Science.gov

Sample records for anderson level ii

  1. ASCOT data from the 1980 field measurement program in the Anderson Creek Valley, California. Vol. II

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.

    1983-04-01

    This report provides a listing of the data acquired during a series of nocturnal drainage flow experiments that were conducted by ASCOT participants in the Anderson Creek valley during September 1980. These experiments were designed to evaluate the transport and dispersion characteristics associated with nocturnal drainage flows. The report includes data from meteorological measurements systems and tracer experiments. The meteorological data include measurements from tethersondes, acoustic sounders, meteorological towers, pilot balloons, optical anemometers, and rawinsondes; while the tracer experiments provided data on the spatial and temporal distributions of perfluorocarbon, heavy methane, sulfur hexafluoride, oil fog, tetroons, and radon tracers.

  2. Level repulsion exponent β for many-body localization transitions and for Anderson localization transitions via Dyson Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    The generalization of the Dyson Brownian motion approach of random matrices to Anderson localization (AL) models (Chalker et al 1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 554) and to many-body localization (MBL) Hamiltonians (Serbyn and Moore 2015 arXiv:1508.07293) is revisited to extract the level repulsion exponent β, where β =1 in the delocalized phase governed by the Wigner-Dyson statistics, β =0 , in the localized phase governed by the Poisson statistics, and 0<{βc}<1 at the critical point. The idea is that the Gaussian disorder variables h i are promoted to Gaussian stationary processes h i (t) in order to sample the disorder stationary distribution with some time correlation τ. The statistics of energy levels can then be studied via Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations. For the MBL quantum spin Hamiltonian with random fields h i , we obtain β =2qn,n+1\\text{EA}(N)/qn,n\\text{EA}(N) in terms of the Edwards-Anderson matrix qnm\\text{EA}(N)\\equiv \\frac{1}{N}{\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|σ iz|{φm}> {{|}2} for the same eigenstate m  =  n and for consecutive eigenstates m  =  n  +  1. For the Anderson localization tight-binding Hamiltonian with random on-site energies h i , we find β =2{{Y}n,n+1}(N)/≤ft({{Y}n,n}(N)-{{Y}n,n+1}(N)\\right) in terms of the density correlation matrix {{Y}nm}(N)\\equiv {\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|i> {{|}2}|< i|{φm}> {{|}2} for consecutive eigenstates m  =  n  +  1, while the diagonal element m  =  n corresponds to the inverse participation ratio {{Y}nn}(N)\\equiv {\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|i> {{|}4} of the eigenstate |{φn}> .

  3. Surface hopping with a manifold of electronic states. II. Application to the many-body Anderson-Holstein model

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2015-02-28

    We investigate a simple surface hopping (SH) approach for modeling a single impurity level coupled to a single phonon and an electronic (metal) bath (i.e., the Anderson-Holstein model). The phonon degree of freedom is treated classically with motion along–and hops between–diabatic potential energy surfaces. The hopping rate is determined by the dynamics of the electronic bath (which are treated implicitly). For the case of one electronic bath, in the limit of small coupling to the bath, SH recovers phonon relaxation to thermal equilibrium and yields the correct impurity electron population (as compared with numerical renormalization group). For the case of out of equilibrium dynamics, SH current-voltage (I-V) curve is compared with the quantum master equation (QME) over a range of parameters, spanning the quantum region to the classical region. In the limit of large temperature, SH and QME agree. Furthermore, we can show that, in the limit of low temperature, the QME agrees with real-time path integral calculations. As such, the simple procedure described here should be useful in many other contexts.

  4. No correlation between Anderson Reservoir stage level and underlying Calaveras fault seismicity despite calculated differential stress increases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2011-01-01

    Concerns have been raised that stresses from reservoir impoundment may trigger damaging earthquakes because rate changes have been associated with reservoir impoundment or stage-level changes globally. Here, the idea is tested blindly using Anderson Reservoir, which lies atop the seismically active Calaveras fault. The only knowledge held by the author going into the study was the expectation that reservoir levels change cyclically because of seasonal rainfall. Examination of seismicity rates near the reservoir reveals variability, but no correlation with stage-level changes. Three-dimensional fi nite-element modeling shows stress changes suffi cient for earthquake triggering along the Calaveras fault zone. Since many of the reported cases of induced triggering come from low-strain settings, it is speculated that gradual stressing from stage-level changes in high-strain settings may not be signifi cant. From this study, it can be concluded that reservoirs are not necessarily risky in active tectonic settings. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  5. Culture Curriculum: French, Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Ruth Wellman

    This teacher's guide to cultural instruction at level 2 integrates materials derived from several sources. The guide is based on: (1) suggestions from "French for Secondary Schools," New York State Education Department; (2) general information concerning the geography, products, industries, regions, cities of France, the French Union, and the city…

  6. Anderson Localization of Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Müller, Cord A.; Delande, Dominique; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2009-11-01

    At low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with an attractive interaction forms a bright soliton. When exposed to a weak and smooth external potential, the shape of the soliton is hardly modified, but its center-of-mass motion is affected. We show that in a spatially correlated disordered potential, the quantum motion of a bright soliton displays Anderson localization. The localization length can be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

  7. Anderson Localization of Solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Mueller, Cord A.; Delande, Dominique

    2009-11-20

    At low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with an attractive interaction forms a bright soliton. When exposed to a weak and smooth external potential, the shape of the soliton is hardly modified, but its center-of-mass motion is affected. We show that in a spatially correlated disordered potential, the quantum motion of a bright soliton displays Anderson localization. The localization length can be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

  8. Universality and the QCD Anderson transition.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Matteo; Kovács, Tamás G; Pittler, Ferenc

    2014-03-14

    We study the Anderson-type transition previously found in the spectrum of the QCD quark Dirac operator in the high-temperature, quark-gluon plasma phase. Using finite size scaling for the unfolded level spacing distribution, we show that in the thermodynamic limit there is a genuine mobility edge, where the spectral statistics changes from Poisson to Wigner-Dyson statistics in a nonanalytic way. We determine the correlation length critical exponent ν and find that it is compatible with that of the unitary Anderson model. PMID:24679282

  9. Kondo-Anderson transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettemann, S.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Varga, I.; Slevin, K.

    2012-03-01

    Dilute magnetic impurities in a disordered Fermi liquid are considered close to the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT). Critical power-law correlations between electron wave functions at different energies in the vicinity of the AMIT result in the formation of pseudogaps of the local density of states. Magnetic impurities can remain unscreened at such sites. We determine the density of the resulting free magnetic moments in the zero-temperature limit. While it is finite on the insulating side of the AMIT, it vanishes at the AMIT, and decays with a power law as function of the distance to the AMIT. Since the fluctuating spins of these free magnetic moments break the time-reversal symmetry of the conduction electrons, we find a shift of the AMIT, and the appearance of a semimetal phase. The distribution function of the Kondo temperature TK is derived at the AMIT, in the metallic phase, and in the insulator phase. This allows us to find the quantum phase diagram in an external magnetic field B and at finite temperature T. We calculate the resulting magnetic susceptibility, the specific heat, and the spin relaxation rate as a function of temperature. We find a phase diagram with finite-temperature transitions among insulator, critical semimetal, and metal phases. These new types of phase transitions are caused by the interplay between Kondo screening and Anderson localization, with the latter being shifted by the appearance of the temperature-dependent spin-flip scattering rate. Accordingly, we name them Kondo-Anderson transitions.

  10. 30. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing control transmitter electronic cabinets and control modules. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  11. 55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with eighty-eight 1-1/2" diameter copper ion return RF balance tube systems. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  12. 53. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with incoming waveguide and control switch. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  13. On the level system of Bi II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejewska, M.; Meijer, F. G.; Stachowska, E.

    2013-10-01

    The spectrum of Bi II was remeasured in the wavelength range 620-74 nm, using different hollow cathode light sources, resulting in 91 new classified lines. We found two even and eight odd new levels. Fine and hyperfine structure analysis has been performed with a many configurations approach. We determined for all levels the Landé gJ-factors and the hfs A-constants, using the wavefunctions calculated. For the first time, radial hyperfine structure parameters were determined for the excited configurations 6s26pnl (l = s, p, d, f, g). We will also discuss the important role of configuration interaction effects on fine and hyperfine structures.

  14. Anderson attractors in active arrays

    PubMed Central

    Laptyeva, Tetyana V.; Tikhomirov, Andrey A.; Kanakov, Oleg I.; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V.

    2015-01-01

    In dissipationless linear media, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of matter, light, and sound waves. The addition of nonlinearity causes interaction between the eigenmodes, which results in a slow wave diffusion. We go beyond the dissipationless limit of Anderson arrays and consider nonlinear disordered systems that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess specific excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the threshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multi-peak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices, active waveguide or cavity-QED arrays. PMID:26304462

  15. Quantifying Anderson's fault types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Anderson [1905] explained three basic types of faulting (normal, strike-slip, and reverse) in terms of the shape of the causative stress tensor and its orientation relative to the Earth's surface. Quantitative parameters can be defined which contain information about both shape and orientation [Ce??le??rier, 1995], thereby offering a way to distinguish fault-type domains on plots of regional stress fields and to quantify, for example, the degree of normal-faulting tendencies within strike-slip domains. This paper offers a geometrically motivated generalization of Angelier's [1979, 1984, 1990] shape parameters ?? and ?? to new quantities named A?? and A??. In their simple forms, A?? varies from 0 to 1 for normal, 1 to 2 for strike-slip, and 2 to 3 for reverse faulting, and A?? ranges from 0?? to 60??, 60?? to 120??, and 120?? to 180??, respectively. After scaling, A?? and A?? agree to within 2% (or 1??), a difference of little practical significance, although A?? has smoother analytical properties. A formulation distinguishing horizontal axes as well as the vertical axis is also possible, yielding an A?? ranging from -3 to +3 and A?? from -180?? to +180??. The geometrically motivated derivation in three-dimensional stress space presented here may aid intuition and offers a natural link with traditional ways of plotting yield and failure criteria. Examples are given, based on models of Bird [1996] and Bird and Kong [1994], of the use of Anderson fault parameters A?? and A?? for visualizing tectonic regimes defined by regional stress fields. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. 6. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY NEAR BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY NEAR BUILDING 132, FACING SOUTHEAST (BUILDINGS 124, 122, 120, and 118 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  17. 9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING WEST (BUILDINGS 126, 128, 129, 130, and 131 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  18. 10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING NORTHEAST (BUILDINGS 131, 130, 129, and 128 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  19. Paired-Associate Learning at Three Imagery Levels in Level I and Level II Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prawat, Richard S.

    Two views of paired-associate learning were examined by assessing the paired-associate learning efficiency of eighth grade samples identified by digit span and IQ test performance as Jensen-type Level I and Level II learners. Eighty eighth grade students ranging in age from 13 years 3 months to 14 years 10 months were selected as subjects. Three…

  20. Culture Curriculum for German, Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oetiker, Rosemary

    This teacher's guide to cultural instruction in a level-2 German course is designed to be used with the text "Deutsch, Erstes Buch, Erster Teil." Instructional observations pertain to the seventh through the 12th lessons and comprise the major portion of this text including: )1) die Eisenbahn, (2) Reisen und Essen in Deutschland, (3) die Familie,…

  1. New Fe ii energy levels from stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, F.; Kurucz, R. L.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: The spectra of B-type and early A-type stars show numerous unidentified lines in the whole optical range, especially in the 5100-5400 Å interval. Because Fe ii transitions to high energy levels should be observed in this region, we used semiempirical predicted wavelengths and gf-values of Fe ii to identify unknown lines. Methods: Semiempirical line data for Fe ii computed by Kurucz are used to synthesize the spectrum of the slow-rotating, Fe-overabundant CP star HR 6000. Results: We determined a total of 109 new 4f levels for Fe ii with energies ranging from 122 324 cm-1 to 128 110 cm-1. They belong to the Fe ii subconfigurations 3d6(3P)4f (10 levels), 3d6(3H)4f (36 levels), 3d6(3F)4f (37 levels), and 3d6(3G)4f (26 levels). We also found 14 even levels from 4d (3 levels), 5d (7 levels), and 6d (4 levels) configurations. The new levels have allowed us to identify more than 50% of the previously unidentified lines of HR 6000 in the wavelength region 3800-8000 Å. Tables listing the new energy levels are given in the paper; tables listing the spectral lines with log gf ≥ -1.5 that are transitions to the 4f energy levels are given in the Online Material. These new levels produce 18 000 lines throughout the spectrum from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Tables 6-9 are also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/520/A57

  2. Anderson localization from classical trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Piet W.; Altland, Alexander

    2008-08-01

    We show that Anderson localization in quasi-one-dimensional conductors with ballistic electron dynamics, such as an array of ballistic chaotic cavities connected via ballistic contacts, can be understood in terms of classical electron trajectories only. At large length scales, an exponential proliferation of trajectories of nearly identical classical action generates an abundance of interference terms, which eventually leads to a suppression of transport coefficients. We quantitatively describe this mechanism in two different ways: the explicit description of transition probabilities in terms of interfering trajectories, and an hierarchical integration over fluctuations in the classical phase space of the array cavities.

  3. 54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch at open port door. Note incoming waveguide and control switch at lower left of photograph and note several waveguides leaving top of scanner switch around the circumference of switch. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. 52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch with open port door in radar scanner building 105 showing emanating waveguides from lower switch in vertical run; photograph also shows catwalk to upper scanner switch in upper left side of photograph and structural supports. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. 31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing various electronic central indicator panel to control building air conditioning, steam pressure, supply temperature, discharge temperature, supply pressure, transformer vault status, and radome conditioning system. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. Establishing level II neonatal services in southwestern Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Michael; Makkar, Abhishek; Foulks, Arlen; Legako, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Historically, Neonatal Services in Oklahoma have relied upon Level III and IV NICUs within the largest metropolitan areas to provide services for premature and other sick newborns. Smaller, regional Level II nurseries have delivered care according to previous American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Guidelines for Levels of Care. With changing guidelines in perinatal and neonatal care, there has been the need to add to available neonatal resources to continue to allow infants to remain in their home. This article is a description of a partnership between Comanche County Memorial Hospital (CCMH) and the Department of Pediatrics, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Section at OU Health Sciences Center (OUHSC) to establish a regional Level II NICU and the planning and implementation required to meet local, state, and national standards. The process, which involved neonatologists, nurse practitioners, nurses, laboratory services, pharmacy services, radiology, and respiratory therapy, resulted in a fully-functioning 8-bed Level II NICU. PMID:25790596

  7. Energy transport in the Anderson insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, D. B.; Protopopov, I. V.; Burin, A. L.; Gornyi, I. V.; Santos, R. A.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the heat conductivity in Anderson insulators in the presence of a power-law interaction. Particle-hole excitations built on localized electron states are viewed as two-level systems randomly distributed in space and energy and coupled due to electron-electron interaction. A small fraction of these states form resonant pairs that in turn build a complex network allowing for energy propagation. We identify the character of energy transport through this network and evaluate the thermal conductivity. For physically relevant cases of two-dimensional and three-dimensional spin systems with 1 /r3 dipole-dipole interaction (originating from the conventional 1 /r Coulomb interaction between electrons), the found thermal conductivity κ scales with temperature as κ ∝T3 and κ ∝T4 /3 , respectively. Our results may be of relevance also to other realizations of random spin Hamiltonians with long-range interactions.

  8. Aligning a reflection cavity by Anderson's method.

    PubMed

    Reasenberg, Robert D

    2012-06-01

    The sounding rocket principle of equivalence measurement uses a set of four laser gauges operating in Fabry-Perot cavities to determine the relative acceleration of two test masses that are chemically different. One end of each cavity is a flat mirror on a test mass. Because the test masses are unconstrained and thus expected to rotate slightly during measurement, and because the distance measurements are made at the sub-picometer level, it is essential to have real-time alignment of the beam entering the cavity. However, the cavity must be used in reflection and space is limited. We show that Anderson's alignment method can be used in reflection, but that it requires that the Fabry-Perot cavity have mirrors with significantly unequal reflectivities. PMID:22695543

  9. 27 CFR 9.86 - Anderson Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anderson Valley. 9.86 Section 9.86 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.86 Anderson Valley. (a) Name. The name of...

  10. Anderson and Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    The legacy of P. W. Anderson, perhaps the most fertile and influential condensed matter physicist of the second half of the twentieth century, is briefly mentioned here. I note three pervasive values. They are: emergence with its constant tendency to surprise us and to stretch our imagination, the Baconian emphasis on the experimental moorings of modern science, and mechanism as the explanatory core. Out of his work, which is spread over more than six decades and in many ways has charted modern condensed matter physics, nearly a dozen seminal contributions, chosen idiosyncratically, are mentioned at the risk of leaving out many which may also have started subfields. Some of these are: antiferromagnestism and broken symmetry, superexchange and strong electron correlations, localization in disordered systems, gauge invariance and mass, and the resonating valence bond in magnetic systems as well as in high-temperature superconductivity...

  11. Home Economics. Sample Test Items. Levels I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Educational Testing.

    A sample of behavioral objectives and related test items that could be developed for content modules in Home Economics levels I and II, this book is intended to enable teachers to construct more valid and reliable test materials. Forty-eight one-page modules are presented, and opposite each module are listed two to seven specific behavioral…

  12. Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

  13. Modified Anderson orthogonality catastrophe power law in the presence of shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Swarnali; Hentschel, Martina

    2011-01-01

    We study Anderson orthogonality catastrophe (AOC) for parabolic quantum dots and focus on the effects of degeneracies, realized through the inherent shell structure of their energy levels that can be lifted through an external magnetic field, on the Anderson overlap. We find rich and interesting behaviors as a function of the strength and position of the perturbation, the system size, and the applied magnetic field. In particular, even for weak perturbations, we observe a pronounced AOC that is related to the degeneracy of energy levels. Most importantly, the power-law decay of the Anderson overlap as a function of the number of particles is modified in comparison to the metallic case due to the rearrangement of the energy-level shell structure. We support our analytical results by numerical calculations and also study the distribution of Anderson overlaps.

  14. Anderson localization in metallic nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Zhijie; Lin, Fang; Pang, Wei; Xu, Haitao; Tan, Suiyan; Fu, Shenhe; Li, Yongyao

    2016-06-01

    Anderson localization has been observed in various types of waves, such as matter waves, optical waves and acoustic waves. Here we reveal that the effect of Anderson localization can be also induced in metallic nonlinear nanoparticle arrays excited by a random electrically driving field. We find that the dipole-induced nonlinearity results in ballistic expansion of dipole intensity during evolution; while the randomness of the external driving field can suppress such an expansion. Increasing the strength of randomness above the threshold value, a localized pattern of dipole intensity can be generated in the metallic nanoparticle arrays. By means of statistics, the mean intensity distribution of the dipoles reveals the formation of Anderson localization. We further show that the generated Anderson localization is highly confined, with its size down to the scale of incident wavelength. The reported results might facilitate the manipulations of electromagnetic fields in the scale of wavelength.

  15. Anderson localization in metallic nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Mai, Zhijie; Lin, Fang; Pang, Wei; Xu, Haitao; Tan, Suiyan; Fu, Shenhe; Li, Yongyao

    2016-06-13

    Anderson localization has been observed in various types of waves, such as matter waves, optical waves and acoustic waves. Here we reveal that the effect of Anderson localization can be also induced in metallic nonlinear nanoparticle arrays excited by a random electrically driving field. We find that the dipole-induced nonlinearity results in ballistic expansion of dipole intensity during evolution; while the randomness of the external driving field can suppress such an expansion. Increasing the strength of randomness above the threshold value, a localized pattern of dipole intensity can be generated in the metallic nanoparticle arrays. By means of statistics, the mean intensity distribution of the dipoles reveals the formation of Anderson localization. We further show that the generated Anderson localization is highly confined, with its size down to the scale of incident wavelength. The reported results might facilitate the manipulations of electromagnetic fields in the scale of wavelength. PMID:27410338

  16. Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson

    NASA Video Gallery

    When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

  17. Coherent Backscattering Reveals the Anderson Transition.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Delande, D; Miniatura, C; Cherroret, N

    2015-11-13

    We develop an accurate finite-time scaling analysis of the angular width of the coherent backscattering (CBS) peak for waves propagating in 3D random media. Applying this method to ultracold atoms in optical speckle potentials, we show how to determine both the mobility edge and the critical exponent of the Anderson transition from the temporal behavior of the CBS width. Our method could be used in experiments to fully characterize the 3D Anderson transition. PMID:26613427

  18. Coherent Backscattering Reveals the Anderson Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Delande, D.; Miniatura, C.; Cherroret, N.

    2015-11-01

    We develop an accurate finite-time scaling analysis of the angular width of the coherent backscattering (CBS) peak for waves propagating in 3D random media. Applying this method to ultracold atoms in optical speckle potentials, we show how to determine both the mobility edge and the critical exponent of the Anderson transition from the temporal behavior of the CBS width. Our method could be used in experiments to fully characterize the 3D Anderson transition.

  19. Transport and Anderson localization in disordered two-dimensional photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tal; Bartal, Guy; Fishman, Shmuel; Segev, Mordechai

    2007-03-01

    One of the most interesting phenomena in solid-state physics is Anderson localization, which predicts that an electron may become immobile when placed in a disordered lattice. The origin of localization is interference between multiple scatterings of the electron by random defects in the potential, altering the eigenmodes from being extended (Bloch waves) to exponentially localized. As a result, the material is transformed from a conductor to an insulator. Anderson's work dates back to 1958, yet strong localization has never been observed in atomic crystals, because localization occurs only if the potential (the periodic lattice and the fluctuations superimposed on it) is time-independent. However, in atomic crystals important deviations from the Anderson model always occur, because of thermally excited phonons and electron-electron interactions. Realizing that Anderson localization is a wave phenomenon relying on interference, these concepts were extended to optics. Indeed, both weak and strong localization effects were experimentally demonstrated, traditionally by studying the transmission properties of randomly distributed optical scatterers (typically suspensions or powders of dielectric materials). However, in these studies the potential was fully random, rather than being 'frozen' fluctuations on a periodic potential, as the Anderson model assumes. Here we report the experimental observation of Anderson localization in a perturbed periodic potential: the transverse localization of light caused by random fluctuations on a two-dimensional photonic lattice. We demonstrate how ballistic transport becomes diffusive in the presence of disorder, and that crossover to Anderson localization occurs at a higher level of disorder. Finally, we study how nonlinearities affect Anderson localization. As Anderson localization is a universal phenomenon, the ideas presented here could also be implemented in other systems (for example, matter waves), thereby making it feasible

  20. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD (II) LEVELS AND LEAD (II) NEUROTOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafl...

  1. The Internal Validation of Level II and Level III Respiratory Therapy Examinations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jouett, Michael L.

    This project began with the delineation of the roles and functions of respiratory therapy personnel by the American Association for Respiratory Therapy. In Phase II, The Psychological Corporation used this delineation to develop six proficiency examinations, three at each of two levels. One exam at each level was designated for the purpose of the…

  2. Quantum phase transitions in the pseudogap Anderson Holstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Mengxing; Ingersent, Kevin

    2011-03-01

    We study a pseudogap Anderson-Holstein model of a magnetic impurity level that (1) hybridizes with a conduction band whose density of states vanishes in power-law fashion at the Fermi energy, and (2) couples, via its charge, to a nondispersive bosonic mode (e.g., an optical phonon). The model exhibits quantum phase transitions (QPTs) of different types depending on the strength λ of the impurity-boson coupling. For small λ , the suppression of the density of states near the Fermi energy leads to QPTs between strong-coupling (Kondo) and local-moment phases. A sufficiently large λ , however, transforms the bare Coulomb repulsion between a pair of electrons in the impurity level into an effective attraction, leading to QPTs between strong-coupling (charge-Kondo) and local-charge phases. Critical exponents characterizing the response to a local magnetic field (for small λ) or electric potential (for large λ) suggest that the QPTs belong to the same universality class as the QPT of the previously studied pseudogap Anderson model. One specific case of the pseudogap Anderson-Holstein model may be realized in a double-quantum-dot device, where the QPTs manifest themselves in the finite- temperature linear electrical conductance. Supported by NSF grant DMR-0710540.

  3. Schemata, Cognitive Structure, and Advance Organizers: A Reply to Anderson, Spiro, and Anderson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ausubel, David P.

    1980-01-01

    Anderson, Spiro, and Anderson (EJ 189 658) assert that the author's assimilation theory of meaningful learning and retention is "hopelessly vague." Documented examination of these assertions indicates that they are unspecified, unsubstantiated, undocumented, and based on indisputable misrepresentation of published material and on logical non…

  4. Thermalization processes in interacting Anderson insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovadyahu, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes experiments utilizing a unique property of electron glasses to gain information on the fundamental nature of the interacting Anderson-localized phase. The methodology is based on measuring the energy absorbed by the electronic system from alternating electromagnetic fields as a function of their frequency. Experiments on three-dimensional (3D) amorphous indium-oxide films suggest that, in the strongly localized regime, the energy spectrum is discrete and inelastic electron-electron events are strongly suppressed. These results imply that, at low temperatures, electron thermalization and finite conductivity depend on coupling to the phonon bath. The situation is different for samples nearing the metal-insulator transition; in insulating samples that are close to the mobility edge, energy absorption persists to much higher frequencies. Comparing these results with previously studied 2D samples [Ovadyahu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 156602 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.156602] demonstrates that the mean-level spacing (on a single-particle basis) is not the only relevant scale in this problem. The possibility of delocalization by many-body effects and the relevance of a nearby mobility edge (which may be a many-body edge) are discussed.

  5. Wavelengths, energy levels and hyperfine structure of Mn II and Sc II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Pickering, Juliet C.; Townley-Smith, Keeley I. M.; Hala, .

    2015-08-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Groups at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Imperial College London (ICL) have measured atomic data of astronomical interest. Our spectrometers include Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers at NIST and ICL covering the region 1350 Å to 5.5 μm and a 10.7-m grating spectrometer at NIST covering wavelengths from 300 - 5000 Å. Sources for these spectra include high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) lamps, Penning discharges, and sliding spark discharges. Recent work has focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure (HFS) constants for iron-group elements. The analysis of FT spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn II is being led by ICL and is described in a companion poster [1]. Current work being led by NIST includes the analysis of HFS in Mn II, analysis of Mn II in the vacuum ultraviolet, and a comprehensive analysis of Sc II.Comprehensive HFS constants for Mn II are needed for the interpretation of stellar spectra and incorrect abundances may be obtained when HFS is omitted. Holt et al. [2] have measured HFS constants for 59 levels of Mn II using laser spectroscopy. We used FT spectra of Mn/Ni and Mn/Cu HCLs covering wavelength ranges from 1350 Å to 5.4 μm to confirm 26 of the A constants of Holt et al. and obtain values for roughly 40 additional levels. We aim to obtain HFS constants for the majority of lines showing significant HFS that are observed in chemically-peculiar stars.Spectra of Sc HCLs have been recorded from 1800 - 6700 Å using a vacuum ultraviolet FT spectrometer at NIST. Additional measurements to cover wavelengths above 6700 Å and below 1800 Å are in progress. The spectra are being analyzed by NIST and Alighar Muslim University, India in order to derive improved wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters.This work was partially supported by NASA, the STFC and PPARC (UK), the Royal Society of the UK

  6. 4. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY, FACING SOUTH/SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY, FACING SOUTH/SOUTHWEST. (BUILDINGS 126, 124, 122, 120, and 114 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  7. Experimental oscillator strengths of highly excited levels of Mo II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón, C.; Aguilera, J. A.; Ortiz, M.; Mayo-García, R.

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of 161 oscillator strengths arising from highly excited levels of Mo II are presented, 148 of which are obtained for the first time. These results extend the previous ones already published on lower excited levels of Mo II. A laser-induced plasma generated from a fused glass sample prepared from molybdenum oxide with a Mo atomic concentration of 0.1% was used to obtain the presented radiative parameters via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Measurements were carried out with an electron density of (2.5 ± 0.1) · 1017 cm‑3 and an electron temperature of 14 400 ± 200 K as the plasma evolved in air at atmospheric pressure. As a consequence, an optically thin plasma and a local thermodynamic equilibrium environment were then present in the measurements. In order to put on an absolute scale the relative intensities, both the combination of branching fractions with measured lifetimes and the comparison of well-known lines using the plasma temperature were carried out. Also, the new results are compared with previously theoretical and obtained experimental values wherever possible.

  8. Low shear viscosity due to Anderson localization

    SciTech Connect

    Giannakis, Ioannis; Hou Defu; Ren Haicang; Li Jiarong

    2008-01-15

    We study the Anderson localization effect on the shear viscosity in a system with random medium by Kubo formula. We show that this effect can suppress nonperturbatively the shear viscosity and other transport coefficients. The possible relevancy of such a suppression to the near perfect fluid behavior of the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  9. Tandem Level II and Level III field analyses for in-field decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, D.E.; Christenson, J.

    1995-12-31

    In order to provide cost-effective and timely analytical support for a site investigation in central Pennsylvania, Environmental Resources Management, Inc. (ERM) used its mobile analytical service, the ERM-FAST{reg_sign} service to perform on-site soil analyses targeting both Level II and Level III data quality objectives. Of specific concern were volatile organic compounds. The soil concentration levels of these contaminants of interest were required on a rapid-turnaround basis in order to make decisions regarding subsequent boring locations and other analytical logistics. The strategy and analytical systems used for this investigation provided cost-effective, quick-turnaround results that would not have been possible through routine fixed-facility analyses.

  10. Anderson localization for chemically realistic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terletska, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Disorder which is ubiquitous for most materials can strongly effect their properties. It may change their electronic structures or even cause their localization, known as Anderson localization. Although, substantial progress has been achieved in the description of the Anderson localization, a proper mean-field theory of this phenomenon for more realistic systems remains elusive. Commonly used theoretical methods such as the coherent potential approximation and its cluster extensions fail to describe the Anderson transition, as the average density of states (DOS) employed in such theories is not critical at the transition. However, near the transition, due to the spatial confinement of carriers, the local DOS becomes highly skewed with a log-normal distribution, for which the most probable and the typical values differ noticeably from the average value. Dobrosavljevic et.al., incorporated such ideas in their typical medium theory (TMT), and showed that the typical (not average) DOS is critical at the transition. While the TMT is able to capture the localized states, as a local single site theory it still has several drawbacks. For the disorder Anderson model in three dimension it underestimates the critical disorder strength, and fails to capture the re-entrance behavior of the mobility edge. We have recently developed a cluster extension of the TMT, which addresses these drawbacks by systematically incorporating non-local corrections. This approach converges quickly with cluster size and allows us to incorporate the effect of interactions and realistic electronic structure. As the first steps towards realistic material modeling, we extended our TMDCA formalisms to systems with the off diagonal disorder and multiple bands structures. We also applied our TMDCA scheme to systems with both disorder and interactions and found that correlations effects tend to stabilize the metallic behavior even in two dimensions. This work was supported by DOE SciDAC Grant No. DE-FC02

  11. Universal mechanism for Anderson and weak localization.

    PubMed

    Filoche, Marcel; Mayboroda, Svitlana

    2012-09-11

    Localization of stationary waves occurs in a large variety of vibrating systems, whether mechanical, acoustical, optical, or quantum. It is induced by the presence of an inhomogeneous medium, a complex geometry, or a quenched disorder. One of its most striking and famous manifestations is Anderson localization, responsible for instance for the metal-insulator transition in disordered alloys. Yet, despite an enormous body of related literature, a clear and unified picture of localization is still to be found, as well as the exact relationship between its many manifestations. In this paper, we demonstrate that both Anderson and weak localizations originate from the same universal mechanism, acting on any type of vibration, in any dimension, and for any domain shape. This mechanism partitions the system into weakly coupled subregions. The boundaries of these subregions correspond to the valleys of a hidden landscape that emerges from the interplay between the wave operator and the system geometry. The height of the landscape along its valleys determines the strength of the coupling between the subregions. The landscape and its impact on localization can be determined rigorously by solving one special boundary problem. This theory allows one to predict the localization properties, the confining regions, and to estimate the energy of the vibrational eigenmodes through the properties of one geometrical object. In particular, Anderson localization can be understood as a special case of weak localization in a very rough landscape. PMID:22927384

  12. Integrals of motion for one-dimensional Anderson localized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Ranjan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Yuzbashyan, Emil A.; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2016-03-01

    Anderson localization is known to be inevitable in one-dimension for generic disordered models. Since localization leads to Poissonian energy level statistics, we ask if localized systems possess ‘additional’ integrals of motion as well, so as to enhance the analogy with quantum integrable systems. We answer this in the affirmative in the present work. We construct a set of nontrivial integrals of motion for Anderson localized models, in terms of the original creation and annihilation operators. These are found as a power series in the hopping parameter. The recently found Type-1 Hamiltonians, which are known to be quantum integrable in a precise sense, motivate our construction. We note that these models can be viewed as disordered electron models with infinite-range hopping, where a similar series truncates at the linear order. We show that despite the infinite range hopping, all states but one are localized. We also study the conservation laws for the disorder free Aubry-Andre model, where the states are either localized or extended, depending on the strength of a coupling constant. We formulate a specific procedure for averaging over disorder, in order to examine the convergence of the power series. Using this procedure in the Aubry-Andre model, we show that integrals of motion given by our construction are well-defined in localized phase, but not so in the extended phase. Finally, we also obtain the integrals of motion for a model with interactions to lowest order in the interaction.

  13. Reply. [to the comment by Anderson et al. (1993)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.; Ferek, Ronald G.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1994-01-01

    While Hegg et al. (1993) accepts the criticism of Anderson et al. (1994) in principle, this involves the adoption of an aerosol composition model and the model that they propose to reconcile these observations with the assertion of Charlson et al. (1992) does not agree with many observations, particularly those made over the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the use of a gain factor (i.e. the partial derivative of aerosol mass with respect to the sulfate ion), proposed by Anderson et al., may be valid for particular cases where a proposed composition model really reflects the actual aerosol composition, this procedure is considered questionable in general. The use of sulfate as a tracer for nonsulfate aerosol mass is questionable, because in the present authors' data set, sulfate averaged only about 26% of the dry aerosol mass. The ammonium mass associated with sulfate mass is not analogous to that betwen the oxygen mass and sulfur mass in the sulfate ion. Strong chemical bonds are present between sulfur and oxygen in sulfate, whereas ammonium and sulfate in haze droplets are ions in solution that may or may not be associated with one another. Thus, there is no reason to assume that sulfate will act as a reliable tracer of ammonium mass. Hegg et al. expresses the view that their approach used for estimating sulfate light scattering efficiency is appropriate for the current level of understanding of atmospheric aerosols.

  14. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of RNA Polymerase II Levels in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dalley, B. K.; Rogalski, T. M.; Tullis, G. E.; Riddle, D. L.; Golomb, M.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the regulation of RNA polymerase II levels in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have constructed nematode strains having one, two, or three copies of ama-1, the gene for the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Steady-state levels of RNA polymerase II polypeptides and solubilized enzyme activity are invariant with gene dosage, indicating regulatory compensation. However, steady-state levels of ama-1 mRNA are directly proportional to gene dosage. These results imply that RNA polymerase II levels in C. elegans are regulated post-transcriptionally. PMID:8436272

  15. Phil Anderson's Magnetic Ideas in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Piers

    In Philip W. Anderson's research, magnetism has always played a special role, providing a prism through which other more complex forms of collective behavior and broken symmetry could be examined. I discuss his work on magnetism from the 1950s, where his early work on antiferromagnetism led to the pseudospin treatment of superconductivity -- to the 1970s and 1980s, highlighting his contribution to the physics of local magnetic moments. Phil's interest in the mechanism of moment formation, and screening evolved into the modern theory of the Kondo effect and heavy fermions.

  16. Anderson transition for Google matrix eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a number of random matrix models describing the Google matrix G of directed networks. The properties of their spectra and eigenstates are analyzed by numerical matrix diagonalization. We show that for certain models it is possible to have an algebraic decay of PageRank vector with the exponent similar to real directed networks. At the same time the spectrum has no spectral gap and a broad distribution of eigenvalues in the complex plain. The eigenstates of G are characterized by the Anderson transition from localized to delocalized states and a mobility edge curve in the complex plane of eigenvalues.

  17. Astronaut Clay Anderson Speaks With S.C. Students

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA astronaut Clay Anderson participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at Crayton Middle School, Columbia,...

  18. Distribution of critical temperature at Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammag, Rayda; Kim, Ki-Seok

    2016-05-01

    Based on a local mean-field theory approach at Anderson localization, we find a distribution function of critical temperature from that of disorder. An essential point of this local mean-field theory approach is that the information of the wave-function multifractality is introduced. The distribution function of the Kondo temperature (TK) shows a power-law tail in the limit of TK→0 regardless of the Kondo coupling constant. We also find that the distribution function of the ferromagnetic transition temperature (Tc) gives a power-law behavior in the limit of Tc→0 when an interaction parameter for ferromagnetic instability lies below a critical value. However, the Tc distribution function stops the power-law increasing behavior in the Tc→0 limit and vanishes beyond the critical interaction parameter inside the ferromagnetic phase. These results imply that the typical Kondo temperature given by a geometric average always vanishes due to finite density of the distribution function in the TK→0 limit while the typical ferromagnetic transition temperature shows a phase transition at the critical interaction parameter. We propose that the typical transition temperature serves a criterion for quantum Griffiths phenomena vs smeared transitions: Quantum Griffiths phenomena occur above the typical value of the critical temperature while smeared phase transitions result at low temperatures below the typical transition temperature. We speculate that the ferromagnetic transition at Anderson localization shows the evolution from quantum Griffiths phenomena to smeared transitions around the critical interaction parameter at low temperatures.

  19. Two-impurity Anderson model: A variational study

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, L.C. , PHB-Ecublens, CH-1015 Lausanne Dipartimento di Fisica A. Volta,'' Universita di Pavia, via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia ); Beck, H. )

    1993-09-01

    A comprehensive variational study of the two-impurity Anderson model is presented. First a lowest-order basis is introduced, which does not contain electronic excitations above the Fermi level: in this basis, the indirect [ital f]-[ital f] interaction of the form [minus][ital J][bold S][sub 1][center dot][bold S][sub 2] is not generated but is added by hand. The effect of electron-hole (EH) excitations is also studied. A suitable discretization of the continuous band spectrum allows us to obtain all eigenvalues and eigenvectors and to calculate finite-temperature magnetic properties. For a distance [ital R][gt][ital R][sub [ital c

  20. Note on Anderson's "Causal Models in Educational Research: Nonrecursive Models."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Jonathan

    1979-01-01

    Contrary to Anderson (EJ 187 936), his rule for equation identification is a necessary but not sufficient condition; furthermore, the choice of two-stage or ordinary least squares depends on results and not on methodological properties of estimators. Modification of Anderson's rule and a means for choosing between estimates is offered. (Author/CP)

  1. Controlled Triol-Derivative Bonding and Decoration Transformation on Cu-Centered Anderson-Evans Polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Li, Bao; Qian, Hujun; Wu, Lixin

    2016-05-01

    To create new types of organic ligands covalently grafted onto polyoxometalates and identify the reaction mechanism, we selected Cu(II) as the central heteroatom for the synthesis of a series of disklike Anderson-Evans clusters bearing different triol derivatives on both their faces via one-pot and/or step-by-step routes. By using a [(n-C4H9)4N]4[Mo8O26] precursor cluster and copper acetate as the starting materials, several organically modified χ isomers with Cu(II) heteroatom centers were obtained. Starting from a [(n-C4H9)4N]2[Mo2O7] subcluster, however, a half-malposition coordination fashion of triol ligands with a δ isomer on one face and a χ isomer on the other face of the Anderson-Evans cluster was obtained. By changing the reaction solvent from acetonitrile to methanol, we realized a secondary organic modification of the triol-grafted clusters and obtained a triol ligand/methanol codecoration on the Anderson-Evans polyoxometalate. In addition, by changing the reaction environment, we succeeded in modulating the transformation of triol ligands from one site to another on the polyoxometalate cluster. Importantly, by control of the reaction condition, the methanol molecules were also taken off from the cluster. PMID:27074087

  2. Revised energy levels and hyperfine structure constants of Ta II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windholz, Laurentius; Arcimowicz, Bronislaw; Uddin, Zaheer

    2016-06-01

    Using a wave number calibrated Fourier transform spectrum, we determined the energy levels of the first ion of tantalum with high accuracy. To get the correct center of gravity wave numbers of the observed spectral lines, the knowledge of the hyperfine constants of the involved levels was necessary. From the observed values we deduced the energy levels in a global fit. A comparison between our results and all available literature values is presented.

  3. Slow Relaxation in Anderson Critical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soonwon; Yao, Norman; Choi, Joonhee; Kucsko, Georg; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    We study the single particle dynamics in disordered systems with long range hopping, focusing on the critical cases, i.e., the hopping amplitude decays as 1 /rd in d-dimension. We show that with strong on-site potential disorder, the return probability of the particle decays as power-law in time. As on-site potential disorder decreases, the temporal profile smoothly changes from a simple power-law to the sum of multiple power-laws with exponents ranged from 0 to νmax. We analytically compute the decay exponents using a simple resonance counting argument, which quantitatively agrees with exact numerical results. Our result implies that the dynamics in Anderson Critical systems are dominated by resonances. Harvard-MIT CUA, Kwanjeong Educational Fellowship, AFOSR MURI, Samsung Scholarship.

  4. Magnetoresistance of an Anderson insulator of bosons.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Anirban; Galitski, Victor; Müller, Markus

    2013-07-12

    We study the magnetoresistance of two-dimensional bosonic Anderson insulators. We describe the change in spatial decay of localized excitations in response to a magnetic field, which is given by an interference sum over alternative tunneling trajectories. The excitations become more localized with increasing field (in sharp contrast to generic fermionic excitations which get weakly delocalized): the localization length ξ(B) is found to change as ξ(-1)(B)-ξ(-1)(0)~B(4/5). The quantum interference problem maps onto the classical statistical mechanics of directed polymers in random media (DPRM). We explain the observed scaling using a simplified droplet model which incorporates the nontrivial DPRM exponents. Our results have implications for a variety of experiments on magnetic-field-tuned superconductor-to-insulator transitions observed in disordered films, granular superconductors, and Josephson junction arrays, as well as for cold atoms in artificial gauge fields. PMID:23889427

  5. Kolmogorov turbulence, Anderson localization and KAM integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    The conditions for emergence of Kolmogorov turbulence, and related weak wave turbulence, in finite size systems are analyzed by analytical methods and numerical simulations of simple models. The analogy between Kolmogorov energy flow from large to small spacial scales and conductivity in disordered solid state systems is proposed. It is argued that the Anderson localization can stop such an energy flow. The effects of nonlinear wave interactions on such a localization are analyzed. The results obtained for finite size system models show the existence of an effective chaos border between the Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) integrability at weak nonlinearity, when energy does not flow to small scales, and developed chaos regime emerging above this border with the Kolmogorov turbulent energy flow from large to small scales.

  6. Anderson localization makes adiabatic quantum optimization fail

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, Boris; Krovi, Hari; Roland, Jérémie

    2010-01-01

    Understanding NP-complete problems is a central topic in computer science (NP stands for nondeterministic polynomial time). This is why adiabatic quantum optimization has attracted so much attention, as it provided a new approach to tackle NP-complete problems using a quantum computer. The efficiency of this approach is limited by small spectral gaps between the ground and excited states of the quantum computer’s Hamiltonian. We show that the statistics of the gaps can be analyzed in a novel way, borrowed from the study of quantum disordered systems in statistical mechanics. It turns out that due to a phenomenon similar to Anderson localization, exponentially small gaps appear close to the end of the adiabatic algorithm for large random instances of NP-complete problems. This implies that unfortunately, adiabatic quantum optimization fails: The system gets trapped in one of the numerous local minima. PMID:20616043

  7. The Role of Contrast in the Perception of Achromatic Transparency: Comment on Singh and Anderson (2002) and Anderson (2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Marc K.

    2008-01-01

    M. Singh and B. L. Anderson proposed a perceptual theory of achromatic transparency in which the perceived transmittance of a perceived transparent filter is determined by the ratio of the Michelson contrast seen in the region of transparency to that of the background seen directly. Subsequently, B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and J. Meng proposed that…

  8. Integrals of motion for one-dimensional Anderson localized systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Modak, Ranjan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Yuzbashyan, Emil A.; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2016-03-02

    Anderson localization is known to be inevitable in one-dimension for generic disordered models. Since localization leads to Poissonian energy level statistics, we ask if localized systems possess ‘additional’ integrals of motion as well, so as to enhance the analogy with quantum integrable systems. Weanswer this in the affirmative in the present work. We construct a set of nontrivial integrals of motion for Anderson localized models, in terms of the original creation and annihilation operators. These are found as a power series in the hopping parameter. The recently found Type-1 Hamiltonians, which are known to be quantum integrable in a precisemore » sense, motivate our construction.Wenote that these models can be viewed as disordered electron models with infinite-range hopping, where a similar series truncates at the linear order.Weshow that despite the infinite range hopping, all states but one are localized.Wealso study the conservation laws for the disorder free Aubry–Andre model, where the states are either localized or extended, depending on the strength of a coupling constant.Weformulate a specific procedure for averaging over disorder, in order to examine the convergence of the power series. Using this procedure in the Aubry–Andre model, we show that integrals of motion given by our construction are well-defined in localized phase, but not so in the extended phase. Lastly, we also obtain the integrals of motion for a model with interactions to lowest order in the interaction.« less

  9. Factors Associated with Knowledge Level Attained by Vocational Agriculture II Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotrlik, Joe W.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the technical agriculture knowledge level attained by Vocational Agriculture II students on a criterion-referenced test developed from Louisiana's Vocational Agriculture II basic curriculum; and determine if students' scores on the test differed according to selected variables: Future Farmers of America…

  10. Resistance of Gram-positive bacteria to nisin is not determined by lipid II levels.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Naomi E; Smid, Eddy J; Kok, Jan; de Kruijff, Ben; Kuipers, Oscar P; Breukink, Eefjan

    2004-10-01

    Lipid II is essential for nisin-mediated pore formation at nano-molar concentrations. We tested whether nisin resistance could result from different Lipid II levels, by comparing the maximal Lipid II pool in Micrococcus flavus (sensitive) and Listeria monocytogenes (relatively insensitive) and their nisin-resistant variants, with a newly developed method. No correlation was observed between the maximal Lipid II pool and nisin sensitivity, as was further corroborated by using spheroplasts of nisin-resistant and wild-type strains of M. flavus, which were equally sensitive to nisin. PMID:15451114

  11. Career Portfolio for Learning Support Students. Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youshock, Joseph; And Others

    This second level of a portfolio for learners with special needs is intended for grades 9-10. A discussion of its conceptual design describes the four educational content areas from which it was developed (career development assessment, curriculum-based vocational assessment, community-referenced assessment, and work habits assessment) and four…

  12. Importance of level mixing on accurate [Fe II] transition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, N. C.; Hibbert, A.

    2010-12-01

    Context. In a very recent measurement Gurell et al. (2009, A&A, 508, 525) commented that while the theoretical lifetime of a 4G5.5 is approximately one tenth of the lifetime of b 2H5.5 the corresponding measurement shows this to be close to one fifth. This large discrepancy is attributed to the effect of inadequate level mixing in the theoretical calculations. Aims: The aim of this work is to make a detailed analysis of these level mixing effects on transitions from various lower levels to the a 4G5.5 and b 2H5.5 levels given in three previous calculations and in the present more extensive CI calculation. Methods: The CIV3 structure codes of Hibbert (1975, Comput. Phys. Commun., 9, 141) and Hibbert et al. (1991, Comput. Phys. Commun., 64, 455) are used in the present work, combined with our “fine-tuning” extrapolation process. Results: The calculated mixing between the upper levels, obtained in previous calculations, is shown to be too weak. The stronger mixing determined in our work gives rise to a calculated lifetime for b 2H5.5 within 3% of the measured value. On the other hand our calculated lifetime for a 4G5.5 is around 20% lower than the measured value, which has fairly wide error bars. Conclusions: Our enhanced calculations explain the difference between previous calculations of the b 2H5.5 lifetime and the recent measured value and confirm the latter. We also suggest a somewhat higher value than experiment for the lifetime of a 4G5.5.

  13. Estimation of Failure Frequency for Type I and II High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K.H.

    2001-05-15

    The failure frequency of Type I and Type II High Level Waste tanks was calculated. The degradation mechanism that could lead to large break failure and the credits taken for steps taken to prevent large break failure were considered.

  14. Anderson localization in metamaterials and other complex media (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gredeskul, Sergey A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Asatryan, Ara A.; Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Bliokh, Yuri P.; Freilikher, Valentin D.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.

    2012-07-01

    This is a review of some recent (mostly ours) results on Anderson localization of light and electron waves in complex disordered systems, including: (i) left-handed metamaterials, (ii) magnetoactive optical structures, (iii) graphene superlattices, and (iv) nonlinear dielectric media. First, we demonstrate that left-handed metamaterials can significantly suppress localization of light and lead to an anomalously enhanced transmission. This suppression is essential at the long-wavelength limit in the case of normal incidence, at specific angles of oblique incidence (Brewster anomaly), and in vicinity of zero-ɛ or zero-μ frequencies for dispersive metamaterials. Remarkably, in disordered samples comprised of alternating normal and left-handed metamaterials, the reciprocal Lyapunov exponent and reciprocal transmittance increment can differ from each other. Second, we study magnetoactive multilayered structures, which exhibit nonreciprocal localization of light depending on the direction of propagation and on polarization. At resonant frequencies or realizations such nonreciprocity results in effectively unidirectional transport of light. Third, we discuss the analogy between wave propagation through multilayered samples with metamaterials and charge transport in graphene, which provides a simple physical explanation of unusual conductive properties of disordered graphene superlatices. We predict disorder-induced resonance of the transmission coefficient at oblique incidence of Dirac quasiparticles. Finally, we demonstrate that an interplay of nonlinearity and disorder in dielectric media can lead to bistability of individual localized states excited inside the medium at resonant frequencies. This results in nonreciprocity of wave transmission and unidirectional transport of light.

  15. Identification of new fluorescence processes in the UV spectra of cool stars from new energy levels of Fe II and Cr II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Two fluorescence processes operating in atmospheres of cool stars, symbiotic stars, and the Sun are presented. Two emission lines, at 1347.03 and 1360.17 A, are identified as fluorescence lines of Cr II and Fe II. The lines are due to transitions from highly excited levels, which are populated radiatively by the hydrogen Lyman alpha line due to accidental wavelength coincidences. Three energy levels, one in Cr II and two in Fe II, are reported.

  16. Factorial validity and measurement invariance across intelligence levels and gender of the overexcitabilities questionnaire-II (OEQ-II).

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Wim; Hofmans, Joeri; Cooremans, Sven; Staels, Eva

    2014-03-01

    The concept of overexcitability, derived from Dabrowski's theory of personality development, offers a promising approach for the study of the developmental dynamics of giftedness. The present study aimed at (a) examining the factorial structure of the Overexcitabilities Questionnaire-II scores (OEQ-II) and (b) testing measurement invariance of these scores across intelligence and gender. A sample of 641 Dutch-speaking adolescents from 11 to 15 years old, 363 girls and 278 boys, participated in this study. Results showed that a model without cross-loadings did not fit the data well (using confirmatory factor analysis), whereas a factor model in which all cross-loadings were included yielded fit statistics that were in support of the factorial structure of the OEQ-II scores (using exploratory structural equation modeling). Furthermore, our findings supported the assumption of (partial) strict measurement invariance of the OEQ-II scores across intelligence levels and across gender. Such levels of measurement invariance allow valid comparisons between factor means and factor relationships across groups. In particular, the gifted group scored significantly higher on intellectual and sensual overexcitability (OE) than the nongifted group, girls scored higher on emotional and sensual OE than boys, and boys scored higher on intellectual and psychomotor OE than girls. PMID:24079958

  17. Regulation of synaptic connectivity: levels of Fasciclin II influence synaptic growth in the Drosophila CNS.

    PubMed

    Baines, Richard A; Seugnet, Laurent; Thompson, Annemarie; Salvaterra, Paul M; Bate, Michael

    2002-08-01

    Much of our understanding of synaptogenesis comes from studies that deal with the development of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Although well studied, it is not clear how far the NMJ represents an adequate model for the formation of synapses within the CNS. Here we investigate the role of Fasciclin II (Fas II) in the development of synapses between identified motor neurons and cholinergic interneurons in the CNS of Drosophila. Fas II is a neural cell adhesion molecule homolog that is involved in both target selection and synaptic plasticity at the NMJ in Drosophila. In this study, we show that levels of Fas II are critical determinants of synapse formation and growth in the CNS. The initial establishment of synaptic contacts between these identified neurons is seemingly independent of Fas II. The subsequent proliferation of these synaptic connections that occurs postembryonically is, in contrast, significantly retarded by the absence of Fas II. Although the initial formation of synaptic connectivity between these neurons is seemingly independent of Fas II, we show that their formation is, nevertheless, significantly affected by manipulations that alter the relative balance of Fas II in the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. Increasing expression of Fas II in either the presynaptic or postsynaptic neurons, during embryogenesis, is sufficient to disrupt the normal level of synaptic connectivity that occurs between these neurons. This effect of Fas II is isoform specific and, moreover, phenocopies the disruption to synaptic connectivity observed previously after tetanus toxin light chain-dependent blockade of evoked synaptic vesicle release in these neurons. PMID:12151538

  18. Primary colon cancer with a high serum PIVKA-II level

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kazuya; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Onodera, Kazuhiko; Matsuda, Minoru; Kawakami, Takako; Higuchi, Mineko; Kato, Kimitaka; Kato, Yurina; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Protein induced by vitamin K absence/antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) is an abnormal protein, and several reports have demonstrated the efficacy of PIVKA-II in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We report an extremely rare case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with a high serum PIVKA-II level. Presentation of Case A 95-year-old woman presented with right lower quadrant pain and appetite loss. An abdominal computed tomography scan and ultrasonography showed an ascending colon tumor and multiple metastatic tumors in the liver. The serum level of PIVKA-II was extremely high, 11,900 ng/mL. Colonoscopic examination revealed a tumor accompanied by an ulcer in the ascending colon, which was highly suspicious for malignancy. Multiple biopsies showed well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon, which was evaluated as colon cancer, stage IV. PIVKA-II-productive colon cancer was confirmed. Chemotherapy with TS-1 was administered. The patient died 3 months after initial admission. Discussion The expression of PIVKA-II was detected in non-cancer areas, with non-specific expression observed in plasma cells in our case. There might be some possibility that hepatoid differentiation exists in other regions of the colon tumor or in the liver tumor, parenchymal cells or lung metastases, which were composed of PIVKA-II-positive and AFP-negative cells. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, high serum levels of PIVKA-II resulting from colon adenocarcinoma have not been reported previously. We report this rare case together with a review of the literature. PMID:25528035

  19. GUIDE FOR TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE TO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PUPILS. LEVEL II, PART 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WILSON, ROBERT; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME COMPRISES LESSONS 56-115 OF THE SECOND LEVEL OF "TEACHING ENGLISH EARLY." FOLLOWING THE SAME FORMAT AS LEVEL II, PART 1, THE APPROACH IS STILL ORAL-AURAL, EMPHASIZING CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES AND "ACTING-OUT" WITH PUPPETS. SOMEWHAT MORE EMPHASIS IS GIVEN TO "FREE DIALOG" AND A GREATER VARIETY OF ACTIVITIES. SEE RELATED DOCUMENTS AL 001…

  20. The Heritability of Jensen's Level I and II and Divergent Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzullo, Thomas R.; And Others

    Heritability is defined as the proportion of a manifested trait's varience that is due to genetic variation. Sixty-five pairs of twins were employed to investigate the heritability of: (1) short term memory (Jensen's Level 1), operationalized using of modified "digit span" test; (2) the general intellective factor (Jensen's Level II),…

  1. Inhalation and ingestion intakes with associated dose estimates for level II and level III personnel using Capstone study data.

    PubMed

    Szrom, Frances; Falo, Gerald A; Lodde, Gordon M; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Daxon, Eric G

    2009-03-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone DU Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe-tests samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large-caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h(-1) based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h(-1) based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h(-1) to 38.9 mg h(-1) based on the wipe-tests data including surface-to-glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h(-1) and 1.78 mg h(-1), respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures. PMID:19204492

  2. Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data

    SciTech Connect

    Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

    2009-03-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

  3. Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Salivary melatonin concentration decreased in type II diabetic patients and periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis. PMID:25346835

  4. (1)/(N) expansion of the nonequilibrium infinite- U Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratiani, Zurab; Mitra, Aditi

    2009-06-01

    Results are presented for the nonequilibrium infinite- U Anderson model using a large N approach, where N is the degeneracy of the impurity level, and where nonequilibrium is established by coupling the level to two leads at two different chemical potentials so that there is current flow. A slave-boson representation combined with Keldysh functional integral methods is employed. Expressions for the static spin susceptibility χS and the conductance G are presented to O((1)/(N)) and for an applied voltage difference V less than the Kondo temperature. The correlation function for the slave boson is found to be significantly modified from its equilibrium form in that it acquires a rapid decay in time with a rate that equals the current-induced decoherence rate. Physical observables are found to have a rather complex dependence on the coupling strength to the two leads which can lead to asymmetric behavior χS(V)≠χS(-V) , G(V)≠G(-V) both in the mixed valence and in the Kondo regime.

  5. Topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanov, Alexander V.; Iomin, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    We study the phenomena of Anderson localization in the presence of nonlinear interaction on a lattice. A class of nonlinear Schrödinger models with arbitrary power nonlinearity is analyzed. We conceive the various regimes of behavior, depending on the topology of resonance overlap in phase space, ranging from a fully developed chaos involving Lévy flights to pseudochaotic dynamics at the onset of delocalization. It is demonstrated that the quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. We describe this localization-delocalization transition as a percolation transition on the infinite Cayley tree (Bethe lattice). It is found in the vicinity of the criticality that the spreading of the wave field is subdiffusive in the limit t →+∞. The second moment of the associated probability distribution grows with time as a power law ∝ tα, with the exponent α =1/3 exactly. Also we find for superquadratic nonlinearity that the analog pseudochaotic regime at the edge of chaos is self-controlling in that it has feedback on the topology of the structure on which the transport processes concentrate. Then the system automatically (without tuning of parameters) develops its percolation point. We classify this type of behavior in terms of self-organized criticality dynamics in Hilbert space. For subquadratic nonlinearities, the behavior is shown to be sensitive to the details of definition of the nonlinear term. A transport model is proposed based on modified nonlinearity, using the idea of "stripes" propagating the wave process to large distances. Theoretical investigations, presented here, are the basis for consistency analysis of the different localization-delocalization patterns in systems with many coupled degrees of freedom in association with the asymptotic properties of the

  6. Anderson localization of electrons in single crystals: Li (x) Fe(7)Se(8).

    PubMed

    Ying, Tianping; Gu, Yueqiang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Xinbo; Jin, Shifeng; Zhao, Linlin; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-02-01

    Anderson (disorder-induced) localization, proposed more than half a century ago, has inspired numerous efforts to explore the absence of wave diffusions in disordered media. However, the proposed disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT), associated with the nonpropagative electron waves, has hardly been observed in three-dimensional (3D) crystalline materials, let alone single crystals. We report the observation of an MIT in centimeter-size single crystals of Li x Fe7Se8 induced by lattice disorder. Both specific heat and infrared reflectance measurements reveal the presence of considerable electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level when the MIT occurs, suggesting that the transition is not due to Coulomb repulsion mechanism. The 3D variable range hopping regime evidenced by electrical transport measurements at low temperatures indicates the localized nature of the electronic states on the Fermi level. Quantitative analyses of carrier concentration, carrier mobility, and simulated density of states (DOS) fully support that Li x Fe7Se8 is an Anderson insulator. On the basis of these results, we provide a unified DOS picture to explain all the experimental results, and a schematic diagram for finding other potential Anderson insulators. This material will thus serve as a rich playground for both theoretical and experimental investigations on MITs and disorder-induced phenomena. PMID:26989781

  7. Anderson localization of electrons in single crystals: LixFe7Se8

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianping; Gu, Yueqiang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Xinbo; Jin, Shifeng; Zhao, Linlin; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Anderson (disorder-induced) localization, proposed more than half a century ago, has inspired numerous efforts to explore the absence of wave diffusions in disordered media. However, the proposed disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT), associated with the nonpropagative electron waves, has hardly been observed in three-dimensional (3D) crystalline materials, let alone single crystals. We report the observation of an MIT in centimeter-size single crystals of LixFe7Se8 induced by lattice disorder. Both specific heat and infrared reflectance measurements reveal the presence of considerable electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level when the MIT occurs, suggesting that the transition is not due to Coulomb repulsion mechanism. The 3D variable range hopping regime evidenced by electrical transport measurements at low temperatures indicates the localized nature of the electronic states on the Fermi level. Quantitative analyses of carrier concentration, carrier mobility, and simulated density of states (DOS) fully support that LixFe7Se8 is an Anderson insulator. On the basis of these results, we provide a unified DOS picture to explain all the experimental results, and a schematic diagram for finding other potential Anderson insulators. This material will thus serve as a rich playground for both theoretical and experimental investigations on MITs and disorder-induced phenomena. PMID:26989781

  8. Critically Evaluated Energy Levels and Spectral Lines of Singly Ionized Indium (In II)

    PubMed Central

    Kramida, A

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive list of the best measured wavelengths in the In II spectrum has been compiled. Uncertainties of the wavelength measurements have been analyzed, and existing inconsistencies have been resolved. An optimized set of fine-structure energy levels that fits all observed wavelengths has been derived. Uncertainties of the energy level values have been reduced by an order of magnitude. An improved value of the ionization limit of In II has been determined by fitting quantum-defect and polarization formulas for several series of levels. Intensities of lines observed by different authors have been analyzed and converted to a uniform scale. A set of recommended values of radiative transition rates has been critically compiled, and uncertainties of these rates have been estimated. The hyperfine structure interval in the 5s 2S ground state of In III has been determined from the measurements of the 5sng and 5snh series in In II. PMID:26401424

  9. ENERGY LEVELS AND SPECTRAL LINES OF SINGLY IONIZED MANGANESE (Mn II)

    SciTech Connect

    Kramida, Alexander; Sansonetti, Jean E.

    2013-04-01

    This compilation revises the previously recommended list of energy levels of singly ionized manganese (Mn II) and provides a comprehensive list of observed spectral lines and transition probabilities in this spectrum. The new level optimization takes into account critically assessed uncertainties of measured wavelengths and includes about a hundred high-precision wavelengths determined by laser spectroscopy and Fourier transform techniques. Uncertainties of 63% of energy levels and 74% of Ritz wavelengths are reduced by a factor of three on average.

  10. New electron levels and classified lines in Pr II from hyperfine structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Furmann, B. . E-mail: furman@phys.put.poznan.pl; Stefanska, D.; Dembczynski, J.; Stachowska, E.

    2007-01-15

    Classification of 75 spectral lines (hitherto not classified) in singly ionized praseodymium (Pr II) with the use of 31 new electron levels belonging to odd configurations 4f{sup 3}5d and 4f{sup 3}6s and 14 new levels belonging to even configurations is presd. Hyperfine structure constant A and B for each new level were determined by using the method of laser-induced fluorescence in a hollow cathode discharge.

  11. Thermalization and dynamics in the single-impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Ireneusz; von Delft, Jan; Weichselbaum, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the process of thermalization, dynamics, and the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) for the single-impurity Anderson model, focusing on the Kondo regime. For this we construct the complete eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian using the numerical renormalization group (NRG) method in the language of the matrix product states. It is a peculiarity of the NRG that while the Wilson chain is supposed to describe a macroscopic bath, very few single-particle excitations already suffice to essentially thermalize the impurity system at finite temperature, which amounts to having added a macroscopic amount of energy. Thus, given an initial state of the system such as the ground state together with microscopic excitations, we calculate the spectral function of the quantum impurity using the microcanonical and diagonal ensembles. These spectral functions are compared to the time-averaged spectral function obtained by time evolving the initial state according to the full Hamiltonian, and to the spectral function calculated using the thermal density matrix. By adding or removing particles at a certain Wilson energy shell on top of the ground state, we find qualitative agreement between the resulting spectral functions calculated for different ensembles. This indicates that the system thermalizes in the long-time limit, and can be described by an appropriate statistical-mechanical ensemble. Moreover, by calculating static quantities such as the impurity spectral density at the Fermi level as well as the dot occupancy for energy eigenstates relevant for microcanonical ensemble, we find good support for the ETH. The ultimate mechanism responsible for this effective thermalization within the NRG can be identified as Anderson orthogonality: the more charge that needs to flow to or from infinity after applying a local excitation within the Wilson chain, the more the system looks thermal afterwards at an increased temperature. For the same reason, however, thermalization

  12. Interpreting the flock algorithm: a reply to Anderson & Barry (2015).

    PubMed

    Duchesne, P; Turgeon, J

    2016-01-01

    Anderson & Barry (Molecular Ecology Resources, 2015, 10, 1020-1030) compared a reprogrammed version of flock (Duchesne & Turgeon , Molecular Ecology Resources, 2009, 9, 1333-1344), flockture, to a particular model of structure (Pritchard , Genetics, 2000, 155, 945-959) that they propose is equivalent to flock, a non-MCMC, non-Bayesian algorithm. They conclude that structure performs better than flockture at clustering individuals from simulated populations with very low level of differentiation (FST c. 0.008) based on 15 microsatellites or 96 SNPs. We rather consider that both algorithms failed, with proportions of correct allocations lower than 50%. The authors also noted the slightly better performance of flockture with SNPs at intermediate FST values (c. 0.02-0.04) but did not comment. Finally, we disagree with the way the processing time of each program was compared. When compared on the basis of a run leading to a clustering solution, the main output of any clustering algorithm, flock, is, as users can readily experience, much faster. In all, we feel that flock performs at least as well as structure as a clustering algorithm. Moreover, flock has two major assets: high speed and clear, well validated, rules to estimate K, the number of populations. It thus provides a valuable addition to the set of tools at the disposal of the many researchers dealing with real empirical data sets. PMID:26768196

  13. Modified Anderson Model——Dynamics of Brittle Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, H.

    2014-12-01

    Anderson's model has been a basic theory of fault mechanical analysis in one century. However, because of the assumptions, there are some major limitations in Anderson model, and it does not account for frequently observed oblique slips, complicated fault cases in nature and the slips occurring on pre-existing planes of weakness. On the basis of Reactivation Tendency Analysis theory proposed by Tong and Yin (2011), we proposed Modified Anderson model and extended Anderson model from 1) homogeneous media to Inhomogeneous media with pre-existing weakness(es); 2) Andersonian stress state to arbitrary stress state; 3) transient activity trend analysis to fault formation and evolution, and verified with sandbox experiments and natural cases. With Modified Anderson model, we can predict 1) the sequence of fault formation; 2) fault orientations and distribution; 3) slip directions (dip slip, oblique-dip slip, oblique slip, oblique strike slip and strike sip) of different fault when the directions of principal stress, orientations and mechanical properties (cohesion and frictional coefficient) of pre-existing weakness(es) are given. The origin of the complicated fault systems in nature can be explained reasonably. There will be a wide applications for oil and gas exploration and development, coal mining, earthquake risk evaluation, etc.

  14. Limiting Radiotherapy to the Contralateral Retropharyngeal and High Level II Lymph Nodes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma is Safe and Improves Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Christopher R.; Gay, Hiram A.; Haughey, Bruce H.; Nussenbaum, Brian; Adkins, Douglas R.; Wildes, Tanya M.; DeWees, Todd A.; Lewis, James S.; Thorstad, Wade L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation treatment volumes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are controversial. Here we report the outcomes, failures, and quality of life (QOL) of patients treated using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that eliminated treatment of contralateral retropharyngeal lymph nodes (RPLN) in the clinically uninvolved neck. Methods A prospective institutional database identified patients with primary oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx and unknown primary HNSCC treated using IMRT. There were three temporal groups (G1-3). G1 received comprehensive neck IMRT with parotid sparing, G2 eliminated the contralateral high level II (HLII) lymph nodes, and G3 further eliminated the contralateral RPLN in the clinically uninvolved neck. Patterns of failure and survival analyses were completed and QOL data measured by the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) was compared in a subset of patients from G1 and G3. Results There were 748 patients identified. Of the 488 patients treated in G2 or G3, 406 had a clinically uninvolved contralateral neck. There were no failures in the spared RPLNs (95% CI; 0-1.3%) or high contralateral neck (95% CI; 0-0.7%). QOL data was compared between 44 patients in G1 and 51 patients in G3. QOL improved both globally and in all domains assessed for G3 in which reduced radiotherapy volumes were used (p < 0.007). Conclusions For patients with locally advanced HNSCC, eliminating coverage to the contralateral HLII and contralateral RPLN in the clinically uninvolved side of the neck is associated with minimal risk of failure in these regions and significantly improved patient-reported QOL. PMID:25143048

  15. PATHWAYS: An Adult Basic Skills Writing Workbook, Level II. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barabe, Rosemeri; And Others

    Developed to facilitate the teaching/learning process, this teacher's guide corresponds to the Adult Basic Education (ABE) Writing Skills Workbook Level II, and may be used as an answer book, as well as a reference manual. It contains concise explanations of the various skills presented, suggested teaching strategies, answers to workbook…

  16. Guide for the Training and Qualification of Welding Personnel. Level II - Advanced Welders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

    This guide is designed to help education and training facilities develop and administer competency-based training programs to qualify and certify trainees in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) requirements for level II (advanced) welders. Presented first are the scope, objectives, and requirements of the AWS…

  17. Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 2: Locating clouds tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

    1995-01-01

    A comparison is made of the vertical distribution of high-level cloud tops derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements and from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for all Julys and Januarys in 1985 to 1990. The results suggest that ISCCP overestimates the pressure of high-level clouds by up to 50-150 mbar, particularly at low latitudes. This is caused by the frequent presence of clouds with diffuse tops (greater than 50% time when cloudy events are observed). The averaged vertical extent of the diffuse top is about 1.5 km. At midlatitudes where the SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressure agree best, clouds with distinct tops reach a maximum relative proportion of the total level cloud amount (about 30-40%), and diffuse-topped clouds are reduced to their minimum (30-40%). The ISCCP-defined cloud top pressure should be regarded not as the material physical height of the clouds but as the level which emits the same infrared radiance as observed. SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressures agree for clouds with distinct tops. There is also an indication that the cloud top pressures of optically thin clouds not overlying thicker clouds are poorly estimated by ISCCP at middle latitudes. The average vertical extent of these thin clouds is about 2.5 km.

  18. GUIDE FOR TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE TO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PUPILS. LEVEL II, PART 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WILSON, ROBERT; AND OTHERS

    THE 55 AUDIO-LINGUAL LESSON UNITS OF "TEACHING ENGLISH EARLY" ARE DESIGNED AS A GUIDE FOR THE TEACHER OF ELEMENTARY GRADE CHILDREN WHO HAVE REACHED LEVEL II IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. AIMED PRIMARILY AT THE SPANISH-SPEAKING (MEXICAN-AMERICAN) CHILD, THIS PRE-READING MATERIAL MAY BE USED WITH OTHER LANGUAGE BACKGROUNDS. (SEE THE FINAL REPORT…

  19. Interactive Journaling as a Brief Intervention for Level-II DUI and DWI Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheck, Amy Mary; Hoffmann, Norman G.; Proctor, Steven L.; Couillou,Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a brief alcohol intervention in increasing basic alcohol-related knowledge, and the intention to change high-risk drinking behaviors, among a sample of DUI and DWI offenders. Pre- and post-test data, in addition to program evaluation data, from 872 Level-II DUI and DWI offenders…

  20. Anderson localization effects near the Mott metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragança, Helena; Aguiar, M. C. O.; Vučičević, J.; Tanasković, D.; Dobrosavljević, V.

    2015-09-01

    The interplay between Mott and Anderson routes to localization in disordered interacting systems gives rise to different transitions and transport regimes. Here, we investigate the phase diagram at finite temperatures using dynamical mean-field theory combined with typical medium theory, which is an effective theory of the Mott-Anderson metal-insulator transition. We mainly focus on the properties of the coexistence region associated with the Mott phase transition. For weak disorder, the coexistence region is found to be similar to that in the clean case. However, as we increase disorder, Anderson localization effects are responsible for shrinking the coexistence region, and at sufficiently strong disorder (approximately equal to twice the bare bandwidth) it drastically narrows, the critical temperature Tc abruptly goes to zero, and we observe a phase transition in the absence of a coexistence of the metallic and insulating phases. In this regime, the effects of interaction and disorder are found to be of comparable importance for charge localization.

  1. Formation of excited Cu II levels through second-kind collisions in a Ne-Cu discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akihiro; Hattori, Shuzo

    1983-01-01

    Transient spectroscopic techniques have been used to discriminate between various processes forming excited Cu II levels in a Ne-Cu discharge. Ratio of the cross sections for Ne +-Cu charge transfer reaction into individual Cu II 5s levels has been determined. The Cu II 4p levels were found to be excited through some unidentified process as well as Ne(metastable) -Cu Penning reaction, and the former was more effective.

  2. The M. D. Anderson proton therapy system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Gillin, Michael; Bues, Martin; Zhu, X. Ronald; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Mohan, Radhe; Woo, Shiao; Lee, Andrew; Komaki, Ritsko; Cox, James; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishida, Takayuki; Sasaki, Toshie; Matsuda, Koji

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe University of Texas M. D. Anderson proton therapy system (PTC-H) including the accelerator, beam transport, and treatment delivery systems, the functionality and clinical parameters for passive scattering and pencil beam scanning treatment modes, and the results of acceptance tests. Methods: The PTC-H has a synchrotron (70-250 MeV) and four treatment rooms. An overall control system manages the treatment, physics, and service modes of operation. An independent safety system ensures the safety of patients, staff, and equipment. Three treatment rooms have isocentric gantries and one room has two fixed horizontal beamlines, which include a large-field treatment nozzle, used primarily for prostate treatments, and a small-field treatment nozzle for ocular treatments. Two gantry treatment rooms and the fixed-beam treatment room have passive scattering nozzles. The third gantry has a pencil beam scanning nozzle for the delivery of intensity modulated proton treatments (IMPT) and single field uniform dose (SFUD) treatments. The PTC-H also has an experimental room with a fixed horizontal beamline and a passive scattering nozzle. The equipment described above was provided by Hitachi, Ltd. Treatment planning is performed using the Eclipse system from Varian Medical Systems and data management is handled by the MOSAIQ system from IMPAC Medical Systems, Inc. The large-field passive scattering nozzles use double scattering systems in which the first scatterers are physically integrated with the range modulation wheels. The proton beam is gated on the rotating range modulation wheels at gating angles designed to produce spread-out-Bragg peaks ranging in size from 2 to 16 g/cm{sup 2}. Field sizes of up to 25x25 cm{sup 2} can be achieved with the double scattering system. The IMPT delivery technique is discrete spot scanning, which has a maximum field size of 30x30 cm{sup 2}. Depth scanning is achieved by changing the energy

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio observations of Galactic WISE HII regions (Anderson+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, D. S.; Wenger, T. V.; Cunningham, V.

    2016-01-01

    We draw our targets from the MIR objects in the WISE catalog of Anderson+, 2014, J/ApJS/212/1. We also include in our sample Sharpless H II regions (Sharpless 1959, VII/20). See section 2 for further details. Our observations were made with the GBT 100m telescope from 2012 July through 2014 August. There are seven radio recombination lines (RRLs) that can be cleanly observed simultaneously with the GBT in the X-band: H87α to H93α. We average these seven RRLs (each at two orthogonal polarizations) to create a single average RRL spectrum. We followed the same GBT observational procedure as in the original HRDS (Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS; Bania et al. 2010ApJ...718L.106B). (3 data files).

  4. Level II scour analysis for bridge 2 (WODFTH00010002) on Town Highway 1, crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODFTH00010002 on Town Highway 1 crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  5. Review of the Constellation Level II Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Documents during Participation in the Constellation Level II SR&QA Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Kenneth D.; Gentz, Steven J.; Beil, Robert J.; Minute, Stephen A.; Currie, Nancy J.; Scott, Steven S.; Thomas, Walter B., III; Smiles, Michael D.; Schafer, Charles F.; Null, Cynthia H.; Bay, P. Michael

    2009-01-01

    At the request of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and the Constellation Program (CxP) Safety, Reliability; and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Director, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) participated in the Cx SR&QA Requirements forum. The Requirements Forum was held June 24-26; 2008, at GRC's Plum Brook Facility. The forums purpose was to gather all stakeholders into a focused meeting to help complete the process of refining the CxP to refine its Level II SR&QA requirements or defining project-specific requirements tailoring. Element prime contractors had raised specific questions about the wording and intent of many requirements in areas they felt were driving costs without adding commensurate value. NESC was asked to provide an independent and thorough review of requirements that contractors believed were driving Program costs, by active participation in the forum. This document contains information from the forum.

  6. An Anderson-like model of the QCD chiral transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Matteo; Kovács, Tamás G.; Pittler, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    We study the problems of chiral symmetry breaking and eigenmode localisation in finite-temperature QCD by looking at the lattice Dirac operator as a random Hamiltonian. We recast the staggered Dirac operator into an unconventional three-dimensional Anderson Hamiltonian ("Dirac-Anderson Hamiltonian") carrying internal degrees of freedom, with disorder provided by the fluctuations of the gauge links. In this framework, we identify the features relevant to chiral symmetry restoration and localisation of the low-lying Dirac eigenmodes in the ordering of the local Polyakov lines, and in the related correlation between spatial links across time slices, thus tying the two phenomena to the deconfinement transition. We then build a toy model based on QCD and on the Dirac-Anderson approach, replacing the Polyakov lines with spin variables and simplifying the dynamics of the spatial gauge links, but preserving the above-mentioned relevant dynamical features. Our toy model successfully reproduces the main features of the QCD spectrum and of the Dirac eigenmodes concerning chiral symmetry breaking and localisation, both in the ordered (deconfined) and disordered (confined) phases. Moreover, it allows us to study separately the roles played in the two phenomena by the diagonal and the off-diagonal terms of the Dirac-Anderson Hamiltonian. Our results support our expectation that chiral symmetry restoration and localisation of the low modes are closely related, and that both are triggered by the deconfinement transition.

  7. Interpolation Processes in Object Perception: Reply to Anderson (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellman, Philip J.; Garrigan, Patrick; Shipley, Thomas F.; Keane, Brian P.

    2007-01-01

    P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, & T. F. Shipley presented a theory of 3-D interpolation in object perception. Along with results from many researchers, this work supports an emerging picture of how the visual system connects separate visible fragments to form objects. In his commentary, B. L. Anderson challenges parts of that view, especially the idea…

  8. Scaling of the conductance distribution near the Anderson transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slevin, Keith; Markoš, Peter; Ohtsuki, Tomi

    2003-04-01

    The scaling hypothesis is the foundation of our understanding of the Anderson transition. We present a direct numerical demonstration of the scaling of the conductance distribution of a disordered system in the critical regime. This complements a previous demonstration of the scaling of certain averages of the conductance distribution [K. Slevin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3594 (2001)].

  9. Spectral density method to Anderson-Holstein model

    SciTech Connect

    Chebrolu, Narasimha Raju Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-06-24

    Two-parameter spectral density function of a magnetic impurity electron in a non-magnetic metal is calculated within the framework of the Anderson-Holstein model using the spectral density approximation method. The effect of electron-phonon interaction on the spectral function is investigated.

  10. Excessive Copper(II) and Zinc(II) Levels in Drinkable Water Sources in Areas Along the Lake Victoria Shorelines in Siaya County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Wambu, Enos W; Omwoyo, Wesley N; Akenga, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Copper(II) and zinc(II) levels in drinkable water sources in the alluvium areas of the Lake Victoria Basin in Siaya County of Kenya were evaluated to assess the risk posed to resident communities by hydrogeological accumulation of toxic residues in the sedimentary regions of the lake basin. The levels of the metals in water were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Metal concentrations ranged from 0.11 to 4.29 mg/L for Cu(II) and 0.03 to 1.62 mg/L for Zn(II), which were both higher than those normally recorded in natural waters. The Cu(II) levels also exceeded WHO guidelines for drinking water in 27% of the samples. The highest prevalence of excessive Cu(II) was found among dams and open pans (38%), piped water (33%) and spring water (25%). It was estimated that 18.2% of the resident communities in the current study area are exposed to potentially toxic levels of Cu(II) through their drinking water. PMID:26615531

  11. COMPREHENSIVE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND IMPROVED ENERGY LEVELS FOR SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph; Kerber, Florian

    2012-10-15

    We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 A. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

  12. Arc Detection and Interlock Module for the PEP II Low Level RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    A new arc detection and interlock generating module for the SLAC PEP-II low-level RF VXI-based system has been developed. The system is required to turn off the RF drive and high voltage power supply in the event of arcing in the cavity windows, klystron window, or circulator. Infrared photodiodes receive arc signals through radiation resistant optical fibers. Gain and bandwidth are selectable for each channel to allow tailoring response. The module also responds to interlock requests from other modules in the VXI system and communicates with the programmable logic controller (PLC) responsible for much of the low-level RF system's interlock functionality.

  13. Anderson transition in low-dimensional disordered systems driven by long-range nonrandom hopping.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Malyshev, V A; Sierra, G; Martín-Delgado, M A; Rodríguez-Laguna, J; Domínguez-Adame, F

    2003-01-17

    The single-parameter scaling hypothesis predicts the absence of delocalized states for noninteracting quasiparticles in low-dimensional disordered systems. We show analytically, using a supersymmetric method combined with a renormalization group analysis, as well as numerically that extended states may occur in the one- and two-dimensional Anderson model with a nonrandom hopping falling off as some power of the distance between sites. The different size scaling of the bare level spacing and the renormalized magnitude of the disorder seen by the quasiparticles finally results in the delocalization of states at one of the band edges of the quasiparticle energy spectrum. PMID:12570579

  14. Genetic evidence that the elevated levels of Escherichia coli helicase II antagonize recombinational DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Petranović, M; Zahradka, K; Zahradka, D; Petranović, D; Nagy, B; Salaj-Smic, E; Petranović, D

    2001-01-01

    Some phages survive irradiation much better upon multiple than upon single infection, a phenomenon known as multiplicity reactivation (MR). Long ago MR of UV-irradiated lambda red phage in E. coli cells was shown to be a manifestation of recA-dependent recombinational DNA repair. We used this experimental model to assess the influence of helicase II on the type of recombinational repair responsible for MR. Since helicase II is encoded by the SOS-inducible uvrD gene, SOS-inducing treatments such as irradiating recA(+) or heating recA441 cells were used. We found: i) that MR was abolished by the SOS-inducing treatments; ii) that in uvrD background these treatments did not affect MR; and iii) that the presence of a high-copy plasmid vector carrying the uvrD(+) allele together with its natural promoter region was sufficient to block MR. From these results we infer that helicase II is able to antagonize the type of recA-dependent recombinational repair acting on multiple copies of UV-damaged lambda DNA and that its anti-recombinogenic activity is operative at elevated levels only. PMID:11879732

  15. Quality assurance plan for the High Level Controller for the CBMS Block II

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.W.; Robbins, I.F.; Stewart, K.A.; Terry, C.L.; Whitaker, R.A.; Wolf, D.A.; Zager, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    This document establishes the software Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the High Level Controller for the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II (HLC/CBMS-II) project activities under the Computing, Robotics, and Education (CRE) Directorate management. It defines the requirements and assigns responsibilities for ensuring, with a high degree of confidence, that project objectives will be achieved as planned. The CBMS Program was awarded to ORNL by the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to design the next version (Block II) mass spectrometer for the detection and identification of chemical and biological warfare agents, to fabricate four engineering prototypes, and to construct eight preproduction units. Section 1 of this document provides an introduction to the HLC/CBMS-II project QAP. Sections 2 and 3 describe the specific aspects of quality assurance as applicable to the project. Section 4 reviews the project approach to risk management. The Risk Management Matrix given in Appendix A is a tool to assess, prioritize, and prevent problems before they occur; therefore, the matrix will be reviewed and revised on a periodic basis. Appendix B shows the quality assurance criteria of the DOE Order 5700.6C and their applicability to this project.

  16. SAGE II Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties at Non-Volcanic Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Burton, Sharon P.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Peter, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Since 2000, stratospheric aerosol levels have been relatively stable and at the lowest levels observed in the historical record. Given the challenges of making satellite measurements of aerosol properties at these levels, we have performed a study of the sensitivity of the product to the major components of the processing algorithm used in the production of SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements and the retrieval process that produces the operational surface area density (SAD) product. We find that the aerosol extinction measurements, particularly at 1020 nm, remain robust and reliable at the observed aerosol levels. On the other hand, during background periods, the SAD operational product has an uncertainty of at least a factor of 2 during due to the lack of sensitivity to particles with radii less than 100 nm.

  17. Operator interface for the PEP-II low level RF control system

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.; Claus, R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper focuses on the operational aspects of the low level RF control system being built for the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. Subsystems requiring major operational considerations include displays for monitor and control from UNIX workstations, slow feedback loops and control sequences residing on microprocessors, and various client applications in the existing SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) control system. Since commissioning of PEP-II RF is currently in-progress, only those parts of the control system used during this phase are discussed in detail. Based on past experience with the SLC control system, it is expected that effort expended during commissioning on a solid user interface will result in smoother transition to full reliable 24-hour-a-day operation.

  18. Electron impact excitation of the Ne II and Ne III fine structure levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.; Cumbee, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Electron impact excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of the low lying levels of the Ne II and Ne III ions are of great interest in cool molecular environments including young stellar objects, photodissociation regions, active galactic nuclei, and X-ray dominated regions. We have carried out details computations for cross sections and rate coefficients using the Dirac R-matrix codes (DARC), the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes (BP) and the Intermediate Coupling Frame Transformation (ICFT) codes, for both Ne II and Ne III. We also compare our results with previous calculations. We are primarily interested in rate coefficients in the temperature range below 1000 K, and the focus is on obtaining the most accurate rate coefficients for those temperatures. We present both a recommended set of effective collision strengths and an indication of the uncertainties on these values. Work at Auburn University and UGA partly supported by NASA Grant NNX15AE47G.

  19. Genetic suppression of a phosphomimic myosin II identifies system-level factors that promote myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yixin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Surcel, Alexandra; Miller, Christopher; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2014-01-01

    How myosin II localizes to the cleavage furrow in Dictyostelium and metazoan cells remains largely unknown despite significant advances in understanding its regulation. We designed a genetic selection using cDNA library suppression of 3xAsp myosin II to identify factors involved in myosin cleavage furrow accumulation. The 3xAsp mutant is deficient in bipolar thick filament assembly, fails to accumulate at the cleavage furrow, cannot rescue myoII-null cytokinesis, and has impaired mechanosensitive accumulation. Eleven genes suppressed this dominant cytokinesis deficiency when 3xAsp was expressed in wild-type cells. 3xAsp myosin II's localization to the cleavage furrow was rescued by constructs encoding rcdBB, mmsdh, RMD1, actin, one novel protein, and a 14-3-3 hairpin. Further characterization showed that RMD1 is required for myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation, acting in parallel with mechanical stress. Analysis of several mutant strains revealed that different thresholds of myosin II activity are required for daughter cell symmetry than for furrow ingression dynamics. Finally, an engineered myosin II with a longer lever arm (2xELC), producing a highly mechanosensitive motor, could also partially suppress the intragenic 3xAsp. Overall, myosin II accumulation is the result of multiple parallel and partially redundant pathways that comprise a cellular contractility control system. PMID:25318674

  20. Association of the Serum Angiotensin II Level with Disease Severity in Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiamei; Li, Huiyu; Jie, Shenghua

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging infectious disease caused by a novel Bunyavirus. Recent data suggest that the physiological balance of multiple proinflammatory cytokines is substantially changed in cases of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) infection, and the inflammatory response probably plays an important role in disease progression. Angiotensin II is an important active substance of the renin-angiotensin system, and studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II is involved in key events in the inflammatory process and can regulate inflammatory cell responses. Methods In order to elucidate the role of angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of SFTS, we collected serum samples from SFTS patients in the acute or convalescent phase and tested the angiotensin II levels using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as SFTSV viral RNA with real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, we explored possible correlations between the angiotensin II levels and clinical parameters in SFTS patients. Results Our data showed that the serum level of angiotensin II was significantly increased in the acute phase compared with that seen in the convalescent phase and the healthy controls, while there were no significant differences between the convalescent cases and healthy controls (p>0.05). A correlation analysis demonstrated that the level of angiotensin II positively correlated with the SFTS viral RNA load. The angiotensin II levels were also found to be correlated with clinical parameters indicating impairments in organ functions. Moreover, we also found that the angiotensin II levels were significantly increased in the severe cases versus the non-severe cases (p<0.001). Conclusion The serum angiotensin II levels in SFTS patients may be used to stratify the disease severity and are possibly predictive of disease outcomes. PMID:27086801

  1. Anderson localization of graphene by helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naitou, Y.; Ogawa, S.

    2016-04-01

    Irradiation of a single-layer graphene (SLG) with accelerated helium ions (He+) controllably generates defect distributions, which create a charge carrier scattering source within the SLG. We report direct experimental observation of metal-insulator transition in SLG on SiO2/Si substrates induced by Anderson localization. This transition was investigated using scanning capacitance microscopy by monitoring the He+ dose conditions on the SLG. The experimental data show that a defect density of more than ˜1.2% induced Anderson localization. We also investigated the localization length by determining patterned placement of the defects and estimated the length to be several dozen nanometers. These findings provide valuable insight for patterning and designing graphene-based nanostructures using helium ion microscopy.

  2. Anderson localization on the Bethe lattice: nonergodicity of extended States.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Altshuler, B L; Kravtsov, V E; Scardicchio, A

    2014-07-25

    Statistical analysis of the eigenfunctions of the Anderson tight-binding model with on-site disorder on regular random graphs strongly suggests that the extended states are multifractal at any finite disorder. The spectrum of fractal dimensions f(α) defined in Eq. (3) remains positive for α noticeably far from 1 even when the disorder is several times weaker than the one which leads to the Anderson localization; i.e., the ergodicity can be reached only in the absence of disorder. The one-particle multifractality on the Bethe lattice signals on a possible inapplicability of the equipartition law to a generic many-body quantum system as long as it remains isolated. PMID:25105646

  3. High levels of MHC class II allelic diversity in lake trout from Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorschner, M.O.; Duris, T.; Bronte, C.R.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.; Phillips, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Sequence variation in a 216 bp portion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II B1 domain was examined in 74 individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from different locations in Lake Superior. Forty-three alleles were obtained which encoded 71-72 amino acids of the mature protein. These sequences were compared with previous data obtained from five Pacific salmon species and Atlantic salmon using the same primers. Although all of the lake trout alleles clustered together in the neighbor-joining analysis of amino acid sequences, one amino acid allelic lineage was shared with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species in another genus which probably diverged from Salvelinus more than 10-20 million years ago. As shown previously in other salmonids, the level of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) exceeded the level of synonymous substitution (d(S)). The level of nucleotide diversity at the MHC class II B1 locus was considerably higher in lake trout than in the Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lake trout colonized Lake Superior from more than one refuge following the Wisconsin glaciation. Recent population bottlenecks may have reduced nucleotide diversity in Pacific salmon populations.

  4. Ground-state properties of the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenbecler, R.; Fulco, J. R.; Gill, W.; Scalapino, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The ground-state energy, hybridization matrix element, local moment, and spin-density correlations of a one-dimensional, finite-chain, periodic, symmetric Anderson model are obtained by numerical simulations and compared with perturbation theory and strong-coupling results. It is found that the local f-electron spins are compensated by correlation with other f-electrons as well as band electrons leading to a nonmagnetic ground state.

  5. Perturbative Interpretation of Adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer Free Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Muneki; Takahashi, Chako; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2016-07-01

    In conventional well-known derivation methods for the adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) free energy, special assumptions that are difficult to mathematically justify except in some mean-field models, must be made. Here, we present a new adaptive TAP free energy derivation method. Using this derivation technique, without any special assumptions, the adaptive TAP free energy can be simply obtained as a high-temperature expansion of the Gibbs free energy.

  6. Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

  7. Many-body Anderson localization in one-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delande, Dominique; Sacha, Krzysztof; Płodzień, Marcin; Avazbaev, Sanat K.; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2013-04-01

    We show, using quasi-exact numerical simulations, that Anderson localization in a disordered one-dimensional potential survives in the presence of attractive interaction between particles. The localization length of the particles' center of mass—computed analytically for weak disorder—is in good agreement with the quasi-exact numerical observations using the time evolving block decimation algorithm. Our approach allows for simulation of the entire experiment including the final measurement of all atom positions.

  8. Markovian Anderson Model: Bounds for the Rate of Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcheremchantsev, Serguei

    We consider the Anderson model in with potentials whose values at any site of the lattice are Markovian independent random functions of time. For solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation we show under some conditions that with probability 1 where for d=1,2 and for .

  9. Energy levels and mean lives of Cl II to Cl VII.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashkin, S.; Martinson, I.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the spectra of chlorine between 500 and 2800 A using the beam-foil technique. Over 200 multiplets have been observed, many of which had not been reported earlier. A number of such transitions could be classified, and several new term values are proposed for Cl IV, Cl V, Cl VI , and Cl VII. Mean lives of various excited levels were measured for Cl II to Cl VII. The results are compared with theoretical calculations and other measurements in appropriate isoelectronic systems.

  10. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Physiological Free Cu(II) Levels in Live Cells with a Cu(II)-Selective Carbonic Anhydrase-Based Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    McCranor, Bryan J.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Zeng, Hui Hui; Stoddard, A.K.; Hurst, Tamiika; Fierke, Carol A.; Lakowicz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a required trace element that plays key roles in a number of human enzymes, such that copper deficiency or genetic defects in copper transport lead to serious or fatal disease. Rae, et al., had famously predicted that free copper ion levels in the cell cytoplasm were extremely low, typically too low to be observable. We recently developed a variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase II for sensing metal ions that exhibits 25-fold better selectivity for Cu(II) over Zn(II) than the wild type protein, enabling us to accurately measure Cu(II) in the presence of ordinary cellular (picomolar) concentrations of free zinc. We inserted a fluorescent labeled Cu(II)-specific variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase into PC-12 cells and found that the levels are indeed extremely low (in the femtomolar range). We imaged the free Cu(II) levels in living cells by means of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy. Implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:24671220

  11. A Suitable Option for Gustilo and Anderson Grade III Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ronghua; Wang, Zhijun; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhao, Yuhuan; Xu, Lusheng; Yu, Shaobin

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury remains difficult, particularly due to the incidence of wound infections, delayed fracture union, and traumatic extremity amputation. However, little data is available on delayed skin graft or flap reconstructions of Gustilo grade III injury, especially using new technologies of wound coverage, such as vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) combined with limited internal and/or external fixation. Material/Methods Between June 2008 and May 2013, we performed the VSD technique combined with limited internal and/or external fixation on 38 patients (22 males and 16 females, with a mean age of 36.5 years) with Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. VSD was regularly changed and delayed skin grafts or flaps were used to cover the defect. Two patients were lost to follow-up, and the remaining 36 were available for evaluation. The complications, wound healing, infections, and bony union were assessed for a mean duration of 2.5 years (range, 1–4 years). Results Complications were seen in 5 of the 36 cases: 2 cases had infection alone, 1 case had delayed union or nonunion, 1 case had infection and delayed union, and 1 case had wound necrosis, infection, and nonunion. VSD was regularly changed 2–6 times. Morphological appearance and functional recovery were satisfactory in all cases. Conclusions Using VSD before skin grafts or flaps coverage, combined with limited internal and/or external fixation, is a suitable option for Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. PMID:27564219

  12. Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Shu-Hui; Song, Juntao Li, Yu-Xian

    2013-11-14

    We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

  13. A Suitable Option for Gustilo and Anderson Grade III Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ronghua; Wang, Zhijun; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhao, Yuhuan; Xu, Lusheng; Yu, Shaobin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The management of Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury remains difficult, particularly due to the incidence of wound infections, delayed fracture union, and traumatic extremity amputation. However, little data is available on delayed skin graft or flap reconstructions of Gustilo grade III injury, especially using new technologies of wound coverage, such as vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) combined with limited internal and/or external fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Between June 2008 and May 2013, we performed the VSD technique combined with limited internal and/or external fixation on 38 patients (22 males and 16 females, with a mean age of 36.5 years) with Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. VSD was regularly changed and delayed skin grafts or flaps were used to cover the defect. Two patients were lost to follow-up, and the remaining 36 were available for evaluation. The complications, wound healing, infections, and bony union were assessed for a mean duration of 2.5 years (range, 1-4 years). RESULTS Complications were seen in 5 of the 36 cases: 2 cases had infection alone, 1 case had delayed union or nonunion, 1 case had infection and delayed union, and 1 case had wound necrosis, infection, and nonunion. VSD was regularly changed 2-6 times. Morphological appearance and functional recovery were satisfactory in all cases. CONCLUSIONS Using VSD before skin grafts or flaps coverage, combined with limited internal and/or external fixation, is a suitable option for Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. PMID:27564219

  14. On the Anderson localization conjecture in Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Constanze; Busse, Kyle; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    In 1958, Anderson suggested that sufficiently large impurities in a semi-conductor could lead to spatial localization of electrons. This idea unfolded into the field of Anderson Localization, one of the most fascinating phenomena in solid-state physics as it plays a major role in the conductive properties of imperfectly ordered materials. The Anderson Localization Conjecture claims that random disorder of any strength causes localization of electrons in the medium. The problem has proven to be highly non-trivial. Over the years the community has argued whether spatial localization occurs in 2D for small impurities. From a mathematical standpoint, the conjecture is still considered an open question. In 2013, Liaw challenged the commonly held assumption that localization holds in 2D by introducing a new mathematically more rigorous method to test for extended states, and applying it to the discrete random Schrödinger operator. One of the advantages of the underlying method is its versatility. It can be applied to any ordered system such as colloids, crystals, and atomic lattices. In a cross-disciplinary effort we merge this method with a numerical code used to simulate 2D physics systems, in preparation for experimentally testing the theory against complex plasma crystals.

  15. Language Assessment Scales, Level 2, LAS II, for Grades 6 and Up, English/Spanish. Examiner's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sharon E.; De Avila, Edward A.

    Language Assessment Scales, Level 2 (LAS II) are used to assess the linguistic proficiency of limited-English-speaking or non-English-speaking adolescents. LAS II, like its predecessor, LAS I, provides a picture of oral linguistic proficiency based on a student's performance across four linguistic subsystems: phonemic, lexical, syntactic and…

  16. Level II Milestone Review of LLNL Program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, M F; Benson, D J; Yip, S

    2003-01-14

    This document describes an evaluation of the Level II Milestone achievements of the LLNL program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives on January 14, 2003. ''The Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives Program'' is a mixture of advanced computational methodology and physico-chemical theory applied to understanding deflagration and detonation of plastic-bonded explosives from the nano to the macro scales. At many points, the modeling is tied directly to experiments within the precisions of both. Advances are needed in the experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of detonations. Work reported in this review represents significant, cross-pollinating advances in each area. The team successfully carried out ALE-3D simulations of deflagration in PBX with grain scale effects. (Milestone requirements 1 and 2), interpreted experimental data on flame speed vs. pressure and sensitivity to global kinetics in terms of ALE-3D simulations (Milestone requirement 3), and used the results of these simulations to develop a continuum reactive flow model that captures some of these effects (Milestone requirement 4). By comparing experiments and detonation velocities in small diameter, unconfined explosives, they found non-idealities that remain at intermediate diameters (ca. 1.5 mm) that require further analysis. In all of these areas, the project team has met, indeed exceeded, their Level II Milestone goals.

  17. Development of High Level Trigger Software for Belle II at SuperKEKB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Mineo, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Belle collaboration has been trying for 10 years to reveal the mystery of the current matter-dominated universe. However, much more statistics is required to search for New Physics through quantum loops in decays of B mesons. In order to increase the experimental sensitivity, the next generation B-factory, SuperKEKB, is planned. The design luminosity of SuperKEKB is 8 x 1035cm-2s-1 a factor 40 above KEKB's peak luminosity. At this high luminosity, the level 1 trigger of the Belle II experiment will stream events of 300 kB size at a 30 kHz rate. To reduce the data flow to a manageable level, a high-level trigger (HLT) is needed, which will be implemented using the full offline reconstruction on a large scale PC farm. There, physics level event selection is performed, reducing the event rate by ~ 10 to a few kHz. To execute the reconstruction the HLT uses the offline event processing framework basf2, which has parallel processing capabilities used for multi-core processing and PC clusters. The event data handling in the HLT is totally object oriented utilizing ROOT I/O with a new method of object passing over the UNIX socket connection. Also under consideration is the use of the HLT output as well to reduce the pixel detector event size by only saving hits associated with a track, resulting in an additional data reduction of ~ 100 for the pixel detector. In this contribution, the design and implementation of the Belle II HLT are presented together with a report of preliminary testing results.

  18. Direct determination of the timing of sea level change during termination II.

    PubMed

    Gallup, Christina D; Cheng, H; Taylor, F W; Edwards, R L

    2002-01-11

    An outcrop within the last interglacial terrace on Barbados contains corals that grew during the penultimate deglaciation, or Termination II. We used combined 230Th and 231Pa dating to determine that they grew 135.8 +/- 0.8 thousand years ago, indicating that sea level was 18 +/- 3 meters below present sea level at the time. This suggests that sea level had risen to within 20% of its peak last-interglacial value by 136 thousand years ago, in conflict with Milankovitch theory predictions. Orbital forcing may have played a role in the deglaciation, as may have isostatic adjustments due to large ice sheets. Other corals in the same outcrop grew during oxygen isotope (delta18O) substage 6e, indicating that sea level was 38 +/- 5 meters below present sea level, about 168.0 thousand years ago. When compared to the delta18O signal in the benthic V19-30/V19-28 record at that time, the coral data extend to the previous glacial cycle the conclusion that deep-water temperatures were colder during glacial periods. PMID:11786639

  19. Electrons and photons at High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anuar, Afiq A.

    2015-12-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to keep the HLT output rate manageable while maintaining thresholds low enough to cover physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the ingredients that have been successfully applied in the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. Improvements in HLT electron and photon definitions will be presented, focusing in particular on: updated clustering algorithm and the energy calibration procedure, new Particle-Flow-based isolation approach and pileup mitigation techniques, and the electron-dedicated track fitting algorithm based on Gaussian Sum Filter.

  20. Finite size effect and Friedel oscillations for a Friedel-Anderson impurity by FAIR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yaqi

    A compact solution consisting of 4-8 Slater states (FAIR solution) is introduced to treat the Friedel Anderson and Kondo impurity problem. The ground state energy is obtained with impressively high accuracy. Net integrated polarization density is calculated and it confirms the existence of Kondo cloud. Finite size effect in the impurity problem is studied using FAIR method. It is shown that the formation of a Kondo ground state requires a minimum sample size and is accompanied by the presence of Kondo cloud. The Friedel Oscillations in the vicinity of a Friedel-Anderson impurity are investigated by FAIR method. The development of Friedel oscillation with a phase shift of pi/2 outside the Kondo radius is confirmed. And the amplitude A(xi) of the Friedel oscillations show a very similar behavior to that of a simple non-interacting Friedel impurity with a narrow resonance at the Fermi level. This similarity supports the concept of a "Kondo" resonance. And the Kondo resonance half width GammaFA is suggested to be GammaFA ≈ Echi/2.4, where Echi is the Kondo energy calculated from susceptibility.

  1. Angiotensin II Levels in Gingival Tissues from Healthy Individuals, Patients with Nifedipine Induced Gingival Overgrowth and Non Responders on Nifedipine

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Anitha; Balaji, Thodur Madapusi

    2015-01-01

    Context The Renin Angiotensin system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Drug Induced Gingival Overgrowth (DIGO), a fibrotic condition, caused by Phenytoin, Nifedipine and Cyclosporine. Aim This study quantified Angiotensin II levels in gingival tissue samples obtained from healthy individuals, patients on Nifedipine manifesting/not manifesting drug induced gingival overgrowth. Materials and Methods Gingival tissue samples were obtained from healthy individuals (n=24), patients on nifidipine manifesting gingival overgrowth (n= 18) and patients on nifidipine not manifesting gingival overgrowth (n=8). Angiotensin II levels were estimated in the samples using a commercially available ELISA kit. Results Angiotensin II levels were significantly elevated in patients on Nifedipine manifesting gingival overgrowth compared to the other 2 groups (p<0.01). Conclusion The results of the study give an insight into the role played by Angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of drug induced gingival overgrowth. PMID:26436057

  2. Evaluation of Phase II glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A vendor glass formulation study was carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), supporting the Phase I and Phase II melter vendor testing activities for Westinghouse Hanford Company. This study is built upon the LLW glass optimization effort that will be described in a separate report. For Phase I vendor melter testing, six glass formulations were developed at PNL and additional were developed by Phase I vendors. All the doses were characterized in terms of viscosity and chemical durability by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. Twelve Phase II glass formulations (see Tables 3.5 and 3.6) were developed to accommodate 2.5 wt% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 1.0 wt% S0{sub 3} without significant processing problems. These levels of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SO{sub 3} are expected to be the highest possible concentrations from Hanford Site LLW streams at 25 wt% waste loading in glass. The Phase H compositions formulated were 6 to 23 times more durable than the environmental assessment (EA) glass. They melt within the temperature range of 1160{degrees} to 1410{degrees}C to suit different melting technologies. The composition types include boron-free for volatilization sensitive melters; boron-containing glasses for coId-cap melters; Zr-containing, glasses for enhanced Iong-term durability; and Fe-containing glasses for reducing melting temperature and melt volatility while maintaining chemical durability.

  3. Variable induction of vitellogenin genes in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) by the honeybee, Apis mellifera L, host and its environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcript levels of vitellogenins (Vgs) in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) were variably induced by interactions between the developing honeybee as a food source and the capped honeybee cell environment. Transcripts for 2 Vgs of varroa mites were sequenced and putative Vg pr...

  4. Examining the role of foraging and malvolio in host-finding behavior in the honey bee parasite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When a female varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), invades a honey bee brood cell, the physiology rapidly changes from the feeding phoretic to reproductive. Changes in the foraging and malvolio transcript levels in the brain have been associated with modulated intra-specific food sea...

  5. The Influence of Alcoholic Liver Disease on Serum PIVKA-II Levels in Patients without Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kang, Seong Hee; Lee, Beom Jae; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Prothrombin induced by vitamin K deficiency or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) is a widely used diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We evaluated the correlation between alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and serum PIVKA-II levels in chronic liver disease (CLD) patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 2,528 CLD patients without HCC. Among these patients, 76 exhibited serum high PIVKA-II levels of >125 mAU/mL (group 1). We categorized 76 control patients matched by age, sex, and the presence of liver cirrhosis from the remaining patients who were negative for serum PIVKA-II (group 2). Results Group 1 revealed increased antibiotic usage (23.7% vs 2.6%, p<0.001) and incidence of ALD (60.5% vs 14.5%, p<0.001) as well as elevated aspartate aminotransferase (52.5 IU/L vs 30.5 IU/L, p=0.025) and γ glutamyl transpeptidase (67.5 IU/L vs 36.5 IU/L, p=0.005) levels compared with group 2. Further, group 1 was significantly associated with a worse Child-Pugh class than group 2. In the multivariate analysis, ALD (odds ratio [OR], 7.151; p<0.001) and antibiotic usage (OR, 5.846; p<0.001) were significantly associated with positive PIVKA-II levels. Conclusions Our study suggests that ALD and antibiotics usage may be confounding factors when interpreting high serum PIVKA-II levels in patients without HCC. Therefore, serum PIVKA-II levels in patients with ALD or in patients administered antibiotics should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25473073

  6. Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 1: Global and zonal mean cloud amounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

    1995-01-01

    Global high-level clouds identified in Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements for January and July in the period 1985 to 1990 are compared with near-nadir-looking observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Global and zonal mean high-level cloud amounts from the two data sets agree very well, if clouds with layer extinction coefficients of less than 0.008/km at 1.02 micrometers wavelength are removed from the SAGE II results and all detected clouds are interpreted to have an average horizontal size of about 75 km along the 200 km transimission path length of the SAGE II observations. The SAGE II results are much more sensitive to variations of assumed cloud size than to variations of detection threshold. The geographical distribution of cloud fractions shows good agreement, but systematic regional differences also indicate that the average cloud size varies somewhat among different climate regimes. The more sensitive SAGE II results show that about one third of all high-level clouds are missed by ISCCP but that these clouds have very low optical thicknesses (less than 0.1 at 0.6 micrometers wavelength). SAGE II sampling error in monthly zonal cloud fraction is shown to produce no bias, to be less than the intraseasonal natural variability, but to be comparable with the natural variability at longer time scales.

  7. Low-level waste data base development - EPICOR II resin/liner investigation - a program review

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Reno, H.W.; Schmitt, R.C.; Ayers, A.L. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the titled program and gives the status of the work on resin degradation, resin solidification, and field testing of solidified samples. A brief discussion of some recent results also is included. Resin materials from EPICOR-II prefilters used during cleanup of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being examined to (a) develop a data base for low-level waste and (b) obtain information on survivability of waste forms composed of ion exchange media loaded with radionuclides and solidified in matrices of cement and Dow polymer. An unusual aspect of the investigation is the use of commercial grade resins which have been loaded with over five times the radioactivity normally seen in a commercial application. That dramatically increases the total radiation dose to the resins. 21 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Low level waste data base development - EPICOR-II resin/liner investigation. Program review

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1985-09-10

    This paper presents an overview of the titled program and gives the status of the work on resin degradation, resin solidification, and field testing of solidified samples. A brief discussion of some recent results is also included. Resin materials from EPICOR-II prefilters used in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being examined to (1) develop a low level waste data base and (2) obtain information on survivability of waste forms composed of ion exchange media loaded with radionuclides and solidified in matrices of cement and Dow polymer. An unusual aspect of this investigation is the use of commercial grade resins which have been loaded with over five times the radioactivity normally seen in a commercial application. That dramatically increases the total radiation dose to the resins. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Commissioning experience with the PEP-II low-level RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

    1997-05-01

    The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment and supported by EPICS. All signal processing and control is done at baseband using in-phase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. Remotely configurable RF feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to the required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. The system contains a built-in baseband network analyzer which allows remote measurement of the RF feedback loop transfer functions and automated configuration of these loops. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system.

  10. Gap Voltage Feed Forward Board for PEP II Low Level RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, William; Claus, Richard; Sapozhnikov, Leonid; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    This paper describes the Gap Voltage Feed-Forward VXI module used in the PEP-II Low Level RF System. This module produces adaptively generated inphase (I) and quadrature (Q) reference signals for a single RF station based on measurements of periodic (1-turn) beam induced cavity transients caused by the presence of an ion clearing gap. In addition the module receives a fiber optically transmitted, bandlimited 'kic' signal from the longitudinal feedback system which is used to phase modulate the RF drive. This allows the RF system to act as a 'subwoofer' for the longitudinal feedback system for low order coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the fundamental mode of the accelerating cavities. The module includes hardware for remote measurement and adjustment of the 'kick' transfer function.

  11. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method

    SciTech Connect

    Sabik, A. Gołek, F.; Antczak, G.

    2015-05-15

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (Δϕ) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present Δϕ of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers.

  12. Transversal Anderson localization of sound in acoustic waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yangtao; Ke, Manzhu; Feng, Junheng; Wang, Mudi; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-22

    We present designs of one-dimensional acoustic waveguide arrays and investigate wave propagation inside. Under the condition of single identical waveguide mode and weak coupling, the acoustic wave motion in waveguide arrays can be modeled with a discrete mode-coupling theory. The coupling constants can be retrieved from simulations or experiments as the function of neighboring waveguide separations. Sound injected into periodic arrays gives rise to the discrete diffraction, exhibiting ballistic or extended transport in transversal direction. But sound injected into randomized waveguide arrays readily leads to Anderson localization transversally. The experimental results show good agreement with simulations and theoretical predictions. PMID:25812602

  13. STS-118 Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Clay Anderson Perform EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist Rick Mastracchio was anchored on the foot restraint of the Canadarm2 as he participated in the third session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. Assisting Mastracchio was Expedition 15 flight engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame). During the 5 hour, 28 minute space walk, the two relocated the S-band Antenna Sub-Assembly from the Port 6 (P6) truss to the Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1 and retrieved the P6 transponder.

  14. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method.

    PubMed

    Sabik, A; Gołek, F; Antczak, G

    2015-05-01

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (Δϕ) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present Δϕ of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers. PMID:26026572

  15. Remembering Joan (Jan) Mary Anderson (1932-2015).

    PubMed

    Chow, Wah Soon; Horton, Peter; Barrett, Martin; Osmond, Charles Barry

    2016-08-01

    Joan Mary Anderson, known to most people as Jan, was born on May 12, 1932 in Dunedin, New Zealand. She died on August 28, 2015 in Canberra, Australia. To celebrate her life, we present here a brief biography, some comments on her discoveries in photosynthesis during a career spanning more than half a century, and reminiscences from family and friends. We remember this wonderful person who had an unflagging curiosity, creative ability to think laterally, enthusiasm, passion, generosity and love of color and culture. PMID:27363420

  16. Quasiperiodic driving of Anderson localized waves in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatami, H.; Danieli, C.; Bodyfelt, J. D.; Flach, S.

    2016-06-01

    We consider a quantum particle in a one-dimensional disordered lattice with Anderson localization in the presence of multifrequency perturbations of the onsite energies. Using the Floquet representation, we transform the eigenvalue problem into a Wannier-Stark basis. Each frequency component contributes either to a single channel or a multichannel connectivity along the lattice, depending on the control parameters. The single-channel regime is essentially equivalent to the undriven case. The multichannel driving increases substantially the localization length for slow driving, showing two different scaling regimes of weak and strong driving, yet the localization length stays finite for a finite number of frequency components.

  17. The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Simões, A. S. R.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and a weak delocalization of the 5f-electrons. We calculate the Kondo and Curie temperatures and we can account for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of UTe.

  18. Collective Kondo effect in the Anderson-Hubbard lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazekas, P.; Itai, K.

    1997-02-01

    The periodic Anderson model is extended by switching on a Hubbard U for the conduction electrons. We use the Gutzwiller variational method to study the nearly integral valent limit. The lattice Kondo energy contains the U-dependent chemical potential of the Hubbard subsystem in the exponent, and the correlation-induced band narrowing in the prefactor. Both effects tend to suppress the Kondo scale, which can be understood to result from the blocking of hybridization. At half-filling, we find a Brinkman-Rice-type transition from a Kondo insulator to a Mott insulator.

  19. Theory of the Anderson transition in the quasiperiodic kicked rotor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chushun; Altland, Alexander; Garst, Markus

    2011-08-12

    We present the first microscopic theory of transport in quasiperiodically driven environments ("kicked rotors"), as realized in recent atom optic experiments. We find that the behavior of these systems depends sensitively on the value of a dimensionless Planck constant h: for irrational values of h/(4π) they fall into the universality class of disordered electronic systems and we describe the corresponding localization phenomena. In contrast, for rational values the rotor-Anderson insulator acquires an infinite (static) conductivity and turns into a "supermetal." We discuss the ensuing possibility of a metal-supermetal quantum phase transition. PMID:21902396

  20. Kubo-Anderson Mixing in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Brink, A. Maassen Van Den

    A novel ab initio analysis of the Reynolds stress is presented in order to model non-local turbulence transport. The theory involves a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. A scaling relation maps the path space onto the boundary layer. Analytical sampling rates are shown to model mixing by exchange. Nonlocal mixing involves a scaling exponent ɛ≈0.58 (ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit). The resulting transport equation represents a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process.

  1. Experimental Observation of Two-Dimensional Anderson Localization with the Atomic Kicked Rotor.

    PubMed

    Manai, Isam; Clément, Jean-François; Chicireanu, Radu; Hainaut, Clément; Garreau, Jean Claude; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Delande, Dominique

    2015-12-11

    Dimension 2 is expected to be the lower critical dimension for Anderson localization in a time-reversal-invariant disordered quantum system. Using an atomic quasiperiodic kicked rotor-equivalent to a two-dimensional Anderson-like model-we experimentally study Anderson localization in dimension 2 and we observe localized wave function dynamics. We also show that the localization length depends exponentially on the disorder strength and anisotropy and is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the self-consistent theory for the 2D Anderson localization. PMID:26705619

  2. NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

    2011-03-28

    The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. It is an open structure platform, and we try to provide a narrow API set for client application. With this narrow API, existing applications developed in different language under different architecture could be ported to our platform with small modification. This paper describes system infrastructure design, client API and system integration, and latest progress. As a new 3rd generation synchrotron light source with ultra low emittance, there are new requirements and challenges to control and manipulate the beam. A use case study and a theoretical analysis have been performed to clarify requirements and challenges to the high level applications (HLA) software environment. To satisfy those requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture of the software framework is critical for beam commissioning, study and operation. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating, plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology. The HLA is combination of tools for accelerator physicists and operators, which is same as traditional approach. In NSLS-II, they include monitoring applications and control routines. Scripting environment is very important for the later part of HLA and both parts are designed based on a common set of APIs. Physicists and operators are users of these APIs, while control system engineers and a few accelerator physicists are the developers of these APIs. With our Client/Server mode based approach, we leave how to retrieve information to the

  3. Radiative lifetime measurements of some Tm I and Tm II levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Xinghao; Yu, Qi; Li, Yongfan; Gao, Yang; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 88 levels of Tm I in the energy range 22 791.176-48 547.98 cm-1 and 29 levels of Tm II in the range 27 294.79-65 612.85 cm-1 were measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-ablation plasma. The lifetime values obtained are in the range from 15.4 to 7900 ns for Tm I and from 36.5 to 1000 ns for Tm II. To the best of our knowledge, 77 lifetimes of Tm I and 22 lifetimes of Tm II are reported for the first time. Good agreements between the present results and the previous experimental values were achieved for both Tm I and Tm II.

  4. Influence of luminosity leveling on the CDF-II B-Physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Matthew; Lewis, Jonathan; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The effective bandwidth of the CDF-II level 1 trigger is approximately 25 kHz. Some of this bandwidth is used to record events that form the data sets used by the high p{sub T} physics analyses. The remaining bandwidth is used by triggers that are sensitive to hadronic B decays and provide one of the most important samples used for the study of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. At high luminosities, the hadronic B triggers have rates that greatly exceed the available bandwidth. Rather than incur large dead-times associated with these excessive rates, these B triggers are prescaled to limit the total trigger rate to the effective level 1 trigger bandwidth. The prescales are dynamically adjusted as the store progresses so that all of the bandwidth that is not used for the high p{sub T} physics program is used to record hadronic B triggers. In principle, the luminosity could be held at a more constant level throughout the store in such a way that the integrated luminosity would be the same as that obtained from a normal store. It has been suggested that this would allow B triggers to be recorded with lower prescales and consequently with higher B{sub s}{sup 0} signal efficiencies. This note describes a parametric model of the high p{sub T} and hadronic B triggers used by CDF and compares the yields of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} decays that would result with and without luminosity leveling.

  5. Visualization on supercomputing platform level II ASC milestone (3537-1B) results from Sandia.

    SciTech Connect

    Geveci, Berk; Fabian, Nathan; Marion, Patrick; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2010-09-01

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia portion of the ASC Level II Visualization on the platform milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratories. This milestone contains functionality required for performing visualization directly on a supercomputing platform, which is necessary for peta-scale visualization. Sandia's contribution concerns in-situ visualization, running a visualization in tandem with a solver. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors(GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the performance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. Scientific simulation on parallel supercomputers is traditionally performed in four

  6. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    PubMed Central

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  7. Phase Boundaries of the Pseudogap Anderson Impurity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Aaron; Chowdhury, Tathagata; Ingersent, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    As the temperature of metals containing dilute concentrations of magnetic impurities reach very low temperatures, a phenomenon known as the Kondo effect takes place in which the resistance increases. This is due to the domination of spin-exchange processes that occur between the electrons of the metal and the electrons of the magnetic impurity near absolute zero. The Anderson model is a quantum impurity model that was developed in the 1960s to explain this phenomenon. It involves a single magnetic impurity tunnel-coupled to the conduction band of a metal. If the conduction band of this system contains a pseudogap, or a power-law decrease in the density of states around the Fermi energy, then quantum phase transitions will occur. The phase boundaries of the pseudogap Anderson impurity model have been previously approximated using poor man's scaling analysis. Here, we focus on using the more accurate numerical renormalization group method to calculate the location of these boundaries. We then compare these numerical results with the predictions derived from the scaling approximations. The development of nanotechnology like quantum dots and STM have rekindled interest in the Kondo effect since it can now be studied within controlled settings. Supported by the NSF REU Grant DMR-1156737: REU Site in Materials Physics at the University of Florida.

  8. Ferromagnetism in the two-dimensional periodic Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, C. D.; Bonca, J.; Gubernatis, J. E.

    2001-05-01

    Using the constrained-path Monte Carlo method, we studied the magnetic properties of the two-dimensional periodic Anderson model for electron fillings between 1/4 and 1/2. We also derived two effective low-energy theories to assist in interpreting the numerical results. For 1/4 filling, we found that the system can be a Mott or a charge-transfer insulator, depending on the relative values of the Coulomb interaction and the charge-transfer gap between the two noninteracting bands. The insulator may be a paramagnet or antiferromagnet. We concentrated on the effect of electron doping on these insulating phases. Upon doping we obtained a partially saturated ferromagnetic phase for low concentrations of conduction electrons. If the system were a charge-transfer insulator, we would find that the ferromagnetism is induced by the well-known Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction. However, we found a novel correlated hopping mechanism inducing the ferromagnetism in the region where the nondoped system is a Mott insulator. Our regions of ferromagnetism spanned a much smaller doping range than suggested by recent slave boson and dynamical mean-field theory calculations, but they were consistent with that obtained by density-matrix renormalization group calculations of the one-dimensional periodic Anderson model.

  9. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  10. Human mast cells decrease SLPI levels in type II – like alveolar cell model, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Camilla; Nyström, Max; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Westin, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    Background Mast cells are known to accumulate at sites of inflammation and upon activation to release their granule content, e.g. histamine, cytokines and proteases. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is produced in the respiratory mucous and plays a role in regulating the activity of the proteases. Result We have used the HMC-1 cell line as a model for human mast cells to investigate their effect on SLPI expression and its levels in cell co-culture experiments, in vitro. In comparison with controls, we found a significant reduction in SLPI levels (by 2.35-fold, p < 0.01) in a SLPI-producing, type II-like alveolar cell line, (A549) when co-cultured with HMC-1 cells, but not in an HMC-1-conditioned medium, for 96 hours. By contrast, increased SLPI mRNA expression (by 1.58-fold, p < 0.05) was found under the same experimental conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed mast cell transmigration in co-culture with SLPI-producing A549 cells for 72 and 96 hours. Conclusion These results indicate that SLPI-producing cells may assist mast cell migration and that the regulation of SLPI release and/or consumption by mast cells requires interaction between these cell types. Therefore, a "local relationship" between mast cells and airway epithelial cells might be an important step in the inflammatory response. PMID:12952550

  11. Tropomyosin and Myosin-II Cellular Levels Promote Actomyosin Ring Assembly in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Benjamin C.; Sladewski, Thomas E.; Pollard, Luther W.

    2010-01-01

    Myosin-II (Myo2p) and tropomyosin are essential for contractile ring formation and cytokinesis in fission yeast. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches to understand how these proteins function at contractile rings. We find that ring assembly is delayed in Myo2p motor and tropomyosin mutants, but occurs prematurely in cells engineered to express two copies of myo2. Thus, the timing of ring assembly responds to changes in Myo2p cellular levels and motor activity, and the emergence of tropomyosin-bound actin filaments. Doubling Myo2p levels suppresses defects in ring assembly associated with a tropomyosin mutant, suggesting a role for tropomyosin in maximizing Myo2p function. Correspondingly, tropomyosin increases Myo2p actin affinity and ATPase activity and promotes Myo2p-driven actin filament gliding in motility assays. Tropomyosin achieves this by favoring the strong actin-bound state of Myo2p. This mode of regulation reflects a role for tropomyosin in specifying and stabilizing actomyosin interactions, which facilitates contractile ring assembly in the fission yeast system. PMID:20110347

  12. Current state of the parametric analysis of the energy levels of U I and U II

    SciTech Connect

    Rajnak, K.

    1980-03-01

    Several computational advances have allowed us to assign nearly all levels of U I below 20,000 cm/sup -1/ and many beyond that. Parameter values are reported for the odd configurations f/sup 3/ds/sup 2/ + f/sup 3/d/sup 2/s and the even configurations f/sup 2/d/sup 2/s/sup 2/ + f/sup 3/s/sup 2/p + f/sup 4/s/sup 2/, f/sup 3/dsp and f/sup 4/ds. Several remaining problems are pointed out. Tentative assignments of the lower levels of the previously unidentified f/sup 2/d/sup 3/s and f/sup 3/d/sup 3/ configurations are made. For U II preliminary calculations have been carried out on the even configurations f/sup 2/(ds/sup 2/ + d/sup 2/s), f/sup 4/s and f/sup 4/d.

  13. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Si II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-07-01

    Energies for the lowest 56 levels, belonging to the 3s2 3p, 3s 3p2, 3p3, 3s2 3d, 3s 3p 3d, 3s2 4ℓ and 3s2 5ℓ configurations of Si II, are calculated using the General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package (GRASP) code. Analogous calculations have also been performed (for up to 175 levels) using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). Furthermore, radiative rates are calculated for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions. Extensive comparisons are made with available theoretical and experimental energy levels, and the accuracy of the present results is assessed to be better than 0.1 Ryd. Similarly, the accuracy for radiative rates (and subsequently lifetimes) is estimated to be better than 20 per cent for most of the (strong) transitions. Electron impact excitation collision strengths are also calculated, with the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC), over a wide energy range up to 13 Ryd. Finally, to determine effective collision strengths, resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. These collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and results listed over a wide range of temperatures, up to 105.5 K. Our data are compared with earlier R-matrix calculations and differences noted, up to a factor of 2, for several transitions. Although scope remains for improvement, the accuracy for our results of collision strengths and effective collision strengths is assessed to be about 20 per cent for a majority of transitions.

  14. Aspartoacylase deficiency does not affect N-acetylaspartylglutamate level or glutamate carboxypeptidase II activity in the knockout mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Sankar; Ezell, Edward L; Quast, Michael J; Wei, Jingna; Tyring, Stephen K; Michals-Matalon, Kimberlee; Matalon, Reuben

    2004-08-01

    Aspartoacylase (ASPA)-deficient patients [Canavan disease (CD)] reportedly have increased urinary excretion of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide abundant in the brain. Whether elevated excretion of urinary NAAG is due to ASPA deficiency, resulting in an abnormal level of brain NAAG, is examined using ASPA-deficient mouse brain. The level of NAAG in the knockout mouse brain was similar to that in the wild type. The NAAG hydrolyzing enzyme, glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II), activity was normal in the knockout mouse brain. These data suggest that ASPA deficiency does not affect the NAAG or GCP II level in the knockout mouse brain, if documented also in patients with CD. PMID:15246864

  15. Interpretation of high-dimensional numerical results for the Anderson transition

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, I. M.

    2014-12-15

    The existence of the upper critical dimension d{sub c2} = 4 for the Anderson transition is a rigorous consequence of the Bogoliubov theorem on renormalizability of φ{sup 4} theory. For d ≥ 4 dimensions, one-parameter scaling does not hold and all existent numerical data should be reinterpreted. These data are exhausted by the results for d = 4, 5 from scaling in quasi-one-dimensional systems and the results for d = 4, 5, 6 from level statistics. All these data are compatible with the theoretical scaling dependences obtained from Vollhardt and Wolfle’s self-consistent theory of localization. The widespread viewpoint that d{sub c2} = ∞ is critically discussed.

  16. Tunable Anderson metal-insulator transition in quantum spin-Hall insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chui-Zhen; Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-feng; Wang, Ziqiang; Xie, X. C.

    2015-06-01

    We numerically study disorder effects in the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang (BHZ) model, and we find that the Anderson transition of a quantum spin-Hall insulator (QSHI) is determined by model parameters. The BHZ Hamiltonian is equivalent to two decoupled spin blocks that belong to the unitary class. In contrast to the common belief that a two-dimensional unitary system scales to an insulator except at certain critical points, we find, through calculations scaling properties of the localization length, level statistics, and participation ratio, that a possible exotic metallic phase emerges between the QSHI and normal insulator phases in the InAs/GaSb-type BHZ model. On the other hand, direct transition from a QSHI to a normal insulator is found in the HgTe/CdTe-type BHZ model. Furthermore, we show that the metallic phase originates from the Berry phase and can survive both inside and outside the gap.

  17. Fermi-liquid theory for the single-impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Christophe; Moca, Cǎtǎlin Paşcu; von Delft, Jan; Zaránd, Gergely

    2015-08-01

    We generalize Nozières' Fermi-liquid theory for the low-energy behavior of the Kondo model to that of the single-impurity Anderson model. In addition to the electrons' phase shift at the Fermi energy, the low-energy Fermi-liquid theory is characterized by four Fermi-liquid parameters: the two given by Nozières that enter to first order in the excitation energy, and two additional ones that enter to second order and are needed away from particle-hole symmetry. We express all four parameters in terms of zero-temperature physical observables, namely the local charge and spin susceptibilities and their derivatives with respect to the local level position. We determine these in terms of the bare parameters of the Anderson model using Bethe ansatz and numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculations. Our low-energy Fermi-liquid theory applies throughout the crossover from the strong-coupling Kondo regime via the mixed-valence regime to the empty-orbital regime. From the Fermi-liquid theory, we determine the conductance through a quantum dot symmetrically coupled to two leads in the regime of small magnetic field, low temperature, and small bias voltage, and compute the coefficients of the ˜B2 , ˜T2 , and ˜V2 terms exactly in terms of the Fermi-liquid parameters. The coefficients of T2, V2, and B2 are found to change sign during the Kondo to empty-orbital crossover. The crossover becomes universal in the limit that the local interaction is much larger than the level width. For completeness, we also compute the shot noise and discuss the resulting Fano factor.

  18. 75 FR 34170 - Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Assistance on March 18, 2010, applicable to workers of Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, South Carolina. The notice was published in the Federal Register April 23, 2010 (75 FR 21356). The... Employment and Training Administration Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic...

  19. How Large is Large? Estimating the Critical Disorder for the Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenker, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Complete localization is shown to hold for the d-dimensional Anderson model with uniformly distributed random potentials provided the disorder strength where satisfies with the self-avoiding walk connective constant for the lattice . Notably, is precisely the large disorder threshold proposed by Anderson in 1958.

  20. Tripeptidyl Peptidase II Mediates Levels of Nuclear Phosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2*

    PubMed Central

    Wiemhoefer, Anne; Stargardt, Anita; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Renner, Maria C.; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Stap, Jan; Raspe, Marcel A.; Tomkinson, Birgitta; Kessels, Helmut W.; Ovaa, Huib; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Florea, Bogdan; Reits, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) is a serine peptidase involved in various biological processes, including antigen processing, cell growth, DNA repair, and neuropeptide mediated signaling. The underlying mechanisms of how a peptidase can influence this multitude of processes still remain unknown. We identified rapid proteomic changes in neuroblastoma cells following selective TPP2 inhibition using the known reversible inhibitor butabindide, as well as a new, more potent, and irreversible peptide phosphonate inhibitor. Our data show that TPP2 inhibition indirectly but rapidly decreases the levels of active, di-phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) and ERK2 in the nucleus, thereby down-regulating signal transduction downstream of growth factors and mitogenic stimuli. We conclude that TPP2 mediates many important cellular functions by controlling ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation. For instance, we show that TPP2 inhibition of neurons in the hippocampus leads to an excessive strengthening of synapses, indicating that TPP2 activity is crucial for normal brain function. PMID:26041847

  1. Selenium levels and Glutathione peroxidase activity in the plasma of patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    González de Vega, Raquel; Fernández-Sánchez, María Luisa; Fernández, Juan Carlos; Álvarez Menéndez, Francisco Vicente; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Selenium, an essential trace element, is involved in the complex system of defense against oxidative stress through selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx) and other selenoproteins. Because of its antioxidant properties, selenium or its selenospecies at appropriate levels could hinder oxidative stress and so development of diabetes. In this vein, quantitative speciation of selenium in human plasma samples from healthy and diabetic patients (controlled and non-controlled) was carried out by affinity chromatography (AF) coupled on-line to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and isotope dilution analysis (IDA). Similarly, it is well known that patients with diabetes who exhibit poor control of blood glucose show a decreased total antioxidant activity. Thus, we evaluated the enzymatic activity of GPx in diabetic and healthy individuals, using the Paglia and Valentine enzymatic method, observing a significant difference (p<0.05) between the three groups of assayed patients (healthy (n=24): 0.61±0.11U/ml, controlled diabetic (n=38): 0.40±0.12U/ml and non-controlled diabetic patients (n=40): 0.32±0.09U/ml). Our results show that hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. What is more, glycation of GPx experiments demonstrated that it is the degree of glycation of the selenoenzyme (another species of the Se protein) what actually modulates its eventual activity against ROS in type II diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27473831

  2. High levels of Nrf2 determine chemoresistance in type II endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Chen, Ning; Zhao, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Kong, Beihua; Zheng, Wenxin; Zhang, Donna D.

    2010-01-01

    Type II endometrial cancer, which mainly presents as serous and clear cell types, has proved to be the most malignant and recurrent carcinoma among various female genital malignancies. The transcription factor, Nrf2, was first described as having chemopreventive activity. Activation of the Nrf2-mediated cellular defense response protects cells against the toxic and carcinogenic effects of environmental insults by upregulating an array of genes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS) and restore cellular redox homeostasis. However, the cancer-promoting role of Nrf2 has recently been revealed. Nrf2 is constitutively upregulated in several types of human cancer tissues and cancer cell lines. Furthermore, inhibition of Nrf2 expression sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, the constitutive level of Nrf2 was compared in different types of human endometrial tumors. It was found that Nrf2 was highly expressed in endometrial serous carcinoma (ESC), whereas complex hyperplasia (CH) and endometrial endometrioid carcinoma (EEC) had no or marginal expression of Nrf2. Likewise, the ESC derived SPEC-2 cell line had a higher level of Nrf2 expression and was more resistant to the toxic effects of cisplatin and paclitaxel than that of the Ishikawa cell line, which was generated from EEC. Silencing of Nrf2 rendered SPEC-2 cells more susceptible to chemotherapeutic drugs while it had a limited effect on Ishikawa cells. Inhibition of Nrf2 expression by overexpressing Keap1 sensitized SPEC-2 cells or SPEC-2-derived xenografts to chemotherapeutic treatments using both cell culture and SCID mouse models. Collectively, we provide a molecular basis for the use of Nrf2 inhibitors to increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs and to combat chemoresistance, the biggest obstacle in chemotherapy. PMID:20530669

  3. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Christoph P.; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase. PMID:27045779

  4. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model.

    PubMed

    Orth, Christoph P; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase. PMID:27045779

  5. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Christoph P.; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase.

  6. ESCRT-II controls retinal axon growth by regulating DCC receptor levels and local protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Konopacki, Filip A.; Dwivedy, Asha; Bellon, Anaïs; Blower, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis and local protein synthesis (LPS) act coordinately to mediate the chemotropic responses of axons, but the link between these two processes is poorly understood. The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is a key regulator of cargo sorting in the endocytic pathway, and here we have investigated the role of ESCRT-II, a critical ESCRT component, in Xenopus retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons. We show that ESCRT-II is present in RGC axonal growth cones (GCs) where it co-localizes with endocytic vesicle GTPases and, unexpectedly, with the Netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC). ESCRT-II knockdown (KD) decreases endocytosis and, strikingly, reduces DCC in GCs and leads to axon growth and guidance defects. ESCRT-II-depleted axons fail to turn in response to a Netrin-1 gradient in vitro and many axons fail to exit the eye in vivo. These defects, similar to Netrin-1/DCC loss-of-function phenotypes, can be rescued in whole (in vitro) or in part (in vivo) by expressing DCC. In addition, ESCRT-II KD impairs LPS in GCs and live imaging reveals that ESCRT-II transports mRNAs in axons. Collectively, our results show that the ESCRT-II-mediated endocytic pathway regulates both DCC and LPS in the axonal compartment and suggest that ESCRT-II aids gradient sensing in GCs by coupling endocytosis to LPS. PMID:27248654

  7. 78 FR 11626 - Foreign-Trade Zone 176-Rockford, IL, Authorization of Production Activity, AndersonBrecon Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ..., AndersonBrecon Inc. (Medical Device Kitting), Rockford, IL On October 12, 2012, AndersonBrecon Inc... public comment (77 FR 64311, 10-19-2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of...

  8. Anderson Localization, Non-linearity and Stable Genetic Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Charles L.

    2006-07-01

    In many models of genotypic evolution, the vector of genotype populations satisfies a system of linear ordinary differential equations. This system of equations models a competition between differential replication rates (fitness) and mutation. Mutation operates as a generalized diffusion process on genotype space. In the large time asymptotics, the replication term tends to produce a single dominant quasi-species, unless the mutation rate is too high, in which case the asymptotic population becomes de-localized. We introduce a more macroscopic picture of genotypic evolution wherein a random fitness term in the linear model produces features analogous to Anderson localization. When coupled with density dependent non-linearities, which limit the population of any given genotype, we obtain a model whose large time asymptotics display stable genotypic diversity.

  9. [Fabry-Anderson disease: current state of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Vega-Vega, Olynka; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Angélica; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Fabry-Anderson disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase. This enzymatic defect results in the accumulation of glycosphingolipid into different lines cells. Usually the deficiency is complete, resulting in a multisystem disorder, with injury in different organs, predominantly heart, kidney and nervous system. However, in some patients the enzymatic deficit is partial and causes diverse clinical variants of the disease (renal or cardiac variety), this cause a difficult diagnostic and the absence of real epidemiology data. This review is about the epidemiology, the metabolic defect of this disease, it's molecular and genetics bases, the different forms of clinical presentation and the enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:21888295

  10. Universal Knight shift anomaly in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M.; Curro, N. J.; Scalettar, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    We report a determinant Quantum Monte Carlo investigation which quantifies the behavior of the susceptibility and the entropy in the framework of the periodic Anderson model, focusing on the evolution with different degree of conduction electron (c )-local moment (f ) hybridization. These results capture the behavior observed in several experiments, including the universal behavior of the NMR Knight shift anomaly below the crossover temperature T*. We find that T* is a measure of the onset of c - f correlations and grows with increasing hybridization. These results suggest that the NMR Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements in non-Fermi-liquid materials are strongly influenced by the temperature dependence of the c - f kinetic energy. Our results provide a microscopic basis for the phenomenological two-fluid model of Kondo lattice behavior, and its evolution with pressure and temperature.

  11. Topological Anderson insulators in systems without time-reversal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ying; Avishai, Y.; Wang, X. R.

    2016-06-01

    Occurrence of the topological Anderson insulator (TAI) in a HgTe quantum well suggests that when time-reversal symmetry (TRS) is maintained, the pertinent topological phase transition, marked by re-entrant 2 e2/h quantized conductance contributed by helical edge states, is driven by disorder. Here we show that when TRS is broken, the physics of the TAI becomes even richer. The pattern of longitudinal conductance and nonequilibrium local current distribution displays novel TAI phases characterized by nonzero Chern numbers, indicating the occurrence of multiple chiral edge modes. Tuning either disorder or Fermi energy (in both topologically trivial and nontrivial phases), drives transitions between these distinct TAI phases, characterized by jumps of the quantized conductance from 0 to e2/h and from e2/h to 2 e2/h . An effective medium theory based on the Born approximation yields an accurate description of different TAI phases in parameter space.

  12. Limb salvage talectomy for 3C Gustilo–Anderson fracture

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Hasan Raza; Pillai, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Foot fractures vary in severity with complex midfoot fractures having poor morbidity rates and high amputation rates. Complex midfoot fractures are rarely reported since they are uncommon and only treated in specialist centres. Given the important role of the midfoot in foot function, reconstruction is preferable. Soft tissue management on the dorsal aspect of the foot poses further challenges to reconstructive surgeons. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman who sustained an open 3C Gustilo–Anderson fracture that was initially treated with open reduction internal fixation and free flap. She subsequently developed flap and internal fixation failure with osteomyelitis of the talus. We report a good outcome using primary limb shortening with a talectomy, tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis using external fixation and a combination of vancomycin-loaded calcium sulphate and intravenous antibiotics in our patient. PMID:27173882

  13. Atomic Bose and Anderson Glasses in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damski, B.; Zakrzewski, J.; Santos, L.; Zoller, P.; Lewenstein, M.

    2003-08-01

    An ultracold atomic Bose gas in an optical lattice is shown to provide an ideal system for the controlled analysis of disordered Bose lattice gases. This goal may be easily achieved under the current experimental conditions by introducing a pseudorandom potential created by a second additional lattice or, alternatively, by placing a speckle pattern on the main lattice. We show that, for a noncommensurable filling factor, in the strong-interaction limit, a controlled growing of the disorder drives a dynamical transition from superfluid to Bose-glass phase. Similarly, in the weak interaction limit, a dynamical transition from superfluid to Anderson-glass phase may be observed. In both regimes, we show that even very low-intensity disorder-inducing lasers cause large modifications of the superfluid fraction of the system.

  14. Multi-Scale Jacobi Method for Anderson Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbrie, John Z.

    2015-11-01

    A new KAM-style proof of Anderson localization is obtained. A sequence of local rotations is defined, such that off-diagonal matrix elements of the Hamiltonian are driven rapidly to zero. This leads to the first proof via multi-scale analysis of exponential decay of the eigenfunction correlator (this implies strong dynamical localization). The method has been used in recent work on many-body localization (Imbrie in On many-body localization for quantum spin chains, arXiv:1403.7837 , 2014).

  15. Bosonic Josephson effect in the Fano-Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, G.; Schaller, G.; Brandes, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the coherent dynamics of a noninteracting Bose-Einstein condensate in a system consisting of two bosonic reservoirs coupled via a spatially localized mode. We describe this system by a two-terminal Fano-Anderson model and investigate analytically the time evolution of observables such as the Josephson current. In doing so, we find that the Josephson current sensitively depends on the on-site energy of the localized mode. This facilitates using this setup as a transistor for a Bose-Einstein condensate. We identify two regimes. In one regime, the system exhibits well-behaved long-time dynamics with a slowly oscillating and undamped Josephson current. In a second regime, the Josephson current is a superposition of an extremely weakly damped slow oscillation and an undamped fast oscillation. Our results are confirmed by finite-size simulations.

  16. Measurement of the mobility edge for 3D Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeghini, Giulia; Landini, Manuele; Castilho, Patricia; Roy, Sanjukta; Spagnolli, Giacomo; Trenkwalder, Andreas; Fattori, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    An outstanding problem of Anderson localization (AL) in 3D systems is the determination of the mobility edge, i.e. the energy threshold that separates localized and extended states. In our experiment we use a Bose-Einstein condensate of 39 K atoms and study its transport properties in a disordered optical potential. By tuning the inter-particle interactions to zero via magnetic Feshbach resonances, we study the single-particle phenomenon of AL. A novel technique to measure and control the atomic energy distribution allows us to measure for the first time the position of the localization threshold as a function of the disorder strength. We also study how the addition of finite repulsive or attractive interactions breaks the localized regime and triggers subdiffusive expansion of the atoms. In the future, similar experiments might also probe the existence of many-body localization in 3D.

  17. Alcohol and Alcohol Safety. Volume II of II. A Curriculum Manual for Elementary Level. A Teacher's Activities Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; Platt, Judith

    This curriculum manual for the elementary school level is the first in a series on alcohol and alcohol safety and is designed as a teacher's activities guide. Each activity provided is a self-contained learning experience which requires varying numbers of class period and focuses on one or more objectives. Activities are numbered consecutively and…

  18. Nonequilibrium dynamics of a singlet-triplet Anderson impurity near the quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roura Bas, P.; Aligia, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    We study the singlet-triplet Anderson model (STAM) in which a configuration with a doublet is hybridized with another containing a singlet and a triplet, as a minimal model to describe two-level quantum dots coupled to two metallic leads in effectively a one-channel fashion. The model has a quantum phase transition which separates regions of a doublet and a singlet ground state. The limits of integer valence of the STAM (which include a model similar to the underscreened spin-1 Kondo model) are derived and used to predict the behavior of the conductance through the system on both sides of the transition, where it jumps abruptly. At a special quantum critical line, the STAM can be mapped to an infinite- U ordinary Anderson model (OAM) plus a free spin 1/2. We use this mapping to obtain the spectral densities of the STAM as a function of those of the OAM at the transition. Using the non-crossing approximation (NCA), we calculate the spectral densities and conductance through the system as a function of temperature and bias voltage, and determine the changes that take place at the quantum phase transition. The separation of the spectral density into a singlet and a triplet part allows us to shed light on the underlying physics and to explain a shoulder observed recently in the zero bias conductance as a function of temperature in transport measurements through a single fullerene molecule (Roch et al 2008 Nature 453 633). The structure with three peaks observed in nonequilibrium transport in these experiments is also explained.

  19. Fire Fighter Level I-II-III [and] Practical Skills Test. Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series. Final Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribyl, Paul F.

    Practical skills tests are provided for fire fighter trainees in the Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series, Fire Fighter Levels I, II, and III. A course introduction appears first and contains this information: recommended instructional sequence, required facilities, instructional methodology, requirements for certification, course…

  20. Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1989-1992. Volume III: Level II Model Technology School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This report, the third in a series of six, evaluates the 10 school districts that received grants from the California Department of Education to develop Level II Model Technology School (MTS) Projects intended to enhance instruction and student learning through a combination of curriculum improvement and integration of technology within a single…

  1. Intensity of lines from low-lying levels in C II, N III, O IV, NE VI, MG VIII, SI X, and SI II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, S.

    1982-01-01

    The populations of the excited state 2P 0 3/2 relative to the ground state 2P 0 1/2 are obtained, in a study of line intensities of the transition between those two states in C II, N III, O IV, Ne VI, Mg VIII, Si X, and Si II in the chromosphere-corona transition region, by considering all the radiative and collisional transition processes. The collisional transitions to the higher states which cascade to the upper level are included among these processes. It is found that the intensity, which may be expressed as a function of temperature alone, increases in the transition region with the charge on the ion for a sequence.

  2. Random Walks in Anderson's Garden: A Journey from Cuprates to Cooper Pair Insulators and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    Anderson's Garden is a drawing presented to Philip W. Anderson on the eve of his 60th birthday celebration, in 1983, by a colleague (author unknown). This cartoon (Fig. 1) succinctly depicts some of Anderson's pre-1983 works. As an avid reader of Anderson's papers, a random walk in Anderson's garden had become a part of my routine since graduate school days. This was of immense help and prepared me for a wonderful collaboration with Anderson on the theory of high-Tc cuprates and quantum spin liquids at Princeton. Here I narrate this story, ending with a brief summary of my ongoing theoretical efforts to extend Anderson's RVB theory for superconductivity to encompass the recently observed high-temperature (Tc ~ 203K) superconductivity in solid H2S at pressure ~200GPa. In H2S molecule, four valence electrons form two saturated covalent bonds, H-S-H. These bond singlets are confined Cooper pairs close to chemical potential. Solid H2S is a Cooper pair insulator. Pressure changes the structure and not the number of valence electrons. Bond singlet pairing tendency continues and new S-S and H-H bonds are formed. S-S bonds are mostly saturated. However, hydrogen sublattice has unsaturated H-H bonds. It prepares ground for a RVB superconducting state.

  3. Functional-integral study of the asymmetric Anderson model for dilute fluctuating-valence systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianxi, Dai; Ting, Chin-Sen

    1983-11-01

    The functional-integral method in the harmonic approximation which was developed by Amit and Keiter has been extended to study the asymmetric Anderson model. This model gives a valid description of dilute rare-earth ions in metal. The magnetic susceptibility and the occupation number of the localized or f electrons are expressed in terms of some series of double integrals. These double integrals are evaluated numerically by an integration method in number theory. Our results for the temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility agree quite well with those of renormalization-group calculation by Krishna-Murthy et al. for the f level lying above the Fermi level. However, when the f level lies below the Fermi level, the result of the present approximation loses its agreement with that of the renormalization-group calculation at low temperatures. The f-electron occupation number has also been calculated as a function of temperature and as a function of the energy level of f electrons.

  4. Some comments on Anderson and Pospahala's correction of bias in line transect sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.R.; Burnham, K.P.; Chain, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    ANDERSON and POSPAHALA (1970) investigated the estimation of wildlife population size using the belt or line transect sampling method and devised a correction for bias, thus leading to an estimator with interesting characteristics. This work was given a uniform mathematical framework in BURNHAM and ANDERSON (1976). In this paper we show that the ANDERSON-POSPAHALA estimator is optimal in the sense of being the (unique) best linear unbiased estimator within the class of estimators which are linear combinations of cell frequencies, provided certain assumptions are met.

  5. Routes Towards Anderson-Like Localization of Bose-Einstein Condensates in Disordered Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, T.; Drenkelforth, S.; Kruse, J.; Ertmer, W.; Arlt, J.; Sacha, K.; Zakrzewski, J.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-10-01

    We investigate, both experimentally and theoretically, possible routes towards Anderson-like localization of Bose-Einstein condensates in disordered potentials. The dependence of this quantum interference effect on the nonlinear interactions and the shape of the disorder potential is investigated. Experiments with an optical lattice and a superimposed disordered potential reveal the lack of Anderson localization. A theoretical analysis shows that this absence is due to the large length scale of the disorder potential as well as its screening by the nonlinear interactions. Further analysis shows that incommensurable superlattices should allow for the observation of the crossover from the nonlinear screening regime to the Anderson localized case within realistic experimental parameters.

  6. Quantum criticality at the Anderson transition: A typical medium theory perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, Samiyeh; Tang, Shao; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    We present a complete analytical and numerical solution of the typical medium theory (TMT) for the Anderson metal-insulator transition. This approach self-consistently calculates the typical amplitude of the electronic wave functions, thus representing the conceptually simplest order-parameter theory for the Anderson transition. We identify all possible universality classes for the critical behavior, which can be found within such a mean-field approach. This provides insights into how interaction-induced renormalizations of the disorder potential may produce qualitative modifications of the critical behavior. We also formulate a simplified description of the leading critical behavior, thus obtaining an effective Landau theory for Anderson localization.

  7. Two-photon Anderson localization in a disordered quadratic waveguide array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Y. F.; Xu, P.; Lu, L. L.; Zhong, M. L.; Zhu, S. N.

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate two-photon Anderson localization in a χ (2) waveguide array with off-diagonal disorder. The nonlinear parametric down-conversion process would enhance both the single-photon and the two-photon Anderson localization. In the strong disorder regime, the two-photon position correlation exhibits a bunching distribution around the pumped waveguides, which is independent of pumping conditions and geometrical structures of waveguide arrays. Quadratic nonlinearity can be supplied as a new ingredient for Anderson localization. Also, our results pave the way for engineering quantum states through nonlinear quantum walks.

  8. Routes Towards Anderson-Like Localization of Bose-Einstein Condensates in Disordered Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, T.; Drenkelforth, S.; Kruse, J.; Ertmer, W.; Arlt, J.; Sacha, K.; Zakrzewski, J.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-10-21

    We investigate, both experimentally and theoretically, possible routes towards Anderson-like localization of Bose-Einstein condensates in disordered potentials. The dependence of this quantum interference effect on the nonlinear interactions and the shape of the disorder potential is investigated. Experiments with an optical lattice and a superimposed disordered potential reveal the lack of Anderson localization. A theoretical analysis shows that this absence is due to the large length scale of the disorder potential as well as its screening by the nonlinear interactions. Further analysis shows that incommensurable superlattices should allow for the observation of the crossover from the nonlinear screening regime to the Anderson localized case within realistic experimental parameters.

  9. Melissa L. Anderson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association/American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. The 2012 winner is Melissa L. Anderson for her ongoing commitment to understanding, treating, and preventing domestic violence in Deaf women and underserved populations in general. Anderson is passionate in her efforts to study the factors underlying violence toward women and in applying psychological science to intervene in and prevent such abuse. She is dedicated to improving the quality of life and well-being of underserved women and ensuring that services and programs become accessible to them. Anderson's Award citation is also presented. PMID:23163470

  10. Effects of correlated hybridization in the single-impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Líbero, Valter; Veiga, Rodrigo

    2013-03-01

    The development of new materials often dependents on the theoretical foundations which study the microscopic matter, i.e., the way atoms interact and create distinct configurations. Among the interesting materials, those with partially filled d or f orbitals immersed in nonmagnetic metals have been described by the Anderson model, which takes into account Coulomb correlation (U) when a local level (energy Ed) is doubled occupied, and an electronic hybridization between local levels and conduction band states. In addition, here we include a correlated hybridization term, which depends on the local-level occupation number involved. This term breaks particle-hole symmetry (even when U + 2Ed = 0), enhances charge fluctuations on local levels and as a consequence strongly modifies the crossover between the Hamiltonian fixed-points, even suppressing one or other. We exemplify these behaviors showing data obtained from the Numerical Renormalization Group (NRG) computation for the impurity temperature-dependent specific heat, entropy and magnetic susceptibility. The interleaving procedure is used to recover the continuum spectrum after the NRG-logarithmic discretization of the conduction band. Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo - FAPESP.

  11. Angiotensin II plasma levels are linked to disease severity and predict fatal outcomes in H7N9-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fengming; Guo, Jing; Zou, Zhen; Liu, Jun; Cao, Bin; Zhang, Shuyang; Li, Hui; Wang, Wei; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Song; Pan, Jingcao; Bao, Changjun; Zeng, Mei; Xiao, Haixia; Qian, Guirong; Hu, Xinjun; Chen, Yuanting; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Huandi; Zhu, Jindong; Gao, Hainv; Yang, Shigui; Liu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Shufa; Yang, Jiezuan; Diao, Hongyan; Cao, Hongcui; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Min; Tan, Shuguang; Guo, Dan; Zhao, Xiliang; Ye, Yicong; Wu, Wei; Xu, Yingchun; Penninger, Josef M; Li, Dangsheng; Gao, George F; Jiang, Chengyu; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-01-01

    A novel influenza A (H7N9) virus of avian origin emerged in eastern China in the spring of 2013. This virus causes severe disease in humans, including acute and often lethal respiratory failure. As of January 2014, 275 cases of H7N9-infected patients had been reported, highlighting the urgency of identifying biomarkers for predicting disease severity and fatal outcomes. Here, we show that plasma levels of angiotensin II, a major regulatory peptide of the renin-angiotensin system, are markedly elevated in H7N9 patients and are associated with disease progression. Moreover, the sustained high levels of angiotensin II in these patients are strongly correlated with mortality. The predictive value of angiotensin II is higher than that of C-reactive protein and some clinical parameters such as the PaO2/FiO2 ratio (partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen). Our findings indicate that angiotensin II is a biomarker for lethality in flu infections. PMID:24800963

  12. COURSE OUTLINE FOR FIRST SIX WEEKS FOR SCIENCE-LEVEL II, TALENT PRESERVATION CLASSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, TX.

    THE FIRST 6-WEEK UNIT CONCERNS ANIMAL LIFE, AND TOPICS INCLUDE PROTOZOA, INVERTEBRATES, AND VERTEBRATES. UNIT II, "THE HUMAN BODY", INCLUDES BODY SYSTEMS, HEALTH, AND SAFETY. TEXTBOOK REFERENCES, CONTENT OUTLINE, TEACHING SUGGESTIONS, REFERENCE READINGS, AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS ARE GIVEN UNDER EACH TOPIC. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT FIRST EXPERIENCES WITH…

  13. Evaluability Assessment of the Title II Basic Skills Improvement Program: Implications for State-Level Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Aurelia C.; Bourexis, Patricia S.

    The implications of the lessons learned through an evaluability assessment (EA) of the Title II Basic Skills Improvement Program (BSIP) for State Education Agency (SEA) support of model demonstration programs are discussed. The purposes, methodology and uses of the EA process are presented. Also included is a discussion of the details of the…

  14. Breast reconstruction at the MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peirong

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in the 1970s marks the beginning of modern breast reconstruction although implants were available even earlier mainly for breast augmentation. Mastectomy techniques have evolved from the early Halsted radical mastectomy to the modern skin sparing mastectomy. The latter made possible using implants for breast reconstruction. Although prosthetic reconstruction provides a simpler procedure with quick recovery, autologous reconstruction offers more natural and long-lasting results especially in the setting of radiotherapy. Both forms have been extensively used at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) while microsurgical breast reconstruction has been the hallmark of the MDACC experience. One of the most challenging areas of breast reconstruction is how to achieve good results without compromising adjuvant therapy when post-mastectomy radiotherapy is required. Managing upper extremity lymphedema following breast cancer treatment is another difficult issue which has gained great attention in recent years. This article highlights the important work in various aspects of breast reconstruction that has been done at the MDACC. PMID:27563563

  15. The Knight shift anomaly in the disordered periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, Raimundo; Costa, Natanael; Paiva, Thereza; Curro, Nicholas; Scalettar, Richard

    In some materials, the coherence temperature T* signals the regime in which one has a heavy-electron fluid and `dissolved' local moments. An experimental signature of T* is provided by the Knight shift anomaly in NMR measurements. Further, the contribution of the heavy-electron fluid to the Knigh shift, KHF, displays universal character over a wide range of temperatures. An important probe of the physical mechanisms at play is the random substitution of say, La for Ce in CeRhIn5: this amounts to removing local moments at random sites, and one may wonder whether these universal features are sensitive to the presence of disorder. The Periodic Anderson Model (PAM) captures many aspects of heavy-fermion materials, so here we consider the two-dimensional PAM with a fraction x of the f-sites removed at random. Through Determinant Quantum Monte Carlo simulations we find that universality of KHF persists even in the presence of disorder, which, in turn, allows us to establish that T* decreases monotonically with x, in agreement with available experimental data. Our simulations also shed light into the low temperature behavior of the disordered PAM at low temperatures: the spin liquid phase of the local moments is suppressed upon dilution.

  16. Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities in arbitrary conduction bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tie-Feng; Tong, Ning-Hua; Cao, Zhan; Sun, Qing-Feng; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities is a key quantity in understanding the physics of Kondo screening. Traditional numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculation of the impurity contribution χimp to susceptibility, defined originally by Wilson in a flat wide band, has been generalized before to structured conduction bands. The results brought about non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic Kondo behaviors in χimp, even when the bands are not gapped at the Fermi energy. Here, we use the full density-matrix (FDM) NRG to present high-quality data for the local susceptibility χloc and to compare them with χimp obtained by the traditional NRG. Our results indicate that those exotic behaviors observed in χimp are unphysical. Instead, the low-energy excitations of the impurity in arbitrary bands only without gap at the Fermi energy are still a Fermi liquid and paramagnetic. We also demonstrate that unlike the traditional NRG yielding χloc less accurate than χimp, the FDM method allows a high-precision dynamical calculation of χloc at much reduced computational cost, with an accuracy at least one order higher than χimp. Moreover, artifacts in the FDM algorithm to χimp and origins of the spurious non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic features are clarified. Our work provides an efficient high-precision algorithm to calculate the spin susceptibility of impurity for arbitrary structured bands, while negating the applicability of Wilson's definition to such cases.

  17. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan; Slevin, Keith

    2016-04-01

    We study numerically the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition. We find that a small concentration of Heisenberg impurities enhances the critical disorder amplitude Wc with increasing exchange coupling strength J . The resulting scaling with J is analyzed which supports an anomalous scaling prediction by Wegner due to the combined breaking of time-reversal and spin-rotational symmetry. Moreover, we find that the presence of magnetic impurities lowers the critical correlation length exponent ν and enhances the multifractality parameter α0. The new value of ν improves the agreement with the value measured in experiments on the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in doped semiconductors like phosphor-doped silicon, where a finite density of magnetic moments is known to exist in the vicinity of the MIT. The results are obtained by a finite-size scaling analysis of the geometric mean of the local density of states which is calculated by means of the kernel polynomial method. We establish this combination of numerical techniques as a method to obtain critical properties of disordered systems quantitatively.

  18. Analytical Perturbative Treatment of Multiterminal Nonequilibrium Anderson Impurity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Nobuhiko

    2015-03-01

    We investigate analytically the nonequilibrium Anderson impurity model connecting with multiterminal leads. Within the validity of the second-order perturbation regarding the interaction strength, the full dependence on frequency and bias voltage of the nonequilibrium self-energy and spectral function is determined for a generic multiterminal setting where the current preservation has been an issue. Our analytical perturbative treatment respects the current conservation as well as the spectral sum rule, and it encompasses Fermi-liquid and non-Fermi liquid behaviors, showing that increasing finite-bias voltage leads to a crossover from the Kondo resonance to the Coulomb blockade phenomena. Analysis on two-terminal and multiterminal settings shows that finite-bias voltage does not split the Kondo resonance in this order; no specific structure due to multiple leads emerges in the spectral function. Overall bias dependence is quite similar to finite-temperature effect, which could be understood by help of the Ward identity and the limit of N >> 1 terminals. Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 26400382, MEXT, Japan).

  19. Application of the Gutzwiller method to the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazekas, P.; Brandow, B. H.

    1987-11-01

    The ground state of the orbitally non-degenerate periodic Anderson model is studied variationally. Our Ansatz is the lattice version of the lowest-order Varma-Yafet trial state, with the number of the independent variational parameters being equal to the number of k-states within the Fermi-surface. We employ a two-band version of the Gutzwiller method. The only approximation we make is the replacement of the determinant expressions in the Gutzwiller expansion by their averages. Apart from this, the optimisation problem is solved exactly, and the results can be interpreted in terms of an effective free-fermion Hamiltonian. The renormalisation factor of the hybridisation is of the Rice-Ueda form. A simple model is introduced to get closed-form results in the limit of small hybridisation, and we find the same Kondo exponent as Rice and Ueda. The spin dependence of the effective hybridisation leads to a spin polarisation instability for sufficiently small hybridisation, even within the mixed valent regime.

  20. Kondo hole route to incoherence in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pramod; Vidhyadhiraja, N. S.

    2013-03-01

    The interplay of disorder and interactions in strongly correlated electronic systems is a subject of perennial interest. In this work, we have investigated the effect of Kondo-hole type disorder on the dynamics and transport properties of heavy fermion systems. We employ the periodic Anderson model within the framework of coherent potential approximation and dynamical mean field theory. The crossover from lattice coherent behaviour to an incoherent single-impurity behaviour is reflected in all aspects: a highly frequency (ω)-dependent hybridization becomes almost flat, the coherence peak in resistivity (per impurity) gives way to a Hammann form that saturates at low temperature (T); the Drude peak and the mid-infrared peak in the optical conductivity vanish almost completely. The zero temperature resistivity can be captured in a closed form expression, and we show how the Nordheim's rule gets strongly modified in these systems. The thermopower exhibits a characteristic peak, which changes sign with increasing disorder, and its location is shown to correspond to the low energy scale of the system (ωL). In fact, the thermopower appears to be much more sensitive to disorder variations than the resistivity. A comparison to experiments yields quantitative agreement. JNCASR and CSIR

  1. Breast reconstruction at the MD Anderson Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in the 1970s marks the beginning of modern breast reconstruction although implants were available even earlier mainly for breast augmentation. Mastectomy techniques have evolved from the early Halsted radical mastectomy to the modern skin sparing mastectomy. The latter made possible using implants for breast reconstruction. Although prosthetic reconstruction provides a simpler procedure with quick recovery, autologous reconstruction offers more natural and long-lasting results especially in the setting of radiotherapy. Both forms have been extensively used at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) while microsurgical breast reconstruction has been the hallmark of the MDACC experience. One of the most challenging areas of breast reconstruction is how to achieve good results without compromising adjuvant therapy when post-mastectomy radiotherapy is required. Managing upper extremity lymphedema following breast cancer treatment is another difficult issue which has gained great attention in recent years. This article highlights the important work in various aspects of breast reconstruction that has been done at the MDACC. PMID:27563563

  2. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan

    2014-08-20

    We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude W{sub c}, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, W{sub c} is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

  3. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude Wc, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, Wc is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

  4. Adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer approach to inverse Ising problems with quenched random fields.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiping; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2013-06-01

    The adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer equation is derived for inverse Ising problems in the presence of quenched random fields. We test the proposed scheme on Sherrington-Kirkpatrick, Hopfield, and random orthogonal models and find that the adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer approach allows accurate inference of quenched random fields whose distribution can be either Gaussian or bimodal. In particular, another competitive method for inferring external fields, namely, the naive mean field method with diagonal weights, is compared and discussed. PMID:23848649

  5. Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,H.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

  6. Low Level of Microsatellite Instability Correlates with Poor Clinical Prognosis in Stage II Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mojarad, Ehsan Nazemalhosseini; Kashfi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Mirtalebi, Hanieh; Taleghani, Mohammad Yaghoob; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Savabkar, Sanaz; Pourhoseingholi, Mohammad Amin; Jalaeikhoo, Hasan; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microsatellite instability (MSI) on the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) requires more investigation. We assessed the role of MSI status in survival of individuals diagnosed with primary colorectal cancer. In this retrospective cross-sectional study the MSI status was determined in 158 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors and their matched normal tissues from patients who underwent curative surgery. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to assess the clinical prognostic significance. In this study we found that MSI-H tumors were predominantly located in the colon versus rectum (p = 0.03), associated with poorer differentiation (p = 0.003) and TNM stage II/III of tumors (p = 0.02). In CRC patients with stage II, MSI-L cases showed significantly poorer survival compared with patients who had MSI-H or MSS tumors (p = 0.04). This study indicates that MSI-L tumors correlate with poorer clinical outcome in patients with stage II tumors (p = 0.04) or in tumors located in the colon (p = 0.02). MSI-L characterizes a distinct subgroup of CRC patients who have a poorer outcome. This study suggests that MSI status in CRC, as a clinical prognostic marker, is dependent on other factors, such as tumor stage and location. PMID:27429617

  7. On one-step replica symmetry breaking in the Edwards–Anderson spin glass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ferraro, Gino; Wang, Chuang; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Aurell, Erik

    2016-07-01

    We consider a one-step replica symmetry breaking description of the Edwards–Anderson spin glass model in 2D. The ingredients of this description are a Kikuchi approximation to the free energy and a second-level statistical model built on the extremal points of the Kikuchi approximation, which are also fixed points of a generalized belief propagation (GBP) scheme. We show that a generalized free energy can be constructed where these extremal points are exponentially weighted by their Kikuchi free energy and a Parisi parameter y, and that the Kikuchi approximation of this generalized free energy leads to second-level, one-step replica symmetry breaking (1RSB), GBP equations. We then proceed analogously to the Bethe approximation case for tree-like graphs, where it has been shown that 1RSB belief propagation equations admit a survey propagation solution. We discuss when and how the one-step-replica symmetry breaking GBP equations that we obtain also allow a simpler class of solutions which can be interpreted as a class of generalized survey propagation equations for the single instance graph case.

  8. Health assessment for Anderson Development Company, Adrian, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID002931228. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-10

    The Anderson Development Company (ADC) site has been placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). From approximately 1968 to 1979 ADC manufactured 4,4'-methylene-bis(2-chloroaniline) (MBOCA), also known under the trademark names of MOCA and Curene 422. In 1978 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommended that MBOCA be regulated as a human carcinogen. Discharges of waste waters and air emissions from ADC during the production of MBOCA eventually caused contamination in company lagoons, sludges, and effluents; in municipal sewer influent, effluent, and sludges; in surface-water drains and the Raisin River; and in soil, street sweepings, and residences within a 1-mile radius of the plant. In 1979 and 1980, detectable levels of MBOCA were found in urine specimens collected from ADC and user-plant employees and members of their families. MBOCA may have been carried out of the manufacturing plant on the shoes and clothing of the employees and deposited in their residence. Detectable concentrations of MBOCA were also found in urine specimens of some children living near the site. Because the documented contamination created a continuing potential for environment and human exposure, comprehensive remedial measures were implemented during 1980 and 1981. The site is of potential public health concern because a risk to human health may exist from possible exposure to a hazardous substance at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time; human exposure to MBOCA has occurred/may be still occurring via contaminated soil and garden sources of food.

  9. Parabolic Anderson Model in a Dynamic Random Environment: Random Conductances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, D.; den Hollander, F.; Maillard, G.

    2016-06-01

    The parabolic Anderson model is defined as the partial differential equation ∂ u( x, t)/ ∂ t = κ Δ u( x, t) + ξ( x, t) u( x, t), x ∈ ℤ d , t ≥ 0, where κ ∈ [0, ∞) is the diffusion constant, Δ is the discrete Laplacian, and ξ is a dynamic random environment that drives the equation. The initial condition u( x, 0) = u 0( x), x ∈ ℤ d , is typically taken to be non-negative and bounded. The solution of the parabolic Anderson equation describes the evolution of a field of particles performing independent simple random walks with binary branching: particles jump at rate 2 d κ, split into two at rate ξ ∨ 0, and die at rate (- ξ) ∨ 0. In earlier work we looked at the Lyapunov exponents λ p(κ ) = limlimits _{tto ∞} 1/t log {E} ([u(0,t)]p)^{1/p}, quad p in {N} , qquad λ 0(κ ) = limlimits _{tto ∞} 1/2 log u(0,t). For the former we derived quantitative results on the κ-dependence for four choices of ξ : space-time white noise, independent simple random walks, the exclusion process and the voter model. For the latter we obtained qualitative results under certain space-time mixing conditions on ξ. In the present paper we investigate what happens when κΔ is replaced by Δ𝓚, where 𝓚 = {𝓚( x, y) : x, y ∈ ℤ d , x ˜ y} is a collection of random conductances between neighbouring sites replacing the constant conductances κ in the homogeneous model. We show that the associated annealed Lyapunov exponents λ p (𝓚), p ∈ ℕ, are given by the formula λ p({K} ) = {sup} {λ p(κ ) : κ in {Supp} ({K} )}, where, for a fixed realisation of 𝓚, Supp(𝓚) is the set of values taken by the 𝓚-field. We also show that for the associated quenched Lyapunov exponent λ 0(𝓚) this formula only provides a lower bound, and we conjecture that an upper bound holds when Supp(𝓚) is replaced by its convex hull. Our proof is valid for three classes of reversible ξ, and for all 𝓚

  10. Attractive Hubbard model with disorder and the generalized Anderson theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchinskii, E. Z. Kuleeva, N. A. Sadovskii, M. V.

    2015-06-15

    Using the generalized DMFT+Σ approach, we study the influence of disorder on single-particle properties of the normal phase and the superconducting transition temperature in the attractive Hubbard model. A wide range of attractive potentials U is studied, from the weak coupling region, where both the instability of the normal phase and superconductivity are well described by the BCS model, to the strong-coupling region, where the superconducting transition is due to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of compact Cooper pairs, formed at temperatures much higher than the superconducting transition temperature. We study two typical models of the conduction band with semi-elliptic and flat densities of states, respectively appropriate for three-dimensional and two-dimensional systems. For the semi-elliptic density of states, the disorder influence on all single-particle properties (e.g., density of states) is universal for an arbitrary strength of electronic correlations and disorder and is due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band. In the case of a flat density of states, universality is absent in the general case, but still the disorder influence is mainly due to band widening, and the universal behavior is restored for large enough disorder. Using the combination of DMFT+Σ and Nozieres-Schmitt-Rink approximations, we study the disorder influence on the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} for a range of characteristic values of U and disorder, including the BCS-BEC crossover region and the limit of strong-coupling. Disorder can either suppress T{sub c} (in the weak-coupling region) or significantly increase T{sub c} (in the strong-coupling region). However, in all cases, the generalized Anderson theorem is valid and all changes of the superconducting critical temperature are essentially due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band.

  11. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  12. Theoretical studies of electronic band-tail states, Anderson transition and surfaces of amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jianjun

    In this dissertation, we study the Anderson transition within the electronic band tail states, and amorphous surfaces. The disorder induced band tail states is one of the unique character of amorphous semiconductors. Because of the proximity to the Fermi level, the nature of these band tail states is of obvious interest to theory of doping and transport. The study of amorphous solid surface is also an interesting area for theory. It is possible to have some major rearrangements near surfaces of amorphous solids (the amorphous analog of surface reconstruction), and the local bonding environment could be dramatically different from that of bulk. The study of the surfaces can also help people toward understanding the growth mechanism. First, electronic band tail states of amorphous silicon and amorphous diamond were studied based on the large (4096 atom) and realistic structural models. To solve the large tight-binding Hamiltonian matrices, we used two order N methods: the maximum entropy method for computing the total densities of states, and the modified Lanczos techniques for computing the individual energy eigenstates in the band gap regions. The DC conductivity was estimated with the Kubo formula. Next, the structural and electronic properties of the surfaces of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) were also studied with a first-principles, local basis LDA technique. We reported two structural models made under different conditions, and examined the transition of the local bonding environment from the bulk to the surface. In the study of band tail states, we observe that Anderson (local-to-extended) transition within the band states proceeds by "cluster proliferation". We interpret the nature of band tail states in terms of a "resonant cluster model" through which one can qualitatively understand the evolution of the states from midgap toward the mobility edges. In the study of ta-C surfaces, we observe that nearly 50% surface atoms are threefold coordinated and

  13. Precocene II, a Trichothecene Production Inhibitor, Binds to Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel and Increases the Superoxide Level in Mitochondria of Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Sakamoto, Naoko; Suzuki, Michio; Kimura, Makoto; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    Precocene II, a constituent of essential oils, shows antijuvenile hormone activity in insects and inhibits trichothecene production in fungi. We investigated the molecular mechanism by which precocene II inhibits trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum, the main causal agent of Fusarium head blight and trichothecene contamination in grains. Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, was identified as the precocene II-binding protein by an affinity magnetic bead method. Precocene II increased the superoxide level in mitochondria as well as the amount of oxidized mitochondrial proteins. Ascorbic acid, glutathione, and α-tocopherol promoted trichothecene production by the fungus. These antioxidants compensated for the inhibitory activity of precocene II on trichothecene production. These results suggest that the binding of precocene II to VDAC may cause high superoxide levels in mitochondria, which leads to stopping of trichothecene production. PMID:26248339

  14. Precocene II, a Trichothecene Production Inhibitor, Binds to Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel and Increases the Superoxide Level in Mitochondria of Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Sakamoto, Naoko; Suzuki, Michio; Kimura, Makoto; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    Precocene II, a constituent of essential oils, shows antijuvenile hormone activity in insects and inhibits trichothecene production in fungi. We investigated the molecular mechanism by which precocene II inhibits trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum, the main causal agent of Fusarium head blight and trichothecene contamination in grains. Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, was identified as the precocene II-binding protein by an affinity magnetic bead method. Precocene II increased the superoxide level in mitochondria as well as the amount of oxidized mitochondrial proteins. Ascorbic acid, glutathione, and α-tocopherol promoted trichothecene production by the fungus. These antioxidants compensated for the inhibitory activity of precocene II on trichothecene production. These results suggest that the binding of precocene II to VDAC may cause high superoxide levels in mitochondria, which leads to stopping of trichothecene production. PMID:26248339

  15. Teaching Games Level Design Using the StarCraft II Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetser, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    Level design is often characterised as "where the rubber hits the road" in game development. It is a core area of games design, alongside design of game rules and narrative. However, there is a lack of literature dedicated to documenting teaching games design, let alone the more specialised topic of level design. Furthermore, there…

  16. The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level II. Books 1-20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Designed as supplementary reading materials for Indian and non-Indian children in the primary grades, this series of 10 booklets presents 13 legends and 7 stories of Northwest tribes. Stories in this second level of the six-level series were developed cooperatively by people of the Crow, Muckleshoot, Skokomish, Blackfeet, Northern Cheyenne,…

  17. Application of the S=1 underscreened Anderson lattice model to Kondo uranium and neptunium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing the coexistence of the Kondo screening effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the Anderson lattice Hamiltonian with a two-fold degenerate f level in each site, corresponding to 5f2 electronic configuration with S=1 spins. A derivation of the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation is presented and the resulting Hamiltonian has an effective f-band term, in addition to the regular exchange Kondo interaction between the S=1 f spins and the s=1/2 spins of the conduction electrons. The resulting effective Kondo lattice model can describe both the Kondo regime and a weak delocalization of the 5f electrons. Within this model we compute the Kondo and Curie temperatures as a function of model parameters, namely the Kondo exchange interaction constant JK, the magnetic intersite exchange interaction JH, and the effective f bandwidth. We deduce, therefore, a phase diagram of the model which yields the coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and also accounts for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of uranium compounds such as UTe.

  18. Kondo insulators modeled by the one-dimensional Anderson lattice: A numerical-renormalization-group study

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, M.; Yu, C.C.

    1995-04-15

    In order to better understand Kondo insulators, we have studied both the symmetric and asymmetric Anderson lattices at half filling in one dimension using the density-matrix formulation of the numerical renormalization group. The asymmetric case is treated in the mixed-valence regime. We have calculated the charge gap, the spin gap, and the quasiparticle gap as a function of the repulsive interaction {ital U} using open boundary conditions for lattices as large as 24 sites. We find that the charge gap is larger than the spin gap for all {ital U} for both the symmetric and asymmetric cases. Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions are evident in the {ital f}-spin--{ital f}-spin correlation functions at large {ital U} in the symmetric case, but are suppressed in the asymmetric case as the {ital f} level approaches the Fermi energy. This suppression can also be seen in the staggered susceptibility {chi}({ital q}=2{ital k}{sub {ital F}}) and it is consistent with neutron scattering measurements of {chi}({ital q}) in CeNiSn.

  19. Basic Properties of Conductivity and Normal Hall Effect in the Periodic Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Miyake, Kazumasa

    2016-04-01

    Exact formulas of diagonal conductivity σxx and Hall conductivity σxy are derived from the Kubo formula in hybridized two-orbital systems with arbitrary band dispersions. On the basis of the theoretical framework for the Fermi liquid based on these formulas, the ground-state properties of the periodic Anderson model with electron correlation and weak impurity scattering are studied on the square lattice. It is shown that imbalance of the mass-renormalization factors causes remarkable increase in σxx and σxy in the valence-fluctuation regime as the f level increases while the cancellation of the renormalization factors causes slight increase in σxx and σxy in the Kondo regime. The Hall coefficient RH shows almost constant behavior in both the regimes. Near half filling, RH is expressed by the total hole density as R{H} = 1/(bar{n}{hole}e) while RH approaches zero near quarter filling, which reflects the curvature of the Fermi surface. These results hold as far as the damping rate for f electrons is less than about 10% of the renormalized hybridization gap. From these results we discuss pressure dependence of residual resistivity and normal Hall effect in Ce- and Yb-based heavy electron systems.

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (BRNATH00290034) on Town Highway 29, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    The Town Highway 29 crossing of Locust Creek is a 37-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 32-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 23, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 25 degrees. There was no observable scour protection measure at the site. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E.

  1. Chemotherapy for bone sarcomas in adults: the MD anderson experience.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Robert S; Wagner, Michael J; Livingston, J Andrew; Ravi, Vinod; Patel, Shreyaskumar R

    2015-01-01

    Increasing age is an adverse prognostic factor in the treatment of primary bone tumors. There are few published data on treatment of primary bone tumors in adults. This paper presents data from the Department of Sarcoma Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, summarizing our treatment results. To treat primary osteosarcoma, we used 90 mg/m2 of doxorubicin as a continuous intravenous infusion over 48 to 96 hours and 120 to 160 mg/m2 of cisplatin intravenously or intra-arterially. Initially, we found a marked difference in postoperative continuous disease-free survival (CDFS) between those with 90% or greater (i.e., good response) tumor necrosis and those with less than 90% (i.e., poor response) tumor necrosis. The sequential addition of high-dose methotrexate and ifosfamide to patients with poorly responding disease improved their CDFS to that of patients with good response. Older patients and those who have tumors with variant histology have inferior outcomes. Evaluation of subsequent patients revealed similar outcomes for those with good or poor response to induction therapy, supporting our practice of adaptation of postoperative chemotherapy to the results of preoperative chemotherapy. PET-CT is the best imaging modality to screen for a response with tumors inside bone. To treat Ewing sarcoma, we have employed 2 mg of vincristine, 75 to 90 mg/m2 of doxorubicin as a 72-hour infusion, and 2.5 g/m2 of ifosfamide over 3 hours daily for 4 doses (i.e., vincristine, doxorubicin, and ifosfamide [VAI]). Preliminary analysis indicates a higher CDFS when adjusted for patient age than seen with the standard alternating regimen used in pediatrics. A screening MRI of the pelvis and spine can detect subtle metastatic disease in bone or bone marrow that is missed by other imaging modalities or blind biopsy. Chondrosarcoma is treated surgically or on investigational protocols. Giant cell tumor of bone is usually managed surgically, but multiple

  2. Anderson localization to enhance light-matter interaction (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Pedro David

    2016-04-01

    Deliberately introducing disorder in low-dimensional nanostructures like photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) [1] or photonic crystals (PCs) [2] leads to Anderson localization where light is efficiently trapped by random multiple scattering with the lattice imperfections. These disorder-induced optical modes hace been demonstrated to be very promising for cavity-quantum electrodynamics (QED) experiments where the radiative emission rate of single quantum emitters can be controlled when tuned through resonance with one of these random cavities. Our statistical analysis of the emission dynamics from single quantum dots embeded in disordered PCWs [3] provides detailed insigth about the statistical properties of QED in these complex nanostructures. In addition, using internal light sources reveals new physics in the form of nonuniversal intensity correlations between the different scattered paths within the structure which imprint the local QED properties deep inside the complex structure onto the far-field intensity pattern [2]. Finally, increasing the optical gain in PCWs allows on-chip random nanolasing where the cavity feedback is provided by the intrinsic disorder which enables highly efficient, stable, and broadband tunable lasers with very small mode volumes [4]. The figure of merit of these disorder-induced cavities is their localization length which determines to a large degree the coupling efficiency of a quantum emitter to a disorder-induced cavity as well as the efficiency of random lasing and reveals a strongly dispersive behavior and a non-trivial dependence on disorder in PCWs [5]. [1] L. Sapienza, H. Thyrrestrup, S. Stobbe, P.D. Garcia, S. Smolka, and P. Lodahl, Science 327, 1352 (2010). [2] P. D. García, S. Stobbe, I. Soellner and P. Lodahl, Physical Review Letters 109, 253902 (2012). [3] A. Javadi, S. Maibom, L. Sapienza, H. Thyrrestrup, P.D. Garcia, and P. Lodahl, Opt. Express 22, 30992 (2014). [4] J. Liu, P. D. Garcia, S. Ek, N. Gregersen, T. Suhr, M

  3. Mode 3 Project-Based O-Level: Part II Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greatorex, D.; Lock, R.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a British biology course for the O-level which aims to promote the understanding of broad biological principles through an environmental approach. Results of proper assessment and overall examination performance are also revealed. (HM)

  4. Investigating the Causes for Decreased Levels of Glutathione in Individuals with Type II Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lagman, Minette; Ly, Judy; Saing, Tommy; Morris, Devin; Chi, Po-Ting; Ochoa, Cesar; Sathananthan, Airani; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains an eminent global burden with one third of the world’s population latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). Individuals with compromised immune systems are especially vulnerable to M. tb infection. In fact, individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) are two to three times more susceptible to TB than those without T2DM. In this study, we report that individuals with T2DM have lower levels of glutathione (GSH) due to compromised levels of GSH synthesis and metabolism enzymes. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), a cytokine that is known to decrease the expression of the catalytic subunit of glutamine-cysteine ligase (GCLC) was found in increased levels in the plasma samples from individuals with T2DM, explaining the possible underlying mechanism that is responsible for decreased levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM. Moreover, increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) were observed in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. Increased levels of IL-6 and IL-17 was accompanied by enhanced production of free radicals further indicating an alternative mechanism for the decreased levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM. Augmenting the levels of GSH in macrophages isolated from individuals with T2DM resulted in improved control of M. tb infection. Furthermore, cytokines that are responsible for controlling M. tb infection at the cellular and granuloma level such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and interleukin-12 (IL-12), were found to be compromised in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. On the other hand, interleukin-10 (IL-10), an immunosuppressive cytokine was increased in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. Overall, these findings suggest that lower levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM lead to their increased susceptibility to

  5. Density matrix renormalization group study in energy space for a single-impurity Anderson model and an impurity quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Tomonori; Yunoki, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    The density matrix renormalization group method is introduced in energy space to study Anderson impurity models. The method allows for calculations in the thermodynamic limit and is advantageous for studying not only the dynamical properties, but also the quantum entanglement of the ground state at the vicinity of an impurity quantum phase transition. This method is applied to obtain numerically exactly the ground-state phase diagram of the single-impurity Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice at half-filling. The calculation of local static quantities shows that the phase diagram contains two distinct phases, the local moment (LM) phase and the asymmetric strong coupling (ASC) phase, but no Kondo screening phase. These results are supported by the local spin and charge excitation spectra, which exhibit qualitatively different behavior in these two phases and also reveal the existence of the valence fluctuating point at the phase boundary. For comparison, we also study the low-energy effective pseudogap Anderson model using the method introduced here. Although the high-energy excitations are obviously different, we find that the ground-state phase diagram and the asymptotically low-energy excitations are in good quantitative agreement with those for the single-impurity Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice, thus providing a quantitative justification for the previous studies based on low-energy approximate approaches. Furthermore, we find that the lowest entanglement level is doubly degenerate for the LM phase, whereas it is singlet for the ASC phase and is accidentally threefold degenerate at the valence fluctuating point. This should be contrasted with the degeneracy of the energy spectrum because the ground state is found to be always singlet. Our results therefore clearly demonstrate that the low-lying entanglement spectrum can be used to determine with high accuracy the phase boundary of the impurity quantum phase transition.

  6. PRESTO-II: a low-level waste environmental transport and risk assessment code

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.E.; Emerson, C.J.; Chester, R.O.; Little, C.A.; Hiromoto, G.

    1986-04-01

    PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed for the evaluation of possible health effects from shallow-land and, waste-disposal trenches. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal operations. Human exposure scenarios considered include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and limited site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include ground-water transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, suspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, external exposure, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Both population doses and individual doses, as well as doses to the intruder and farmer, may be calculated. Cumulative health effects in terms of cancer deaths are calculated for the population over the 1000-year period using a life-table approach. Data are included for three example sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. A code listing and example input for each of the three sites are included in the appendices to this report.

  7. Homemade Equipment for the Teaching of Electrochemistry at Advanced Level. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a detailed description for the construction of equipment needed to investigate acid/base equilibria through the measurement of pH and potentiometric titrations. Suggested experiments and calibration techniques are explained. This information helps to solve the problems of inadequate, expensive equipment required for A-level chemistry…

  8. BICYCLE II: a computer code for calculating levelized life-cycle costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hardie, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    This report describes the BICYCLE computer code. BICYCLE was specifically designed to calculate levelized life-cycle costs for plants that produce electricity, heat, gaseous fuels, or liquid fuels. Included are (1) derivations of the equations used by BICYCLE, (2) input instructions, (3) sample case input, and (4) sample case output.

  9. Vitronectin and dermcidin serum levels predict the metastatic progression of AJCC I-II early-stage melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Martínez, Idoia; Gardeazabal, Jesús; Erramuzpe, Asier; Sanchez-Diez, Ana; Cortés, Jesús; García-Vázquez, María D; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Izu, Rosa; Luís Díaz-Ramón, Jose; de la Fuente, Ildefonso M; Asumendi, Aintzane; Boyano, María D

    2016-10-01

    Like many cancers, an early diagnosis of melanoma is fundamental to ensure a good prognosis, although an important proportion of stage I-II patients may still develop metastasis during follow-up. The aim of this work was to discover serum biomarkers in patients diagnosed with primary melanoma that identify those at a high risk of developing metastasis during the follow-up period. Proteomic and mass spectrophotometry analysis was performed on serum obtained from patients who developed metastasis during the first years after surgery for primary tumors and compared with that from patients who remained disease-free for more than 10 years after surgery. Five proteins were selected for validation as prognostic factors in 348 melanoma patients and 100 controls by ELISA: serum amyloid A and clusterin; immune system proteins; the cell adhesion molecules plakoglobin and vitronectin and the antimicrobial protein dermcidin. Compared to healthy controls, melanoma patients have high serum levels of these proteins at the moment of melanoma diagnosis, although the specific values were not related to the histopathological stage of the tumors. However, an analysis based on classification together with multivariate statistics showed that tumor stage, vitronectin and dermcidin levels were associated with the metastatic progression of patients with early-stage melanoma. Although melanoma patients have increased serum dermcidin levels, the REPTree classifier showed that levels of dermcidin <2.98 μg/ml predict metastasis in AJCC stage II patients. These data suggest that vitronectin and dermcidin are potent biomarkers of prognosis, which may help to improve the personalized medical care of melanoma patients and their survival. PMID:27216146

  10. Exciton level structure and dynamics in the CP47 antenna complex of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.C.; Jankowiak, R.; Small, G.J. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA ); Yocum, C.F. ); Picorel, R. National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO ); Alfonso, M. ); Seibert, M. )

    1994-08-04

    Persistent nonphotochemical and population bottleneck hole-burning results obtained as a function of burn wavelength are reported for the CP47 proximal antenna protein complex of photosystem II. Attention is focused on the lower energy chlorophyll a Q[sub y] states. Results are presented for the CP47 complex from two preparations. The Chl a content per CP47 complex was determined, spectroscopically, to be 14 [+-] 2. On the basis of the analysis of the hole spectra and the 4.2 K static fluorescence spectrum, the lowest energy state of CP47 lies at 690 nm (fluorescence origin at 691 nm). The width of the weak 690-nm absorption band from inhomogeneous broadening is 100 cm[sup [minus]1]. The linear electron-phonon coupling of the 690-nm state is weak with a Huang-Rhys factor (S) of about 0.2 and a mean phonon frequency ([Omega][sub m]) of 120 cm[sup [minus]1], which explains why the Stokes shift (2S[Omega][sub m]) is so small. The 690-nm state is found to be excitonically correlated with a hitherto unobserved state at 687 nm. However, the combined absorption intensity of the 690- and 687-nm states was determined to be equivalent to only 1 Chl a molecule. Results are presented which illustrate that these two states are fragile (i.e., their associated chlorophyll a molecules are disrupted). Thus, it is possible that the correct number of Chl a molecules is 2, not 1. 53 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Exciting Molecules Close to the Rotational Quantum Resonance: Anderson Wall and Rotational Bloch Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Floß, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2016-05-19

    We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under conditions close to the quantum resonance. The quantum resonance effect causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that a disturbance of the quantum resonance, either by the centrifugal distortion of the rotating molecules or a controlled detuning of the pulse train period from the so-called rotational revival time, eventually halts the growth by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentum, the Anderson wall. Below the wall, the rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at near-ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology. PMID:26799273

  12. John Anderson's development of (situational) realism and its bearing on psychology today.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Fiona J

    2009-10-01

    In 1927, the Scottish philosopher John Anderson arrived in Australia to take up the chair of Philosophy at the University of Sydney. By the late 1930s, the "macrostructure" of his realist system was in place. It includes a theory of process and a substantial metaphysics, one that opposes positivism, linguistic philosophy and all forms of idealism. However, beyond Australia it remains largely unknown, despite its bearing on a number of current issues in psychology and the social sciences generally. This article outlines Anderson's transition from Hegelian idealism to realism, describes aspects of his ontology and epistemology, compares some of Anderson's ideas with Dewey's pragmatism and explains their relevance to present-day psychology. PMID:20027696

  13. Pyrene-Anderson-Modified CNTs as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lujiang; Hu, Jun; Ji, Yuanchun; Streb, Carsten; Song, Yu-Fei

    2015-12-14

    An organo-functionalized polyoxometalate (POM)-pyrene hybrid (Py-Anderson) has been used for noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to give a Py-Anderson-CNT nanocomposite through π-π interactions. The as-synthesized nanocomposite was used as the anode material for lithium-ion batteries, and shows higher discharge capacities and better rate capacity and cycling stability than the individual components. When the current density was 0.5 mA cm(-2), the nanocomposite exhibited an initial discharge capacity of 1898.5 mA h g(-1) and a high discharge capacity of 665.3 mA h g(-1) for up to 100 cycles. AC impedance spectroscopy provides insight into the electrochemical properties and the charge-transfer mechanism of the Py-Anderson-CNTs electrode. PMID:26538031

  14. Anderson Localization from the Berry-Curvature Interchange in Quantum Anomalous Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zhenhua; Han, Yulei; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Deng, Xinzhou; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Shengyuan A.; Wang, Jian; Niu, Qian

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the localization mechanism of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the presence of spin-flip disorders. We show that the QAHE stays quantized at weak disorders, then enters a Berry-curvature mediated metallic phase at moderate disorders, and finally goes into the Anderson insulating phase at strong disorders. From the phase diagram, we find that at the charge neutrality point although the QAHE is most robust against disorders, the corresponding metallic phase is much easier to be localized into the Anderson insulating phase due to the interchange of Berry curvatures carried, respectively, by the conduction and valence bands. In the end, we provide a phenomenological picture related to the topological charges to better understand the underlying physical origin of the QAHE Anderson localization.

  15. Anderson Localization from the Berry-Curvature Interchange in Quantum Anomalous Hall Systems.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhenhua; Han, Yulei; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Deng, Xinzhou; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Shengyuan A; Wang, Jian; Niu, Qian

    2016-07-29

    We theoretically investigate the localization mechanism of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the presence of spin-flip disorders. We show that the QAHE stays quantized at weak disorders, then enters a Berry-curvature mediated metallic phase at moderate disorders, and finally goes into the Anderson insulating phase at strong disorders. From the phase diagram, we find that at the charge neutrality point although the QAHE is most robust against disorders, the corresponding metallic phase is much easier to be localized into the Anderson insulating phase due to the interchange of Berry curvatures carried, respectively, by the conduction and valence bands. In the end, we provide a phenomenological picture related to the topological charges to better understand the underlying physical origin of the QAHE Anderson localization. PMID:27517785

  16. Excitation of the Yb II transitions terminating on the low-lying odd levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yu. M.

    2007-10-01

    Excitation of the transitions from the even levels of a singly charged ytterbium ion that terminate on the low-lying odd levels 4 f 13(2 F °)6 s 2 2 F °, 4 f 14(1 S)6 p 2 P °, and 4 f 13(2 F °7/2) 5 d6 p(3 D)3[3/2]° is experimentally studied by measuring 51 excitation cross sections at an electron energy of 50 eV, and 16 optical excitation functions are determined within the electron energy range 0 200 eV. The largest magnitudes of the measured cross sections exceed 3 × 10-17 cm2.

  17. Level II scour analysis for bridge 35 (BURKTH00310035) on Town Highway 31, crossing the West Branch Passumpsic River, Burke, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BURKTH00310035 on Town Highway 31 crossing the West Branch Passumpsic River, Burke, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  18. Financial protection against nuclear hazards: thirty years' experience under the Price-Anderson Act

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, L.R.; Hayn, I.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the operation of the Price-Anderson Act in the light of the last 10 years' experience and the changes that have occurred during that period both in the law and regulations and in the nuclear and insurance industries, and to provide an independent analysis of various proposals to extend or amend the Act prior to its 1987 expiration. The report does not analyze the impact of the Silkwood v. Kerr McGee Corp. decision. The five chapters cover historical background, financial protection under the Price-Anderson Act and in the absence of the Act, fundamental policy issues, and alternative proposals.

  19. Designed Assembly of Heterometallic Cluster Organic Frameworks Based on Anderson-Type Polyoxometalate Clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xiong; Wang, Yang-Xin; Wang, Rui-Hu; Cui, Cai-Yan; Tian, Chong-Bin; Yang, Guo-Yu

    2016-05-23

    A new approach to prepare heterometallic cluster organic frameworks has been developed. The method was employed to link Anderson-type polyoxometalate (POM) clusters and transition-metal clusters by using a designed rigid tris(alkoxo) ligand containing a pyridyl group to form a three-fold interpenetrated anionic diamondoid structure and a 2D anionic layer, respectively. This technique facilitates the integration of the unique inherent properties of Anderson-type POM clusters and cuprous iodide clusters into one cluster organic framework. PMID:27061042

  20. Interaction effect in the Kondo energy of the periodic Anderson-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itai, K.; Fazekas, P.

    1996-07-01

    We extend the periodic Anderson model by switching on a Hubbard U for the conduction band. The nearly integral valent limit of the Anderson-Hubbard model is studied with the Gutzwiller variational method. The lattice Kondo energy shows U dependence both in the prefactor and the exponent. Switching on U reduces the Kondo scale, which can be understood to result from the blocking of hybridization. At half filling, we find a Brinkman-Rice-type transition from a Kondo insulator to a Mott insulator. Our findings should be relevant for a number of correlated two-band models of recent interest.

  1. Entanglement Area Law in Disordered Free Fermion Anderson Model in One, Two, and Three Dimensions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pouranvari, Mohammad; Zhang, Yuhui; Yang, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We calculate numerically the entanglement entropy of free fermion ground states in one-, two-, and three-dimensional Anderson models and find that it obeys the area law as long as the linear size of the subsystem is sufficiently larger than the mean free path. This result holds in the metallic phase of the three-dimensional Anderson model, where the mean free path is finite although the localization length is infinite. Relation between the present results and earlier ones on area law violation in special one-dimensional models that support metallic phases is discussed.

  2. Wildlife Impact Assessment: Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects, Idaho. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1986-05-01

    This report presents an analysis of impacts on wildlife and their habitats as a result of construction and operation of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects in Idaho. The objectives were to: (1) determine the probable impacts of development and operation of the Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects to wildlife and their habitats; (2) determine the wildlife and habitat impacts directly attributable to hydroelectric development and operation; (3) briefly identify the current major concerns for wildlife in the vicinities of the hydroelectric projects; and (4) provide for consultation and coordination with interested agencies, tribes, and other entities expressing interest in the project.

  3. Vacuum birefringence in strong magnetic fields: (II) Complex refractive index from the lowest Landau level

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Koichi; Itakura, Kazunori

    2013-07-15

    We compute the refractive indices of a photon propagating in strong magnetic fields on the basis of the analytic representation of the vacuum polarization tensor obtained in our previous paper. When the external magnetic field is strong enough for the fermion one-loop diagram of the polarization tensor to be approximated by the lowest Landau level, the propagating mode in parallel to the magnetic field is subject to modification: The refractive index deviates from unity and can be very large, and when the photon energy is large enough, the refractive index acquires an imaginary part indicating decay of a photon into a fermion–antifermion pair. We study dependences of the refractive index on the propagating angle and the magnetic-field strength. It is also emphasized that a self-consistent treatment of the equation which defines the refractive index is indispensable for accurate description of the refractive index. This self-consistent treatment physically corresponds to consistently including the effects of back reactions of the distorted Dirac sea in response to the incident photon. -- Highlights: •Vacuum birefringence and photon decay are described by the complex refractive index. •Resummed photon vacuum polarization tensor in the lowest Landau level is used. •Back reactions from the distorted Dirac sea are self-consistently taken into account. •Self-consistent treatment drastically changes structure in photon energy dependence. •Dependences on photon propagation angle and magnetic-field strength are presented.

  4. The FERRUM project: Experimental lifetimes and transition probabilities from highly excited even 4d levels in Fe ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report lifetime measurements of the 6 levels in the 3d6(5D)4d e6G term in Fe ii at an energy of 10.4 eV, and f-values for 14 transitions from the investigated levels. The lifetimes were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions in a laser-produced plasma. The high excitation energy, and the fact that the levels have the same parity as the the low-lying states directly populated in the plasma, necessitated the use of a two-photon excitation scheme. The probability for this process is greatly enhanced by the presence of the 3d6(5D)4p z6F levels at roughly half the energy difference. The f-values are obtained by combining the experimental lifetimes with branching fractions derived using relative intensities from a hollow cathode discharge lamp recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer. The data is important for benchmarking atomic calculations of astrophysically important quantities and useful for spectroscopy of hot stars.

  5. Modular data and Verlinde formulae for fractional level WZW models II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutzig, Thomas; Ridout, David

    2013-10-01

    This article gives a complete account of the modular properties and Verlinde formula for conformal field theories based on the affine Kac-Moody algebra slˆ(2) at an arbitrary admissible level k. Starting from spectral flow and the structure theory of relaxed highest weight modules, characters are computed and modular transformations are derived for every irreducible admissible module. The culmination is the application of a continuous version of the Verlinde formula to deduce non-negative integer structure coefficients which are identified with Grothendieck fusion coefficients. The Grothendieck fusion rules are determined explicitly. These rules reproduce the well-known "fusion rules" of Koh and Sorba, negative coefficients included, upon quotienting the Grothendieck fusion ring by a certain ideal.

  6. Post-processing V&V level II ASC milestone (2360) results.

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Elmer; Karelitz, David B.; Brunner, Thomas A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Weirs, V. Gregory; Shead, Timothy M.

    2007-09-01

    The 9/30/2007 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2360) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include loading of edge and face data on an Exodus mesh, run-time computation of an exact solution to a verification problem, delivery of results data from the server to the client, computation of an integral-based error metric, simultaneous loading of simulation and test data, and comparison of that data using visual and quantitative methods. The capabilities were tested extensively by performing a typical ALEGRA HEDP verification task. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including completion of a verification task on a 13 million element mesh.

  7. Vibrational levels and anharmonicity in SF 6—II. Anharmonic and potential constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Robin S.; Krohn, Burton J.

    Expressions for the vibrational energy levels of spherical-top molecules are reviewed. We show that even without a full analysis of the anharmonic splitting of higher vibrational states, the positions of many observed transitions can be adequately described with "effective" anharmonicity constants that combine some of the (unknown) splitting terms together with the "true" anharmonicity constants X ij. A notation is developed that distinguishes between the effective constants obtained from binary ( X' ij) and various types of ternary ( X'' ij, …) combinations. On this basis we analyze the data set of the previous paper on the vibrational levels of SF 6, based largely on FTIR spectra obtained at a resolution of 0.05 cm -1. Many of the anharmonicity constants determine the frequencies of several bands, and can be fitted to the data by least-squares regression with standard deviations of 0.001-0.05 cm -1. Of the 21 constants X ij, we obtain values for six, plus 12 X' ijs obtained from binary combinations and one ( X‴ 22) from ternary combinations. Of the two constants undetermined in this paper, a precise value of X33 is available from high-resolution spectroscopy of 3ν 3, and only X35 remains unknown. The fit also yields band origins for the i.r.-inactive bending fundamentals ν 5 and ν 6. Using these constants, we estimate the harmonic fundamental frequencies ω i. The general quadratic force field of SF 6 has been redetermined, using as constraints in the F1 u block the central-atom isotopic frequency shifts and the Coriolis constants ζ 3 and ζ 4.

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 6 (FAYSTH00010006) on Town Highway 1, crossing Shepard Brook, Fayston, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Flynn, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure FAYSTH00010006 on Town Highway 1 crossing Shepard Brook, Fayston, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Shepard Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 56 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 72.6 mm (0.238 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 2, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Shepard Brook is a 42-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 40-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 39.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the calculated opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. Scour, 2.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth, was observed along the right abutment during the Level I assessment. The left abutment is

  9. Microporous Cd(II) metal-organic framework as fluorescent sensor for nitroaromatic explosives at the sub-ppm level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Po; Han, Lu-Lu; Wang, Zhi; Guo, Ling-Yu; Sun, Di

    2016-03-01

    A novel Cd(II) metal-organic framework (MOF) based on a rigid biphenyltetracarboxylic acid, [Cd4(bptc)2(DMA)4(H2O)2·4DMA] (1) was successfully synthesized under the solvothermal condition and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and further consolidated by elemental analyses, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), infrared spectra (IR) and luminescent measurements. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that compound 1 is 4-connected PtS (Point symbol: {42·84}) network based on [Cd2(COO)4] secondary building units (SBUs). Its inherent porous and emissive characteristics make them to be a suitable fluorescent probe to sense small solvents and nitroaromatic explosives. Compound 1 shows obviously solvent-dependent emissive behaviors, especially for acetone with very high fluorescence quenching effect. Moreover, compound 1 displays excellent sensing of nitroaromatic explosives at sub-ppm level, giving a detection limit of 0.43 ppm and 0.37 ppm for nitrobenzene (NB) and p-nitrotoluene (PNT), respectively. This shows this Cd(II) MOF can be used as fluorescence probe for the detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

  10. Improving Limit Surface Search Algorithms in RAVEN Using Acceleration Schemes: Level II Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Sen, Ramazan Sonat; Smith, Curtis Lee

    2015-07-01

    The RAVEN code is becoming a comprehensive tool to perform Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA); Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and Propagation; and Verification and Validation (V&V). The RAVEN code is being developed to support the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway by developing an advanced set of methodologies and algorithms for use in advanced risk analysis. The RISMC approach uses system simulator codes applied to stochastic analysis tools. The fundamental idea behind this coupling approach to perturb (by employing sampling strategies) timing and sequencing of events, internal parameters of the system codes (i.e., uncertain parameters of the physics model) and initial conditions to estimate values ranges and associated probabilities of figures of merit of interest for engineering and safety (e.g. core damage probability, etc.). This approach applied to complex systems such as nuclear power plants requires performing a series of computationally expensive simulation runs. The large computational burden is caused by the large set of (uncertain) parameters characterizing those systems. Consequently, exploring the uncertain/parametric domain, with a good level of confidence, is generally not affordable, considering the limited computational resources that are currently available. In addition, the recent tendency to develop newer tools, characterized by higher accuracy and larger computational resources (if compared with the presently used legacy codes, that have been developed decades ago), has made this issue even more compelling. In order to overcome to these limitations, the strategy for the exploration of the uncertain/parametric space needs to use at best the computational resources focusing the computational effort in those regions of the uncertain/parametric space that are “interesting” (e.g., risk-significant regions of the input space) with respect the targeted Figures Of Merit (FOM): for example, the failure of the system

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 26 (ROYATH00540026) on Town Highway 54, crossing Broad Brook, Royalton, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROYATH00540026 on Town Highway 54 crossing Broad Brook, Royalton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 11.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture with trees and brush on the immediate banks. The right bank, upstream and downstream of the bridge, is forested. In the study area, Broad Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 37 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 66.3 mm (0.218 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 13, 1995 and the Level II site visit on July 11, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 54 crossing of Broad Brook is a 29-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.3 ft. The bridge is supported by a vertical, concrete face laid-up stone abutment with concrete wingwalls on the left and a laid-up stone

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 18 (SHEFTH00410018) on Town Highway 41, crossing Millers Run, Sheffield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SHEFTH00410018 on Town Highway 41 crossing Millers Run, Sheffield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 16.2-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is grass upstream and downstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, Millers Run has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 50 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 50.9 mm (0.167 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 1, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable, which is evident in the moderate to severe fluvial erosion in the upstream reach. The Town Highway 41 crossing of the Millers Run is a 30-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 28-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.2 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening. The computed

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 68 (NFIETH00960068) on Town Highway 96, crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NFIETH00960068 on Town Highway 96 crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 30.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The right bank upstream is forested and the downstream right bank is pasture. Vermont state route 12A runs parallel to the river on the right bank. In the study area, the Dog River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 70 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 47.9 mm (0.157 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 96 crossing of the Dog River is a 45-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 43-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 41.5 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 2 (RYEGTH00020002) on Town Highway 2, crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure RYEGTH00020002 on Town Highway 2 crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 75.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of cut grass, trees, and brush on the flood plains while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Wells River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.006 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 110 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 82.3 mm (0.270 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 24, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable with moderate fluvial erosion and meandering downstream of the bridge. The Town Highway 2 crossing of the Wells River is a 79-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 75-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 27, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 75.1 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments, the left has a spill-through embankment, with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 5 (DUMMVT00300005) on State Route 30, crossing Stickney Brook, Dummerston, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure DUMMVT00300005 on State Route 30 crossing Stickney Brook, Dummerston, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 6.31-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest and brush. In the study area, Stickney Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 80 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material is predominantly cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 80.3 mm (0.264 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 12, 1996, indicated that the reach was aggrading. The State Route 30 crossing of Stickney Brook is a 84-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 82-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 79.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the toe of the right spill-through slope during

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 21 (MORETH00010021) on Town Highway 1, crossing Cox Brook, Moretown, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MORETH00010021 on Town Highway 1 crossing Cox Brook, Moretown, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north-central Vermont. The 2.85-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly forested. In the study area, Cox Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 23 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 47.5 mm (0.156 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 18, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Cox Brook is a 29-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 27-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 40 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment downstream during the Level I assessment. The

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 26 (WSTOTH00070026) on Town Highway 7, crossing Greendale Brook, Weston, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Hammond, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WSTOTH00070026 on Town Highway 7 crossing Greendale Brook, Weston, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south central Vermont. The 3.13-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, the Greendale Brook has a sinuous, non-incised, non-alluvial channel with a slope of approximately 0.015 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 38 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 64.8 mm (0.213 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 19, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The channel has moved to the right, however, scour countermeasures are in place along the upstream right bank. The Town Highway 7 crossing of the Greendale Brook is a 52-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 50-foot steel-beam span with a concrete deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, April 07, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 48.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 18 (GROTTH00480018) on Town Highway 48, crossing the Wells River Groton, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure GROTTH00480018 on Town Highway 48 crossing the Wells River, Groton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in eastern Vermont. The 53.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the right bank upstream and the left bank downstream while the surface cover is shrub and brushland along the left bank upstream and the right bank downstream. The immediate banks are vegetated with brush and scattered trees. In the study area, the Wells River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 69 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 66.7 mm (0.219 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 28, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 48 crossing of the Wells River is a 38-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 36-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 33.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 4 (MAIDTH00070004) on Town Highway 7, crossing Cutler Mill Brook, Maidstone, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MAIDTH00070004 on Town Highway 7 crossing the Cutler Mill Brook, Maidstone, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 18.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly shrub and brushland. In the study area, the Cutler Mill Brook has a non-incised, meandering channel with local braiding and a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 2 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 27.6 mm (0.091 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 19, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to large meanders in the channel. The Town Highway 7 crossing of the Cutler Mill Brook is a 25-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 22-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 5, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 21.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. A scour hole 2.0 ft deeper than

  20. I.I. Rabi Prize Talk: Artificial gauge fields in multi-level atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielman, Ian

    2015-05-01

    We used Raman lasers to induce artificial gauge fields or spin-orbit coupling in the three-level system formed by the f=1 electronic ground state manifold of rubidium-87. In this colloquium I will report on two effects of this laser-coupling. I will explore the itinerant magnetic phases present in a spin-1 spin-orbit coupled atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC); in this system, itinerant ferromagnetic order is stabilized by the spin-orbit coupling, vanishing in its absence. We first located a second-order phase transition that continuously stiffens until, at a tricritical point, it transforms into a first-order transition. These measurements are all in agreement with theory. We engineered a two-dimensional magnetic lattice in an elongated strip geometry, with effective per-plaquette flux about 4/3 times the flux quanta. We imaged the localized edge and bulk states of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in this strip, with single lattice-site resolution along the narrow direction. Further, we observed both the skipping orbits of excited atoms traveling down our system's edges, analogues to edge magnetoplasmons in 2-D electron systems. Our lattice's long direction consisted of the sites of an optical lattice and its narrow direction consisted of the internal atomic spin states: a synthetic dimension.

  1. Quantum Calculation of Inelastic CO Collisions with H. II. Pure Rotational Quenching of High Rotational Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kyle M.; Song, L.; Yang, B. H.; Groenenboom, G. C.; van der Avoird, A.; Balakrishnan, N.; Forrey, R. C.; Stancil, P. C.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon monoxide is a simple molecule present in many astrophysical environments, and collisional excitation rate coefficients due to the dominant collision partners are necessary to accurately predict spectral line intensities and extract astrophysical parameters. We report new quantum scattering calculations for rotational deexcitation transitions of CO induced by H using the three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) of Song et al. State-to-state cross sections for collision energies from 10-5 to 15,000 cm-1 and rate coefficients for temperatures ranging from 1 to 3000 K are obtained for CO (v = 0, j) deexcitation from j=1-45 to all lower j‧ levels, where j is the rotational quantum number. Close-coupling and coupled-states calculations were performed in full-dimension for j=1-5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 while scaling approaches were used to estimate rate coefficients for all other intermediate rotational states. The current rate coefficients are compared with previous scattering results using earlier PESs. Astrophysical applications of the current results are briefly discussed.

  2. First participation by the NMISA in a low-level comparison: CCRI(II)-S9 exercise.

    PubMed

    van Wyngaardt, W M; van Staden, M J; Lubbe, J

    2013-11-01

    The NMISA Radioactivity Standards Laboratory participated in the CCRI(II)-S9 inter-comparison of the measurement of the activity concentration of (137)Cs and (40)K in rice material, piloted by the KRISS. The paper describes the equipment used, the measurement set-up and data analysis. The efficiency of the detector for (137)Cs and (40)K was determined by comparison against a spiked standard solution, and Monte Carlo simulations performed to estimate the difference in γ-ray escape probability between the solution standard and starch (as an approximation for milled rice) due to attenuation disparities. The uncertainty budget was estimated rather conservatively, since these were the first low-level measurements performed by the NMISA using an HPGe detector. PMID:23562433

  3. Severity and prognosis of acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning are indicated by C-reactive protein and copeptin levels and APACHE II score

    PubMed Central

    WU, XINKUAN; XIE, WEI; CHENG, YUELEI; GUAN, QINGLONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and copeptin, in addition to the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, in patients with acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning (AOPP). A total of 100 patients with AOPP were included and divided into mild, moderate and severe groups according to AOPP diagnosis and classification standards. Blood samples were collected from all patients on days 1, 3 and 7 following AOPP. The concentrations of CRP and copeptin in the plasma were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All AOPP patients underwent APACHE II scoring and the diagnostic value of these scores was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs). On days 1, 3 and 7 after AOPP, the levels of CRP and copeptin were increased in correlation with the increase in AOPP severity, and were significantly higher compared with the control groups. Furthermore, elevated CRP and copeptin plasma levels were detected in patients with severe AOPP on day 7, whereas these levels were reduced in patients with mild or moderate AOPP. APACHE II scores, blood lactate level, acetylcholine esterase level, twitch disappearance time, reactivating agent dose and inability to raise the head were the high-risk factors that affected the prognosis of AOPP. Patients with plasma CRP and copeptin levels higher than median values had worse prognoses. The areas under curve for ROCs were 0.89, 0.75 and 0.72 for CRP levels, copeptin levels and APACHE II scores, respectively. In addition, the plasma contents of CRP and copeptin are increased according to the severity of AOPP. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that CRP and copeptin levels and APACHE II scores may be used for the determination of AOPP severity and the prediction of AOPP prognosis. PMID:26997996

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (BRIDTH00040042) on Town Highway 04, crossing Dailey Hollow Brook, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00040042 on town highway 4 crossing Dailey Hollow Brook, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic division of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 2.20-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the overbanks are covered by shrubs and trees except for the upstream right overbank where there is a house. Dailey Hollow Brook enters Dailey Hollow Branch at the downstream face of the bridge. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.035 ft/ft. The channel top width and channel depth upstream of the bridge is 19 ft and 3 ft, respectively. Downstream of the bridge and the confluence the channel top width and channel depth is 39 ft and 2 ft respectively. The predominant channel bed material is cobble and gravel (D50 is 64.7 mm or 0.212 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 4 crossing of Dailey Hollow Brook is a 25-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 23-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches) exists along all four wingwalls, the downstream right road approach

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (SHARTH00040013) on Town Highway 4, crossing Broad Brook, Sharon, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SHARTH00040013 on Town Highway 4 crossing Broad Brook, Sharon, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is brushland on the downstream left overbank and row crops on the right overbank, while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. Upstream of the bridge, the overbanks are forested. In the study area, Broad Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 69 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 112 mm (0.369 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 11, 1995 and Level II site visit on July 23, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 4 crossing of Broad Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot concrete tee beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.1 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening

  6. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (PFRDTH00030013) on Town Highway 3, crossing Furnace Brook, Pittsford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure PFRDTH00030013 on Town Highway 3 crossing Furnace Brook, Pittsford, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Taconic section of the New England physiographic province in western Vermont. The 17.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is grass along the downstream right bank while the remaining banks are primarily forested. In the study area, Furnace Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 49 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 70.2 mm (0.230 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 20, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 3 crossing of Furnace Brook is a 75-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 72-ft-long steel stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 14, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through slopes. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 35 degrees. The opening-skew-to-roadway was determined from surveyed data collected at the bridge although, information provided from the

  7. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 43 (CHELTH00460043) on Town Highway 46, crossing Jail Brook, Chelsea, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHELTH00460043 on Town Highway 46 crossing Jail Brook, Chelsea, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.68-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is best described as suburban with homes, lawns, and a few trees. In the study area, Jail Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 32 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from coarse sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 43.0 mm (0.141 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 18, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of Jail Brook is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 23-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.8 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately zero degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is also zero degrees. Channel scour was not observed. However, the left abutment footing was exposed one foot. Scour

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30 (BRIDTH00330030) on Town Highway 33, crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00330030 on town highway 33 crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 7.51-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Branch has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 45 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 60.7 mm (0.199 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 33 crossing of Dailey Hollow Branch is a 31-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Type-2 stone-fill (less than 36 inches diameter) protection was found at all four wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (JAMATH00010025) on Town Highway 1, crossing Ball Mountain Brook, Jamaica, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure JAMATH00010025 on Town Highway 1 crossing Ball Mountain Brook, Jamaica, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southern Vermont. The 29.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right bank which is pasture with some trees along the channel. In the study area, Ball Mountain Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.021 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 86 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 222 mm (0.727 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 13, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Ball Mountain Brook is a 78-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 75-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 73 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 24 (MANCUS00070024) on U.S. Route 7, crossing Lye Brook, Manchester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MANCUS00070024 on U.S. Route 7 crossing Lye Brook, Manchester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Taconic section of the New England physiographic province in southwestern Vermont. The 8.13-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the primary surface cover consists of brush and trees. In the study area, Lye Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 66 ft and an average bank height of 11 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 90.0 mm (0.295 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 6, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. Although, the immediate reach is considered stable, upstream of the bridge the Lye Brook valley is very steep (0.05 ft/ft). Extreme events in a valley this steep may quickly reveal the instability of the channel. In the Flood Insurance Study for the Town of Manchester (Federal Emergency Management Agency, January, 1985), Lye Brook’s overbanks were described as “boulder strewn” after the August 1976 flood. The U.S. Route 7 crossing of Lye Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, September

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (TOPSTH00570038) on Town Highway 57, crossing Waits River, Topsham, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure TOPSTH00570038 on Town Highway 57 crossing the Waits River, Topsham, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east central Vermont. The 37.3-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly pasture while the left bank upstream is suburban. In the study area, the Waits River has a sinuous locally anabranched channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 76 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 57.2 mm (0.188 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 28, 1995, indicated that the reach was considered laterally unstable due to cut-banks upstream, mid-channel bars and lateral migration of the channel towards the left abutment. The Town Highway 34 crossing of the Waits River is a 34-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.4 ft. The bridge is supported by a vertical, stone abutment with concrete facing and wingwalls on the right and by a vertical, concrete

  12. ["Analysis of fate" in psychiatry and psychotherapy. II. Correlations withe the level of general psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Grünner, O

    1976-07-01

    We demonstrated in a group of 166 psychiatric patients, with disorders of schizophrenic and cyclothymic circle and with neuroses too, significant relations between the results of the projection test of Szondi and between the greatness of total psychopathology, evaluated by means of the Minnesota Multiphasic Inquiry (M.M.P.I.). We could ascertain, that the patients with the higher level of total psychopathology (evaluated by means of M.M.P.I.) have also a greater number of abnormal results according to the projection test of Szondi. At these patients we saw significantly more "valve groups", which witness to the irresolution in the instinctive motivations of behaviour. At these patients we could ascertain further the greater number of those personalities, which according to the projection test of Szondi suffered from a lack of breaking and self-critical elements in their behaviour. Subjects with heightened values of M.M.P.I. have significantly more results with abnormal relations of masculinity and of feminity according to the sexual index of Szondi test. The choices and the selection from the set of 48 fixed photographies, which the patient realises at the Szondi test in teen repeated sessions, form so a significant relation not only to the psychiatric diagnoses, as was ascertained in the first part of this work, but also to the height of total psychopathology, evaluated by means of the M.M.P.I. The familial subconsciousness influences so significantly the consciousness of personality and can participate substantially in the development of psychopathologic symptoms. PMID:1015733

  13. Environmental toxins and breast cancer on Long Island. II. Organochlorine compound levels in blood.

    PubMed

    Gammon, Marilie D; Wolff, Mary S; Neugut, Alfred I; Eng, Sybil M; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Britton, Julie A; Terry, Mary Beth; Levin, Bruce; Stellman, Steven D; Kabat, Geoffrey C; Hatch, Maureen; Senie, Ruby; Berkowitz, Gertrud; Bradlow, H Leon; Garbowski, Gail; Maffeo, Carla; Montalvan, Pat; Kemeny, Margaret; Citron, Marc; Schnabel, Freya; Schuss, Allan; Hajdu, Steven; Vinceguerra, Vincent; Niguidula, Nancy; Ireland, Karen; Santella, Regina M

    2002-08-01

    Whether environmental contaminants increase breast cancer risk among women on Long Island, NY, is unknown. The study objective is to determine whether breast cancer risk is increased in relation to organochlorines, compounds with known estrogenic characteristics that were extensively used on Long Island and other areas of the United States. Recent reports do not support a strong association, although there are concerns with high risks observed in subgroups of women. Blood samples from 646 case and 429 control women from a population-based case-control study conducted on Long Island were analyzed. No substantial elevation in breast cancer risk was observed in relation to the highest quintile of lipid-adjusted serum levels of p,p'-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethene (DDE) [odds ratio (OR), 1.20 versus lowest quintile; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76-1.90], chlordane (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.62-1.55), dieldrin (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.69-2.72), the sum of the four most frequently occurring PCB congeners (nos. 118, 153, 138, and 180; OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.54-1.29), and other PCB congener groupings. No dose-response relations were apparent. Nor was risk increased in relation to organochlorines among women who had not breastfed or were overweight, postmenopausal, or long-term residents of Long Island; or with whether the case was diagnosed with invasive rather than in situ disease, or with a hormone receptor-positive tumor. These findings, based on the largest number of samples analyzed to date among primarily white women, do not support the hypothesis that organochlorines increase breast cancer risk among Long Island women. PMID:12163320

  14. Cadmium Level, Glycemic Control, and Indices of Renal Function in Treated Type II Diabetics: Implications for Polluted Environments

    PubMed Central

    Anetor, John I.; Uche, Chukwuemelie Z.; Ayita, Emmanuel B.; Adedapo, Solomon K.; Adeleye, Jokotade O.; Anetor, Gloria O.; Akinlade, Sola K.

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has recently emerged as a major concern not only in environmental toxicology but also in metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and its complications. Conflicting data aside, these studies have not been examined in a clinical population undergoing management as well as possible modulation by the prominent metabolic antagonist of Cd such as zinc (Zn). This study examined the relationship between cadmium levels, glycemic control, and renal pathology in established type II diabetic patients with focus on populations exposed to modern environmental health hazards (MEHHs). Sixty-five participants, consisting of 45 type-2 diabetics and 20 non-diabetics were enrolled for the study, mean age 61.51 ± 5.27 years. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was used to classify them into three sub-groups: (A) good glycemic control (44.4%), (B) fair glycemic control (24.4%), and (C) poor glycemic control (31.1%). Plasma levels of glucose, Cd, Zn, HbA1c, creatinine, urinary creatinine, microalbuminuria, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were determined in all participants using standard methods. Fasting plasma glucose was higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics (p = 0.000) as well as Zn level, though not significantly. Interestingly, Cd level, Cd/Zn ratio, and urinary creatinine were significantly lower in diabetics than in non-diabetics. The group with poor glycemic control (C) had significantly higher Cd level compared to the one with good glycemic control (group A). The renal function revealed that microalbuminuria and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics, while eGFR was found to be similar in both diabetics and non-diabetics. UACR inversely correlated with Cd level, while plasma creatinine level positively correlated with Cd but not significantly. Correlation between Cd and HbA1c revealed non-significant inverse correlation (r = −0.007; p > 0.05), while Zn showed a

  15. Cadmium Level, Glycemic Control, and Indices of Renal Function in Treated Type II Diabetics: Implications for Polluted Environments.

    PubMed

    Anetor, John I; Uche, Chukwuemelie Z; Ayita, Emmanuel B; Adedapo, Solomon K; Adeleye, Jokotade O; Anetor, Gloria O; Akinlade, Sola K

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has recently emerged as a major concern not only in environmental toxicology but also in metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and its complications. Conflicting data aside, these studies have not been examined in a clinical population undergoing management as well as possible modulation by the prominent metabolic antagonist of Cd such as zinc (Zn). This study examined the relationship between cadmium levels, glycemic control, and renal pathology in established type II diabetic patients with focus on populations exposed to modern environmental health hazards (MEHHs). Sixty-five participants, consisting of 45 type-2 diabetics and 20 non-diabetics were enrolled for the study, mean age 61.51 ± 5.27 years. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was used to classify them into three sub-groups: (A) good glycemic control (44.4%), (B) fair glycemic control (24.4%), and (C) poor glycemic control (31.1%). Plasma levels of glucose, Cd, Zn, HbA1c, creatinine, urinary creatinine, microalbuminuria, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were determined in all participants using standard methods. Fasting plasma glucose was higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics (p = 0.000) as well as Zn level, though not significantly. Interestingly, Cd level, Cd/Zn ratio, and urinary creatinine were significantly lower in diabetics than in non-diabetics. The group with poor glycemic control (C) had significantly higher Cd level compared to the one with good glycemic control (group A). The renal function revealed that microalbuminuria and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics, while eGFR was found to be similar in both diabetics and non-diabetics. UACR inversely correlated with Cd level, while plasma creatinine level positively correlated with Cd but not significantly. Correlation between Cd and HbA1c revealed non-significant inverse correlation (r = -0.007; p > 0.05), while Zn showed a

  16. Dimensional Dependence of Critical Exponent of the Anderson Transition in the Orthogonal Universality Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueoka, Yoshiki; Slevin, Keith

    2014-08-01

    We report improved numerical estimates of the critical exponent of the Anderson transition in Anderson’s model of localization in d = 4 and 5 dimensions. We also report a new Borel-Padé analysis of existing ɛ expansion results that incorporates the asymptotic behavior for d → ∞ and gives better agreement with available numerical results.

  17. Adolescent Identities and Sexual Behavior: An Examination of Anderson's Player Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Peggy C.; Longmore, Monica A.; Manning, Wendy D.; Northcutt, Miriam J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the social and behavioral characteristics of male adolescents who self-identify as players, focusing particularly on Anderson's claim that this social role is inextricably linked with poverty and minority status. Results indicate that black respondents, those affiliated with liberal peers and young men who initially report a…

  18. Melissa L. Anderson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association/American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. The 2012 winner is Melissa L. Anderson for her ongoing commitment to understanding, treating, and preventing domestic violence in Deaf women…

  19. AUTO ANSWER CIRCUIT DESIGN FOR AN ANDERSON JACOBSON AD 342 MODEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a circuit which connects a Western Electric Model 1001F Data Accessing Arrangement to an Anderson Jacobson Model AD 342 Modem. It automatically answers the phone and holds a data connection as long as a received carrier is present. It self resets upon loss of...

  20. Dystopian Visions of Global Capitalism: Philip Reeve's "Mortal Engines" and M.T Anderson's "Feed"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullen, Elizabeth; Parsons, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This article examines Philip Reeve's novel for children, "Mortal Engines", and M.T. Anderson's young adult novel, "Feed", by assessing these dystopias as prototypical texts of what Ulrich Beck calls risk society. Through their visions of a fictional future, the two narratives explore the hazards created by contemporary techno-economic progress,…

  1. Single-ion-pair fluorescence ratios in ruby and Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, S.; Gibbs, H. M.; Passner, A.

    1981-12-01

    The experiment of Koo, Walker, and Geschwind (KWG) presenting evidence for a mobility edge separating localized and extended states has been repeated and extended. Although some of the features reported by KWG were seen, there are notable qualitative and quantitative differences in our work. We conclude that there is no compelling evidence for an Anderson transition in ruby.

  2. Between Voice and Voicelessness: Transacting Silence in Laurie Halse Anderson's "Speak."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Quinn, Elaine J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes how Laurie Halse Anderson's insightful novel, "Speak" (1999), reminds readers of the distance women have come in identifying the "oppressive and unhealthy behavior of the silences that so often betray them." Concludes that the oppression of silence which generations of women have stoically accepted is now being challenged publicly and…

  3. 78 FR 41835 - Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... consistent with the Plain Writing Act as well as the Presidential Memorandum, ``Plain Language in Government... made the initial changes to the Price-Anderson Act amounts on October 27, 2005 (70 FR 61885), and the first periodic inflation adjustments on September 29, 2008 (73 FR 56451). This final rule makes...

  4. The effect of angiotensin II microinjection into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis on serum lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide metabolite levels

    PubMed Central

    Kafami, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Overactivity of renin-angiotensin system is involved in the pathophysiology of renal and cardiovascular diseases. It is suggested that endothelial cells can release nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species in response to angiotensin II (Ang II). Angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor of Ang II has been found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST). BST is involved in autonomic function. This study was performed to find the role of central Ang II in serum lipid peroxidation product and in releasing NO into circulation. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one catheterized rats were placed in stereotaxic instrument. A hole was drilled above BST. In the control group, saline 0.9% (100 nl) was microinjected into the BST. In the second group, Ang II (100 μM, 100–150 nl) was microinjected into the BST. In the third group losartan (an AT1 antagonist) was microinjected (100 μM, 200 nl) before Ang II into the BST. Systolic blood pressure was recorded. The NO metabolite (nitrite) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in the rat's serum. Results: The data indicated that microinjection of Ang II into the BST produced a pressor response (P < 0.0001). It also increased MDA and nitrite levels of the serum significantly (P < 0.001, P < 0.0001). Pretreatment with losartan before Ang II microinjection attenuated serum's levels of MDA and nitrite (P < 0.001, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that central effect of Ang II on blood pressure is accompanied with increased levels of MDA and nitrite in the circulation. PMID:27376045

  5. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1987-06-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

  6. Quantification of phase I / II metabolizing enzyme gene expression and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct levels in human prostate

    PubMed Central

    John, Kaarthik; Ragavan, Narasimhan; Pratt, M. Margaret; Singh, Paras B.; Al-Buheissi, Salah; Matanhelia, Shyam S.; Phillips, David H.; Poirier, Miriam C.; Martin, Francis L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies of migrant populations suggest that dietary and/or environmental factors play a crucial role in the aetiology of prostatic adenocarcinoma (CaP). The human prostate consists of the peripheral zone (PZ), transition zone (TZ) and central zone (CZ); CaP occurs most often in the PZ. METHODS To investigate the notion that an underlying differential expression of phase I/II genes, and/or the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts might explain the elevated PZ susceptibility, we examined prostate tissues (matched tissue sets consisting of PZ and TZ) from men undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy for CaP (n=26) or cystoprostatectomy (n=1). Quantitative gene expression analysis was employed for cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and CYP1A2, as well as N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). RESULTS CYP1B1, NAT1 and COMT were expressed in all tissue sets; levels of CYP1B1 and NAT1 were consistently higher in the PZ compared to TZ. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of CYP1B1 (nuclear-associated and primarily in basal epithelial cells) and NAT1. Tissue sections from 23 of these aforementioned 27 matched tissue sets were analyzed for PAH-DNA adduct levels using antiserum elicited against DNA modified with r7, t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]pyrene (BPDE). PAH-DNA adduct levels were highest in glandular epithelial cells, but a comparison of PZ and TZ showed no significant differences. CONCLUSION Although expression of activating and/or detoxifying enzymes may be higher in the PZ, PAH-DNA adduct levels appear to be similar in both zones. Therefore, factors other than PAH-DNA adducts may be responsible for promotion of tumour formation in the human prostate. PMID:19143007

  7. Experimental and analytical study of loss-of-flow transients in EBR-II occurring at decay power levels

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Betten, P.R.; Planchon, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    A series of eight loss-of-flow (LOF) tests have been conducted in EBR-II to study the transition between forced and natural convective flows following a variety of loss-of-primary-pumping power conditions from decay heat levels. Comparisons of measurements and pretest/posttest predictions were made on a selected test. Good agreements between measurements and predictions was found prior to and just after the flow reaching its minimum, but the agreement is not as good after that point. The temperatures are consistent with the flow response and the assumed decay power. The measured results indicate that the flows of driver and the instrumented subassemblies are too much in the analytical model in the natural convective region. Although a parametric study on secondary flow, turbulent-laminar flow transition, heat transfer ability of the intermediate heat exchange at low flow and flow mixing in the primary tank has been performed to determine their effects on the flow, the cause of the discrepancy at very low flow level is still unknown.

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 22 (JAY-TH00400022) on Town Highway 40, crossing Jay Branch, Jay, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

    1997-01-01

    8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northern Vermont. The 2.15-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is primarily pasture on the upstream and downstream left overbank while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The downstream right overbank of the bridge is forested. In the study area, Jay Branch Tributary has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 26 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 40.5 mm (0.133 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 40 crossing of Jay Branch Tributary is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel skew and the opening-skew-to-roadway are zero degrees. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the left and right abutments, at the upstream right wingwall, and at the downstream left

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (BETHTH00070038) on Town Highway 007, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    The town highway 5 crossing of the Black River is a 70-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 65-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. There is also a retaining wall along the upstream side of the road embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 3.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment. The scour hole was 27 feet long, 15 feet wide, and was 2.5 feet below the abutment footing at the time of the Level I assessment. This right abutment had numerous cracks and had settled. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

  10. GIS based Cadastral level Forest Information System using World View-II data in Bir Hisar (Haryana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mothi Kumar, K. E.; Singh, S.; Attri, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.; Sarika; Hooda, R. S.; Sapra, R. K.; Garg, V.; Kumar, V.; Nivedita

    2014-11-01

    Identification and demarcation of Forest lands on the ground remains a major challenge in Forest administration and management. Cadastral forest mapping deals with forestlands boundary delineation and their associated characterization (forest/non forest). The present study is an application of high resolution World View-II data for digitization of Protected Forest boundary at cadastral level with integration of Records of Right (ROR) data. Cadastral vector data was generated by digitization of spatial data using scanned mussavies in ArcGIS environment. Ortho-images were created from World View-II digital stereo data with Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system with WGS 84 datum. Cadastral vector data of Bir Hisar (Hisar district, Haryana) and adjacent villages was spatially adjusted over ortho-image using ArcGIS software. Edge matching of village boundaries was done with respect to khasra boundaries of individual village. The notified forest grids were identified on ortho-image and grid vector data was extracted from georeferenced cadastral data. Cadastral forest boundary vectors were digitized from ortho-images. Accuracy of cadastral data was checked by comparison of randomly selected geo-coordinates points, tie lines and boundary measurements of randomly selected parcels generated from image data set with that of actual field measurements. Area comparison was done between cadastral map area, the image map area and RoR area. The area covered under Protected Forest was compared with ROR data and within an accuracy of less than 1 % from ROR area was accepted. The methodology presented in this paper is useful to update the cadastral forest maps. The produced GIS databases and large-scale Forest Maps may serve as a data foundation towards a land register of forests. The study introduces the use of very high resolution satellite data to develop a method for cadastral surveying through on - screen digitization in a less time as compared to the old fashioned

  11. Selective solid-phase extraction and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) Ions in wastewater using diethylenetriamine-functionalized carbon nanotubes dispersed in graphene oxide colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangbing; Cui, Yuemei; Chang, Xijun; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) were dispersed in graphene oxide (GO) colloids to be further functionalized with diethylenetriamine (DETA), resulting in GO-MCNTs-DETA nanocomposites for the solid-phase extraction and analysis of Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions at the trace levels in wastewater. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) indicates that this new solid-phase sorbent could facilitate the maximum static adsorption capacities of 5.4, 13.8, 6.6 and 9.5 mg g(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, showing the adsorption capacity up to 95% within about 30 min. Moreover, the detection limits of the GO-MCNTs-DETA-based analysis method were found to be 0.16, 0.50, 0.24 and 0.38 ng mL(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, with the relative standard deviation of lower than 3.0% (n=5). Importantly, common coexisting ions showed no significant interference on the separation and pre-concentration of these heavy metal ions at pH 4.0. Subsequently, the GO-MCNTs-DETA sorbent was successfully employed for the separation and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions in wastewater samples yielding 75-folds concentration factors. PMID:26695275

  12. Impaired Memory in OT-II Transgenic Mice Is Associated with Decreased Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis Possibly Induced by Alteration in Th2 Cytokine Levels.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seong Gak; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Chung, Hyunju; Choi, Junghyun; Song, Eun Ji; Han, Seung-Yun; Oh, Myung Sook; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jin-Il; Moon, Minho

    2016-08-31

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have focused on the effects of CD4+ T cell on cognitive function. However, the changes of Th2 cytokines in restricted CD4+ T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire model and their effects on the adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether and how the mice with restricted CD4+ repertoire TCR exhibit learning and memory impairment by using OT-II mice. OT-II mice showed decreased adult neurogenesis in hippocampus and short- and long- term memory impairment. Moreover, Th2 cytokines in OT-II mice are significantly increased in peripheral organs and IL-4 is significantly increased in brain. Finally, IL-4 treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells. Taken together, abnormal level of Th2 cytokines can lead memory dysfunction via impaired adult neurogenesis in OT-II transgenic. PMID:27432189

  13. Impaired Memory in OT-II Transgenic Mice Is Associated with Decreased Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis Possibly Induced by Alteration in Th2 Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Seong Gak; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Chung, Hyunju; Choi, Junghyun; Song, Eun Ji; Han, Seung-Yun; Oh, Myung Sook; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jin-il; Moon, Minho

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have focused on the effects of CD4+ T cell on cognitive function. However, the changes of Th2 cytokines in restricted CD4+ T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire model and their effects on the adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether and how the mice with restricted CD4+ repertoire TCR exhibit learning and memory impairment by using OT-II mice. OT-II mice showed decreased adult neurogenesis in hippocampus and short- and long- term memory impairment. Moreover, Th2 cytokines in OT-II mice are significantly increased in peripheral organs and IL-4 is significantly increased in brain. Finally, IL-4 treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells. Taken together, abnormal level of Th2 cytokines can lead memory dysfunction via impaired adult neurogenesis in OT-II transgenic. PMID:27432189

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (RANDVT00120042) on State Highway 12, crossing Third Branch White River, Randolph, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    bridge consisting of four concrete spans. The maximum span length is 57 ft. (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., July 29, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments and three concrete piers. The toe of the left abutment is at the channel edge. The toe of the right abutment is set back on the right over-bank. The roadway centerline on the structure has a slight horizontal curve; however, the main channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

  15. Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

    1987-10-01

    A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 7 (WALDTH00020007) on Town Highway 2, crossing Coles Brook, Walden, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    ft, an average channel top width of 37 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 32.9 mm (0.108 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 9, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to cut-banks, point bars, and loose unconsolidated bed material. The Town Highway 2 crossing of Coles Brook is a 74-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 71-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, April 5, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 69.3 ft. The bridge is supported by spill-through abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed from 60 ft. to 100 ft. downstream during the Level I assessment. Scour protection measures at the site include: type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the right bank upstream, at the downstream end of the downstream left wingwall and downstream right wingwall; and type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the left bank upstream, at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall, and along the entire base of the left and right abutments. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are

  17. The 2012 Thomas Hunt Morgan medal: Kathryn V. Anderson.

    PubMed

    Wolfner, Mariana F; Schedl, Tim

    2012-06-01

    The Genetics Society of America annually honors members who have made outstanding contributions to genetics. The Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal recognizes a lifetime contribution to the science of genetics. The Genetics Society of America Medal recognizes particularly outstanding contributions to the science of genetics over the past 31 years. The George W. Beadle Medal recognizes distinguished service to the field of genetics and the community of geneticists. The Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education recognizes individuals or groups who have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level, from kindergarten through graduate school and beyond. The Novitski Prize recognizes an extraordinary level of creativity and intellectual ingenuity in solving significant problems in biological research through the application of genetic methods. We are pleased to announce the 2012 awards. PMID:22701044

  18. Observation of Anderson localization in ultrathin films of three-dimensional topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jian; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Xiao; Yang, Shuo; Lin, Chaojing; Yang, Wenmin; Wu, Kehui; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Li, Yongqing

    2015-05-29

    Anderson localization, the absence of diffusive transport in disordered systems, has been manifested as hopping transport in numerous electronic systems, whereas in recently discovered topological insulators it has not been directly observed. Here, we report experimental demonstration of a crossover from diffusive transport in the weak antilocalization regime to variable range hopping transport in the Anderson localization regime with ultrathin (Bi_{1-x}Sb_{x})_{2}Te_{3} films. As disorder becomes stronger, negative magnetoconductivity due to the weak antilocalization is gradually suppressed, and eventually, positive magnetoconductivity emerges when the electron system becomes strongly localized. This work reveals the critical role of disorder in the quantum transport properties of ultrathin topological insulator films, in which theories have predicted rich physics related to topological phase transitions. PMID:26066450

  19. Characterization of the heartworm Acanthocheilonema spirocauda (Leidy, 1858) Anderson, 1992 (Nematoda: Onchocercidae) in Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Leidenberger, Sonja; Boström, Sven

    2008-12-01

    The heartworm Acanthocheilonema spirocauda (Leidy, Proc Acad Nat Sci Philadelphia 10:110-112, 1858) Anderson, 1992 is described from material collected from harbour seals in Scandinavia and compared with types and other specimens described by Anderson (Can J Zool 37:481-493, 1959) from harbour seals in eastern USA. Most morphometric characters of the material from USA fall within the ranges established for the Scandinavian one. Some intraspecific variability in the organisation of papillae on the male tail was detected among the Scandinavian specimens. Differences between the specimens from Scandinavia and Eastern USA are also found in the organisation of papillae on the tail of males and females. An excretory pore was not discernible, but a clearly hemizonid-like structure is described. For the first time, scanning electron micrographs present external morphological structures of the species. PMID:18762981

  20. Magnetic frustration in the three-band Anderson lattice model for high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ihle, D.; Kasner, M. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-band Anderson lattice model for the CuO{sub 2} planes in high-{Tc} superconductors is established. Treating this model by perturbation theory, the effective spin interactions are derived. The antiferromagnetic superexchange integrals are calculated as functions of the direct oxygen transfer and the hole concentration. It is found that frustration in the superexchange occurs, even in the undoped case, which increases with oxygen trnasfer and decreases with hole concentration.

  1. Analysis of the characteristics of patients with open tibial fractures of Gustilo and Anderson type III☆

    PubMed Central

    Jaña Neto, Frederico Carlos; de Paula Canal, Marina; Alves, Bernardo Aurélio Fonseca; Ferreira, Pablício Martins; Ayres, Jefferson Castro; Alves, Robson

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of patients with Gustilo–Anderson Type III open tibial fractures treated at a tertiary care hospital in São Paulo between January 2013 and August 2014. Methods This was a cross-sectional retrospective study. The following data were gathered from the electronic medical records: age; gender; diagnosis; trauma mechanism; comorbidities; associated fractures; Gustilo and Anderson, Tscherne and AO classifications; treatment (initial and definitive); presence of compartment syndrome; primary and secondary amputations; MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score) index; mortality rate; and infection rate. Results 116 patients were included: 81% with fracture type IIIA, 12% IIIB and 7% IIIC; 85% males; mean age 32.3 years; and 57% victims of motorcycle accidents. Tibial shaft fractures were significantly more prevalent (67%). Eight patients were subjected to amputation: one primary case and seven secondary cases. Types IIIC (75%) and IIIB (25%) predominated among the patients subjected to secondary amputation. The MESS index was greater than 7 in 88% of the amputees and in 5% of the limb salvage group. Conclusion The profile of patients with open tibial fracture of Gustilo and Anderson Type III mainly involved young male individuals who were victims of motorcycle accidents. The tibial shaft was the segment most affected. Only 7% of the patients underwent amputation. Given the current controversy in the literature about amputation or salvage of severely injured lower limbs, it becomes necessary to carry out prospective studies to support clinical decisions. PMID:27069881

  2. Abrupt physical and chemical changes during 1992-1999, Anderson Springs, SE Geyser Geothermal Field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, Cathy J.; Goff, Fraser; Walter, Stephen R.; Sorey, Michael L.; Counce, Dale; Colvard, Elizabeth M.

    2000-01-01

    The Anderson Springs area is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. Patrons drank a variety of cool to hot mineral waters from improved springs, swam in various baths and pools, and hiked in the rugged hills flanking Anderson Creek and its tributaries. In the bluffs to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. By the early 1970s, the higher ridges south and west of Anderson Springs became part of the southeast sector of the greater Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric power plants are built on these ridges, producing energy from a vapor-dominated 240 °C reservoir. Only the main hot spring at Anderson Springs has maintained a recognizable identity since the 1930s. The hot spring is actually a cluster of seeps and springs that issue from a small fault in a ravine southwest of Anderson Creek. Published and unpublished records show that the maximum temperature (Tm) of this cluster fell gradually from 63°C in 1889 to 48°C in 1992. However, Tm of the cluster climbed to 77°C in 1995 and neared boiling (98°C) in 1998. A new cluster of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm = 99.3°C) formed in 1998 about 30 m north of the old spring cluster. Several evergreen trees on steep slopes immediately above these vents apparently were killed by the new activity. Thermal waters at Anderson Hot Springs are mostly composed of near-surface ground waters with some added gases and condensed steam from The Geysers geothermal system. Compared to gas samples from Southeast Geysers wells, the hot spring gases are higher in CO2 and lower in H2S and NH3. As the springs increased in temperature, however, the gas composition became more like the mean composition

  3. Electronic structure of vitamin B12 within the framework of the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Zafer; Mayda, Selma; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-03-01

    We study the electronic structure of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine C63H88CoN14O14P) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. Here, our purpose is to understand the many-body effects originating from the transition-metal impurity. In this approach, the cobalt 3 d orbitals are treated as the impurity states placed in a semiconductor host which consists of the rest of the molecule. The parameters of the resulting effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock approximation for the electronic structure of the molecule. The quantum Monte Carlo technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective Haldane-Anderson model for vitamin B12. We find that new states form inside the semiconductor gap due to the on-site Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3 d orbitals and that these states become the highest occupied molecular orbitals. In addition, we present results on the charge distribution and spin correlations around the Co atom. We compare the results of this approach with those obtained by the density-functional theory calculations.

  4. Molecular Survey of the Salmonella Phage Typing System of Anderson

    PubMed Central

    Schmieger, Horst

    1999-01-01

    Typing phages for Salmonella and the prophages of their typical propagation strains were analyzed at the DNA level. Most of them belong to the P22 branch of the lambdoid phages. Acquisition of new plating properties of the typing phages by propagation in particular strains can be due to different host specific modifications of the DNA or to recombination events with residing prophages which are reflected by changes in the respective DNA restriction patterns. It is concluded that the actually available set of typing phages is a historically unique combination of strains. PMID:10049397

  5. Performance/Design Requirements and Detailed Technical Description for a Computer-Directed Training Subsystem for Integration into the Air Force Phase II Base Level System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, A. K.; And Others

    The performance/design requirements and a detailed technical description for a Computer-Directed Training Subsystem to be integrated into the Air Force Phase II Base Level System are described. The subsystem may be used for computer-assisted lesson construction and has presentation capability for on-the-job training for data automation, staff, and…

  6. Homemaking--Family Living. Curriculum Planning Guidelines. Level I-II. Middle School, Grades 5-8. Reprint 1978. Home Economics Education, [No. 1].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational Education Curriculum Development.

    This curriculum guide for Levels I and II home economics teachers in New York State provides guidelines for developing instructional program content for grades 5-8. An introductory section describes the design of the homemaking-family living curriculum; presents procedures for utilizing modules in planning instruction with an example of plans for…

  7. Increased Glycated Hemoglobin Level is Associated With SYNTAX Score II in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Karakoyun, Süleyman; Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Rencüzoğulları, İbrahim; Karabağ, Yavuz; Altıntaş, Bernas; Topçu, Selim; Lazoğlu, Zakir; Tanboğa, İbrahim Halil; Sevimli, Serdar

    2016-04-01

    SYNTAX score II (SS II) uses 2 anatomical and 6 clinical variables for the prediction of mortality after coronary artery bypass graft and percutaneous coronary intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), and SYNTAX Score (SS) and SS II in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease (CAD). We enrolled 215 consecutive diabetic patients with stable angina pectoris who underwent coronary angiography. The SS II was calculated using a nomogram that was based on the findings of a previous study. There was a moderate correlation between HbA1c and SS (r = .396, P < .001), but there was a good correlation between HbA1c and SS II (r = .535, P < .001). There was also a weak correlation between FBG (r = .270, P = .001), PPG (r = .177, P = .027), and SS, but there was a weak-moderate correlation between FBG (r = .341, P < .001), PPG (r = .256, P = .001), and SS II. A better correlation has been detected between HbA1c and SS II compared to the correlation between HbA1c and SS. PMID:26101367

  8. Hypobetalipoproteinemia with accumulation of an apoprotein B-like protein in intestinal cells. Immunoenzymatic and biochemical characterization of seven cases of Anderson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bouma, M E; Beucler, I; Aggerbeck, L P; Infante, R; Schmitz, J

    1986-01-01

    We describe here seven cases (from five kindreds) of Anderson's disease, which is characterized by diarrhea, steatorrhea, hypobetalipoproteinemia with low levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and phospholipids, and failure to secrete chylomicrons after a fat meal. Enterocytes isolated from intestinal biopsies of patients after overnight fast showed numerous fat droplets, a histological picture resembling that of abetalipoproteinemia. Immunoenzymatic staining of the enterocytes demonstrated large amounts of material that reacted with a polyclonal antiserum to apolipoprotein B. Further, the immunoreactive material was found to react with several different monoclonal antibodies capable of recognizing both the B100 and B48 forms of apoprotein B, but not with any of several monoclonal antibodies capable of recognizing only B100. This suggests that the material in the enterocytes is the B48 form of apoprotein B or a fragment thereof. Additional findings included decreased low density lipoprotein levels with an abnormal chemical composition, abnormal high density lipoprotein2 (HDL2) and HDL3 particle size distributions, and an abnormal HDL apoprotein composition. Increased amounts of proteins having electrophoretic mobilities similar to apo E and the E-AII complex were present. Finally, some cases exhibited additional protein components of apparent molecular weights between 17,000 and 28,000, which was similar to some cases of abetalipoproteinemia. These findings demonstrate that Anderson's disease is not due to the absence of synthesis of intestinal apo B and suggest that it is more complex than previously thought, affecting all the lipoprotein classes. Images PMID:2426307

  9. Formation of copper(I) from trace levels of copper(II) as an artifactual impurity in the HPLC analysis of olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Baertschi, Steven W; Olsen, Bernard A; Wozniak, Timothy J; Toltl, Nick; O'Shea, Colette; Jansen, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    An analytical artifact peak appearing to be an impurity was observed intermittently among several laboratories performing HPLC analyses of olanzapine drug substance and formulation samples. The artifact peak was identified as Cu(I) that was formed from the reaction of trace amounts of Cu(II) with olanzapine in the sample solution. Unlike Cu(II), Cu(I) was retained under the ion-pairing HPLC conditions used for analysis. A reaction mechanism was postulated whereby Cu(II) present in the sample solution oxidizes olanzapine to a radical-cation, resulting in formation of Cu(I) and three oxidation products of olanzapine including a previously unknown oxidation product that was identified as hydroxy-olanzapine. Acetonitrile in the sample solution was necessary for the reaction to occur. As little as 100 ppb Cu(II) in the sample solution produced a Cu(I) peak, that by peak area, corresponded to about 0.1% relative to the olanzapine peak. The hydroxy-olanzapine oxidation product was also detectable, but the relative peak area was much smaller. To prevent formation of the Cu(I) artifact peak, EDTA was added to the sample solvent to complex any trace Cu(II) that might be present. The addition of EDTA was shown to prevent Cu(I) formation when Cu(II) was present at levels of 4ppm in the sample solution. PMID:27023131

  10. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS § 8.2 Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. (a) It is my opinion that an indemnity agreement entered into...

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (BRNATH00800016) on Town Highway 80, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 17.5 to 23.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented

  12. Cranial location of level II lymph nodes in laryngeal cancer: Implications for elective nodal target volume delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Braam, Petra M. . E-mail: P.M.Braam@umcutrecht.nl; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Terhaard, Chris

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the cranial distribution of level II lymph nodes in patients with laryngeal cancer to optimize the elective radiation nodal target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: The most cranially located metastatic lymph node was delineated in 67 diagnostic CT data sets. The minimum distance from the base of the skull (BOS) to the lymph node was determined. Results: A total of 98 lymph nodes were delineated including 62 ipsilateral and 36 contralateral lymph nodes. The mean ipsilateral and contralateral distance from the top of the most cranial metastatic lymph node to the BOS was 36 mm (range, -9-120; standard deviation [SD], 17.9) and 35 mm (range, 14-78; SD 15.0), respectively. Only 5% and 12% of the ipsilateral and 3% and 9% of the contralateral metastatic lymph nodes were located within 15 mm and 20 mm below the BOS, respectively. No significant differences were found between patients with only ipsilateral metastatic lymph nodes and patients with bilateral metastatic lymph nodes. Between tumors that do cross the midline and those that do not, no significant difference was found in the distance of the most cranial lymph node to the BOS and the occurrence ipsilateral or contralateral. Conclusions: Setting the cranial border of the nodal target volume 1.5 cm below the base of the skull covers 95% of the lymph nodes and should be considered in elective nodal irradiation for laryngeal cancer. Bilateral neck irradiation is mandatory, including patients with unilateral laryngeal cancer, when elective irradiation is advised.

  13. Low-energy exciton level structure and dynamics in light harvesting complex II trimers from the Chl a/b antenna complex of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, N.R.S.; Small, G.J. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA ); Amerongen, H. van; Kwa, S.L.S.; Grondelle, R. van )

    1994-04-28

    Nonphotochemical hole-burned spectra obtained as a function of burn wavelength at 4.2 K are reported for the isolated LHC II peripheral antenna complex of photosystem II. The lowest-energy state of the trimer complex is shown to lie at 680 nm, 4 nm below the most intense Chl a band at 676 nm. The linear electron-phonon coupling for the 680-nm state is characterized and used to predict that its fluorescence origin should lie at 681 nm, precisely coincident with the observed origin at 4.2 K. The 680-nm band carries the equivalent absorption strength of about one chlorophyll a molecule per C[sub 3] trimer complex, which contains about 27 chlorophyll a molecules. The 680-nm absorption band possesses an inhomogeneous width of [approximately] 120 cm[sup [minus]1], and its zero-phonon line distribution function is largely uncorrelated with those of the higher-energy states. Zero-phonon hole widths are used to determine that the fluorescent 680-nm state dephases in 10 ps at 4.2 K. An interpretation of this dephasing is given in terms of the trimer of subunits structure. Based on the satellite hole structure observed upon hole burning into the 680-nm state, two new states at 674 and 678 nm are identified. 56 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Type I Vs. Type II Cytokine Levels as a Function of SOD1 G93A Mouse Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeyachandran, Amilia; Mertens, Benjamin; McKissick, Eric A.; Mitchell, Cassie S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motoneuron disease that is characterized by the degradation of neurons throughout the central nervous system. Inflammation have been cited a key contributor to ALS neurodegeneration, but the timeline of cytokine upregulation remains unresolved. The goal of this study was to temporally examine the correlation between the varying levels of pro-inflammatory type I cytokines (IL-1β, IL-1α, IL-12, TNF-α, and GFAP) and anti-inflammatory type II cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL-10) throughout the progression of ALS in the SOD1 G93A mouse model. Cytokine level data from high copy SOD1 G93A transgenic mice was collected from 66 peer-reviewed studies. For each corresponding experimental time point, the ratio of transgenic to wild type (TG/WT) cytokine was calculated. One-way ANOVA and t-tests with Bonferonni correction were used to analyze the data. Meta-analysis was performed for four discrete stages: early, pre-onset, post-onset, and end stage. A significant increase in TG cytokine levels was found when compared to WT cytokine levels across the entire SOD1 G93A lifespan for majority of the cytokines. The rates of change of the individual cytokines, and type I and type II were not significantly different; however, the mean fold change of type I was expressed at significantly higher levels than type II levels across all stages with the difference between the means becoming more pronounced at the end stage. An overexpression of cytokines occurred both before and after the onset of ALS symptoms. The trend between pro-inflammatory type I and type II cytokine mean levels indicate a progressive instability of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as anti-inflammatory cytokines fail to mediate the pronounced increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. Very early immunoregulatory treatment is necessary to successfully interrupt ALS-induced neuroinflammation. PMID:26648846

  15. Molecular Model for the Radiative Dipole Strengths and Lifetimes of the Fluorescent Levels of Mn2+and Fe3+ in II-VI And III-V Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrot, R.; Boulanger, D.

    2005-06-01

    A molecular model is used to give an overall semi-phenomenological interpretation of the radiative transition probabilities (RTP) or radiative lifetimes (RL) of Mn2+ and Fe3+ in II-VI and III-V compounds. It is shown that the RTP's are primarily controlled by: (i) the mixing of the wavefunctions of the cation and of the ligands (ii) the molecular spin-orbit interaction which involves the spin-orbit coupling constants ζd of the d electrons of the cation and ζp of the p electrons of the ligands and (iii) the energies of the intermediate levels which appear in the perturbation model.

  16. Genomic organization and reproductive regulation of a large lipid transfer protein in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman).

    PubMed

    Cabrera, A R; Shirk, P D; Duehl, A J; Donohue, K V; Grozinger, C M; Evans, J D; Teal, P E A

    2013-10-01

    The complete genomic region and corresponding transcript of the most abundant protein in phoretic varroa mites, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), were sequenced and have homology with acarine hemelipoglycoproteins and the large lipid transfer protein (LLTP) super family. The genomic sequence of VdLLTP included 14 introns and the mature transcript coded for a predicted polypeptide of 1575 amino acid residues. VdLLTP shared a minimum of 25% sequence identity with acarine LLTPs. Phylogenetic assessment showed VdLLTP was most closely related to Metaseiulus occidentalis vitellogenin and LLTP proteins of ticks; however, no heme binding by VdLLTP was detected. Analysis of lipids associated with VdLLTP showed that it was a carrier for free and esterified C12 -C22 fatty acids from triglycerides, diacylglycerides and monoacylglycerides. Additionally, cholesterol and β-sitosterol were found as cholesterol esters linked to common fatty acids. Transcript levels of VdLLTP were 42 and 310 times higher in phoretic female mites when compared with males and quiescent deutonymphs, respectively. Coincident with initiation of the reproductive phase, VdLLTP transcript levels declined to a third of those in phoretic female mites. VdLLTP functions as an important lipid transporter and should provide a significant RNA interference target for assessing the control of varroa mites. PMID:23834736

  17. Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths for Ultraviolet Transitions Involving 6s26d 2D and 6s6p3 2D Levels in Pb II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, Steven Robert; Heidarian, Negar; Irving, Richard; Ritchey, Adam M.; Ellis, David; Cheng, Song; Curtis, Larry; Furman, Walter

    2016-06-01

    We conducted beam-foil measurements on levels producing Pb II lines at 1203.6 and 1433.9 Å. These were supplemented by archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) covering the Pb II transitions. The oscillator strengths derived from our experimental lifetimes are generally consistent with recent large-scale theoretical results, as well as our own relativistic calculations. Our analysis of the HST spectra confirms the relative strengths of the two lines. However, the oscillator strength obtained for the line at 1433 Å is significantly smaller than earlier theoretical values used to derive the interstellar lead abundance, leading to an increase of 0.43 dex in this quantity. We will present our results for Pb II and compare them with others from the literature.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BETHTH00190035) on Town Highway 19, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream wingwalls, left abutment, and upstream right road embankment; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is at the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 2.1 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 3.9 to 9.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 9 (BARRUSO3020009) on U.S. Route 302, crossing Jail Branch, Barre, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    skew-to-roadway. There is evidence of channel scour along the right bank from 190 feet upstream of the bridge and extending through the bridge along the right abutment. Under the bridge, the scour depth is approximately 0.5 feet below the mean thalweg depth. Scour protection measures at the site include type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the right bank extending from the bridge to 192 feet upstream. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is along the right abutment and the right downstream bank to 205 feet downtream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 4.3 to 7.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Computed scour for the 100-year event does not go below the abutment footings. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (BRIDTH00050046) on Town Highway 05, crossing North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    bridge consisting of a 34-ft steel-beam span, supported by vertical abutments with no wingwalls (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The left abutment is stone; the right abutment is log cribwork with type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along its base. Type-2 stone fill has also been placed on the upstream and downstream sides of the road embankments, except the upstream left which has type-3 (less than 48 inches diameter). The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees; the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of these computed results follow. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 5.7 ft to 7.7 ft. with the worst-case abutment scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the computed scour at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (BRNAVT00120025) on State Highway 12, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along a bedrock outcrop near the upstream left wingwall during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures in place at the site are type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left abutment, upstream right bank, and both downstream banks; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the downstream side of the right road approach and upstream left bank; type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall and downstream end of downstream left wingwall; type-5 (wall/ artificial levee) at the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.5 to 20.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in

  2. Renormalization group flow of the Luttinger-Ward functional: Conserving approximations and application to the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentrop, J. F.; Meden, V.; Jakobs, S. G.

    2016-05-01

    We study the renormalization group flow of the Luttinger-Ward functional and of its two-particle-irreducible vertex functions, given a cutoff in the two-particle interaction. We derive a conserving approximation to the flow and relate it to the fluctuation exchange approximation as well as to nonconserving approximations introduced in an earlier publication [J. F. Rentrop, S. G. Jakobs, and V. Meden, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 48, 145002 (2015), 10.1088/1751-8113/48/14/145002]. We apply the different approximate flow equations to the single-impurity Anderson model in thermal equilibrium at vanishing temperature. Numerical results for the effective mass, the spin susceptibility, the charge susceptibility, and the linear conductance reflect the similarity of the methods to the fluctuation exchange approximation. We find the majority of the approximations to deviate stronger from the exact results than one-particle-irreducible functional renormalization group schemes. However, we identify a simple static two-particle-irreducible flow scheme which performs remarkably well and produces an exponential Kondo-like scale in the renormalized level position.

  3. Femtomole level photoelectrochemical aptasensing for mercury ions using quercetin-copper(II) complex as the DNA intercalator.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Xue, Yan; Wang, Wei

    2014-04-15

    An ultrasensitive and selective photoelectrochemical (PEC) aptasensor for mercury ions was first fabricated based on perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic acid/graphene oxide (PTCA/GO) heterojunction using quercetin-copper(II) complex intercalated into the poly(dT)-poly(dA) duplexes. Both the PTCA/GO heterojunction and the quercetin-copper(II) complex are in favor of the sensitivity for the fabricated PEC aptasensor due to band alignment and strong reduction capability, respectively. And they efficiently promote the separation of photoexcited carriers and enhance the photocurrent. The formation of thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine coordination chemistry resulted in the dehybridization of poly(dT)-poly(dA) duplexes and then the intercalator quercetin-copper(II) complex broke away from the surface of the PEC aptasensor. As the concentration of mercury ions increased, the photocurrent gradually decreased. The electrode response for mercury ions detection was in the linear range from 0.01 pmol L(-1) to 1.00 pmol L(-1) with the detection limit of 3.33 fmol L(-1). The label-free PEC aptasensor has excellent performances with ultrasensitivity and good selectivity besides the advantage of economic and facile fabrication. The strategy of quercetin-copper(II) complex as a novel DNA intercalator paves a new way to improve the performances for PEC sensors. PMID:24291750

  4. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-70-35-5245 crossing Big Walnut Creek in Putnam County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sedimenttransport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-70-35-5245 on Interstate 70 crossing Big Walnut Creek in Pumam.County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Manhattan in the southwestern part of Putnam County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 17.0 feet for the modeled discharge of 29,200 cubic feet per second and approximately 30.9 feet for the modeled discharge of 49,600 cubic feet per second.

  5. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-74-32-4946 crossing Sugar Creek in Montgomery County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.L.; Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sedient-transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Levell II analysis for structure I-74-32-4946 on Interstate 74 crossing Sugar Creek in Montgomery County, Indiana are presented. The site is near the town of Crawfordsville in the central part of Montgomery County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 13.0 feet for the modeled discharge of 3,000  cubic feet per second and approximately 15.1 feet for the modeled discharge of 41,900 cubic feet per second.

  6. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-65-85-5527 crossing Sugar Creek in Johnson County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-65-85-5527 on Interstate 65 crossing Sugar Creek in Johnson County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Amity in the southeastern part of Johnson County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 26.8 feet for the modeled discharge of 26,000 cubic feet per second and approximately 30.8 feet for the modeled discharge of 34,100 cubic feet per second

  7. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-70-60-5180 crossing Branch of McCracken Creek in Hendricks County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-70-60-5180 on Interstate 70 crossing Branch of McCracken Creek in Hendricks County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Center Valley in the south-central part of Hendricks County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 12.4 feet for the modeled discharge of 1,200 cubic feet per second and approximately 24.8 feet for the modeled discharge of 2,040 cubic feet per second.

  8. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-70-69-5185 crossing East Fork White Lick Creek in Hendricks County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-70-69-5185 on Interstate 70 crossing East Fork White Lick Creek in Hendricks County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Camby and is in the southeastern part of Hendricks County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 12.0 feet for the modeled discharge of 5,720 cubic feet per second and approximately 13.8 feet for the modeled discharge of 7,360 cubic feet per second.

  9. Investigation of Anderson lattice behavior in Yb1-xLuxAl3

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.D.; Booth, C.H.; Lawrence, J.M.; Hundley, M.F.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.; Riseborough, P.S.; Ebihara, T.

    2003-10-06

    Measurements of magnetic susceptibility {chi}(T), specific heat C(T), Hall coefficient R{sub H}(T), and Yb valence {nu} = 2 + n{sub f} [f-occupation number n{sub f} (T) determined from Yb L{sub 3} x-ray absorption measurements] were carried out on single crystals of Yb{sub 1-x}Lu{sub x}Al{sub 3}. The low temperature anomalies observed in {chi}(T) and C(T) corresponding to an energy scale T{sub coh} {approx} 40 K in the intermediate valence, Kondo lattice compound YbAl{sub 3} are suppressed by Lu concentrations as small as 5% suggesting these low-T anomalies are extremely sensitive to disorder and, therefore, are a true coherence effect. By comparing the temperature dependence of various physical quantities to the predictions of the Anderson Impurity Model, the slow crossover behavior observed in YbAl{sub 3}, in which the data evolve from a low-temperature coherent, Fermi-liquid regime to a high temperature local moment regime more gradually than predicted by the Anderson Impurity Model, appears to evolve to fast crossover behavior at x {approx} 0.7 where the evolution is more rapid than predicted. These two phenomena found in Yb{sub 1-x}Lu{sub x}Al{sub 3}, i.e., the low-T anomalies and the slow/fast crossover behavior are discussed in relation to recent theories of the Anderson lattice.

  10. Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, William D

    2014-11-01

    For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25507406

  11. Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, William D

    2014-11-01

    For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25423683

  12. Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

  13. STS-118 Astronaut Williams and Expedition 15 Engineer Anderson Perform EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 Astronaut Dave Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, participated in the fourth and final session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). During the 5 hour space walk, Williams and Expedition 15 engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame) installed the External Wireless Instrumentation System Antenna, attached a stand for the shuttle robotic arm extension boom, and retrieved the two Materials International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) for return to Earth. MISSE collects information on how different materials weather in the environment of space.

  14. Machine learning for many-body physics: The case of the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Millis, Andrew J.

    2014-10-01

    Machine learning methods are applied to finding the Green's function of the Anderson impurity model, a basic model system of quantum many-body condensed-matter physics. Different methods of parametrizing the Green's function are investigated; a representation in terms of Legendre polynomials is found to be superior due to its limited number of coefficients and its applicability to state of the art methods of solution. The dependence of the errors on the size of the training set is determined. The results indicate that a machine learning approach to dynamical mean-field theory may be feasible.

  15. Anomalous Floquet-Anderson Insulator as a Nonadiabatic Quantized Charge Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titum, Paraj; Berg, Erez; Rudner, Mark S.; Refael, Gil; Lindner, Netanel H.

    2016-04-01

    We show that two-dimensional periodically driven quantum systems with spatial disorder admit a unique topological phase, which we call the anomalous Floquet-Anderson insulator (AFAI). The AFAI is characterized by a quasienergy spectrum featuring chiral edge modes coexisting with a fully localized bulk. Such a spectrum is impossible for a time-independent, local Hamiltonian. These unique characteristics of the AFAI give rise to a new topologically protected nonequilibrium transport phenomenon: quantized, yet nonadiabatic, charge pumping. We identify the topological invariants that distinguish the AFAI from a trivial, fully localized phase, and show that the two phases are separated by a phase transition.

  16. Exponential Scaling Limit of the Single-Particle Anderson Model Via Adaptive Feedback Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaevsky, Victor

    2016-02-01

    We propose a twofold extension of the Germinet-Klein bootstrap multi-scale analysis (BMSA) for the Anderson models on graphs. First, we show, with the help of a single scaling algorithm, that power-law decay bounds at some initial scale imply an asymptotically exponential decay of eigenfunctions (EFs) and of EF correlators (EFCs), even on graphs (of polynomial growth) which do not fulfill the uniform scalability condition required for the existing BMSA techniques. We also show that the exponential scaling limit of the EFs and EFCs holds true for a class of marginal distributions of the random potential with regularity lower than Hölder continuity of any positive order.

  17. Large thermoelectric figure of merit for three-dimensional topological Anderson insulators via line dislocation engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, O. A.; Abanov, Ar.; Murakami, Shuichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2010-08-01

    We study the thermoelectric properties of three-dimensional topological Anderson insulators with line dislocations. We show that at high densities of dislocations the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT can be dominated by one-dimensional topologically protected conducting states channeled through the lattice screw dislocations in the topological insulator materials with a nonzero time-reversal-invariant momentum such as Bi0.9Sb0.1. When the chemical potential does not exceed much the mobility edge the ZT at room temperatures can reach large values, much higher than unity for reasonable parameters, hence making this system a strong candidate for applications in heat management of nanodevices.

  18. Volume dependence of Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, P. ); Andreani, L.C. ); Continenza, A. ); McMahan, A.K. )

    1993-05-15

    We have undertaken a first-principles theoretical study of the Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg as a function of volume reduction. We present results for the hybridization width [Delta]([epsilon]) in both the [ital J]=5/2 multiplet and in the [Gamma][sub 8], [Gamma][sub 7] crystal field states of the [ital f][sup 1] Ce configuration. We also calculate the hybridization contribution to the magnetic transition temperature. This is found to increase with pressure but is smaller than the experimental values, indicating that the Coulomb exchange contribution to the magnetic coupling is not negligible in these compounds.

  19. Volume dependence of Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, P.; Continenza, A. . Dipt. di Fisica); Andreani, L.C. ); McMahan, A.K. )

    1992-09-01

    We have undertaken a first-principles theoretical study of the Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg as a function of volume reduction. We present results for the hybridization width [Delta]([epsilon]) in both the J = 5/2 multiplet and in the [Gamma][sub 8], [Gamma][sub 7] crystal field states of the f[sup 1] Ce configuration. We also calculate the hybridization contribution to the magnetic transition temperature. This is found to increase with pressure but is smaller than the experimental values, indicating that the Coulomb exchange contribution to the magnetic coupling is not negligible in these compounds.

  20. Volume dependence of Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, P.; Continenza, A.; Andreani, L.C.; McMahan, A.K.

    1992-09-01

    We have undertaken a first-principles theoretical study of the Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg as a function of volume reduction. We present results for the hybridization width {Delta}({epsilon}) in both the J = 5/2 multiplet and in the {Gamma}{sub 8}, {Gamma}{sub 7} crystal field states of the f{sup 1} Ce configuration. We also calculate the hybridization contribution to the magnetic transition temperature. This is found to increase with pressure but is smaller than the experimental values, indicating that the Coulomb exchange contribution to the magnetic coupling is not negligible in these compounds.

  1. ASCOT data from the 1980 field measurement program in the Anderson Creek Valley, California. Vol. III

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.

    1983-04-01

    This report provides a listing of the data acquired during a series of nocturnal drainage flow experiments that were conducted by ASCOT participants in the Anderson Creek valley during September 1980. These experiments were designed to evaluate the transport and dispersion characteristics associated with nocturnal drainage flows. The report includes data from meteorological measurements systems and tracer experiments. The meteorological data include measurements from tethersondes, acoustic sounders, meteorological towers, pilot balloons, optical anemometers, and rawinsondes, while the tracer experiments provided data on the spatial and temporal distributions of perfluorocarbon, heavy methane, sulfur hexafluoride, oil fog, tetroons, and radon tracers.

  2. Mercaptoacetamide-based class II HDAC inhibitor lowers Aβ levels and improves learning and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sung, You Me; Lee, Taehee; Yoon, Hyejin; DiBattista, Amanda Marie; Song, JungMin; Sohn, Yoojin; Moffat, Emily Isabella; Turner, R. Scott; Jung, Mira; Kim, Jungsu; Hoe, Hyang-Sook

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) alter gene expression epigenetically by interfering with the normal functions of HDAC. Given their ability to decrease Aβ levels, HDACIs area potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is unclear how HDACIs alter Aβ levels. We developed two novel HDAC inhibitors with improved pharmacological properties, such as a longer half-life and greater penetration of the blood-brain barrier: mercaptoacetamide-based class II HDACI (coded as W2) and hydroxamide-based class I and IIHDACI (coded as I2) and investigated how they affect Aβ levels and cognition. HDACI W2 decreased Aβ40 and Aβ42 in vitro. HDACI I2 also decreased Aβ40, but not Aβ42. We systematically examined the molecular mechanisms by which HDACIs W2 and I2 can decrease Aβ levels. HDACI W2 decreased gene expression of γ-secretase components and increased the Aβ degradation enzyme Mmp2. Similarly, HDACI I2 decreased expression of β- and γ-secretase components and increased mRNA levels of Aβ degradation enzymes. HDACI W2 also significantly decreased Aβ levels and rescued learning and memory deficits in aged hAPP 3x Tg AD mice. Furthermore, we found that the novel HDACI W2 decreased tau phosphorylation at Thr181, an effect previously unknown for HDACIs. Collectively, these data suggest that class II HDACls may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:23063601

  3. Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, C.J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M.L.; Rytuba, J.J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E.M.; Huebner, M.; White, L.D.; Foster, A.

    1999-01-01

    Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240°C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85°C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63°C in 1889, 42–52°C from 1974 through 1991, and 77°C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98°C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3°C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring

  4. Interactive roles of NPR1 gene-dosage and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels inmutantmice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Das, Subhankar; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to elucidate the interactive roles of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) gene (Npr1) and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II (ANG II), aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokines levels in Npr1 gene-targeted (1-copy, 2-copy, 3-copy, 4-copy) mice. Methods Npr1 genotypes included 1-copy gene-disrupted heterozygous (+/−), 2-copy wild-type (+/+), 3-copy gene-duplicated heterozygous (++/+) and 4-copy gene-duplicated homozygous (++/++) mice. Animals were fed low, normal and high-salt diets. Plasma and cardiac levels of ANG II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined. Results With a high-salt diet, cardiac ANG II levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (13.7 ± 2.8 fmol/mg protein, 111%) compared with 2-copy mice (6.5 ± 0.6), but decreased (−) in 4-copy (4.0 ± 0.5, 38%) mice. Cardiac aldosterone levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (80 ± 4 fmol/mg protein, 79%) compared with 2-copy mice (38 ± 3). Plasma tumour necrosis factor alpha was increased (+) in 1-copy mice (30.27 ± 2.32 pg/ml, 38%), compared with 2-copy mice (19.36 ± 2.49, 24%), but decreased (−) in 3-copy (11.59 ± 1.51, 12%) and 4-copy (7.13 ± 0.52, 22%) mice. Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1α levels were also significantly increased (+) in 1-copy compared with 2-copy mice but decreased (−) in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. Conclusion These results demonstrate that a high-salt diet aggravates cardiac ANG II, aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokine levels in Npr1 gene-disrupted 1-copy mice, whereas, in Npr1 gene-duplicated (3-copy and 4-copy) mice, high salt did not render such elevation, suggesting the potential roles of Npr1 against salt loading. PMID:23188418

  5. The atomic approach to the Anderson model for the finite U case: application to a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Lobo, T; Figueira, M S; Foglio, M E

    2010-07-01

    In the present work we apply the atomic approach to the single-impurity Anderson model (SIAM). A general formulation of this approach, that can be applied both to the impurity and to the lattice Anderson Hamiltonian, was developed in a previous work (Foglio et al 2009 arxiv: 0903.0139v2 [cond-mat.str-el]). The method starts from the cumulant expansion of the periodic Anderson model, employing the hybridization as a perturbation. The atomic Anderson limit is analytically solved and its sixteen eigenenergies and eigenstates are obtained. This atomic Anderson solution, which we call the AAS, has all the fundamental excitations that generate the Kondo effect, and in the atomic approach is employed as a 'seed' to generate the approximate solutions for finite U. The width of the conduction band is reduced to zero in the AAS, and we choose its position such that the Friedel sum rule is satisfied, close to the chemical potential mu. We perform a complete study of the density of states of the SIAM over the whole relevant range of parameters: the empty dot, intermediate valence, Kondo and magnetic regimes. In the Kondo regime we obtain a density of states that characterizes well the structure of the Kondo peak. To show the usefulness of the method we have calculated the conductance of a quantum dot, side-coupled to a conduction band. PMID:20571194

  6. The Wyodak-Anderson coal assessment, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana -- An ArcView project

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, R.M.; Gunther, G.; Ochs, A.; Ellis, M.E.; Stricker, G.D.; Bader, L.R.

    1998-12-31

    In 1997, more than 305 million short tons of clean and compliant coal were produced from the Wyodak-Anderson and associated coal beds and zones of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. To date, all coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson, which averages 0.47 percent sulfur and 6.44 percent ash, has met regulatory compliance standards. Twenty-eight percent of the total US coal production in 1997 was from the Wyodak-Anderson coal. Based on the current consumption rates and forecast by the Energy Information Administration (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coal is projected to produce 413 million short tons by the year 2016. In addition, this coal deposit as well as other Fort Union coals have recently been targeted for exploration and development of methane gas. New US Geological Survey (USGS) digital products could provide valuable assistance in future mining and gas development in the Powder River Basin. An interactive format, with querying tools, using ArcView software will display the digital products of the resource assessment of Wyodak-Anderson coal, a part of the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment of the Powder River Basin. This ArcView project includes coverages of the data point distribution; land use; surface and subsurface ownerships; coal geology, stratigraphy, quality and geochemistry; and preliminary coal resource calculations. These coverages are displayed as map views, cross sections, tables, and charts.

  7. An assessment of global and regional sea level for years 1993-2007 in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffies, Stephen M.; Yin, Jianjun; Durack, Paul J.; Goddard, Paul; Bates, Susan C.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus W.; Bozec, Alexandra; Chassignet, Eric; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Domingues, Catia M.; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Holland, David M.; Ilicak, Mehmet; Large, William G.; Lorbacher, Katja; Lu, Jianhua; Marsland, Simon J.; Mishra, Akhilesh; George Nurser, A. J.; Salas y Mélia, David; Palter, Jaime B.; Samuels, Bonita L.; Schröter, Jens; Schwarzkopf, Franziska U.; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Treguier, Anne Marie; Tseng, Yu-heng; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Winton, Michael; Zhang, Xuebin

    2014-06-01

    We provide an assessment of sea level simulated in a suite of global ocean-sea ice models using the interannual CORE atmospheric state to determine surface ocean boundary buoyancy and momentum fluxes. These CORE-II simulations are compared amongst themselves as well as to observation-based estimates. We focus on the final 15 years of the simulations (1993-2007), as this is a period where the CORE-II atmospheric state is well sampled, and it allows us to compare sea level related fields to both satellite and in situ analyses. The ensemble mean of the CORE-II simulations broadly agree with various global and regional observation-based analyses during this period, though with the global mean thermosteric sea level rise biased low relative to observation-based analyses. The simulations reveal a positive trend in dynamic sea level in the west Pacific and negative trend in the east, with this trend arising from wind shifts and regional changes in upper 700 m ocean heat content. The models also exhibit a thermosteric sea level rise in the subpolar North Atlantic associated with a transition around 1995/1996 of the North Atlantic Oscillation to its negative phase, and the advection of warm subtropical waters into the subpolar gyre. Sea level trends are predominantly associated with steric trends, with thermosteric effects generally far larger than halosteric effects, except in the Arctic and North Atlantic. There is a general anti-correlation between thermosteric and halosteric effects for much of the World Ocean, associated with density compensated changes.

  8. [Pharmacological influences on the brain level and transport of GABA. II) Effect of various psychoactive drugs on brain level and uptake of GABA].

    PubMed

    Gabana, M A; Varotto, M; Saladini, M; Zanchin, G; Battistin, L

    1981-04-30

    The effects of some psychoactive drugs on the level and uptake of GABA in the mouse brain was studied using well standardized procedures, mainely the silica-gel cromatography for determining the GABA content and the brain slices for measuring GABA uptake. It was found that levomepromazine, sulpiride, haloperidol and amytryptiline were without effects on the cerebral level of GABA; it was also found that these drugs do not influence the rates of uptake of GABA by mouse brain slices. Such results do indicate that the psychoactive drugs studied are without effects on the level and uptake of GABA in the brain. PMID:7272066

  9. Simulation of Anderson localization in two-dimensional ultracold gases for pointlike disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morong, W.; DeMarco, B.

    2015-08-01

    Anderson localization has been observed for a variety of media, including ultracold atomic gases with speckle disorder in one and three dimensions. However, observation of Anderson localization in a two-dimensional geometry for ultracold gases has been elusive. We show that a cause of this difficulty is the relatively high percolation threshold of a speckle potential in two dimensions, resulting in strong classical localization. We propose a realistic pointlike disorder potential that circumvents this percolation limit with localization lengths that are experimentally observable. The percolation threshold is evaluated for experimentally realistic parameters, and a regime of negligible classical trapping is identified. Localization lengths are determined via scaling theory, using both exact scattering cross sections and the Born approximation, and by direct simulation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We show that the Born approximation can underestimate the localization length by four orders of magnitude at low energies, while exact cross sections and scaling theory provide an upper bound. Achievable experimental parameters for observing localization in this system are proposed.

  10. Dr Walter Henry Anderson (1870-1937) and the mission hospital at Safed, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Gordon S

    2013-02-01

    Walter Henry Anderson, a brewer's clerk in Burton-upon-Trent, became a missionary doctor, supported by a society promoting welfare and evangelism in Jewish communities abroad. His family background was rich in pastoral ministry at home and adventure abroad. Arguably, this background played a part in his decision to serve the Jews of Safed. His life in Palestine entailed much enterprise and hardship as he raised a family, fought disease and set up a mission hospital serving not only the Jewish community but persons of all faiths. His years in Palestine, from 1894 to 1915, were times of peace in the Middle East before the turmoil unleashed by the Great War. Jews from the Diaspora were gaining an increasing foothold in Palestine, their 'Promised Land'. Themes of that era - the rise of Zionism, confrontation between Judaism and evangelical Christianity, conflict between immigrant Jew and Palestinian Arab and the remarkable travels of Lawrence of Arabia were interwoven with the lives of Dr Anderson and his family. PMID:23610230

  11. Electronic structure and correlations of vitamin B12 studied within the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Zafer; Mayda, Selma; Bulut, Nejat

    2016-05-01

    We study the electronic structure and correlations of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. The parameters of the effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. The quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective model. We observe that new states form inside the semiconductor gap found by HF due to the intra-orbital Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3 d orbitals. In particular, the lowest unoccupied states correspond to an impurity bound state, which consists of states from mainly the CN axial ligand and the corrin ring as well as the Co e g -like orbitals. We also observe that the Co (3 d) orbitals can develop antiferromagnetic correlations with the surrounding atoms depending on the filling of the impurity bound states. In addition, we make comparisons of the HF+QMC data with the density functional theory calculations. We also discuss the photoabsorption spectrum of cyanocobalamine.

  12. Analysis of Anderson Acceleration on a Simplified Neutronics/Thermal Hydraulics System

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Slattery, Stuart R; Hamilton, Steven P; Clarno, Kevin T; Pawlowski, R. P. P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A standard method for solving coupled multiphysics problems in light water reactors is Picard iteration, which sequentially alternates between solving single physics applications. This solution approach is appealing due to simplicity of implementation and the ability to leverage existing software packages to accurately solve single physics applications. However, there are several drawbacks in the convergence behavior of this method; namely slow convergence and the necessity of heuristically chosen damping factors to achieve convergence in many cases. Anderson acceleration is a method that has been seen to be more robust and fast converging than Picard iteration for many problems, without significantly higher cost per iteration or complexity of implementation, though its effectiveness in the context of multiphysics coupling is not well explored. In this work, we develop a one-dimensional model simulating the coupling between the neutron distribution and fuel and coolant properties in a single fuel pin. We show that this model generally captures the convergence issues noted in Picard iterations which couple high-fidelity physics codes. We then use this model to gauge potential improvements with regard to rate of convergence and robustness from utilizing Anderson acceleration as an alternative to Picard iteration.

  13. Time-dependent Mott transition in the periodic Anderson model with nonlocal hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Felix; Potthoff, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent Mott transition in a periodic Anderson model with off-site, nearest-neighbor hybridization is studied within the framework of nonequilibrium self-energy functional theory. Using the two-site dynamical-impurity approximation, we compute the real-time dynamics of the optimal variational parameter and of different observables initiated by sudden quenches of the Hubbard-U and identify the critical interaction. The time-dependent transition is orbital selective, i.e., in the final state, reached in the long-time limit after the quench to the critical interaction, the Mott gap opens in the spectral function of the localized orbitals only. We discuss the dependence of the critical interaction and of the final-state effective temperature on the hybridization strength and point out the various similarities between the nonequilibrium and the equilibrium Mott transition. It is shown that these can also be smoothly connected to each other by increasing the duration of a U-ramp from a sudden quench to a quasi-static process. The physics found for the model with off-site hybridization is compared with the dynamical Mott transition in the single-orbital Hubbard model and with the dynamical crossover found for the real-time dynamics of the conventional Anderson lattice with on-site hybridization.

  14. Gutzwiller approach to the Anderson lattice model with no orbital degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulović, Vladimir Z.; Abrahams, Elihu

    1987-08-01

    A new technique is used to obtain the Gutzwiller ground-state energy functional for the Anderson lattice model with no orbital degeneracy (ALM). For the Hubbard model, known expressions are derived with ease and simplicity. For the ALM, we derive the ground-state energy functional of Varma, Weber, and Randall. As a check on our Gutzwiller functional, we find an independent analytical upper bound for the ground-state energy of ALM with a dispersionless f band. For the case of a dispersionless f band and momentum-independent hybridization, in the Kondo regime, we derive analytical expressions for the ground-state energy, charge, and magnetic susceptibilities. For the special case of infinite Coulomb repulsion, we recover results of Rice and Ueda and of Fazekas and Brandow, notably the negative value of the magnetic susceptibility. The negative magnetic susceptibility persists in the entire Kondo region, i.e., finite-U effects do not stabilize the nonmagnetic Kondo state. This suggests that nonzero orbital degeneracy in the Anderson lattice model must be retained to describe heavy-fermion materials with a normal Fermi liquid ground state.

  15. Electronic structure and correlations of vitamin B12 studied within the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Zafer; Mayda, Selma; Bulut, Nejat

    2016-04-01

    We study the electronic structure and correlations of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. The parameters of the effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. The quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective model. We observe that new states form inside the semiconductor gap found by HF due to the intra-orbital Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3d orbitals. In particular, the lowest unoccupied states correspond to an impurity bound state, which consists of states from mainly the CN axial ligand and the corrin ring as well as the Co eg-like orbitals. We also observe that the Co (3d) orbitals can develop antiferromagnetic correlations with the surrounding atoms depending on the filling of the impurity bound states. In addition, we make comparisons of the HF+QMC data with the density functional theory calculations. We also discuss the photoabsorption spectrum of cyanocobalamine.

  16. Type-II vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser with Watt level output powers at 1.2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, C.; Fuchs, C.; Berger, C.; Ruiz Perez, A.; Koch, M.; Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.; Stolz, W.

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor laser characteristics based on type-II band-aligned quantum well heterostructures for the emission at 1.2 μm are presented. Ten "W"-quantum wells consisting of GaAs/(GaIn)As/Ga(AsSb)/(GaIn)As/GaAs are arranged as resonant periodic gain in a vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser. Its structure is analyzed by X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and reflectance measurements. The laser's power curves and spectra are investigated. Output powers at Watt level are achieved, with a maximum output power of 4 W. It is confirmed that laser operation only involves the type-II transition. A blue shift of the material gain is observed while the modal gain exhibits a red shift.

  17. The differences in temperament–character traits, suicide attempts, impulsivity, and functionality levels of patients with bipolar disorder I and II

    PubMed Central

    Izci, Filiz; Fındıklı, Ebru Kanmaz; Zincir, Serkan; Zincir, Selma Bozkurt; Koc, Merve Iris

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary aim of this study was to compare the differences in temperament–character traits, suicide attempts, impulsivity, and functionality levels of patients with bipolar disorder I (BD-I) and bipolar disorder II (BD-II). Methods Fifty-two BD-I patients and 49 BD-II patients admitted to Erenköy Mental and Neurological Disease Training and Research Hospital psychiatry clinic and fifty age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. A structured clinical interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition Axis I Disorders, Temperament and Character Inventory, Barrett Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11), Hamilton Depression Inventory Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Bipolar Disorder Functioning Questionnaire (BDFQ) were administered to patients and to control group. Results No statistically significant difference in sociodemographic features existed between the patient and control groups (P>0.05). Thirty-eight subjects (37.62%) in the patient group had a suicide attempt. Twenty-three of these subjects (60.52%) had BD-I, and 15 of these subjects (39.47%) had BD-II. Suicide attempt rates in BD-I and II patients were 60.52% and 39.47%, respectively (P<0.05). Comparison of BD-I and II patients with healthy control subjects revealed that cooperativeness (C), self-directedness (Sdi), and self-transcendence (ST) scores were lower and novelty seeking (NS1 and NS2), harm avoidance (HA4), and reward dependence (RD2) subscale scores were higher in patients with BD-I. When BD-I patients were compared with BD-II patients, BIS-11 (attention) scores were higher in patients with BD-II and BIS-11 (motor and nonplanning impulsivity) scores were higher in patients with BD-I. According to BDFQ, relations with friends, participation in social activities, daily activities and hobbies, and occupation subscale scores were lower and taking initiative subscale scores were higher in patients with BD-I. Social withdrawal

  18. Patriot Games: Yes, Indeed, the British Are Coming! But M. T. Anderson's Revolutionary War Novel Is Unlike Anything You've Ever Read

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horning, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with 38-year-old writer Matthew Tobin Anderson. In the interview, Anderson talks about his experiences, passion for writing, teenage interests, and his relation to the distinguished writer Mark Twain. He also states the importance of liberty and what it takes to be a patriot and a loyalist. Furthermore, Matthew…

  19. Reduced Basis Methods for the One Over N Expansion of the Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, Jeffery Michael

    1995-01-01

    The Anderson model simultaneously explains both the bulk properties and valence photoemission spectrum of Cerium and Ytterbium heavy fermion materials. The observed spectral properties of Uranium heavy fermion compounds, however, are qualitatively different; They show a single bandlike peak near the Fermi energy rather than multiple ionization peaks. The spectral properties of Uranium heavy fermion systems represent an unanswered challenge for the description of heavy fermions using the Anderson model. We investigate this issue using an f^1 - f^2 Anderson model and the zero temperature 1/N expansion. The Kondo temperature is small for all valences which is consistent with heavy fermion behavior even in the mixed valence region. In this region, the calculated photoemission spectrum has a Fermi energy peak which contains substantial spectral weight. Unfortunately, the peak is much more narrow than observed in Uranium systems. Spin-orbit effects may broaden the low energy peak. We include Hunds first rule splitting for the f ^2 state in photoemission calculation. The spectrum then has additional structure at low energies, but the overall weight added is too small to explain observed spectra without considering extra broadening mechanisms, such as additional spin orbit terms. We also make contributions to the formal theory of the 1/N expansion. We present a diagrammatic scheme for classifying the basis elements and their coupling, from which the wave function equations may be directly obtained. Secondly, we develop a formulation of the 1/N expansion based upon zeroing the O(Gamma/N) coupling between basis elements with different numbers of electron-hole pairs. The Hamiltonian is then block diagonal. We obtain a full eigenstate and eigenvalue spectrum which is similar to that of the leading order ground state basis replicated at higher energies. Finally we undertake a systematic study of the 1/N corrections for the f^1 - f^2 model. We directly calculate first order

  20. Suicide risk assessment and risk formulation part II: Suicide risk formulation and the determination of levels of risk.

    PubMed

    Berman, Alan L; Silverman, Morton M

    2014-08-01

    The suicide risk formulation (SRF) is dependent on the data gathered in the suicide risk assessment. The SRF assigns a level of suicide risk that is intended to inform decisions about triage, treatment, management, and preventive interventions. However, there is little published about how to stratify and formulate suicide risk, what are the criteria for assigning levels of risk, and how triage and treatment decisions are correlated with levels of risk. The salient clinical issues that define an SRF are reviewed and modeling is suggested for an SRF that might guide clinical researchers toward the refinement of an SRF process. PMID:24286521

  1. A Critical Compilation of Energy Levels, Spectral Lines, and Transition Probabilities of Singly Ionized Silver, Ag II

    PubMed Central

    Kramida, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    All available experimental measurements of the spectrum of the Ag+ ion are critically reviewed. Systematic shifts are removed from the measured wavelengths. The compiled list of critically evaluated wavelengths is used to derive a comprehensive list of energy levels with well-defined uncertainties. Eigenvector compositions and level designations are found in two alternate coupling schemes. Some of the older work is found to be incorrect. A revised value of the ionization energy, 173283(7) cm−1, equivalent to 21.4844(8) eV, is derived from the new energy levels. A set of critically evaluated transition probabilities is given. PMID:26401429

  2. Room Temperature ppb Level Chlorine Gas Sensor Based on Copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine Films

    SciTech Connect

    Bedi, R. K.; Saini, Rajan; Mahajan, Aman

    2010-12-01

    Spin coating technique has been used to fabricate room temperature chlorine gas sensor based on copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine (CuPc(OBu){sub 8}) films. Gas sensor shows a response of 185% to few parts per billion level of Cl{sub 2} gas with response time of 9.5 minutes at room temperature. The interactions between sensor and analytes followed first order kinetics with rate constant 0.01{<=}k{<=}0.02. The chemiresistive sensor showed very good stability at room temperature over a long period of time.

  3. Room Temperature ppb Level Chlorine Gas Sensor Based on Copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedi, R. K.; Saini, Rajan; Mahajan, Aman

    2010-12-01

    Spin coating technique has been used to fabricate room temperature chlorine gas sensor based on copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine (CuPc(OBu)8) films. Gas sensor shows a response of 185% to few parts per billion level of Cl2 gas with response time of 9.5 minutes at room temperature. The interactions between sensor and analytes followed first order kinetics with rate constant 0.01≤k≤0.02. The chemiresistive sensor showed very good stability at room temperature over a long period of time.

  4. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: II. Organism and population-level endpoints.

    PubMed

    Costa, Filipe O; Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to test the performance of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in chronic sediment toxicity tests. It constitutes part of a multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments, integrating organism and population-level endpoints with biochemical markers responses. Here we account for organism and population-level effects, while biomarker responses were reported in a companion article. Five moderately contaminated sediments from Sado and Tagus estuaries were tested, comprising 3 muddy and 2 sandy sediments. These sediments either did not show acute toxicity or were diluted with control sediment as much as required to remove acute toxicity. Subsequent chronic tests consisted of 28-day exposures with survival, individual growth and reproductive traits as endpoints. Two of the muddy sediments induced higher growth rates in the amphipods, and improved reproductive traits. This was understood to be a consequence of the amount of organic matter in the sediment, which was nutritionally beneficial to the amphipods, while concurrently decreasing contaminant bioavailability. Biomarker responses did not reveal toxicant-induced stress in amphipods exposed to these sediments. One of the sandy sediments was acutely toxic at 50% dilution, but in contrast stimulated amphipod growth when diluted 75%. This was presumed to be an indication of a hormetic response. Finally the two remaining contaminated sediments showed pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting survival and reproduction. The sex ratio of survivors was highly biased towards females, and offspring production was severely impaired. The particulars of the responses of this amphipod were examined, as well as strengths versus limitations of the sediment test. This study illustrates the utility of this chronic test for toxicity assessment of contaminated estuarine sediments, with potential application all along Atlantic Europe. PMID:15649529

  5. Large Disorder Renormalization Group Study of the Anderson Model of Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, Sonika; Bhatt, R. N.

    2015-03-01

    We describe a large disorder renormalization group (LDRG) scheme for the Anderson model of localization in one dimension which eliminates eigenstates based on the size of their wavefunctions rather than their energy (as done in RG models to date). We show that our LDRG scheme flows to infinite disorder, and thus becomes asymptotically exact. We use it to obtain the disorder-averaged inverse participation ratio and density of states and compare these with results obtained by exact numerical diagonalization for the entire spectrum. A modified method is formulated for higher dimensions, which is found to be less efficient, but capable of improvement. The possibility of extending this scheme to many-body localized states will be discussed. This work was supported by Department of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0002140.

  6. High-energy neutron dosimetry at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, M.W.; Vasilik, D.G.; Littlejohn, G.J.; Cortez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility indicated potential areas for high energy neutron exposure to personnel. The low sensitivity of the Los Alamos thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) to high energy neutrons warranted issuing a NTA dosimeter in addition to the TLD badge to employees entering these areas. The dosimeter consists of a plastic holder surrounding NTA film that has been desiccated and sealed in a dry nitrogen environment. A study of the fading of latent images in NTA film demonstrated the success of this packaging method to control the phenomenon. The Los Alamos NTA dosimeter is characterized and the fading study discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Pu 4f XPS spectra analyzed in the Anderson impurity model

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L.E.; Peek, J.M.; Allen, J.W.

    1998-05-09

    X-ray photoemission spectra of the {alpha},{beta},{gamma}, and {delta} phases of Pu have been analyzed using the Gunnarsson-Schonhammer implementation of the Anderson impurity model. Changes in the relative intensities of the two spectral features representing mixed f{sup 5} and f{sup 6} final states are in reasonable agreement with the model`s predictions. The coulomb terms, U{sub ff} and U{sub fc}, are quite consistent with those derived from atomic and LDA calculations. Multiplet structure, which agrees with atomic calculations for 4f{sup 13}5f{sup 5}, strongly suggests 5f localization in the final state.

  8. Anderson localization with second quantized fields in a coupled array of waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Clinton; Vemuri, Gautam; Agarwal, G. S.

    2010-11-15

    We report a theoretical study of Anderson localization of nonclassical light in an array of waveguides in which neighboring waveguides are evanescently coupled and in which the disorder can be added in a controlled manner. We use squeezed light at the input to investigate the effects of nonclassicality and compare the results with those obtained by using conventional classical fields, such as a coherent field and a Gaussian field. Our results show that there is an enhancement in fluctuations of localized light due to the medium's disorder. We find superbunching of the localized light, which may be useful for enhancing the interaction between radiation and matter. Another important consequence of sub-Poissonian statistics of the incoming light is to quench the total fluctuations at the output. Finally, we show that as a result of the multiplicative noise in the problem, the output field is far from Gaussian even if the input is a coherent field.

  9. Anderson-Holstein model in two flavors of the noncrossing approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Cohen, Guy; Millis, Andrew J.; Reichman, David R.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical interplay between electron-electron interactions and electron-phonon coupling is investigated within the Anderson-Holstein model, a minimal model for open quantum systems that embody these effects. The influence of phonons on spectral and transport properties is explored in equilibrium, for nonequilibrium steady state and for transient dynamics after a quench. Both the particle-hole symmetric and the more generic particle-hole asymmetric cases are studied. The treatment is based on two complementary noncrossing approximations, the first of which is constructed around the weak-coupling limit and the second around the polaron limit. In general, the two methods disagree in nontrivial ways, indicating that more reliable approaches to the problem are needed. The frameworks used here can form the starting point for numerically exact methods based on bold-line continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo algorithms capable of treating open systems simultaneously coupled to multiple fermionic and bosonic baths.

  10. Leveraging Anderson Acceleration for improved convergence of iterative solutions to transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Taitano, William T.; Knoll, Dana

    2014-09-15

    In this note we demonstrate that using Anderson Acceleration (AA) in place of a standard Picard iteration can not only increase the convergence rate but also make the iteration more robust for two transport applications. We also compare the convergence acceleration provided by AA to that provided by moment-based acceleration methods. Additionally, we demonstrate that those two acceleration methods can be used together in a nested fashion. We begin by describing the AA algorithm. At this point, we will describe two application problems, one from neutronics and one from plasma physics, on which we will apply AA. We provide computational results which highlight the benefits of using AA, namely that we can compute solutions using fewer function evaluations, larger time-steps, and achieve a more robust iteration.

  11. High-order terms in the renormalized perturbation theory for the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandis, Vassilis; Hewson, Alex C.

    2015-09-01

    We study the renormalized perturbation theory of the single-impurity Anderson model, particularly the high-order terms in the expansion of the self-energy in powers of the renormalized coupling U ˜. Though the presence of counterterms in the renormalized theory may appear to complicate the diagrammatics, we show how these can be seamlessly accommodated by carrying out the calculation order-by-order in terms of skeleton diagrams. We describe how the diagrams pertinent to the renormalized self-energy and four vertex can be automatically generated, translated into integrals, and numerically integrated. To maximize the efficiency of our approach we introduce a generalized k -particle/hole propagator, which is used to analytically simplify the resultant integrals and reduce the dimensionality of the integration. We present results for the self-energy and spectral density to fifth order in U ˜, for various values of the model asymmetry, and compare them to a numerical renormalization group calculation.

  12. Modified Anderson Method for Accelerating 3D-RISM Calculations Using Graphics Processing Unit.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Hirata, Fumio

    2012-09-11

    A fast algorithm is proposed to solve the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory on a graphics processing unit (GPU). 3D-RISM theory is a powerful tool for investigating biomolecular processes in solution; however, such calculations are often both memory-intensive and time-consuming. We sought to accelerate these calculations using GPUs, but to work around the problem of limited memory size in GPUs, we modified the less memory-intensive "Anderson method" to give faster convergence to 3D-RISM calculations. Using this method on a Tesla C2070 GPU, we reduced the total computational time by a factor of 8, 1.4 times by the modified Andersen method and 5.7 times by GPU, compared to calculations on an Intel Xeon machine (eight cores, 3.33 GHz) with the conventional method. PMID:26605714

  13. Competition between Hund's coupling and Kondo effect in a one-dimensional extended periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagymási, I.; Sólyom, J.; Legeza, Ö.

    2015-07-01

    We study the ground-state properties of an extended periodic Anderson model to understand the role of Hund's coupling between localized and itinerant electrons using the density-matrix renormalization group algorithm. By calculating the von Neumann entropies we show that two phase transitions occur and two new phases appear as the hybridization is increased in the symmetric half-filled case due to the competition between Kondo effect and Hund's coupling. In the intermediate phase, which is bounded by two critical points, we found a dimerized ground state, while in the other spatially homogeneous phases the ground state is Haldane-like and Kondo-singlet-like, respectively. We also determine the entanglement spectrum and the entanglement diagram of the system by calculating the mutual information thereby clarifying the structure of each phase.

  14. Large thermoelectric figure of merit for three-dimensional topological Anderson insulators via line dislocation engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Oleg; Abanov, Artem; Murakami, Shuichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2011-03-01

    We study the thermoelectric properties of three-dimensional topological Anderson insulators with line dislocations. We show that at high densities of dislocations the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT can be dominated by one-dimensional topologically protected conducting states channeled through the lattice screw dislocations in the topological insulator materials with a nonzero time-reversal-invariant momentum such as Bi 0.9 Sb 0.1 . When the chemical potential does not exceed much the mobility edge the ZT at room temperatures can reach large values, much higher than unity for reasonable parameters, hence making this system a strong candidate for applications in heat management of nanodevices. This work was supported by NSF under Grant Nos. DMR-0547875 and 0757992, by the Research Corporation Cottrell Scholar Award, and by the Welch Foundation (A-1678).

  15. Buildup of the Kondo effect from real-time effective action for the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Sebastian; Liluashvili, Alexander; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The nonequilibrium time evolution of a quantum dot is studied by means of dynamic equations for time-dependent Green's functions derived from a two-particle-irreducible (2PI) effective action for the Anderson impurity model. Coupling the dot between two leads at different voltages, the dynamics of the current through the dot is investigated. We show that the 2PI approach is capable of describing the dynamical buildup of the Kondo effect, which shows up as a sharp resonance in the spectral function, with a width exponentially suppressed in the electron self-coupling on the dot. An external voltage applied to the dot is found to deteriorate the Kondo effect at the hybridization scale. The dynamic equations are evaluated within different nonperturbative resummation schemes, within the direct, particle-particle, and particle-hole channels, as well as their combination, and the results compared with those from other methods.

  16. Financial protection against nuclear hazards: thirty years' experience under the Price-Anderson Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Supplementing earlier reports on ways to provide financial protection against the potential hazards involved in the production of nuclear energy by analyzing the issues raised in the Silkwood v. Kerr-McGee Corporation decision, the author explores the impact of the case on the availability of funds to compensate the public and any increased exposure of the nuclear industry or the federal government to public liability. She concludes that the decision will have a significant impact on the day-to-day administration of claims, and could lead to higher premiums. The court would have to determine the priority given to claims in the event of a catastrophic accident, in which case the only significant impact would be under amendments to the Price-Anderson Act which resulted in elimination of its coverage or a substantial increase in or elimination of the limitation on liability.

  17. Information Transmission and Anderson Localization in two-dimensional networks of firing-rate neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natale, Joseph; Hentschel, George

    Firing-rate networks offer a coarse model of signal propagation in the brain. Here we analyze sparse, 2D planar firing-rate networks with no synapses beyond a certain cutoff distance. Additionally, we impose Dale's Principle to ensure that each neuron makes only or inhibitory outgoing connections. Using spectral methods, we find that the number of neurons participating in excitations of the network becomes insignificant whenever the connectivity cutoff is tuned to a value near or below the average interneuron separation. Further, neural activations exceeding a certain threshold stay confined to a small region of space. This behavior is an instance of Anderson localization, a disorder-induced phase transition by which an information channel is rendered unable to transmit signals. We discuss several potential implications of localization for both local and long-range computation in the brain. This work was supported in part by Grants JSMF/ 220020321 and NSF/IOS/1208126.

  18. ARPES in strongly correlated 4f and 5f systems: Comparison to the Periodic Anderson Model

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Cox, L.E.

    1997-12-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow, nearly temperature independent bands (i.e., no spectral weight loss or transfer with temperature). A small dispersion of the f-bands above the Kondo temperature is easily measurable so that a Kondo resonance, as defined by NCA, is not evident. Preliminary results, however, indicate that the Periodic Anderson Model captures some of the essential physics. Angle-integrated resonant photoemission results on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow 5f feature at E{sub F}, similar in width to f-states in Ce and U compounds, but differing in that cross-section behavior of the near-E{sub F} feature suggests substantial 6D admixture.

  19. Crossover from conventional to inverse indirect magnetic exchange in the depleted Anderson lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Maximilian W.; Titvinidze, Irakli; Potthoff, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the finite-temperature properties of an Anderson lattice with regularly depleted impurities. The physics of this model is ruled by two different magnetic exchange mechanisms: conventional Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction at weak hybridization strength V and an inverse indirect magnetic exchange (IIME) at strong V , both favoring a ferromagnetic ground state. The stability of ferromagnetic order against thermal fluctuations is systematically studied by static mean-field theory for an effective low-energy spin-only model emerging perturbatively in the strong-coupling limit as well as by dynamical mean-field theory for the full model. The Curie temperature is found at a maximum for a half-filled conduction band and at intermediate hybridization strengths in the crossover regime between RKKY and IIME.

  20. Conductance fluctuation of edge-disordered graphene nanoribbons: Crossover from diffusive transport to Anderson localization

    SciTech Connect

    Takashima, Kengo; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2014-03-03

    Conductance fluctuation of edge-disordered graphene nanoribbons (ED-GNRs) is examined using the non-equilibrium Green's function technique combined with the extended Hückel approximation. The mean free path λ and the localization length ξ of the ED-GNRs are determined to classify the quantum transport regimes. In the diffusive regime where the length L{sub c} of the ED-GNRs is much longer than λ and much shorter than ξ, the conductance histogram is given by a Gaussian distribution function with universal conductance fluctuation. In the localization regime where L{sub c}≫ξ, the histogram is no longer the universal Gaussian distribution but a lognormal distribution that characterizes Anderson localization.

  1. Efficient Localization Bounds in a Continuous N-Particle Anderson Model with Long-Range Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaevsky, Victor

    2016-04-01

    We establish strong dynamical and exponential spectral localization for a class of multi-particle Anderson models in a Euclidean space with an alloy-type random potential and a sub-exponentially decaying interaction of infinite range. For the first time in the mathematical literature, the uniform decay bounds on the eigenfunction correlators (EFCs) at low energies are proved, in the multi-particle continuous configuration space, in the (symmetrized) norm-distance, which is a natural distance in the multi-particle configuration space, and not in the Hausdorff distance. This results in uniform bounds on the EFCs in arbitrarily large but bounded domains in the physical configuration space, and not only in the actually infinite space, as in prior works on multi-particle localization in Euclidean spaces.

  2. Magnetic correlations in a periodic Anderson model with nonuniform conduction electron coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, N.; Chiu, W.-T.; Scalettar, R. T.

    2016-06-01

    The periodic Anderson model is widely studied to understand strong correlation physics and especially the competition of antiferromagnetism and singlet formation. In this paper we extend quantum Monte Carlo work on lattices with uniform numbers of neighbors to geometries in which the conduction electron sites can have variable coordination z . This situation is relevant both to recently discovered magnetic quasicrystals and also to magnetism in doped heavy fermion systems. Our key results are the presence of antiferromagnetic order at weak interorbital hybridization Vf d, and a delay in singlet formation to larger values of Vf d on sites with larger z . The staggered magnetization tends to be larger on sites with higher z , providing insight into the behavior to be expected in crown, dice, and CaVO lattices.

  3. One-dimensional Anderson Localization: distribution of wavefunction amplitude and phase at the band center

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V. E.; Yudson, V. I.

    2009-05-14

    The statistics of normalized wavefunctions in the one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model of localization is considered. It is shown that at any energy that corresponds to a rational filling factor f = (p/q) there is a statistical anomaly which is seen in expansion of the generating function (GF) to the order q-2 in the disorder parameter. We study in detail the principle anomaly at f = (1/2) that appears in the leading order. The transfer-matrix equation of the Fokker-Planck type with a two-dimensional internal space is derived for GF. It is shown that the zero-mode variant of this equation is integrable and a solution for the generating function is found in the thermodynamic limit.

  4. Multichannel Numerical Renormalization Group study of the Anderson Hamiltonian with multiple impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, James; Konik, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Using the Numerical Renormalization Group (NRG), the low energy sector of the Anderson Hamiltonian with two impurities in parallel has been previously argued to be consistent with an underscreened spin-1 Kondo effect (R. Zitko and J. Bonca, Phys. Rev. B 76, 241305 (2007); Logan et al., Phys. Rev. B 80, 125117 (2009)). Bethe Ansatz and slave boson calculations have given the ground state as a singlet (M. Kulkarni and R. M. Konik, Phys. Rev. B 83, 245121 (2011)). As an attempt to understand these differences, we have developed a modified NRG routine that takes into account the multiple channels arising from the logarithmic discretization of the Fermi sea. This could conceivably allow for more complicated screening processes suggested by the Bethe ansatz computations. Results of studies using this code for various numbers of impurities and channels will be presented and discussed in relationship to these conflicting views.

  5. Modified Anderson-Darling Test-Based Target Detector in Non-Homogenous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wei, Yinsheng; Li, Bingfei; Alterovitz, Gil

    2014-01-01

    A constant false alarm rate (CFAR) target detector in non-homogenous backgrounds is proposed. Based on K-sample Anderson-Darling (AD) tests, the method re-arranges the reference cells by merging homogenous sub-blocks surrounding the cell under test (CUT) into a new reference window to estimate the background statistics. Double partition test, clutter edge refinement and outlier elimination are used as an anti-clutter processor in the proposed Modified AD (MAD) detector. Simulation results show that the proposed MAD test based detector outperforms cell-averaging (CA) CFAR, greatest of (GO) CFAR, smallest of (SO) CFAR, order-statistic (OS) CFAR, variability index (VI) CFAR, and CUT inclusive (CI) CFAR in most non-homogenous situations. PMID:25177800

  6. Anderson localization in high temperature QCD: background configuration properties and Dirac eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossu, Guido; Hashimoto, Shoji

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the properties of the background gauge field configurations that act as disorder for the Anderson localization mechanism in the Dirac spectrum of QCD at high temperatures. We compute the eigenmodes of the Möbius domain-wall fermion operator on configurations generated for the SU(3) gauge theory with two flavors of fermions, in the temperature range [0.9, 1.9]T c . We identify the source of localization of the eigenmodes with gauge configurations that are self-dual and support negative fluctuations of the Polyakov loop P L , in the high temperature sea of P L ˜ 1. The dependence of these observations on the boundary conditions of the valence operator is studied. We also investigate the spatial overlap of the left-handed and right-handed projected eigenmodes in correlation with the localization and the corresponding eigenvalue. We discuss an interpretation of the results in terms of monopole-instanton structures.

  7. Tunable Anderson Localization in Hydrogenated Graphene Based on the Electric Field Effect: First-Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joongoo; Wei, Su-Huai

    2014-03-01

    We present a mechanism for reversible switching of the Anderson localization (AL) of electrons in hydrogenated graphene through modulation of the H coverage on graphene by external electric fields. The main idea is to exploit the unique acid-base chemistry (i.e., proton transfer reaction) between NH3 gas and hydrogenated graphene, which can be controlled by applying perpendicular electric fields. The proposed field-induced control of disorder in hydrogenated graphene not only has scientific merits in a systematic study of AL of electrons in grapheme but can also lead to new insight into the development of a new type of transistor based on reversible on/off switching of AL. Furthermore, the reversible and effective tuning of the H coverage on graphene should be useful for tailoring material properties of weakly hydrogenated graphene. This work was funded by the NREL LDRD program (DE-AC36-08GO28308).

  8. Decoherence-induced conductivity in the one-dimensional Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Stegmann, Thomas; Wolf, Dietrich E.; Ujsághy, Orsolya

    2014-08-20

    We study the effect of decoherence on the electron transport in the one-dimensional Anderson model by means of a statistical model [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. In this model decoherence bonds are randomly distributed within the system, at which the electron phase is randomized completely. Afterwards, the transport quantity of interest (e.g. resistance or conductance) is ensemble averaged over the decoherence configurations. Averaging the resistance of the sample, the calculation can be performed analytically. In the thermodynamic limit, we find a decoherence-driven transition from the quantum-coherent localized regime to the Ohmic regime at a critical decoherence density, which is determined by the second-order generalized Lyapunov exponent (GLE) [4].

  9. Identification and Analysis of Learning Preferences of Mentally Ill Adults in Rehabilitative Psychosocial Therapy at the Anderson Mental Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Michael K.

    A study identified and analyzed the learning preferences of 17 seriously and chronically mentally ill adults participating in the rehabilitative psychosocial therapy program at the Toxaway Church Site of the Anderson Mental Health Center. Staff perceived as boring and unfocused the traditional treatment approach that relied mainly upon…

  10. Oblique Axis Body Fracture: An Unstable Subtype of Anderson Type III Odontoid Fractures—Apropos of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, Lukas; Schmal, Hagen; Helwig, Peter; Knöller, Stefan; Südkamp, Norbert; Hauschild, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Anderson type III odontoid fractures have traditionally been considered stable and treated conservatively. However, unstable cases with unfavorable results following conservative treatment have been reported. Methods. We present the cases of two patients who sustained minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures with a characteristic fracture pattern that we refer to as “oblique type axis body fracture.” Results. The female patients aged 90 and 72 years, respectively, were both diagnosed with minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures. Both fractures had a characteristic “oblique type” fracture pattern. The first patient was treated conservatively with cervical spine immobilization in a semirigid collar. However, gross displacement was noted at the 6-week follow-up visit. The second patient was therefore treated operatively by C1–C3/4 posterior fusion and the course was uneventful. Conclusions. Oblique type axis body fractures resemble a highly unstable subtype of Anderson type III fractures with the potential of severe secondary deformity following conservative treatment, irrespective of initial grade of displacement. The authors therefore warrant a high index of suspicion for this injury and suggest early operative stabilization. PMID:27042372

  11. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony before the Joint Committee last year, Professor Samuel... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS §...

  12. Oblique Axis Body Fracture: An Unstable Subtype of Anderson Type III Odontoid Fractures-Apropos of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Takai, Hirokazu; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Schmal, Hagen; Helwig, Peter; Knöller, Stefan; Südkamp, Norbert; Hauschild, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Anderson type III odontoid fractures have traditionally been considered stable and treated conservatively. However, unstable cases with unfavorable results following conservative treatment have been reported. Methods. We present the cases of two patients who sustained minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures with a characteristic fracture pattern that we refer to as "oblique type axis body fracture." Results. The female patients aged 90 and 72 years, respectively, were both diagnosed with minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures. Both fractures had a characteristic "oblique type" fracture pattern. The first patient was treated conservatively with cervical spine immobilization in a semirigid collar. However, gross displacement was noted at the 6-week follow-up visit. The second patient was therefore treated operatively by C1-C3/4 posterior fusion and the course was uneventful. Conclusions. Oblique type axis body fractures resemble a highly unstable subtype of Anderson type III fractures with the potential of severe secondary deformity following conservative treatment, irrespective of initial grade of displacement. The authors therefore warrant a high index of suspicion for this injury and suggest early operative stabilization. PMID:27042372

  13. 77 FR 72906 - Chessie Logistics Co., LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Surface Transportation Board Chessie Logistics Co., LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption-- J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc. Chessie Logistics Co., LLC (Chessie), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of... copy of each pleading must be served on Ariel A. Erbacher, Legal Counsel, Chessie Logistics Co.,...

  14. A novel single-side azobenzene-grafted Anderson-type polyoxometalate for recognition-induced chiral migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Yue, Liang; Wang, Yang; Yang, Yang; Wu, Lixin

    2014-09-25

    A three-component supramolecular hybrid system based on host-guest recognition and electrostatic interaction has been developed for a consecutive chiral transfer from an alpha-cyclodextrin to cationic dyes via the bridge of a new azobenzene-grafted Anderson-type polyoxometalate cluster. PMID:25089807

  15. Higher Lipoprotein (a) Levels Are Associated with Better Pulmonary Function in Community-Dwelling Older People – Data from the Berlin Aging Study II

    PubMed Central

    Buchmann, Nikolaus; Kassner, Ursula; Norman, Kristina; Goldeck, David; Eckardt, Rahel; Pawelec, Graham; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    Reduced pulmonary function and elevated serum cholesterol levels are recognized risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Currently, there is some controversy concerning relationships between cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, serum triglycerides and lung function. However, most previous studies compared patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with healthy controls, and only a small number examined this relationship in population-based cohorts. Moreover, lipoprotein a [Lp(a)], another lipid parameter independently associated with cardiovascular diseases, appears not to have been addressed at all in studies of lung function at the population level. Here, we determined relationships between lung function and several lipid parameters including Lp(a) in 606 older community-dwelling participants (55.1% women, 68±4 years old) from the Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II). We found a significantly lower forced expiration volume in 1 second (FEV1) in men with low Lp(a) concentrations (t-test). This finding was further substantiated by linear regression models adjusting for known covariates, showing that these associations are statistically significant in both men and women. According to the highest adjusted model, men and women with Lp(a) levels below the 20th percentile had 217.3ml and 124.2ml less FEV1 and 239.0ml and 135.2ml less FVC, respectively, compared to participants with higher Lp(a) levels. The adjusted models also suggest that the known strong correlation between pro-inflammatory parameters and lung function has only a marginal impact on the Lp(a)-pulmonary function association. Our results do not support the hypothesis that higher Lp(a) levels are responsible for the increased CVD risk in people with reduced lung function, at least not in the group of community-dwelling older people studied here. PMID:26421427

  16. Magnetic and thermodynamic properties of the 3-D periodic anderson lattice hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Huscrot, C.; McMahan, A. K.; Pollock, E. I; Scalettar, R. T.

    1998-09-10

    Tight-binding models capture many of the qualitative features of interaction-induced effects in solids. For example, the simplest such model, the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian, describes the Mott insulating phase which occurs in correlated systems, despite the fact that the one electron band is nominally only half-filled, as well as the tendency towards magnetic order. Both phenomena occur in the transition metal oxides. The Periodic Anderson Model (PAM) is a step towards incorporating more complex orbital structure. It contains a pair of orbitals on each site--a delocalized conduction band and a set of highly correlated, localized states. The PAM successfully describes conditions for transitions between antiferromagnetic order of the local moments and phases in which these moments are quenched into singlets paired with conduction electrons. These phenomena are central to heavy fermion systems. The pressure-induced volume collapse in Ce has also been attributed to Kondo-like quenching of the local f moments in this metal, as has been discussed in the context of the impurity Anderson Model. The authors describe Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of the magnetic and thermodynamic properties of the PAM in three dimensions. Previous QMC studies have been reported in one and two dimensions. A focus of our attention will be on the density of states and the specific heat. The organization of this paper is as follows. They first introduce the PAM and outline some of its properties. Next, a brief presentation of the Quantum Monte Carlo, Maximum Entropy, and Hartree-Fock methods is given. They then show the equilibrium magnetic properties of the PAM, including the spin correlations between conduction and localized orbitals, and antiferromagnetic correlations in the localized band, before turning to the thermodynamics and the density of states. A concluding section describes connections of this work to the problem of the rare earth volume collapse transitions.

  17. Anderson localization of matter waves in 3D anisotropic disordered potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piraud, Marie

    2016-05-01

    We study quantum transport and Anderson localization of matterwaves in 3 dimensional correlated disorder, focusing on the effects of the anisotropy. Indeed, understanding the anisotropy effects is fundamental for experiments with ultracold atoms as well as for several other systems, such as electrons in MOSFETs, light in biological medium, liquid crystals. A major challenge is to understand whether the anisotropy of the diffusion tensor is altered by the interference terms at the origin of Anderson localization. In particular, its anisotropy at the mobility edge remains to be investigated. So far, all theoretical analysis have assumed - more or less implicitly - that the anisotropy of the diffusion tensor is preserved by interference effects, and have focussed on the vanishing of diffusion as a whole. In this talk, I will start by presenting the usual description of matterwave transport in disordered medium. I will then present our method to go beyond the standard self-consistent theory, which includes in particular the full anisotropic structure of the spectral function. It thus avoids the infrared divergence of the usual self-consistent theory and, most importantly, does not make any assumption on the anisotropy of the renormalized diffusion tensor when including quantum interference terms. Using a generic model of disorder with elongated correlations, we find that the diffusion tensor is strongly affected by the quantum interference terms and that the anisotropy strongly diminishes in the vicinity of the mobility edge. Our work paves the way to further investigation with speckle potentials, which are directly relevant to ultracold-atom experiments. It will permit comparison with previous predictions for the mobility edge and shed new light on ongoing experiments in the field of ultracold atoms.

  18. Assimilation of spatially distributed water levels into a shallow-water flood model. Part II: Use of a remote sensing image of Mosel River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostache, Renaud; Lai, Xijun; Monnier, Jérôme; Puech, Christian

    2010-09-01

    SummaryWith rapid flood extent mapping capabilities, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of river inundation prove to be very relevant to operational flood management. In this context, a recently developed method provides distributed water levels from SAR images. Furthermore, in view of improving numerical flood prediction, a variational data assimilation method (4D-var) using such distributed water level has been developed in Part I of this study. This method combines an optimal sense remote sensing data (distributed water levels extracted from spatial images) and a 2D shallow water model. In the present article (Part II of the study), we also derive water levels with a ±40 cm average vertical uncertainty from a RADARSAT-1 image of a Mosel River flood event (1997, France). Assimilated in a 2D shallow water hydraulic model using the 4D-var developed method, these SAR derived spatially distributed water levels prove to be capable of enhancing model calibration. Indeed, the assimilation process can identify optimal Manning friction coefficients, at least in the river channel. Moreover, used as a guide for sensitivity analysis, remote sensing water levels allow also identifying some areas in the floodplain and the channel where Manning friction coefficients are homogeneous. This allows basing the spatial segmentation of roughness coefficient on floodplain hydraulic functioning.

  19. Serum levels of renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II in patients treated by surgical excision, propranolol and captopril for problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Sulzberger, L; Baillie, R; Itinteang, T; de Jong, S; Marsh, R; Leadbitter, P; Tan, S T

    2016-03-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the biology of infantile haemangioma (IH) and its accelerated involution induced by β-blockers was first proposed in 2010. This led to the first clinical trial in 2012 using low-dose captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, demonstrating a similar response in these tumours. This study aimed to compare serial serum levels of the components of the RAS in patients before and after surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment for problematic proliferating IH. Patients with problematic proliferating IH underwent measurements of serum levels of plasma renin activity (PRA), ACE and angiotensin II (ATII) before, and 1-2 and 6 months following surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment. This study included 27 patients undergoing surgical excision (n = 8), propranolol (n = 11) and captopril (n = 8) treatment. Treatment with either surgical excision or propranolol resulted in significant decrease in the mean levels of PRA. Surgical excision or captopril treatment led to significant decline in the mean levels of ATII. All three treatment modalities had no significant effect on the mean levels of ACE. This study demonstrates the effect of surgical excision, propranolol and captopril treatment in lowering the levels of PRA and ATII, but not ACE, supporting a mechanistic role for the RAS in the biology of IH. PMID:26612192

  20. In Vitro Maturation of Mouse Oocytes Increases the Level of Kif11/Eg5 on Meiosis II Spindles.

    PubMed

    Kovacovicova, Kristina; Awadova, Thuraya; Mikel, Pavel; Anger, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Although in vitro maturation (IVM) of oocytes has been used for a relatively long time, during which the culture conditions have improved remarkably, the resulting germ cells are still not fully comparable to the cells obtained from the ovary in many important aspects, namely in fertilization rate and subsequent embryonic development. Some of the differences between IVM and in vivo maturation (IVV) oocytes were already discovered, including variability in spindle assembly and morphology. In this study we focused on a role of molecular motor Kif11 (hereafter referred to as Eg5) in maintaining bipolar spindle structure in IVM and IVV oocytes. Our experiments revealed that in IVM oocytes, Eg5 is abundant on meiosis II spindle, which makes these cells more sensitive to Eg5 inhibition than IVV oocytes. We further demonstrate that this sensitivity is acquired gradually with exposure to the in vitro conditions. This is a remarkable difference in function of spindle apparatus between IVM and IVV oocytes, and we believe our results are important not only for understanding of the chromosome segregation in mammalian oocytes but also because they indicate cells are using alternative pathways to achieve the same function when exposed to different conditions. PMID:27146033

  1. Quantum evolution: The case of weak localization for a 3D alloy-type Anderson model and application to Hamiltonian based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhenwei

    Over the years, people have found Quantum Mechanics to be extremely useful in explaining various physical phenomena from a microscopic point of view. Anderson localization, named after physicist P. W. Anderson, states that disorder in a crystal can cause non-spreading of wave packets, which is one possible mechanism (at single electron level) to explain metal-insulator transitions. The theory of quantum computation promises to bring greater computational power over classical computers by making use of some special features of Quantum Mechanics. The first part of this dissertation considers a 3D alloy-type model, where the Hamiltonian is the sum of the finite difference Laplacian corresponding to free motion of an electron and a random potential generated by a sign-indefinite single-site potential. The result shows that localization occurs in the weak disorder regime, i.e., when the coupling parameter lambda is very small, for energies E ≤ --Clambda 2. The second part of this dissertation considers adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) algorithms for the unstructured search problem to the case when the number of marked items is unknown. In an ideal situation, an explicit quantum algorithm together with a counting subroutine are given that achieve the optimal Grover speedup over classical algorithms, i.e., roughly speaking, reduce O(2n) to O(2n/2), where n is the size of the problem. However, if one considers more realistic settings, the result shows this quantum speedup is achievable only under a very rigid control precision requirement (e.g., exponentially small control error).

  2. Simple thermo-level meter for HeI and HeII by a dynamic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiki, H.

    A simple liquid helium level monitoring device has been developed using pairs of carbon resistors mounted on a stainless steel 'dipstick'. The device described has a resolution of 50 mm and negligible power dissipation. The level of both superfluid and normal helium, and the liquid temperatures, can be determined. The device has no moving parts and after some years of use has proved to be sturdy and durable. A similar device is proposed with a resolution of 12 mm and a microcomputer data recording system.

  3. Involvement of Difference in Decrease of Hemoglobin Level in Poor Prognosis of Stage I and II Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Implication in Outcome of Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jin; Tao Yalan; Li Guo; Yi Wei; Xia Yunfei

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and the difference in its decrease during treatment on outcome of radiotherapy (RT) alone for patients with Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 572 patients with Stage I-II nasopharyngeal carcinoma with RT alone between January 2001 and December 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. Patient characteristics, tumor variables, and Hb level, including pre-RT Hb, mid-RT Hb, and dynamic change of Hb between pre- and post- RT and its difference in decrease ( White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb) were subjected to univariate and multivariable analysis to identify factors that predict disease-specific survival (DSS), local regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS). Results: The 5-year DSS was poorer in the Hb continuous decrease group than in the Hb noncontinuous decrease group (84% vs. 89%; p = 0.008). There was poorer 5-year DSS in patients with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of >11.5 g/L than in those with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of {<=}11.5 g/L (82% vs. 89%; p = 0.001), and poorer LRFS (79% vs. 83%; p = 0.035). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that Hb decrease difference with greater than 11.5 g/L was an independent prognostic factor for DSS and LRFS. Conclusions: The difference in decrease of Hb level during the course of radiation treatment appeared as a poor prognostic factor in Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

  4. The National Council for Geographic Education Competency-Based Geography Test. Secondary Level. Form I. Parts I, II, and III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurfman, Dana G.; And Others

    A 3-part test measures the geography knowledge, skills, and understanding of secondary level students. Part 1, map skills and location, contains 20 questions involving the use of three maps: an imaginary sketch map, a contour map, and a political map of the world. Part 2 consists of 20 questions covering physical geography. Students analyze…

  5. Behavior of mercury in bio-systems. II. Depuration of /sup 203/Hg/sup 2 +/ in various trophic levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdy, M.K.; Prabhu, N.V.

    1984-01-01

    Using radiotracer techniques, the depuration rates for methylmercury at three trophic levels in an aquatic ecosystem are examined. Bacteria (decomposers), mosquito larvae (primary consumers), and fish (secondary consumers) were studied. Results indicated that depuration rates for mercury were temperature dependent - the rate of depuration increased with increase in temperature (up to 45/sup 0/C)

  6. Competency-Based Adult Education Classroom Management Guide for Adult Basic Education Curriculum (Level II, 5-8).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elizabeth

    This Competency-Based Adult Basic Education (CBABE) Classroom Management Guide was developed to aid the Adult Basic Education (ABE) facilitator in implementing a model CBABE Level 5-8 curriculum. First, introductory material provides background on the CBABE project at Brevard Community College (Florida) and the rationale for the development of the…

  7. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT TOXICITY: II. COMPARISON OF GENERIC BENCHMARK DOSE ESTIMATES WITH NO OBSERVED ADVERSE EFFECT LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses (RfDDTS) or reference concentrations (RfCDTS) based on the use of no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELS) divided by uncertainty factors (UFs)The benchmark dose (BUD) has been proposed...

  8. Modeling Improvements for Air Source Heat Pumps using Different Expansion Devices at Varied Charge Levels Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes steady-state performance simulations performed on a 3-ton R-22 split heat pump in heating mode. In total, 150 steady-state points were simulated, which covers refrigerant charge levels from 70 % to 130% relative to the nominal value, the outdoor temperatures at 17 F (-8.3 C), 35 F (1.7 C) and 47 F (8.3 C), indoor air flow rates from 60% to 150% of the rated air flow rate, and two types of expansion devices (fixed orifice and thermostatic expansion valve). A charge tuning method, which is to calibrate the charge inventory model based on measurements at two operation conditions, was applied and shown to improve the system simulation accuracy significantly in an extensive range of charge levels. In addition, we discuss the effects of suction line accumulator in modeling a heat pump system using either a fixed orifice or thermal expansion valve. Last, we identify the issue of refrigerant mass flow mal-distribution at low charge levels and propose an improved modeling approach.

  9. Venus: Cloud level circulation during 1982 as determined from Pioneer cloud photopolarimeter images. II - Solar longitude dependent circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limaye, Sanjay S.

    1988-01-01

    Pioneer Venus Orbiter images obtained in 1982 indicate a marked solar-locked dependence of cloud level circulation in both averaged cloud motions and cloud layer UV reflectivity. An apparent relationship is noted between horizontal divergence and UV reflectivity: the highest reflectivities are associated with regions of convergence at high latitudes, while lower values are associated with equatorial latitude regions where the motions are divergent. In solar-locked coordinates, the rms deviation of normalized UV brightness is higher at 45-deg latitudes than in equatorial regions.

  10. Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part II: Transport and Diffusion of Tracer under Stable Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, Lisa S.; Allwine, K Jerry; Banta, Robert M.

    2006-05-01

    Differences in nighttime transport and diffusion of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer in an urban complex-terrain setting (Salt Lake City, Utah) are investigated using surface and Dopplerlidar wind data, and large-scale surface pressure differences. Interacting scales of motion, as studied through the URBAN 2000 field program combined with the Vertical Transport and Mixing Experiment (VTMX), explained the differences in the tracer behavior during three separate Intensive Operating Periods (IOPs). With an emphasis on nighttime stable boundary layer conditions, these field programs were designed to study flow features responsible for the nighttime transport of airborne substances. This transport has implications for air quality, homeland security, and emergency response issues if the airborne substances are hazardous. The important flow features investigated included thermally forced canyon and slope flows and a low-level jet (LLJ) that dominated the basin-scale winds when the surface pressure gradient was weak. The presence of thermally forced flows contributed to the complexity and hindered the predictability of the tracer motion within and beyond the city. When organized thermally forced flows were present, the tracer tended to stay closer to the city for longer periods of time, even though a strong basin-scale LLJ did develop. When thermally forced flows were short-lived or absent, the basin-scale low-level jet dominated the wind field and enhanced the transport of tracer material out of the city.

  11. Dual nature of localization in guiding systems with randomly corrugated boundaries: Anderson-type versus entropic

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Yu.V. Shostenko, L.D.

    2015-05-15

    coexist in waveguide-like systems with randomly corrugated boundaries, specifically, the entropic localization and the one-dimensional Anderson (disorder-driven) localization. If the particular mode propagates across the rough segment ballistically, the Fabry–Pérot-type oscillations should be observed in the conductance, which are suppressed for the mode transferred in the Anderson-localized regime.

  12. Commensurability effects in one-dimensional Anderson localization: Anomalies in eigenfunction statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V.E.; Yudson, V.I.

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Statistics of normalized eigenfunctions in one-dimensional Anderson localization at E = 0 is studied. > Moments of inverse participation ratio are calculated. > Equation for generating function is derived at E = 0. > An exact solution for generating function at E = 0 is obtained. > Relation of the generating function to the phase distribution function is established. - Abstract: The one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model (AM), i.e. a tight-binding chain with random uncorrelated on-site energies, has statistical anomalies at any rational point f=(2a)/({lambda}{sub E}) , where a is the lattice constant and {lambda}{sub E} is the de Broglie wavelength. We develop a regular approach to anomalous statistics of normalized eigenfunctions {psi}(r) at such commensurability points. The approach is based on an exact integral transfer-matrix equation for a generating function {Phi}{sub r}(u, {phi}) (u and {phi} have a meaning of the squared amplitude and phase of eigenfunctions, r is the position of the observation point). This generating function can be used to compute local statistics of eigenfunctions of 1d AM at any disorder and to address the problem of higher-order anomalies at f=p/q with q > 2. The descender of the generating function P{sub r}({phi}){identical_to}{Phi}{sub r}(u=0,{phi}) is shown to be the distribution function of phase which determines the Lyapunov exponent and the local density of states. In the leading order in the small disorder we derived a second-order partial differential equation for the r-independent ('zero-mode') component {Phi}(u, {phi}) at the E = 0 (f=1/2 ) anomaly. This equation is nonseparable in variables u and {phi}. Yet, we show that due to a hidden symmetry, it is integrable and we construct an exact solution for {Phi}(u, {phi}) explicitly in quadratures. Using this solution we computed moments I{sub m} = N< vertical bar {psi} vertical bar {sup 2m}> (m {>=} 1) for a chain of the length N {yields} {infinity} and found an

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (BRIDTH00050033) on Town Highway 5, crossing the North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00050033 on town highway 5 crossing the North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 5.01-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the downstream banks are forested and the upstream banks have dense woody brush; the upstream right overbank is an open field. In the study area, the North Branch Ottauquechee River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.017 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 30 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 83.2 mm (0.273 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 3, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. Also at the time of the site visit, there was considerable backwater at the bridge site due to a three foot tall beaver dam 40 feet downstream. The beaver dam was assumed destroyed by flood flow and was ignored in the analyses. The town highway 5 crossing of the North Branch Ottauquechee Riveris a 25-ft-long, onelane bridge consisting of one 23-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (ANDOVT00110038) on State Route 11, crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOVT00110038 on State Route 11 crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south central Vermont. The 5.65-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. Upstream and downstream of the study site banks and overbanks are forested. In the study area, the Middle Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 44 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 54.0 mm (0.177 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 5, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The State Route 11 crossing of the Middle Branch Williams River is a 33-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 55 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. There were no scour problems observed during the Level I assessment. Type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) and type-3 stone fill

  15. Modulation of coffee aroma via the fermentation of green coffee beans with Rhizopus oligosporus: II. Effects of different roast levels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Liang Wei; Cheong, Mun Wai; Curran, Philip; Yu, Bin; Liu, Shao Quan

    2016-11-15

    This study aims to evaluate how changes of the volatile and non-volatile profiles of green coffees induced by Rhizopus oligosporus fermentation of green coffee beans (Part I) translated to changes in the volatile and aroma profiles of light, medium and dark roasted coffees and non-volatile profile of roasted coffee where fermentation effects were most distinctive (light roast). R. oligosporus fermentation resulted in 1.7-, 1.5- and 1.3-fold increases in pyrazine, 2-methylpyrazine and 2-ethylpyrazine levels in coffees of all roast degrees, respectively. This corresponded with the greater extent of amino acids degradation in light roasted fermented coffee. Ethyl palmitate was detected exclusively in medium and dark roasted fermented coffees. The sweet attribute of light and dark roasted coffees were increased following fermentation along with other aroma profile changes that were roast degree specific. This work aims to develop a direct but novel methodology for coffee aroma modulation through green coffee beans fermentation. PMID:27283714

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (CHESTH00030010) on Town Highway 3 (VT 35), crossing the South Branch of Williams River, Chester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESTH00030010 on Town Highway 3 (VT 35) crossing the South Branch Williams River, Chester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 9.44-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, the South Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 67 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 69.0 mm (0.226 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 26-27, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 3 (VT 35) crossing of the South Branch Williams River is a 69-foot-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 67-foot steel-stringer span with a concrete deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 23, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 64.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. The scour protection (spill

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (WNDHTH00020010) on Town Highway 2, crossing the Middle Branch of the Williams River, Windham, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WNDHTH00020010 on Town Highway 2 crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Windham, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south central Vermont. The 1.44-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the predominate surface cover upstream of the bridge is pasture on the left bank and forest on the right bank. Downstream of the bridge the surface cover consists of forest on the right bank and grass on the left bank. In the study area, the Middle Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 28 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 61.4 mm (0.201 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 22, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 2 crossing of the Middle Branch Williams River is a 25-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 22-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 31, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees to the opening while the opening

  18. Evidence for a defect level above the conduction band edge of InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices for applications in efficient infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Prins, A. D.; Lewis, M. K.; Bushell, Z. L.; Sweeney, S. J.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.

    2015-04-27

    We report pressure-dependent photoluminescence (PL) experiments under hydrostatic pressures up to 2.16 GPa on a mid-wave infrared InAs/InAs{sub 0.86}Sb{sub 0.14} type-II superlattice (T2SL) structure at different pump laser excitation powers and sample temperatures. The pressure coefficient of the T2SL transition was found to be 93 ± 2 meV·GPa{sup −1}. The integrated PL intensity increases with pressure up to 1.9 GPa then quenches rapidly indicating a pressure induced level crossing with the conduction band states at ∼2 GPa. Analysis of the PL intensity as a function of excitation power at 0, 0.42, 1.87, and 2.16 GPa shows a clear change in the dominant photo-generated carrier recombination mechanism from radiative to defect related. From these data, evidence for a defect level situated at 0.18 ± 0.01 eV above the conduction band edge of InAs at ambient pressure is presented. This assumes a pressure-dependent energy shift of −11 meV·GPa{sup −1} for the valence band edge and that the defect level is insensitive to pressure, both of which are supported by an Arrhenius activation energy analysis.

  19. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2012-07-15

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  20. Phosphatase Rtr1 Regulates Global Levels of Serine 5 RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphorylation and Cotranscriptional Histone Methylation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gerald O; Fox, Melanie J; Smith-Kinnaman, Whitney R; Gogol, Madelaine; Fleharty, Brian; Mosley, Amber L

    2016-09-01

    In eukaryotes, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1 contains a heptapeptide repeat sequence of (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7)n that undergoes reversible phosphorylation through the opposing action of kinases and phosphatases. Rtr1 is a conserved protein that colocalizes with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and has been shown to be important for the transition from elongation to termination during transcription by removing RNAPII CTD serine 5 phosphorylation (Ser5-P) at a selection of target genes. In this study, we show that Rtr1 is a global regulator of the CTD code with deletion of RTR1 causing genome-wide changes in Ser5-P CTD phosphorylation and cotranscriptional histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-resolution microarrays, we show that RTR1 deletion results in global changes in RNAPII Ser5-P levels on genes with different lengths and transcription rates consistent with its role as a CTD phosphatase. Although Ser5-P levels increase, the overall occupancy of RNAPII either decreases or stays the same in the absence of RTR1 Additionally, the loss of Rtr1 in vivo leads to increases in H3K36me3 levels genome-wide, while total histone H3 levels remain relatively constant within coding regions. Overall, these findings suggest that Rtr1 regulates H3K36me3 levels through changes in the number of binding sites for the histone methyltransferase Set2, thereby influencing both the CTD and histone codes. PMID:27247267

  1. Angiotensin II-inhibiting drugs have no effect on intraneuronal Aβ or oligomeric Aβ levels in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferrington, Linda; Miners, J Scott; Palmer, Laura E; Bond, Susan M; Povey, Joanne E; Kelly, Paul AT; Love, Seth; Horsburgh, Karen J; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2011-01-01

    Background: Reducing the excessive accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a key objective of most AD therapies. Several studies suggest that pharmacological inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) or its by-product angiotensin II may delay onset or progression of dementia and it has been suggested that this occurs via regulation of Aβ. Intraneuronal oligomeric accumulation of Aβ is postulated to be one of the earliest pathological events. Thus this study investigated the effect of an ACE-inhibitor, captopril, and two angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), eprosartan and valsartan, on intraneuronal Aβ pathology and oligomeric Aβ levels in a triple transgenic (3xTGAD) mouse model of AD. Methods: Male, adult (3-4 month old) 3xTgAD mice (n=39) were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups: valsartan (0.17g/l), eprosartan (0.8g/l), captopril (5g/l) or normal drinking water and the drugs given ad libitum for 2 months. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was measured at baseline, at 2 weeks and at 2 months when the mice were sacrificed and the brains hemisected for analysis. One hemisphere was processed for Aβ and amyloid precursor protein (APP) immunohistochemistry and the other for biochemical measurement of oligomeric Aβ and APP. ACE activity was measured in the brain and kidney. Results: MABP was significantly reduced at 2 weeks and 2 months in the ACE-I group (p=0.0006) but was unaltered in the ARB groups compared to vehicle. Neither ACE-I nor ARB treatment altered Aβ and APP immunolabelling or the level of Aβ or APP in brain tissue homogenates. Similarly neither ACE-I nor ARB treatment altered ACE activity in either brain or kidney compared to control tissue. Conclusions: ACE-I or ARB administration over 2 months did not affect APP levels or either intraneuronal Aβ or oligomeric Aβ levels in 3xTGAD mice. While ARBs did not alter MABP, captopril did mediate reductions in MABP in the 3xTGAD mice which appeared to

  2. An inventory of wetlands in the East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    An inventory of wetlands within the floodplain of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee was conducted during October, 1991 through May, 1992 for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District. About 15 miles of EFPC channel and 500 acres of its floodplain are contaminated with mercury and other contaminants released from the Y-12 Plant on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. The wetland inventory will serve as baseline information for DOE`s remedial action planning and National Environmental Policy Act compliance efforts related to the contamination. In order to provide broad wetland determinations beyond which future wetland definitions are unlikely to expand, the 1989 Federal Manual for Identifying And Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands was utilized. Using the manual`s methodology in a contaminated system under the approved health and safety plan presented some unique problems, resulting in intrusive sampling for field indicators of hydric soils being accomplished separately from observation of other criteria. Beginning with wetland areas identified on National Wetland Inventory Maps, the entire floodplain was examined for presence of wetland criteria, and 17 wetlands were identified ranging from 0.01 to 2.81 acres in size. The majority of wetlands identified were sized under 1 acre. Some of the wetlands identified were not delineated on the National Wetland Inventory Maps, and much of the wetland area delineated on the maps did not meet the criteria under the 1989 manual.

  3. Slow dynamics in a two-dimensional Anderson-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar Lev, Yevgeny; Reichman, David R.

    2016-02-01

    We study the real-time dynamics of a two-dimensional Anderson-Hubbard model using nonequilibrium self-consistent perturbation theory within the second-Born approximation. When compared with exact diagonalization performed on small clusters, we demonstrate that for strong disorder this technique approaches the exact result on all available timescales, while for intermediate disorder, in the vicinity of the many-body localization transition, it produces quantitatively accurate results up to nontrivial times. Our method allows for the treatment of system sizes inaccessible by any numerically exact method and for the complete elimination of finite-size effects for the times considered. We show that for a sufficiently strong disorder the system becomes nonergodic, while for intermediate disorder strengths and for all accessible timescales transport in the system is strictly subdiffusive. We argue that these results are incompatible with a simple percolation picture, but are consistent with the heuristic random resistor network model where subdiffusion may be observed for long times until a crossover to diffusion occurs. The prediction of slow finite-time dynamics in a two-dimensional interacting and disordered system can be directly verified in future cold-atoms experiments.

  4. Nonequilibrium transport in the Anderson-Holstein model with interfacial screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetto, Enrico; Stefanucci, Gianluca

    Image charge effects in nanoscale junctions with strong electron-phonon coupling open the way to unexplored physical scenarios. Here we present a comprehensive study of the transport properties of the Anderson-Holstein model in the presence of dot-lead repulsion. We propose an accurate many-body approach to deal with the simultaneous occurrence of the Franck-Condon blockade and the screening-induced enhancement of the polaron mobility. Remarkably, we find that a novel mechanism of negative differential conductance origins from the competition between the charge blocking due to the electron-phonon interaction and the charge deblocking due to the image charges. An experimental setup to observe this phenomenon is discussed. References [1]E. Perfetto, G. Stefanucci and M. Cini, Phys. Rev. B 85, 165437 (2012). [2] E. Perfetto and G. Stefanucci, Phys. Rev. B 88, 245437 (2013). [3] E. Perfetto and G. Stefanucci, Journal of Computational Electronics 14, 352 (2015). E.P. and G.S. acknowledge funding by MIUR FIRB Grant No. RBFR12SW0J.

  5. The anomalous Floquet-Anderson insulator as a non-adiabatic quantized charge pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titum, Paraj; Berg, Erez; Rudner, Mark S.; Refael, Gil; Lindner, Netanel H.

    Periodically driven quantum systems provide a novel and versatile platform for realizing topological phenomena. Among these are analogs of topological insulators and superconductors, attainable in static systems; however, some of these phenomena are unique to the periodically driven case. Here, we show that disordered, periodically driven systems admit an ``anomalous'' two dimensional phase, whose quasi-energy spectrum consists of chiral edge modes that coexist with a fully localized bulk - an impossibility for static Hamiltonians. This unique situation serves as the basis for a new topologically-protected non-equilibrium transport phenomenon: quantized non-adiabatic charge pumping. We identify the bulk topological invariant that characterizes the new phase (which we call the ``anomalous Floquet Anderson Insulator'', or AFAI). We provide explicit models which constitute a proof of principle for the existence of the new phase. Finally, we present evidence that the disorder-driven transition from the AFAI to a trivial, fully localized phase is in the same universality class as the quantum Hall plateau transition.

  6. Eigenfunction structure and scaling of two interacting particles in the one-dimensional Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, Klaus M.

    2016-04-01

    The localization properties of eigenfunctions for two interacting particles in the one-dimensional Anderson model are studied for system sizes up to N = 5000 sites corresponding to a Hilbert space of dimension ≈107 using the Green function Arnoldi method. The eigenfunction structure is illustrated in position, momentum and energy representation, the latter corresponding to an expansion in non-interacting product eigenfunctions. Different types of localization lengths are computed for parameter ranges in system size, disorder and interaction strengths inaccessible until now. We confirm that one-parameter scaling theory can be successfully applied provided that the condition of N being significantly larger than the one-particle localization length L1 is verified. The enhancement effect of the two-particle localization length L2 behaving as L2 ~ L21 is clearly confirmed for a certain quite large interval of optimal interactions strengths. Further new results for the interaction dependence in a very large interval, an energy value outside the band center, and different interaction ranges are obtained.

  7. Finite-size corrections for ground states of Edwards-Anderson spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Falkner, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    Extensive computations of ground-state energies of the Edwards-Anderson spin glass on bond-diluted, hypercubic lattices are conducted in dimensions d=3, ..., 7. Results are presented for bond densities exactly at the percolation threshold, p=pc, and deep within the glassy regime, p>pc, where finding ground states is one of the hardest combinatorial optimization problems. Finite-size corrections of the form 1/Nω are shown to be consistent throughout with the prediction ω=1-y/d, where y refers to the "stiffness" exponent that controls the formation of domain wall excitations at low temperatures. At p=pc, an extrapolation for d→∞ appears to match our mean-field results for these corrections. In the glassy phase, however, ω does not approach its anticipated mean-field value of 2/3, obtained from simulations of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass on an N-clique graph. Instead, the value of ω reached at the upper critical dimension matches another type of mean-field spin glass models, namely those on sparse random networks of regular degree called Bethe lattices.

  8. Initiating tumor banking for translational research: MD Anderson and Liverpool experience.

    PubMed

    Mishra, A; Pandey, A; Shaw, R

    2007-01-01

    The ultimate progress in the cancer diagnosis and therapy has only been possible with the ongoing translational research that is likely to play a very important role in future as well. Hence the importance of such translation from bedside to bench and vis versa cannot be over-emphasized. Accordingly it has become more important to collect tumor samples along with the clinical information in a systematic manner to perform a good basic science research in future. With a population of over a billion and a heavy burden of cancer, India has the 'biggest' potential to establish the 'largest' tumor bank across the globe. Establishing a tumor bank involves money and manpower that may not be feasible across most of the centers in India. Taking into the considering the model of tumor banking of the two leading institutions of the world (MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA and University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool UK), this article presents the salient tips for a center in India to get started with tumor banking with minimal investment. Furthermore a simplified form of ethical consent is presented for the centers to adapt unanimously. PMID:17401220

  9. Path to poor coherence in the periodic Anderson model from Mott physics and hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaricci, A.; de'Medici, L.; Sordi, G.; Rozenberg, M. J.; Capone, M.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the anomalous metal arising from hole-doping the Mott insulating state in the periodic Anderson model. Using dynamical mean-field theory we show that, as opposed to the electron-doped case, in the hole-doped regime the hybridization between localized and delocalized orbitals leads to the formation of composite quasiparticles reminiscent of the Zhang-Rice singlets. We compute the coherence temperature of this state, showing its extremely small value at low doping. As a consequence the weakly doped Mott state deviates from the predictions of Fermi-liquid theory already at small temperatures. The onset of the Zhang-Rice state and of the consequent poor coherence is due to the electronic structure in which both localized and itinerant carriers have to be involved in the formation of the conduction states and to the proximity to the Mott state. By investigating the magnetic properties of this state, we discuss the relation between the anomalous metallic properties and the behavior of the magnetic degrees of freedom.

  10. Anderson lattice in the intermediate valence compound Ce3Ni2B2N3-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Tahir; Bauer, Ernst; Hilscher, Gerfried; Michor, Herwig

    2011-03-01

    We have studied magnetic, thermodynamic, and transport properties of Ce3Ni2B2N3-δ and its solid solution with the Tc≃13 K superconductor La3Ni2B2N3-δ. The solid solution (La,Ce)3Ni2B2N3-δ reveals a rapid reduction of Tc by increasing the Ce content with a complete suppression of superconductivity at the composition La2.85Ce0.15Ni2B2N3-δ. The low-temperature properties characterize Ce3Ni2B2N3-δ as an intermediate valence system with a moderately enhanced Sommerfeld value γ≃54 mJ/mol K2 and a susceptibility χ0≃1.6×10-3 emu/mol, increased by about one order of magnitude as compared to the respective value χ0≃0.2×10-3 emu/mol of superconducting La3Ni2B2N3-δ (γ=26 mJ/mol K2) which serves as reference with a nonmagnetic rare earth ion. The electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power of Ce3Ni2B2N3-δ are analyzed in terms of the degenerate Anderson lattice model revealing a characteristic Kondo temperature TKALM~1100 K.

  11. Non-equilibrium STLS approach to transport properties of single impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezai, Raheleh; Ebrahimi, Farshad

    2014-04-01

    In this work, using the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we study the effects of the electron-electron interaction and the electron-spin correlation on the non-equilibrium Kondo effect and the transport properties of the symmetric single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) at zero temperature by generalizing the self-consistent method of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander (STLS) for a single-band tight-binding model with Hubbard type interaction to out of equilibrium steady-states. We at first determine in a self-consistent manner the non-equilibrium spin correlation function, the effective Hubbard interaction, and the double-occupancy at the impurity site. Then, using the non-equilibrium STLS spin polarization function in the non-equilibrium formalism of the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) of Yosida and Yamada, and Horvatic and Zlatic, we compute the spectral density, the current-voltage characteristics and the differential conductance as functions of the applied bias and the strength of on-site Hubbard interaction. We compare our spectral densities at zero bias with the results of numerical renormalization group (NRG) and depict the effects of the electron-electron interaction and electron-spin correlation at the impurity site on the aforementioned properties by comparing our numerical result with the order U2 IPT. Finally, we show that the obtained numerical results on the differential conductance have a quadratic universal scaling behavior and the resulting Kondo temperature shows an exponential behavior.

  12. Multifractal structure of eigenstates in the Anderson model with long-range off-diagonal disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, D. A.; Schober, H. R.

    1998-05-01

    The spectrum of eigenvalues and the spatial structure of eigenstates for the Anderson model with long-range off-diagonal disorder (Vij=(+/-)/\\|Ri-Rj\\|d) is investigated numerically where Ri are Poisson-distributed random points in d-dimensional space. For this marginal case all states in the system are delocalized. Analyzing the scaling with system size of the inverse participation numbers for the most extended modes we find that these states exhibit a self-similar multifractal structure. The generalized dimensions, Dq, and the multifractal spectrum, f(α), are calculated. For d=3 the information dimension D1=2.65 and the correlation dimension D2=2.33 that characterizes the power-law behavior of the averaged two-particle Green function. The temporal autocorrelation function C(t) built from the eigenstates of the most dispersive oscillator exhibits an nondiffusive algebraic decay C(t)~t-δ with the exponent δ≡D~2=D2/d reflecting the generalized multifractal dimension of the local density of states.

  13. Investigation of Anderson localization in disordered heterostructures irradiated by a Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardakani, Abbas Ghasempour

    2016-02-01

    The propagation of a Gaussian beam through a one-dimensional disordered media is studied. By employing the transfer matrix method, the localization length as a function of frequency is calculated for different values of transverse coordinate r. It is demonstrated that the localization length significantly depends on r in different frequency ranges. This result is in contrast to those reported for a plane wave incident on disordered structures in which the localization length is transversely constant. For some frequency regions, the peak of localization length is red-shifted and becomes smaller with increasing the transverse coordinate. At some frequencies, the system is in the localized state for particular values of r, while at other r values the system is in the extend regime at the same frequencies. It is observed that the quality of localization at each frequency depends on r. To quantify the localization behavior of the whole Gaussian beam, a modified localization length is defined in terms of the input and output powers of the Gaussian beam where the dependence of Anderson localization on the transverse coordinate is considered. It is suggested that this modified localization length is used in experiments performed for study of wave propagation in one-dimensional random media under illumination of laser beams.

  14. Anderson Localization for Schrödinger Operators on with Strongly Mixing Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgain, Jean; Schlag, Wilhelm

    In this paper we show that for a.e. x∈[ 0,2 π) the operators defined on as and with Dirichlet condition ψ- 1= 0, have pure point spectrum in with exponentially decaying eigenfunctions where δ > 0 and are small. As it is a simple consequence of known techniques that for small λ one has [- 2 +δ, 2-δ]⊂ spectrum (H(x)) for a.e.x∈[ 0, 2 π), we thus established Anderson localization on the spectrum up to the edges and the center. More general potentials than cosine can be treated, but only those energies with nonzero spectral density are allowed. Finally, we prove the same result for operators on the whole line with potential , where A:?2-->?2 is a hyperbolic toral automorphism, F∈C1(?2), ∫F= 0, and λ small. The basis for our analysis is an asymptotic formula for the Lyapunov exponent for λ--> 0 by Figotin-Pastur, and generalized by Chulaevski-Spencer. We combine this asymptotic expansion with certain martingale large deviation estimates in order to apply the methods developed by Bourgain and Goldstein in the quasi-periodic case.

  15. Anderson-like alkoxo-polyoxovanadate clusters serving as unprecedented second building units to construct metal-organic polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Teng; Wang, Xin-Long; Li, Shuang-Bao; Gong, Ya-Ru; Song, Bai-Qiao; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Su, Zhong-Min

    2016-08-11

    Unprecedented Anderson-like alkoxo-polyoxovanadate [V6O6(OCH3)9(μ6-SO4)(COO)3](2-) polyanions can serve as 3-connected second building units (SBUs) that assemble with dicarboxylate or tricarboxylate ligands to form a new family of metal organic tetrahedrons of V4E6 and V4F4 type (V = vertex, E = edge, and F = face). To our knowledge, this alkoxo-polyoxovanadate-based SBU is the first ever reported. PMID:27363544

  16. [Heart involvement in Anderson-Fabry disease: Italian recommendations for diagnostic, follow-up and therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Pieruzzi, Federico; Pieroni, Maurizio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Marziliano, Nicola; Morrone, Amelia; Cecchi, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations of the GLA gene that encodes alpha-galactosidase A. It is characterized by a multisystemic involvement: the renal, neurological, heart, cochleovestibular and cutaneous systems are the most damaged. Morbidity and mortality of Anderson-Fabry disease depend on renal insufficiency, heart failure and nervous system involvement. Left ventricular hypertrophy is the most common cardiac manifestation followed by conduction system disease, valve dysfunction, and arrhythmias. Mild to moderate left ventricular hypertrophy may simulate a non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Management of Anderson-Fabry disease starting from the diagnosis of cardiac involvement, the prevention of complications, the therapeutic aspects, up to appropriate clinical follow-up, requires a multidisciplinary approach. According to recent management guidelines, only few evidence-based data are available to guide the clinical and therapeutic approach to this rare disease. An Italian Board, composed by nephrologists, cardiologists, geneticists, pediatricians and neurologists has been established in order to approve by consensus a diagnostic and therapeutic management protocol. The authors report the results of this cardiologic management consensus. PMID:26571477

  17. Petrographic characteristics of the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed (Paleocene), Powder River Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, P.D.; Stanton, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Six lithofacies of the thick ( > 30 m) Wyodak-Anderson subbituminous coal bed of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), Powder River Basin, Wyoming, can be delimited using megascopic and petrographic data. Previous lithofacies analysis of the rock types associated with the Wyodak-Anderson bed suggested that raised peat accumulated in restricted parts of an inland flood plain. The peat bodies were separated by deposits of contemporaneous, possibly anastomosed channels. In this study, megascopic descriptions from four mine highwalls of the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed were found to be similar to facies defined by microscopic data from core and highwall samples. The data indicate that the upper and lower parts of the coal bed are rich in preserved wood remains (for instance, humotelinite), whereas the middle part of the bed contains comparatively larger amounts of material that resulted from degradation and comminution of the peat (e.g. eugelinite). The facies are interpreted to be the result of different chemical and biological environments at the time of peat formation. ?? 1988.

  18. A report documenting the completion of the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the ASC level II milestone ""Visualization on the supercomputing platform

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, James P; Patchett, John M; Lo, Li - Ta; Mitchell, Christopher; Mr Marle, David; Brownlee, Carson

    2011-01-24

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Los Alamos portion of the ASC Level II 'Visualization on the Supercomputing Platform' milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The milestone text is shown in Figure 1 with the Los Alamos portions highlighted in boldfaced text. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is the most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors (GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the perfromance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. In conclusion, we improved CPU-based rendering performance by a a factor of 2-10 times on our tests. In addition, we evaluated CPU and CPU-based rendering performance. We encourage production visualization experts to consider using CPU

  19. Cardiovascular risk factor levels and their relationships with overweight and fat distribution in children: the Fleurbaix Laventie Ville Santé II study

    PubMed Central

    Botton, Jérémie; Heude, Barbara; Kettaneh, Adrien; Borys, Jean-Michel; Lommez, Agnès; Bresson, Jean-Louis; Ducimetière, Pierre; Charles, Marie-Aline

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To document for the first time in a general population of French children, the prevalence and levels of cardiovascular risk factors, and to assess, separately in boys and girls, whether these risk factors were associated with fat mass distribution independently of subcutaneous overall adiposity. Subjects and design A cross sectional analysis of baseline data from 452 children (235 boys and 217 girls) aged 8–17 years included in 1999 in a population-based epidemiologic study, the Fleurbaix Laventie Ville Santé II (FLVS II) study. Methods Overweight was defined according to the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) references and to the 90th percentiles of the French BMI curves. The thresholds of parameters defining cardiovascular and metabolic risk were the 95th percentile of the Task Force Report on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents for blood pressure, and those of the American Academy of Pediatrics for lipids. Anthropometric and biologic parameters were described by gender and according to overweight. Partial correlations between cardiovascular risk factors and anthropometric measures of adiposity (BMI, sum of four skinfold thicknesses, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio) were calculated. In a second step, these correlations were additionally adjusted for the sum of four skinfold thicknesses. Results High plasma triglycerides, high insulin concentration and low plasma HDL cholesterol were associated with all measures of adiposity (|r|≥0.20; p<0.002). When obese children were excluded, overweight children already had high triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol levels respectively 2 and 20 times more frequently than normal weight children. Among overweight children, 7.7% had at least two risk factors among high blood pressure, high plasma triglycerides or glucose, and low HDL concentrations, versus 0.25% among normal weight children (p=0.002). After adjusting for the sum of skinfolds, an independent association between the risk

  20. Study of uranium(VI) and radium(II) sorption at trace level on kaolinite using a multisite ion exchange model.

    PubMed

    Reinoso-Maset, Estela; Ly, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Uranium and the long-lived decay product radium-226 are abundantly present in mine wastes produced during uranium extraction activities. In the case of release to the surrounding environment, these radionuclides are at trace level compared to groundwater solutes, and the presence, content and properties of clay minerals in the host environment influence the extent of radionuclide sorption and, in turn, migration. Since clays are known to have the distinctive property of retaining ions, the aim of this work was to study the sorption of trace U(VI) and Ra(II) on a common phyllosilicate mineral, kaolinite, in the presence of excess K, a common groundwater cation, in order to obtain a thermodynamic database that describes the ion exchange equilibria occurring at the mineral-solution interface. Following a detailed experimental protocol using chemical and radiochemical analytical techniques, batch experiments over a wide pH range (from 2 to 11) and fixed concentration (ca. 10(-9) M), and additional adsorption isotherms at two different solution pH (6.2 and 10.4) over a concentration range (10(-10) to 10(-4) M) were carried out to measure the distribution coefficient (Kd) of U(VI) and Ra(II) sorption on kaolinite. The experimental sorption data was processed according to a general multisite sorbent/multispecies sorbate ion exchange model, which allowed deducing the charge of adsorbed species and the stoichiometry of the associated adsorption equilibria on kaolinite's surface sites. Aqueous speciation calculations predicted Ra(II) as Ra(2+) over the working pH range, and its adsorption curves and isotherms were explained using three sorption sites. Adsorption of U(VI) occurred on four sorption sites and was governed by its solution speciation, with positively charged hydroxylated (UO2(2+) and UO2(OH)(+)) and silicate (UO2(H3SiO4)(+)) species being adsorbed between pH 2 and 6, whereas its negatively charged forms (UO2(OH)3(-) and UO2(OH)4(2-)) dominated U(VI) sorption at

  1. Simultaneous trace-levels determination of Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions in various samples using a modified carbon paste electrode based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a new synthesized Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Afkhami, Abbas; Bagheri, Hasan; Khoshsafar, Hosein; Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Tabatabaee, Masoumeh; Shirzadmehr, Ali

    2012-10-01

    A modified carbon paste electrode based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and 3-(4-methoxybenzylideneamino)-2-thioxothiazolodin-4-one as a new synthesized Schiff base was constructed for the simultaneous determination of trace amounts of Hg(II) and Pb(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The modified electrode showed an excellent selectivity and stability for Hg(II) and Pb(II) determinations and for accelerated electron transfer between the electrode and the analytes. The electrochemical properties and applications of the modified electrode were studied. Operational parameters such as pH, deposition potential and deposition time were optimized for the purpose of determination of traces of metal ions at pH 3.0. Under optimal conditions the limits of detection, based on three times the background noise, were 9.0×10(-4) and 6.0×10(-4) μmol L(-1) for Hg(II) and Pb(II) with a 90 s preconcentration, respectively. In addition, the modified electrode displayed a good reproducibility and selectivity, making it suitable for the simultaneous determination of Hg(II) and Pb(II) in real samples such as sea water, waste water, tobacco, marine and human teeth samples. PMID:22975186

  2. On Planetary Evolution and the Evolution of Planetary Science During the Career of Don Anderson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2003-12-01

    The planets of our solar system have long been viewed by Don Anderson as laboratories for testing general aspects of planetary evolution and as points of comparison to the Earth. I was fortunate to have been a student 39 years ago in a course at Caltech that Don taught with Bob Kovach on the interiors of the Earth and the planets. At that time, Mariner 4 had not yet flown by Mars, the lunar Ranger program was still in progress, and it was permissible to entertain the hypothesis that all of the terrestrial planets were identical in bulk composition. In the last four decades spacecraft have visited every planet from Mercury to Neptune; samples from the Moon, Mars, asteroids, and comets reside in our laboratories; and more than 100 planets have been discovered orbiting other stars. More importantly, traditionally distinct fields have merged to the point where planetary scientists must be conversant with the findings and modes of thinking from astronomy and biology as well as the geosciences. A few examples illustrate this confluence. Theoretical models for the structure of the atmospheres of gas-giant planets led to the first astronomical detection of an extrasolar planetary atmosphere for the transiting planet HD209458b. Although the atmospheric models were based on those for solar-system gas giants, the 3.5-day orbital period means that this planet is 100 times closer to its star than Jupiter is to the Sun, its effective temperature is 1100 K, and the detected signature of the planetary atmosphere was absorption by neutral sodium. Sodium in Mercury's exosphere, detected astronomically from Earth, figures into the question of how the terrestrial planets came to have distinct bulk compositions. Hypotheses to account for Mercury's high uncompressed density, and by inference its high ratio of metal to silicate, range from chemical gradients in the early solar nebula to preferential removal of silicates from a differentiated protoplanet by nebular heating or giant impact

  3. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; Cox, James; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John

    2003-08-26

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week.

  4. Evaluating Quality in Clinical Cancer Research: The M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cox, James D.; Giralt, Sergio A.; Veazie, Mary L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Bruner, Janet M.; Chan, Ka Wah; Hittelman, Walter N.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Iyer, Revathy B.; Karp, Daniel D.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Lippman, Scott M.; Raad, Issam I.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Zwelling, Leonard A.; Markman, Maurie

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the unquestionable importance of clinically oriented research designed to test the safety and efficacy of new therapies in patients with malignant disease, there is limited information regarding strategies to evaluate the quality of such efforts at academic institutions. Methods To address this issue, a committee of senior faculty at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center established specific criteria by which investigators from all departments engaged in clinical research could be formally evaluated. Scoring criteria were established and revised based on the results of a pilot study. Beginning in January 2004, the committee evaluated all faculty involved in clinical research within 35 departments. Scores for individual faculty members were assigned on a scale of 1 (outstanding) to 5; a score of 3 was set as the standard for the institution. Each department also received a score. The results of the evaluation were shared with departmental chairs and the Chief Academic Officer. Results 392 faculty were evaluated. The median score was 3. Full professors more frequently received a score of 1, but all faculty ranks received scores of 4 and 5. As a group, tenure/tenure track faculty achieved superior scores compared to nontenure track faculty. Conclusions Based on our experience, we believe it is possible to conduct a rigorous consensus-based evaluation of the quality of clinical cancer research being conducted at an academic medical center. It is reasonable to suggest such evaluations can be used as a management tool and may lead to higher-quality clinical research. PMID:19571599

  5. Incidence of Atypical Femur Fractures in Cancer Patients: The MD Anderson Cancer Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Beatrice J; Sun, Ming; West, Dennis P; Guindani, Michele; Lin, Yan Heather; Lu, Huifang; Hu, Mimi; Barcenas, Carlos; Bird, Justin; Feng, Chun; Saraykar, Smita; Tripathy, Debasish; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Gagel, Robert; Murphy, William A

    2016-08-01

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) are rare adverse events attributed to bisphosphonate (BP) use. Few cases of AFF in cancer have been described; the aim of this study is to identify the incidence and risk factors for AFF in a large cancer center. This retrospective study was conducted at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. The incidence rate of AFF among BP users was calculated from January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2013. The control group (n = 51) included 2 or 3 patients on BPs matched for age (≤1 year) and gender. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between clinical characteristics and AFF. Twenty-three AFF cases were identified radiographically among 10,587 BP users, the total BP exposure was 53,789 months (4482 years), and the incidence of AFF in BP users was 0.05 cases per 100,000 person-years. Meanwhile, among 300,553 patients who did not receive BPs there were 2 cases of AFF as compared with the 23 cases noted above. The odds ratio (OR) of having AFF in BP users was 355.58 times higher (95% CI, 84.1 to 1501.4, p < 0.0001) than the risk in non-BP users. The OR of having AFF in alendronate users was 5.54 times greater (OR 5.54 [95% CI, 1.60 to 19.112, p = 0.007]) than the odds of having AFF among other BP users. Patients who were on zoledronic acid (ZOL) had smaller odds of developing AFF compared with other BP users in this matched case control sample. AFFs are rare, serious adverse events that occur in patients with cancer who receive BP therapy. Patients with cancer who receive BPs for prior osteoporosis therapy or for metastatic cancer are at higher risk of AFF. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26896384

  6. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John; Cox, James

    2003-08-01

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week.

  7. Cancer-related symptom assessment in France: validation of the French M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory.

    PubMed

    Guirimand, Frédéric; Buyck, Jean-François; Lauwers-Allot, Elisabeth; Revnik, Julia; Kerguen, Thierry; Aegerter, Philippe; Brasseur, Louis; Cleeland, Charles S

    2010-04-01

    This multicenter study was intended to validate the French version of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI-Fr) in French cancer patients (n=162) with solid tumors or hematological malignancies. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) was used as a part of the validation. Factor analysis showed three underlying constructs for symptom items: general symptoms (pain, fatigue, disturbed sleep, shortness of breath, drowsiness, dry mouth, and numbness or tingling items); emotional and cognitive components (distress, sadness, and remembering items); and a gastrointestinal component (nausea, vomiting, and lack of appetite items), with Cronbach's alphas of 0.79, 0.73, and 0.71, respectively. Convergent validity was established by comparing MDASI-Fr items with the EORTC QLQ-C30 scale and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Overall, the 19-item MDASI-Fr score correlated well with the QLQ-C30 global health status, and the pain item of the MDASI-Fr was highly correlated with the short form of the BPI. The most prevalent symptoms were fatigue, distress, dry mouth, and pain. Twenty-five percent of patients reported moderate or severe pain (numeric rating scale >4 on 0-10 severity ratings). Physician ratings of global change on a second visit were significantly associated with changes in patient ratings on the MDASI-Fr, supporting the sensitivity of the measure. Symptoms interfered most with work and general activity. The MDASI-Fr is a valid and reliable tool for measuring symptom severity and interference in French cancer patients. PMID:20413059

  8. Examining the role of foraging and malvolio in host-finding behavior in the honey bee parasite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman).

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Ana R; Shirk, Paul D; Teal, Peter E A; Grozinger, Christina M; Evans, Jay D

    2014-02-01

    When a female varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), invades a honey bee brood cell, the physiology rapidly changes from feeding phoretic to reproductive. Changes in foraging and malvolio transcript levels in the brain have been associated with modulated intra-specific food searching behaviors in insects and other invertebrates. Transcription profiles for both genes were examined during and immediately following brood cell invasion to assess their role as potential control elements. Vdfor and Vdmvl transcripts were found in all organs of varroa mites with the highest Vdfor transcript levels in ovary-lyrate organs and the highest Vdmvl in Malpighian tubules. Changes in transcript levels of Vdfor and Vdmvl in synganglia were not associated with the cell invasion process, remaining comparable between early reproductive mites (collected from the pre-capping brood cells) and phoretic mites. However, Vdfor and Vdmvl transcript levels were lowered by 37 and 53%, respectively, in synganglia from reproductive mites compared to early reproductive mites, but not significantly different to levels in synganglia from phoretic mites. On the other hand, in whole body preparations the Vdfor and Vdmvl had significantly higher levels of transcript in reproductive mites compared to phoretic and early reproductive, mainly due to the presence of both transcripts accumulating in the eggs carried by the ovipositing mite. Varroa mites are a critical component for honey bee population decline and finding varroa mite genes associated with brood cell invasion, reproduction, ion balance and other physiological processes will facilitate development of novel control avenues for this honey bee parasite. PMID:24375502

  9. Changes in the patterns, presentation and management of penetrating chest trauma patients at a level II trauma centre in southern Pakistan over the last two decades.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Umer Muhammad; Faruque, Ahmad; Ansari, Hamza; Ahmad, Mansoor; Rashid, Umar; Perveen, Shazia; Sharif, Hasanat

    2011-01-01

    Penetrating chest trauma can be used as an indicator of violence in the country. We aimed to look at the changes in its incidence and management at a major trauma centre in the country. We also wanted to look at any effect of prehospital time on surgical intervention and outcome of the victim. In this retrospective descriptive study, we observed the presentation and management of 191 penetrating chest injury patients at a level II trauma hospital in Pakistan in the last 20 years. The study sample was divided into two groups: Group 1, 1988-1998 and Group 2, 1999-2009. No significant change in incidence of trauma was observed between the two groups. The delay in the time between event and arrival showed an increase in the number of surgical procedures performed. Also the number of thoracotomies performed went up significantly in the second decade from 5.7 to 16.5% with a P<0.05. Six (3.1%) mortality cases were observed in 20 years. It was seen that the greater the prehospital time, the greater the chances of surgery. Also seen was the increase in mortality as critical cases could make it to the hospital alive in recent times due to improved transportation services. PMID:20923826

  10. Differences in strength and conditioning coach self-perception of leadership style behaviors at the National Basketball Association, Division I-A, and Division II levels.

    PubMed

    Magnusen, Marshall J

    2010-06-01

    Leader behaviors have been found to vary by competitive level (6,9,11,26). Similar differences based on the competitive environment have been reported with strength coaches and their training emphases (15,28) but not their leadership style behaviors. This latter area is important to explore because strength coach leader behaviors may result in enhanced cooperation, improved communication, and improved athlete psychological and emotional well-being (14,23,25,27). Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to examine the differences in self-perceived leadership styles of National Basketball Association, Division I-A (DI-A) men's basketball, and Division II (DII) men's basketball strength and conditioning coaches. The self-perceived leadership styles of 145 men's basketball strength coaches (National Basketball Association [NBA]=22, DI-A=92, and DII=31) were obtained using the Revised Leadership Scale for Sport (26,41). Frequency data about demographics and training methods were also collected. No significant differences were reported for positive feedback. Otherwise, NBA strength coaches reported more democratic leadership style behaviors than DI-A strength coaches. Division I-A strength coaches were found to be more autocratic than NBA or DII strength coaches. Both NBA and DI-A strength coaches indicated a higher level of training and instruction than did DII strength coaches. National Basketball Association strength coaches also reported engaging in more situational and socially supportive leader behaviors than DI-A and DII strength coaches. Leader behaviors can positively and negatively impact an athlete (23); thus, strength coaches need to evaluate their competitive environment and reflect on the impact of their behaviors and how their approach to leading athletes may need to vary based on the situation. PMID:20453682

  11. Thinking Levels of Questions in Christian Reading Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    If Christian schools desire students to achieve higher-level thinking, then the textbooks that teachers use should reflect such thinking. Using Risner's (1987) methodology, raters classified questions from two Christian publishers' fifth grade reading textbooks based on the revised Bloom's taxonomy (Anderson et al., 2001). The questions in the A…

  12. TRIHALOMETHANE LEVELS IN HOME TAP WATER AND SEMEN QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trihalomethane Levels in Home Tap Water and Semen Quality
    Laura Fenster, 1 Kirsten Waller, 2 Gayle Windham, 1 Tanya Henneman, 2 Meredith Anderson, 2 Pauline Mendola, 3 James W. Overstreet, 4 Shanna H. Swan5

    1California Department of Health Services, Division of Environm...

  13. Theoretical (in B3LYP/6-3111++G** level), spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and thermogravimetric studies of gentisic acid and sodium, copper(II) and cadmium(II) gentisates.

    PubMed

    Regulska, E; Kalinowska, M; Wojtulewski, S; Korczak, A; Sienkiewicz-Gromiuk, J; Rzączyńska, Z; Swisłocka, R; Lewandowski, W

    2014-11-11

    The DFT calculations (B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) mixed with LanL2DZ for transition metals basis sets) for different conformers of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid), sodium 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (gentisate) and copper(II) and cadmium(II) gentisates were done. The proposed hydrated structures of transition metal complexes were based on the results of experimental findings. The theoretical geometrical parameters and atomic charge distribution were discussed. Moreover Na, Cu(II) and Cd(II) gentisates were synthesized and the composition of obtained compounds was revealed by means of elemental and thermogravimetric analyses. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of gentisic acid and gentisates were registered and the effect of metals on the electronic charge distribution of ligand was discussed. PMID:24910979

  14. The magnetocaloric effect with critical behavior of a periodic Anderson-like organic polymer.

    PubMed

    Ding, L J; Zhong, Y; Fan, S W; Zhu, L Y

    2016-01-01

    We study the magnetocaloric effect and the critical behavior of a periodic Anderson-like organic polymer using Green's function theory, in which the localized f orbitals hybridize with the conduction orbitals at even sites. The field-induced metal-insulator transitions with the magnetic Grüneisen parameter showing |Γh|∼T(-1) power-law critical behaviour are revealed, which provides a new thermodynamic means for probing quantum phase transitions. It is found that the competition of up-spin and down-spin hole excitations is responsible for the double peak structure of magnetic entropy change (-ΔS) for the dominant Kondo coupling case, implying a double magnetic cooling process via demagnetization, which follows a power law dependence of the magnetic field h: -ΔS∼h(n). The local exponent n tends to 1 and 2 below and above TC, while has a minimum of 0.648 at TC, which is in accordance with the experimental observation of perovskite manganites Pr0.55Sr0.45MnO3 and Nd0.55Sr0.45MnO3 (J. Y. Fan et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 2011, 98, 072508; Europhys. Lett., 2015, 112, 17005) corresponding to the conventional ferromagnets within the mean field theory -ΔS∼h(2/3). At TC, the -ΔS∼h curves with a convex curvature superpose each other for small V values, which are separated by the large V case, distinguishing the RKKY interaction and Kondo coupling explicitly. Furthermore, the critical scaling law n(TC) = 1 + (β- 1)/(β + γ) = 1 + 1/δ(1 - 1/β) is related to the critical exponents (β, γ, and δ) extracted from the Arrott-Noakes equation of state and the Kouvel-Fisher method, which fulfill the Widom scaling relation δ = 1 + γβ(-1), indicating the self-consistency and reliability of the obtained results. In addition, based on the scaling hypothesis through checking the scaling analysis of magnetization, the M-T-h curves collapse into two independent universal branches below and above TC. PMID:26617276

  15. Non-equilibrium STLS approach to transport properties of single impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, Raheleh Ebrahimi, Farshad

    2014-04-15

    In this work, using the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we study the effects of the electron–electron interaction and the electron-spin correlation on the non-equilibrium Kondo effect and the transport properties of the symmetric single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) at zero temperature by generalizing the self-consistent method of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander (STLS) for a single-band tight-binding model with Hubbard type interaction to out of equilibrium steady-states. We at first determine in a self-consistent manner the non-equilibrium spin correlation function, the effective Hubbard interaction, and the double-occupancy at the impurity site. Then, using the non-equilibrium STLS spin polarization function in the non-equilibrium formalism of the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) of Yosida and Yamada, and Horvatic and Zlatic, we compute the spectral density, the current–voltage characteristics and the differential conductance as functions of the applied bias and the strength of on-site Hubbard interaction. We compare our spectral densities at zero bias with the results of numerical renormalization group (NRG) and depict the effects of the electron–electron interaction and electron-spin correlation at the impurity site on the aforementioned properties by comparing our numerical result with the order U{sup 2} IPT. Finally, we show that the obtained numerical results on the differential conductance have a quadratic universal scaling behavior and the resulting Kondo temperature shows an exponential behavior. -- Highlights: •We introduce for the first time the non-equilibrium method of STLS for Hubbard type models. •We determine the transport properties of SIAM using the non-equilibrium STLS method. •We compare our results with order-U2 IPT and NRG. •We show that non-equilibrium STLS, contrary to the GW and self-consistent RPA, produces the two Hubbard peaks in DOS. •We show that the method keeps the universal scaling behavior and correct

  16. Sample-to-sample fluctuations of the overlap distributions in the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson spin glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baños, R. A.; Cruz, A.; Fernandez, L. A.; Gil-Narvion, J. M.; Gordillo-Guerrero, A.; Guidetti, M.; Iñiguez, D.; Maiorano, A.; Mantovani, F.; Marinari, E.; Martin-Mayor, V.; Monforte-Garcia, J.; Muñoz Sudupe, A.; Navarro, D.; Parisi, G.; Perez-Gaviro, S.; Ricci-Tersenghi, F.; Ruiz-Lorenzo, J. J.; Schifano, S. F.; Seoane, B.; Tarancón, A.; Tripiccione, R.; Yllanes, D.

    2011-11-01

    We study the sample-to-sample fluctuations of the overlap probability densities from large-scale equilibrium simulations of the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson spin glass below the critical temperature. Ultrametricity, stochastic stability, and overlap equivalence impose constraints on the moments of the overlap probability densities that can be tested against numerical data. We found small deviations from the Ghirlanda-Guerra predictions, which get smaller as system size increases. We also focus on the shape of the overlap distribution, comparing the numerical data to a mean-field-like prediction in which finite-size effects are taken into account by substituting delta functions with broad peaks.

  17. Bi-stability in single impurity Anderson model with strong electron-phonon interaction(polaron regime)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari-asl, Amir

    2016-09-01

    We consider a single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) in which the quantum dot(QD) is strongly coupled to a phonon bath in polaron regime. This coupling results in an effective e-e attraction. By computing the self energies using a current conserving approximation which is up to second order in this effective attraction, we show that if the interaction is strong enough, in non particle-hole (PH) symmetric case, the system would be bi-stable and we have hysteresis loop in the I-V characteristic. Moreover, the system shows negative differential conductance in some bias voltage intervals.

  18. Ferromagnetic ordering in Mn-doped quantum wells GaAs-AlGaAs resulting from the virtual Anderson transition

    SciTech Connect

    Agrinskaya, N. V.; Berezovets, V. A.; Bouravlev, A.; Kozub, V. I.

    2014-08-20

    We present our results obtained for Mn-doped GaAs quantum wells where the evidences of the ferromagnetic transition at relatively high temperatures were found at unusually small Mn concentrations. The observed values of hopping resistance at small temperatures evidenced that the samples are deep in the insulating regime. Thus the corresponding estimates of the overlapping integrals can hardly explain the large values of Curie temperatures T{sub c} ≃ 100 K. We develop a theoretical model qualitatively explaining the experimental results basing on the concept of virtual Anderson transition.

  19. Competition between antiferromagnetic order and spin-liquid behavior in the two-dimensional periodic Anderson model at half filling

    SciTech Connect

    Vekic, M.; Cannon, J.W.; Scalapino, D.J.; Scalettar, R.T.; Sugar, R.L. Physics Department, Centenary College, 2911 Centenary Boulevard, Shreveport, Louisiana 71104 Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 )

    1995-03-20

    We study the two-dimensional periodic Anderson model at half filling using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) techniques. The ground state undergoes a magnetic order-disorder transition as a function of the effective exchange coupling between the conduction and localized bands. Low-lying spin and charge excitations are determined using the maximum entropy method to analytically continue the QMC data. At finite temperature we find a competition between the Kondo effect and antiferromagnetic order which develops in the localized band through Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions.

  20. Joint min-max distribution and Edwards-Anderson's order parameter of the circular 1/f-noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiangyu; Le Doussal, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the joint min-max distribution and the Edwards-Anderson's order parameter for the circular model of 1/f-noise. Both quantities, as well as generalisations, are obtained exactly by combining the freezing-duality conjecture and Jack-polynomial techniques. Numerical checks come with significantly improved control of finite-size effects in the glassy phase, and the results convincingly validate the freezing-duality conjecture. Application to diffusive dynamics is discussed. We also provide a formula for the pre-factor ratio of the joint/marginal Carpentier-Le Doussal tail for minimum/maximum which applies to any logarithmic random energy model.

  1. Persistence of energy-dependent localization in the Anderson-Hubbard model with increasing system size and doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, P.; Wortis, R.

    2016-05-01

    Non-interacting systems with bounded disorder have been shown to exhibit sharp density of state peaks at the band edge which coincide with an energy range of abruptly suppressed localization. Recent work has shown that these features also occur in the presence of on-site interactions in ensembles of two-site Anderson-Hubbard systems at half filling. Here we demonstrate that this effect in interacting systems persists away from half filling, and moreover that energy regions with suppressed localization continue to appear in ensembles of larger systems despite a loss of sharp features in the density of states.

  2. ASCOT data from the 1980 field-measurement program in the Anderson Creek Valley, California. Vol. I

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.

    1983-04-01

    This report provides a listing of the data acquired during a series of nocturnal drainage flow experiments that were conducted by ASCOT participants in the Anderson Creek valley during September 1980. These experiments were designed to evaluate the transport and dispersion characteristics associated with nocturnal drainage flows. The report includes data from meteorological measurements systems and tracer experiments. The meteorological data include measurements from tethersondes, acoustic sounders, meteorological towers, pilot balloons, optical anemometers, and rawinsondes; while the tracer experiments provided data on the spatial and temporal distributions of perfluorocarbon, heavy methane, sulfur hexafluoride oil fog, tetroons, and radon tracers.

  3. Visual test of subparts per billion-level copper(ii) by Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction coupled with a functionalized gold nanoparticle probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Jing-Fu; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2012-10-01

    By combining Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction with a gold nanoparticle-based visual test, a novel method was developed for the field assay of Cu(ii) in environmental water at subparts per billion-levels within 30 min. When a 200 mL water sample was treated with 12.5 mg L-1 Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the proposed procedure, the detection limit with the naked eye was 0.2 μg L-1 Cu(ii). The proposed method is very specific to Cu(ii), with tolerance against at least 100-fold amounts of other environmentally relevant metal ions except for Hg(ii) (25-fold), and was successfully applied to the detection of trace Cu(ii) in tap water, river water, and treated wastewater, and results agreed well with that determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).By combining Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction with a gold nanoparticle-based visual test, a novel method was developed for the field assay of Cu(ii) in environmental water at subparts per billion-levels within 30 min. When a 200 mL water sample was treated with 12.5 mg L-1 Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the proposed procedure, the detection limit with the naked eye was 0.2 μg L-1 Cu(ii). The proposed method is very specific to Cu(ii), with tolerance against at least 100-fold amounts of other environmentally relevant metal ions except for Hg(ii) (25-fold), and was successfully applied to the detection of trace Cu(ii) in tap water, river water, and treated wastewater, and results agreed well with that determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, synthesis, and characterization of Cys-AuNPs and Fe3O4 NPs, magnetic-solid phase extraction and colorimetric test procedures, and effects of parameters on the extraction efficiency. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31753b

  4. Verification of Anderson superexchange in MnO via magnetic pair distribution function analysis and ab initio theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Benjamin A. Frandsen; Brunelli, Michela; Page, Katharine; Uemura, Yasutomo J.; Staunton, Julie B.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2016-05-11

    Here, we present a temperature-dependent atomic and magnetic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of neutron total scattering measurements of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. The known antiferromagnetic ground-state structure fits the low-temperature data closely with refined parameters that agree with conventional techniques, confirming the reliability of the newly developed magnetic PDF method. The measurements performed in the paramagnetic phase reveal significant short-range magnetic correlations on a ~1 nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range spin arrangement. Ab initio calculations using a self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory predict magnetic interactions dominatedmore » by Anderson superexchange and reproduce the measured short-range magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. Further calculations simulating an additional contribution from a direct exchange interaction show much worse agreement with the data. Furthermore, the Anderson superexchange model for MnO is thus verified by experimentation and confirmed by ab initio theory.« less

  5. Verification of Anderson Superexchange in MnO via Magnetic Pair Distribution Function Analysis and ab initio Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandsen, Benjamin A.; Brunelli, Michela; Page, Katharine; Uemura, Yasutomo J.; Staunton, Julie B.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2016-05-01

    We present a temperature-dependent atomic and magnetic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of neutron total scattering measurements of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. The known antiferromagnetic ground-state structure fits the low-temperature data closely with refined parameters that agree with conventional techniques, confirming the reliability of the newly developed magnetic PDF method. The measurements performed in the paramagnetic phase reveal significant short-range magnetic correlations on a ˜1 nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range spin arrangement. Ab initio calculations using a self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory predict magnetic interactions dominated by Anderson superexchange and reproduce the measured short-range magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. Further calculations simulating an additional contribution from a direct exchange interaction show much worse agreement with the data. The Anderson superexchange model for MnO is thus verified by experimentation and confirmed by ab initio theory.

  6. Verification of Anderson Superexchange in MnO via Magnetic Pair Distribution Function Analysis and ab initio Theory.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Benjamin A; Brunelli, Michela; Page, Katharine; Uemura, Yasutomo J; Staunton, Julie B; Billinge, Simon J L

    2016-05-13

    We present a temperature-dependent atomic and magnetic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of neutron total scattering measurements of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. The known antiferromagnetic ground-state structure fits the low-temperature data closely with refined parameters that agree with conventional techniques, confirming the reliability of the newly developed magnetic PDF method. The measurements performed in the paramagnetic phase reveal significant short-range magnetic correlations on a ∼1  nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range spin arrangement. Ab initio calculations using a self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory predict magnetic interactions dominated by Anderson superexchange and reproduce the measured short-range magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. Further calculations simulating an additional contribution from a direct exchange interaction show much worse agreement with the data. The Anderson superexchange model for MnO is thus verified by experimentation and confirmed by ab initio theory. PMID:27232042

  7. Quantum transparency of Anderson insulator junctions: Statistics of transmission eigenvalues, shot noise, and proximity conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Branislav K.; Dragomirova, Ralitsa L.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate quantum transport through strongly disordered barriers, made of a material with exceptionally high resistivity that behaves as an Anderson insulator or a “bad metal” in the bulk, by analyzing the distribution of Landauer transmission eigenvalues for a junction where such barrier is attached to two clean metallic leads. We find that scaling of the transmission eigenvalue distribution with the junction thickness (starting from the single interface limit) always predicts a nonzero probability to find high transmission channels even in relatively thick barriers. Using this distribution, we compute the zero frequency shot noise power (as well as its sample-to-sample fluctuations) and demonstrate how it provides a single number characterization of nontrivial transmission properties of different types of disordered barriers. The appearance of open conducting channels, whose transmission eigenvalue is close to one, and corresponding violent mesoscopic fluctuations of transport quantities explain at least some of the peculiar zero-bias anomalies in the Anderson-insulator/superconductor junctions observed in recent experiments [A. Vaknin, A. Frydman, and Z. Ovadyahu, Phys. Rev. B 61, 13037 (2000)]. Our findings are also relevant for the understanding of the role of defects that can undermine quality of thin tunnel barriers made of conventional band insulators.

  8. Development of the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Gynecologic Applicators for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Historical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yordy, John S.; Almond, Peter R.; Delclos, Luis

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To provide historical background on the development and initial studies of the gynecological (gyn) applicators developed by Dr. Gilbert H. Fletcher, a radiation oncologist and chairperson from 1948 to 1981 of the department at the M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) for Cancer Research in Houston, TX, and to acknowledge the previously unrecognized contribution that Dr. Leonard G. Grimmett, a radiation physicist and chairperson from 1949 to 1951 of the physics department at MDAH, made to the development of the gynecological applicators. Methods and Materials: We reviewed archival materials from the Historical Resource Center and from the Department of Radiation Physics at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, as well as contemporary published papers, to trace the history of the applicators. Conclusions: Dr. Fletcher's work was influenced by the work on gynecologic applicators in the 1940s in Europe, especially work done at the Royal Cancer Hospital in London. Those efforts influenced not only Dr. Fletcher's approach to the design of the applicators but also the methods used to perform in vivo measurements and determine the dose distribution. Much of the initial development of the dosimetry techniques and measurements at MDAH were carried out by Dr. Grimmett.

  9. Surgical Results of Anderson-Hynes Dismembered Pyeloplasty Without Internal Drainage in Adults With Ureteroplevic Junction Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohamadi, Aliasghar; Saeedi, Parisa; Hoghabrosadat, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anderson-Hynes dismembered pyeloplasty is the gold standard therapeutic approach to ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Use of a drainage method to protect the suture line from leakage is a matter of controversy. Objectives: We have compared the surgical outcome of Anderson-Hynes dismembered pyeloplasty for UPJO repair, with or without internal stenting. Patients and Methods: Eighty-two patients with UPJO were evaluated from 1996 to 2002. Complicated or emergent cases were excluded. Classic standard dismembered pyeloplasty was performed. Internal drainage, with a double j catheter, was performed in several patients, randomly. Another drain was also placed in the retroperitoneal space. The follow-up of patients was planned weekly, with patient visits and urine analysis and intravenous pyelography (IVP) and diethylene-triamine-pentaacetate (DTPA) scan after one month. Results: The study group consisted of 51 male and 31 female patients, who were mostly in the age range of 20 - 40 years. Comparing the two techniques of pyeloplasty with or without internal drainage, there was no significant difference between groups regarding extravasation and anastomosis complications, such as leakage, stenosis, urinoma formation or evidence of obstruction on postoperative IVP or DTPA scan. However, a higher incidence of catheter related urinary symptoms and flank pain was reported among those with internal stent. Conclusions: Pyeloplasty, with adequate spatulation, hemostasis and a watertight anastomosis, represents the mainstay of successful pyeloplasty and there may be no significant benefit for urethral stenting, especially in non-complicated cases. PMID:26034744

  10. Nailing the coffin shut on doubts that violent video games stimulate aggression: comment on Anderson et al. (2010).

    PubMed

    Huesmann, L Rowell

    2010-03-01

    Over the past half century the mass media, including video games, have become important socializers of children. Observational learning theory has evolved into social-cognitive information processing models that explain that what a child observes in any venue has both short-term and long-term influences on the child's behaviors and cognitions. C. A. Anderson et al.'s (2010) extensive meta-analysis of the effects of violent video games confirms what these theories predict and what prior research about other violent mass media has found: that violent video games stimulate aggression in the players in the short run and increase the risk for aggressive behaviors by the players later in life. The effects occur for males and females and for children growing up in Eastern or Western cultures. The effects are strongest for the best studies. Contrary to some critics' assertions, the meta-analysis of C. A. Anderson et al. is methodologically sound and comprehensive. Yet the results of meta-analyses are unlikely to change the critics' views or the public's perception that the issue is undecided because some studies have yielded null effects, because many people are concerned that the implications of the research threaten freedom of expression, and because many people have their identities or self-interests closely tied to violent video games. PMID:20192555

  11. Anderson acceleration of the Jacobi iterative method: An efficient alternative to Krylov methods for large, sparse linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratapa, Phanisri P.; Suryanarayana, Phanish; Pask, John E.

    2016-02-01

    We employ Anderson extrapolation to accelerate the classical Jacobi iterative method for large, sparse linear systems. Specifically, we utilize extrapolation at periodic intervals within the Jacobi iteration to develop the Alternating Anderson-Jacobi (AAJ) method. We verify the accuracy and efficacy of AAJ in a range of test cases, including nonsymmetric systems of equations. We demonstrate that AAJ possesses a favorable scaling with system size that is accompanied by a small prefactor, even in the absence of a preconditioner. In particular, we show that AAJ is able to accelerate the classical Jacobi iteration by over four orders of magnitude, with speed-ups that increase as the system gets larger. Moreover, we find that AAJ significantly outperforms the Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) method in the range of problems considered here, with the relative performance again improving with size of the system. Overall, the proposed method represents a simple yet efficient technique that is particularly attractive for large-scale parallel solutions of linear systems of equations.

  12. Preliminary report on coal resources of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Margaret S.; Gunther, Gregory L.; Flores, Romeo M.; Ochs, Allen M.; Stricker, Gary D.; Roberts, Steven B.; Taber, Thomas T.; Bader, Lisa R.; Schuenemeyer, John H.

    1998-01-01

    The National Coal Resource Assessment (NCRA) project by the U.S. Geological Survey is designed to assess US coal with the greatest potential for development in the next 20 to 30 years. Coal in the Wyodak-Anderson (WA) coal zone in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana is plentiful, clean, and compliant with EPA emissions standards. This coal is considered to be very desirable for development for use in electric power generation. The purpose of this NCRA study was to compile all available data relating to the Wyodak- Anderson coal, correlate the beds that make up the WA coal zone, create digital files pertaining to the study area and the WA coal, and produce a variety of reports on various aspects of the assessed coal unit. This report contains preliminary calculations of coal resources for the WA coal zone and is one of many products of the NCRA study. Coal resource calculations in this report were produced using both public and confidential data from many sources. The data was manipulated using a variety of commercially available software programs and several custom programs. A general description of the steps involved in producing the resource calculations is described in this report.

  13. Effects of different dietary intake on mRNA levels of MSTN, IGF-I, and IGF-II in the skeletal muscle of Dorper and Hu sheep hybrid F1 rams.

    PubMed

    Xing, H J; Wang, Z Y; Zhong, B S; Ying, S J; Nie, H T; Zhou, Z R; Fan, Y X; Wang, F

    2014-01-01

    MSTN, IGF-І(insulin-like growth factor-І) and IGF-II (insulin-like growth factor-II) regulate skeletal muscle growth. This study investigated the effects of different dietary intake levels on skeletal muscles. Sheep was randomly assigned to 3 feeding groups: 1) the maintenance diet (M), 2) 1.4 x the maintenance diet (1.4M), and 3) 2.15 x the maintenance diet (2.15M). Before slaughtering the animals, blood samples were collected to measure plasma urea, growth hormone, and insulin concentrations. After slaughtering, the longissimus dorsi, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, gastrocnemius, soleus, and chest muscle were removed to record various parameters, including the mRNA expression levels of MSTN and IGFs, in addition to skeletal muscle fiber diameter and cross-sectional area. The result showed that as dietary intake improved, the mRNA expression levels of MSTN and IGF-II decreased, whereas IGF-Іexpression increased. The mRNA expression levels of MSTN and IGFs were significantly different in the same skeletal muscle under different dietary intake. The skeletal muscle fiber diameter and cross-sectional area increased with greater dietary intake, as observed for the mRNA expression of IGF-І; however, it contrasted to that observed for the mRNA expression of MSTN and IGF-II. In conclusion, dietary intake levels have a certain influence on MSTN and IGFs mRNA expression levels, in addition to skeletal muscle fiber diameter and cross-sectional area. This study contributes valuable information for enhancing the molecular-based breeding of sheep. PMID:25078581

  14. Regulation of Electron Transport in Photosystems I and II in C3, C3-C4, and C4 Species of Panicum in Response to Changing Irradiance and O2 Levels.

    PubMed

    Peterson, R. B.

    1994-05-01

    Regulation of the quantum yields of linear electron transport and photosystem II photochemistry ([phi]II) with changing irradiance and gas-phase O2 concentration was studied in leaf tissue from Panicum bisulcatum (C3), Panicum milioides (C3-C4), and Panicum antidotale (C4) at 200 [mu]bars of CO2 and 25[deg]C using infrared gas analysis and chlorophyll fluorescence yield measurements. When the O2 level was increased from 14 to 213 mbars at high irradiance, [phi]II increased by as much as 115% in P. bisulcatum but by no more than 17% in P. antidotale. Under the same conditions [phi]II increased to an intermediate degree in P. milioides. Measurements of accumulation of the photooxidized form of the photosystem I reaction center (P700+) based on the light-dependent in vivo absorbance change at 830 nm indicate that the steady-state concentration of P700+ varied in an antiparallel manner with [phi]II when either the irradiance or O2 concentration was changed. Hence, O2-dependent changes in [phi]II were indicative of variations in linear photosynthetic electron transport. These experiments revealed, however, that a significant capacity was retained for in vivo regulation of the apparent quantum yield of photosystem I ([phi]I) independently of [phi]II+ Coordinate regulation of quantum yields of photosystems I and II (expressed as [phi]I:[phi]II in response to changing irradiance and O2 level differed markedly for the C3 and C4 species, and the response for the C3-C4 species most closely resembled that observed for the C4 species. The fraction of total linear electron transport supporting photorespiration at 213 mbars of O2 was negligible in the C4 species and was 13% lower in the C3-C4 species relative to the C3 species as calculated from fluorescence and gas-exchange determinations. At high photon-flux rates and high O2 concentration, the potential benefit to light use for net CO2 uptake arising from lower photorespiration in P. milioides was offset by a reduced capacity

  15. Price-Anderson Act Amendments Act of 1986. A report submitted to the Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, May 21, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The report on proposed legislation (S. 1225) to amend the Price-Anderson Act provisions of the Atomic Energy Act to extend and improve the procedures for compensating the public in the event of a nuclear accident is favorable, but suggest some changes. The bill reauthorizes the Price-Anderson indemnification system for 25 years, increases funds available for victim compensation, and expedites congressional procedures for responding with additional action as needed in the event of the theft or an accident involving nuclear materials. The report outlines the background and need for the legislation, gives a section-by-section analysis, and presents additional views and statements of committee members.

  16. Spectroscopic Studies of the Salmonella enterica Adenosyltransferase Enzyme SeCobA: Molecular-Level Insight into the Mechanism of Substrate Cob(II)alamin Activation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    CobA from Salmonella enterica (SeCobA) is a member of the family of ATP:Co(I)rrinoid adenosyltransferase (ACAT) enzymes that participate in the biosynthesis of adenosylcobalamin by catalyzing the transfer of the adenosyl group from an ATP molecule to a reactive Co(I)rrinoid species transiently generated in the enzyme active site. This reaction is thermodynamically challenging, as the reduction potential of the Co(II)rrinoid precursor in solution is far more negative than that of available reducing agents in the cell (e.g., flavodoxin), precluding nonenzymic reduction to the Co(I) oxidation state. However, in the active sites of ACATs, the Co(II)/Co(I) redox potential is increased by >250 mV via the formation of a unique four-coordinate (4c) Co(II)rrinoid species. In the case of the SeCobA ACAT, crystallographic and kinetic studies have revealed that the phenylalanine 91 (F91) and tryptophan 93 (W93) residues are critical for in vivo activity, presumably by blocking access to the lower axial ligand site of the Co(II)rrinoid substrate. To further assess the importance of the F91 and W93 residues with respect to enzymatic function, we have characterized various SeCobA active-site variants using electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. Our data provide unprecedented insight into the mechanism by which SeCobA converts the Co(II)rrinoid substrate to 4c species, with the hydrophobicity, size, and ability to participate in offset π-stacking interactions of key active-site residues all being critical for activity. The structural changes that occur upon Co(II)rrinoid binding also appear to be crucial for properly orienting the transiently generated Co(I) “supernucleophile” for rapid reaction with cosubstrate ATP. PMID:25423616

  17. The levels of urinary glycosaminoglycans of patients with attenuated and severe type of mucopolysaccharidosis II determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mashima, Ryuichi; Sakai, Eri; Tanaka, Misa; Kosuga, Motomichi; Okuyama, Torayuki

    2016-06-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play important roles on the regulation of extracellular signaling, neuronal development, and cartilage maintenance. The extracellular concentration of total GAGs has been used as an established measure for the diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs). Heparan sulfate (HS), Dermatan sulfate (DS) and chondroitin sulfate are known to be elevated in the GAGs under pathological conditions associated with MPS. Furthermore, the selective accumulation of disease-specific one of, or a combination of, them has also been used for the estimation of subtypes of MPS. A previously developed method [Auray-Blais C et al. Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 102 (2011) 49-56.] measures the concentration of GAGs using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with higher precision. To ask whether the selective accumulation of HS and DS in the urine of MPS II patients discriminate the attenuated and severe type of MPS II, we examined the concentrations of HS and DS by this methodology. Compared to the healthy controls, we found a marked elevation of HS and DS in all of the MPS II-affected patients. Among patients who received ERT with confirmed elevation of antibody titer, the concentrations of HS in the urine of patients with attenuated type were lower than those with severe type of MPS II. In these patients, the concentrations of DS by LC-MS/MS and of total GAG by DMB failed to depend on the accumulation of antibody. These results suggest that the LC-MS/MS method employed in this study might discriminate the subtypes of MPS II in different clinical background. PMID:27331006

  18. Novel Anderson-type [TeMo6O24](6-)-based metal-organic complexes tuned by different species and their coordination modes: assembly, various architectures and properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuli; Sun, Junjun; Lin, Hongyan; Chang, Zhihan; Tian, Aixiang; Liu, Guocheng; Wang, Xiang

    2016-02-14

    Four novel Anderson-type polyoxometalates (POMs) [TeMo6O24](6-) (TeMo6)-based metal-organic complexes (MOCs), namely, H2[Zn4(3-Hdpyp)2(TeMo6O24)2(H2O)16]·6H2O (1), [Zn3(3-dpyb)2(TeMo6O24)(H2O)12]·8H2O (2), [Cu2(4-Hdpyp)2(TeMo6O24)(H2O)6]·4H2O (3), and [Cu3(3-dpyp)2(TeMo6O24)(H2O)8]·4H2O (4) (3-dpyp = N,N'-bis(3-pyridinecarboxamide)-1,3-propane, 3-dpyb = N,N'-bis(3-pyridinecarboxamide)-1,4-butane, 4-dpyp = N,N'-bis(4-pyridinecarboxamide)-1,3-propane), were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR spectra, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). In complex 1, two TeMo6 polyoxoanions bridge Zn(II) ions to generate a discrete tetranuclear zinc complex H2[Zn4(3-Hdpyp)2(TeMo6O24)2(H2O)16]. In 2, the TeMo6 anions connect the metal-organic units [Zn3(3-dpyb)2](6+) to form an Anderson-type TeMo6-based wave-like metal-organic chain. Both the discrete tetranuclear subunits in 1 and 1D wavy chains in 2 were further extended to 2D supramolecular networks through the hydrogen bonding interactions. In complex 3, the TeMo6 anions link the metal-organic units [Cu2(4-Hdpyp)2](6+) to construct a 2D layer, which is further extended to a 3D supramolecular framework by the hydrogen bonding interactions. In complex 4, the TeMo6 polyoxoanions bridge the Cu(II) ions to generate a 2D Cu-TeMo6 inorganic layer, which is further linked by the μ2-bridging 3-dpyp ligands to form a 3D metal-organic framework. The effects of various coordination modes of TeMo6 polyanions and the bis-pyridyl-bis-amide ligands, as well as the central metals on the structures of the title complexes have been discussed. Besides, the fluorescence, electrochemical properties and photocatalytic activities of the title complexes have been investigated in detail. PMID:26745725

  19. Anderson-Fabry disease: a histopathological study of three cases with observations on the mechanism of production of pain

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Pauline

    1973-01-01

    A clinical review and histopathological study of three cases of Anderson-Fabry disease is presented and pathological changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems are reported, in some sites for the first time. These are telangiectatic changes in vessels of the sympathetic ganglia in the vertebral trunk; storage of glycolipid in pigmented cells of the substantia nigra and in anterior horn cells; and degeneration of nerve fibres in the dorsal root entry zone and substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord. The histopathological findings suggest that in this disease pain is due to involvement of dorsal root ganglion cells with associated axonal degeneration of the small fibres in pathways subserving pain. Images PMID:4204059

  20. Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 1986. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session. August 5, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The committee recommends several amendments to H.R. 3653, a bill designed to improve nuclear insurance procedures. Among the amendments are the inclusion of storage, handling, transportation, treatment, or disposal of, or research and development on and changes dealing with reimbursement procedures and limits. The bill reauthorizes the Price-Anderson Act, but limits liability and creates industry-wide liability in the event of a major accident. The report covers background information and hearings, summarizes the 15 amendments and each section how the bill will effect relevant changes in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. Dissenting views argue against setting a liability cap on nuclear waste accidents because it discourages safety consciousness on the part of contractors and because there is no precedent in liability insurance for limiting liability.