermi-liquid parameters: the two given by Nozires that enter to first order in the excitation energy, and two additional ones that enter to second order and are needed away from particle-hole symmetry. We express all four parameters in terms of zero-temperature physical observables, namely the local charge and spin susceptibilities and their derivatives with respect to the local level position. We determine these in terms of the bare parameters of the Anderson model using Bethe ansatz and numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculations. Our low-energy Fermi-liquid theory applies throughout the crossover from the strong-coupling Kondo regime via the mixed-valence regime to the empty-orbital regime. From the Fermi-liquid theory, we determine the conductance through a quantum dot symmetrically coupled to two leads in the regime of small magnetic field, low temperature, and small bias voltage, and compute the coefficients of the B2 , T2 , and V2 terms exactly in terms of the Fermi-liquid parameters. The coefficients of T2, V2, and B2 are found to change sign during the Kondo to empty-orbital crossover. The crossover becomes universal in the limit that the local interaction is much larger than the level width. For completeness, we also compute the shot noise and discuss the resulting Fano factor.

  9. 75 FR 34170 - Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Assistance on March 18, 2010, applicable to workers of Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, South Carolina. The notice was published in the Federal Register April 23, 2010 (75 FR 21356). The... Employment and Training Administration Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic...

  10. Comment on Anderson and Cuneo's "The Height + Width Rule in Children's Judgments of Quantity."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogartz, Richard S.

    1978-01-01

    Bogartz questions the Anderson and Cuneo study (p335-78 of this issue) on statistical-methodological grounds and on their positions concerning the concepts of conservation, centration, and compensation. (For Anderson and Cuneo's rejoinder to Bogartz, see p388-92 of this journal issue.) (SJL)

  11. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Adam K. Anderson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Adam K. Anderson, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for his outstanding contribution to understanding the representation of emotion and its influence on cognition. By combining psychological and neuroscience techniques with rigorous and creative experimental designs, Anderson has

  12. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Adam K. Anderson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Adam K. Anderson, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for his outstanding contribution to understanding the representation of emotion and its influence on cognition. By combining psychological and neuroscience techniques with rigorous and creative experimental designs, Anderson has…

  13. The GLAS editing procedures for the FGGE level II-B data collected during SOP-1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W.; Edelmann, D.; Carus, H.

    1981-01-01

    The modifications made to the FGGE Level II-b data are discussed and the FORTRAN program developed to perform the modifications is described. It is suggested that the edited database is the most accurate one available for FGGE SOP-1 and 2.

  14. Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1989-1992. Volume III: Level II Model Technology School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This report, the third in a series of six, evaluates the 10 school districts that received grants from the California Department of Education to develop Level II Model Technology School (MTS) Projects intended to enhance instruction and student learning through a combination of curriculum improvement and integration of technology within a single

  15. The Validity of the Otis-Lennon Mental Ability Test, Elementary II Level, for Suspected Mental Retardates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covin, Theron M.

    1976-01-01

    Using Otis-Lennon Mental Ability Test, Elementary II Level and WISC Verbal Performance and Full Scale IQs of 40 white children, correlations of .71, .57 and .73, respectively, were computed. Results suggest IQs and should be interpreted with caution when used as criterion for identifying mentally retarded white children. (Author)

  16. Fire Fighter Level I-II-III [and] Practical Skills Test. Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series. Final Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribyl, Paul F.

    Practical skills tests are provided for fire fighter trainees in the Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series, Fire Fighter Levels I, II, and III. A course introduction appears first and contains this information: recommended instructional sequence, required facilities, instructional methodology, requirements for certification, course

  17. Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1989-1992. Volume II: Model Technology Schools, Level I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This report, the second in a series of six, presents the findings of evaluative studies of six Level I Model Technology School sites which were conducted as part of Phase II of the California Educational Technology Assessment Program. The project sites are: Alhambra City School District (two schools); Cupertino Union Elementary District and…

  18. Quench dynamics of Anderson impurity model using configuration interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chungwei; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-10-01

    We study the quench dynamics of an Anderson impurity model using the configuration interaction (CI) method. In particular, we focus on the relaxation behavior of the impurity occupation. The system is found to behave very differently in the weak-coupling and strong-coupling regimes. In the weak-coupling regime, the impurity occupation relaxes to a time-independent constant quickly after only a few oscillations. In the strong-coupling regime, the impurity occupation develops a fast oscillation, with a much slower relaxation. We show that it is the multipeak structure in the many-body energy spectrum that separates these two regimes. The characteristic behavior, including the power-law decay and the period of oscillation, can also be related to certain features in the many-body energy spectrum. The respective advantages of several impurity solvers are discussed, and the convergence of different CI truncation schemes is provided.

  19. Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes activities in the Department of Energy's Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Enforcement Program in calendar year 1997 and highlights improvements planned for 1998. The DOE Enforcement Program involves the Office of Enforcement and Investigation in the DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health, as well as numerous PAAA Coordinators and technical advisors in DOE Field and Program Offices. The DOE Enforcement Program issued 13 Notices of Violation (NOV`s) in 1997 for cases involving significant or potentially significant nuclear safety violations. Six of these included civil penalties totaling $440,000. Highlights of these actions include: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory Radiological Control Violations / Associated Universities, Inc.; (2) Bioassay Program Violations at Mound / EG and G, Inc.; (3) Savannah River Crane Operator Uptake / Westinghouse Savannah River Company; (4) Waste Calciner Worker Uptake / Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company; and (5) Reactor Scram and Records Destruction at Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin).

  20. Universal Knight shift anomaly in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M.; Curro, N. J.; Scalettar, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    We report a determinant Quantum Monte Carlo investigation which quantifies the behavior of the susceptibility and the entropy in the framework of the periodic Anderson model, focusing on the evolution with different degree of conduction electron (c )-local moment (f ) hybridization. These results capture the behavior observed in several experiments, including the universal behavior of the NMR Knight shift anomaly below the crossover temperature T*. We find that T* is a measure of the onset of c - f correlations and grows with increasing hybridization. These results suggest that the NMR Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements in non-Fermi-liquid materials are strongly influenced by the temperature dependence of the c - f kinetic energy. Our results provide a microscopic basis for the phenomenological two-fluid model of Kondo lattice behavior, and its evolution with pressure and temperature.

  1. Classification and symmetry properties of scaling dimensions at Anderson transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzberg, I. A.; Mirlin, A. D.; Zirnbauer, M. R.

    2013-03-01

    We develop a classification of composite operators without gradients at Anderson-transition critical points in disordered systems. These operators represent correlation functions of the local density of states (or of wave-function amplitudes). Our classification is motivated by the Iwasawa decomposition for the field of the pertinent supersymmetric ? model: The scaling operators are represented by plane waves in terms of the corresponding radial coordinates. We also present an alternative construction of scaling operators by using the notion of highest-weight vector. We further argue that a certain Weyl-group invariance associated with the ?-model manifold leads to numerous exact symmetry relations between the scaling dimensions of the composite operators. These symmetry relations generalize those derived earlier for the multifractal spectrum of the leading operators.

  2. Poisson equation and a self-consistent periodical Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, U.; Sandalov, I.; Eriksson, O.

    2001-08-01

    We show that the formally exact expression for the free energy (with a nonrelativistic Hamiltonian) for the correlated metal generates the Poisson equation within the saddle-point approximation for the electric potential, where the charge density automatically includes correlations. In this approximation the problem is reduced to the self-consistent periodical Anderson model. The parameter of the mixing interaction in this formulation have to be found self-consistently together with the correlated charge density. The factors, calculated by Irkhin, for the mixing interaction, which reflect the structure of the many-electron states of the f ion involved, arise automatically in this formulation and are quite sensitive to the specific element we are interested in. We also discuss the definitions of the mixing interaction for the mapping from ab initio to model calculations.

  3. Multi-Scale Jacobi Method for Anderson Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbrie, John Z.

    2015-11-01

    A new KAM-style proof of Anderson localization is obtained. A sequence of local rotations is defined, such that off-diagonal matrix elements of the Hamiltonian are driven rapidly to zero. This leads to the first proof via multi-scale analysis of exponential decay of the eigenfunction correlator (this implies strong dynamical localization). The method has been used in recent work on many-body localization (Imbrie in On many-body localization for quantum spin chains, arXiv:1403.7837 , 2014).

  4. New superconducting state of the Anderson-lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.H. ); Zimanyi, G.T. )

    1989-11-01

    We discuss the possible existence of a new superconducting state, the two-component superconducting (TCSC) state, of the Anderson-lattice model, when the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg exchange energy {ital J}{sub {ital H}} generated by the hybridization between the conduction band and localized orbitals exceeds a constant multiple of the Kondo energy {ital k}{sub {ital B}}T{sub K}. In this new state, holes in both the conduction band and localized orbitals exhibit two-particle off-diagonal long-range order, and the condensate wave function is a coherent mixture of both types of singlet pairs. We propose that the TCSC phase is a possible candidate for the superconducting phase in the high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} copper oxides.

  5. Kondo destruction and valence fluctuations in an Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Pixley, J H; Kirchner, Stefan; Ingersent, Kevin; Si, Qimiao

    2012-08-24

    Unconventional quantum criticality in heavy-fermion systems has been extensively analyzed in terms of a critical destruction of the Kondo effect. Motivated by a recent demonstration of quantum criticality in a mixed-valent heavy-fermion system, ?-YbAlB(4), we study a particle-hole-asymmetric Anderson impurity model with a pseudogapped density of states. We demonstrate Kondo destruction at a mixed-valent quantum critical point, where a collapsing Kondo energy scale is accompanied by a singular charge-fluctuation spectrum. Both spin and charge responses scale with energy over temperature (?/T) and magnetic field over temperature (H/T). Implications for unconventional quantum criticality in mixed-valence heavy fermions are discussed. PMID:23002763

  6. Kondo Destruction and Valence Fluctuations in an Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, J. H.; Kirchner, Stefan; Ingersent, Kevin; Si, Qimiao

    2012-08-01

    Unconventional quantum criticality in heavy-fermion systems has been extensively analyzed in terms of a critical destruction of the Kondo effect. Motivated by a recent demonstration of quantum criticality in a mixed-valent heavy-fermion system, ?-YbAlB4, we study a particle-hole-asymmetric Anderson impurity model with a pseudogapped density of states. We demonstrate Kondo destruction at a mixed-valent quantum critical point, where a collapsing Kondo energy scale is accompanied by a singular charge-fluctuation spectrum. Both spin and charge responses scale with energy over temperature (?/T) and magnetic field over temperature (H/T). Implications for unconventional quantum criticality in mixed-valence heavy fermions are discussed.

  7. Anomalous optical Anderson localization in mixed one dimensional photonic quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cunding; Kong, Mingdong; Li, Bincheng

    2015-09-21

    Anomalous optical Anderson localization (AOAL) in mixed one-dimensional (1D) photonic quasicrystals with matching impedance is obtained when the average refractive index of left- and right-handed layers is approximately zero. The transport properties of ordinary and anomalous localization are investigated and compared. The difficulties in expressing analytically the scaling factors of the mixed photonic quasicrystals are illustrated from Hamiltonian-map analysis. An approach based on transfer matrix method is proposed to simulate the localization behavior. From the simulation, it is found that the narrow distribution of the phase shift is responsible for AOAL in the mixed photonic structures. The scaling factors of AOAL decrease with the broadening of the phase shift distribution. The maximum phase shifts of the mixed photonic structures determine the lower boundary of the anomalous localization. PMID:26406759

  8. 78 FR 11626 - Foreign-Trade Zone 176-Rockford, IL, Authorization of Production Activity, AndersonBrecon Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ..., AndersonBrecon Inc. (Medical Device Kitting), Rockford, IL On October 12, 2012, AndersonBrecon Inc... public comment (77 FR 64311, 10-19-2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of...

  9. Nonequilibrium dynamics of a singlet-triplet Anderson impurity near the quantum phase transition.

    PubMed

    Roura Bas, P; Aligia, A A

    2010-01-20

    We study the singlet-triplet Anderson model (STAM) in which a configuration with a doublet is hybridized with another containing a singlet and a triplet, as a minimal model to describe two-level quantum dots coupled to two metallic leads in effectively a one-channel fashion. The model has a quantum phase transition which separates regions of a doublet and a singlet ground state. The limits of integer valence of the STAM (which include a model similar to the underscreened spin-1 Kondo model) are derived and used to predict the behavior of the conductance through the system on both sides of the transition, where it jumps abruptly. At a special quantum critical line, the STAM can be mapped to an infinite- U ordinary Anderson model (OAM) plus a free spin 1/2. We use this mapping to obtain the spectral densities of the STAM as a function of those of the OAM at the transition. Using the non-crossing approximation (NCA), we calculate the spectral densities and conductance through the system as a function of temperature and bias voltage, and determine the changes that take place at the quantum phase transition. The separation of the spectral density into a singlet and a triplet part allows us to shed light on the underlying physics and to explain a shoulder observed recently in the zero bias conductance as a function of temperature in transport measurements through a single fullerene molecule (Roch et al 2008 Nature 453 633). The structure with three peaks observed in nonequilibrium transport in these experiments is also explained. PMID:21386260

  10. Potentiometric-surface map of the Wyodak-Anderson Coal Bed, Powder River Structural Basin, Wyoming, 1973-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daddow, Pamela B.

    1986-01-01

    Previous water level maps of shallow aquifers in the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming were based on water levels from wells completed in different stratigraphic intervals within thick sequences of sedimentary rocks. A potentiometric surface using water levels from a single aquifer had never been mapped throughout the basin. The sandstone aquifers in the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age and the Wasatch Formation of Eocene age are discontinuous and lenticular, and do not extend even short distances. Coal aquifers are more continuous and the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed, in the Fort Union Formation, has been mapped in much of the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming. Water level altitudes in the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed and other stratigraphically equivalent coal beds were mapped to determine if they represent a continuous potentiometric surface in the Powder River structural basin. The potentiometric surface, except in the vicinity of the Wyodak mine east of Gillette, represents a premining condition as it was based on water level measurements made during 1973-84 that were not significantly affected by mining. The map was prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. (Lantz-PTT)

  11. Protein kinase C beta II mRNA levels decrease in the striatum and cortex of transgenic Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, A S; Denovan-Wright, E M; Hamilton, L C; Robertson, H A

    2001-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by the inheritance of the huntingtin gene with an expanded CAG repeat. The function of the normal or mutant form of the huntingtin protein remains to be determined. We used differential display to determine differences in steady-state mRNA levels between wild-type and the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of HD. Using this method, we determined that the steady-state mRNA levels of protein kinase C beta II (PKC beta II) subunit are decreased in symptomatic HD mice compared with age-matched wild-type controls. The decrease in PKC beta II mRNA levels occurred in both the striatum and cortex. Previously, it had been demonstrated that PKC beta II immunoreactivity is decreased in the caudate-putamen of patients with Huntington's disease. PKC has been implicated in the long-term potentiation model of brain plasticity and learning, and the loss of PKC may affect information storage in HD. The expression of htt-HD throughout the brain affects the transcription of specific genes in regions not associated with widespread neurodegeneration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:11291528

  12. Atomic-level insights into metabolite recognition and specificity of the SAM-II riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Urmi; Kelley, Jennifer M.; Hamelberg, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Although S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), a metabolic by-product of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), differs from SAM only by a single methyl group and an overall positive charge, SAH binds the SAM-II riboswitch with more than 1000-fold less affinity than SAM. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the molecular basis of such high selectivity in ligand recognition by SAM-II riboswitch. The biosynthesis of SAM exclusively generates the (S,S) stereoisomer, and (S,S)-SAM can spontaneously convert to the (R,S) form. We, therefore, also examined the effects of (R,S)-SAM binding to SAM-II and its potential biological function. We find that the unfavorable loss in entropy in SAM-II binding is greater for (S,S)- and (R,S)-SAM than SAH, which is compensated by stabilizing electrostatic interactions with the riboswitch. The positively charged sulfonium moiety on SAM acts as the crucial anchor point responsible for the formation of key ionic interactions as it fits favorably in the negatively charged binding pocket. In contrast, SAH, with its lone pair of electrons on the sulfur, experiences repulsion in the binding pocket of SAM-II and is enthalpically destabilized. In the presence of SAH, similar to the unbound riboswitch, the pseudoknot structure of SAM-II is not completely formed, thus exposing the Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Unlike SAM, this may further facilitate ribosomal assembly and translation initiation. Our analysis of the conformational ensemble sampled by SAM-II in the absence of ligands and when bound to SAM or SAH reveals that ligand binding follows a combination of conformational selection and induced-fit mechanisms. PMID:22194311

  13. Random Walks in Anderson's Garden: A Journey from Cuprates to Cooper Pair Insulators and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    Anderson's Garden is a drawing presented to Philip W. Anderson on the eve of his 60th birthday celebration, in 1983, by a colleague (author unknown). This cartoon (Fig. 1) succinctly depicts some of Anderson's pre-1983 works. As an avid reader of Anderson's papers, a random walk in Anderson's garden had become a part of my routine since graduate school days. This was of immense help and prepared me for a wonderful collaboration with Anderson on the theory of high-Tc cuprates and quantum spin liquids at Princeton. Here I narrate this story, ending with a brief summary of my ongoing theoretical efforts to extend Anderson's RVB theory for superconductivity to encompass the recently observed high-temperature (Tc ~ 203K) superconductivity in solid H2S at pressure ~200GPa. In H2S molecule, four valence electrons form two saturated covalent bonds, H-S-H. These bond singlets are confined Cooper pairs close to chemical potential. Solid H2S is a Cooper pair insulator. Pressure changes the structure and not the number of valence electrons. Bond singlet pairing tendency continues and new S-S and H-H bonds are formed. S-S bonds are mostly saturated. However, hydrogen sublattice has unsaturated H-H bonds. It prepares ground for a RVB superconducting state.

  14. Some comments on Anderson and Pospahala's correction of bias in line transect sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.R.; Burnham, K.P.; Chain, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    ANDERSON and POSPAHALA (1970) investigated the estimation of wildlife population size using the belt or line transect sampling method and devised a correction for bias, thus leading to an estimator with interesting characteristics. This work was given a uniform mathematical framework in BURNHAM and ANDERSON (1976). In this paper we show that the ANDERSON-POSPAHALA estimator is optimal in the sense of being the (unique) best linear unbiased estimator within the class of estimators which are linear combinations of cell frequencies, provided certain assumptions are met.

  15. COURSE OUTLINE FOR FIRST SIX WEEKS FOR SCIENCE-LEVEL II, TALENT PRESERVATION CLASSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, TX.

    THE FIRST 6-WEEK UNIT CONCERNS ANIMAL LIFE, AND TOPICS INCLUDE PROTOZOA, INVERTEBRATES, AND VERTEBRATES. UNIT II, "THE HUMAN BODY", INCLUDES BODY SYSTEMS, HEALTH, AND SAFETY. TEXTBOOK REFERENCES, CONTENT OUTLINE, TEACHING SUGGESTIONS, REFERENCE READINGS, AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS ARE GIVEN UNDER EACH TOPIC. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT FIRST EXPERIENCES WITH

  16. Implementation of a Proficiency-Based Diploma System in Maine: Phase II--District Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvernail, David L.; Stump, Erika K.; McCafferty, Anita Stewart; Hawes, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the findings from Phase II of a study of Maine's implementation of a proficiency-based diploma system. At the request of the Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs of the Maine Legislature, the Maine Policy Research Institute (MEPRI) has conducted a two-phased study of the implementation of Maine law…

  17. Theory of Anderson pseudospin resonance with Higgs mode in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Naoto; Aoki, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    A superconductor illuminated by an ac electric field with frequency ? is theoretically found to generate a collective precession of Anderson's pseudospins, and hence a coherent amplitude oscillation of the order parameter, with a doubled frequency 2 ? through a nonlinear light-matter coupling. We provide a fundamental theory, based on the mean-field formalism, to show that the induced pseudospin precession resonates with the Higgs amplitude mode of the superconductor at 2 ? =2 ? with 2 ? being the superconducting gap. The resonant precession is accompanied by a divergent enhancement of the third-harmonic generation (THG). By decomposing the THG susceptibility into the bare one and vertex correction, we find that the enhancement of the THG cannot be explained by individual quasiparticle excitations (pair breaking), so that the THG serves as a smoking gun for an identification of the collective Higgs mode. We further explore the effect of electron-electron scattering on the pseudospin resonance by applying the nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory to the attractive Hubbard model driven by ac electric fields. The result indicates that the pseudospin resonance is robust against electron correlations, although the resonance width is broadened due to electron scattering, which determines the lifetime of the Higgs mode.

  18. Anderson Localization for Schrdinger Operators on with Strongly Mixing Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgain, Jean; Schlag, Wilhelm

    In this paper we show that for a.e. x?[ 0,2 ?) the operators defined on as and with Dirichlet condition ?- 1= 0, have pure point spectrum in with exponentially decaying eigenfunctions where ? > 0 and are small. As it is a simple consequence of known techniques that for small ? one has [- 2 +?, 2-?]? spectrum (H(x)) for a.e.x?[ 0, 2 ?), we thus established Anderson localization on the spectrum up to the edges and the center. More general potentials than cosine can be treated, but only those energies with nonzero spectral density are allowed. Finally, we prove the same result for operators on the whole line with potential , where A:?2-->?2 is a hyperbolic toral automorphism, F?C1(?2), ?F= 0, and ? small. The basis for our analysis is an asymptotic formula for the Lyapunov exponent for ?--> 0 by Figotin-Pastur, and generalized by Chulaevski-Spencer. We combine this asymptotic expansion with certain martingale large deviation estimates in order to apply the methods developed by Bourgain and Goldstein in the quasi-periodic case.

  19. Numerical and Laboratory Studies of Ultrasonic Anderson Localization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenherz, James Henry

    A numerical study of Anderson localization in two dimensions and a laboratory study of weak localization in three dimensions are presented. The two-dimensional study was performed by mathematically modelling a system of masses connected to a rigid base by springs of random stiffness. The masses were connected together by inextensible, massless strings. The resulting system of equations was then solved on a digital computer by stepping forward in time and solving explicitly for the displacements at each time step. Plots of the second moment of energy vs. time were made for different amounts of disorder, with values for the ratio of randomness to coupling strength (W/V) ranging from 6.0 to 9.0. No mobility edge was found, indicating that all modes were exponentially localized regardless of the degree of disorder. The three-dimensional study was performed by scattering a beam of 7 MHz ultrasound at a cell containing a slurry of glass or PMMA spherical beads and water, and measuring the backscattered energy as a function of angle. In accord with theoretical predictions, an enhanced backscatter peak with a width of 12 degrees and a magnitude twice that of the large-angle scattered energy was observed with the glass beads in a water slurry. An ultrasonic beam splitter was designed and successfully implemented to observe the small-angle scattered energy.

  20. Kondo hole route to incoherence in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pramod; Vidhyadhiraja, N. S.

    2013-03-01

    The interplay of disorder and interactions in strongly correlated electronic systems is a subject of perennial interest. In this work, we have investigated the effect of Kondo-hole type disorder on the dynamics and transport properties of heavy fermion systems. We employ the periodic Anderson model within the framework of coherent potential approximation and dynamical mean field theory. The crossover from lattice coherent behaviour to an incoherent single-impurity behaviour is reflected in all aspects: a highly frequency (ω)-dependent hybridization becomes almost flat, the coherence peak in resistivity (per impurity) gives way to a Hammann form that saturates at low temperature (T); the Drude peak and the mid-infrared peak in the optical conductivity vanish almost completely. The zero temperature resistivity can be captured in a closed form expression, and we show how the Nordheim's rule gets strongly modified in these systems. The thermopower exhibits a characteristic peak, which changes sign with increasing disorder, and its location is shown to correspond to the low energy scale of the system (ωL). In fact, the thermopower appears to be much more sensitive to disorder variations than the resistivity. A comparison to experiments yields quantitative agreement. JNCASR and CSIR

  1. Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities in arbitrary conduction bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tie-Feng; Tong, Ning-Hua; Cao, Zhan; Sun, Qing-Feng; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities is a key quantity in understanding the physics of Kondo screening. Traditional numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculation of the impurity contribution ?imp to susceptibility, defined originally by Wilson in a flat wide band, has been generalized before to structured conduction bands. The results brought about non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic Kondo behaviors in ?imp, even when the bands are not gapped at the Fermi energy. Here, we use the full density-matrix (FDM) NRG to present high-quality data for the local susceptibility ?loc and to compare them with ?imp obtained by the traditional NRG. Our results indicate that those exotic behaviors observed in ?imp are unphysical. Instead, the low-energy excitations of the impurity in arbitrary bands only without gap at the Fermi energy are still a Fermi liquid and paramagnetic. We also demonstrate that unlike the traditional NRG yielding ?loc less accurate than ?imp, the FDM method allows a high-precision dynamical calculation of ?loc at much reduced computational cost, with an accuracy at least one order higher than ?imp. Moreover, artifacts in the FDM algorithm to ?imp and origins of the spurious non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic features are clarified. Our work provides an efficient high-precision algorithm to calculate the spin susceptibility of impurity for arbitrary structured bands, while negating the applicability of Wilson's definition to such cases.

  2. A Haldane-Anderson impurity model study for the spin- and charge-states of iron in heme proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badaut, Vivien; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Yunoki, Seiji

    2012-12-01

    To understand the spin and charge properties of iron(II) hemo-proteins like myoglobin, we formulated a Haldane-Anderson impurity model within the closed-shell DFT-hybrid-GGA approximation. We employed a mean-field approximation to solve a simple model of myoglobin active site, the iron porphyin-imidazol complex FeP(Im), which was found to reproduce some of the known spin-charge states of myoglobin. We also computed the spin-charge phase diagram of iron in FeP(Im) with and without O2 attached to the central iron, and found that the spin-charge states for FeP(Im) is much more sensitive to the local correlations than that for FeP(Im)(O2).

  3. Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,H.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

  4. Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson - Duration: 2 minutes, 45 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

  5. How many frogs does it take to leap around the Americas? Comments on Anderson and Gillam.

    PubMed

    Moore, J H; Moseley, M E

    2001-07-01

    In modeling the colonization of the Americas, Anderson and Gillam (2000) employ size estimates for vanguard forager bands that are of dubious reproductive viability in light of human incest prohibitions and variable sex ratios at birth. PMID:20043372

  6. Immunoscoring by correlating MHC class II and TCR expression: high level immune functions represented by the KIRP dataset of TCGA.

    PubMed

    Butler, Shanitra N; Blanck, George

    2016-02-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) is primarily oriented towards revealing the status of cancer cells but TCGA RNASeq data have the potential of representing gene expression for a variety of cells that are included during RNA preparation, i.e., cells that cannot be removed from the microenvironment during cancer sample isolation. Thus, we seek to determine whether RNASeq data can be used to pioneer greater precision for immunoscoring. We obtained the RNASeq results for HLA class II genes, the class II transactivator (CIITA) and T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha segments. The data indicated strong degrees of correlation of HLA class II expression with TCR expression. Furthermore, biomarkers of professional antigen-presenting cells also correlated with TCR expression, with the kidney renal papillary cell carcinoma (KIRP) dataset indicative of the highest level, immune function microenvironment. These analyses indicate that an immune function signature, with probable internal HLA class II-TCR verifications, can be obtained from individual TCGA samples; this in turn indicates that such signatures might provide a basis for correlations with prognosis or for convenient indications of therapy options, such as tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte availability for ex-vivo amplification. Although tumor immunoscoring has been proposed, the above analysis represents the first immunoscoring approach that correlates antigen presentation capacity with TCR mRNA expression. PMID:26293619

  7. Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SHIMA, HIROAKI; KUTOMI, GORO; SATOMI, FUKINO; MAEDA, HIDEKI; TAKAMARU, TOMOKO; KAMESHIMA, HIDEKAZU; OMURA, TOSEI; MORI, MITSURU; HATAKENAKA, MASAMITSU; HASEGAWA, TADASHI; HIRATA, KOICHI

    2014-01-01

    In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

  8. Anderson localization as a parametric instability of the linear kicked oscillator

    PubMed

    Tessieri; Izrailev

    2000-09-01

    We rigorously analyze the correspondence between the one-dimensional standard Anderson model and a related classical system, the "kicked oscillator" with noisy frequency. We show that the Anderson localization corresponds to a parametric instability of the oscillator, the localization length being related to the rate of exponential growth of the energy of the oscillator. Analytical expression for a weak disorder is obtained, which is valid both inside the energy band and at the band edge. PMID:11088802

  9. The proton-controlled synthesis of unprecedented diol functionalized Anderson-type POMs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangwei; Li, Qi; Zeng, Mengyan; Huang, Yichao; Zhang, Jin; Hao, Jian; Wei, Yongge

    2016-01-28

    By addition of excess acid into the reaction mixture, a series of organically-derived Anderson-type polyoxometalates, {[R1CR2(CH2O)2]CrMo6O18(OH)4}(3-), with diols as the ligands are reported herein. Such a diol functionalization mode not only works for some specific triol ligands but also can readily be extended to the diol ligands, which will greatly enrich the species of alkoxo-derivatized Anderson POM clusters. PMID:26730957

  10. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  11. Attractive Hubbard model with disorder and the generalized Anderson theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchinskii, E. Z.; Kuleeva, N. A.; Sadovskii, M. V.

    2015-06-01

    Using the generalized DMFT+Σ approach, we study the influence of disorder on single-particle properties of the normal phase and the superconducting transition temperature in the attractive Hubbard model. A wide range of attractive potentials U is studied, from the weak coupling region, where both the instability of the normal phase and superconductivity are well described by the BCS model, to the strong-coupling region, where the superconducting transition is due to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of compact Cooper pairs, formed at temperatures much higher than the superconducting transition temperature. We study two typical models of the conduction band with semi-elliptic and flat densities of states, respectively appropriate for three-dimensional and two-dimensional systems. For the semi-elliptic density of states, the disorder influence on all single-particle properties (e.g., density of states) is universal for an arbitrary strength of electronic correlations and disorder and is due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band. In the case of a flat density of states, universality is absent in the general case, but still the disorder influence is mainly due to band widening, and the universal behavior is restored for large enough disorder. Using the combination of DMFT+Σ and Nozieres-Schmitt-Rink approximations, we study the disorder influence on the superconducting transition temperature T c for a range of characteristic values of U and disorder, including the BCS-BEC crossover region and the limit of strong-coupling. Disorder can either suppress T c (in the weak-coupling region) or significantly increase T c (in the strong-coupling region). However, in all cases, the generalized Anderson theorem is valid and all changes of the superconducting critical temperature are essentially due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band.

  12. Clinical prodromes of neurodegeneration in Anderson-Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Derralynn; Milligan, Alan; Richfield, Linda; Reichmann, Heinz; Mehta, Atul; Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of prodromal clinical features of neurodegeneration in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) in comparison to age-matched controls. Methods: This is a single-center, prospective, cross-sectional study in 167 participants (60 heterozygous females and 50 hemizygous males with genetically confirmed AFD, 57 age-matched controls) using a clinical screening program consisting of structured interview, quantitative tests of motor function, and assessments of cognition, depression, olfaction, orthostatic intolerance, pain, REM sleep behavior disorder, and daytime sleepiness. Results: In comparison to age-matched controls (mean age 48.3 years), patients with AFD (mean age 49.0 years) showed slower gait and transfer speed, poorer fine manual dexterity, and lower hand speed, which was independent of focal symptoms due to cerebrovascular disease. Patients with AFD were more severely affected by depression, pain, and daytime sleepiness and had a lower quality of life. These motor and nonmotor manifestations significantly correlated with clinical disease severity. However, patients with AFD did not reveal extrapyramidal motor features or signs of significant cognitive impairment, hyposmia, orthostatic intolerance, or REM sleep behavior disorder, which commonly precede later neurodegenerative disease. In our cohort, there were no differences in neurologic manifestations of AFD between heterozygous females and hemizygous males. Conclusions: Aside from cerebrovascular manifestations and small fiber neuropathy, AFD results in a distinct neurologic phenotype comprising poorer motor performance and specific nonmotor features. In contrast to functional loss of glucocerebrosidase in Gaucher disease, ?-galactosidase deficiency in AFD is not associated with a typical cluster of clinical features prodromal for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease. PMID:25762709

  13. Theoretical foundations of spatially-variant mathematical morphology part ii: gray-level images.

    PubMed

    Bouaynaya, Nidhal; Schonfeld, Dan

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we develop a spatially-variant (SV) mathematical morphology theory for gray-level signals and images in the Euclidean space. The proposed theory preserves the geometrical concept of the structuring function, which provides the foundation of classical morphology and is essential in signal and image processing applications. We define the basic SV gray-level morphological operators (i.e., SV gray-level erosion, dilation, opening, and closing) and investigate their properties. We demonstrate the ubiquity of SV gray-level morphological systems by deriving a kernel representation for a large class of systems, called V-systems, in terms of the basic SV graylevel morphological operators. A V-system is defined to be a gray-level operator, which is invariant under gray-level (vertical) translations. Particular attention is focused on the class of SV flat gray-level operators. The kernel representation for increasing V-systems is a generalization of Maragos' kernel representation for increasing and translation-invariant function-processing systems. A representation of V-systems in terms of their kernel elements is established for increasing and upper-semi-continuous V-systems. This representation unifies a large class of spatially-variant linear and non-linear systems under the same mathematical framework. Finally, simulation results show the potential power of the general theory of gray-level spatially-variant mathematical morphology in several image analysis and computer vision applications. PMID:18369253

  14. Teaching Games Level Design Using the StarCraft II Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetser, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    Level design is often characterised as "where the rubber hits the road" in game development. It is a core area of games design, alongside design of game rules and narrative. However, there is a lack of literature dedicated to documenting teaching games design, let alone the more specialised topic of level design. Furthermore, there…

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (HANCTH00010010) on Town Highway 1, crossing the White River, Hancock, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HANCTH00010010 on town highway 1 crossing the White River, Hancock, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province of central Vermont. The 59.8-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is primarily grass with trees and brush on the immediate channel banks. In the study area, the White River has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 104 ft and an average channel depth of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 98.9 mm (0.325 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 15, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 1 crossing of the White River is a 91-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 89-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 26, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 feet. Abutment scour ranged from 13.1 to 17.1 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  16. Precocene II, a Trichothecene Production Inhibitor, Binds to Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel and Increases the Superoxide Level in Mitochondria of Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Sakamoto, Naoko; Suzuki, Michio; Kimura, Makoto; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    Precocene II, a constituent of essential oils, shows antijuvenile hormone activity in insects and inhibits trichothecene production in fungi. We investigated the molecular mechanism by which precocene II inhibits trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum, the main causal agent of Fusarium head blight and trichothecene contamination in grains. Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, was identified as the precocene II-binding protein by an affinity magnetic bead method. Precocene II increased the superoxide level in mitochondria as well as the amount of oxidized mitochondrial proteins. Ascorbic acid, glutathione, and ?-tocopherol promoted trichothecene production by the fungus. These antioxidants compensated for the inhibitory activity of precocene II on trichothecene production. These results suggest that the binding of precocene II to VDAC may cause high superoxide levels in mitochondria, which leads to stopping of trichothecene production. PMID:26248339

  17. New Mn II energy levels from the STIS-HST spectrum of the HgMn star HD 175640

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, F.; Kurucz, R. L.; Cowley, C. R.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: The NIST database lists several Mn ii lines that were observed in the laboratory but not classified. They cannot be used in spectrum synthesis because their atomic line data are unknown. These lines are concentrated in the 2380-2700 interval. We aimed to assign energy levels and log gf values to these lines. Methods: Semi-empirical line data for Mn ii computed by Kurucz were used to synthesize the ultraviolet spectrum of the slow-rotating, HgMn star HD 175640. The spectrum was compared with the high-resolution spectrum observed with the HST-STIS equipment. A UVES spectrum covering the 3050-10 000 region was also examined. Results: We determined a total of 73 new energy levels, 58 from the STIS spectrum of HD 175640 and another 15 from the UVES spectrum. The new energy levels give rise to numerous new computed lines. We have identified more than 50% of the unclassified lines listed in the NIST database and have changed the assignment of another 24 lines. An abundance analysis of the star HD 175640, based on the comparison of observed and computed ultraviolet spectra in the 1250-3040 interval, is the by-product of this study on Mn ii. Tables A.1 and A.2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A10

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (BRNATH00290034) on Town Highway 29, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    The Town Highway 29 crossing of Locust Creek is a 37-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 32-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 23, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 25 degrees. There was no observable scour protection measure at the site. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E.

  19. Continuous assimilation of simulated Geosat altimetric sea level into an eddy-resolving numerical ocean model. I - Sea level differences. II - Referenced sea level differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Warren B.; Tai, Chang-Kou; Holland, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The optimal interpolation method of Lorenc (1981) was used to conduct continuous assimilation of altimetric sea level differences from the simulated Geosat exact repeat mission (ERM) into a three-layer quasi-geostrophic eddy-resolving numerical ocean box model that simulates the statistics of mesoscale eddy activity in the western North Pacific. Assimilation was conducted continuously as the Geosat tracks appeared in simulated real time/space, with each track repeating every 17 days, but occurring at different times and locations within the 17-day period, as would have occurred in a realistic nowcast situation. This interpolation method was also used to conduct the assimilation of referenced altimetric sea level differences into the same model, performing the referencing of altimetric sea sevel differences by using the simulated sea level. The results of this dynamical interpolation procedure are compared with those of a statistical (i.e., optimum) interpolation procedure.

  20. Investigating the Causes for Decreased Levels of Glutathione in Individuals with Type II Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lagman, Minette; Ly, Judy; Saing, Tommy; Morris, Devin; Chi, Po-Ting; Ochoa, Cesar; Sathananthan, Airani; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains an eminent global burden with one third of the worlds population latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). Individuals with compromised immune systems are especially vulnerable to M. tb infection. In fact, individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) are two to three times more susceptible to TB than those without T2DM. In this study, we report that individuals with T2DM have lower levels of glutathione (GSH) due to compromised levels of GSH synthesis and metabolism enzymes. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?), a cytokine that is known to decrease the expression of the catalytic subunit of glutamine-cysteine ligase (GCLC) was found in increased levels in the plasma samples from individuals with T2DM, explaining the possible underlying mechanism that is responsible for decreased levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM. Moreover, increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) were observed in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. Increased levels of IL-6 and IL-17 was accompanied by enhanced production of free radicals further indicating an alternative mechanism for the decreased levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM. Augmenting the levels of GSH in macrophages isolated from individuals with T2DM resulted in improved control of M. tb infection. Furthermore, cytokines that are responsible for controlling M. tb infection at the cellular and granuloma level such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), interleukin-1? (IL-1?), interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-?), and interleukin-12 (IL-12), were found to be compromised in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. On the other hand, interleukin-10 (IL-10), an immunosuppressive cytokine was increased in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. Overall, these findings suggest that lower levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM lead to their increased susceptibility to M. tb infection. PMID:25790445

  1. Application of the S=1 underscreened Anderson lattice model to Kondo uranium and neptunium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing the coexistence of the Kondo screening effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the Anderson lattice Hamiltonian with a two-fold degenerate f level in each site, corresponding to 5f2 electronic configuration with S=1 spins. A derivation of the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation is presented and the resulting Hamiltonian has an effective f-band term, in addition to the regular exchange Kondo interaction between the S=1 f spins and the s=1/2 spins of the conduction electrons. The resulting effective Kondo lattice model can describe both the Kondo regime and a weak delocalization of the 5f electrons. Within this model we compute the Kondo and Curie temperatures as a function of model parameters, namely the Kondo exchange interaction constant JK, the magnetic intersite exchange interaction JH, and the effective f bandwidth. We deduce, therefore, a phase diagram of the model which yields the coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and also accounts for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of uranium compounds such as UTe.

  2. Basic Properties of Conductivity and Normal Hall Effect in the Periodic Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Miyake, Kazumasa

    2016-04-01

    Exact formulas of diagonal conductivity σxx and Hall conductivity σxy are derived from the Kubo formula in hybridized two-orbital systems with arbitrary band dispersions. On the basis of the theoretical framework for the Fermi liquid based on these formulas, the ground-state properties of the periodic Anderson model with electron correlation and weak impurity scattering are studied on the square lattice. It is shown that imbalance of the mass-renormalization factors causes remarkable increase in σxx and σxy in the valence-fluctuation regime as the f level increases while the cancellation of the renormalization factors causes slight increase in σxx and σxy in the Kondo regime. The Hall coefficient RH shows almost constant behavior in both the regimes. Near half filling, RH is expressed by the total hole density as R{H} = 1/(bar{n}{hole}e) while RH approaches zero near quarter filling, which reflects the curvature of the Fermi surface. These results hold as far as the damping rate for f electrons is less than about 10% of the renormalized hybridization gap. From these results we discuss pressure dependence of residual resistivity and normal Hall effect in Ce- and Yb-based heavy electron systems.

  3. Confinement effect on Anderson-Higgs modes in superfluid 3He-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, T.; Sauls, J. A.

    2015-03-01

    Superfluid 3He is a prototype to observe the spectrum of Anderson-Higgs (AH) modes associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. In bulk superfluid 3He, AH modes have been observed experimentally through attenuation of zero sound, propagation of transverse sound and its acoustic Faraday rotation. Starting from a Lagrangian formulation, we examine the AH modes of 3He-B confined in a restricted geometry. For bulk 3He-B this formalism leads to the well known spectrum of bosonic collectives modes of the bulk B-phase labelled by the quantum numbers for total angular momentum, J = 0 , 1 , 2 , ... , the projection along an axis, Jz = - J , ... , + J , and the parity under particle-hole conversion, K = +/- 1 . For the equilibrium phases of 3He confinement induces pair breaking and leads to symmetry breaking, giving rise to a rich topological phase diagram. In terms of the bosonic excitations, we find that confinement induces symmetry breaking and leads to mixing of modes with different J, as well as to level splittings of the AH modes that are otherwise degenerate in bulk 3He-B. We find a new spectrum of Bosonic modes is generated that are bound to the surface of superfluid 3He in a restricted geometry. We also report on the coupling of the AH modes to ultra-sound.

  4. A three-level model for alkali metal vapor lasers. Part II: broadband optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, Gordon D.; Perram, Glen P.

    2013-09-01

    The effects of pump laser spectral bandwidth on the performance of longitudinally pumped diode-pumped alkali lasers is explored by extending the analytic, three-level model using longitudinally averaged number densities. By assuming a statistical distribution between the upper two levels, the limiting solution for the quasi-two level system is achieved. A second limiting solution is identified for strongly bleached conditions where the atom recycle rate, limited by spin-orbit relaxation, fully specifies the output power. Performance in the intermediate regime depends significantly on the pump bandwidth relative to the atomic absorption line width and requires numerical simulation. The ratio of populations for the two excited, 2P3/2,1/2 states completes an analytic solution and depends primarily on pump laser bandwidth, threshold, and alkali concentration. Absorption well into the wings on the atomic profile can be utilized by increasing alkali concentration, but imposes increased pump intensity threshold.

  5. PRESTO-II: a low-level waste environmental transport and risk assessment code

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.E.; Emerson, C.J.; Chester, R.O.; Little, C.A.; Hiromoto, G.

    1986-04-01

    PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed for the evaluation of possible health effects from shallow-land and, waste-disposal trenches. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal operations. Human exposure scenarios considered include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and limited site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include ground-water transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, suspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, external exposure, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Both population doses and individual doses, as well as doses to the intruder and farmer, may be calculated. Cumulative health effects in terms of cancer deaths are calculated for the population over the 1000-year period using a life-table approach. Data are included for three example sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. A code listing and example input for each of the three sites are included in the appendices to this report.

  6. Homemade Equipment for the Teaching of Electrochemistry at Advanced Level. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a detailed description for the construction of equipment needed to investigate acid/base equilibria through the measurement of pH and potentiometric titrations. Suggested experiments and calibration techniques are explained. This information helps to solve the problems of inadequate, expensive equipment required for A-level chemistry…

  7. Homemade Equipment for the Teaching of Electrochemistry at Advanced Level. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a detailed description for the construction of equipment needed to investigate acid/base equilibria through the measurement of pH and potentiometric titrations. Suggested experiments and calibration techniques are explained. This information helps to solve the problems of inadequate, expensive equipment required for A-level chemistry

  8. MARVEL: Measured active rotational-vibrational energy levels. II. Algorithmic improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Csszr, Attila G.

    2012-07-01

    When determining energy levels from several, in cases many, measured and assigned high-resolution molecular spectra according to the Ritz principle, it is advantageous to investigate the spectra via the concept of spectroscopic networks (SNs). Experimental SNs are finite, weighted, undirected, multiedge, rooted graphs, whereby the vertices are the energy levels, the edges are the transitions, and the weights are provided by transition intensities. A considerable practical problem arises from the fact that SNs can be very large for isotopologues of molecules widely studied; for example, the experimental dataset for the H2 16O molecule contains some 160,000 measured transitions and 20,000 energy levels. In order to treat such large SNs and extract the maximum amount of information from them, sophisticated algorithms are needed when inverting the transition data. To achieve numerical effectiveness, we found the following efficient algorithms applicable to very large SNs: reading the input data employs hash codes, building the components of the SN utilizes a recursive depth-first search algorithm, solving the linear least-squares problem is via the conjugate gradient method, and determination of the uncertainties of the energy levels takes advantage of the robust reweighting algorithm.

  9. A Definition of Achievement Level II in the Control of Spanish Syntax. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Clay Benjamin; Shawl, James Robert

    A third volume of a highly articulated set of language materials defines achievement level 2 in the control of Spanish syntax while providing descriptions and interrelationships of vital syntactic structures and expected student performance. The noun phrase, predicate phrase, verbal aspects, adverbials, relativization, noun modification,…

  10. Community-Based Career Guidance Practices. Vol. II--Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manatee Junior Coll., Bradenton, FL.

    This collection of eighty-six secondary level career guidance practices contains the following nine types of activities: novel practices such as games and role enactments, volunteering, field trips, special career emphases, intern/extern practices, work experience and exploration practices, exchanges, mobile practices, and educator in-services. A…

  11. Increased Serum Pepsinogen II Level as a Marker of Pangastritis and Corpus-Predominant Gastritis in Gastric Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Massarrat, Sadegh; Haj-Sheykholeslami, Arghavan

    2016-02-01

    Serum pepsinogen I and II are considered as indicators of changes in gastric morphology. Important publications from the last decades are reviewed with regard to the serum level of these biomarkers for the diagnosis of normal gastric mucosa, diffuse gastritis and its change to atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia as well as gastric cancer. Due to the low sensitivity of serum biomarkers for diagnosis of gastric cancer, especially at its early stage and the poor prognosis of the tumor at the time of diagnosis, its prevention by eradication of H. pylori remains the mandatory strategy. On the other hand, the severity of regression and non-reversibility of precancerous lesions and intestinal metaplasia in gastric mucosa through eradication of H. pylori make it necessary to diagnose diffuse gastritis at its early stage. Increased serum pepsinogen II compared to normal serum pepsinogen I seems to indicate the presence of diffuse gastritis without precancerous lesions suitable for eradication of H. pylori infection, when it is serologically positive. A diagram illustrates the strategy of this therapeutic measure depending on the age of people and the level of serum biomarkers in areas with high gastric cancer prevalence. PMID:26838085

  12. Exciton level structure and dynamics in the CP47 antenna complex of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.C.; Jankowiak, R.; Small, G.J. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA ); Yocum, C.F. ); Picorel, R. National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO ); Alfonso, M. ); Seibert, M. )

    1994-08-04

    Persistent nonphotochemical and population bottleneck hole-burning results obtained as a function of burn wavelength are reported for the CP47 proximal antenna protein complex of photosystem II. Attention is focused on the lower energy chlorophyll a Q[sub y] states. Results are presented for the CP47 complex from two preparations. The Chl a content per CP47 complex was determined, spectroscopically, to be 14 [+-] 2. On the basis of the analysis of the hole spectra and the 4.2 K static fluorescence spectrum, the lowest energy state of CP47 lies at 690 nm (fluorescence origin at 691 nm). The width of the weak 690-nm absorption band from inhomogeneous broadening is 100 cm[sup [minus]1]. The linear electron-phonon coupling of the 690-nm state is weak with a Huang-Rhys factor (S) of about 0.2 and a mean phonon frequency ([Omega][sub m]) of 120 cm[sup [minus]1], which explains why the Stokes shift (2S[Omega][sub m]) is so small. The 690-nm state is found to be excitonically correlated with a hitherto unobserved state at 687 nm. However, the combined absorption intensity of the 690- and 687-nm states was determined to be equivalent to only 1 Chl a molecule. Results are presented which illustrate that these two states are fragile (i.e., their associated chlorophyll a molecules are disrupted). Thus, it is possible that the correct number of Chl a molecules is 2, not 1. 53 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Selective solid-phase extraction and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) Ions in wastewater using diethylenetriamine-functionalized carbon nanotubes dispersed in graphene oxide colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangbing; Cui, Yuemei; Chang, Xijun; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) were dispersed in graphene oxide (GO) colloids to be further functionalized with diethylenetriamine (DETA), resulting in GO-MCNTs-DETA nanocomposites for the solid-phase extraction and analysis of Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions at the trace levels in wastewater. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) indicates that this new solid-phase sorbent could facilitate the maximum static adsorption capacities of 5.4, 13.8, 6.6 and 9.5mgg(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, showing the adsorption capacity up to 95% within about 30min. Moreover, the detection limits of the GO-MCNTs-DETA-based analysis method were found to be 0.16, 0.50, 0.24 and 0.38ngmL(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, with the relative standard deviation of lower than 3.0% (n=5). Importantly, common coexisting ions showed no significant interference on the separation and pre-concentration of these heavy metal ions at pH 4.0. Subsequently, the GO-MCNTs-DETA sorbent was successfully employed for the separation and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions in wastewater samples yielding 75-folds concentration factors. PMID:26695275

  14. Level II scour analysis for bridge 35 (BURKTH00310035) on Town Highway 31, crossing the West Branch Passumpsic River, Burke, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BURKTH00310035 on Town Highway 31 crossing the West Branch Passumpsic River, Burke, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  15. Differences in plasma TIMP-1 levels between healthy people and patients with rectal cancer stage II or III

    PubMed Central

    Oblak, Irena; Anderluh, Franc; Velenik, Vaneja; Mozina, Barbara; Ocvirk, Janja; Ciric, Eva; Podvrsnik, Natasa Hrovatic

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to analyse whether the levels of the tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) are higher in patients with rectal cancer as compared with healthy blood donors. Patients and methods. Two hundred and seventeen patients (147 male, 70 female) with histologically confirmed non-metastatic rectal cancer (clinical stage IIIII) and 45 healthy blood donors (15 male, 30 female) were included in analysis. Patients mean age was 66 years (range: 3487 years) and healthy blood donors mean age was 35 years (range: 1864 years). Plasma TIMP-1 concentrations were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using commercially available TIMP-1 ELISA kit. Mann-Whitney-test for independent groups was used to assess the differences of plasma TIMP-1 levels and clinicopathological parameters. Two-sided tests were used and the differences at P<0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results Median patients TIMP-1 level was 180 ng/mL (range: 22-538 ng/mL); the mean (SD) level was 193.7 (79.5) ng/mL. The median healthy blood donors TIMP-1 level was 112 ng/mL (range: 48-211 ng/mL); the mean (SD) level was 115 (35.7) ng/mL. TIMP-1 levels in patients with rectal cancer were statistically significantly higher than TIMP-1 levels in healthy blood donors (P<0.0001). Significant differences in TIMP-1 levels were not found comparing gender (P=0.43), but in both groups TIMP-1 levels were increased with higher age (P=0.007). Conclusions Patients with rectal cancer had statistically significantly higher mean and median TIMP-1 level than healthy blood donors which is in accordance with the results published in other publications. These findings suggest possibility that plasma TIMP-1 levels could be used as new biological markers for early cancer detection. PMID:22933958

  16. Low-Level Laser Irradiation Stimulates Tenocyte Migration with Up-Regulation of Dynamin II Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Lin, Miao-Sui; Chen, Ying-Hsun; Liang, Fang-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used to treat sports-related tendinopathy or tendon injury. Tendon healing requires tenocyte migration to the repair site, followed by proliferation and synthesis of the extracellular matrix. This study was designed to determine the effect of laser on tenocyte migration. Furthermore, the correlation between this effect and expression of dynamin 2, a positive regulator of cell motility, was also investigated. Tenocytes intrinsic to rat Achilles tendon were treated with low-level laser (660 nm with energy density at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 J/cm2). Tenocyte migration was evaluated by an in vitro wound healing model and by transwell filter migration assay. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were determined by reverse transcription/real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and Western blot analysis respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was used to evaluate the dynamin 2 expression in tenocytes. Tenocytes with or without laser irradiation was treated with dynasore, a dynamin competitor and then underwent transwell filter migration assay. In vitro wound model revealed that more tenocytes with laser irradiation migrated across the wound border to the cell-free zone. Transwell filter migration assay confirmed that tenocyte migration was enhanced dose-dependently by laser. Real-time PCR and Western-blot analysis demonstrated that mRNA and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were up-regulated by laser irradiation dose-dependently. Confocal microscopy showed that laser enhanced the expression of dynamin 2 in cytoplasm of tenocytes. The stimulation effect of laser on tenocytes migration was suppressed by dynasore. In conclusion, low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration in a process that is mediated by up-regulation of dynamin 2, which can be suppressed by dynasore. PMID:22666495

  17. Post-processing V&V Level II ASC Milestone (2843) results.

    SciTech Connect

    Karelitz, David B.; Ice, Lisa G.; Wilke, Jason; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Attaway, Stephen W.

    2008-10-01

    The 9/30/2008 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2843) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include fragment detection from CTH simulation data, fragment characterization and analysis, and fragment sorting and display operations. The capabilities were tested extensively both on sample and actual simulations. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including a comparison between simulated and test data, and the ability to output each fragment as an individual geometric file.

  18. Vacuum birefringence in strong magnetic fields: (II) Complex refractive index from the lowest Landau level

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Koichi; Itakura, Kazunori; Department of Particle and Nuclear Studies, Graduate University for Advanced Studies , 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801

    2013-07-15

    We compute the refractive indices of a photon propagating in strong magnetic fields on the basis of the analytic representation of the vacuum polarization tensor obtained in our previous paper. When the external magnetic field is strong enough for the fermion one-loop diagram of the polarization tensor to be approximated by the lowest Landau level, the propagating mode in parallel to the magnetic field is subject to modification: The refractive index deviates from unity and can be very large, and when the photon energy is large enough, the refractive index acquires an imaginary part indicating decay of a photon into a fermion–antifermion pair. We study dependences of the refractive index on the propagating angle and the magnetic-field strength. It is also emphasized that a self-consistent treatment of the equation which defines the refractive index is indispensable for accurate description of the refractive index. This self-consistent treatment physically corresponds to consistently including the effects of back reactions of the distorted Dirac sea in response to the incident photon. -- Highlights: •Vacuum birefringence and photon decay are described by the complex refractive index. •Resummed photon vacuum polarization tensor in the lowest Landau level is used. •Back reactions from the distorted Dirac sea are self-consistently taken into account. •Self-consistent treatment drastically changes structure in photon energy dependence. •Dependences on photon propagation angle and magnetic-field strength are presented.

  19. The FERRUM project: Experimental lifetimes and transition probabilities from highly excited even 4d levels in Fe ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report lifetime measurements of the 6 levels in the 3d6(5D)4d e6G term in Fe ii at an energy of 10.4 eV, and f-values for 14 transitions from the investigated levels. The lifetimes were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions in a laser-produced plasma. The high excitation energy, and the fact that the levels have the same parity as the the low-lying states directly populated in the plasma, necessitated the use of a two-photon excitation scheme. The probability for this process is greatly enhanced by the presence of the 3d6(5D)4p z6F levels at roughly half the energy difference. The f-values are obtained by combining the experimental lifetimes with branching fractions derived using relative intensities from a hollow cathode discharge lamp recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer. The data is important for benchmarking atomic calculations of astrophysically important quantities and useful for spectroscopy of hot stars.

  20. Pyrene-Anderson-Modified CNTs as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lujiang; Hu, Jun; Ji, Yuanchun; Streb, Carsten; Song, Yu-Fei

    2015-12-14

    An organo-functionalized polyoxometalate (POM)-pyrene hybrid (Py-Anderson) has been used for noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to give a Py-Anderson-CNT nanocomposite through ?-? interactions. The as-synthesized nanocomposite was used as the anode material for lithium-ion batteries, and shows higher discharge capacities and better rate capacity and cycling stability than the individual components. When the current density was 0.5?mA?cm(-2) , the nanocomposite exhibited an initial discharge capacity of 1898.5?mA?h?g(-1) and a high discharge capacity of 665.3?mA?h?g(-1) for up to 100 cycles. AC impedance spectroscopy provides insight into the electrochemical properties and the charge-transfer mechanism of the Py-Anderson-CNTs electrode. PMID:26538031

  1. Elevated high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels correlate with decreased apolipoprotein A-I and A-II fractional catabolic rate in women.

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, E A; Eisenberg, S; Breslow, J L

    1989-01-01

    High levels of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) protect against coronary heart disease susceptibility, but the metabolic mechanisms underlying elevated HDL-C levels are poorly understood. We now report the turnover of isologous radioiodinated HDL apolipoproteins, apo A-I and apo A-II, in 15 female subjects on a metabolic diet with HDL-C levels ranging from 51 to 122 mg/dl. The metabolic parameters, fractional catabolic rate (FCR) and absolute synthetic rate (SR), were determined for apo A-I and apo A-II in all subjects. There was an inverse correlation between plasma HDL-C and the FCR of apo A-I and apo A-II (r = -0.75, P less than 0.001, and r = -0.54, P = 0.036, respectively), but no correlation with the SR of either apo A-I or apo A-II (r = 0.09, and r = -0.16, respectively, both P = NS). Apo A-I levels correlated inversely with apo A-I FCR (r = -0.64, P = 0.01) but not with apo A-I SR (r = 0.30, P = NS). In contrast, plasma levels of apo A-II did not correlate with apo A-II FCR (r = -0.38, P = 0.16), but did correlate with apo A-II SR (r = 0.65, P = 0.009). Further analysis showed that apo A-I and apo A-II FCR were inversely correlated with the HDL-C/apo A-I + A-II ratio (r = -0.69 and -0.61, P = 0.005 and 0.015, respectively). These data suggest that: (a) low HDL apolipoprotein FCR is the predominant metabolic mechanism of elevated HDL-C levels; (b) apo A-I FCR is the primary factor in controlling plasma apo A-I levels, but apo A-II SR is the primary factor controlling plasma apo A-II levels; (c) low HDL apolipoprotein FCR is associated with a lipid-rich HDL fraction. These findings elucidate aspects of HDL metabolism which contribute to high HDL-C levels and which may constitute mechanisms for protection against coronary heart disease. PMID:2500457

  2. Molecular characterization and expression analyses of ST8Sia II and IV in piglets during postnatal development: lack of correlation between transcription and posttranslational levels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Nai; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Fengjun; Liu, Ni; Lv, Chunlong; Troy, Frederic A; Wang, Bing

    2015-12-01

    The two mammalian ?2,8-polysialyltransferases (polyST's), ST8Sia II (STX) and ST8Sia IV (PST), catalyze synthesis of the ?2-8-linked polysialic acid (polySia) glycans on neural cell adhesion molecules (NCAMs). The objective of this study was to clone the coding sequence of the piglet ST8Sia II and determine the mRNA expression levels of ST8Sia II, ST8Sia IV, NCAM and neuropilin-2 (NRP-2), also a carrier protein of polySia, during postnatal development. The amino acid sequence deduced from the coding sequence of ST8Sia II was compared with seven other mammalian species. Piglet ST8Sia II was highly conserved and shared 67.8% sequence identity with ST8Sia IV. Genes coding for ST8Sia II and IV were differentially expressed and distinctly different in neural and non-neural tissues at postnatal days 3 and 38. Unexpectedly, the cellular levels of mRNA coding for ST8Sia II and IV showed no correlation with the posttranslational level of polySia glycans in different tissues. In contrast, mRNA abundance coding for NCAM and neuropilin-2 correlated with expression of ST8Sia II and IV. These findings show that the cellular abundance of ST8Sia II and IV in postnatal piglets is regulated at the level of translation/posttranslation, and not at the level of transcription, a finding that has not been previously reported. These studies further highlight differences in the molecular mechanisms controlling polysialylation in adult rodents and neonatal piglets. PMID:26452605

  3. Use of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles for enhanced interlibrary loan, part II: Network application.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, V M; Dell, E Y

    1993-01-01

    The Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery, and Union List Task Force of the Health Sciences Libraries Consortium (HSLC) accepted the charge of maximizing use of the advanced features of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles. A pilot project was initiated to address the task force's recommendation to the HSLC Board that all nonrush interlibrary loan (ILL) documents be transmitted to participants within forty-eight hours of request receipt. This paper describes the project, which tests a network application for unattended, overnight transmission of documents. In determining whether this technology could be used as the primary medium for ILL of photocopies, the following criteria were used: the percentage of ILL requests filled by telefacsimile; the speed, quality, and reliability of service; and the impact of telefacsimile on document delivery costs. The article discusses the project history, optimal use of equipment features for library applications, full-scale implementation, and operational issues that affect ILL policy. PMID:8374580

  4. Post-processing V&V level II ASC milestone (2360) results.

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Elmer; Karelitz, David B.; Brunner, Thomas A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Weirs, V. Gregory; Shead, Timothy M.

    2007-09-01

    The 9/30/2007 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2360) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include loading of edge and face data on an Exodus mesh, run-time computation of an exact solution to a verification problem, delivery of results data from the server to the client, computation of an integral-based error metric, simultaneous loading of simulation and test data, and comparison of that data using visual and quantitative methods. The capabilities were tested extensively by performing a typical ALEGRA HEDP verification task. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including completion of a verification task on a 13 million element mesh.

  5. Frequency response testing at Experimental Breeder Reactor II using discrete-level periodic signals

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, W.D.; Larson, H.A. . Coll. of Engineering); Dean, E.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-2) reactivity-to-power frequency-response function was measured with pseudo-random, discrete-level, periodic signals. The reactor power deviation was small with insignificant perturbation of normal operation and in-place irradiation experiments. Comparison of results with measured rod oscillator data and with theoretical predictions show good agreement. Moreover, measures of input signal quality (autocorrelation function and energy spectra) confirm the ability to enable this type of frequency response determination at EBR-2. Measurements were made with the pseudo-random binary sequence, quadratic residue binary sequence, pseudo-random ternary sequence, and the multifrequency binary sequence. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Modular data and Verlinde formulae for fractional level WZW models II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutzig, Thomas; Ridout, David

    2013-10-01

    This article gives a complete account of the modular properties and Verlinde formula for conformal field theories based on the affine Kac-Moody algebra sl(2) at an arbitrary admissible level k. Starting from spectral flow and the structure theory of relaxed highest weight modules, characters are computed and modular transformations are derived for every irreducible admissible module. The culmination is the application of a continuous version of the Verlinde formula to deduce non-negative integer structure coefficients which are identified with Grothendieck fusion coefficients. The Grothendieck fusion rules are determined explicitly. These rules reproduce the well-known "fusion rules" of Koh and Sorba, negative coefficients included, upon quotienting the Grothendieck fusion ring by a certain ideal.

  7. Use of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles for enhanced interlibrary loan, part II: Network application.

    PubMed

    Bennett, V M; Dell, E Y

    1993-07-01

    The Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery, and Union List Task Force of the Health Sciences Libraries Consortium (HSLC) accepted the charge of maximizing use of the advanced features of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles. A pilot project was initiated to address the task force's recommendation to the HSLC Board that all nonrush interlibrary loan (ILL) documents be transmitted to participants within forty-eight hours of request receipt. This paper describes the project, which tests a network application for unattended, overnight transmission of documents. In determining whether this technology could be used as the primary medium for ILL of photocopies, the following criteria were used: the percentage of ILL requests filled by telefacsimile; the speed, quality, and reliability of service; and the impact of telefacsimile on document delivery costs. The article discusses the project history, optimal use of equipment features for library applications, full-scale implementation, and operational issues that affect ILL policy. PMID:8374580

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 23 (WALDTH00060023) on Town Highway 6, crossing Stannard Brook, Walden, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WALDTH00060023 on Town Highway 6 crossing Stannard Brook, Walden, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in eastern Vermont. The 5.61-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the upstream surface cover is shrub and brushland with some trees. The downstream surface cover is forest. In the study area, Stannard Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 54 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 64.0 mm (0.210 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 8, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 6 crossing of Stannard Brook is a 59-ft-long (bottom width), two-lane pipe arch culvert consisting of one 22-foot corrugated plate pipe arch span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 21.9 ft.The pipe arch is supported by vertical, concrete kneewalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream end of the right kneewall during the Level I assessment. There was also a scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth observed along the downstream end of the left kneewall. The scour counter measures at the site included type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream and downstream end of the left and right kneewall. There was also type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and kneewalls). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 2.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge, which was greater than the 100-year discharge. Left kneewall scour ranged from 11.7 to 16.8 ft. The worst-case left kneewall scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right kneewall scour ranged from 13.7 to 16.7 ft. The worst-case right kneewall scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. During the Level I survey ledge was discovered at the upstream end of the right abutment. The ledge in the channel may limit scour depths. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment/ kneewall scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 6 (FAYSTH00010006) on Town Highway 1, crossing Shepard Brook, Fayston, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Flynn, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure FAYSTH00010006 on Town Highway 1 crossing Shepard Brook, Fayston, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Shepard Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 56 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 72.6 mm (0.238 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 2, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Shepard Brook is a 42-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 40-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 39.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the calculated opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. Scour, 2.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth, was observed along the right abutment during the Level I assessment. The left abutment is undermined along the base of the footing. In addition, 1.5 ft of scour was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left bank upstream and type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.9 to 3.9 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year. Abutment scour ranged from 11.1 to 17.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 19

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 29 (HUNTTH00290029) on Town Highway 29, crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00290029 on Town Highway 29 crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 4.16-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream and downstream of the bridge. In the study area, Cobb Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.024 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 53 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 112.0 mm (0.367 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 29 crossing of Cobb Brook is a 36-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 11, 1995) and a wooden deck. The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 27 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway was measured to be 20 degrees. VTAOT records indicate an opening-skew-to-roadway of zero degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed extending from 12 ft upstream of the upstream end of the left abutment to 10 ft under the bridge in the center of the channel during the Level I assessment. Another scour hole approximately 1.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream end of the right abutment during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream end of the right abutment and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the upstream end of the upstream left retaining wall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was computed to be zero ft. Abutment scour ranged from 9.9 to 12.5 ft along the left abutment and from 6.2 to 8.6 ft along the right abutment. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  11. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid and blood plasma levels of IGF-II and its binding proteins in Alzheimers disease: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-related system is implicated in neuroregeneration and cell repair, as well as regulating lifespan. IGF-II, one component of this system, has also been found to affect memory functions in a rat model. In this study we explored changes in the IGF-related system in patients with Alzheimers disease (AD), including changes in IGF-II levels. Methods We measured blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 in 72 healthy controls and 92 patients with AD. Results We found significantly lower blood plasma levels of IGF-II and IGFBP-3 in patients with AD, compared with controls. The levels of IGF-II and IGFBP-2 were significantly elevated in the CSF from patients with AD. We also found correlations between established CSF biomarkers for AD (tau and P-tau) and components of the IGF system. Conclusions CSF and blood plasma levels of IGF-II and some of its binding proteins are changed in patients with AD. Further investigation into this area may unravel important clues to the nature of this disease. PMID:24685003

  12. Effect of Aloe vera leaves on blood glucose level in type I and type II diabetic rat models.

    PubMed

    Okyar, A; Can, A; Akev, N; Baktir, G; Stlpinar, N

    2001-03-01

    Aloe vera (L.) Burm. fil. (= A. barbadensis Miller) (Liliaceae) is native to North Africa and also cultivated in Turkey. Aloes have long been used all over the world for their various medicinal properties. In the past 15 years, there have been controversial reports on the hypoglycaemic activity of Aloe species, probably due to differences in the parts of the plant used or to the model of diabetes chosen. In this study, separate experiments on three main groups of rats, namely, non-diabetic (ND), type I (IDDM) and type II (NIDDM) diabetic rats were carried out. A. vera leaf pulp and gel extracts were ineffective on lowering the blood sugar level of ND rats. A. vera leaf pulp extract showed hypoglycaemic activity on IDDM and NIDDM rats, the effectiveness being enhanced for type II diabetes in comparison with glibenclamide. On the contrary, A. vera leaf gel extract showed hyperglycaemic activity on NIDDM rats. It may therefore be concluded that the pulps of Aloe vera leaves devoid of the gel could be useful in the treatment of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus PMID:11268118

  13. Microporous Cd(II) metal-organic framework as fluorescent sensor for nitroaromatic explosives at the sub-ppm level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Po; Han, Lu-Lu; Wang, Zhi; Guo, Ling-Yu; Sun, Di

    2016-03-01

    A novel Cd(II) metal-organic framework (MOF) based on a rigid biphenyltetracarboxylic acid, [Cd4(bptc)2(DMA)4(H2O)2·4DMA] (1) was successfully synthesized under the solvothermal condition and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and further consolidated by elemental analyses, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), infrared spectra (IR) and luminescent measurements. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that compound 1 is 4-connected PtS (Point symbol: {42·84}) network based on [Cd2(COO)4] secondary building units (SBUs). Its inherent porous and emissive characteristics make them to be a suitable fluorescent probe to sense small solvents and nitroaromatic explosives. Compound 1 shows obviously solvent-dependent emissive behaviors, especially for acetone with very high fluorescence quenching effect. Moreover, compound 1 displays excellent sensing of nitroaromatic explosives at sub-ppm level, giving a detection limit of 0.43 ppm and 0.37 ppm for nitrobenzene (NB) and p-nitrotoluene (PNT), respectively. This shows this Cd(II) MOF can be used as fluorescence probe for the detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

  14. Signatures of Anderson localization in the ionization rates of periodically driven Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimberger, Sandro; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2001-09-01

    We provide a statistical characterization of the ionization yield of one-dimensional, periodically driven Rydberg states of atomic hydrogen, in the spirit of Anderson localization theory. We find excellent agreement with predictions for the conductance across an Anderson localized, quasi-one-dimensional, disordered wire, in the semiclassical limit of highly excited atomic initial states. For the moderate atomic excitations typically encountered in state of the art laboratory experiments, finite-size effects induce significant deviations from the solid state picture. However, large-scale fluctuations of the atomic conductance prevail and are robust when averaged over a finite interval of driving field amplitudes, as inevitably done in the experiment.

  15. Anderson localization of a Tonks-Girardeau gas in potentials with controlled disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Radic, J.; Bacic, V.; Jukic, D.; Buljan, H.; Segev, M.

    2010-06-15

    We theoretically demonstrate features of Anderson localization in a Tonks-Girardeau gas confined in one-dimensional potentials with controlled disorder. That is, we investigate the evolution of the single-particle density and correlations of a Tonks-Girardeau wave packet in such disordered potentials. The wave packet is initially trapped, the trap is suddenly turned off, and after some time the system evolves into a localized steady state due to Anderson localization. The density tails of the steady state decay exponentially, while the coherence in these tails increases. The latter phenomenon corresponds to the same effect found in incoherent optical solitons.

  16. Entanglement Area Law in Disordered Free Fermion Anderson Model in One, Two, and Three Dimensions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pouranvari, Mohammad; Zhang, Yuhui; Yang, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We calculate numerically the entanglement entropy of free fermion ground states in one-, two-, and three-dimensional Anderson models and find that it obeys the area law as long as the linear size of the subsystem is sufficiently larger than the mean free path. This result holds in the metallic phase of the three-dimensional Anderson model, where the mean free path is finite although the localization length is infinite. Relation between the present results and earlier ones on area law violation in special one-dimensional models that support metallic phases is discussed.

  17. Frontal Plane Motion of the Pelvis and Hip during Gait Stance Discriminates Children with Diplegia Levels I and II of the GMFCS

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, Renata Noce; Franco, Rosa de Lourdes Lima Dias; Furtado, Sheyla Cavalcanti; Barela, Ana Maria Forti; Deluzio, Kevin John; Mancini, Marisa Cotta

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine if gait waveform could discriminate children with diplegic cerebral palsy of the GMFCS levels I and II. Patients. Twenty-two children with diplegia, 11 classified as level I and 11 as level II of the GMFCS, aged 7 to 12 years. Methods. Gait kinematics included angular displacement of the pelvis and lower limb joints during the stance phase. Principal components (PCs) analyses followed by discriminant analysis were conducted. Results. PC1s of the pelvis and hip in the frontal plane differ significantly between groups and captured 80.5% and 86.1% of the variance, respectively. PC1s captured the magnitude of the pelvic obliquity and hip adduction angle during the stance phase. Children GMFCS level II walked with reduced pelvic obliquity and hip adduction angles, and these variables could discriminate the groups with a cross-validation of 95.5%. Conclusion. Reduced pelvic obliquity and hip adduction were observed between children GMFCS level II compared to level I. These results could help the classification process of mild-to-moderate children with diplegia. In addition, it highlights the importance of rehabilitation programs designed to improve pelvic and hip mobility in the frontal plane of diplegic cerebral palsy children level II of the GMFCS. PMID:22792478

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 53 (CAMBTH00750053) on Town Highway 75, crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00750053 on Town Highway 75 crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 4.30-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest, except for the downstream right overbank area which has a barn surrounded by grass and shrubs. In the study area, the Brewster River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.05 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 84.4 mm (0.277 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 75 crossing of the Brewster River is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway as surveyed is 10 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream left wingwall. There was also type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) along the downstream end of the downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.1 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 10.7 to 17.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 6 (MORRTH00030006) on Town Highway 3, crossing Ryder Brook, Morristown, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MORRTH00030006 on Town Highway 3 crossing Ryder Brook, Morristown, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north-central Vermont. The 19.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover also is forested. In the study area, Ryder Brook has a straight channel with an average channel top width of 450 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The predominant channel bed material is silt and clay with a median grain size (D50) of 0.0719 mm (0.000236 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 18, 1996, indicated that the reach was aggraded, but the channel through the bridge was scoured. The Town Highway 3 crossing of Ryder Brook is a 72-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 70-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, January 31, 1996). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through embankments and wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. Channel scour under the bridge was evident at this site during the Level I assessment. The depth of the channel increases from 3 feet at the upstream bridge face to 10 feet at the downstream bridge face. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on the spill-through embankments of each abutment, the upstream road embankments and the downstream left road embankment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 20.4 to 25.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.3 to 10.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 44 (CHESVT00110044) on State Route 11, crossing Andover Brook, Chester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESVT00110044 on State Route 11 crossing Andover Brook, Chester, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 12.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture with dense woody vegetation on the immediate banks except the downstream left bank of the bridge which is forested. In the study area, Andover Brook has an incised, meandering channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 74 ft and an average bank height of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 83.6 mm (0.274 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 11, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The State Route 11 crossing of Andover Brook is a 58-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 56-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 52.9 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. A scour hole 1.8 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream left wingwall and left abutment during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site included type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) along the upstream left bank between the wingwall and a concrete wall. There was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the entire base of the upstream left wingwall, and the downstream end of the downstream right wingwall. There was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream end of the downstream left wingwall. There was also a concrete wall along the upstream left bank from 18 to 50 ft upstream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge. The incipientovertopping discharge is 520 cfs less than the 100-year discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 16.4 to 20.9 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 8.4 to 9.4 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at both the 100-year and 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 26 (WSTOTH00070026) on Town Highway 7, crossing Greendale Brook, Weston, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Hammond, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WSTOTH00070026 on Town Highway 7 crossing Greendale Brook, Weston, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south central Vermont. The 3.13-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, the Greendale Brook has a sinuous, non-incised, non-alluvial channel with a slope of approximately 0.015 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 38 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 64.8 mm (0.213 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 19, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The channel has moved to the right, however, scour countermeasures are in place along the upstream right bank. The Town Highway 7 crossing of the Greendale Brook is a 52-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 50-foot steel-beam span with a concrete deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, April 07, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 48.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right wingwall and right abutment during the Level I assessment. Scour protection measures at the site include: type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall, along the left bank upstream, at the downstream end of the downstream left wing wall, and along the entire length of the downstream right wing wall; type 4 (less than 60 inches) and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches) along the right bank upstream. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 3.9 to 9.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). The Hire equation (abutment scour) is often used when the horizontal length blocked by flow divided by the depth of flow is greater than 25 (Richardson and others, 1995 p. 49). Although the Hire equation could be applied to the left abutment more conservative scour estimates were given by the Froehlich equation on the left abutment. Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 4 (MAIDTH00070004) on Town Highway 7, crossing Cutler Mill Brook, Maidstone, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MAIDTH00070004 on Town Highway 7 crossing the Cutler Mill Brook, Maidstone, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 18.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly shrub and brushland. In the study area, the Cutler Mill Brook has a non-incised, meandering channel with local braiding and a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 2 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 27.6 mm (0.091 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 19, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to large meanders in the channel. The Town Highway 7 crossing of the Cutler Mill Brook is a 25-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 22-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 5, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 21.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. A scour hole 2.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along both banks upstream, along the entire base length of the upstream left wingwall, and along the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge was determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 2.2 to 4.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 5.7 to 12.4 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 21 (MORETH00010021) on Town Highway 1, crossing Cox Brook, Moretown, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MORETH00010021 on Town Highway 1 crossing Cox Brook, Moretown, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north-central Vermont. The 2.85-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly forested. In the study area, Cox Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 23 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 47.5 mm (0.156 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 18, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Cox Brook is a 29-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 27-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 40 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment downstream during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the left bank upstream. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100-year and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 2.8 to 4.0 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the left abutment at the 100-year discharge and at the right abutment at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information inclu

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 18 (GROTTH00480018) on Town Highway 48, crossing the Wells River Groton, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure GROTTH00480018 on Town Highway 48 crossing the Wells River, Groton, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in eastern Vermont. The 53.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the right bank upstream and the left bank downstream while the surface cover is shrub and brushland along the left bank upstream and the right bank downstream. The immediate banks are vegetated with brush and scattered trees. In the study area, the Wells River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 69 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 66.7 mm (0.219 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 28, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 48 crossing of the Wells River is a 38-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 36-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 33.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 0 degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-toroadway is also 0 degrees. Local scour 3.25 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed underneath the bridge along the left and right abutments during the Level I assessment. In addition, a scour hole extends from 90 ft US to 50 ft DS for a total length of 115 ft with an average scour depth of 2.0 ft. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the left bank upstream, along the entire base length of the downstream right wingwall, and along the left and right banks downstream; and type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 2.0 to 2.3 ft at the left abutment and 8.8 to 14.6 ft at the right abutment. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge at the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 31 (HUNTTH00220031) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220031 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, obtained from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 5.01-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of trees and brush. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.06 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 44 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from boulder to gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 107.0 mm (0.352 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 34-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot steel I-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 31.2 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. The VTAOT computed opening-skewto-roadway is 2 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed at the downstream end of the left abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was computed to be zero ft. Abutment scour ranged from 7.0 to 10.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the left abutment and at the incipient-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  6. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 32 (HUNTTH00220032) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220032 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 5.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right overbank which is pasture. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.05 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 58 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 127 mm (0.416 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 36-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 34-foot steel-beam span and a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 12, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 35.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls on the left. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment and downstream left wingwall during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.4 to 10.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  7. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 68 (NFIETH00960068) on Town Highway 96, crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NFIETH00960068 on Town Highway 96 crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 30.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The right bank upstream is forested and the downstream right bank is pasture. Vermont state route 12A runs parallel to the river on the right bank. In the study area, the Dog River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 70 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 47.9 mm (0.157 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 96 crossing of the Dog River is a 45-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 43-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 41.5 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. Channel scour 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth, was observed under the bridge during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left bank upstream and type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream and downstream right banks that extends partially in front of the right wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.8 to 1.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 8.5 to 12.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 5C (CORITH0003005C) on Town Highway 3, crossing Cooksville Brook, Corinth, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Severance, Tim

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CORITH0003005C on Town Highway 3 crossing Cooksville Brook, Corinth, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 20.2-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture with a residence on the upstream right bank near the bridge. The immediate channel banks have some woody vegetation cover. In the study area, Cooksville Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 46 ft and an average channel depth of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranged from sand to cobble and had a median grain size (D50) of 41.0 mm (0.135 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 5, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 3 crossing of Cooksville Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 37-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 17, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls on the left abutment. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measures at the site were type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream and downstream ends of the right abutment and type-4 (less than 60 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank below the residence. Also, there is a wall along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 2.7 to 3.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 7.0 to 19.0 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 2 (RYEGTH00020002) on Town Highway 2, crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure RYEGTH00020002 on Town Highway 2 crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 75.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of cut grass, trees, and brush on the flood plains while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Wells River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.006 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 110 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 82.3 mm (0.270 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 24, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable with moderate fluvial erosion and meandering downstream of the bridge. The Town Highway 2 crossing of the Wells River is a 79-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 75-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 27, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 75.1 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments, the left has a spill-through embankment, with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 3 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed in the channel from upstream and through the bridge during the Level I assessment. The scour protection counter-measures at the site included type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) along the base of the left abutment forming a spill-through embankment. There was also type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream right wingwall, the upstream right bank and downstream left bank. There was a stone wall along the upstream left bank extending 130 ft from the bridge. In addition there was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the downstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was zero. Abutment scour ranged from 7.1 to 11.4 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-si

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 26 (ROYATH00540026) on Town Highway 54, crossing Broad Brook, Royalton, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROYATH00540026 on Town Highway 54 crossing Broad Brook, Royalton, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 11.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture with trees and brush on the immediate banks. The right bank, upstream and downstream of the bridge, is forested. In the study area, Broad Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 37 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 66.3 mm (0.218 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 13, 1995 and the Level II site visit on July 11, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 54 crossing of Broad Brook is a 29-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.3 ft. The bridge is supported by a vertical, concrete face laid-up stone abutment with concrete wingwalls on the left and a laid-up stone abutment on the right. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream end of the right abutment during the Level I assessment. Also, at the upstream end of the left abutment, the footing is exposed 0.5 ft. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left bank, at the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall, along the entire length of the downstream left wingwall, and at the upstream end of the right abutment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 2.2 to 7.4 ft on the left and from 14.7 to 17.7 ft on the right. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge for the left and at the 500-year discharge for the right. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is prese

  11. I.I. Rabi Prize Talk: Artificial gauge fields in multi-level atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielman, Ian

    2015-05-01

    We used Raman lasers to induce artificial gauge fields or spin-orbit coupling in the three-level system formed by the f=1 electronic ground state manifold of rubidium-87. In this colloquium I will report on two effects of this laser-coupling. I will explore the itinerant magnetic phases present in a spin-1 spin-orbit coupled atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC); in this system, itinerant ferromagnetic order is stabilized by the spin-orbit coupling, vanishing in its absence. We first located a second-order phase transition that continuously stiffens until, at a tricritical point, it transforms into a first-order transition. These measurements are all in agreement with theory. We engineered a two-dimensional magnetic lattice in an elongated strip geometry, with effective per-plaquette flux about 4/3 times the flux quanta. We imaged the localized edge and bulk states of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in this strip, with single lattice-site resolution along the narrow direction. Further, we observed both the skipping orbits of excited atoms traveling down our system's edges, analogues to edge magnetoplasmons in 2-D electron systems. Our lattice's long direction consisted of the sites of an optical lattice and its narrow direction consisted of the internal atomic spin states: a synthetic dimension.

  12. The level and nature of autistic intelligence II: what about Asperger syndrome?

    PubMed

    Soulires, Isabelle; Dawson, Michelle; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Mottron, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    A distinctively uneven profile of intelligence is a feature of the autistic spectrum. Within the spectrum, Asperger individuals differ from autistics in their early speech development and in being less likely to be characterized by visuospatial peaks. While different specific strengths characterize different autistic spectrum subgroups, all such peaks of ability have been interpreted as deficits: isolated, aberrant, and irreconcilable with real human intelligence. This view has recently been challenged by findings of autistic strengths in performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), an important marker of general and fluid intelligence. We investigated whether these findings extend to Asperger syndrome, an autistic spectrum subgroup characterized by verbal peaks of ability, and whether the cognitive mechanisms underlying autistic and Asperger RPM performance differ. Thirty-two Asperger adults displayed a significant advantage on RPM over Wechsler Full-Scale and Performance scores relative to their typical controls, while in 25 Asperger children an RPM advantage was found over Wechsler Performance scores only. As previously found with autistics, Asperger children and adults achieved RPM scores at a level reflecting their Wechsler peaks of ability. Therefore, strengths in RPM performance span the autistic spectrum and imply a common mechanism advantageously applied to different facets of cognition. Autistic spectrum intelligence is atypical, but also genuine, general, and underestimated. PMID:21991394

  13. The Level and Nature of Autistic Intelligence II: What about Asperger Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Soulières, Isabelle; Dawson, Michelle; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Mottron, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    A distinctively uneven profile of intelligence is a feature of the autistic spectrum. Within the spectrum, Asperger individuals differ from autistics in their early speech development and in being less likely to be characterized by visuospatial peaks. While different specific strengths characterize different autistic spectrum subgroups, all such peaks of ability have been interpreted as deficits: isolated, aberrant, and irreconcilable with real human intelligence. This view has recently been challenged by findings of autistic strengths in performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), an important marker of general and fluid intelligence. We investigated whether these findings extend to Asperger syndrome, an autistic spectrum subgroup characterized by verbal peaks of ability, and whether the cognitive mechanisms underlying autistic and Asperger RPM performance differ. Thirty-two Asperger adults displayed a significant advantage on RPM over Wechsler Full-Scale and Performance scores relative to their typical controls, while in 25 Asperger children an RPM advantage was found over Wechsler Performance scores only. As previously found with autistics, Asperger children and adults achieved RPM scores at a level reflecting their Wechsler peaks of ability. Therefore, strengths in RPM performance span the autistic spectrum and imply a common mechanism advantageously applied to different facets of cognition. Autistic spectrum intelligence is atypical, but also genuine, general, and underestimated. PMID:21991394

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (CHESVT01030016) on State Route 103, crossing the Williams River, Chester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESVT01030016 on State Route 103 crossing the Williams River, Chester, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 15.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture except for the downstream right overbank which is forested. In the study area, the Williams River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.008 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 56 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 67.5 mm (0.222 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 16, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The State Route 103 crossing of the Williams River is a 162-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of three steel-beam spans (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 157.7 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments and piers with no wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 55 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is also 55 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) along the upstream left bank. There was type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank and both spill-through embankments and both downstream banks. There was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the upstream right and downstream left road embankments. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0. Abutment scour ranged from 6.4 to 9.0 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Pier scour ranged from 7.9 to 10.1 ft. The worst-case pier scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge for both piers. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 45 (BRNETH00070045) on Town Highway 7, crossing the Stevens River, Barnet, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRNETH00070045 on Town Highway 7 crossing the Stevens River, Barnet, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 41.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream and pasture downstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Stevens River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 100 ft and an average bank height of 17 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 105 mm (0.344 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 22, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 7 crossing of the Stevens River is a 37-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 34-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 16, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 33 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 20 degrees. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the entire left and right abutments, upstream and downstream wingwalls, and upstream and downstream banks. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.8 to 5.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge, which was greater than the 100-year discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 21.8 to 28.6 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 14.6 to 17.4 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (TOPSTH00570038) on Town Highway 57, crossing Waits River, Topsham, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure TOPSTH00570038 on Town Highway 57 crossing the Waits River, Topsham, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east central Vermont. The 37.3-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly pasture while the left bank upstream is suburban. In the study area, the Waits River has a sinuous locally anabranched channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 76 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 57.2 mm (0.188 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 28, 1995, indicated that the reach was considered laterally unstable due to cut-banks upstream, mid-channel bars and lateral migration of the channel towards the left abutment. The Town Highway 34 crossing of the Waits River is a 34-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.4 ft. The bridge is supported by a vertical, stone abutment with concrete facing and wingwalls on the right and by a vertical, concrete abutment with wingwalls on the left. The channel is skewed approximately 0 degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is also zero degrees. A scour hole 2.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed towards the left bank underneath the bridge. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the left bank upstream, in the upstream left wing wall area, along the left abutment, at the downstream end of the right abutment, and in the downstream left wing wall area. There is type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) in the downstream right wing wall area. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.6 to 5.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 9.8 to 18.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30 (BRIDTH00330030) on Town Highway 33, crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00330030 on town highway 33 crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 7.51-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Branch has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 45 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 60.7 mm (0.199 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 33 crossing of Dailey Hollow Branch is a 31-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Type-2 stone-fill (less than 36 inches diameter) protection was found at all four wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.5 to 3.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge, which is between the 100- and 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.9 to 14.6 ft. with the worst-case scenario also occurring at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (HUNTTH00220033) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220033 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 8.65-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right overbank which is pasture. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 42 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 76.7 mm (0.252 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 26, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 40-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 23.5-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 36.9 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. The scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the left and right banks upstream that extended through the bridge and along the downstream banks. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is analyzed since it has the potential of being the worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.5 to 14.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 34 (HUNTTH00210034) on Town Highway 21, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00210034 on Town Highway 21 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 6.23-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 90.0 mm (0.295 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 26, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 21 crossing of Brush Brook is a 28-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 26-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 25.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with a wingwall on the upstream right. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening and the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 5 degrees. A tributary enters Brush Brook on the right bank immediately downstream of the bridge. At the confluence, the left bank of Brush Brook is eroded and there is a small void under the downstream end of the left abutment footing which is completely exposed. The right abutment footing is also exposed. The scour countermeasures at the site include type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream banks and in front of the right abutment and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream right wingwall and along the downstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.9 to 10.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (PFRDTH00030013) on Town Highway 3, crossing Furnace Brook, Pittsford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure PFRDTH00030013 on Town Highway 3 crossing Furnace Brook, Pittsford, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Taconic section of the New England physiographic province in western Vermont. The 17.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is grass along the downstream right bank while the remaining banks are primarily forested. In the study area, Furnace Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 49 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 70.2 mm (0.230 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 20, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 3 crossing of Furnace Brook is a 75-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 72-ft-long steel stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 14, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through slopes. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 35 degrees. The opening-skew-to-roadway was determined from surveyed data collected at the bridge although, information provided from the VTAOT files, indicates that the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees (Appendix D). The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on the spill-through slope along each abutment. Type-2 stone fill scour protection was also found along the upstream left wingwall and downstream right wingwall. Type-1 (less than 12 inches diameter) stone fill scour protection was found along the upstream right wingwall and downstream left wingwall. No bank protection was observed downstream or upstream. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.2 to 2.0 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 7.8 to 13.1 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution although, bedrock outcropping is apparent both upstream and downstream of this bridge. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives e

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 43 (CHELTH00460043) on Town Highway 46, crossing Jail Brook, Chelsea, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHELTH00460043 on Town Highway 46 crossing Jail Brook, Chelsea, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.68-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is best described as suburban with homes, lawns, and a few trees. In the study area, Jail Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 32 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from coarse sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 43.0 mm (0.141 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 18, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of Jail Brook is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 23-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.8 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately zero degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is also zero degrees. Channel scour was not observed. However, the left abutment footing was exposed one foot. Scour countermeasures at the site consisted of type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on the banks and road embankments upstream and downstream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.1 to 1.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 5.0 to 6.5 ft at the left abutment and 4.7 to 6.2 ft at the right abutment. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (SHARTH00040013) on Town Highway 4, crossing Broad Brook, Sharon, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SHARTH00040013 on Town Highway 4 crossing Broad Brook, Sharon, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is brushland on the downstream left overbank and row crops on the right overbank, while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. Upstream of the bridge, the overbanks are forested. In the study area, Broad Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 69 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 112 mm (0.369 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 11, 1995 and Level II site visit on July 23, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 4 crossing of Broad Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot concrete tee beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.1 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 2.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream end of the right abutment. At the downstream end of the left abutment, a 1.0 foot scour hole was observed . Scour countermeasures at the site include type-2 stone fill (less than 3 feet diameter) at each road embankment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.7 to 1.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 5.6 to 9.4 ft. The worst case left abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 19.0 to 19.8 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (JAMATH00010025) on Town Highway 1, crossing Ball Mountain Brook, Jamaica, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure JAMATH00010025 on Town Highway 1 crossing Ball Mountain Brook, Jamaica, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southern Vermont. The 29.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right bank which is pasture with some trees along the channel. In the study area, Ball Mountain Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.021 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 86 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 222 mm (0.727 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 13, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Ball Mountain Brook is a 78-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 75-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 73 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed at the upstream bridge face. The scour protection measures at the site were type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream banks and along both abutments, and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the downstream banks. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour only occurred at the 500-year discharge and was 0.1 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 11.2 to 15.7 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (BRIDTH00050037) on Town Highway 5, crossing North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00050037 on town highway 5 crossing the North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 10.5-mi2 drainage area is a predominantly rural basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the left and right banks are forested. Town highway 5 runs parallel to the upstream left and downstream right banks. In the study area, the North Branch Ottauquechee River has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 50 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 79.3 mm or 0.260 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 2, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 5 crossing of the North Branch Ottauquechee Riveris a 38-ft-long, onelane bridge consisting of one 35-foot steel beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, stone abutments with wingwalls. The right abutment has settled due to scour. Type-3 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) provides protection to the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall and the base of the downstream right wingwall. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees; the opening-skew-to-roadway is 20 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.4 to 1.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 11.0 to 14.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A crosssection of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (CONCTH00580033) on Town Highway 58, crossing Miles Stream, Concord, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CONCTH00580033 on Town Highway 58 crossing Miles Stream, Concord, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 17.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture upstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. Downstream of the bridge, the right bank is forested and the left bank has shrubs and brush. In the study area, Miles Stream has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 91 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 61.6 mm (0.188 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 15, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 58 crossing of Miles Stream is a 44-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 39-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 37.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with stone fill in front creating spillthrough embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. The only scour countermeasure at the site was type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the left and right banks upstream, in front of the abutments forming spill through embankments, and extending along the banks downstream. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 4.0 to 9.7 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the right abutment and at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge for the left abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour

  6. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (BRIDTH00040042) on Town Highway 04, crossing Dailey Hollow Brook, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00040042 on town highway 4 crossing Dailey Hollow Brook, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic division of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 2.20-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the overbanks are covered by shrubs and trees except for the upstream right overbank where there is a house. Dailey Hollow Brook enters Dailey Hollow Branch at the downstream face of the bridge. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.035 ft/ft. The channel top width and channel depth upstream of the bridge is 19 ft and 3 ft, respectively. Downstream of the bridge and the confluence the channel top width and channel depth is 39 ft and 2 ft respectively. The predominant channel bed material is cobble and gravel (D50 is 64.7 mm or 0.212 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 4 crossing of Dailey Hollow Brook is a 25-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 23-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches) exists along all four wingwalls, the downstream right road approach, and the channel banks in the immediate vicinity of the bridge. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening; the opening-skewto-roadway is also 20 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for modelled flows was 0.0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 3.9 to 5.4 ft. with the worst-case abutment scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

  7. Social support and the likelihood of maintaining and improving levels of physical activity: the Whitehall II Study

    PubMed Central

    De Vogli, Roberto; Stafford, Mai; Shipley, Martin J.; Marmot, Michael G.; Cox, Tom; Vahtera, Jussi; Väänänen, Ari; Heponiemi, Tarja; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Kivimäki, Mika

    2012-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the association between social support and leisure time physical activity (LTPA) is scarce and mostly based on cross-sectional data with different types of social support collapsed into a single index. The aim of this study was to investigate whether social support from the closest person was associated with LTPA. Methods: Prospective cohort study of 5395 adults (mean age 55.7 years, 3864 men) participating in the British Whitehall II study. Confiding/emotional support and practical support were assessed at baseline in 1997–99 using the Close Persons Questionnaire. LTPA was assessed at baseline and follow-up in (2002–04). Baseline covariates included socio-demographics, self-rated health, long-standing illnesses, physical functioning and common mental disorders. Results: Among participants who reported recommended levels of LTPA at baseline, those who experienced high confiding/emotional support were more likely to report recommended levels of LTPA at follow-up [odds ratio (OR): 1.39, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12–1.70 in a model adjusted for baseline covariates]. Among those participants who did not meet the recommended target of LTPA at baseline, high confiding/emotional support was not associated with improvement in activity levels. High practical support was associated with both maintaining (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.10–1.63) and improving (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02–1.53) LTPA levels. Conclusion: These findings suggest that emotional and practical support from the closest person may help the individual to maintain the recommended level of LTPA. Practical support also predicted a change towards a more active lifestyle. PMID:21750013

  8. 77 FR 72906 - Chessie Logistics Co., LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Surface Transportation Board Chessie Logistics Co., LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption-- J. Emil... exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc. (Anderson) and to operate 1.006... it. See Mannheim Armitage Ry.--Acquis. & Operation Exemption--Certain Trackage Rights of J....

  9. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor-? Agonist Slows the Progression of Hypertension, Attenuates Plasma Interleukin-6 Levels and Renal Inflammatory Markers in Angiotensin II Infused Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Justin L.; Duan, Rong; El-Marakby, Ahmed; Alhashim, Abdulmohsin; Lee, Dexter L.

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR-? plays an important role in attenuating hypertension. The current study determines the anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory role of PPAR-? agonist during a slow-pressor dose of Ang II (400?ng/kg/min). Ten to twelve week old male PPAR-? KO mice and their WT controls were implanted with telemetry devices and infused with Ang II for 12 days. On day 12 of Ang II infusion, MAP was elevated in PPAR-? KO mice compared to WT (161 4?mmHg versus 145 4?mmHg) and fenofibrate (145?mg/kg/day) reduced MAP in WT + Ang II mice (134 7?mmHg). Plasma IL-6 levels were higher in PPAR-? KO mice on day 12 of Ang II infusion (30 4 versus 8 2?pg/mL) and fenofibrate reduced plasma IL-6 in Ang II-treated WT mice (10 3?pg/mL). Fenofibrate increased renal expression of CYP4A, restored renal CYP2J expression, reduced the elevation in renal ICAM-1, MCP-1 and COX-2 in WT + Ang II mice. Our results demonstrate that activation of PPAR-? attenuates Ang II-induced hypertension through up-regulation of CYP4A and CYP2J and an attenuation of inflammatory markers such as plasma IL-6, renal MCP-1, renal expression of ICAM-1 and COX-2. PMID:22848208

  10. Exact expression of the ground-state energy for the symmetric anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Norio; Okiji, Ayao

    1981-12-01

    The exact expression of the ground-state energy for the symmetric Anderson model is obtained with the use of the Wiegmann approach. It is found that some of the quasi-momenta appearing in Wiegmann's paper are necessarily complex to obtain the expression of the ground-state energy.

  11. Melissa L. Anderson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association/American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. The 2012 winner is Melissa L. Anderson for her ongoing commitment to understanding, treating, and preventing domestic violence in Deaf women

  12. 78 FR 41835 - Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ...The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA), requires the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to adjust the maximum total and annual standard deferred premiums specified in the Price-Anderson Act for inflation at least once during each 5-year period following August 20, 2003. The NRC is amending its regulations to satisfy this...

  13. AUTO ANSWER CIRCUIT DESIGN FOR AN ANDERSON JACOBSON AD 342 MODEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a circuit which connects a Western Electric Model 1001F Data Accessing Arrangement to an Anderson Jacobson Model AD 342 Modem. It automatically answers the phone and holds a data connection as long as a received carrier is present. It self resets upon loss of...

  14. 54. August 18, 1939 Oakland, California A.E. Anderson Taken during ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. August 18, 1939 Oakland, California A.E. Anderson Taken during trials on San Fransico Bay. Photograph taken for the U.S. Lighthouse Service. Currently in collection at Columbia River Maritime Museum. (Negative #67-133.3) - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter FIR, Puget Sound Area, Seattle, King County, WA

  15. Anderson v. University of Wisconsin: Handicap and Race Discrimination in Readmission Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth R.

    1989-01-01

    "Anderson v. University of Wisconsin" gives important guidance to universities by detailing the components of race and handicap discrimination claims, and illustrating how these claims can succeed. Readmission procedures that could reduce the likelihood of charges of discrimination are suggested. (Author/MLW)

  16. GIS based Cadastral level Forest Information System using World View-II data in Bir Hisar (Haryana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mothi Kumar, K. E.; Singh, S.; Attri, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.; Sarika; Hooda, R. S.; Sapra, R. K.; Garg, V.; Kumar, V.; Nivedita

    2014-11-01

    Identification and demarcation of Forest lands on the ground remains a major challenge in Forest administration and management. Cadastral forest mapping deals with forestlands boundary delineation and their associated characterization (forest/non forest). The present study is an application of high resolution World View-II data for digitization of Protected Forest boundary at cadastral level with integration of Records of Right (ROR) data. Cadastral vector data was generated by digitization of spatial data using scanned mussavies in ArcGIS environment. Ortho-images were created from World View-II digital stereo data with Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system with WGS 84 datum. Cadastral vector data of Bir Hisar (Hisar district, Haryana) and adjacent villages was spatially adjusted over ortho-image using ArcGIS software. Edge matching of village boundaries was done with respect to khasra boundaries of individual village. The notified forest grids were identified on ortho-image and grid vector data was extracted from georeferenced cadastral data. Cadastral forest boundary vectors were digitized from ortho-images. Accuracy of cadastral data was checked by comparison of randomly selected geo-coordinates points, tie lines and boundary measurements of randomly selected parcels generated from image data set with that of actual field measurements. Area comparison was done between cadastral map area, the image map area and RoR area. The area covered under Protected Forest was compared with ROR data and within an accuracy of less than 1 % from ROR area was accepted. The methodology presented in this paper is useful to update the cadastral forest maps. The produced GIS databases and large-scale Forest Maps may serve as a data foundation towards a land register of forests. The study introduces the use of very high resolution satellite data to develop a method for cadastral surveying through on - screen digitization in a less time as compared to the old fashioned cadastral parcel boundaries surveying method.

  17. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1987-06-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (MNTGTH00190028) on Town Highway 19, crossing Wade Brook, Montgomery, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the banks have dense woody vegetation coverage. In the study area, Wade Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.0253 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 58 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel and cobbles (D50 is 81.8 mm or 0.269 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 9, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 19 crossing of Wade Brook is a 24-ft-wide corrugated steel, multi-plate pipe-arch (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 3, 1994). The culvert is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 26 degrees. There was no localized scour evident during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site were type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on all of the roadway embankments, the upstream left bank, and each wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.5 to 1.0 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.6 to 16.1 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 7 (WALDTH00020007) on Town Highway 2, crossing Coles Brook, Walden, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    ft, an average channel top width of 37 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 32.9 mm (0.108 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 9, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to cut-banks, point bars, and loose unconsolidated bed material. The Town Highway 2 crossing of Coles Brook is a 74-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 71-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, April 5, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 69.3 ft. The bridge is supported by spill-through abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed from 60 ft. to 100 ft. downstream during the Level I assessment. Scour protection measures at the site include: type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the right bank upstream, at the downstream end of the downstream left wingwall and downstream right wingwall; and type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the left bank upstream, at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall, and along the entire base of the left and right abutments. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 5.7 to 12.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 12 (HUNTTH00010012) on Town Highway 001, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    frequency data contained in the Flood Insurance Study for the Town of Huntington (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1978). The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 9.19-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have some woody vegetation. In the study area, the Brush Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 100.0 mm (0.328 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Brush Brook is a 64-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 62-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 6 degrees. Channel scour 2.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right bank and along the base of the spill-through protection for the right abutment during the Level I assessment. Scour protection measured at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left and right banks and in front of all four wingwalls. In front of the abutments, there was type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) forming a spill-through slope. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. There was no computed contraction scour for any modelled flow. Abutment scour ranged from 1.4 to 2.8 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 9. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 7H (HUNTTH0001007H) on Town Highway 1, crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.20-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream of the bridge. Downstream of the bridge is brushland and pasture. In the study area, the Cobb Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 65.5 mm (0.215 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 24, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Cobb Brook is a 23-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 20-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, June 21, 1996). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 2.8 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. Protection measures at the site include type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream right wingwall, type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream right wingwall and the downstream end of the downstream left wingwall, and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.2 to 1.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 4.0 to 8.7 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 10. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (BARTTH00080037) on Town Highway 8, crossing Willoughby River, Barton, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1996-01-01

    of north-central Vermont in the town of Barton. The 60.4-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the banks have sparse to moderate woody vegetation coverage. In the study area, the Willoughby River is probably incised, has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.009 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 108 ft and an average channel depth of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed material is cobble (D50 is 95.1 mm or 0.312 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 20, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 8 crossing of the Willoughby River is a 96-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 94-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 4, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. No scour was reported in the channel or along abutments or wingwalls during the Level I assessment. Type-2 stone fill (less than 24 inches diameter) was reported at each abutment and all four wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. Data in appendix D (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 4, 1994) indicate that the right abutment may be founded on or near marble bedrock which may limit scour depths. Bedrock was not detected by borings in the vicinity of the left abutment. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 7.3 to 10.7 ft and the worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (RANDVT00120042) on State Highway 12, crossing Third Branch White River, Randolph, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    bridge consisting of four concrete spans. The maximum span length is 57 ft. (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., July 29, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments and three concrete piers. The toe of the left abutment is at the channel edge. The toe of the right abutment is set back on the right over-bank. The roadway centerline on the structure has a slight horizontal curve; however, the main channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

  4. Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

    1987-10-01

    A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Exclusive detection of sub-nanomolar levels of palladium(II) in water: an excellent probe for multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Namita; Dey, Nilanjan; Kumar, Krishan; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-11-01

    A new colorimetric probe has been developed for the detection and estimation of Pd(II) at sub-nanomolar concentrations. The probe consisted of rhodamine (signaling unit), which was linked with a bis-picolyl moiety (binding site) through a phenyl ring. Pd(II) induced opening of the spirolactam ring of the probe with the generation of a prominent pink color. The excellent selectivity of the probe towards Pd(II) over Pd(0) or Rh(II) ensured its potential utility for the detection of residual palladium contamination in pharmaceutical drugs and in Pd-catalyzed reactions. The probe showed a "turn-on" (bright yellow) fluorescence upon the addition of Pd(II), which made it suitable for the detection of Pd contaminants in mammalian cells. PMID:25204281

  6. Highly sensitive determination of Cu(II) iron in ng/mL level in natural waters using Sulfochlorophenol S.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Danhua; Zhang, Guoping

    2015-03-01

    The highly sensitive complexation of Cu(II) with Sulfochlorophenol S (SCPS) at pH4.03 was characterized by the spectral correction technique. This reaction was used to determine the Cu(II) content in various sources by the light-absorption ratio variation approach (LARVA). The limit of detection of Cu(II) was only 1.35ng/mL, thus facilitating the direct monitoring of natural water. The Cu(II) contents in the Huangpu River, Yangtze River, and Taihu Lake of China were determined with satisfactory results, and the recovery rates of Cu(II) using SCPS were between 94.5 and 102.6%. PMID:25647804

  7. Interactive roles of NPR1 gene-dosage and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels inmutantmice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Das, Subhankar; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to elucidate the interactive roles of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) gene (Npr1) and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II (ANG II), aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokines levels in Npr1 gene-targeted (1-copy, 2-copy, 3-copy, 4-copy) mice. Methods Npr1 genotypes included 1-copy gene-disrupted heterozygous (+/?), 2-copy wild-type (+/+), 3-copy gene-duplicated heterozygous (++/+) and 4-copy gene-duplicated homozygous (++/++) mice. Animals were fed low, normal and high-salt diets. Plasma and cardiac levels of ANG II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined. Results With a high-salt diet, cardiac ANG II levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (13.7 2.8 fmol/mg protein, 111%) compared with 2-copy mice (6.5 0.6), but decreased (?) in 4-copy (4.0 0.5, 38%) mice. Cardiac aldosterone levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (80 4 fmol/mg protein, 79%) compared with 2-copy mice (38 3). Plasma tumour necrosis factor alpha was increased (+) in 1-copy mice (30.27 2.32 pg/ml, 38%), compared with 2-copy mice (19.36 2.49, 24%), but decreased (?) in 3-copy (11.59 1.51, 12%) and 4-copy (7.13 0.52, 22%) mice. Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1? levels were also significantly increased (+) in 1-copy compared with 2-copy mice but decreased (?) in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. Conclusion These results demonstrate that a high-salt diet aggravates cardiac ANG II, aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokine levels in Npr1 gene-disrupted 1-copy mice, whereas, in Npr1 gene-duplicated (3-copy and 4-copy) mice, high salt did not render such elevation, suggesting the potential roles of Npr1 against salt loading. PMID:23188418

  8. Increased Glycated Hemoglobin Level is Associated With SYNTAX Score II in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Karakoyun, Süleyman; Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Rencüzoğulları, İbrahim; Karabağ, Yavuz; Altıntaş, Bernas; Topçu, Selim; Lazoğlu, Zakir; Tanboğa, İbrahim Halil; Sevimli, Serdar

    2016-04-01

    SYNTAX score II (SS II) uses 2 anatomical and 6 clinical variables for the prediction of mortality after coronary artery bypass graft and percutaneous coronary intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), and SYNTAX Score (SS) and SS II in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease (CAD). We enrolled 215 consecutive diabetic patients with stable angina pectoris who underwent coronary angiography. The SS II was calculated using a nomogram that was based on the findings of a previous study. There was a moderate correlation between HbA1c and SS (r = .396, P < .001), but there was a good correlation between HbA1c and SS II (r = .535, P < .001). There was also a weak correlation between FBG (r = .270, P = .001), PPG (r = .177, P = .027), and SS, but there was a weak-moderate correlation between FBG (r = .341, P < .001), PPG (r = .256, P = .001), and SS II. A better correlation has been detected between HbA1c and SS II compared to the correlation between HbA1c and SS. PMID:26101367

  9. Effective models for Anderson impurity and Kondo problems from continuous unitary transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krones, Jrn; Uhrig, Gtz S.

    2015-03-01

    The method of continuous unitary transformations (CUTs) is applied to the Anderson impurity and the Kondo model aiming at the systematic derivation of convergent effective models. If CUTs are applied in a conventional way, diverging differential equations occur. Similar to poor man's scaling, the energy scale, below which the couplings diverge, corresponds to the Kondo temperature TK. We present a way to apply CUTs to the Kondo and to the Anderson impurity model so that no divergences occur but a converged effective low-energy model is derived with small finite parameters at arbitrarily small energies. The ground state corresponds to a bound singlet with a binding energy given by the Kondo temperature TK.

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (BRNATH00800016) on Town Highway 80, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 17.5 to 23.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  11. Cranial location of level II lymph nodes in laryngeal cancer: Implications for elective nodal target volume delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Braam, Petra M. . E-mail: P.M.Braam@umcutrecht.nl; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Terhaard, Chris

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the cranial distribution of level II lymph nodes in patients with laryngeal cancer to optimize the elective radiation nodal target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: The most cranially located metastatic lymph node was delineated in 67 diagnostic CT data sets. The minimum distance from the base of the skull (BOS) to the lymph node was determined. Results: A total of 98 lymph nodes were delineated including 62 ipsilateral and 36 contralateral lymph nodes. The mean ipsilateral and contralateral distance from the top of the most cranial metastatic lymph node to the BOS was 36 mm (range, -9-120; standard deviation [SD], 17.9) and 35 mm (range, 14-78; SD 15.0), respectively. Only 5% and 12% of the ipsilateral and 3% and 9% of the contralateral metastatic lymph nodes were located within 15 mm and 20 mm below the BOS, respectively. No significant differences were found between patients with only ipsilateral metastatic lymph nodes and patients with bilateral metastatic lymph nodes. Between tumors that do cross the midline and those that do not, no significant difference was found in the distance of the most cranial lymph node to the BOS and the occurrence ipsilateral or contralateral. Conclusions: Setting the cranial border of the nodal target volume 1.5 cm below the base of the skull covers 95% of the lymph nodes and should be considered in elective nodal irradiation for laryngeal cancer. Bilateral neck irradiation is mandatory, including patients with unilateral laryngeal cancer, when elective irradiation is advised.

  12. Urinary levels of type II collagen C?telopeptide crosslink are unrelated to joint space narrowing in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuca, S A; Brandt, K D; Eyre, D R; Katz, B P; Askew, J; Lane, K A

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine whether urinary concentrations of the cross linked C?telopeptide of type II collagen (CTx?II) distinguish subjects with progressive radiographic or symptomatic knee osteoarthritis from those with stable disease. Methods Subjects were 120 obese women with unilateral knee osteoarthritis who participated in a 30 month, randomised, placebo controlled trial of structure modification by doxycycline, in which a standardised semiflexed anteroposterior view of the knee was obtained at baseline and 30?months. Subjects were selected from a larger sample to permit comparisons of urinary CTx?II levels between 60 progressors and 60 non?progressors with respect to medial joint space narrowing. Each group contained 30 subjects who, across five semi?annual assessments, reported on at least two occasions an increase of ?20% in 50 ft walk pain (minimum?=?1?cm on a 10 cm visual analogue scale), relative to the previous visit. The remainder reported no increases in knee pain. Urine samples were obtained semi?annually for determination of the CTx?II and creatinine concentrations. Results In an analysis of the placebo group only, the frequency of radiographic progressors in the upper and middle tertiles (48% and 60%, respectively) of the baseline CTx?II distribution was not significantly different than that in the lower tertile (64%). These results were unchanged after inclusion of data from subjects in the doxycycline group. Furthermore, serial CTx?II levels did not distinguish subjects with progressive radiographic or symptomatic knee osteoarthritis from those with stable disease. Conclusions In this pilot study, urinary CTx?II concentration was not a useful biomarker of osteoarthritis progression. PMID:16339292

  13. Ferromagnetic instability in a mean-field slave-boson approach for the Anderson lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Dorin, V.; Schlottmann, P. )

    1993-05-15

    We consider a stoichiometric metallic Anderson lattice with orbital degeneracy in the [ital U][r arrow][infinity] limit. A Gutzwiller type of mean-field approximation is formulated in terms of three slave bosons per site in analogy to Kotliar and Ruckenstein's approach for the Hubbard model. In the orbitally nondegenerate case the paramagnetic solution becomes unstable towards ferromagnetism if the valence is smaller than a critical one. This instability is suppressed with increasing orbital degeneracy.

  14. Observation of migrating transverse Anderson localizations of light in nonlocal media.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

    2014-05-16

    We report the experimental observation of the interaction and attraction of many localized modes in a two-dimensional system realized by a disordered optical fiber supporting transverse Anderson localization. We show that a nonlocal optically nonlinear response of thermal origin alters the localization length by an amount determined by the optical power and also induces an action at a distance between the localized modes and their spatial migration. Evidence of a collective and strongly interacting regime is given. PMID:24877941

  15. Determinant method and quantum simulations of many-body effects in a single impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Gubernatis, J.E.; Olson, T.C.; Scalapino, D.J.; Sugar, R.L.

    1986-06-01

    We present a short description of a quantum Monte Carlo technique that has proved useful for simulating many-body effects in systems of interacting fermins at finite temperatures. We then report our preliminary results using this technique on a single impurity Anderson model. Examples of such many-body effects as local moment formation, Kondo behavior, and mixed valence phenomena found in the simulations are shown.

  16. Magnetic frustration in the three-band Anderson lattice model for high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ihle, D.; Kasner, M. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-band Anderson lattice model for the CuO{sub 2} planes in high-{Tc} superconductors is established. Treating this model by perturbation theory, the effective spin interactions are derived. The antiferromagnetic superexchange integrals are calculated as functions of the direct oxygen transfer and the hole concentration. It is found that frustration in the superexchange occurs, even in the undoped case, which increases with oxygen trnasfer and decreases with hole concentration.

  17. Properties of a localized magnetic impurity in a superconducting host: The Anderson-Holstein-BCS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha Raju, Ch.; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-12-01

    A symmetric Anderson-Holstein model with a BCS interaction term is considered to investigate the effect of local electron-phonon interaction on a magnetic impurity in a superconductor. The Kikuchi-Morita Cluster variation (CV) method is used to calculate the local impurity magnetic moment and the binding energy between the impurity and the conduction electrons in the superconductor. The effect of electron-phonon interaction and the order parameter on the bound state is discussed.

  18. Study on a family with anderson--Fabry's disease and associated familial spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed Central

    Pierides, A M; Holti, G; Crombie, A L; Roberts, D F; Gardiner, S E; Colling, A; Anderson, J

    1976-01-01

    A family in the north-east of England with Anderson--Fabry's disease is presented. Alpha-galactosidase activity in plasma and white cells was significantly reduced in three adult male members of the family. One of them had an abnormal chromosome karyotype pattern with an extra Y chromosome (47,XYY) and he was clinically less severely affected than his brothers. Coincidentally five other members of the family suffered from a form of familial spastic paraplegia. Images PMID:828204

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 45 (CHELTH00440045) on Town Highway 44, crossing first Branch White River, Chelsea, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    bridge consisting of one 27-foot clear-span concrete-encased steel beam deck superstructure (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 5 degrees. Both abutment footings were reported as exposed and the left abutment was reported to be undermined by 0.5 ft at the time of the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left abutment which was reported as failed. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.4 to 5.1 ft. with the worst-case occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 9.9 to 20.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (BRNAVT00120025) on State Highway 12, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along a bedrock outcrop near the upstream left wingwall during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures in place at the site are type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left abutment, upstream right bank, and both downstream banks; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the downstream side of the right road approach and upstream left bank; type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall and downstream end of downstream left wingwall; type-5 (wall/ artificial levee) at the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.5 to 20.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during f

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BRNATH00680035) on Town Highway 68, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    abutments with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment and downstream right wingwall during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure in place at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the left abutment and wingwalls except the downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 11.5 to 25.7 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled "Scour Results". Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives "excessively conservative estimates of scour depths" (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineerin

  2. Electronic structure of vitamin B12 within the framework of the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Zafer; Mayda, Selma; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-03-01

    We study the electronic structure of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine C63H88CoN14O14P) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. Here, our purpose is to understand the many-body effects originating from the transition-metal impurity. In this approach, the cobalt 3 d orbitals are treated as the impurity states placed in a semiconductor host which consists of the rest of the molecule. The parameters of the resulting effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock approximation for the electronic structure of the molecule. The quantum Monte Carlo technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective Haldane-Anderson model for vitamin B12. We find that new states form inside the semiconductor gap due to the on-site Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3 d orbitals and that these states become the highest occupied molecular orbitals. In addition, we present results on the charge distribution and spin correlations around the Co atom. We compare the results of this approach with those obtained by the density-functional theory calculations.

  3. Abrupt physical and chemical changes during 1992-1999, Anderson Springs, SE Geyser Geothermal Field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, Cathy J.; Goff, Fraser; Walter, Stephen R.; Sorey, Michael L.; Counce, Dale; Colvard, Elizabeth M.

    2000-01-01

    The Anderson Springs area is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. Patrons drank a variety of cool to hot mineral waters from improved springs, swam in various baths and pools, and hiked in the rugged hills flanking Anderson Creek and its tributaries. In the bluffs to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. By the early 1970s, the higher ridges south and west of Anderson Springs became part of the southeast sector of the greater Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric power plants are built on these ridges, producing energy from a vapor-dominated 240 °C reservoir. Only the main hot spring at Anderson Springs has maintained a recognizable identity since the 1930s. The hot spring is actually a cluster of seeps and springs that issue from a small fault in a ravine southwest of Anderson Creek. Published and unpublished records show that the maximum temperature (Tm) of this cluster fell gradually from 63°C in 1889 to 48°C in 1992. However, Tm of the cluster climbed to 77°C in 1995 and neared boiling (98°C) in 1998. A new cluster of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm = 99.3°C) formed in 1998 about 30 m north of the old spring cluster. Several evergreen trees on steep slopes immediately above these vents apparently were killed by the new activity. Thermal waters at Anderson Hot Springs are mostly composed of near-surface ground waters with some added gases and condensed steam from The Geysers geothermal system. Compared to gas samples from Southeast Geysers wells, the hot spring gases are higher in CO2 and lower in H2S and NH3. As the springs increased in temperature, however, the gas composition became more like the mean composition of steam discharges from the Southeast Geysers. The hot spring waters are low in ions of Cl, B, and Li, but relatively high in HCO3, SO4 and NH4. The stable-isotope compositions (deuterium and oxygen-18) of these waters plot near the global meteoric water line. Geochemical data through time reveal apparent maxima in the concentrations of SO4, Fe, and Mn in 1991 to 1992, before the cluster became hotter. The black-to-gray deposits from the new spring cluster are rich in pyrite and contain anomalous metals. About one-half mile to the east of the hot springs, mineralized water discharges intermittently from an old adit of the Schwartz (Anderson) mine, and enters a tributary of Anderson Creek. This drainage increased substantially in July 1998, and a slurry of mine water and precipitates were transported down the tributary and into Anderson Creek. In December 1998, the adit water was 22°C, and had a chemical composition that was similar to spring waters that once discharged in the ravines surrounding the old Anderson Springs resort. The cause for the abrupt changes that have occurred in thermal features at Anderson Springs is still not resolved. One possibility is that these changes are a response to withdrawal of steam from The Geysers geothermal field over more than 20 years of production. Pressure declines in the geothermal reservoir may have caused a "drying out" of the overlying condensation zone. Induced boiling in this zone and upflow of deep steam to shallower depths would cause heating and vaporization of shallow ground waters. In addition, earthquakes occurring in the vicinity of Anderson Springs have increased significantly after nearby geothermal power plants began operation. These earthquakes may have enhanced surface discharge of thermal fluids along fractures and faults.

  4. Type I Vs. Type II Cytokine Levels as a Function of SOD1 G93A Mouse Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeyachandran, Amilia; Mertens, Benjamin; McKissick, Eric A.; Mitchell, Cassie S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motoneuron disease that is characterized by the degradation of neurons throughout the central nervous system. Inflammation have been cited a key contributor to ALS neurodegeneration, but the timeline of cytokine upregulation remains unresolved. The goal of this study was to temporally examine the correlation between the varying levels of pro-inflammatory type I cytokines (IL-1β, IL-1α, IL-12, TNF-α, and GFAP) and anti-inflammatory type II cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL-10) throughout the progression of ALS in the SOD1 G93A mouse model. Cytokine level data from high copy SOD1 G93A transgenic mice was collected from 66 peer-reviewed studies. For each corresponding experimental time point, the ratio of transgenic to wild type (TG/WT) cytokine was calculated. One-way ANOVA and t-tests with Bonferonni correction were used to analyze the data. Meta-analysis was performed for four discrete stages: early, pre-onset, post-onset, and end stage. A significant increase in TG cytokine levels was found when compared to WT cytokine levels across the entire SOD1 G93A lifespan for majority of the cytokines. The rates of change of the individual cytokines, and type I and type II were not significantly different; however, the mean fold change of type I was expressed at significantly higher levels than type II levels across all stages with the difference between the means becoming more pronounced at the end stage. An overexpression of cytokines occurred both before and after the onset of ALS symptoms. The trend between pro-inflammatory type I and type II cytokine mean levels indicate a progressive instability of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as anti-inflammatory cytokines fail to mediate the pronounced increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. Very early immunoregulatory treatment is necessary to successfully interrupt ALS-induced neuroinflammation. PMID:26648846

  5. Hypobetalipoproteinemia with accumulation of an apoprotein B-like protein in intestinal cells. Immunoenzymatic and biochemical characterization of seven cases of Anderson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bouma, M E; Beucler, I; Aggerbeck, L P; Infante, R; Schmitz, J

    1986-01-01

    We describe here seven cases (from five kindreds) of Anderson's disease, which is characterized by diarrhea, steatorrhea, hypobetalipoproteinemia with low levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and phospholipids, and failure to secrete chylomicrons after a fat meal. Enterocytes isolated from intestinal biopsies of patients after overnight fast showed numerous fat droplets, a histological picture resembling that of abetalipoproteinemia. Immunoenzymatic staining of the enterocytes demonstrated large amounts of material that reacted with a polyclonal antiserum to apolipoprotein B. Further, the immunoreactive material was found to react with several different monoclonal antibodies capable of recognizing both the B100 and B48 forms of apoprotein B, but not with any of several monoclonal antibodies capable of recognizing only B100. This suggests that the material in the enterocytes is the B48 form of apoprotein B or a fragment thereof. Additional findings included decreased low density lipoprotein levels with an abnormal chemical composition, abnormal high density lipoprotein2 (HDL2) and HDL3 particle size distributions, and an abnormal HDL apoprotein composition. Increased amounts of proteins having electrophoretic mobilities similar to apo E and the E-AII complex were present. Finally, some cases exhibited additional protein components of apparent molecular weights between 17,000 and 28,000, which was similar to some cases of abetalipoproteinemia. These findings demonstrate that Anderson's disease is not due to the absence of synthesis of intestinal apo B and suggest that it is more complex than previously thought, affecting all the lipoprotein classes. Images PMID:2426307

  6. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS § 8.2 Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. (a) It is my opinion that an indemnity agreement entered into...

  7. HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma with Overt Level II and/or III metastases at presentation: The risk of subclinical disease in ipsilateral levels IB, IV and V

    PubMed Central

    SANGUINETI, GIUSEPPE; PAI, SARA; AGBAHIWE, HAROLD; RICCHETTI, FRANCESCO; WESTRA, WILLIAM; SORMANI, MARIA PIA; CLEMENTE, STEFANIA; CALIFANO, JOSEPH

    2015-01-01

    Background To assess the risk of subclinical neck nodal involvement of levels IB, IV and V for early T-stage, node positive, human papilloma virus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal carcinoma. Material and methods We retrospectively identified the patients with clinically positive and un-violated neck that underwent upfront ipsilateral neck dissection for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer between 1998 and 2010. From the pathology report we extracted the prevalence rate of involvement of each selected level and then estimated the risk that a level that does not contain any node larger than 10 mm at computed tomography (CT) harbors subclinical disease. Predictors of involvement were investigated as well. Results Ninety-one patients were analyzed. The risk of subclinical disease in both levels IB and V is < 5%, while it is 6.5% (95% CI 3.19.9%) for level IV. Level IB subclinical involvement slightly exceeds 5% when 2 + ipsilateral levels besides IB are involved. The risk of occult disease in level IV tends to be < 5% when level III is not involved. Conclusion These data support the exclusion from the elective nodal volume of level V and level IB but when 2 + other levels are involved. Level IV might also be spared when level III is negative. Clinical implementation within a prospective study is justified. PMID:24274389

  8. NX-PVKA levels before and after hepatectomy of hepatocellular carcinoma as predictors of patient survival: a preliminary evaluation of an improved assay for PIVKA-II.

    PubMed

    Nanashima, Atsushi; Abo, Takafumi; Taura, Naota; Shibata, Hideki; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Takagi, Katsunori; Arai, Junichi; Oyama, Shousaburou; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Although the protein-induced vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) is used as a prognostic marker in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a newly-improved assay, NX-PVKA (PIVKA-II measured using P-11 and P-16 antibodies) and NX-PVKA-R (ratio of PIVKA-II and NX-PVKA), are more accurate markers of PIVKA-II. We conducted a prospectively preliminary analysis of the relationship between NX-PVKA-R and clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in 22 patients with HCC who underwent hepatectomy and measured changes of this marker's levels after treatment. Median value of PIVKA-II (80 mAU/ml), NX-PVKA (60 mAU/ml), NX-PVKA-R (1.5) and NX-PVKA-D (difference of markers, 15 mAU/ml) were determined. Tumor relapse was observed in six patients, and the one year relapse-free survival rate was 88%. Correlation between PIVKA-II or alpha-fetoprotein levels and NX-PVKA, NX-PVKA-R or -D levels was significant (p<0.001). NX-PVKA-R was significantly correlated with tumor size (p<0.05). In patients who underwent pre-treatment before hepatectomy, PIVKA-II, NX-PVKA and NX-PVKA-R tended to be higher than in patients without pre-treatment, but this difference was not significant (p>0.10). For macroscopic findings, NX-PVKA-R for the confluent-nodular type was significantly higher than that for the simple-nodular type (p<0.05). The tumor-free survival rate in the group with a high NX-PVKA-R was significantly lower than that in the group with a low NX-PVKA-R group (p<0.05). In patients with tumor recurrence, postoperative NX-PVKA-R increased again. We conclude that a high value of NX-PVKA-R after hepatectomy for HCC reflects malignant potential and predicts early recurrence in patients with HCC. PMID:23749928

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 9 (BARRUSO3020009) on U.S. Route 302, crossing Jail Branch, Barre, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    skew-to-roadway. There is evidence of channel scour along the right bank from 190 feet upstream of the bridge and extending through the bridge along the right abutment. Under the bridge, the scour depth is approximately 0.5 feet below the mean thalweg depth. Scour protection measures at the site include type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the right bank extending from the bridge to 192 feet upstream. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is along the right abutment and the right downstream bank to 205 feet downtream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 4.3 to 7.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Computed scour for the 100-year event does not go below the abutment footings. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive m

  10. Elevated serum levels of creatine kinase BB in autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II--a family study.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Fowler, H L; Pendleton, J W; Sforza, P P; Gerard, R D; Lui, C Y; Eldridge, T H; Iranmanesh, A

    1992-07-01

    A markedly elevated BB isoenzyme fraction of serum creatine kinase was noted in four male siblings and correlated with typical radiographic findings of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis Type II (ADO Type II). Patients with other sclerosing bone diseases had no elevation of CK-BB. The precision of the electrophoretic mobility patterns and correlation by I-125 tagged radioimmunoassay method confirms that this is CK-BB. We postulate that the dysfunctional and/or immature osteoclasts in ADO are more dependent on CK-BB than on the usual tricarboxylic acid cycle for the production of energy. The correlation of marked elevation of serum CK-BB with radiographic evidence of ADO Type II may prove to be of value as a biologic marker in the early diagnosis of the illness and lead to better understanding of the metabolism of bone. PMID:1516225

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 51 (RANDTH00SC0051) on School Street, crossing Thayer Brook, Randolph, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1996-01-01

    ft, an average channel top width of 36 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 58.2 mm or 0.191 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visits on August 4, 1994 and December 8, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The School Street crossing of Thayer Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 35-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the downstream left bank was the only existing protection. The approach channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the bridge face; the opening-skew-to-roadway is also 45 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.0 to 2.2 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.2 to 12.0 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

  12. High levels of microRNA-21 in the stroma of colorectal cancers predict short disease-free survival in stage II colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Jrgensen, Stine; Fog, Jacob Ulrik; Skilde, Rolf; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Hansen, Ulla; Brnner, Nils; Baker, Adam; Mller, Sren; Nielsen, Hans Jrgen

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all patients with stage II colorectal cancer will experience recurrent disease and subsequently die within 5years. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is upregulated in several cancer types and has been associated with survival in colon cancer. In the present study we developed a robust in situ hybridization assay using high-affinity Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) probes that specifically detect miR-21 in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples. The expression of miR-21 was analyzed by in situ hybridization on 130 stage II colon and 67 stage II rectal cancer specimens. The miR-21 signal was revealed as a blue chromogenic reaction, predominantly observed in fibroblast-like cells located in the stromal compartment of the tumors. The expression levels were measured using image analysis. The miR-21 signal was determined as the total blue area (TB), or the area fraction relative to the nuclear density (TBR) obtained using a red nuclear stain. High TBR (and TB) estimates of miR-21 expression correlated significantly with shorter disease-free survival (p=0.004, HR=1.28, 95% CI: 1.061.55) in the stage II colon cancer patient group, whereas no significant correlation with disease-free survival was observed in the stage II rectal cancer group. In multivariate analysis both TB and TBR estimates were independent of other clinical parameters (age, gender, total leukocyte count, K-RAS mutational status and MSI). We conclude that miR-21 is primarily a stromal microRNA, which when measured by image analysis identifies a subgroup of stage II colon cancer patients with short disease-free survival. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10585-010-9355-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21069438

  13. Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, William D

    2014-11-01

    For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25423683

  14. Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, William D

    2014-11-01

    For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25507406

  15. Anderson localization problem: An exact solution for 2-D anisotropic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovkov, V. N.; von Niessen, W.

    2007-04-01

    Our previous results [V.N. Kuzovkov, W. von Niessen, V. Kashcheyevs, O. Hein, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 14 (2002) 13777] dealing with the analytical solution of the two-dimensional (2-D) Anderson localization problem due to disorder is generalized for anisotropic systems (two different hopping matrix elements in transverse directions). We discuss the mathematical nature of the metal-insulator phase transition which occurs in the 2-D case, in contrast to the 1-D case, where such a phase transition does not occur. In anisotropic systems two localization lengths arise instead of only one length.

  16. Exponential Scaling Limit of the Single-Particle Anderson Model Via Adaptive Feedback Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaevsky, Victor

    2016-02-01

    We propose a twofold extension of the Germinet-Klein bootstrap multi-scale analysis (BMSA) for the Anderson models on graphs. First, we show, with the help of a single scaling algorithm, that power-law decay bounds at some initial scale imply an asymptotically exponential decay of eigenfunctions (EFs) and of EF correlators (EFCs), even on graphs (of polynomial growth) which do not fulfill the uniform scalability condition required for the existing BMSA techniques. We also show that the exponential scaling limit of the EFs and EFCs holds true for a class of marginal distributions of the random potential with regularity lower than Hlder continuity of any positive order.

  17. STS-118 Astronaut Williams and Expedition 15 Engineer Anderson Perform EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 Astronaut Dave Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, participated in the fourth and final session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). During the 5 hour space walk, Williams and Expedition 15 engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame) installed the External Wireless Instrumentation System Antenna, attached a stand for the shuttle robotic arm extension boom, and retrieved the two Materials International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) for return to Earth. MISSE collects information on how different materials weather in the environment of space.

  18. Steady-state and dynamical Anderson localization of counterpropagating beams in two-dimensional photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Jovic, Dragana M.; Belic, Milivoj R.

    2010-02-15

    We demonstrate Anderson localization of mutually incoherent counterpropagating beams in an optically induced two-dimensional photonic lattice. The effect is displayed in a system of two broad probe beams propagating head-on through a fixed disordered photonic lattice recorded in a photorefractive crystal. In addition to the steady-state localization, we also observe the dynamical localization; that is, the localization of time-changing beams. As compared to the localization of single beams, in which there exist no dynamical effects, the localization of counterpropagating beams is more pronounced and prone to instabilities.

  19. Ensemble-Averaged Quantum Correlations between Path-Entangled Photons Undergoing Anderson Localization.

    PubMed

    Gilead, Yehonatan; Verbin, Mor; Silberberg, Yaron

    2015-09-25

    We measure ensemble-averaged quantum correlations of path-entangled photons, propagating in a disordered lattice and undergoing Anderson localization. These result in intriguing patterns, which show that quantum interference leads to unexpected dependencies of the location of one particle on the location of the other. These correlations are shared between localized and nonlocalized components of the two-photon wave function, and, moreover, yield information regarding the nature of the disorder itself. Such effects cannot be reproduced with classical waves, and are undetectable without ensemble averaging. PMID:26451556

  20. Exponential Scaling Limit of the Single-Particle Anderson Model Via Adaptive Feedback Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprino, Silvia; Cavallaro, Guido; Marchioro, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    We propose a twofold extension of the Germinet-Klein bootstrap multi-scale analysis (BMSA) for the Anderson models on graphs. First, we show, with the help of a single scaling algorithm, that power-law decay bounds at some initial scale imply an asymptotically exponential decay of eigenfunctions (EFs) and of EF correlators (EFCs), even on graphs (of polynomial growth) which do not fulfill the uniform scalability condition required for the existing BMSA techniques. We also show that the exponential scaling limit of the EFs and EFCs holds true for a class of marginal distributions of the random potential with regularity lower than Hlder continuity of any positive order.

  1. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson during TCDT M113 training activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson takes a break during training on the operation of an M113 armored personnel carrier during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia.

  2. DMFT Study for Valence Fluctuations in the Extended Periodic Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinzaki, Ryu; Nasu, Joji; Koga, Akihisa

    2016-02-01

    We study valence fluctuations at finite temperatures in the extended periodic Anderson model, where the Coulomb interaction between conduction and localized f-electrons is taken into account, using dynamical mean-field theory combined with the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo (CT-QMC) method. The valence transition with the hysteresis is clearly found, indicating the first-order phase transition between the Kondo and mixed-valence states. We demonstrate that spin correlation rapidly develops when the system approaches the valence transition point. The comparison of the impurity solvers, the CT-QMC, non-crossing approximation, and one-crossing approximation, is also addressed.

  3. [Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman, 2000); the change in classification within the genus Varroa (Oudemans, 1904)].

    PubMed

    Topolska, G

    2001-01-01

    Varroa jacobsoni was noted for the first time in 1904, in the nest ofApis cerana. In Apis mellifera nests the first Varroa mites were probably found in Korea (1950), next in Japan (1958). In the following years they have spread all over the world. All the time they were regarded as V. jacobsoni. Recently Anderson and Trueman have proved that Varroa jacobsoni is more than one species. They gave the new name Varroa destructor n. sp. to the group of six haplotypes. Mites, which became pests ofA. mellifera worldwide, belong to V. destructor. PMID:16888966

  4. Local Polarization Distribution and Edwards-Anderson Order Parameter of Relaxor Ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinc, R.; Dolin Ek, J.; Gregorovi? , A.; Zalar, B.; Filipi? , C.; Kutnjak, Z.; Levstik, A.; Pirc, R.

    1999-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the Edwards-Anderson order parameter qEA and the local polarization distribution function W\\(p-->\\) have been determined in a PMN single crystal via 2D 93Nb NMR. A glasslike freezing of reorientable polar clusters occurs in the temperature range of the diffuse relaxor transition, whereas the NMR spectra corresponding to pinned nanodomains do not change with temperature. The obtained form of W\\(p-->\\) as well as the temperature dependence of qEA and the nonlinear dielectric susceptibility can be well described by a newly proposed spherical random bond-random field model of relaxor ferroelectrics.

  5. Volume dependence of Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, P. ); Andreani, L.C. ); Continenza, A. ); McMahan, A.K. )

    1993-05-15

    We have undertaken a first-principles theoretical study of the Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg as a function of volume reduction. We present results for the hybridization width [Delta]([epsilon]) in both the [ital J]=5/2 multiplet and in the [Gamma][sub 8], [Gamma][sub 7] crystal field states of the [ital f][sup 1] Ce configuration. We also calculate the hybridization contribution to the magnetic transition temperature. This is found to increase with pressure but is smaller than the experimental values, indicating that the Coulomb exchange contribution to the magnetic coupling is not negligible in these compounds.

  6. Volume dependence of Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, P.; Continenza, A.; Andreani, L.C.; McMahan, A.K.

    1992-09-01

    We have undertaken a first-principles theoretical study of the Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg as a function of volume reduction. We present results for the hybridization width {Delta}({epsilon}) in both the J = 5/2 multiplet and in the {Gamma}{sub 8}, {Gamma}{sub 7} crystal field states of the f{sup 1} Ce configuration. We also calculate the hybridization contribution to the magnetic transition temperature. This is found to increase with pressure but is smaller than the experimental values, indicating that the Coulomb exchange contribution to the magnetic coupling is not negligible in these compounds.

  7. Volume dependence of Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, P.; Continenza, A. . Dipt. di Fisica); Andreani, L.C. ); McMahan, A.K. )

    1992-09-01

    We have undertaken a first-principles theoretical study of the Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg as a function of volume reduction. We present results for the hybridization width [Delta]([epsilon]) in both the J = 5/2 multiplet and in the [Gamma][sub 8], [Gamma][sub 7] crystal field states of the f[sup 1] Ce configuration. We also calculate the hybridization contribution to the magnetic transition temperature. This is found to increase with pressure but is smaller than the experimental values, indicating that the Coulomb exchange contribution to the magnetic coupling is not negligible in these compounds.

  8. Asymmetric Anderson model and spin excitations in the Kondo insulator YbB{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanov, A. F.; Maksimov, L. A.

    2009-07-15

    A cluster problem is analyzed as an example demonstrating that the observed three-mode behavior of spin-triplet excitations in YbB{sub 12} can be described by the asymmetric Anderson model with insulating singlet ground state. In the case of an infinite system, it is argued that the behavior of the f subsystem can be analyzed by using an effective Hamiltonian H{sub J} with direct antiferromagnetic f-f exchange interaction. The spin excitation spectrum is shown to have a minimum at the antiferromagnetic vector, as observed experimentally. A distinctive feature of the analysis is the use of singlet and triplet basis operators.

  9. Real-time simulations of nonequilibrium transport in the single-impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Heidrich-Meisner, F.; Feiguin, Adrian E; Feiguin, A. E.; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2009-01-01

    One of the main open problems in the field of transport in strongly interacting nanostructures is the understanding of currents beyond the linear response regime. In this work, we consider the single-impurity Anderson model and use the adaptive time-dependent density matrix renormalization group method to compute real-time currents out of equilibrium. We first focus on the particle-hole symmetric point where Kondo correlations are the strongest and then extend the study of the nonequilibrium transport to the mixed-valence regime. As a main result, we present accurate data for the current-voltage characteristics of this model.

  10. Magnetic field induced quantum phase transitions in the two-impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lujun; Zhu, Jian - Xin

    2010-11-17

    In the two-impurity Anderson model, the inter-impurity spin exchange interaction favors a spin singlet state between two impurities leading to the localization of quasiparticles. We show that a local uniform magnetic field can delocalize the quasiparticies to restore the Kondo resonance. This transition is found to be continuous, accompanied by not only the divergence of the staggered (anti ferromagnetic) susceptibility, but also the divergence of the uniform spin susceptibility. This implies that the magnetic field induced quantum phase transitions in Kondo systems are in favor of the local critical type.

  11. Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

  12. The effects of add-on low-dose memantine on cytokine levels in bipolar II depression: a 12-week double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Po See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Yu-Shan; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I Hui; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2014-06-01

    Memantine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist with a mood-stabilizing effect, and an association between bipolar disorder and proinflammatory cytokine levels have been reported. Whether adding-on memantine would reduce cytokine levels and is more effective than valproic acid (VPA) alone in bipolar II disorder was investigated. A randomized, double-blind, controlled, 12-week study was conducted. Patients undergoing regular VPA treatments were randomly assigned to a group: VPA + memantine (5 mg/d) (n = 106) or VPA + placebo (n = 108). The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were used to evaluate clinical response. Symptom severity, plasma tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, and IL-1 levels were examined during weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. To adjust within-subject dependence over repeated assessments, multiple linear regressions with generalized estimating equation methods were used to examine the therapeutic effect. Tumor necrosis factor α levels were significantly lower in the VPA + memantine group than in the VPA + placebo group (P = 0.013). Posttreatment HDRS and YMRS scores decreased significantly in both groups, but not significant, nor was the other between-group cytokine level difference pretreatment and posttreatment. The HDRS score changes were significantly associated with IL-6 (P = 0.012) and IL-1 (P = 0.005) level changes and changes in YMRS score changes with TNF-α (P = 0.005) level changes. Treating bipolar II depression with VPA + memantine may improve the plasma TNF-α level. However, adding-on memantine may not improve clinical symptoms or cytokine levels other than TNF-α. Clinical symptoms may be correlated with certain cytokines. PMID:24717258

  13. Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, C.J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M.L.; Rytuba, J.J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E.M.; Huebner, M.; White, L.D.; Foster, A.

    1999-01-01

    Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63C in 1889, 4252C from 1974 through 1991, and 77C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring. During AugustOctober 1999, several field trips were conducted in the vicinity of Anderson Springs to continue monitoring and sampling the thermal manifestations. The new fumarolic area had increased in temperature and in discharge intensity since 1998, and a zone of dead trees had developed on the steep bank directly west of the fumaroles. Ground temperatures and diffuse flow of CO2 flow through soils were measured in the area surrounding the main spring and new fumaroles and in the zone of tree-kill.

  14. Anderson Localization and the Quantum Phase Diagram of Three Dimensional Disordered Dirac Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Pixley, J H; Goswami, Pallab; Das Sarma, S

    2015-08-14

    We study the quantum phase diagram of a three dimensional noninteracting Dirac semimetal in the presence of either quenched axial or scalar potential disorder, by calculating the average and the typical density of states as well as the inverse participation ratio using numerically exact methods. We show that as a function of the disorder strength a half-filled (i.e., undoped) Dirac semimetal displays three distinct ground states, namely an incompressible semimetal, a compressible diffusive metal, and a localized Anderson insulator, in stark contrast to a conventional dirty metal that only supports the latter two phases. We establish the existence of two distinct quantum critical points, which respectively govern the semimetal-metal and the metal-insulator quantum phase transitions and also reveal their underlying multifractal nature. Away from half-filling the (doped) system behaves as a diffusive metal that can undergo Anderson localization only, which is shown by determining the mobility edge and the phase diagram in terms of energy and disorder. PMID:26317736

  15. Nutritional influences on early white matter development: response to Anderson and Burggren.

    PubMed

    Deoni, Sean C L; Dean, Douglas C; Walker, Lindsay; Dirks, Holly; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan

    2014-10-15

    Does breastfeeding alter early brain development? In a recent retrospective study, our group examined the cross-sectional relationship between early infant feeding practice and white matter maturation and cognitive development. In groups matched for child and mother age, gestation duration, birth weight, gender distribution, and socio-economic status; we observed that children who were breastfed exclusively for at least 3 months showed, on average, increased white matter myelin development compared to children who either were exclusively formula-fed, or received a mixture of breast milk and formula. In secondary analysis on sub-sets of these children, again matched for important confounding variables, we found improved cognitive test scores of receptive language in the exclusively breast-fed children compared to formula or formula+breast-fed children; and that prolonged breastfeeding was associated with increased motor, language, and visual functioning in exclusively breast-fed children. In response to this work, Anderson and Burggren have questioned our methodology and, by association, our findings. Further, they use their critique as a platform for advancing an alternative interpretation of our findings: that observed results were not associated with prolonged breast-feeding, but rather delayed the introduction of cow's milk. In this response, we address and clarify some of the misconceptions presented by Anderson and Burggren. PMID:25064669

  16. Anderson Localization and the Quantum Phase Diagram of Three Dimensional Disordered Dirac Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, J. H.; Goswami, Pallab; Das Sarma, S.

    2015-08-01

    We study the quantum phase diagram of a three dimensional noninteracting Dirac semimetal in the presence of either quenched axial or scalar potential disorder, by calculating the average and the typical density of states as well as the inverse participation ratio using numerically exact methods. We show that as a function of the disorder strength a half-filled (i.e., undoped) Dirac semimetal displays three distinct ground states, namely an incompressible semimetal, a compressible diffusive metal, and a localized Anderson insulator, in stark contrast to a conventional dirty metal that only supports the latter two phases. We establish the existence of two distinct quantum critical points, which respectively govern the semimetal-metal and the metal-insulator quantum phase transitions and also reveal their underlying multifractal nature. Away from half-filling the (doped) system behaves as a diffusive metal that can undergo Anderson localization only, which is shown by determining the mobility edge and the phase diagram in terms of energy and disorder.

  17. Simulation of Anderson localization in two-dimensional ultracold gases for pointlike disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morong, W.; DeMarco, B.

    2015-08-01

    Anderson localization has been observed for a variety of media, including ultracold atomic gases with speckle disorder in one and three dimensions. However, observation of Anderson localization in a two-dimensional geometry for ultracold gases has been elusive. We show that a cause of this difficulty is the relatively high percolation threshold of a speckle potential in two dimensions, resulting in strong classical localization. We propose a realistic pointlike disorder potential that circumvents this percolation limit with localization lengths that are experimentally observable. The percolation threshold is evaluated for experimentally realistic parameters, and a regime of negligible classical trapping is identified. Localization lengths are determined via scaling theory, using both exact scattering cross sections and the Born approximation, and by direct simulation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We show that the Born approximation can underestimate the localization length by four orders of magnitude at low energies, while exact cross sections and scaling theory provide an upper bound. Achievable experimental parameters for observing localization in this system are proposed.

  18. Type-II vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser with Watt level output powers at 1.2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, C.; Fuchs, C.; Berger, C.; Ruiz Perez, A.; Koch, M.; Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.; Stolz, W.

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor laser characteristics based on type-II band-aligned quantum well heterostructures for the emission at 1.2 μm are presented. Ten "W"-quantum wells consisting of GaAs/(GaIn)As/Ga(AsSb)/(GaIn)As/GaAs are arranged as resonant periodic gain in a vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser. Its structure is analyzed by X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and reflectance measurements. The laser's power curves and spectra are investigated. Output powers at Watt level are achieved, with a maximum output power of 4 W. It is confirmed that laser operation only involves the type-II transition. A blue shift of the material gain is observed while the modal gain exhibits a red shift.

  19. Development of EUV resists in supercritical CO II solutions using CO II compatible salts (CCS): results from a two-level full factorial design of experiments (DOE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Mark; DeYoung, James; Harbinson, Chris; Miles, Merrick

    2006-03-01

    Direct development of EUV resists in homogeneous carbon dioxide (CO2) solutions containing CO2 compatible salts (CCS) has been demonstrated. These CCS complexes have been designed and prepared such that the anion and/or the cation of the salt contains at least one CO2-soluble portion. In the described method, standard positive tone EUV resists are processed in supercritical CO2 containing less than 20 mM CCS, at pressures ranging from 3500 to 5500 psi, 35 to 65 C with cycle times as short as 1 minute to give reverse image development. Substantial reduction in image collapse and LER/LWR has been observed; large aspect ratios approaching 10 have been measured in dense line/space features, and dense lines with 3 sigma LWR values that are 30% smaller than comparable TMAH developed samples have been observed. This paper will describe results from a two level full factorial design of experiments (DOE) using four factors. Two experimental samples were processed at each point, along with four center point runs to give a total of 36 experimental samples. An additional seven supplemental runs were also prepared. Responses measured for the DOE include half height resist thickness, resist height, contrast, iso/dense bias, aspect ratio of collapse, line edge roughness, and line profile. Details of how the responses were measured will be presented in the paper. Effects of individual factors on each response, along with the significant interactions between factors will be reported. An optimized parameter space will be selected and additional follow-up experiments will be described.

  20. The differences in temperament–character traits, suicide attempts, impulsivity, and functionality levels of patients with bipolar disorder I and II

    PubMed Central

    Izci, Filiz; Fındıklı, Ebru Kanmaz; Zincir, Serkan; Zincir, Selma Bozkurt; Koc, Merve Iris

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary aim of this study was to compare the differences in temperament–character traits, suicide attempts, impulsivity, and functionality levels of patients with bipolar disorder I (BD-I) and bipolar disorder II (BD-II). Methods Fifty-two BD-I patients and 49 BD-II patients admitted to Erenköy Mental and Neurological Disease Training and Research Hospital psychiatry clinic and fifty age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. A structured clinical interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition Axis I Disorders, Temperament and Character Inventory, Barrett Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11), Hamilton Depression Inventory Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Bipolar Disorder Functioning Questionnaire (BDFQ) were administered to patients and to control group. Results No statistically significant difference in sociodemographic features existed between the patient and control groups (P>0.05). Thirty-eight subjects (37.62%) in the patient group had a suicide attempt. Twenty-three of these subjects (60.52%) had BD-I, and 15 of these subjects (39.47%) had BD-II. Suicide attempt rates in BD-I and II patients were 60.52% and 39.47%, respectively (P<0.05). Comparison of BD-I and II patients with healthy control subjects revealed that cooperativeness (C), self-directedness (Sdi), and self-transcendence (ST) scores were lower and novelty seeking (NS1 and NS2), harm avoidance (HA4), and reward dependence (RD2) subscale scores were higher in patients with BD-I. When BD-I patients were compared with BD-II patients, BIS-11 (attention) scores were higher in patients with BD-II and BIS-11 (motor and nonplanning impulsivity) scores were higher in patients with BD-I. According to BDFQ, relations with friends, participation in social activities, daily activities and hobbies, and occupation subscale scores were lower and taking initiative subscale scores were higher in patients with BD-I. Social withdrawal subscale scores were higher in patients with BD-II. Conclusion In our study, NS, HA, and RD scores that may be found high in suicide attempters and Sdi scores that may be found low in suicide attempters were as follows: NS1, NS2, HA4, and RD2 subscale scores were high and Sdi scores were low in patients with BD-I, suggesting a higher rate of suicide attempts in this group of patients. In addition, C and Sdi scores that indicate a predisposition to personality disorder were significantly lower in patients with BD-I than patients with BD-II and healthy controls, suggesting a higher rate of personality disorder comorbidity in patients with BD-I. Higher impulsivity and suicidality rates and poorer functionality in patients with BD-I also suggest that patients with BD-I may be more impulsive and more prone to suicide and have poorer functionality in some areas. PMID:26848266

  1. A Critical Compilation of Energy Levels, Spectral Lines, and Transition Probabilities of Singly Ionized Silver, Ag II

    PubMed Central

    Kramida, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    All available experimental measurements of the spectrum of the Ag+ ion are critically reviewed. Systematic shifts are removed from the measured wavelengths. The compiled list of critically evaluated wavelengths is used to derive a comprehensive list of energy levels with well-defined uncertainties. Eigenvector compositions and level designations are found in two alternate coupling schemes. Some of the older work is found to be incorrect. A revised value of the ionization energy, 173283(7) cm?1, equivalent to 21.4844(8) eV, is derived from the new energy levels. A set of critically evaluated transition probabilities is given. PMID:26401429

  2. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: II. Organism and population-level endpoints.

    PubMed

    Costa, Filipe O; Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to test the performance of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in chronic sediment toxicity tests. It constitutes part of a multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments, integrating organism and population-level endpoints with biochemical markers responses. Here we account for organism and population-level effects, while biomarker responses were reported in a companion article. Five moderately contaminated sediments from Sado and Tagus estuaries were tested, comprising 3 muddy and 2 sandy sediments. These sediments either did not show acute toxicity or were diluted with control sediment as much as required to remove acute toxicity. Subsequent chronic tests consisted of 28-day exposures with survival, individual growth and reproductive traits as endpoints. Two of the muddy sediments induced higher growth rates in the amphipods, and improved reproductive traits. This was understood to be a consequence of the amount of organic matter in the sediment, which was nutritionally beneficial to the amphipods, while concurrently decreasing contaminant bioavailability. Biomarker responses did not reveal toxicant-induced stress in amphipods exposed to these sediments. One of the sandy sediments was acutely toxic at 50% dilution, but in contrast stimulated amphipod growth when diluted 75%. This was presumed to be an indication of a hormetic response. Finally the two remaining contaminated sediments showed pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting survival and reproduction. The sex ratio of survivors was highly biased towards females, and offspring production was severely impaired. The particulars of the responses of this amphipod were examined, as well as strengths versus limitations of the sediment test. This study illustrates the utility of this chronic test for toxicity assessment of contaminated estuarine sediments, with potential application all along Atlantic Europe. PMID:15649529

  3. Potential side effects of dental amalgam restorations. (II). No relation between mercury levels in the body and mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Bratel, J; Haraldson, T; Ottosson, J O

    1997-06-01

    A group of 50 consecutive patients, referred for self-reported complaints which they related to dental amalgam restorations, was compared with control patients matched by age, sex and postal zip code. All patients were subjected to a psychiatric examination and a set of rating scales and questionnaires, and the symptoms were related to the mercury levels in blood, urine and hair. A psychiatric diagnosis was established in 70% of the patients in the index group versus 14% in the control group. The prevailing symptoms were anxiety, asthenia and depression. Mercury levels in blood, urine and hair were similar among index cases and controls, and were far below critical levels of mercury intoxication. There was no correlation between mercury levels and the severity of the reported symptoms. Therefore, mercury was not a likely cause of the complaints. Instead, the reported symptoms were part of a broad spectrum of mental disorders. PMID:9249191

  4. Room Temperature ppb Level Chlorine Gas Sensor Based on Copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine Films

    SciTech Connect

    Bedi, R. K.; Saini, Rajan; Mahajan, Aman

    2010-12-01

    Spin coating technique has been used to fabricate room temperature chlorine gas sensor based on copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine (CuPc(OBu){sub 8}) films. Gas sensor shows a response of 185% to few parts per billion level of Cl{sub 2} gas with response time of 9.5 minutes at room temperature. The interactions between sensor and analytes followed first order kinetics with rate constant 0.01{<=}k{<=}0.02. The chemiresistive sensor showed very good stability at room temperature over a long period of time.

  5. Patriot Games: Yes, Indeed, the British Are Coming! But M. T. Anderson's Revolutionary War Novel Is Unlike Anything You've Ever Read

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horning, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with 38-year-old writer Matthew Tobin Anderson. In the interview, Anderson talks about his experiences, passion for writing, teenage interests, and his relation to the distinguished writer Mark Twain. He also states the importance of liberty and what it takes to be a patriot and a loyalist. Furthermore, Matthew…

  6. Patriot Games: Yes, Indeed, the British Are Coming! But M. T. Anderson's Revolutionary War Novel Is Unlike Anything You've Ever Read

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horning, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with 38-year-old writer Matthew Tobin Anderson. In the interview, Anderson talks about his experiences, passion for writing, teenage interests, and his relation to the distinguished writer Mark Twain. He also states the importance of liberty and what it takes to be a patriot and a loyalist. Furthermore, Matthew

  7. Higher Lipoprotein (a) Levels Are Associated with Better Pulmonary Function in Community-Dwelling Older People – Data from the Berlin Aging Study II

    PubMed Central

    Buchmann, Nikolaus; Kassner, Ursula; Norman, Kristina; Goldeck, David; Eckardt, Rahel; Pawelec, Graham; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    Reduced pulmonary function and elevated serum cholesterol levels are recognized risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Currently, there is some controversy concerning relationships between cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, serum triglycerides and lung function. However, most previous studies compared patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with healthy controls, and only a small number examined this relationship in population-based cohorts. Moreover, lipoprotein a [Lp(a)], another lipid parameter independently associated with cardiovascular diseases, appears not to have been addressed at all in studies of lung function at the population level. Here, we determined relationships between lung function and several lipid parameters including Lp(a) in 606 older community-dwelling participants (55.1% women, 68±4 years old) from the Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II). We found a significantly lower forced expiration volume in 1 second (FEV1) in men with low Lp(a) concentrations (t-test). This finding was further substantiated by linear regression models adjusting for known covariates, showing that these associations are statistically significant in both men and women. According to the highest adjusted model, men and women with Lp(a) levels below the 20th percentile had 217.3ml and 124.2ml less FEV1 and 239.0ml and 135.2ml less FVC, respectively, compared to participants with higher Lp(a) levels. The adjusted models also suggest that the known strong correlation between pro-inflammatory parameters and lung function has only a marginal impact on the Lp(a)-pulmonary function association. Our results do not support the hypothesis that higher Lp(a) levels are responsible for the increased CVD risk in people with reduced lung function, at least not in the group of community-dwelling older people studied here. PMID:26421427

  8. Serum levels of renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II in patients treated by surgical excision, propranolol and captopril for problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Sulzberger, L; Baillie, R; Itinteang, T; de Jong, S; Marsh, R; Leadbitter, P; Tan, S T

    2016-03-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the biology of infantile haemangioma (IH) and its accelerated involution induced by β-blockers was first proposed in 2010. This led to the first clinical trial in 2012 using low-dose captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, demonstrating a similar response in these tumours. This study aimed to compare serial serum levels of the components of the RAS in patients before and after surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment for problematic proliferating IH. Patients with problematic proliferating IH underwent measurements of serum levels of plasma renin activity (PRA), ACE and angiotensin II (ATII) before, and 1-2 and 6 months following surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment. This study included 27 patients undergoing surgical excision (n = 8), propranolol (n = 11) and captopril (n = 8) treatment. Treatment with either surgical excision or propranolol resulted in significant decrease in the mean levels of PRA. Surgical excision or captopril treatment led to significant decline in the mean levels of ATII. All three treatment modalities had no significant effect on the mean levels of ACE. This study demonstrates the effect of surgical excision, propranolol and captopril treatment in lowering the levels of PRA and ATII, but not ACE, supporting a mechanistic role for the RAS in the biology of IH. PMID:26612192

  9. Assimilation of spatially distributed water levels into a shallow-water flood model. Part II: Use of a remote sensing image of Mosel River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostache, Renaud; Lai, Xijun; Monnier, Jérôme; Puech, Christian

    2010-09-01

    SummaryWith rapid flood extent mapping capabilities, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of river inundation prove to be very relevant to operational flood management. In this context, a recently developed method provides distributed water levels from SAR images. Furthermore, in view of improving numerical flood prediction, a variational data assimilation method (4D-var) using such distributed water level has been developed in Part I of this study. This method combines an optimal sense remote sensing data (distributed water levels extracted from spatial images) and a 2D shallow water model. In the present article (Part II of the study), we also derive water levels with a ±40 cm average vertical uncertainty from a RADARSAT-1 image of a Mosel River flood event (1997, France). Assimilated in a 2D shallow water hydraulic model using the 4D-var developed method, these SAR derived spatially distributed water levels prove to be capable of enhancing model calibration. Indeed, the assimilation process can identify optimal Manning friction coefficients, at least in the river channel. Moreover, used as a guide for sensitivity analysis, remote sensing water levels allow also identifying some areas in the floodplain and the channel where Manning friction coefficients are homogeneous. This allows basing the spatial segmentation of roughness coefficient on floodplain hydraulic functioning.

  10. No strong correlations between serum cytokine levels, CMV serostatus and hand-grip strength in older subjects in the Berlin BASE-II cohort.

    PubMed

    Goldeck, David; Pawelec, Graham; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Oettinger, Lilly; Haehnel, Karin; Demuth, Ilja

    2016-02-01

    Hand-grip strength is strongly correlated with measures of muscle mass and can be taken to predict morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hand-grip strength and other markers associated with immune ageing, such as Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, leukocyte telomere length and serum levels of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in the elderly. We have assessed grip strength with the Smedley Dynamometer in younger (22-37years) and older (60-85years) men and women in a sample of people living in Berlin (the BASE-II study). Serum cytokine levels were determined by flow-cytometry, CMV serostatus via ELISA and leukocyte telomere length by quantitative PCR. IL-1? levels tended to be negatively associated with grip strength, but we did not find a significant association with IL-6 levels. CMV-seropositivity was not associated with higher levels of IL-1?, IL-6 or TNF, nor with weaker grip strength in men or women at any age. A putative general measure of organismal ageing, overall leukocyte telomere length, was also found not to be associated with lower grip strength in the elderly. Hand-grip strength remains an important biomarker independent of CMV infection or shorter telomere lengths, and poorly reflected in peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, all of which have been associated in some studies with frailty and mortality. PMID:25906063

  11. The anderson's rotating interferometer and its application to binary star measurements. (French Title: L'interfromtre rotation de john august anderson (1876-1956) et son application - la tentative de rsolution de nouvelles binaires)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneau, D.

    2011-12-01

    Following the tests of interferometric observations carried out by Albert A. Michelson with the 2.5 m telescope of the Mount Wilson, George. E. Hale thinks that this technique could be applied to the measurement of close double stars. He asks John A. Anderson to produce an instrument allowing such measurements. The principle of the ocular rotating interferometer and the way of using it for the measurement of double stars are first described. Then the effects of atmospheric dispersion on the observation of the stellar interference fringes and the remedy that Anderson implements to compensate it are described. Images of the Anderson's interferometer are used to present the instrument and to describe its operation. Installed at the 2,5 m telescope, this instrument was used by Anderson and Paul W. Merrill to resolve the spectroscopic binary Capella for the first time, like a 'visual binary'. Moreover, Merrill took the measurement of two difficult visual pairs discovered by Aitken (kap UMa = A 1585 and nu2 Boo = A 1634) and tried to resolve some new visual binaries among stars known as binary spectroscopic, stars with composite spectra, variable stars and some bright stars, which led him to publish a list of 73 stars finally found simple. Finally, the remarks made by Merrill in conclusion of his work will be analyzed.

  12. Spatial variability in distribution and prevalence of Caribbean scleractinian coral and octocoral diseases. II. Genera-level analysis.

    PubMed

    Cróquer, Aldo; Weil, Ernesto

    2009-02-25

    Geographic assessments of coral/octocoral diseases affecting major reef-building genera and abundant reef species are important to understand their local and geographic spatial-temporal variability and their impact. The status and spatial variability of major Caribbean coral/octocoral diseases affecting important reef-building coral (Montastraea, Diploria, Siderastrea, Stephanocoenia, Porites, and Agaricia) and common, widespread octocoral genera (Gorgonia and Pseudopterogorgia) was assessed along 4 permanent 10 x 2 m band-transects in each of 3 depth habitats (<4, 5-12 and >15 m) on 2 reefs in 6 countries across the wider Caribbean during the summer and fall of 2005. A permutational multivariate analysis of variance was used to test the spatial variability (countries, reef sites and depth habitats) in prevalence of major diseases in these genera. We found a significant interaction of disease prevalence in the different coral and octocoral genera between reef sites and habitats (depth intervals). Montastraea was primarily affected by both white plague (WP-II) and yellow band disease in deep (16.9 +/- SE 16% and 16.9 +/- SE 2.3%) and intermediate (8.1 +/- SE 1.6% and 15.5 +/- SE 2.3%) depth habitats of Culebrita (Puerto Rico) and Chub Cut (Bermuda), respectively. Prevalence of multiple diseases simultaneously and other compromised-health problems affecting Montastraea colonies varied between 0.2 to 2% and 0.2 to 1.8%, respectively. Agaricia and Diploria were mostly affected by WP-II (0.5 to 16%), black band disease (0.4 to 5%) and Caribbean ciliate infections (0.2 to 12%). Siderastrea and Stephanocoenia were mainly affected by dark spots disease in Curaçao, with higher prevalence in intermediate (40.5 +/- SE 6.2%) and deep (26.6 +/- SE 4.2%) habitats. Aspergillosis and other compromised-health conditions affected Gorgonia ventalina (0.2 to 8%) and other common and widespread octocoral genera (1 to 14%), respectively. PMID:19402454

  13. Simple thermo-level meter for HeI and HeII by a dynamic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiki, H.

    A simple liquid helium level monitoring device has been developed using pairs of carbon resistors mounted on a stainless steel 'dipstick'. The device described has a resolution of 50 mm and negligible power dissipation. The level of both superfluid and normal helium, and the liquid temperatures, can be determined. The device has no moving parts and after some years of use has proved to be sturdy and durable. A similar device is proposed with a resolution of 12 mm and a microcomputer data recording system.

  14. Training Level, Acculturation, Role Ambiguity, and Multicultural Discussions in Training and Supervising International Counseling Students in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Kok-Mun; Smith, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    This research partially replicated Nilsson and Anderson's "Professional Psychology: Research and Practice" (2004) study on training and supervising international students. It investigated the relationships among international counseling students' training level, acculturation, supervisory working alliance (SWA), counseling self-efficacy (COSE),

  15. Involvement of Difference in Decrease of Hemoglobin Level in Poor Prognosis of Stage I and II Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Implication in Outcome of Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jin; Tao Yalan; Li Guo; Yi Wei; Xia Yunfei

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and the difference in its decrease during treatment on outcome of radiotherapy (RT) alone for patients with Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 572 patients with Stage I-II nasopharyngeal carcinoma with RT alone between January 2001 and December 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. Patient characteristics, tumor variables, and Hb level, including pre-RT Hb, mid-RT Hb, and dynamic change of Hb between pre- and post- RT and its difference in decrease ( White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb) were subjected to univariate and multivariable analysis to identify factors that predict disease-specific survival (DSS), local regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS). Results: The 5-year DSS was poorer in the Hb continuous decrease group than in the Hb noncontinuous decrease group (84% vs. 89%; p = 0.008). There was poorer 5-year DSS in patients with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of >11.5 g/L than in those with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of {<=}11.5 g/L (82% vs. 89%; p = 0.001), and poorer LRFS (79% vs. 83%; p = 0.035). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that Hb decrease difference with greater than 11.5 g/L was an independent prognostic factor for DSS and LRFS. Conclusions: The difference in decrease of Hb level during the course of radiation treatment appeared as a poor prognostic factor in Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

  16. One-dimensional Anderson Localization: distribution of wavefunction amplitude and phase at the band center

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V. E.; Yudson, V. I.

    2009-05-14

    The statistics of normalized wavefunctions in the one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model of localization is considered. It is shown that at any energy that corresponds to a rational filling factor f = (p/q) there is a statistical anomaly which is seen in expansion of the generating function (GF) to the order q-2 in the disorder parameter. We study in detail the principle anomaly at f = (1/2) that appears in the leading order. The transfer-matrix equation of the Fokker-Planck type with a two-dimensional internal space is derived for GF. It is shown that the zero-mode variant of this equation is integrable and a solution for the generating function is found in the thermodynamic limit.

  17. High-order terms in the renormalized perturbation theory for the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandis, Vassilis; Hewson, Alex C.

    2015-09-01

    We study the renormalized perturbation theory of the single-impurity Anderson model, particularly the high-order terms in the expansion of the self-energy in powers of the renormalized coupling U ˜. Though the presence of counterterms in the renormalized theory may appear to complicate the diagrammatics, we show how these can be seamlessly accommodated by carrying out the calculation order-by-order in terms of skeleton diagrams. We describe how the diagrams pertinent to the renormalized self-energy and four vertex can be automatically generated, translated into integrals, and numerically integrated. To maximize the efficiency of our approach we introduce a generalized k -particle/hole propagator, which is used to analytically simplify the resultant integrals and reduce the dimensionality of the integration. We present results for the self-energy and spectral density to fifth order in U ˜, for various values of the model asymmetry, and compare them to a numerical renormalization group calculation.

  18. Classical mapping for Hubbard operators: Application to the double-Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Miller, William H.; Levy, Tal J.; Rabani, Eran

    2014-05-28

    A classical Cartesian mapping for Hubbard operators is developed to describe the nonequilibrium transport of an open quantum system with many electrons. The mapping of the Hubbard operators representing the many-body Hamiltonian is derived by using analogies from classical mappings of boson creation and annihilation operators vis--vis a coherent state representation. The approach provides qualitative results for a double quantum dot array (double Anderson impurity model) coupled to fermionic leads for a range of bias voltages, Coulomb couplings, and hopping terms. While the width and height of the conduction peaks show deviations from the master equation approach considered to be accurate in the limit of weak system-leads couplings and high temperatures, the Hubbard mapping captures all transport channels involving transition between many electron states, some of which are not captured by approximate nonequilibrium Green function closures.

  19. Leggett Modes and the Anderson-Higgs Mechanism in Superconductors without Inversion Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Nikolaj; Einzel, Dietrich; Klam, Ludwig; Manske, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    We develop a microscopic and gauge-invariant theory for collective modes resulting from the phase of the superconducting order parameter in noncentrosymmetric superconductors. Considering various crystal symmetries, we derive the corresponding gauge mode ?G(q ) and find, in particular, new Leggett modes ?L(q ) with characteristic properties that are unique to noncentrosymmetric superconductors. We calculate their mass and dispersion that reflect the underlying spin-orbit coupling and thus the balance between triplet and singlet superconductivity occurring simultaneously. Finally, we demonstrate the role of the Anderson-Higgs mechanism: while the long-range Coulomb interaction shifts ?G(q ) to the condensate plasma mode ?P(q ), it leaves the mass ?0 of the new Leggett mode unaffected and only slightly modifies its dispersion.

  20. Efficient Localization Bounds in a Continuous N-Particle Anderson Model with Long-Range Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaevsky, Victor

    2016-02-01

    We establish strong dynamical and exponential spectral localization for a class of multi-particle Anderson models in a Euclidean space with an alloy-type random potential and a sub-exponentially decaying interaction of infinite range. For the first time in the mathematical literature, the uniform decay bounds on the eigenfunction correlators (EFCs) at low energies are proved, in the multi-particle continuous configuration space, in the (symmetrized) norm-distance, which is a natural distance in the multi-particle configuration space, and not in the Hausdorff distance. This results in uniform bounds on the EFCs in arbitrarily large but bounded domains in the physical configuration space, and not only in the actually infinite space, as in prior works on multi-particle localization in Euclidean spaces.

  1. Decay of a nonlinear impurity in a structured continuum from a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2007-05-01

    The decay dynamics of a nonlinear impurity mode embedded in a linear structured continuum is theoretically investigated in the framework of a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model. A gradient flow dynamics for the survival probability is derived in the Van Hove ({lambda}{sup 2}t) limit by a multiple-scale asymptotic analysis, and the role of nonlinearity on the decay law is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the existence of bound states embedded in the continuum acts as transient trapping states which slow down the decay. The dynamical behavior predicted in the {lambda}{sup 2}t limit is studied in detail for a simple tight-binding one-dimensional lattice model, which may describe electron or photon transport in condensed matter or photonic systems. Numerical simulations of the underlying equations confirm, in particular, the trapping effect in the decay process due to bound states embedded in the continuum.

  2. Leveraging Anderson Acceleration for improved convergence of iterative solutions to transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willert, Jeffrey; Taitano, William T.; Knoll, Dana

    2014-09-01

    In this note we demonstrate that using Anderson Acceleration (AA) in place of a standard Picard iteration can not only increase the convergence rate but also make the iteration more robust for two transport applications. We also compare the convergence acceleration provided by AA to that provided by moment-based acceleration methods. Additionally, we demonstrate that those two acceleration methods can be used together in a nested fashion. We begin by describing the AA algorithm. At this point, we will describe two application problems, one from neutronics and one from plasma physics, on which we will apply AA. We provide computational results which highlight the benefits of using AA, namely that we can compute solutions using fewer function evaluations, larger time-steps, and achieve a more robust iteration.

  3. Perfect absorption in nanotextured thin films via Anderson-localized photon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschlimann, Martin; Brixner, Tobias; Differt, Dominik; Heinzmann, Ulrich; Hensen, Matthias; Kramer, Christian; Lkermann, Florian; Melchior, Pascal; Pfeiffer, Walter; Piecuch, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Stiebig, Helmut; Strber, Christian; Thielen, Philip

    2015-10-01

    The enhancement of light absorption in absorber layers is crucial in a number of applications, including photovoltaics and thermoelectrics. The efficient use of natural resources and physical constraints such as limited charge extraction in photovoltaic devices require thin but efficient absorbers. Among the many different strategies used, light diffraction and light localization at randomly nanotextured interfaces have been proposed to improve absorption. Although already exploited in commercial devices, the enhancement mechanism for devices with nanotextured interfaces is still subject to debate. Using coherent two-dimensional nanoscopy and coherent light scattering, we demonstrate the existence of localized photonic states in nanotextured amorphous silicon layers as used in commercial thin-film solar cells. Resonant absorption in these states accounts for the enhanced absorption in the long-wavelength cutoff region. Our observations establish that Anderson localizationthat is, strong localizationis a highly efficient resonant absorption enhancement mechanism offering interesting opportunities for the design of efficient future absorber layers.

  4. Decoherence-induced conductivity in the one-dimensional Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Stegmann, Thomas; Wolf, Dietrich E.; Ujsághy, Orsolya

    2014-08-20

    We study the effect of decoherence on the electron transport in the one-dimensional Anderson model by means of a statistical model [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. In this model decoherence bonds are randomly distributed within the system, at which the electron phase is randomized completely. Afterwards, the transport quantity of interest (e.g. resistance or conductance) is ensemble averaged over the decoherence configurations. Averaging the resistance of the sample, the calculation can be performed analytically. In the thermodynamic limit, we find a decoherence-driven transition from the quantum-coherent localized regime to the Ohmic regime at a critical decoherence density, which is determined by the second-order generalized Lyapunov exponent (GLE) [4].

  5. Self-Consistent Theory of Anderson Localization in Two Dimensions in View of Exact Transport Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Y.; Itoh, M.

    2012-10-01

    Self-consistent theory of Anderson localization of two-dimensional non-interacting electrons is formulated in the context of the exact transport equation and conductivity expression derived by the present authors (YI). The irreducible scattering vertex by Vollhardt and Wlfle (VW) is used in this equation, determining the diffusion coefficient in the scattering vertex self-consistently, through Einstein relation. It predicts a similar localization length to that obtained by VW, but shows that the conductivity evaluated by the Kubo formula decays exponentially, as the system size approaches the localization length. The result is opposed to the prediction by VW, who showed different behaviour of the diffusion coefficient that is equivalent to our conductivity. Our calculation also implies that the localization may be described along with the Landau-Silin theory of Fermi liquid.

  6. Induced delocalization by correlation and interaction in the one-dimensional Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Conrad; Wimberger, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    We consider long-range correlated disorder and mutual interacting particles according to a dipole-dipole coupling as modifications to the one-dimensional Anderson model. Technically, we rely on the numerical exact diagonalization of the system's Hamilitonian. From the perspective of different localization measures, we confirm and extend the picture of the emergence of delocalized states with increasing correlations. Besides these studies, a definition for multiparticle localization is proposed. In the case of two interacting bosons, we observe a sensitivity of localization with respect to the range of the particle-particle interaction and insensitivity to the coupling's sign, which should stimulate new theoretical approaches and experimental investigations with, e.g., dipolar cold quantum gases.

  7. Low temperature phases of the periodic Anderson model with electron-phonon correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enzhi; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Shuxiang; Tam, Ka-Ming; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We study the periodic Anderson model with the conduction electrons coupled to phonons. It has been shown by using the dynamical mean field theory that the model contains two disordered phases, the Kondo singlet phase for strong hybridization and the local moment phase for weak hybridization. In the hybridization-temperature plane, these two phases are separated by a first order phase transition line which terminates at a second order phase transition point. At low temperature the entropy in the Kondo singlet phase is quenched by the formation of a Fermi liquid, while the local moment phase will have residual entropy unless it is quenched by ordering. We calculate the lattice charge susceptibility to demonstrate that the conduction electrons form a charge density wave ordering below a critical temperature. The current work is funded by the NSF EPSCoR LA-SiGMA project under Award #EPS-1003897.

  8. Laparoscopic Anderson-Hynes procedure as a treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction caused by fibroepithelial polyp.

    PubMed

    Szydelko, Tomasz; Tuchendler, Tomasz; Litarski, Adam; Urba?czyk, Grzegorz; Apozna?ski, Wojciech; Janczak, Dariusz

    2013-12-01

    Fibroepithelial polyps (FEPs) are rare benign ureteral neoplasms of mesodermal origin. As an intrinsic cause of ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) they are very uncommon. Excretory urography and diuretic renography used by many urologists to diagnose a UPJO may not detect the ureteral polyp. We present a case of ureteropelvic junction obstruction caused by a fibroepithelial polyp, which was not diagnosed preoperatively. The patient underwent successful laparoscopic excision of the polyp with Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty. We believe that laparoscopy is a useful, minimally invasive operative technique in the treatment of FEPs and may be considered a procedure of choice in large polyps, in which cases the endoscopic procedure is difficult or impossible to perform. PMID:24501609

  9. Wavepacket dynamics of coupled particles in aperiodic chains: Weakening of Anderson localization and local field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixoto, A. S.; Dias, W. S.; Lyra, M. L.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2014-02-01

    We study the wavepacket dynamics of two interacting particles under an aperiodic potential that can be continuously tuned from a pseudo-random to a uniform regime. Assuming an on-site Hubbard interaction, we show that the influence of interaction is not strong enough to change the characteristic aperiodicity that signals the emergence of extended states. However, we unveil that the inter-particles interaction promotes a weakening of Anderson localization that is more prominent at intermediate couplings. The wavepacket dynamics in the regime presenting extended eigenstates show an oscillatory motion of the centroid while the wavepacket widens. We explain in detail the origin of these oscillations and discuss the characteristics of the Bloch oscillations of the two-particles wavepacket by exploring the relevance of bounded states to the dynamics of pair formation.

  10. The Anderson localization problem, the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam paradox and the generalized diffusion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovkov, V. N.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this paper is twofold. First, based on the interpretation of a quantum tight-binding model in terms of a classical Hamiltonian map, we consider the Anderson localization (AL) problem as the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) effect in a modified dynamical system containing both stable and unstable (inverted) modes. Delocalized states in the AL are analogous to the stable quasi-periodic motion in FPU, whereas localized states are analogous to thermalization, respectively. The second aim is to use the classical Hamilton map for a simplified derivation of exact equations for the localization operator H(z). The latter was presented earlier (Kuzovkov et al 2002 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 14 13777) treating the AL as a generalized diffusion in a dynamical system. We demonstrate that counter-intuitive results of our studies of the AL are similar to the FPU counter-intuitivity.

  11. Anderson localization with second quantized fields in a coupled array of waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Clinton; Vemuri, Gautam; Agarwal, G. S.

    2010-11-15

    We report a theoretical study of Anderson localization of nonclassical light in an array of waveguides in which neighboring waveguides are evanescently coupled and in which the disorder can be added in a controlled manner. We use squeezed light at the input to investigate the effects of nonclassicality and compare the results with those obtained by using conventional classical fields, such as a coherent field and a Gaussian field. Our results show that there is an enhancement in fluctuations of localized light due to the medium's disorder. We find superbunching of the localized light, which may be useful for enhancing the interaction between radiation and matter. Another important consequence of sub-Poissonian statistics of the incoming light is to quench the total fluctuations at the output. Finally, we show that as a result of the multiplicative noise in the problem, the output field is far from Gaussian even if the input is a coherent field.

  12. Strong-disorder renormalization group study of the Anderson localization transition in three and higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan Mard, Hossein; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir; Hoyos, José A.; Miranda, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    We implement an efficient strong-disorder renormalization group (SDRG) procedure for disordered tight-binding models in dimension D >= 3 , including the localization properties on Erdős-Rényi random graphs, which represent an appropriate infinite dimensional limit. Our dramatically improved SDRG algorithm is based on a judicious elimination of most (irrelevant) new bonds generated under RG. It yields excellent agreement with exact numerical results for universal properties at the critical point, without significant increase of the required computer time, even as the spatial dimension is increased beyond D = 3 . This opens an efficient avenue to explore the critical properties of Anderson transition in the strong-coupling limit of high spatial dimensions.

  13. Measuring service quality at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E A; Zwelling, L A

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates the service quality of four clinics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center using a questionnaire methodology. The SERVQUAL instrument was administered to patients of the Medical Breast, Leukemia, Medical Gastroenterology and Bone Marrow Aspiration clinics. Results show that, according to the service gap methodology of comparing expectations and perceptions, across all four clinics the issues of billing accuracy and waiting times are deemed by patients as significant problems. In comparing the individual clinics, the Medical Gastroenterology and Leukemia clinics are best performers and the Medical Breast clinic is the worst. However, these differences in performance are due to differences in patients' expectations of service quality, rather than differences in perceptions. Concludes that customer expectations can have a strong impact on a firm's evaluation of its service quality. PMID:10162922

  14. Magnetic localization in the spin-polarized one-dimensional Anderson-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, M.; Yamada, S.; Machida, M.; Taniguchi, N.

    2009-05-01

    In order to study an interplay of disorder, correlation, and spin imbalance on antiferromagnetism, we systematically explore the ground state of one-dimensional spin-imbalanced Anderson-Hubbard model by using the density-matrix renormalization-group method. We find that disorders localize the antiferromagnetic spin-density wave induced by imbalanced fermions and the increase in the disorder magnitude shrinks the areas of the localized antiferromagnetized regions. Moreover, the antiferromagnetism finally disappears above a large disorder. The localization behaviors are observable in atomic Fermi gases loaded on optical lattices as broadening of the momentum distribution of the spin density by using the Stern-Gerlach type of time-of-flight imaging.

  15. Probing Anderson localization of light by weak non-linear effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, T.; Bhrer, W.; Ackermann, M.; Aegerter, C. M.; Maret, G.

    2014-11-01

    Breakdown of wave transport due to strong disorder is a universal phenomenon known as Anderson localization (AL). It occurs because of the macroscopic population of reciprocal multiple scattering paths, which in three dimensional systems happens at a critical scattering strength. Intensities on these random loops should thus be highly increased relative to those of a diffusive sample. In order to highlight localized modes of light, we exploit the optical nonlinearities of TiO2. Power dependent and spectrally resolved time of flight distribution measurements in transmission through slabs of TiO2 powders at various turbidities reveal that mostly long loops are affected by nonlinearities and that the deviations from diffusive transport observed at long times are due to these localized modes. Our data are a first step in the experimental investigation of the interplay between nonlinear effects and AL in 3D.

  16. High-energy neutron dosimetry at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, M.W.; Vasilik, D.G.; Littlejohn, G.J.; Cortez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility indicated potential areas for high energy neutron exposure to personnel. The low sensitivity of the Los Alamos thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) to high energy neutrons warranted issuing a NTA dosimeter in addition to the TLD badge to employees entering these areas. The dosimeter consists of a plastic holder surrounding NTA film that has been desiccated and sealed in a dry nitrogen environment. A study of the fading of latent images in NTA film demonstrated the success of this packaging method to control the phenomenon. The Los Alamos NTA dosimeter is characterized and the fading study discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Competition between Hund's coupling and Kondo effect in a one-dimensional extended periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagymsi, I.; Slyom, J.; Legeza, .

    2015-07-01

    We study the ground-state properties of an extended periodic Anderson model to understand the role of Hund's coupling between localized and itinerant electrons using the density-matrix renormalization group algorithm. By calculating the von Neumann entropies we show that two phase transitions occur and two new phases appear as the hybridization is increased in the symmetric half-filled case due to the competition between Kondo effect and Hund's coupling. In the intermediate phase, which is bounded by two critical points, we found a dimerized ground state, while in the other spatially homogeneous phases the ground state is Haldane-like and Kondo-singlet-like, respectively. We also determine the entanglement spectrum and the entanglement diagram of the system by calculating the mutual information thereby clarifying the structure of each phase.

  18. Leveraging Anderson Acceleration for improved convergence of iterative solutions to transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Taitano, William T.; Knoll, Dana

    2014-09-15

    In this note we demonstrate that using Anderson Acceleration (AA) in place of a standard Picard iteration can not only increase the convergence rate but also make the iteration more robust for two transport applications. We also compare the convergence acceleration provided by AA to that provided by moment-based acceleration methods. Additionally, we demonstrate that those two acceleration methods can be used together in a nested fashion. We begin by describing the AA algorithm. At this point, we will describe two application problems, one from neutronics and one from plasma physics, on which we will apply AA. We provide computational results which highlight the benefits of using AA, namely that we can compute solutions using fewer function evaluations, larger time-steps, and achieve a more robust iteration.

  19. Classical mapping for Hubbard operators: application to the double-Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Miller, William H; Levy, Tal J; Rabani, Eran

    2014-05-28

    A classical Cartesian mapping for Hubbard operators is developed to describe the nonequilibrium transport of an open quantum system with many electrons. The mapping of the Hubbard operators representing the many-body Hamiltonian is derived by using analogies from classical mappings of boson creation and annihilation operators vis-à-vis a coherent state representation. The approach provides qualitative results for a double quantum dot array (double Anderson impurity model) coupled to fermionic leads for a range of bias voltages, Coulomb couplings, and hopping terms. While the width and height of the conduction peaks show deviations from the master equation approach considered to be accurate in the limit of weak system-leads couplings and high temperatures, the Hubbard mapping captures all transport channels involving transition between many electron states, some of which are not captured by approximate nonequilibrium Green function closures. PMID:24880265

  20. Analytic Flow Equations for the Fermi Liquid Parameters of the Anderson Impurity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandis, Vassilis; Hewson, Alex C.

    2015-08-01

    The low temperature behavior of a Fermi liquid can be described in terms of quasiparticle excitations that are in 1-1 correspondence with those of the noninteracting system. Because of adiabatic continuity, the Landau parameters, which describe the interactions between the quasiparticles, must evolve continuously as the interactions are turned on and be described by a set of flow equations. For strongly correlated electron systems it is not possible to follow this flow in perturbation theory when the interactions become strong. We explore the idea here of overcoming this problem by renormalizing the quasiparticles in this flow using a renormalized perturbation theory. This approach is tested in the case of a single impurity Anderson model. Analytic flow equations are derived which give excellent results for the Landau parameters in the strong correlation regime.

  1. GW approach to Anderson model in and out of equilibrium : scaling properties in the Kondo regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Spataru, Dan Catalin

    2010-03-01

    The low-energy properties of the Anderson model for a single impurity coupled to two leads are studied using the GW approximation. We find that quantities such as the spectral function at zero temperature, the linear-response conductance as function of temperature or the differential conductance as function of bias voltage exhibit universal scaling behavior in the Kondo regime. We show how the form of the GW scaling functions relates to the form of the scaling functions obtained from the exact solution at equilibrium. We also compare the energy scale that goes inside the GW scaling functions with the exact Kondo temperature, for a broad range of the Coulomb interaction strength in the asymptotic regime. This analysis allows to clarify a presently suspended question in the literature, namely whether or not the GW solution captures the Kondo resonance.

  2. Quantum critical phase and Lifshitz transition in an extended periodic Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Laad, M S; Koley, S; Taraphder, A

    2012-06-13

    We study the quantum phase transition in f-electron systems as a quantum Lifshitz transition driven by selective-Mott localization in a realistic extended Anderson lattice model. Using dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), we find that a quantum critical phase with anomalous ω/T scaling separates a heavy Landau-Fermi liquid from ordered phase(s). This non-Fermi liquid state arises from a lattice orthogonality catastrophe originating from orbital-selective Mott localization. Fermi surface reconstruction occurs via the interplay between and penetration of the Green function zeros to the poles, leading to violation of Luttinger's theorem in the strange metal. We show how this naturally leads to scale-invariant responses in transport. Thus, our work represents a specific DMFT realization of the hidden-FL and FL* theories, and holds promise for the study of 'strange' metal phases in quantum matter. PMID:22589244

  3. Behavior of mercury in bio-systems. II. Depuration of /sup 203/Hg/sup 2 +/ in various trophic levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdy, M.K.; Prabhu, N.V.

    1984-01-01

    Using radiotracer techniques, the depuration rates for methylmercury at three trophic levels in an aquatic ecosystem are examined. Bacteria (decomposers), mosquito larvae (primary consumers), and fish (secondary consumers) were studied. Results indicated that depuration rates for mercury were temperature dependent - the rate of depuration increased with increase in temperature (up to 45/sup 0/C)

  4. Circulating Apo 2L levels decreased in genotype II hepatitis C with pegylated interferon-2 alpha treatment.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Arzu Didem; Celik, Betul; Kose, Sukran; Seyman, Derya; Gumuslu, Saadet; Yalcin, Ata Nevzat

    2014-12-01

    Pro-inflammatory factors regulated by TRAIL in vivo may lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for diseases as diverse as infection, autoimmunity and allergy. In this study we aimed to investigate the relationship between IFN treatment response, HCV viral load and sApo 2L levels. Eleven HCV-treatment naive HCV-infected patients were treated with pegIFN alfa-2a. Intensive serum circulating Apo 2L levels were monitored at study visits on day 0 (pretreatment), and in weeks 4, 6 and 12. HCV-RNA and sApo 2L levels decreased gradually with PegIF-alfa 2 treatment and the differences were significant between day 0 and week 4 (p 0.001, p 0.005 and p 0.01, p 0.005 respectively); between day 0 and week 12 (p 0.001, p 0.005 and p 0.001, p 0.000 respectively); between weeks 6 and 12 (p 0.01, p 0.05 and p 0.01, p 0.05 respectively). We suggest that decreased levels of circulating Apo 2L may reflect its increased binding to its ligand expressed on hepatocytes or lymphocytes under the influence of PegIFN treatment. PMID:25551843

  5. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT TOXICITY: II. COMPARISON OF GENERIC BENCHMARK DOSE ESTIMATES WITH NO OBSERVED ADVERSE EFFECT LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses (RfDDTS) or reference concentrations (RfCDTS) based on the use of no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELS) divided by uncertainty factors (UFs)The benchmark dose (BUD) has been proposed...

  6. The National Council for Geographic Education Competency-Based Geography Test. Secondary Level. Form I. Parts I, II, and III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurfman, Dana G.; And Others

    A 3-part test measures the geography knowledge, skills, and understanding of secondary level students. Part 1, map skills and location, contains 20 questions involving the use of three maps: an imaginary sketch map, a contour map, and a political map of the world. Part 2 consists of 20 questions covering physical geography. Students analyze

  7. Investigation of a near mid-gap trap energy level in mid-wavelength infrared InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrbel, Jaros?aw; Ciura, ?ukasz; Motyka, Marcin; Szmulowicz, Frank; Kolek, Andrzej; Kowalewski, Andrzej; Moszczy?ski, Pawe?; Dyksik, Mateusz; Madejczyk, Pawe?; Krishna, Sanjay; Rogalski, Antoni

    2015-11-01

    In this report, we present results of an experimental investigation of a near mid-gap trap energy level in InAs10 ML/GaSb10 ML type-II superlattices. Using thermal analysis of dark current, Fourier transform photoluminescence and low-frequency noise spectroscopy, we have examined several wafers and diodes with similar period design and the same macroscopic construction. All characterization techniques gave nearly the same value of about 140 meV independent of substrate type. Additionally, photoluminescence spectra show that the transition related to the trap centre is temperature independent. The presented methodology for thermal analysis of dark current characteristics should be useful to easily estimate the position of deep energy levels in superlattice photodiodes.

  8. Molecular analysis and intestinal expression of SAR1 genes and proteins in Anderson's disease (Chylomicron retention disease)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anderson's disease (AD) or chylomicron retention disease (CMRD) is a very rare hereditary lipid malabsorption syndrome. In order to discover novel mutations in the SAR1B gene and to evaluate the expression, as compared to healthy subjects, of the Sar1 gene and protein paralogues in the intestine, we investigated three previously undescribed individuals with the disease. Methods The SAR1B, SAR1A and PCSK9 genes were sequenced. The expression of the SAR1B and SAR1A genes in intestinal biopsies of both normal individuals and patients was measured by RTqPCR. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies to recombinant Sar1 protein was used to evaluate the expression and localization of the Sar1 paralogues in the duodenal biopsies. Results Two patients had a novel SAR1B mutation (p.Asp48ThrfsX17). The third patient, who had a previously described SAR1B mutation (p.Leu28ArgfsX7), also had a p.Leu21dup variant of the PCSK9 gene. The expression of the SAR1B gene in duodenal biopsies from an AD/CMRD patient was significantly decreased whereas the expression of the SAR1A gene was significantly increased, as compared to healthy individuals. The Sar1 proteins were present in decreased amounts in enterocytes in duodenal biopsies from the patients as compared to those from healthy subjects. Conclusions Although the proteins encoded by the SAR1A and SAR1B genes are 90% identical, the increased expression of the SAR1A gene in AD/CMRD does not appear to compensate for the lack of the SAR1B protein. The PCSK9 variant, although reported to be associated with low levels of cholesterol, does not appear to exert any additional effect in this patient. The results provide further insight into the tissue-specific nature of AD/CMRD. PMID:21235735

  9. Correlation between levels of expression of minichromosome maintenance proteins, Ki-67 proliferation antigen and metallothionein I/II in laryngeal squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Nowinska, Katarzyna; Chmielewska, Magdalena; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Pula, Bartosz; Pastuszewski, Wojciech; Krecicki, Tomasz; Podhorska-Oko?ow, Marzena; Zabel, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    MCM2, MCM3 and MCM7 are minichromosome maintenance proteins found in dividing cells and they play a role in DNA synthesis. Increased MCM expression level is observed in cells of different cancer types. Additionally, metallothioneins (MT-I/II) are involved in control of cell proliferation and differentiation and changes of their expression are observed in many types of cancer. Ki-67 is known cancer cell proliferation antigen currently used in prognostic evaluation. The study material consisted of 83 laryngeal squamous cell cancer (LSCC) cases and 10 benign hypertrophic lesions of larynx epithelium as a control group. For the present study, laryngeal cancer cell line HEp-2 and human keratinocytes were employed, and to evaluate expression of all the markers, immunohistochemical method (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF) and western blot analysis were used. Statistical analysis showed strong positive correlation between expression of MCM2, MCM3, MCM7 and Ki-67 antigen in LSCC. Additionally, moderate positive correlation was observed between MCM3 and MT-I/II expression. In cancer cells, the level of expression of MCM3, MCM2, MCM7 and Ki-67 markers was increasing with the grade of LSCC malignancy. IF and western blot analysis showed higher MCM2, MCM3, MCM7 expression in HEp-2 cells in comparison to their expression in keratinocytes. MCM proteins might be useful markers of cell proliferation in LSCC. PMID:26648405

  10. Angiotensin II receptor blockers decreased blood glucose levels: a longitudinal survey using data from electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Noboru; Takahashi, Yasuo; Yamadate, Shuukoh; Asai, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    Background A beneficial effect on glucose metabolism is reported with angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) treatment of hypertension. The effect on blood glucose level during the course of treatment with ARBs in clinical cases is uncertain. Our objectives were to survey the changes in glucose and HbA1c levels in patients with hypertension over a one-year period, and to study the correlations between these values and the time after the start of ARB therapy. Methods We conducted a retrospective longitudinal survey of blood glucose and HbA1c measurements in Japanese patients aged ?20 years with newly diagnosed hypertension but without diabetes, who had received ARB monotherapy with candesartan cilexetil, losartan potassium, olmesartan medoxomil, telmisartan, or valsartan during the period from December 2004 to November 2005. Data including 2465 measurements of non-fasting blood glucose in 485 patients and 457 measurements of HbA1c in 155 patients were obtained from electronic medical records of Nihon University School of Medicine. Linear mixed effects models were used to analyze the relationship between these longitudinal data of blood examinations and covariates of patient age, sex, medication, and duration of ARB therapy. Results Casual blood glucose level was associated with the duration of treatment (P < 0.0001), but not with age, sex, or medication. Blood glucose level was significantly decreased during the periods of 0~3 months (P < 0.0001) and 3~6 months (P = 0.0081) compared with baseline, but was not significantly different between 6~12 months and baseline. There was no association between HbA1c level and covariates of sex, age, medication and duration of treatment. Conclusion Our findings provide new clinical evidence that the effects of ARBs on glucose metabolism may change during the course of treatment, suggesting a blood glucose-lowering effect in the short-term after the start of treatment. PMID:17903269

  11. Volcanic ash dispersed in the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Triplehorn, D.M.; Stanton, R.W.; Ruppert, L.F.; Crowley, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    Minerals derived from air-fall volcanic ash were found in two zones in the upper Paleocene Wyodak-Anderson coal bed of the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, and are the first reported evidence of such volcanic material in this thick (> 20 m) coal bed. The volcanic minerals occur in zones that are not visually obvious because they contain little or no clay. These zones were located by geophysical logs of the boreholes and X-ray radiography of the cores. The zones correspond to two of a series of incremental core samples of the coal bed that have anomalous concentrations of Zr, Ba, Nb, Sr, and P2O5. Two suites of minerals were found in both of the high-density zones. A primary suite (not authigenic) consists of silt-sized quartz grains, biotite, and minor zircon. A minor suite consists of authigenic minerals, including calcite, pyrite, kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and an alumino-phosphate (crandallite?). The original volcanic ash is inferred to have consisted of silica glass containing phenocrysts of quartz, biotite, zircon, and possibly, associated feldspars, pyroxenes, and amphiboles. The glass, as well as the less stable minerals, probably dissolved relatively quickly and contributed to the minor authigenic mineral suite or was removed from the peat as a result of the prevailing hydrologic conditions present in a raised peat formation. This type of volcanic ash suggests that suggests that volcanic material could have rained on the peat; this fallout may have also had a fertilizing effect on the peat by providing nutrients essential for plant growth thus contributing to the thick accumulations of the Wyodak-Anderson bed. Notwithstanding, the presence of these minerals provides evidence for the contribution by volcanic sources to the mineral content of coal, but not as tonsteins. ?? 1991.

  12. Computer-assisted reconstruction of stratigraphic framework of an Anderson coal deposit, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, F.W.; Molnia, C.L.

    1985-05-01

    The Big George coal bed, 30 mi (48 km) west of Gillette, Wyoming, is the thickest part of a large Anderson coal deposit. The coal resources of this central core, essentially a single bed of coal up to 202 ft (62 m) thick, were previously estimated at 113 billion short tons. This deposit is in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation; overburden ranges from 700 to 2400 ft (213 to 732 m). The Big George bed was initially outlined using geophysical logs from nearly 300 oil and gas drill holes. More logs were studied in the northern portion of Big George and as far north as the Montana state line to examine the entire system of coal beds that includes this thick bed. We interpreted geophysical logs primarily for coal and sandstone, digitized lithologic intervals, and generated strip logs of lithologic sequences using a microcomputer. These computer-generated strip logs of lithologic sequences using a microcomputer. These computer-generated logs were generated in lines of sections, on matching elevations, to reconstruct the stratigraphic framework of subsurface coal in this part of the Powder River basin. The framework was used to trace the interval containing the Anderson deposit into the Decker, Montana, and Recluse, Wyoming, areas. This interval appears to be confined by the Smith coal bed above; the bottom of the interval is less well defined. Lithologic patterns of the framework suggest that a major fluvial channel system defined part of the northwestern boundary of the Big George coal bed. The locations of these channels may have been controlled primarily by Laramide deformation in the Powder River basin.

  13. Identification and Analysis of Learning Preferences of Mentally Ill Adults in Rehabilitative Psychosocial Therapy at the Anderson Mental Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Michael K.

    A study identified and analyzed the learning preferences of 17 seriously and chronically mentally ill adults participating in the rehabilitative psychosocial therapy program at the Toxaway Church Site of the Anderson Mental Health Center. Staff perceived as boring and unfocused the traditional treatment approach that relied mainly upon…

  14. A versatile and highly efficient post-functionalization method for grafting organic molecules onto Anderson-type polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecht, Stef; Jacobs, Jeroen; Van Meervelt, Luc; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2015-11-28

    A new azide functionalized Anderson polyoxometalate was synthesized, fully characterized and subsequently used as a building block for further POM post-functionalization with organic compounds through a copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Optimization of the reaction conditions led to an efficient, fast, convenient and versatile POM coupling method. PMID:26486549

  15. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony before the Joint Committee last year, Professor Samuel... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS §...

  16. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony before the Joint Committee last year, Professor Samuel... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS §...

  17. Statistical measurements of quantum emitters coupled to Anderson-localized modes in disordered photonic-crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Alisa; Maibom, Sebastian; Sapienza, Luca; Thyrrestrup, Henri; Garca, Pedro D; Lodahl, Peter

    2014-12-15

    We present a statistical study of the Purcell enhancement of the light emission from quantum dots coupled to Anderson-localized cavities formed in disordered photonic-crystal waveguides. We measure the time-resolved light emission from both single quantum emitters coupled to Anderson-localized cavities and directly from the cavities that are fed by multiple quantum dots. Strongly inhibited and enhanced decay rates are observed relative to the rate of spontaneous emission in a homogeneous medium. From a statistical analysis, we report an average Purcell factor of 4.5 0.4 without applying any spectral tuning. By spectrally tuning individual quantum dots into resonance with Anderson-localized modes, a maximum Purcell factor of 23.8 1.5 is recorded, which is at the onset of the strong-coupling regime. Our data quantify the potential of Anderson-localized cavities for controlling and enhancing the light-matter interaction strength in a photonic-crystal waveguide, which is of relevance for cavity quantum-electrodynamics experiments, efficient energy harvesting and random lasing. PMID:25607048

  18. Genomic organization and reproductive regulation of a carrier/storage protein in the Varroa Mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genomic region and corresponding transcript of the most abundant protein in the phoretic varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), were sequenced and found to be homologous with hemelipoglyco-proteins (HeLP/CP) of acarines. The genomic arrangement showed the presence of 14 in...

  19. A novel single-side azobenzene-grafted Anderson-type polyoxometalate for recognition-induced chiral migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Yue, Liang; Wang, Yang; Yang, Yang; Wu, Lixin

    2014-09-25

    A three-component supramolecular hybrid system based on host-guest recognition and electrostatic interaction has been developed for a consecutive chiral transfer from an alpha-cyclodextrin to cationic dyes via the bridge of a new azobenzene-grafted Anderson-type polyoxometalate cluster. PMID:25089807

  20. Semi-empirical Anderson-Newns-Grimley model for qualitative study of metal clusters adsorbed on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaev, S. Zh.

    1992-07-01

    The possibility of application of the semi-empirical Anderson-Newns-Grimley model to qualitative determination of Green functions of metal clusters adsorbed on metal substrates is discussed. The Green functions of the adatoms in adsorbed clusters differing in size and geometry are obtained.

  1. Binge-like ethanol consumption increases corticosterone levels and neurodegneration whereas occupancy of type II glucocorticoid receptors with mifepristone is neuroprotective.

    PubMed

    Cippitelli, Andrea; Damadzic, Ruslan; Hamelink, Carol; Brunnquell, Michael; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus; Eskay, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Excessive ethanol (EtOH) use leads to impaired memory and cognition. Using a rat model of binge-like intoxication, we tested whether elevated corticosterone (Cort) levels contribute to the neurotoxic consequences of EtOH exposure. Rats were adrenalectomized (Adx) and implanted with cholesterol pellets, or cholesterol pellets containing Cort in order to achieve basal, medium, or high blood concentrations of Cort. Intragastric EtOH or an isocaloric control solution was given three times daily for 4 days to achieve blood alcohol levels ranging between 200 and 350 mg/dl. Mean 24-hour plasma levels of Cort were ?110 and ?40 ng/ml in intact EtOH-treated and intact control animals, respectively. Basal Cort replacement concentrations in EtOH-treated Adx animals did not exacerbate alcohol-induced neurodegeneration in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) or the entorhinal cortex (EC) as observed by amino-cupric silver staining. In contrast, Cort replacement pellets resulting in plasma Cort levels twofold higher (medium) than normal, or greater than twofold higher (high) in Adx-Cort-EtOH animals increased neurodegeneration. In separate experiments, pharmacological blockade of the Type II glucocorticoid (GC) receptor was initiated with mifepristone (RU38486; 0, 5, 15 mg/kg/day, i.p.). At the higher dose, mifepristone decreased the number of degenerating hippocampal DG cells in binge-EtOH-treated intact animals, whereas, only a trend for reduction was observed in 15 mg/kg/day mifepristone-treated animals in the EC, as determined by fluoro-jade B staining. These results suggest that elevated circulating Cort in part mediates EtOH-induced neurotoxicity in the brain through activation of Type II GC receptors. PMID:22500955

  2. Spin-polarized transport through a single-level quantum dot in the Kondo regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swirkowicz, R.; Wilczynski, M.; Barnas, J.

    2006-02-01

    Nonequilibrium electronic transport through a quantum dot coupled to ferromagnetic leads (electrodes) is studied theoretically by the nonequilibrium Green function technique. The system is described by the Anderson model with arbitrary correlation parameter U. Exchange interaction between the dot and ferromagnetic electrodes is taken into account via an effective molecular field. The following situations are analysed numerically: (i) the dot is symmetrically coupled to two ferromagnetic leads, (ii) one of the two ferromagnetic leads is half-metallic with almost total spin polarization of electron states at the Fermi level, and (iii) one of the two electrodes is nonmagnetic whereas the other one is ferromagnetic. Generally, the Kondo peak in the density of states (DOS) becomes spin-split when the total exchange field acting on the dot is nonzero. The spin-splitting of the Kondo peak in DOS leads to splitting and suppression of the corresponding zero-bias anomaly in the differential conductance.

  3. Do Passive Jobs Contribute to Low Levels of Leisure-Time Physical Activity? The Whitehall II Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, David; Elovainio, Marko; Jokela, Markus; De Vogli, Roberto; Marmot, Michael G.; Kivimäki, Mika

    2011-01-01

    Background There is mixed evidence on the association between psychosocial work exposures (i.e., passive jobs) and physical activity, but previous studies did not take into account the effect of cumulative exposures nor did they examine different trajectories in exposure. We investigated whether exposure to passive jobs, measured three times over an average of five years, is associated with leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). Methods Data were from working men (n=4291) and women (n=1794) aged 35 to 55 who participated in the first three phases of the Whitehall II prospective cohort. Exposure to passive jobs was measured at each phase and LTPA at phases 1 and 3. Participants were categorized according to whether or not they worked in a passive job at each phase, leading to a scale ranging from 0 (non-passive job at all three phases) to 3 (passive job at all three phases). Poisson regression with robust variance estimates were used to assess the prevalence ratios of low LTPA. Results An association was found in men between exposure to passive jobs over 5 years and low LTPA at follow-up, independently of other relevant risk factors. The prevalence ratio for low LTPA in men was 1.16 (95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.33) times greater for employees with three reports of passive job than for those who had never worked in passive jobs. No association was observed in women. Conclusion This study provides evidence that working in passive jobs may encourage a passive lifestyle in men. PMID:19528047

  4. One-level modeling for diagnosing surface winds over complex terrain. II - Applicability to short-range forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, P.; Getenio, B.; Zak-Rosenthal, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Alpert and Getenio (1988) modification of the Mass and Dempsey (1985) one-level sigma-surface model was used to study four synoptic events that included two winter cases (a Cyprus low and a Siberian high) and two summer cases. Results of statistical verification showed that the model is not only capable of diagnosing many details of surface mesoscale flow, but might also be useful for various applications which require operative short-range prediction of the diurnal changes of high-resolution surface flow over complex terrain, for example, in locating wildland fires, determining the dispersion of air pollutants, and predicting changes in wind energy or of surface wind for low-level air flights.

  5. Spontaneous emission and absorption properties of a driven three-level system. II. The Λ and cascade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manka, A. S.; Doss, H. M.; Narducci, L. M.; Ru, P.; Oppo, G.-L.

    1991-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the spectral profile of spontaneously emitted radiation from Λ and cascade models of driven three-level atoms, and with the absorption spectra of a weak probe. The atoms are excited by a pair of coherent external fields that are resonant or nearly resonant with the two dipole-allowed transitions of each of these two models. The main aim of this work is to extend earlier studies of the V-model configuration of three-level atoms and to present a comprehensive survey of the emission and absorption features of these systems. In addition to a derivation of exact formulas for the spectra and explicit analytic approximations in the high-intensity limit, we provide an explanation for the existence of simultaneous stationary population inversion between pairs of atomic levels and explore the effect of Doppler broadening on the absorption profile of the weak probe. In view of the latter analysis, in particular, we conclude that gain features persist even in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. This suggests the possibility of experimental tests in a cell rather than an atomic-beam environment.

  6. Shuttle II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talay, T. A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a status report on the study of a next-generation manned launch system, called Shuttle II, being conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. Underlying reasons for considering such a system include the need for low-cost, safe, and reliable manned access to space. System and operational characteristics for a Shuttle II vehicle are presented. The need for fully reusable launch systems with radically simpler ground and flight operations is stated to be critical in reducing launch costs. Advancing technologies have a major impact on the choice of vehicle concepts. For a near-term level of technology, a two-stage vertical-takeoff rocket vehicle has been selected for further in-depth Shuttle II studies. The role of the Shuttle II vehicle in a proposed space transportation system, which includes heavy lift and Space Shuttle complementary manned systems, is discussed.

  7. Quantum evolution: The case of weak localization for a 3D alloy-type Anderson model and application to Hamiltonian based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhenwei

    Over the years, people have found Quantum Mechanics to be extremely useful in explaining various physical phenomena from a microscopic point of view. Anderson localization, named after physicist P. W. Anderson, states that disorder in a crystal can cause non-spreading of wave packets, which is one possible mechanism (at single electron level) to explain metal-insulator transitions. The theory of quantum computation promises to bring greater computational power over classical computers by making use of some special features of Quantum Mechanics. The first part of this dissertation considers a 3D alloy-type model, where the Hamiltonian is the sum of the finite difference Laplacian corresponding to free motion of an electron and a random potential generated by a sign-indefinite single-site potential. The result shows that localization occurs in the weak disorder regime, i.e., when the coupling parameter lambda is very small, for energies E ? --Clambda 2. The second part of this dissertation considers adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) algorithms for the unstructured search problem to the case when the number of marked items is unknown. In an ideal situation, an explicit quantum algorithm together with a counting subroutine are given that achieve the optimal Grover speedup over classical algorithms, i.e., roughly speaking, reduce O(2n) to O(2n/2), where n is the size of the problem. However, if one considers more realistic settings, the result shows this quantum speedup is achievable only under a very rigid control precision requirement (e.g., exponentially small control error).

  8. Proposed design requirements for high-integrity containers used to store, transport, and dispose of high-specific-activity, low-level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.; Allen, G.C.; Pope, R.B.

    1981-04-01

    This report develops proposed design requirements for high integrity containers used to store, transport and/or dispose of high-activity, low-level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II. The wastes considered are the dewatered resins produced by the EPICOR II waste treatment system used to clean-up the auxiliary building water. The radioactivity level of some of these EPICOR II liners is 1300 curies per container. These wastes may be disposed of in an intermediate depth burial (10 to 20 meter depth) facility. The proposed container design requirements are directed to ensure isolation of the waste and protection of the public health and safety.

  9. Sleep-Dependent Synaptic Down-Selection (II): Single-Neuron Level Benefits for Matching, Selectivity, and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Atif; Nere, Andrew; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    In a companion paper (1), we used computer simulations to show that a strategy of activity-dependent, on-line net synaptic potentiation during wake, followed by off-line synaptic depression during sleep, can provide a parsimonious account for several memory benefits of sleep at the systems level, including the consolidation of procedural and declarative memories, gist extraction, and integration of new with old memories. In this paper, we consider the theoretical benefits of this two-step process at the single-neuron level and employ the theoretical notion of Matching between brain and environment to measure how this process increases the ability of the neuron to capture regularities in the environment and model them internally. We show that down-selection during sleep is beneficial for increasing or restoring Matching after learning, after integrating new with old memories, and after forgetting irrelevant material. By contrast, alternative schemes, such as additional potentiation in wake, potentiation in sleep, or synaptic renormalization in wake, decrease Matching. We also argue that, by selecting appropriate loops through the brain that tie feedforward synapses with feedback ones in the same dendritic domain, different subsets of neurons can learn to specialize for different contingencies and form sequences of nested perception-action loops. By potentiating such loops when interacting with the environment in wake, and depressing them when disconnected from the environment in sleep, neurons can learn to match the long-term statistical structure of the environment while avoiding spurious modes of functioning and catastrophic interference. Finally, such a two-step process has the additional benefit of desaturating the neuron's ability to learn and of maintaining cellular homeostasis. Thus, sleep-dependent synaptic renormalization offers a parsimonious account for both cellular and systems level effects of sleep on learning and memory. PMID:24151486

  10. Sleep-Dependent Synaptic Down-Selection (II): Single-Neuron Level Benefits for Matching, Selectivity, and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Atif; Nere, Andrew; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    In a companion paper (1), we used computer simulations to show that a strategy of activity-dependent, on-line net synaptic potentiation during wake, followed by off-line synaptic depression during sleep, can provide a parsimonious account for several memory benefits of sleep at the systems level, including the consolidation of procedural and declarative memories, gist extraction, and integration of new with old memories. In this paper, we consider the theoretical benefits of this two-step process at the single-neuron level and employ the theoretical notion of Matching between brain and environment to measure how this process increases the ability of the neuron to capture regularities in the environment and model them internally. We show that down-selection during sleep is beneficial for increasing or restoring Matching after learning, after integrating new with old memories, and after forgetting irrelevant material. By contrast, alternative schemes, such as additional potentiation in wake, potentiation in sleep, or synaptic renormalization in wake, decrease Matching. We also argue that, by selecting appropriate loops through the brain that tie feedforward synapses with feedback ones in the same dendritic domain, different subsets of neurons can learn to specialize for different contingencies and form sequences of nested perception-action loops. By potentiating such loops when interacting with the environment in wake, and depressing them when disconnected from the environment in sleep, neurons can learn to match the long-term statistical structure of the environment while avoiding spurious modes of functioning and catastrophic interference. Finally, such a two-step process has the additional benefit of desaturating the neuron’s ability to learn and of maintaining cellular homeostasis. Thus, sleep-dependent synaptic renormalization offers a parsimonious account for both cellular and systems level effects of sleep on learning and memory. PMID:24151486

  11. Usefulness of Serum Unbound Free Fatty Acid Levels to Predict Death Early in Patients with ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction[From the TIMI II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Andrew H.; Kampf, J. Patrick; Kwan, Thomas; Zhu, Baolong; Adams, Jesse; Kleinfeld, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Circulating total free fatty acids (FFA) are elevated early in myocardial infarction (MI) and are associated with an increase in mortality. We investigated the association of serum unbound free fatty acids (FFAu) levels with mortality,in patients presenting with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) II trial.TIMI II enrolled patients within 4 hours of chest pain. Patients were treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within 1 hour of enrollment. The concentration of FFAu was evaluated in serum samplesfrom 1834 patients obtained at baseline, before therapy.FFAu was an independent risk factor for death as early as one day of hospitalization and continued to be an independent risk factor for the more than 38 years of follow up. When adjusted for other cardiovascular risk factors FFAu levels in the fourth as compared to the first quartile remained an independent risk factor for death due to MI (hazard ratio, 5.0; 95 % confidence interval, 1.9-13.0), to all cardiac death (hazard ratio, 2.4; confidence interval, 1.3-4.4) and to all cause death (hazard ratio, 1.9, confidence interval, 1.2-3.1).Females were twice as likely to be in the upper two FFAu quartiles and had approximately twice the rate of death as males. In conclusion, increased levels of FFAu are one of the earliest molecular biomarkers of mortality in STEMI and are independent of other risk factors known to affect outcomes in STEMI. PMID:24176067

  12. Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part II: Transport and Diffusion of Tracer under Stable Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, Lisa S.; Allwine, K. Jerry; Banta, Robert M.

    2006-05-01

    Differences in nighttime transport and diffusion of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer in an urban complex-terrain setting (Salt Lake City, Utah) are investigated using surface and Doppler lidar wind data and large-scale surface pressure differences. Interacting scales of motion, as studied through the URBAN 2000 field program combined with the Vertical Transport and Mixing (VTMX) experiment, explained the differences in the tracer behavior during three separate intensive operating periods. With an emphasis on nighttime stable boundary layer conditions, these field programs were designed to study flow features responsible for the nighttime transport of airborne substances. This transport has implications for air quality, homeland security, and emergency response if the airborne substances are hazardous. The important flow features investigated included thermally forced canyon and slope flows and a low-level jet (LLJ) that dominated the basin-scale winds when the surface pressure gradient was weak. The presence of thermally forced flows contributed to the complexity and hindered the predictability of the tracer motion within and beyond the city. When organized thermally forced flows were present, the tracer tended to stay closer to the city for longer periods of time, even though a strong basin-scale LLJ did develop. When thermally forced flows were short lived or absent, the basin-scale low-level jet dominated the wind field and enhanced the transport of tracer material out of the city.

  13. Irradiation with ultraviolet light and gamma-rays increases the level of DNA topoisomerase II in nuclei of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Thielmann, H W; Popanda, O

    1998-02-01

    DNA topoisomerase II was monitored with the monoclonal antibody Ki-S1 in human fibroblasts after irradiation of cells with 254-nm UV light and -rays from a 137Cs source. DNA topoisomerase II was localized immunohistochemically as bright fluorescent dots in the karyoplasm. Investigated fibroblasts originated from normal human donors and a xeroderma pigmentosum patient (XP12BE). All cell lines showed a time and dose-dependent increase in DNA topoisomerase II abundance after irradiation. The increase may reflect enhanced accessibility of the enzyme, enhanced gene expression or enhanced stabilization of mRNA or protein molecules. The effect was detectable as early as 1 h after irradiation at doses 3 J/m2 or 3 Gy. It passed through a maximum and decreased within 18 h (UV light) or 6 h ( -rays). Except for the duration of the response, no principal differences were seen between the effects caused by UV light and those elicited by -rays. The increase in enzyme levels might be part of the well-known DNA damage responses which operate in cell-protective or DNA-reparative pathways or may reflect initiation of apoptosis. DNA topoisomerase I was detected with a commercially available polyclonal antibody raised against human DNA topoisomerase I. In unirradiated cells, DNA topoisomerase I was found to be mainly concentrated in nucleoli. Irradiation with -rays changed the staining pattern in that it caused a multitude of DNA topoisomerase I-rich centers to occur which may reflect sites of transcription of radiation-inducible genes. PMID:9458348

  14. The effects of omega-3 on blood pressure and the relationship between serum visfatin level and blood pressure in patients with type II diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinzadeh Atar, Mohammad Javad; Hajianfar, Hossein; Bahonar, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension is a condition normally detected in people with type II diabetes.It eventually leads to cardiovascular diseases in the patient. Visfatin is an adipocytokine which issecreted from adipose tissue and can affect the inflammatory reaction and also serum lipidlevels. Additionally, omega-3 inhibits the accumulation of fat and formation of insulinresistance. The current study tried to investigate the effects of omega-3 on blood pressurecompared to placebo and the relationship between serum visfatin levels and blood pressure. METHODS A total number of 71 women with type II diabetes were randomly assigned to2 groups to receive either omega-3 capsules or placebo capsules. In the first step, aquestionnaire consisting age, height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, and systolic anddiastolic blood pressure was filled out for each subject. Blood samples were then collected forlaboratory tests. The next step was to conduct 8 weeks of intervention. All variables, except age,were measured again after the intervention. Hip circumference was considered as the maximumcircumference of the buttocks. Waist circumference was measured by placing a tape horizontallyacross the abdomen at the end of a normal exhalation. Laboratory tests included the assessmentof visfatin, glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations. Lipid profile, i.e. lowdensity lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglyceride (TG), and cholesterol,was also assessed. Using SPSS18, data obtained from the study was analyzed by a variety ofappropriate statistical tests. RESULTS There was a significant change in mean differences of systolic and diastolic bloodpressure. Blood pressure showed a significant reduction in the omega-3 group compared to theplacebo group. However, no significant changes were observed in systolic and diastolic bloodpressure before and after the intervention (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION Based on the results of this study, a daily consumption of omega-3 is suggestedfor patients with type II diabetes. PMID:23056097

  15. Water pair potential of near spectroscopic accuracy. II. Vibration-rotation-tunneling levels of the water dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenenboom, G. C.; Wormer, P. E. S.; van der Avoird, A.; Mas, E. M.; Bukowski, R.; Szalewicz, K.

    2000-10-01

    Nearly exact six-dimensional quantum calculations of the vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) levels of the water dimer for values of the rotational quantum numbers J and K ?2 show that the SAPT-5s water pair potential presented in the preceding paper (paper I) gives a good representation of the experimental high-resolution far-infrared spectrum of the water dimer. After analyzing the sensitivity of the transition frequencies with respect to the linear parameters in the potential we could further improve this potential by using only one of the experimentally determined tunneling splittings of the ground state in (H2O)2. The accuracy of the resulting water pair potential, SAPT-5st, is established by comparison with the spectroscopic data of both (H2O)2 and (D2O)2: ground and excited state tunneling splittings and rotational constants, as well as the frequencies of the intermolecular vibrations.

  16. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  17. A novel magnetic ion imprinted nano-polymer for selective separation and determination of low levels of mercury(II) ions in fish samples.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Ezzatolla; Aboufazeli, Forouzan; Zhad, Hamid Reza Lotfi; Sadeghi, Omid; Amani, Vahid

    2013-12-15

    In this work a novel ion imprinted polymer (IIP) based on N-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethenamine (V-Pic) was coated on Fe3O4 nano-particles and characterized by thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), IR spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and also elemental analysis. The application of this novel magnetic sorbent was investigated in rapid extraction, preconcentration and also determination of trace amounts of Hg(II) ions by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Effect of various parameters such as sample pH, adsorption time and desorption time, maximum capacity and also eluent type and concentration was investigated in this study. The relative standard deviation (RSD%) and limit of detection (LOD) of the method were found to be 1.47% and 0.03 ng mL(-1), respectively. The amounts of mercury in some standard reference materials was Also determined using this sorbent in order to confirm the accuracy of this method. Finally, this sorbent was successfully applied for determination of low levels of Hg(II) ions in various fish samples. PMID:23993582

  18. Effects of graded levels of potato by-products in barley- and corn-based beef feedlot diets: II. Palatability.

    PubMed

    Busboom, J R; Nelson, M L; Jeremiah, L E; Duckett, S K; Cronrath, J D; Falen, L; Kuber, P S

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of barley- or corn-based diets containing 0, 10, or 20% potato by-product (DM basis) on Warner-Bratzler shear force and palatability of beef. One hundred forty-four crossbred beef steers (333+/-.44 kg) were allotted within weight block (3) to a randomized complete block design with a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement of dietary treatments. Main effects were grain (barley or corn) and level of potato by-product (0, 10, or 20% of diet DM). There were a total of 18 pens with eight steers per pen and three pens per treatment. Steers were fed diets containing 83% concentrate (grain plus potato by-product), 10% supplement, and 7% alfalfa (DM basis) for an average of 130 d. Longissimus muscle cuts were used for Warner-Bratzler shear force determination (four steers per pen) and evaluation (two steers per pen) by a 10-member trained laboratory panel, a professional flavor/texture profile panel, and by consumer panels. Diet did not affect (P > .10) Warner-Bratzler shear force or trained laboratory panel tenderness, juiciness, and flavor intensity scores. Flavor/texture profile panel scores indicated feeding a corn-based diet as opposed to barley-based diet produced a more appropriate well-balanced and well-blended beef flavor and texture. However, the magnitudes of the differences were relatively small, and flavor and texture amplitude ratings for both barley- and corn-fed beef were well above average. Beef from steers fed 10 or 20% potato by-product had lower (P < .05) incidences of inappropriate aromatics and aftertastes, which may have a slightly beneficial effect on beef flavor, but flavor amplitude was not affected (P > .05) by level of potato. Moreover, consumer panel overall acceptability scores were not affected by diet. Thus, feedlot diets containing corn or barley with or without potato by-product should result in palatable beef products. PMID:10907825

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (ANDOVT00110038) on State Route 11, crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOVT00110038 on State Route 11 crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south central Vermont. The 5.65-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. Upstream and downstream of the study site banks and overbanks are forested. In the study area, the Middle Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 44 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 54.0 mm (0.177 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 5, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The State Route 11 crossing of the Middle Branch Williams River is a 33-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 55 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. There were no scour problems observed during the Level I assessment. Type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) was present on the left bank upstream and right bank upstream respectively. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) was present in the upstream left wing wall area. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.8 to 3.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year flow. Abutment scour ranged from 12.0 to 14.0 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year flow at the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (REDSTH00360025) on Town Highway 36, crossing the West Branch Deerfield River, Readsboro, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure REDSTH00360025 on Town Highway 36 crossing the West Branch Deerfield River, Readsboro, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 14.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the upstream right bank and forest on the upstream left bank. The surface cover on the downstream right and left banks is primarily grass, shrubs and brush. In the study area, the West Branch Deerfield River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 65 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders, with a median grain size (D50) of 117 mm (0.383 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 1, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 36 crossing of the West Branch Deerfield River is a 59-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 57-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, September 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 54 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. During the Level I assessment, a scour hole approximately 2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right wingwall and a scour hole approximately 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream left wingwall. The scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the downstream end of the downstream left wingwall, at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall, at the downstream end of the right abutment, along the entire base length of the downstream right wingwall, along the upstream right bank and along the downstream left bank. A stone wall was noted along the upstream left bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.6 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 15.1 to 16.3 ft along the left abutment and from 7.4 to 9.2 ft along the right abutment. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping and 500-year discharges for the left abutment and at the 500-year discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on t

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (CHESTH00030010) on Town Highway 3 (VT 35), crossing the South Branch of Williams River, Chester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESTH00030010 on Town Highway 3 (VT 35) crossing the South Branch Williams River, Chester, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 9.44-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, the South Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 67 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 69.0 mm (0.226 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 26-27, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 3 (VT 35) crossing of the South Branch Williams River is a 69-foot-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 67-foot steel-stringer span with a concrete deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 23, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 64.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. The scour protection (spill-through abutments) measured at the site was type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) extending the entire base length and around the ends of the left and right abutments. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for modelled flows ranged from 0.8 to 3.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 13.3 to 14.9 ft. The worst-case scour at the left abutment occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 4.1 to 6.0 ft. The worst-case scour at the right abutment occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 11R (ROCKTH0001011R) on Town Highway 1 (VT 121 & FAS 125), crossing the Saxtons River, Rockingham, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROCKTH0001011R on Town Highway 1 crossing the Saxtons River, Rockingham, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 68.3-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of houses, short grass, and scattered trees except along the immediate river banks, which are tree covered. In the study area, the Saxtons River has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 121 ft and an average bank height of 8 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 109 mm (0.359 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 3, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. Lateral instability was evident with respect to a cut-bank on the left bank upstream with slip failure of bank material. Furthermore, there is a wide point bar along the right bank upstream opposite the cut-bank. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Saxtons River is a 184-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of three steel-beam spans (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 30, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete, skeletal-style abutment walls with spill-through embankments adjacent to each wall. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) on the spill-through embankments. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. There was no computed contraction scour for all modelled flows at this site. Abutment scour ranged from 9.0 to 13.4 feet. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the left abutment. There are two piers for which computed pier scour ranged from 9.0 to 18.4 feet. The left and right piers in this report are presented as pier 1 and pier 2, respectively. The worst-case pier scour occurred at pier 2 for the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed s

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (WNDHTH00020010) on Town Highway 2, crossing the Middle Branch of the Williams River, Windham, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WNDHTH00020010 on Town Highway 2 crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Windham, Vermont (figures 18). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south central Vermont. The 1.44-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the predominate surface cover upstream of the bridge is pasture on the left bank and forest on the right bank. Downstream of the bridge the surface cover consists of forest on the right bank and grass on the left bank. In the study area, the Middle Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 28 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 61.4 mm (0.201 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 22, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 2 crossing of the Middle Branch Williams River is a 25-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 22-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 31, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 50 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along both upstream banks. The scour protection measures downstream were type -1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) on the left bank and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) on the right bank. Scour protection measures do not exist underneath the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for modelled flows ranged from 0.9 to 2.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.5 to 8.8 ft along the right abutment and from 8.7 to 10.1 ft along the left abutment. The worst-case abutment scour at the right abutment occurred at the 100-year discharge and at the left abutment at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled Scour Results. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives excessively conservative estimates of scour depths (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  4. Growth hormone concentration and disappearance rate, insulin-like growth factors I and II and insulin levels in iron-deficient veal calves.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, A; Mullis, P E; Eggenberger, E; Blum, J W

    1994-01-01

    In calves with severe iron (Fe) deficiency, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels and IGF-I responses to exogenous growth hormone (GH) are reduced, while insulin-dependent glucose utilization is enhanced. Blood plasma concentrations of immunoreactive insulin (IRI), IGF-I, IGF-II and GH, and the half-life of blood plasma GH [after an i.v. injection of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH; 100 micrograms rbGH/kg body weight)] were measured in 20 calves at body weights between 160 and 190 kg. Calves were fed milk replacers containing 50 or 10 mg Fe/kg (groups Fe50 and Fe10, respectively). Daily weight gain and feed utilization were similar in both groups. Group Fe10 developed mild Fe deficiency anemia and blood plasma urea-nitrogen concentrations were higher (p < 0.05) than in group Fe50. IGF-I and IGF-II concentrations did not vary consistently over a 10-hour period and were not significantly influenced by different Fe intakes. The IRI concentration increased transiently (p < 0.05) after feed intake, but the total response was (not significantly) smaller in Fe-deficient calves. Plasma GH concentration changed episodically and was similar in both groups. Loss of GH from the circulation after i.v. rbGH injection, estimated by biexponential analysis, during the distribution or alpha phase (first 16 min) was similar in both groups, but during the beta phase was shorter (p < 0.05) in group Fe10 than in group Fe50 (29.9 and 34.2 min, respectively). The increased disappearance rate of GH, seen even in mild Fe deficiency, may contribute to reduced GH levels and IGF-I responses to GH in severe Fe deficiency. PMID:7710263

  5. Evidence for a defect level above the conduction band edge of InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices for applications in efficient infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Prins, A. D.; Lewis, M. K.; Bushell, Z. L.; Sweeney, S. J.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.

    2015-04-27

    We report pressure-dependent photoluminescence (PL) experiments under hydrostatic pressures up to 2.16 GPa on a mid-wave infrared InAs/InAs{sub 0.86}Sb{sub 0.14} type-II superlattice (T2SL) structure at different pump laser excitation powers and sample temperatures. The pressure coefficient of the T2SL transition was found to be 93 ± 2 meV·GPa{sup −1}. The integrated PL intensity increases with pressure up to 1.9 GPa then quenches rapidly indicating a pressure induced level crossing with the conduction band states at ∼2 GPa. Analysis of the PL intensity as a function of excitation power at 0, 0.42, 1.87, and 2.16 GPa shows a clear change in the dominant photo-generated carrier recombination mechanism from radiative to defect related. From these data, evidence for a defect level situated at 0.18 ± 0.01 eV above the conduction band edge of InAs at ambient pressure is presented. This assumes a pressure-dependent energy shift of −11 meV·GPa{sup −1} for the valence band edge and that the defect level is insensitive to pressure, both of which are supported by an Arrhenius activation energy analysis.

  6. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2012-07-15

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  7. Commensurability effects in one-dimensional Anderson localization: Anomalies in eigenfunction statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V.E.; Yudson, V.I.

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Statistics of normalized eigenfunctions in one-dimensional Anderson localization at E = 0 is studied. > Moments of inverse participation ratio are calculated. > Equation for generating function is derived at E = 0. > An exact solution for generating function at E = 0 is obtained. > Relation of the generating function to the phase distribution function is established. - Abstract: The one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model (AM), i.e. a tight-binding chain with random uncorrelated on-site energies, has statistical anomalies at any rational point f=(2a)/({lambda}{sub E}) , where a is the lattice constant and {lambda}{sub E} is the de Broglie wavelength. We develop a regular approach to anomalous statistics of normalized eigenfunctions {psi}(r) at such commensurability points. The approach is based on an exact integral transfer-matrix equation for a generating function {Phi}{sub r}(u, {phi}) (u and {phi} have a meaning of the squared amplitude and phase of eigenfunctions, r is the position of the observation point). This generating function can be used to compute local statistics of eigenfunctions of 1d AM at any disorder and to address the problem of higher-order anomalies at f=p/q with q > 2. The descender of the generating function P{sub r}({phi}){identical_to}{Phi}{sub r}(u=0,{phi}) is shown to be the distribution function of phase which determines the Lyapunov exponent and the local density of states. In the leading order in the small disorder we derived a second-order partial differential equation for the r-independent ('zero-mode') component {Phi}(u, {phi}) at the E = 0 (f=1/2 ) anomaly. This equation is nonseparable in variables u and {phi}. Yet, we show that due to a hidden symmetry, it is integrable and we construct an exact solution for {Phi}(u, {phi}) explicitly in quadratures. Using this solution we computed moments I{sub m} = N< vertical bar {psi} vertical bar {sup 2m}> (m {>=} 1) for a chain of the length N {yields} {infinity} and found an essential difference between their m-behavior in the center-of-band anomaly and for energies outside this anomaly. Outside the anomaly the 'extrinsic' localization length defined from the Lyapunov exponent coincides with that defined from the inverse participation ratio ('intrinsic' localization length). This is not the case at the E = 0 anomaly where the extrinsic localization length is smaller than the intrinsic one. At E = 0 one also observes an anomalous enhancement of large moments compatible with existence of yet another, much smaller characteristic length scale.

  8. Shiba states and zero-bias anomalies in the hybrid normal-superconductor Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    itko, Rok; Lim, Jong Soo; Lpez, Rosa; Aguado, Ramn

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid semiconductor-superconductor systems are interesting melting pots where various fundamental effects in condensed-matter physics coexist. For example, when a quantum dot is coupled to a superconducting electrode two very distinct phenomena, superconductivity and the Kondo effect, compete. As a result of this competition, the system undergoes a quantum phase transition when the superconducting gap ? is of the order of the Kondo temperature TK. The underlying physics behind such transition ultimately relies on the physics of the Anderson model where the standard metallic host is replaced by a superconducting one, namely the physics of a (quantum) magnetic impurity in a superconductor. A characteristic feature of this hybrid system is the emergence of subgap bound states, the so-called Yu-Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) states, which cross zero energy across the quantum phase transition, signaling a switching of the fermion parity and spin (doublet or singlet) of the ground state. Interestingly, similar hybrid devices based on semiconducting nanowires with spin-orbit coupling may host exotic zero-energy bound states with Majorana character. Both parity crossings and Majorana bound states (MBSs) are experimentally marked by zero-bias anomalies in transport, which are detected by coupling the hybrid device with an extra normal contact. We here demonstrate theoretically that this extra contact, usually considered as a nonperturbing tunneling weak probe, leads to nontrivial effects. This conclusion is supported by numerical renormalization-group calculations of the phase diagram of an Anderson impurity coupled to both superconducting and normal-state leads. We obtain this phase diagram for an arbitrary ratio ?/TK, which allows us to analyze relevant experimental scenarios, such as parity crossings as well as Kondo features induced by the normal lead, as this ratio changes. Spectral functions at finite temperatures and magnetic fields, which can be directly linked to experimental tunneling transport characteristics, show zero-energy anomalies irrespective of whether the system is in the doublet or singlet regime. We also derive the analytical condition for the occurrence of Zeeman-induced fermion-parity switches in the presence of interactions which bears unexpected similarities with the condition for emergent MBSs in nanowires.

  9. Dual nature of localization in guiding systems with randomly corrugated boundaries: Anderson-type versus entropic

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Yu.V. Shostenko, L.D.

    2015-05-15

    A unified theory for the conductance of an infinitely long multimode quantum wire whose finite segment has randomly rough lateral boundaries is developed. It enables one to rigorously take account of all feasible mechanisms of wave scattering, both related to boundary roughness and to contacts between the wire rough section and the perfect leads within the same technical frameworks. The rough part of the conducting wire is shown to act as a mode-specific randomly modulated effective potential barrier whose height is governed essentially by the asperity slope. The mean height of the barrier, which is proportional to the average slope squared, specifies the number of conducting channels. Under relatively small asperity amplitude this number can take on arbitrary small, up to zero, values if the asperities are sufficiently sharp. The consecutive channel cut-off that arises when the asperity sharpness increases can be regarded as a kind of localization, which is not related to the disorder per se but rather is of entropic or (equivalently) geometric origin. The fluctuating part of the effective barrier results in two fundamentally different types of guided wave scattering, viz., inter- and intramode scattering. The intermode scattering is shown to be for the most part very strong except in the cases of (a) extremely smooth asperities, (b) excessively small length of the corrugated segment, and (c) the asperities sharp enough for only one conducting channel to remain in the wire. Under strong intermode scattering, a new set of conducting channels develops in the corrugated waveguide, which have the form of asymptotically decoupled extended modes subject to individual solely intramode random potentials. In view of this fact, two transport regimes only are realizable in randomly corrugated multimode waveguides, specifically, the ballistic and the localized regime, the latter characteristic of one-dimensional random systems. Two kinds of localization are thus shown to coexist in waveguide-like systems with randomly corrugated boundaries, specifically, the entropic localization and the one-dimensional Anderson (disorder-driven) localization. If the particular mode propagates across the rough segment ballistically, the Fabry–Pérot-type oscillations should be observed in the conductance, which are suppressed for the mode transferred in the Anderson-localized regime.

  10. Angiotensin II-inhibiting drugs have no effect on intraneuronal A? or oligomeric A? levels in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferrington, Linda; Miners, J Scott; Palmer, Laura E; Bond, Susan M; Povey, Joanne E; Kelly, Paul AT; Love, Seth; Horsburgh, Karen J; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2011-01-01

    Background: Reducing the excessive accumulation of amyloid ?-protein (A?) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a key objective of most AD therapies. Several studies suggest that pharmacological inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) or its by-product angiotensin II may delay onset or progression of dementia and it has been suggested that this occurs via regulation of A?. Intraneuronal oligomeric accumulation of A? is postulated to be one of the earliest pathological events. Thus this study investigated the effect of an ACE-inhibitor, captopril, and two angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), eprosartan and valsartan, on intraneuronal A? pathology and oligomeric A? levels in a triple transgenic (3xTGAD) mouse model of AD. Methods: Male, adult (3-4 month old) 3xTgAD mice (n=39) were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups: valsartan (0.17g/l), eprosartan (0.8g/l), captopril (5g/l) or normal drinking water and the drugs given ad libitum for 2 months. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was measured at baseline, at 2 weeks and at 2 months when the mice were sacrificed and the brains hemisected for analysis. One hemisphere was processed for A? and amyloid precursor protein (APP) immunohistochemistry and the other for biochemical measurement of oligomeric A? and APP. ACE activity was measured in the brain and kidney. Results: MABP was significantly reduced at 2 weeks and 2 months in the ACE-I group (p=0.0006) but was unaltered in the ARB groups compared to vehicle. Neither ACE-I nor ARB treatment altered A? and APP immunolabelling or the level of A? or APP in brain tissue homogenates. Similarly neither ACE-I nor ARB treatment altered ACE activity in either brain or kidney compared to control tissue. Conclusions: ACE-I or ARB administration over 2 months did not affect APP levels or either intraneuronal A? or oligomeric A? levels in 3xTGAD mice. While ARBs did not alter MABP, captopril did mediate reductions in MABP in the 3xTGAD mice which appeared to be independent of ACE activity. Further studies are needed to examine the effects of these drugs over a longer term and in older mice (i.e. when AD-like changes are more pronounced). PMID:21416061

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo investigation of Knight shift anomaly in Periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mi; Curro, Nicholas; Scalettar, Richard; UC Davis Team; UC Davis Team

    2014-03-01

    We report a Determinant Quantum Monte Carlo investigation of the Knight shift anomaly observed in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of heavy fermion materials. As opposed to normal Fermi liquids, the Knight shift in heavy fermion materials deviates from the total susceptibility ? below a crossover temperature T*. This deviation is believed to originate in the different temperature dependence of the conduction electron and local moment components of the total susceptibility ?. Here we quantify the behavior of ?cc(T) ,?cf(T) , and ?ff(T) in the framework of periodic Anderson model (PAM), focussing on the evolution with different degree of conduction electron-local moment hybridization. These results confirm several predictions of the two-fluid theory of the Knight shift anomaly, including the demonstration of a universal logarithmic divergence of the contribution of the heavy electrons to the Knight shift. This universal behavior, which occurs with decreasing temperature below T* in the paramagnetic state, agrees well with experimental findings, and indicates that different heavy fermion materials exhibit a common scaling, differing only in the coherence temperature scale, T*.

  12. Finite-size corrections for ground states of Edwards-Anderson spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Falkner, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    Extensive computations of ground-state energies of the Edwards-Anderson spin glass on bond-diluted, hypercubic lattices are conducted in dimensions d=3, ..., 7. Results are presented for bond densities exactly at the percolation threshold, p=pc, and deep within the glassy regime, p>pc, where finding ground states is one of the hardest combinatorial optimization problems. Finite-size corrections of the form 1/N? are shown to be consistent throughout with the prediction ?=1-y/d, where y refers to the "stiffness" exponent that controls the formation of domain wall excitations at low temperatures. At p=pc, an extrapolation for d?? appears to match our mean-field results for these corrections. In the glassy phase, however, ? does not approach its anticipated mean-field value of 2/3, obtained from simulations of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass on an N-clique graph. Instead, the value of ? reached at the upper critical dimension matches another type of mean-field spin glass models, namely those on sparse random networks of regular degree called Bethe lattices.

  13. Phase diagram and reentrance for the 3D Edwards-Anderson model using information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, V.; Saravia, G.; Vogel, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Data compressor techniques are used to study the phase diagram of the generalized Edwards-Anderson model in three dimensions covering the full range of mixture between ferromagnetic (concentration 1-x) and antiferromagnetic interactions (concentration x). The recently proposed data compressor wlzip is used to recognize criticality by the maximum information content in the files storing the simulation processes. The method allows not only the characterization of the ferromagnetic to paramagnetic (FP) transition (x<0.22, or x>0.78) but also it equally well yields the spin-glass to paramagnetic (SP) transition (0.22

  14. Water-quality assessment of the Middle Fork Anderson River watershed, Crawford and Perry Counties, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayers, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    This report, on water quality for streams in Crawford and Perry Counties, Indiana, defines the variation in concentrations of nutrients, inorganic constituents, suspended sediment, bacteria, and phytoplankton in streams, and chlorinated hydrocarbons in bed materials in the Middle Fork Anderson River watershed; identifies areas and sources of water-quality problems; and determines the effects of existing flood-retarding structures on water quality. The data base for this water-quality assessment included five sets of samples collected from September 1975 through July 1976. Temperature, specific conductance, pH, and dissolved-oxygen concentration of water were measured, and stream discharge was estimated at 25 sites. Samples for laboratory analysis were collected at 9 of these sites in September 1975, at 8 of the sites in December 1975, and at 7 of the sites in March, June, and July 1976. Surface-water quality in the watershed is generally good except for problem-causing concentrations of bacteria, dissolved oxygen, and phosphorus at some sites along the main stem during low flow, and manganese at most sites year-round. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Advanced Anderson-Fabry disease presenting with left ventricular apical aneurysm and ventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Marie-France; Shah, Alap; Trohman, Richard G; Madias, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old female with Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD)-R342Q missense mutation on exon 7 in alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) gene - presented with sustained ventricular tachycardia. Imaging confirmed the presence of a new left ventricular apical aneurysm (LVAA) and a significantly reduced intra-cavitary gradient compared to two years prior. AFDcv is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by GLA enzyme deficiency. The phenotypic expression of AFD in the heart is not well described. Cardiac involvement can include left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), which is typically symmetric, but can also mimic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Left ventricular apical aneurysm is a rare finding in HCM. We suggest a shared mechanism of LVAA formation in AFD and HCM, independent of the underlying cardiomyopathy. Mechanisms of LVAA formation in HCM include genetic predisposition and long-standing left ventricular wall stress from elevated intra-cavitary systolic pressures due to mid-cavitary obstruction. Both mechanisms are supported in this patient (a brother with AFD also developed a small LVAA). Screening for AFD should be considered in cases of unexplained LVH, particularly in patients with the aneurysmal variant of HCM. PMID:26090373

  16. Portable Automated Mesonet (PAM) data from the 1980 experiment in Anderson Creek Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Nappo, C.J.; Satterfield, L.C.

    1984-08-01

    During the 1980 ASCOT field study in Anderson Creek Valley, CA, the National Center for Atmospheric Research operated its Portable Automated Mesonet (PAM) system from 9 to 25 September. These data provide continuous measurements of surface-layer winds, temperature, atmospheric pressures, and relative humidities at 27 stations. Wind speed and direction were measured at 4 m (AGL), and temperature, pressure and relative humidity were measured at 2 m (AGL). Observation sampling rate was 1 Hz, and these values were processed into one-minute averages which are stored on magnetic tape. The one-minute average wind direction was calculated as the prevailing wind direction, i.e., the direction of the one-minute averaged wind vector. The data are organized by day and station. In order to simplify examination, the observation periods are divided into daytime (0600 to 2100 LST) and nighttime (1800 to 0900 LST) segments. The data have been edited to remove obvious outliers. The plots are constructed from the one-minute observations. Empty spaces or graphs represent missing or unacceptable data.

  17. Slow dynamics in a two-dimensional Anderson-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar Lev, Yevgeny; Reichman, David R.

    2016-02-01

    We study the real-time dynamics of a two-dimensional Anderson-Hubbard model using nonequilibrium self-consistent perturbation theory within the second-Born approximation. When compared with exact diagonalization performed on small clusters, we demonstrate that for strong disorder this technique approaches the exact result on all available timescales, while for intermediate disorder, in the vicinity of the many-body localization transition, it produces quantitatively accurate results up to nontrivial times. Our method allows for the treatment of system sizes inaccessible by any numerically exact method and for the complete elimination of finite-size effects for the times considered. We show that for a sufficiently strong disorder the system becomes nonergodic, while for intermediate disorder strengths and for all accessible timescales transport in the system is strictly subdiffusive. We argue that these results are incompatible with a simple percolation picture, but are consistent with the heuristic random resistor network model where subdiffusion may be observed for long times until a crossover to diffusion occurs. The prediction of slow finite-time dynamics in a two-dimensional interacting and disordered system can be directly verified in future cold-atoms experiments.

  18. Investigation of Anderson localization in disordered heterostructures irradiated by a Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardakani, Abbas Ghasempour

    2016-02-01

    The propagation of a Gaussian beam through a one-dimensional disordered media is studied. By employing the transfer matrix method, the localization length as a function of frequency is calculated for different values of transverse coordinate r. It is demonstrated that the localization length significantly depends on r in different frequency ranges. This result is in contrast to those reported for a plane wave incident on disordered structures in which the localization length is transversely constant. For some frequency regions, the peak of localization length is red-shifted and becomes smaller with increasing the transverse coordinate. At some frequencies, the system is in the localized state for particular values of r, while at other r values the system is in the extend regime at the same frequencies. It is observed that the quality of localization at each frequency depends on r. To quantify the localization behavior of the whole Gaussian beam, a modified localization length is defined in terms of the input and output powers of the Gaussian beam where the dependence of Anderson localization on the transverse coordinate is considered. It is suggested that this modified localization length is used in experiments performed for study of wave propagation in one-dimensional random media under illumination of laser beams.

  19. Auxiliary master equation approach within matrix product states: Spectral properties of the nonequilibrium Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorda, Antonius; Ganahl, Martin; Evertz, Hans Gerd; von der Linden, Wolfgang; Arrigoni, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    Within the recently introduced auxiliary master equation approach it is possible to address steady state properties of strongly correlated impurity models, small molecules, or clusters efficiently and with high accuracy. It is particularly suited for dynamical mean field theory in the nonequilibrium as well as in the equilibrium case. The method is based on the solution of an auxiliary open quantum system, which can be made quickly equivalent to the original impurity problem. In its first implementation a Krylov space method was employed. Here, we aim at extending the capabilities of the approach by adopting matrix product states for the solution of the corresponding auxiliary quantum master equation. This allows for a drastic increase in accuracy and permits us to access the Kondo regime for large values of the interaction. In particular, we investigate the nonequilibrium steady state of a single-impurity Anderson model and focus on the spectral properties for temperatures T below the Kondo temperature TK and for small bias voltages ? . For the two cases considered, with T ?TK/4 and T ?TK/10 , we find a clear splitting of the Kondo resonance into a two-peak structure for ? close above TK. In the equilibrium case (? =0 ) and for T ?TK/4 , the obtained spectral function essentially coincides with the one from numerical renormalization group.

  20. An inventory of wetlands in the East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    An inventory of wetlands within the floodplain of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee was conducted during October, 1991 through May, 1992 for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District. About 15 miles of EFPC channel and 500 acres of its floodplain are contaminated with mercury and other contaminants released from the Y-12 Plant on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. The wetland inventory will serve as baseline information for DOE`s remedial action planning and National Environmental Policy Act compliance efforts related to the contamination. In order to provide broad wetland determinations beyond which future wetland definitions are unlikely to expand, the 1989 Federal Manual for Identifying And Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands was utilized. Using the manual`s methodology in a contaminated system under the approved health and safety plan presented some unique problems, resulting in intrusive sampling for field indicators of hydric soils being accomplished separately from observation of other criteria. Beginning with wetland areas identified on National Wetland Inventory Maps, the entire floodplain was examined for presence of wetland criteria, and 17 wetlands were identified ranging from 0.01 to 2.81 acres in size. The majority of wetlands identified were sized under 1 acre. Some of the wetlands identified were not delineated on the National Wetland Inventory Maps, and much of the wetland area delineated on the maps did not meet the criteria under the 1989 manual.

  1. Advanced Anderson-Fabry disease presenting with left ventricular apical aneurysm and ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Marie-France; Shah, Alap; Trohman, Richard G; Madias, Christopher

    2015-06-16

    A 54-year-old female with Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD)-R342Q missense mutation on exon 7 in alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) gene - presented with sustained ventricular tachycardia. Imaging confirmed the presence of a new left ventricular apical aneurysm (LVAA) and a significantly reduced intra-cavitary gradient compared to two years prior. AFDcv is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by GLA enzyme deficiency. The phenotypic expression of AFD in the heart is not well described. Cardiac involvement can include left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), which is typically symmetric, but can also mimic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Left ventricular apical aneurysm is a rare finding in HCM. We suggest a shared mechanism of LVAA formation in AFD and HCM, independent of the underlying cardiomyopathy. Mechanisms of LVAA formation in HCM include genetic predisposition and long-standing left ventricular wall stress from elevated intra-cavitary systolic pressures due to mid-cavitary obstruction. Both mechanisms are supported in this patient (a brother with AFD also developed a small LVAA). Screening for AFD should be considered in cases of unexplained LVH, particularly in patients with the aneurysmal variant of HCM. PMID:26090373

  2. Identification of Mott insulators and Anderson insulators in self-assembled gold nanoparticles thin films.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng-Wei; Ni, I-Chih; Tzeng, Shien-Der; Wu, Cen-Shawn; Kuo, Watson

    2014-06-01

    How the interparticle tunnelling affects the charge conduction of self-assembled gold nanoparticles is studied by three means: tuning the tunnel barrier width by different molecule modification and by substrate bending, and tuning the barrier height by high-dose electron beam exposure. All approaches indicate that the metal-Mott insulator transition is governed predominantly by the interparticle coupling strength, which can be quantified by the room temperature sheet resistance. The Hubbard gap, following the prediction of quantum fluctuation theory, reduces to zero rapidly as the sheet resistance decreases to the quantum resistance. At very low temperature, the fate of devices near the Mott transition depends on the strength of disorder. The charge conduction is from nearest-neighbour hopping to co-tunnelling between nanoparticles in Mott insulators whereas it is from variable-range hopping through charge puddles in Anderson insulators. When the two-dimensional nanoparticle network is under a unidirectional strain, the interparticle coupling becomes anisotropic so the average sheet resistance is required to describe the charge conduction. PMID:24752439

  3. A report documenting the completion of the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the ASC level II milestone ""Visualization on the supercomputing platform

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, James P; Patchett, John M; Lo, Li - Ta; Mitchell, Christopher; Mr Marle, David; Brownlee, Carson

    2011-01-24

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Los Alamos portion of the ASC Level II 'Visualization on the Supercomputing Platform' milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The milestone text is shown in Figure 1 with the Los Alamos portions highlighted in boldfaced text. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is the most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors (GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the perfromance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. In conclusion, we improved CPU-based rendering performance by a a factor of 2-10 times on our tests. In addition, we evaluated CPU and CPU-based rendering performance. We encourage production visualization experts to consider using CPU-based rendering solutions when it is appropriate. For example, on remote supercomputers CPU-based rendering can offer a means of viewing data without having to offload the data or geometry onto a CPU-based visualization system. In terms of comparative performance of the CPU and CPU we believe that further optimizations of the performance of both CPU or CPU-based rendering are possible. The simulation community is currently confronting this reality as they work to port their simulations to different hardware architectures. What is interesting about CPU rendering of massive datasets is that for part two decades CPU performance has significantly outperformed CPU-based systems. Based on our advancements, evaluations and explorations we believe that CPU-based rendering has returned as one viable option for the visualization of massive datasets.

  4. Linalool decreases HepG2 viability by inhibiting mitochondrial complexes I and II, increasing reactive oxygen species and decreasing ATP and GSH levels.

    PubMed

    Usta, Julnar; Kreydiyyeh, Sawsan; Knio, Khuzama; Barnabe, Pascale; Bou-Moughlabay, Yolla; Dagher, Shawki

    2009-06-15

    Coriander is used as an appetizer, a common food seasoning in Mediterranean dishes, and a remedy for many ailments. In this study we tested the biochemical effect of its essential oil components, in particular linalool, its main component. The oil extract was prepared by hydro-distillation of coriander seeds. The various components were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy. The effect of the various oil components on the viability of different cell lines (HepG2, Caco2, NIH3t3, MCF7 and Hek293) was examined using MTT assay. Linalool was the most potent and HepG2 cells the most sensitive. A 50% and 100% decrease in the viability of HepG2 was obtained at 0.4 microM and 2 microM linalool, respectively. Whereas none of the other components exerted a significant effect at concentrations lower than 50 microM, myrcene and nerolidol, the structural analogues of linalool, were more potent at 100 microM than the other components decreasing HepG2 viability to 26%. The biochemical effect of linalool on mitochondria isolated from HepG2 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition in complexes I and II activities of the respiratory chain, and a time-dependent decrease in ATP level. In addition, a time-dependent decrease in glutathione (GSH) level and in the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium was obtained, indicating increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Pretreatment with the antioxidants: N-acetyl cysteine (2mM), Trolox (100 microM) and different flavonoids (50 microM) was partially protective against the linalool-induced cell death; the most effective response was that of rutin and apigenin which restored 91% of HepG2 viability. We hereby report a decrease in cell viability of HepG2 cells by linalool and identify the mitochondria as one possible target for its site of action, inhibiting complexes I and II and decreasing ATP. In addition linalool increased ROS generation and decreased GSH level. PMID:19428344

  5. Forward approximation as a mean-field approximation for the Anderson and many-body localization transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietracaprina, Francesca; Ros, Valentina; Scardicchio, Antonello

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we analyze the predictions of the forward approximation in some models which exhibit an Anderson (single-body) or many-body localized phase. This approximation, which consists of summing over the amplitudes of only the shortest paths in the locator expansion, is known to overestimate the critical value of the disorder which determines the onset of the localized phase. Nevertheless, the results provided by the approximation become more and more accurate as the local coordination (dimensionality) of the graph, defined by the hopping matrix, is made larger. In this sense, the forward approximation can be regarded as a mean-field theory for the Anderson transition in infinite dimensions. The sum can be efficiently computed using transfer matrix techniques, and the results are compared with the most precise exact diagonalization results available. For the Anderson problem, we find a critical value of the disorder which is 0.9 % off the most precise available numerical value already in 5 spatial dimensions, while for the many-body localized phase of the Heisenberg model with random fields the critical disorder hc=4.0 ±0.3 is strikingly close to the most recent results obtained by exact diagonalization. In both cases we obtain a critical exponent ν =1 . In the Anderson case, the latter does not show dependence on the dimensionality, as it is common within mean-field approximations. We discuss the relevance of the correlations between the shortest paths for both the single- and many-body problems, and comment on the connections of our results with the problem of directed polymers in random medium.

  6. Systematic defect donor levels in III-V and II-VI semiconductors revealed by hybrid functional density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petretto, Guido; Bruneval, Fabien

    2015-12-01

    The identification of defect levels from photoluminescence spectroscopy is a useful but challenging task. Density-functional theory (DFT) is a highly valuable tool to this aim. However, the semilocal approximations of DFT that are affected by a band gap underestimation are not reliable to evaluate defect properties, such as charge transition levels. It is now established that hybrid functional approximations to DFT improve the defect description in semiconductors. Here we demonstrate that the use of hybrid functionals systematically stabilizes donor defect states in the lower part of the band gap for many defects, impurities or vacancies, in III-V and in II-VI semiconductors, even though these defects are usually considered as acceptors. These donor defect states are a very general feature and, to the best of our knowledge, have been overlooked in previous studies. The states we identify here may challenge the older assignments to photoluminescent peaks. Though appealing to screen quickly through the possible stable charge states of a defect, semilocal approximations should not be trusted for that purpose.

  7. [Heart involvement in Anderson-Fabry disease: Italian recommendations for diagnostic, follow-up and therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Pieruzzi, Federico; Pieroni, Maurizio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Marziliano, Nicola; Morrone, Amelia; Cecchi, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations of the GLA gene that encodes alpha-galactosidase A. It is characterized by a multisystemic involvement: the renal, neurological, heart, cochleovestibular and cutaneous systems are the most damaged. Morbidity and mortality of Anderson-Fabry disease depend on renal insufficiency, heart failure and nervous system involvement. Left ventricular hypertrophy is the most common cardiac manifestation followed by conduction system disease, valve dysfunction, and arrhythmias. Mild to moderate left ventricular hypertrophy may simulate a non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Management of Anderson-Fabry disease starting from the diagnosis of cardiac involvement, the prevention of complications, the therapeutic aspects, up to appropriate clinical follow-up, requires a multidisciplinary approach. According to recent management guidelines, only few evidence-based data are available to guide the clinical and therapeutic approach to this rare disease. An Italian Board, composed by nephrologists, cardiologists, geneticists, pediatricians and neurologists has been established in order to approve by consensus a diagnostic and therapeutic management protocol. The authors report the results of this cardiologic management consensus. PMID:26571477

  8. Full density-matrix numerical renormalization group calculation of impurity susceptibility and specific heat of the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merker, L.; Weichselbaum, A.; Costi, T. A.

    2012-08-01

    Recent developments in the numerical renormalization group (NRG) allow the construction of the full density matrix (FDM) of quantum impurity models [see A. Weichselbaum and J. von Delft, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.99.076402 99, 076402 (2007)] by using the completeness of the eliminated states introduced by F. B. Anders and A. Schiller [F. B. Anders and A. Schiller, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.196801 95, 196801 (2005)]. While these developments prove particularly useful in the calculation of transient response and finite-temperature Green's functions of quantum impurity models, they may also be used to calculate thermodynamic properties. In this paper, we assess the FDM approach to thermodynamic properties by applying it to the Anderson impurity model. We compare the results for the susceptibility and specific heat to both the conventional approach within NRG and to exact Bethe ansatz results. We also point out a subtlety in the calculation of the susceptibility (in a uniform field) within the FDM approach. Finally, we show numerically that for the Anderson model, the susceptibilities in response to a local and a uniform magnetic field coincide in the wide-band limit, in accordance with the Clogston-Anderson compensation theorem.

  9. Petrographic characteristics of the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed (Paleocene), Powder River Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, P.D.; Stanton, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Six lithofacies of the thick ( > 30 m) Wyodak-Anderson subbituminous coal bed of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), Powder River Basin, Wyoming, can be delimited using megascopic and petrographic data. Previous lithofacies analysis of the rock types associated with the Wyodak-Anderson bed suggested that raised peat accumulated in restricted parts of an inland flood plain. The peat bodies were separated by deposits of contemporaneous, possibly anastomosed channels. In this study, megascopic descriptions from four mine highwalls of the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed were found to be similar to facies defined by microscopic data from core and highwall samples. The data indicate that the upper and lower parts of the coal bed are rich in preserved wood remains (for instance, humotelinite), whereas the middle part of the bed contains comparatively larger amounts of material that resulted from degradation and comminution of the peat (e.g. eugelinite). The facies are interpreted to be the result of different chemical and biological environments at the time of peat formation. ?? 1988.

  10. Damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and photosystem II after water shortage and high-temperature stress in two lines of maize which differ in endogenous levels of abscisic acid and drought resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ristic, Z.; Cass, D.D. )

    1991-05-01

    This study examines damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and photosystem II (PS II), and the rate of CO{sub 2} fixation after exposure to 7-d water shortage followed by 6-h (WTS-6) or 24-h (WTS-24) high temperature (45C) stress in the high-level. Abscisic acid (ABA) drought-resistant (DR) line of maize ZPBL 1304 and the low-level ABA drought-sensitive line ZPL 389. Seven-day water shortage followed by 6-h high-temperature stress slightly damaged PS II in the DR line ZPBL 1304. The DS line ZPL 389 was affected by WTS-6 to a great extent; however, the stress-caused damage to this line was reversible. Exposure to WTS-24 caused reversible damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and PS II in DR line. The DS line was not capable of withstanding severe stress conditions; WTS-24 killed almost all the plants. The results on the rate of CO{sub 2} fixation were in agreement with those on the damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and PS II. Considerable drought and heat resistance was apparent in the line (ZPBL 1304) which synthesizes a unique band of heat-shock protein(s) of 45 KDa. In conclusion, the high-level ABA DR line ZPBL 1304 showed much greater capability of withstanding WTS than the low-level ABA DS line ZPL 389.

  11. The pioneer woman's view of migraine: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson's thesis "Sur la migraine".

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, M; Isler, H

    1999-01-01

    This is a presentation of a doctoral thesis of 1870. The author was English but the thesis and the examinations were in French. Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, usually referred to as E.G.A., was the first woman in Britain to obtain the title of M.D., but not the first in Europe. Nadeshda Prokofevna Suslova, a Russian, received her M.D. in 1867 in Zurich, the most liberal university at that time, soon to be flooded by female students from Russia. E.G.A. had been applying to the few possible European universities but she settled for Paris after the Empress Eugenie had decided that she should be accepted there. This meant that she could succeed without having to be a Paris resident, just by writing a thesis and passing a series of examinations presided over by Paul Broca. This was important as she was already conducting private and dispensary practice, and could not find a locum (she insisted on a woman). E.G.A. had suffered many setbacks, for being a woman, as such being unacceptable in dissection rooms and operating theatres, and generally in a professional career where women were unheard of. She was finally permitted to receive her medical diploma from the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries of London. She wrote about her thesis: "I have chosen Headache as its subject. I had to find a subject which could be well studied without post-mortem observations, of which I can have but very few in either private or dispensary practice; and I wished also to take a large subject, one that demanded some insight into the harmony that exists between the main physiological functions." Marcia Wilkinson (M.W.), who worked in the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Hospital in London for 35 years, heard there of E.G.A.'s thesis on migraine and sent for it from Paris. In 1966 she translated it into English from the original French, being interested both in the subject and in the person of this resolute and lucid woman. When H. Isler found the French thesis in the British Library he intended to translate it but, after discussion, we decided on a joint effort (95% of the translation is by M.W.; very few details were changed, and some footnotes added for better understanding). We think that E.G.A.'s text is a classic, showing profound understanding, sound practical advice, and also, in its theoretical part, the limits of neurophysiological knowledge in Paris when Brown-Sequard was "charge des cours" there. We may add that in her various examinations she had to answer questions, in French, on the use of footprints by the police, the general nature of fishes, toxic fishes, electric fishes, cod liver oil, and the secretion of tears. She earned much applause from the public, which consisted of male French students, and the overt appreciation of Paul Broca, head examiner, and Dr Wurtz, the Dean of the Faculte de Mdecine. The impact of her thesis in the 19th century was modest. It appears to be rather marginal in the German literature of the early 20th century, but it has imprinted the management of migraine at the City of London Migraine Clinic in the last thirty years. The importance of nutrition, regular meals, regular habits, the need to supplement analgesics with antiemetics, and the treatment of the attack with rest, and great quantities of hot tea, were certainly related to E.G.A.'s doctrine. The internationally prevailing recommendation to give antiemetics, and then only analgesics, as well as the combination of both in one tablet, may thus be traced back to E.G.A. via the teachings of M.W. and Nat Blau. PMID:10099853

  12. On Planetary Evolution and the Evolution of Planetary Science During the Career of Don Anderson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2003-12-01

    The planets of our solar system have long been viewed by Don Anderson as laboratories for testing general aspects of planetary evolution and as points of comparison to the Earth. I was fortunate to have been a student 39 years ago in a course at Caltech that Don taught with Bob Kovach on the interiors of the Earth and the planets. At that time, Mariner 4 had not yet flown by Mars, the lunar Ranger program was still in progress, and it was permissible to entertain the hypothesis that all of the terrestrial planets were identical in bulk composition. In the last four decades spacecraft have visited every planet from Mercury to Neptune; samples from the Moon, Mars, asteroids, and comets reside in our laboratories; and more than 100 planets have been discovered orbiting other stars. More importantly, traditionally distinct fields have merged to the point where planetary scientists must be conversant with the findings and modes of thinking from astronomy and biology as well as the geosciences. A few examples illustrate this confluence. Theoretical models for the structure of the atmospheres of gas-giant planets led to the first astronomical detection of an extrasolar planetary atmosphere for the transiting planet HD209458b. Although the atmospheric models were based on those for solar-system gas giants, the 3.5-day orbital period means that this planet is 100 times closer to its star than Jupiter is to the Sun, its effective temperature is 1100 K, and the detected signature of the planetary atmosphere was absorption by neutral sodium. Sodium in Mercury's exosphere, detected astronomically from Earth, figures into the question of how the terrestrial planets came to have distinct bulk compositions. Hypotheses to account for Mercury's high uncompressed density, and by inference its high ratio of metal to silicate, range from chemical gradients in the early solar nebula to preferential removal of silicates from a differentiated protoplanet by nebular heating or giant impact disruption, processes that would have affected the final composition of the other inner planets to lesser degrees. These hypotheses will be distinguishable by future remote sensing measurements from a spacecraft in Mercury orbit, but all lead to the prediction that volatile species such as sodium should be deficient in Mercury's silicate fraction. The most recent models for Mercury's exosphere are consistent with the idea that the required fresh supply of sodium from Mercury's surface is no greater than that predicted for meteorite infall. One of the leading questions driving the current exploration of Mars is whether the surface or subsurface was ever conducive to the origin and evolution of life. Sites of hydrothermal circulation within the crust may have provided the necessary energy and chemical building blocks. Remote sensing of candidate hydrothermal minerals at the Martian surface is the leading technique being used to seek such sites, but paleomagnetism may offer another route. Several hypotheses link hydrothermal activity to either the formation of magnetic carriers during the lifetime of the Martian dynamo or the alteration of such carriers after the dynamo ceased, leading to the possibility that high-resolution mapping of crustal magnetism may provide a prospecting tool for promising Martian biological habitats. As Don Anderson showed us by example throughout his career, students of the Earth need not confine their attention to a single planet or even a single planetary system. The lessons from diverse fields that planetary scientists must master to stay current will keep all of us --- like Don --- young and curious.

  13. Chronic renal failure, dialysis, and renal transplantation in Anderson-Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Adalberto; Meroni, Mietta; Battini, Graziana; Righetti, Marco; Mignani, Renzo

    2004-09-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFd) is a rare, inherited, x-linked disease characterized by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzymatic alpha-galactosidase A activity (alpha-Gal-A). The enzyme defect leads to progressive accumulation of glycosphingolipids (GL) in all kinds of cells, tissues, organs, and body fluids. The clinical manifestations are very protean, the residual activity of alpha-Gal-A and/or different gene mutations might explain different phenotypes, but as yet these concepts have not been proven. Usually, patients with AFd show 3 clinical phases, more evident in men than in heterozygous women. The first phase (childhood and adolescence) is characterized by myalgia, arthralgia, acroparesthesia, fever, cutaneous angiokeratomas, and corneal opacities. The second phase is characterized mainly by renal involvement. In the third phase, severe renal impairment and involvement of c