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1

Energy level statistics at the metal-insulator transition in the Anderson model of localization with anisotropic hopping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, a metal-insulator transition (MIT) was found in the anisotropic Anderson model of localization by transfer-matrix methods. This MIT has been also investigated by multifractal analysis and the same critical disorders Wc have been obtained within the accuracy of the data. We now employ energy level statistics to further characterize the MIT. We find a crossover of the nearest-neighbor level

F. Milde; R. A. Römer

1998-01-01

2

Suitability of Palestine salt dome, Anderson Co. , Texas for disposal of high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

The suitability of Palestine salt dome, in Anderson County, Texas, is in serious doubt for a repository to isolate high-level nuclear waste because of abandoned salt brining operations. The random geographic and spatial occurrence of 15 collapse sinks over the dome may prevent safe construction of the necessary surface installations for a repository. The dissolution of salt between the caprock and dome, from at least 15 brine wells up to 500 feet deep, may permit increased rates of salt dissolution long into future geologic time. The subsurface dissolution is occurring at a rate difficult, if not impossible, to assess or to calculate. It cannot be shown that this dissolution rate is insignificant to the integrity of a future repository or to ancillary features. The most recent significant collapse was 36 feet in diameter and took place in 1972. The other collapses ranged from 27 to 105 feet in diameter and from 1.5 to more than 15 feet in depth. ONWI recommends that this dome be removed from consideration as a candidate site.

Patchick, P.F.

1980-01-01

3

No correlation between Anderson Reservoir stage level and underlying Calaveras fault seismicity despite calculated differential stress increases  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Concerns have been raised that stresses from reservoir impoundment may trigger damaging earthquakes because rate changes have been associated with reservoir impoundment or stage-level changes globally. Here, the idea is tested blindly using Anderson Reservoir, which lies atop the seismically active Calaveras fault. The only knowledge held by the author going into the study was the expectation that reservoir levels change cyclically because of seasonal rainfall. Examination of seismicity rates near the reservoir reveals variability, but no correlation with stage-level changes. Three-dimensional fi nite-element modeling shows stress changes suffi cient for earthquake triggering along the Calaveras fault zone. Since many of the reported cases of induced triggering come from low-strain settings, it is speculated that gradual stressing from stage-level changes in high-strain settings may not be signifi cant. From this study, it can be concluded that reservoirs are not necessarily risky in active tectonic settings. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

Parsons, T.

2011-01-01

4

Surface hopping with a manifold of electronic states. II. Application to the many-body Anderson-Holstein model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate a simple surface hopping (SH) approach for modeling a single impurity level coupled to a single phonon and an electronic (metal) bath (i.e., the Anderson-Holstein model). The phonon degree of freedom is treated classically with motion along-and hops between-diabatic potential energy surfaces. The hopping rate is determined by the dynamics of the electronic bath (which are treated implicitly). For the case of one electronic bath, in the limit of small coupling to the bath, SH recovers phonon relaxation to thermal equilibrium and yields the correct impurity electron population (as compared with numerical renormalization group). For the case of out of equilibrium dynamics, SH current-voltage (I-V) curve is compared with the quantum master equation (QME) over a range of parameters, spanning the quantum region to the classical region. In the limit of large temperature, SH and QME agree. Furthermore, we can show that, in the limit of low temperature, the QME agrees with real-time path integral calculations. As such, the simple procedure described here should be useful in many other contexts.

Dou, Wenjie; Nitzan, Abraham; Subotnik, Joseph E.

2015-02-01

5

Critical level statistics at the Anderson transition in four-dimensional disordered systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The level spacing distribution is numerically calculated at the disorder-induced metal-insulator transition for dimensionality d = 4 by applying the Lanczos diagonalisation. The critical level statistics are shown to deviate stronger from the result of the random matrix theory compared to those of d = 3 and to become closer to the Poisson limit of uncorrelated spectra. Using the finite

I. Kh. Zharekeshev; B. Kramer

1998-01-01

6

Short Note Typeset with jpsj2.cls Scaling of the Level Compressibility at the Anderson  

E-print Network

Institut fur Physik Technische Universitat, D-09107, Chemnitz, Germany 2 International University Bremen statistics. 5) The presence of a disorder induced MIT in 3D and the absence of such in 2D and in 1D was shown and #23; is the localization length critical exponent. 7) 2. Spectral Statistics and Level Compressibility

Chemnitz, Technische Universität

7

Machine-Level Programming II: Control Flow  

E-print Network

Machine-Level Programming II: Control Flow l Topics l Condition Codes l Setting l Testing l Control Flow l If-then-else l While, for loop #12;Assembly programmer view l ALU: Arithmetic Logic Unit l IR: Instruction register l GPR: General Purpose Registers l PC: Program Counter l SP: Stack Pointer l BR: Base

Badrinath, B. R.

8

Leona Anderson Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Leona Anderson conducted by Rachel Gadd-Nelson in Burdick, Kansas, on September 18, 2009. In this interview, Leona Anderson discusses her experiences as a member of the Missouri Synod Lutheran ...

Anderson, Leona; Gadd-Nelson, Rachel

2009-09-18

9

55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with eighty-eight 1-1/2" diameter copper ion return RF balance tube systems. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

10

Culture Curriculum for German, Level II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's guide to cultural instruction in a level-2 German course is designed to be used with the text "Deutsch, Erstes Buch, Erster Teil." Instructional observations pertain to the seventh through the 12th lessons and comprise the major portion of this text including: )1) die Eisenbahn, (2) Reisen und Essen in Deutschland, (3) die Familie,…

Oetiker, Rosemary

11

Bioinformatics Robert Anderson1  

E-print Network

Bioinformatics Robert Anderson1 and Zhiping Weng1,2 1. Bioinformatics Program 2. Department of Biomedical Engineering Boston University 44 Cummington Street Boston, MA 02215 What is Bioinformatics? Bioinformatics is the study of applying computational methods to large amount of biological information in order

Weng, Zhiping

12

The Anderson Quin Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

1993-03-18

13

Home Economics. Sample Test Items. Levels I and II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A sample of behavioral objectives and related test items that could be developed for content modules in Home Economics levels I and II, this book is intended to enable teachers to construct more valid and reliable test materials. Forty-eight one-page modules are presented, and opposite each module are listed two to seven specific behavioral…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Educational Testing.

14

31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing various electronic central indicator panel to control building air conditioning, steam pressure, supply temperature, discharge temperature, supply pressure, transformer vault status, and radome conditioning system. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

15

52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch with open port door in radar scanner building 105 showing emanating waveguides from lower switch in vertical run; photograph also shows catwalk to upper scanner switch in upper left side of photograph and structural supports. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

16

The Internal Validation of Level II and Level III Respiratory Therapy Examinations. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This project began with the delineation of the roles and functions of respiratory therapy personnel by the American Association for Respiratory Therapy. In Phase II, The Psychological Corporation used this delineation to develop six proficiency examinations, three at each of two levels. One exam at each level was designated for the purpose of the…

Jouett, Michael L.

17

Anderson localized optical fibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anderson localization has been a subject of fascination and intense research for more than fifty years. It is highly desirable to harness its curious and interesting properties in practical applications. We have taken a step in this direction by using this phenomenon as the wave guiding mechanism in optical fibers. We have shown, both experimentally and numerically, that for a moderate amount of disorder in optical fibers, transverse localization results in an effective propagating beam diameter that is comparable to that of a typical index-guiding optical fiber.1, 2 In this work, we investigate the effect of macro-bending on the localization properties in a disordered polymer optical fiber both experimentally and numerically. We show that macro-bending in ranges of practical interest does not significantly affect the beam propagation in Anderson localized fibers as long as the strong localization dominates the effect of bending.

Karbasi, Salman; Koch, Karl W.; Mafi, Arash

2013-02-01

18

Anderson localization of light near boundaries of disordered photonic lattices  

SciTech Connect

We study numerically the effect of boundaries on Anderson localization of light in truncated two-dimensional photonic lattices in a nonlinear medium. We demonstrate suppression of Anderson localization at the edges and corners, so that stronger disorder is needed near the boundaries to obtain the same localization as in the bulk. We find that the level of suppression depends on the location in the lattice (edge vs corner), as well as on the strength of disorder. We also discuss the effect of nonlinearity on various regimes of Anderson localization.

Jovic, Dragana M. [Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Texas A and M University at Qatar, P. O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Kivshar, Yuri S. [Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Denz, Cornelia [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik and Center for Nonlinear Science (CeNoS), Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Belic, Milivoj R. [Texas A and M University at Qatar, P. O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar)

2011-03-15

19

CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD (II) LEVELS AND LEAD (II) NEUROTOXICITY?  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafl...

20

OUTLINE OF MATHEMATICS- LEVELS II A AND II B FOR TALENT PRESERVATION CLASSES IN GRADE EIGHT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

MEASUREMENT, GEOMETRY, DECIMAL FRACTIONS, AND PERCENTAGE CONSTITUTE UNIT CONTENT FOR LEVEL II-A. NO STEP-BY-STEP PROCEDURES ARE GIVEN. EACH UNIT HAS GENERAL PROCEDURAL AND CONTENT APPROACH SUGGESTIONS. THE UNIT BEGINS WITH MEASUREMENT BECAUSE MOST CLASS MEMBERS WILL BE TAKING A PRACTICAL ARTS COURSE AND WILL NEED TO BE ABLE TO MEASURE MATERIALS.…

Houston Public Schools, TX.

21

Talmadge Anderson Heritage House Talmadge Anderson Heritage House  

E-print Network

Talmadge Anderson Heritage House Talmadge Anderson Heritage House 935 NE B Street, Pullman, WA and Heritage Houses: 509-339-6172 or marc_robinson@wsu.edu. 2. The WSU Culture and Heritage Houses are open present at the event. 4. All events must have a Cultural House Assistant on hand. The Office of Equity

Collins, Gary S.

22

The Anderson Current Loop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four-wire-probe concept applied to electrical-resistance transducers. Anderson current loop is excitation-and-signal-conditioning circuit suitable for use with strain gauges, resistance thermometers, and other electrical-resistance transducers mounted in harsh environments. Used as alternative to Wheatstone bridge. Simplifies signal-conditioning problem, enabling precise measurement of small changes in resistance of transducer. Eliminates some uncertainties in Wheatstone-bridge resistance-change measurements in flight research. Current loop configuration makes effects of lead-wire and contact resistances insignificantly small. Also provides output voltage that varies linearly with change in gauge resistance, and does so at double sensitivity of Wheatstone bridge.

Anderson, Karl F.

1994-01-01

23

Curriculum Guides for Level I and Level II: National Manpower Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Curriculum guides to levels I and II of the Canadian National Manpower Model, which elaborate on content originally presented in 1971, are provided for personnel training programs in the field of mental retardation and related handicapping areas. The guides are said to be based on a philosophy that demands society's acceptance of retarded and…

National Inst. on Mental Retardation, Toronto (Ontario).

24

Stream Classification Level IIStream Classification Level II & Departure Analysis& Departure Analysis  

E-print Network

Level IILevel II #12;Does stream type matter?Does stream type matter? If your interested in hydraulic geometry it doesIf your interested in hydraulic geometry it does #12;Age: DavisAge: Davis''s Observations has been manipulated by entities such asmanipulated by entities such as county road departments

25

America's First Illustrator: Alexander Anderson  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The New York Public Library presents this digital edition of the scrapbooks of 19th-century master illustrator Alexander Anderson. During his 70-year career, Anderson (1775-1870) created wood engravings to illustrate books, periodicals, newspapers, broadsides, and posters, based on his own designs, and the work of other artists. Some of the more prominent works illustrated by Anderson include John Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress", O.L. Holley's "Life of Benjamin Franklin", surveys of architecture, and books intended for teaching school children. This digital collection contains 1,332 of Anderson's engravings that can be browsed or searched by subject. To help interested users determine where images in the scrapbooks may have been published, titles of several major printed catalogs of Anderson's work are listed on the collection guide.

26

9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING WEST (BUILDINGS 126, 128, 129, 130, and 131 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

27

10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING NORTHEAST (BUILDINGS 131, 130, 129, and 128 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

28

Gravitational Anderson localization.  

PubMed

We present a higher dimensional model where gravity is bound to a brane due to Anderson localization. The extra dimensions are taken to be a disordered crystal of branes, with randomly distributed tensions of order the fundamental scale. Such geometries bind the graviton and thus allow for arbitrarily large extra dimensions even when the curvature is small. Thus this model is quite distinct from that of Randall and Sundrum where localization is a consequence of curvature effects in the bulk. The hierarchy problem can be solved by having the standard model brane live a distance away from the brane on which the graviton is localized. The statistical properties of the system are worked out and it is shown that the scenario leads to a continuum of four dimensional theories with differing strengths of gravitational interactions. We live on one particular brane whose gravitational constant is G(N). PMID:23383775

Rothstein, Ira Z

2013-01-01

29

Anderson localization of light  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past decade, the Anderson localization of light and a wide variety of associated phenomena have come to the forefront of research. Numerous investigations have been made into the underlying physics of how disorder affects transport in a crystalline lattice incorporating disorder. The physics involved relies on the analogy between the paraxial equation for electromagnetic waves and the Schrödinger equation describing quantum phenomena. Experiments have revealed how wavefunctions evolve during the localization process, and have led to discoveries of new physics that are universal to wave systems incorporating disorder. This Review summarizes the phenomena associated with the transverse localization of light, with an emphasis on the history, new ideas and future exploration of the field.

Segev, Mordechai; Silberberg, Yaron; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

2013-03-01

30

Spatio-temporal hybrid Anderson localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We address the localization of spatio-temporal wave packets in disordered waveguide arrays whereby temporal localization is mediated by nonlinearity while strong disorder provides Anderson statistical spatial localization. This combination of two different mechanisms allows localization to occur outside the range of parameters where diffraction, dispersion, and self-action have similar strengths, as required for the formation of standard spatio-temporal solitons. Under suitable conditions, nonlinearity is shown to weakly affect the statistically averaged spatial intensity distributions. In contrast, the temporal duration of the localized wave packets strongly depends on the level of disorder.

Lobanov, V. E.; Borovkova, O. V.; Kartashov, Y. V.; Szameit, A.

2014-12-01

31

27 CFR 9.86 - Anderson Valley.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anderson Valley. 9.86 Section 9.86 ...American Viticultural Areas § 9.86 Anderson Valley. (a) Name. The name of...area described in this section is “Anderson Valley.” (b) Approved...

2010-04-01

32

M D Anderson Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

This proposal will establish a Small Animal Imaging Research Program (SAIRP) at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The proposed SAIRP will complement the existing institutional facility that provides small animal imaging services to NIH funded investigators. The broad goal of this SAIRP is to develop novel imaging approaches to solve cancer related biological questions and evaluate new cancer therapies.

33

JOANNA E. ANDERSON CURRICULUM VITAE  

E-print Network

of conflict discussions. Talk presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Positive Psychology Association with low self-esteem derogate a partner's sacrifices. Talk presented at the annual meeting of the American1 JOANNA E. ANDERSON CURRICULUM VITAE Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Psychology Cornell

34

Ahn Stephen Alexander Kyle Allred WesleyAhn, Stephen Alexander, Kyle Allred, Wesley Anderson, Parker Antuma, Jesse Azeez, Karen  

E-print Network

Anderson, Parker Antuma, Jesse Azeez, Karen #12;B id Pi Baskerville Lizzy Bazan AlexandroBaidas, Piotr JSturges, Frank Talbot, Jacob Van De Winkle, Janet Vanleuven, Sheena Vaux, Kaitlyn Vayo II, Louis #12;Voce

Edwards, Paul N.

35

Marked decrease in serum pepsinogen II levels resulting from endoscopic resection of a large duodenal tumor.  

PubMed

Studies have indicated that serum pepsinogen (PG) levels are not only markers for chronic atrophic gastritis but also predictive risk factors for gastric cancer. However, serum PG levels can change because of pathological conditions other than gastritis. We report the first case in which abnormally high serum PG II levels (168.8 ng/mL) led to the discovery of a large tumor covering a wide area in the duodenum, and after resection of the tumor, the serum PG II levels markedly decreased. Because endoscopic and histopathological examinations showed no indications of atrophic changes, inflammation of the gastric mucosa, or Helicobacter pylori infection, the serum PG II levels eventually returned to normal (10.1 ng/mL). The preoperative abnormally high PG II levels were probably caused by the large duodenal tumor that prevented PG II (which is produced by the duodenal Brunner's glands) from being secreted into the lumen, a condition that increased the amount transferred to the bloodstream. No previous reports have investigated serum PG II levels before and after resection of a large duodenal tumor. We believe this case provides valuable insight regarding the dynamics of PG II in the body and has important diagnostic implications. PMID:25376543

Yada, Tomoyuki; Ito, Koichi; Suzuki, Keigo; Okubo, Koki; Aoki, Yoichiro; Akazawa, Naoki; Koizuka, Hitohiko; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Uemura, Naomi

2014-12-01

36

MD Anderson study explains high platelets in ovarian cancer patients; survival reduced  

Cancer.gov

Highly elevated platelet levels fuel tumor growth and reduce the survival of ovarian cancer patients, an international team of researchers led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer center reports in the New England Journal of Medicine.

37

Anderson Localization in Disordered Vibrating Rods  

E-print Network

We study, both experimentally and numerically, the Anderson localization phenomenon in torsional waves of a disordered elastic rod, which consists of a cylinder with randomly spaced notches. We find that the normal-mode wave amplitudes are exponentially localized as occurs in disordered solids. The localization length is measured using these wave amplitudes and it is shown to decrease as a function of frequency. The normal-mode spectrum is also measured as well as computed, so its level statistics can be analyzed. Fitting the nearest-neighbor spacing distribution a level repulsion parameter is defined that also varies with frequency. The localization length can then be expressed as a function of the repulsion parameter. There exists a range in which the localization length is a linear function of the repulsion parameter, which is consistent with Random Matrix Theory. However, at low values of the repulsion parameter the linear dependence does not hold.

J. Flores; L. Gutiérrez; R. A. Méndez-Sánchez; G. Monsivais; P. Mora; A. Morales

2012-03-19

38

Anderson Localization in Disordered Vibrating Rods  

E-print Network

We study, both experimentally and numerically, the Anderson localization phenomenon in torsional waves of a disordered elastic rod, which consists of a cylinder with randomly spaced notches. We find that the normal-mode wave amplitudes are exponentially localized as occurs in disordered solids. The localization length is measured using these wave amplitudes and it is shown to decrease as a function of frequency. The normal-mode spectrum is also measured as well as computed, so its level statistics can be analyzed. Fitting the nearest-neighbor spacing distribution a level repulsion parameter is defined that also varies with frequency. The localization length can then be expressed as a function of the repulsion parameter. There exists a range in which the localization length is a linear function of the repulsion parameter, which is consistent with Random Matrix Theory. However, at low values of the repulsion parameter the linear dependence does not hold.

Flores, J; Méndez-Sánchez, R A; Monsivais, G; Mora, P; Morales, A

2012-01-01

39

America's First Illustrator: Alexander Anderson  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

America has produced many notable wood engravers, but Alexander Anderson is one of the first to have name recognition. Born in 1775, he spent his lifetime crafting illustrations for books, periodicals, newspapers, and other commercial ephemera. This delightful digital collection from the New York Public Library brings together sixteen scrapbooks containing almost 10,000 wood engravings by Anderson. Visitors can click on the "Browse Source Titles" area to view the various volumes, and the subjects covered here are quite diverse. Even a cursory search returns dozens of cat engravings, illustrations of slaves, and lottery advertisements. For anyone with an interest in 19th century material culture, this collection is truly wonderful. It is worth making several return trips to get a full sense of the offerings here, and it is one that will bring new rewards upon each visit.

40

Anderson testifies on Planet Earth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AGU president Don Anderson joined former astronaut Sally Ride and National Aeronautics and Space Administration official Lennard Fisk March 8 in testifying before the Senate committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. The three had been asked to speak on the future of the Mission to Planet Earth, proposed both in a National Academy of Sciences report and a NASA study.Anderson was chairman of the National Academy of Science's Task Group on Earth Sciences, which prepared the report Mission to Planet Earth as part of the series Space Science in the Twenty-First Century. In his testimony, Anderson highlighted parts of the report and quoted the frontispiece “We now have the technology and the incentive to move boldly forward on a Mission to Planet Earth. We call on the nation to implement an integrated global program using both spaceborne and earth-based instrumentation for fundamental research on the origin, evolution and nature of our planet, its place in our solar system, and its interaction with living things, including mankind.”

Wainger, Lisa A.

41

Oregon Title I-M Skill Check List, Level II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following the Migrant Student Record Transfer System skills list, this checklist, designed for non-English speaking students, is a system for rapidly evaluating a student's skill level and for keeping track of the student's mastery of suggested objectives at the second grade level. Objectives to be mastered with 100% accuracy include: reading…

Spencer-Aders, Cathy

42

Resistance of Gram-positive bacteria to nisin is not determined by lipid II levels.  

PubMed

Lipid II is essential for nisin-mediated pore formation at nano-molar concentrations. We tested whether nisin resistance could result from different Lipid II levels, by comparing the maximal Lipid II pool in Micrococcus flavus (sensitive) and Listeria monocytogenes (relatively insensitive) and their nisin-resistant variants, with a newly developed method. No correlation was observed between the maximal Lipid II pool and nisin sensitivity, as was further corroborated by using spheroplasts of nisin-resistant and wild-type strains of M. flavus, which were equally sensitive to nisin. PMID:15451114

Kramer, Naomi E; Smid, Eddy J; Kok, Jan; de Kruijff, Ben; Kuipers, Oscar P; Breukink, Eefjan

2004-10-01

43

[Anderson-Fabry disease and renal transplantation].  

PubMed

Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare disease associated with progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in visceral organs and vascular endothelium. The disease primarily affects male patients. It has long been considered that females are asymptomatic carriers of Anderson-Fabry disease. However, recent results demonstrated a significant proportion of symptomatic affected females. We present our experience in the treatment of patients with Anderson-Fabry disease having received allograft from deceased donor, as well as follow-up of patients having received allograft from donor with unrecognized Anderson-Fabry disease. PMID:22359912

Basi?-Juki?, Nikolina; Kes, Petar; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Mesar, Ines; Cori?, Marijana; Kastelan, Zeljko

2011-01-01

44

Specification for Qualification and Certification for Level II - Advanced Welders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document defines the requirements and program for the American Welding Society (AWS) to certify advanced-level welders through an evaluation process entailing performance qualification and practical knowledge tests requiring the use of advanced reading, computational, and manual skills. The following items are included: statement of the…

American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

45

Jet-cooled naphthalene. II. Single vibronic level fluorescence spectra  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Single vibronic level fluorescence spectra have been measured for naphthalene cooled in a supersonic free jet. Ten spectra in all have been recorded, the excitation energies ranging from 0 to 4029 cm-1 above the 1B3u(??*)?1Ag origin. These results reveal extensive intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) occurring in the absence of collision on a time scale much faster than fluorescence even at vibrational energies as low as 2570 cm-1. Comparison of the observed spectra with model calculations shows that this IVR process involves most of the harmonic overtone/combination basis states of overall b1g symmetry having energies within the absorption line profile.

Beck, S. M.; Hopkins, J. B.; Powers, D. E.; Smalley, R. E.

1981-01-01

46

Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data  

SciTech Connect

Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

2009-03-01

47

Time averaging the semiclassical initial value representation for the calculation of vibrational energy levels. II.  

E-print Network

energy levels. II. Application to H2CO, NH3 , CH4, CH2D2 Alexey L. Kaledin and William H. Miller densities of molecules, previously tested successfully on H2O, is applied here to several larger molecules dynamics, however, the phase space average converges more slowly. Results for vibrational energy levels

Miller, William H.

48

ENERGY LEVELS AND SPECTRAL LINES OF SINGLY IONIZED MANGANESE (Mn II)  

SciTech Connect

This compilation revises the previously recommended list of energy levels of singly ionized manganese (Mn II) and provides a comprehensive list of observed spectral lines and transition probabilities in this spectrum. The new level optimization takes into account critically assessed uncertainties of measured wavelengths and includes about a hundred high-precision wavelengths determined by laser spectroscopy and Fourier transform techniques. Uncertainties of 63% of energy levels and 74% of Ritz wavelengths are reduced by a factor of three on average.

Kramida, Alexander; Sansonetti, Jean E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

2013-04-01

49

Circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor-II\\/mannose-6-phosphate receptor in obesity and type 2 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe extracellular domain of the insulin-like growth factor II\\/mannose-6-phosphate receptor (IGF-II\\/M6P-R) is present in the circulation, but its relationship with plasma IGF-II is largely unknown. As IGF-II appears to be nutritionally regulated, we studied the impact of obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and weight loss on circulating levels of IGF-II and its soluble receptor.

Nilani Jeyaratnaganthan; Kurt Højlund; Jens Peter Kroustrup; Jens Fromholt Larsen; Mette Bjerre; Klavs Levin; Henning Beck-Nielsen; Susana Frago; A. Bassim Hassan; Allan Flyvbjerg; Jan Frystyk

2010-01-01

50

What underlies the Anderson Hamiltonian  

SciTech Connect

The Anderson Hamiltonian characterizes a model in which local orbitals interact with each other through Coulomb interactions and with a bath of itinerant states through hybridization. In trying to find a prescription for the parameters of the model, one simultaneously develops some understanding of the states involved and studies whether the model incorporates enough of the essential physics. One useful tactic is to compare this model with other models and ask how different effects are accommodated. This paper compares results from the model with atomic, band, and modified band calculations for f-electron materials. It did not appear to incorporate effects that seemed to be significant. Specifically, it is difficult to see the relation of this model to the multiple-screening-mode model which is a natural interpretation of our band calculations. The computations are represented as a surrogate for the experiment.

Koelling, D.D.

1986-10-01

51

Light focusing in the Anderson regime.  

PubMed

Anderson localization is a regime in which diffusion is inhibited and waves (also electromagnetic waves) get localized. Here we exploit adaptive optics to achieve focusing in disordered optical fibres in the Anderson regime. By wavefront shaping and optimization, we observe the generation of a propagation-invariant beam, where light is trapped transversally by disorder, and show that Anderson localizations can be also excited by extended speckled beams. We demonstrate that disordered fibres allow a more efficient focusing action with respect to standard fibres in a way independent of their length, because of the propagation-invariant features and cooperative action of transverse localizations. PMID:25072204

Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

2014-01-01

52

REDUCED ANGIOTENSIN II LEVELS CAUSE GENERALIZED VASCULAR DYSFUNCTION VIA OXIDANT STRESS IN HAMSTER CHEEK POUCH ARTERIOLES  

PubMed Central

Objectives We investigated the effect of suppressing plasma angiotensin II (ANG II) levels on arteriolar relaxation in the hamster cheek pouch. Methods Arteriolar diameters were measured via television microscopy during short-term (3–6 days) high salt (HS; 4% NaCl) diet and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition with captopril (100 mg/kg/day). Results ACE inhibition and/or HS diet eliminated endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation to acetylcholine, endothelium-independent dilation to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside, the prostacyclin analogues carbacyclin and iloprost, and the KATP channel opener cromakalim; and eliminated arteriolar constriction during KATP channel blockade with glibenclamide. Scavenging of superoxide radicals and low dose ANG II infusion (25 ng/kg/min, subcutaneous) reduced oxidant stress and restored arteriolar dilation in arterioles of HS-fed hamsters. Vasoconstriction to topically-applied ANG II was unaffected by HS diet while arteriolar responses to elevation of superfusion solution PO2 were unaffected (5% O2, 10% O2) or reduced (21% O2) by HS diet. Conclusions These findings indicate that sustained exposure to low levels of circulating ANG II leads to widespread dysfunction in endothelium-dependent and independent vascular relaxation mechanisms in cheek pouch arterioles by increasing vascular oxidant stress, but does not potentiate O2- or ANG II-induced constriction of arterioles in the distal microcirculation of normotensive hamsters. PMID:23628292

Priestley, Jessica R. C.; Buelow, Matthew W.; McEwen, Scott T.; Weinberg, Brian D.; Delaney, Melanie; Balus, Sarah F.; Hoeppner, Carlyn; Dondlinger, Lynn; Lombard, Julian H.

2013-01-01

53

Spectrofluorimetric determination of picogram level Pb(II) using a dimercaptothiadiazole fluorophore  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the spectrofluorimetric determination of picogram level Pb(II) using 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (DMT) as a fluorophore. Excitation of DMT at 330 nm shows an emission maximum at 435 nm. The colorless solution of DMT changes into highly emittive yellow color immediately after the addition of 0.5 ?M Pb(II) and nearly 245-fold increase in emission intensity at 435 nm was observed. These changes were attributed to the complex formation between Pb(II). The emission intensity linearly increases in the concentration range of 10-100 nM Pb(II) and DMT. Based on the fluorescence enhancement, the concentration of Pb(II) was determined. Interestingly, the emission intensity was increased even in the presence of 0.1 pM Pb(II). The fluorophore showed an extreme selectivity towards 100 nM Pb(II) even in the presence of 50,000-fold higher concentrations of common metal ions interferences such as Na +, K +, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Fe 2+, Cd 2+, Cr 3+, Mn 2+, Zn 2+, Co 2+, Ni 2+ and 5000-, 100- and 40-fold of Cu 2+, Hg 2+ and Ag + ions, respectively. The lowest detection of 20 pg L -1 Pb(II) was achieved for the first time using DMT. The proposed method was successfully utilized for the determination of Pb(II) in tap water, polluted river water and industrial waste water samples. The results obtained in the present study were validated with both AAS and ICP-AES methods.

Vasimalai, N.; John, S. Abraham

2011-11-01

54

Algebra II: Gatekeeper Course--An Examination of CST Proficiency Levels in California and the Bay Area  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the Algebra II course and California Star Test (CST) proficiency levels in the San Francisco Bay Area and in the State of California. CST proficiency levels are examined by grade level for the State and nine counties of the San Francisco Bay Area region. Algebra II is shown to be one of the more complicated courses in the CSU…

Hailer-O'Keefe, Laurie

2012-01-01

55

Sites Sending WSR-88D Level II Data To The CRAFT Project/Univeristy of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Tim Crum Point Of Contact NWS Eastern Region Radar Site Name City, ST SID OF WFO ALBANY ALBANY, NY ALY OF WFO CHEYENNE CHEYENNE, WY CYS CHICAGO ROMEOVILLE, IL LOT DENVER BOULDER, CO BOU DETROIT WHITE LAKE, MI Level II Network Initial Operating Capability) As Of 3 June 2003 Tim Crum Point of Contact NWS Eastern

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

56

Guide for the Training and Qualification of Welding Personnel. Level II - Advanced Welders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is designed to help education and training facilities develop and administer competency-based training programs to qualify and certify trainees in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) requirements for level II (advanced) welders. Presented first are the scope, objectives, and requirements of the AWS…

American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

57

Relationship between skin resistance level and static balance in type II diabetic subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes mellitus is major cause leading to pathological changes in skin foot plantar area (SFPA) and affected the static standing balance duration (SSBD). Skin resistance level (SRL) is related to skin conductance which changes in the presence of sweat. This study aims to find out the relationship between the SRL and SSBD in type II diabetic patients. Sixty-eight voluntary students,

Eyyup Gulbandilar; Ali Cimbiz; Murat Sari; Hilmi Ozden

2008-01-01

58

Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 2: Locating clouds tops  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comparison is made of the vertical distribution of high-level cloud tops derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements and from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for all Julys and Januarys in 1985 to 1990. The results suggest that ISCCP overestimates the pressure of high-level clouds by up to 50-150 mbar, particularly at low latitudes. This is caused by the frequent presence of clouds with diffuse tops (greater than 50% time when cloudy events are observed). The averaged vertical extent of the diffuse top is about 1.5 km. At midlatitudes where the SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressure agree best, clouds with distinct tops reach a maximum relative proportion of the total level cloud amount (about 30-40%), and diffuse-topped clouds are reduced to their minimum (30-40%). The ISCCP-defined cloud top pressure should be regarded not as the material physical height of the clouds but as the level which emits the same infrared radiance as observed. SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressures agree for clouds with distinct tops. There is also an indication that the cloud top pressures of optically thin clouds not overlying thicker clouds are poorly estimated by ISCCP at middle latitudes. The average vertical extent of these thin clouds is about 2.5 km.

Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

1995-01-01

59

Jane Anderson: The Nazi Georgia Peach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thrill-packed life of a little-known Georgian, Jane Anderson, proves that truth is stranger than fiction.\\u000aAnderson led an amazing life filled with exciting adventures, daring deeds, breathtaking escapades, and romantic interludes, a life stranger than the dreams of most people. She changed her name several times. She often traveled across the United States, and lived in Georgia, Arizona, Texas,

Wilkes Donald E. Jr

1995-01-01

60

Alteration of precocene II-induced hepatotoxicity by modulation of hepatic glutathione levels.  

PubMed

Precocene II (6,7-dimethoxy-2,2-dimethyl-2H-benzo[b]pyran), an insect growth regulator that is structurally related to several naturally occurring carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic alkenylbenzenes, is genotoxic and produces hepatic centrolobular necrosis in rats. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the effects of modulation of hepatic glutathione levels on the toxicity of precocene II. Administration of a toxic dose of precocene II (175 mg/kg) to male Sprague-Dawley rats rapidly depleted hepatic GSH, produced histopathological changes in the liver, and induced increases in serum aminotransferase activity. Concurrent administration of the cysteine pro-drug L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC) prevented these toxic effects of precocene II. In contrast, pretreatment of rats with DL-buthionine-SR-sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, potentiated the toxicity of an otherwise non-toxic dose of precocene II (100 mg/kg). These results indicate that glutathione is important for protection from precocene II-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:2598296

Duddy, S K; Hsia, M T

1989-01-01

61

Theoretical interpretation of the Nd II spectrum: odd parity energy levels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The energy levels of singly ionized neodymium (Nd II) are interpreted following the Racah-Slater parametric method, by using the Cowan computer codes. Radial parameters obtained in a least-squares fit are compared with Hartree-Fock (HFR) ab initio integrals. In the odd parity, 596 levels of the mixed configurations 4f35d6s, 4f35d2, 4f36s2, 4f46p and 4f5 are used to determine 39 free parameters, 51 other parameters being constrained. The mean error is 53 cm- 1. The configuration sharing of the levels is supported by the experimental isotope shifts 144Nd-150Nd.

Wyart, Jean-François

2010-09-01

62

Astronaut Anderson Works in SPACEHAB  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia STS-107 mission launched January 16, 2003. STS-107 is strictly a multidiscipline microgravity and Earth science research mission involving 80-plus International experiments to be performed during 16-days, many of which will be managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of the research will be conducted in the Shuttle's mid deck, the area directly under the cockpit, and in the new SPACEHAB Research Double Module. This is the first flight for that module, which doubles the volume available for experiments and significantly increases the amount and complexity of research from the last dedicated Shuttle science mission, STS-95, flown in 1998 with a single SPACEHAB module. The pressurized module is carried in Columbia's payload bay and is accessible to the crew via a turnel from the Shuttle's mid deck. Pictured is an interesting view, looking through the adjoining tunnel, of astronaut Michael P. Anderson, mission specialist, performing work in SPACEHAB. The first shuttle mission in 2003, the STS-107 mission marks the 113th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the 28th flight of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia.

2003-01-01

63

Thermalization processes in interacting Anderson insulators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes experiments utilizing a unique property of electron glasses to gain information on the fundamental nature of the interacting Anderson-localized phase. The methodology is based on measuring the energy absorbed by the electronic system from alternating electromagnetic fields as a function of their frequency. Experiments on three-dimensional (3D) amorphous indium-oxide films suggest that, in the strongly localized regime, the energy spectrum is discrete and inelastic electron-electron events are strongly suppressed. These results imply that, at low temperatures, electron thermalization and finite conductivity depend on coupling to the phonon bath. The situation is different for samples nearing the metal-insulator transition; in insulating samples that are close to the mobility edge, energy absorption persists to much higher frequencies. Comparing these results with previously studied 2D samples [Ovadyahu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 156602 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.156602] demonstrates that the mean-level spacing (on a single-particle basis) is not the only relevant scale in this problem. The possibility of delocalization by many-body effects and the relevance of a nearby mobility edge (which may be a many-body edge) are discussed.

Ovadyahu, Z.

2015-01-01

64

Tablet PC Enhanced Curricula Richard Anderson, Ruth Anderson, Oliver Chung, K. M. Davis,  

E-print Network

Tablet PC Enhanced Curricula Richard Anderson, Ruth Anderson, Oliver Chung, K. M. Davis, Peter write their answers on the slide on their tablets and send them back to the instructor Classroom Classroom Presenter · Tablet PC-based classroom interaction system · Supports inking on slides to integrate

Anderson, Richard

65

Bufalin reduces the level of topoisomerase II in human leukemia cells and affects the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs  

Microsoft Academic Search

When human leukemia HL-60 cells were treated with 10?7 M bufalin, the amounts of both topoisomerase (topo) II? and II? and the activity of topo II decreased markedly and were almost undetectable 18 h after the start of treatment. The level of topo II mRNA started to decrease immediately after the start of treatment with bufalin, with a subsequent decrease

Sachiko Hashimoto; Yongkui Jing; Nobuko Kawazoe; Yutaka Masuda; Shigeo Nakajo; Takemi Yoshida; Yukio Kuroiwa; Kazuyasu Nakaya

1997-01-01

66

Serum uric acid level, blood pressure, and vascular angiotensin II responsiveness in healthy men and women  

PubMed Central

Abstract Uric acid is associated with hypertension and increased renin–angiotensin system activity, although this relationship diminishes after chronic exposure to high levels. Uric acid is more strongly associated with poor outcomes in women compared to men, although whether this is due to a sex?specific uric acid?mediated pathophysiology or reflects sex differences in baseline uric acid levels remains unknown. We examined the association between uric acid and vascular measures at baseline and in response to angiotensin?II challenge in young healthy humans. Fifty?two subjects (17 men, 35 premenopausal women) were studied in high?salt balance. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in men compared to women (328 ± 14 ?mol/L vs. 248 ± 10 ?mol/L, P < 0.001), although all values were within normal sex?specific range. Men demonstrated no association between uric acid and blood pressure, either at baseline or in response to angiotensin?II. In stark contrast, a significant association was observed between uric acid and blood pressure at baseline (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.005; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.02) and in response to angiotensin?II (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.035; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.056) in women. However, this sex difference lost significance after adjustment for baseline uric acid. When all subjects were stratified according to high (>300 ?mol/L) or low (?300 ?mol/L) uric acid levels, only the low uric acid group showed a positive association between uric acid and measures of vascular tone at baseline and in response to angiotensin?II. Differences in uric acid?mediated outcomes between men and women likely reflect differences in exposure to increased uric acid levels, rather than a sex?specific uric acid?mediated pathophysiology. PMID:25501427

Samimi, Arian; Ramesh, Sharanya; Turin, Tanvir C.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Sarna, Magdalena A.; Reimer, Raylene A.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Sola, Darlene Y.; Ahmed, Sofia B.

2014-01-01

67

Serum uric acid level, blood pressure, and vascular angiotensin II responsiveness in healthy men and women.  

PubMed

Uric acid is associated with hypertension and increased renin-angiotensin system activity, although this relationship diminishes after chronic exposure to high levels. Uric acid is more strongly associated with poor outcomes in women compared to men, although whether this is due to a sex-specific uric acid-mediated pathophysiology or reflects sex differences in baseline uric acid levels remains unknown. We examined the association between uric acid and vascular measures at baseline and in response to angiotensin-II challenge in young healthy humans. Fifty-two subjects (17 men, 35 premenopausal women) were studied in high-salt balance. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in men compared to women (328 ± 14 ?mol/L vs. 248 ± 10 ?mol/L, P < 0.001), although all values were within normal sex-specific range. Men demonstrated no association between uric acid and blood pressure, either at baseline or in response to angiotensin-II. In stark contrast, a significant association was observed between uric acid and blood pressure at baseline (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.005; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.02) and in response to angiotensin-II (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.035; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.056) in women. However, this sex difference lost significance after adjustment for baseline uric acid. When all subjects were stratified according to high (>300 ?mol/L) or low (?300 ?mol/L) uric acid levels, only the low uric acid group showed a positive association between uric acid and measures of vascular tone at baseline and in response to angiotensin-II. Differences in uric acid-mediated outcomes between men and women likely reflect differences in exposure to increased uric acid levels, rather than a sex-specific uric acid-mediated pathophysiology. PMID:25501427

Samimi, Arian; Ramesh, Sharanya; Turin, Tanvir C; MacRae, Jennifer M; Sarna, Magdalena A; Reimer, Raylene A; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Sola, Darlene Y; Ahmed, Sofia B

2014-12-01

68

Experimental and theoretical radiative properties of odd-parity highly excited levels in Mo II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiative lifetimes of 13 odd-parity levels of Mo II have been measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) spectroscopy in a plasma produced by laser ablation. The investigated levels, within the energy range 48 022 - 63 497 cm-1, were excited from the ground or appropriate metastable states with one-photon selective excitation. The uncertainties of the measured lifetime results are less than 10%. Calculated lifetimes of Mo II, obtained using the relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR) method including core-polarization effects, are found to agree well with the measured ones. New transition probabilities are deduced for 246 transitions in the wavelength range extending from 207.431 up to 510.813 nm.

Jiang, L. Y.; Wang, Q.; Feng, Y. Y.; Quinet, P.; Biémont, É.; Li, S. B.; Dai, Z. W.

2012-07-01

69

Supervision of Occupational Therapy Level II Fieldwork Students: Impact on and Predictors of Clinician Productivity.  

PubMed

This study aimed to determine whether a difference in productivity exists between clinicians supervising and not supervising a Level II occupational therapy student and whether factors including clinician years of experience, practice setting, and clinician productivity without a student could predict clinician productivity while supervising a student. We used paired-sample t tests to examine clinician productivity with and without a student in 109 clinician-student encounters and regression analysis to determine factors predictive of clinician productivity with a student. Results indicated no difference in clinician productivity with or without a student. Clinician years of experience, practice area, and productivity without a student were significant predictors of clinician productivity while supervising a student. Study results contradict the belief that supervising Level II fieldwork students lowers clinicians' productivity. Findings suggest that practice area and productivity without a student are important factors influencing the productivity of clinicians supervising a fieldwork student. PMID:25553749

Ozelie, Rebecca; Janow, Janet; Kreutz, Corinne; Mulry, Mary Kate; Penkala, Ashley

2015-01-01

70

McDonnell Douglas Delta II main liquid oxygen tank bi-level pressurization system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Past McDonnell Douglas Delta launch vehicles have experienced a longitudinal dynamic instability known as 'pogo' shortly before first-stage main engine cut-off (MECO). To prevent the occurrence of this dynamic phenomena, it was necessary to increase the main liquid oxygen (LOX) tank minimum relief pressure from 31.0 psig to 53.0 psig before MECO. A system had to be devised that would increase tank relief pressure at a time during flight when the hydrostatic pressure at the tank bottom was low enough to prevent exceeding tank structural margins. The Delta II main LOX tank bi-level pressurization system was created to meet these requirements. To date, nine Delta II vehicles have flown, and the devised main LOX tank bi-level pressurization system has operated as expected, successfully eliminating MECO pogo.

Rossoni, M. A.

1990-07-01

71

Review of the Constellation Level II Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Documents during Participation in the Constellation Level II SR&QA Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the request of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and the Constellation Program (CxP) Safety, Reliability; and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Director, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) participated in the Cx SR&QA Requirements forum. The Requirements Forum was held June 24-26; 2008, at GRC's Plum Brook Facility. The forums purpose was to gather all stakeholders into a focused meeting to help complete the process of refining the CxP to refine its Level II SR&QA requirements or defining project-specific requirements tailoring. Element prime contractors had raised specific questions about the wording and intent of many requirements in areas they felt were driving costs without adding commensurate value. NESC was asked to provide an independent and thorough review of requirements that contractors believed were driving Program costs, by active participation in the forum. This document contains information from the forum.

Cameron, Kenneth D.; Gentz, Steven J.; Beil, Robert J.; Minute, Stephen A.; Currie, Nancy J.; Scott, Steven S.; Thomas, Walter B., III; Smiles, Michael D.; Schafer, Charles F.; Null, Cynthia H.; Bay, P. Michael

2009-01-01

72

Truncation of the class II beta-chain cytoplasmic domain influences the level of class II/invariant chain-derived peptide complexes.  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have established that antigen presenting cells (APC) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II beta chains with truncated cytoplasmic domains are impaired in their capacity to activate T cells. While it had been widely accepted that this impairment is due to a defect in class II cytoplasmic domain-dependent signal transduction, we recently generated transgenic mice expressing only truncated class II beta chains, and functional analyses of APC from these mice revealed signaling-independent defects in antigen presentation. Here, we demonstrate that T cells primed on such transgenic APC respond better to stimulation by APC expressing truncated beta chains than by wild-type APC. This finding suggests that APC expressing truncated class II beta chains are not inherently defective in their antigen presenting capacity but, rather, may differ from wild-type APC in the peptide antigens that they present. Indeed, analysis of the peptides bound to class II molecules isolated from normal and transgenic spleen cells revealed clear differences. Most notably, the level of class II-associated invariant chain-derived peptides (CLIP) is significantly reduced in cells expressing only truncated beta chains. Prior studies have established that CLIP and antigenic peptides compete for binding to class II molecules. Thus, our results suggest that the cytoplasmic domain of the class II beta chain affects antigen presentation by influencing the level of CLIP/class II complexes. PMID:8552613

Smiley, S T; Rudensky, A Y; Glimcher, L H; Grusby, M J

1996-01-01

73

COMPREHENSIVE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND IMPROVED ENERGY LEVELS FOR SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)  

SciTech Connect

We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 A. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Kerber, Florian [European Southern Observatory, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-10-15

74

ANDERSON LOCALIZATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES IN CONFINED DISORDERED DIELECTRIC MEDIA  

E-print Network

ANDERSON LOCALIZATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES IN CONFINED DISORDERED DIELECTRIC MEDIA MARIAN RUSEK, Poland 1. Introduction Scattering of electromagnetic waves from varoius kind of obstacles is rich experimental demonstration that Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves is possible in three

Rusek, Marian

75

The FERRUM project: Experimental transition probabilities from highly excited even 5s levels in Cr ii  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report lifetime measurements of the five levels in the 3d4(a5D)5s e6D term in Cr ii at an energy around 83 000 cm-1, and log(gf) values for 38 transitions from the investigated levels. The lifetimes are obtained using time-resolved, laser-induced fluorescence on ions from a laser-produced plasma. Since the levels have the same parity as the low-lying states directly populated in the plasma, we used a two-photon excitation scheme. This process is greatly facilitated by the presence of the 3d4(a5D)4p z6F levels at roughly half the energy difference. The f-values are obtained by combining the experimental lifetimes with branching fractions derived using relative intensities from a hollow cathode lamp recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer.

Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.; Nilsson, H.; Hartman, H.; Bäckström, E.

2014-10-01

76

SAGE II Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties at Non-Volcanic Levels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 2000, stratospheric aerosol levels have been relatively stable and at the lowest levels observed in the historical record. Given the challenges of making satellite measurements of aerosol properties at these levels, we have performed a study of the sensitivity of the product to the major components of the processing algorithm used in the production of SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements and the retrieval process that produces the operational surface area density (SAD) product. We find that the aerosol extinction measurements, particularly at 1020 nm, remain robust and reliable at the observed aerosol levels. On the other hand, during background periods, the SAD operational product has an uncertainty of at least a factor of 2 during due to the lack of sensitivity to particles with radii less than 100 nm.

Thomason, Larry W.; Burton, Sharon P.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Peter, Thomas

2008-01-01

77

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Does Not Suppress Renal Angiotensin II Levels in Angiotensin I–Infused Rats  

PubMed Central

Angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion into rats elevates local angiotensin II levels through an AT1 receptor–dependent pathway in the kidney. We examined whether treatment with an angio-tensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, temocapril, or an AT1-receptor blocker, olmesartan, prevented elevation of Ang II levels in the kidney of angiotensin I (Ang I)-infused rats. Rats were infused with Ang I (100 ng/min) and treated with temocapril (30 mg/kg per day, n = 10) or olmesartan (10 mg/kg per day, n = 9) for 4 weeks. Ang I infusion significantly elevated blood pressure compared with vehicle-infused rats (n = 6). Treatment with temocapril or olmesartan suppressed Ang I–induced hypertension. Temocapril suppressed both plasma and renal ACE activity. Ang I infusion increased Ang II content in the kidney. Interestingly, temocapril failed to reduce the level of Ang II in the kidney, while olmesartan markedly suppressed an increase in renal Ang II levels. These results suggest a limitation of temocapril and a benefit of olmesartan to inhibit the renal renin–angiotensin system and suggest the possible existence of an ACE inhibitor–insensitive pathway that increases Ang II levels in rat kidney. PMID:23698111

Ohnishi, Keisuke; Murase, Miki; Nakano, Daisuke; Pelisch, Nicolas; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ohmori, Koji; Kohno, Masakazu; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Nishiyama, Akira

2013-01-01

78

Image transport through a disordered optical fibre mediated by transverse Anderson localization.  

PubMed

Transverse Anderson localization of light allows localized optical-beam-transport through a transversely disordered and longitudinally invariant medium. Its successful implementation in disordered optical fibres recently resulted in the propagation of localized beams of radii comparable to that of conventional optical fibres. Here we demonstrate optical image transport using transverse Anderson localization of light. The image transport quality obtained in the polymer disordered optical fibre is comparable to or better than some of the best commercially available multicore image fibres with less pixelation and higher contrast. It is argued that considerable improvement in image transport quality can be obtained in a disordered fibre made from a glass matrix with near wavelength-size randomly distributed air-holes with an air-hole fill-fraction of 50%. Our results open the way to device-level implementation of the transverse Anderson localization of light with potential applications in biological and medical imaging. PMID:24566557

Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J; Koch, Karl W; Hawkins, Thomas; Ballato, John; Mafi, Arash

2014-01-01

79

Effect of dietary fiber on the level of free angiotensin II receptor blocker in vitro.  

PubMed

The interaction between angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers (ARBs), such as losartan potassium (LO), candesartan (CA), and telmisartan (TE), and dietary fiber was studied as to the level of free ARB in vitro. When ARB was incubated with soluble (sodium alginate, pectin, and glucomannan) or insoluble (cellulose and chitosan) dietary fiber, the levels of free LO, TE, and CA decreased. This resulted only from mixing the dietary fiber with the ARBs and differed among the types of dietary fiber, and the pH and electrolytes in the mixture. The levels of free LO and TE tended to decrease with a higher concentration of sodium chloride in pH 1.2 fluid. These results suggest that it is important to pay attention to the possible interactions between ARBs and dietary fiber. PMID:24790001

Iwazaki, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Tamezane, Yui; Tanaka, Kenta; Nakagawa, Minami; Imai, Kimie; Nakanishi, Kunio

2014-01-01

80

Visual Absorption Capability1 Lee Anderson  

E-print Network

Visual Absorption Capability1 Lee Anderson 2a/ Jerry Mosier 2b/ Geoffrey Chandler 2c/ 1/ Submitted, Lassen National Forest, Susanville, California. Abstract: Visual absorption capability (VAC) is a tool development which is in harmony with the visual resource vis- ual absorption capability (VAC) is a tool which

Standiford, Richard B.

81

Some GroovyCool Research Chuck Anderson  

E-print Network

Some Groovy­Cool Research Chuck Anderson March 31, 1999 Abstract Very brief description of 2? If the hypothesis is not proved true, what are the conclusions? Identify possible pitfalls in your approach, i.eGraw­Hill, New York, NY, 1987. [3] J.L. McClelland, D.E. Rumelhart, and the PDP Research Group. Parallel

Anderson, Charles W.

82

A theory of magnetoconductance in Anderson insulators  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a simple theory to understand the effect ofmagnetic field on the localisation length f in Anderson insulators. For thin wires, we find that f is doubled, a result recently derived through random matrix theories. For fi1nls or bulk samples, new results are obtained. In this case, the localisation length is multiplied by a non universal factor. We discuss

J. P. Bouchaud

1991-01-01

83

Biology Office Shauna C. Anderson, Director  

E-print Network

Biology Biology Office Shauna C. Anderson, Director 375 WIDB, (801) 422-4295 College of Biology program in biology has open enrollment. The Discipline A degree for students who desire a broad approach to biology, the major provides solid preparation for graduate schools in most fields of biology as well

Hart, Gus

84

FACULTY PRODUCERS Sarah Pia Anderson, Theatre & Dance  

E-print Network

Anderson, Theatre & Dance Liz Constable, Film Studies Jesse Drew, Technocultural Studies John Iacovelli Cholerton, Graphic Designer. 2008 SAVE THE DATE DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE & DANCE 9TH ANNUAL UC DAVIS FILM-sponsored by Film Studies and Art Studio DAVIS VARSITY THEATRE JUNE 3 - 4 , 2009 #12;ABOUT THE FILM FESTIVAL Welcome

Hernes, Peter J.

85

Language Assessment Scales, Level 2, LAS II, for Grades 6 and Up, English/Spanish. Examiner's Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Language Assessment Scales, Level 2 (LAS II) are used to assess the linguistic proficiency of limited-English-speaking or non-English-speaking adolescents. LAS II, like its predecessor, LAS I, provides a picture of oral linguistic proficiency based on a student's performance across four linguistic subsystems: phonemic, lexical, syntactic and…

Duncan, Sharon E.; De Avila, Edward A.

86

Study led by MD Anderson scientists identifies prostate cancer stem cells among low-PSA cells  

Cancer.gov

Prostate cancer cells that defy treatment and display heightened tumor-generating capacity can be identified by levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) expressed in the tumor cells, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in the May 3 edition of Cell Stem Cell.

87

The Anderson Quin Cycle. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

1993-03-18

88

Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II.  

E-print Network

Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II. Increased fertilizer use greatly. It was apparent well before the rapid expansion in fertilizer use that inexpensive ways to evaluate the fertility

89

Thermal lens studies of the reaction of iron(II) with 1,10-phenanthroline at the nanogram level  

Microsoft Academic Search

The determination of iron(II) with 1,10-phenanthroline in aqueous solutions was carried out exemplarily by thermal lens spectrometry.\\u000a The peculiarities of analytical reactions at the nanogram level of reactants can be studied using this method. Under the conditions\\u000a of the competing reaction of ligand protonation, the overall stability constant for iron(II) chelate with 1,10-phenanthroline\\u000a was determined at a level of n

Valerii V. Chernysh; Mikhail Yu. Kononets; M. A. Proskurnin; Svetlana V. Pakhomova; Vsevolod V. Komissarov; Anna I. Zatsman

2001-01-01

90

Genetic suppression of a phosphomimic myosin II identifies system-level factors that promote myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation  

PubMed Central

How myosin II localizes to the cleavage furrow in Dictyostelium and metazoan cells remains largely unknown despite significant advances in understanding its regulation. We designed a genetic selection using cDNA library suppression of 3xAsp myosin II to identify factors involved in myosin cleavage furrow accumulation. The 3xAsp mutant is deficient in bipolar thick filament assembly, fails to accumulate at the cleavage furrow, cannot rescue myoII-null cytokinesis, and has impaired mechanosensitive accumulation. Eleven genes suppressed this dominant cytokinesis deficiency when 3xAsp was expressed in wild-type cells. 3xAsp myosin II's localization to the cleavage furrow was rescued by constructs encoding rcdBB, mmsdh, RMD1, actin, one novel protein, and a 14-3-3 hairpin. Further characterization showed that RMD1 is required for myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation, acting in parallel with mechanical stress. Analysis of several mutant strains revealed that different thresholds of myosin II activity are required for daughter cell symmetry than for furrow ingression dynamics. Finally, an engineered myosin II with a longer lever arm (2xELC), producing a highly mechanosensitive motor, could also partially suppress the intragenic 3xAsp. Overall, myosin II accumulation is the result of multiple parallel and partially redundant pathways that comprise a cellular contractility control system. PMID:25318674

Ren, Yixin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Surcel, Alexandra; Miller, Christopher; Robinson, Douglas N.

2014-01-01

91

Genetic suppression of a phosphomimic myosin II identifies system-level factors that promote myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation.  

PubMed

How myosin II localizes to the cleavage furrow in Dictyostelium and metazoan cells remains largely unknown despite significant advances in understanding its regulation. We designed a genetic selection using cDNA library suppression of 3xAsp myosin II to identify factors involved in myosin cleavage furrow accumulation. The 3xAsp mutant is deficient in bipolar thick filament assembly, fails to accumulate at the cleavage furrow, cannot rescue myoII-null cytokinesis, and has impaired mechanosensitive accumulation. Eleven genes suppressed this dominant cytokinesis deficiency when 3xAsp was expressed in wild-type cells. 3xAsp myosin II's localization to the cleavage furrow was rescued by constructs encoding rcdBB, mmsdh, RMD1, actin, one novel protein, and a 14-3-3 hairpin. Further characterization showed that RMD1 is required for myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation, acting in parallel with mechanical stress. Analysis of several mutant strains revealed that different thresholds of myosin II activity are required for daughter cell symmetry than for furrow ingression dynamics. Finally, an engineered myosin II with a longer lever arm (2xELC), producing a highly mechanosensitive motor, could also partially suppress the intragenic 3xAsp. Overall, myosin II accumulation is the result of multiple parallel and partially redundant pathways that comprise a cellular contractility control system. PMID:25318674

Ren, Yixin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Surcel, Alexandra; Miller, Christopher; Robinson, Douglas N

2014-12-15

92

Application of PC's and Linux to the CDF Run II level-3 trigger  

SciTech Connect

For Run II, the CDF Level-3 trigger must provide a sustained input bandwidth of at least 45 MBytes/set and will require processing power of at least 45000 MIPS to perform the necessary reconstruction and filtering of events. We present a distributed, scalable architecture using commod- ity hardware running the Linux operating system. I/O and CPU intensive functions are separated into two types of nodes; ?converter? nodes receive event fragments via ATM from Level 2 computers and distribute complete events to ?processor? nodes via multiple fast ethernets. We present re- sults from a small-scale prototype roughly equivalent to a 1/16th vertical slice of the final system. With this hardware we have demonstrated the capability of sustained I/O rates of 15 MBytes/set, more then three times the required baseline performance. We discuss PC hardware and Linux software issues and modifications for real time performance.

Jim Fromm et al.

1998-12-01

93

Direct determination of the timing of sea level change during termination II.  

PubMed

An outcrop within the last interglacial terrace on Barbados contains corals that grew during the penultimate deglaciation, or Termination II. We used combined 230Th and 231Pa dating to determine that they grew 135.8 +/- 0.8 thousand years ago, indicating that sea level was 18 +/- 3 meters below present sea level at the time. This suggests that sea level had risen to within 20% of its peak last-interglacial value by 136 thousand years ago, in conflict with Milankovitch theory predictions. Orbital forcing may have played a role in the deglaciation, as may have isostatic adjustments due to large ice sheets. Other corals in the same outcrop grew during oxygen isotope (delta18O) substage 6e, indicating that sea level was 38 +/- 5 meters below present sea level, about 168.0 thousand years ago. When compared to the delta18O signal in the benthic V19-30/V19-28 record at that time, the coral data extend to the previous glacial cycle the conclusion that deep-water temperatures were colder during glacial periods. PMID:11786639

Gallup, Christina D; Cheng, H; Taylor, F W; Edwards, R L

2002-01-11

94

Level II Milestone Review of LLNL Program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives  

SciTech Connect

This document describes an evaluation of the Level II Milestone achievements of the LLNL program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives on January 14, 2003. ''The Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives Program'' is a mixture of advanced computational methodology and physico-chemical theory applied to understanding deflagration and detonation of plastic-bonded explosives from the nano to the macro scales. At many points, the modeling is tied directly to experiments within the precisions of both. Advances are needed in the experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of detonations. Work reported in this review represents significant, cross-pollinating advances in each area. The team successfully carried out ALE-3D simulations of deflagration in PBX with grain scale effects. (Milestone requirements 1 and 2), interpreted experimental data on flame speed vs. pressure and sensitivity to global kinetics in terms of ALE-3D simulations (Milestone requirement 3), and used the results of these simulations to develop a continuum reactive flow model that captures some of these effects (Milestone requirement 4). By comparing experiments and detonation velocities in small diameter, unconfined explosives, they found non-idealities that remain at intermediate diameters (ca. 1.5 mm) that require further analysis. In all of these areas, the project team has met, indeed exceeded, their Level II Milestone goals.

Nicol, M F; Benson, D J; Yip, S

2003-01-14

95

Development of High Level Trigger Software for Belle II at SuperKEKB  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Belle collaboration has been trying for 10 years to reveal the mystery of the current matter-dominated universe. However, much more statistics is required to search for New Physics through quantum loops in decays of B mesons. In order to increase the experimental sensitivity, the next generation B-factory, SuperKEKB, is planned. The design luminosity of SuperKEKB is 8 x 1035cm-2s-1 a factor 40 above KEKB's peak luminosity. At this high luminosity, the level 1 trigger of the Belle II experiment will stream events of 300 kB size at a 30 kHz rate. To reduce the data flow to a manageable level, a high-level trigger (HLT) is needed, which will be implemented using the full offline reconstruction on a large scale PC farm. There, physics level event selection is performed, reducing the event rate by ~ 10 to a few kHz. To execute the reconstruction the HLT uses the offline event processing framework basf2, which has parallel processing capabilities used for multi-core processing and PC clusters. The event data handling in the HLT is totally object oriented utilizing ROOT I/O with a new method of object passing over the UNIX socket connection. Also under consideration is the use of the HLT output as well to reduce the pixel detector event size by only saving hits associated with a track, resulting in an additional data reduction of ~ 100 for the pixel detector. In this contribution, the design and implementation of the Belle II HLT are presented together with a report of preliminary testing results.

Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Mineo, S.

2011-12-01

96

Localization of Classical Waves II: Electromagnetic Waves.  

E-print Network

Localization of Classical Waves II: Electromagnetic Waves. Alexander Figotin \\Lambda Department We consider electromagnetic waves in a medium described by a position dependent dielectric constant at all times. Localization of electromagnetic waves is a consequence of Anderson localization

97

Reply. [to the comment by Anderson et al. (1993)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

While Hegg et al. (1993) accepts the criticism of Anderson et al. (1994) in principle, this involves the adoption of an aerosol composition model and the model that they propose to reconcile these observations with the assertion of Charlson et al. (1992) does not agree with many observations, particularly those made over the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the use of a gain factor (i.e. the partial derivative of aerosol mass with respect to the sulfate ion), proposed by Anderson et al., may be valid for particular cases where a proposed composition model really reflects the actual aerosol composition, this procedure is considered questionable in general. The use of sulfate as a tracer for nonsulfate aerosol mass is questionable, because in the present authors' data set, sulfate averaged only about 26% of the dry aerosol mass. The ammonium mass associated with sulfate mass is not analogous to that betwen the oxygen mass and sulfur mass in the sulfate ion. Strong chemical bonds are present between sulfur and oxygen in sulfate, whereas ammonium and sulfate in haze droplets are ions in solution that may or may not be associated with one another. Thus, there is no reason to assume that sulfate will act as a reliable tracer of ammonium mass. Hegg et al. expresses the view that their approach used for estimating sulfate light scattering efficiency is appropriate for the current level of understanding of atmospheric aerosols.

Hegg, Dean A.; Ferek, Ronald G.; Hobbs, Peter V.

1994-01-01

98

The Influence of Alcoholic Liver Disease on Serum PIVKA-II Levels in Patients without Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background/Aims Prothrombin induced by vitamin K deficiency or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) is a widely used diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We evaluated the correlation between alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and serum PIVKA-II levels in chronic liver disease (CLD) patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 2,528 CLD patients without HCC. Among these patients, 76 exhibited serum high PIVKA-II levels of >125 mAU/mL (group 1). We categorized 76 control patients matched by age, sex, and the presence of liver cirrhosis from the remaining patients who were negative for serum PIVKA-II (group 2). Results Group 1 revealed increased antibiotic usage (23.7% vs 2.6%, p<0.001) and incidence of ALD (60.5% vs 14.5%, p<0.001) as well as elevated aspartate aminotransferase (52.5 IU/L vs 30.5 IU/L, p=0.025) and ? glutamyl transpeptidase (67.5 IU/L vs 36.5 IU/L, p=0.005) levels compared with group 2. Further, group 1 was significantly associated with a worse Child-Pugh class than group 2. In the multivariate analysis, ALD (odds ratio [OR], 7.151; p<0.001) and antibiotic usage (OR, 5.846; p<0.001) were significantly associated with positive PIVKA-II levels. Conclusions Our study suggests that ALD and antibiotics usage may be confounding factors when interpreting high serum PIVKA-II levels in patients without HCC. Therefore, serum PIVKA-II levels in patients with ALD or in patients administered antibiotics should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25473073

Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kang, Seong Hee; Lee, Beom Jae; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae; Byun, Kwan Soo

2015-01-01

99

Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 1: Global and zonal mean cloud amounts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Global high-level clouds identified in Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements for January and July in the period 1985 to 1990 are compared with near-nadir-looking observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Global and zonal mean high-level cloud amounts from the two data sets agree very well, if clouds with layer extinction coefficients of less than 0.008/km at 1.02 micrometers wavelength are removed from the SAGE II results and all detected clouds are interpreted to have an average horizontal size of about 75 km along the 200 km transimission path length of the SAGE II observations. The SAGE II results are much more sensitive to variations of assumed cloud size than to variations of detection threshold. The geographical distribution of cloud fractions shows good agreement, but systematic regional differences also indicate that the average cloud size varies somewhat among different climate regimes. The more sensitive SAGE II results show that about one third of all high-level clouds are missed by ISCCP but that these clouds have very low optical thicknesses (less than 0.1 at 0.6 micrometers wavelength). SAGE II sampling error in monthly zonal cloud fraction is shown to produce no bias, to be less than the intraseasonal natural variability, but to be comparable with the natural variability at longer time scales.

Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

1995-01-01

100

Evaluation of Phase II glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

A vendor glass formulation study was carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), supporting the Phase I and Phase II melter vendor testing activities for Westinghouse Hanford Company. This study is built upon the LLW glass optimization effort that will be described in a separate report. For Phase I vendor melter testing, six glass formulations were developed at PNL and additional were developed by Phase I vendors. All the doses were characterized in terms of viscosity and chemical durability by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. Twelve Phase II glass formulations (see Tables 3.5 and 3.6) were developed to accommodate 2.5 wt% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 1.0 wt% S0{sub 3} without significant processing problems. These levels of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SO{sub 3} are expected to be the highest possible concentrations from Hanford Site LLW streams at 25 wt% waste loading in glass. The Phase H compositions formulated were 6 to 23 times more durable than the environmental assessment (EA) glass. They melt within the temperature range of 1160{degrees} to 1410{degrees}C to suit different melting technologies. The composition types include boron-free for volatilization sensitive melters; boron-containing glasses for coId-cap melters; Zr-containing, glasses for enhanced Iong-term durability; and Fe-containing glasses for reducing melting temperature and melt volatility while maintaining chemical durability.

Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J. [and others

1996-03-01

101

Universal mechanism for Anderson and weak localization  

PubMed Central

Localization of stationary waves occurs in a large variety of vibrating systems, whether mechanical, acoustical, optical, or quantum. It is induced by the presence of an inhomogeneous medium, a complex geometry, or a quenched disorder. One of its most striking and famous manifestations is Anderson localization, responsible for instance for the metal-insulator transition in disordered alloys. Yet, despite an enormous body of related literature, a clear and unified picture of localization is still to be found, as well as the exact relationship between its many manifestations. In this paper, we demonstrate that both Anderson and weak localizations originate from the same universal mechanism, acting on any type of vibration, in any dimension, and for any domain shape. This mechanism partitions the system into weakly coupled subregions. The boundaries of these subregions correspond to the valleys of a hidden landscape that emerges from the interplay between the wave operator and the system geometry. The height of the landscape along its valleys determines the strength of the coupling between the subregions. The landscape and its impact on localization can be determined rigorously by solving one special boundary problem. This theory allows one to predict the localization properties, the confining regions, and to estimate the energy of the vibrational eigenmodes through the properties of one geometrical object. In particular, Anderson localization can be understood as a special case of weak localization in a very rough landscape. PMID:22927384

Filoche, Marcel; Mayboroda, Svitlana

2012-01-01

102

Gap Voltage Feed-Forward Board for PEP-II Low Level RF System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the Gap Voltage Feed-Forward VXI module used in the PEP-II Low Level RF System. This module produces adaptively generated inphase (I) and quadrature (Q) reference signals for a single RF station based on measurements of periodic (1-turn) beam induced cavity transients caused by the presence of an ion clearing gap. In addition the module receives a fiber optically transmitted, bandlimited ``kic'' signal from the longitudinal feedback system which is used to phase modulate the RF drive. This allows the RF system to act as a ``subwoofer'' for the longitudinal feedback system for low order coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the fundamental mode of the accelerating cavities. The module includes hardware for remote measurement and adjustment of the ``kick'' transfer function.

Ross, William; Claus, Richard; Sapozhnikov, Leonid

1997-05-01

103

Commissioning Experience with the PEP-II Low Level RF System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment. Remotely configurable feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. An adaptive technique is used to generate the station RF reference which tracks the ion clearing gap induced cavity transients. All RF signal processing and measurements are done using inphase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system.

Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

1997-05-01

104

NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. It is an open structure platform, and we try to provide a narrow API set for client application. With this narrow API, existing applications developed in different language under different architecture could be ported to our platform with small modification. This paper describes system infrastructure design, client API and system integration, and latest progress. As a new 3rd generation synchrotron light source with ultra low emittance, there are new requirements and challenges to control and manipulate the beam. A use case study and a theoretical analysis have been performed to clarify requirements and challenges to the high level applications (HLA) software environment. To satisfy those requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture of the software framework is critical for beam commissioning, study and operation. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating, plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology. The HLA is combination of tools for accelerator physicists and operators, which is same as traditional approach. In NSLS-II, they include monitoring applications and control routines. Scripting environment is very important for the later part of HLA and both parts are designed based on a common set of APIs. Physicists and operators are users of these APIs, while control system engineers and a few accelerator physicists are the developers of these APIs. With our Client/Server mode based approach, we leave how to retrieve information to the developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

2011-03-28

105

The effects of peptide and nonpeptide antagonists of angiotensin II receptors on the level of brain biogenic monoamines in rats with angiotensin II-induced increase of water intake.  

PubMed

The effects of peptide and nonpeptide angiotensin II (Ang II)-receptor antagonists (losartan, EXP-3174, saralasin and sarmesin) on the levels of the biogenic monoamines dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin in the frontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus and hippocampus of rats with Ang II-induced water intake were investigated. Ang II administered i.c.v. at a dose inducing drinking behavior in rats significantly changed the levels of biogenic monoamines. The latter were also significantly affected by the Ang II-receptor antagonists, as in most cases the drugs antagonized the effect of Ang II. Most pronounced were the effects of Ang II and Ang II-receptor antagonists on the dopamine levels. These levels were reduced to zero after Ang II in all brain structures studied. The drugs tested increased the dopamine levels, restoring their values to the values in vehicle-injected rats. Ang II-receptor antagonists exerted mosaic effects on noradrenaline and 5-HT (serotonin) levels depending on both--the type of biogenic monoamine and the brain structure. There was no relationship between the inhibition of Ang II-induced water intake and the changes in the levels of brain biogenic monoamines under the effect of the Ang II-receptor antagonists. These antagonists may play a role in the modulation of brain monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems. PMID:12168505

Stancheva, S; Alova, L; Velkova, M; Georgiev, V

2002-06-01

106

Urinary type II collagen C-telopeptide levels are increased in patients with rapidly destructive hip osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective: To compare type II collagen degradation using a new urinary specific marker in patients with rapidly destructive and those with slowly progressive hip OA. Methods: Twelve patients with rapidly destructive and 28 patients with slowly progressive hip OA were included in a prospective, cross sectional case-control study. Urinary levels of C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of collagen type II (CTX-II) as a marker of cartilage degradation were measured by an ELISA, and urinary free deoxypyridinoline (free DPD), a marker of bone resorption, was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. One x ray evaluation of the hips and urine samples was made in all patients when the diagnosis of OA was established. Results: Patients with hip OA had higher mean (SD) urinary CTX-II levels than 65 healthy age matched controls (492 (232) v 342 (141), p<0.001), but no significant difference was seen for urinary free DPD (p=0.30). Increased urinary CTX-II, but not urinary free DPD, correlated significantly with decreased minimum joint space width assessed by radiograph of the hip. Mean urinary CTX-II levels were significantly higher in patients with rapidly progressive OA than in the slowly progressive group (612 (218) v 441 (221), p=0.015), whereas no significant difference of urinary free DPD was seen between the two groups (p=0.55). Conclusion: Patients with hip OA have increased CTX-II degradation as assessed by a new urinary marker. Increased urinary CTX-II levels are associated with rapidly destructive disease, suggesting that this marker might be useful in identifying patients with hip OA at high risk for rapid progression of joint damage. PMID:12972471

Garnero, P; Conrozier, T; Christgau, S; Mathieu, P; Delmas, P; Vignon, E

2003-01-01

107

Visualization on supercomputing platform level II ASC milestone (3537-1B) results from Sandia.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia portion of the ASC Level II Visualization on the platform milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratories. This milestone contains functionality required for performing visualization directly on a supercomputing platform, which is necessary for peta-scale visualization. Sandia's contribution concerns in-situ visualization, running a visualization in tandem with a solver. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors(GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the performance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. Scientific simulation on parallel supercomputers is traditionally performed in four sequential steps: meshing, partitioning, solver, and visualization. Not all of these components are necessarily run on the supercomputer. In particular, the meshing and visualization typically happen on smaller but more interactive computing resources. However, the previous decade has seen a growth in both the need and ability to perform scalable parallel analysis, and this gives motivation for coupling the solver and visualization.

Geveci, Berk (Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Fabian, Nathan; Marion, Patrick (Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Moreland, Kenneth D.

2010-09-01

108

Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Si II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energies for the lowest 56 levels, belonging to the 3s2 3p, 3s 3p2, 3p3, 3s2 3d, 3s 3p 3d, 3s2 4? and 3s2 5? configurations of Si II, are calculated using the General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package (GRASP) code. Analogous calculations have also been performed (for up to 175 levels) using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). Furthermore, radiative rates are calculated for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions. Extensive comparisons are made with available theoretical and experimental energy levels, and the accuracy of the present results is assessed to be better than 0.1 Ryd. Similarly, the accuracy for radiative rates (and subsequently lifetimes) is estimated to be better than 20 per cent for most of the (strong) transitions. Electron impact excitation collision strengths are also calculated, with the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC), over a wide energy range up to 13 Ryd. Finally, to determine effective collision strengths, resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. These collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and results listed over a wide range of temperatures, up to 105.5 K. Our data are compared with earlier R-matrix calculations and differences noted, up to a factor of 2, for several transitions. Although scope remains for improvement, the accuracy for our results of collision strengths and effective collision strengths is assessed to be about 20 per cent for a majority of transitions.

Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

2014-07-01

109

ADOLESCENT IDENTITIES AND SEXUAL BEHAVIOR: AN EXAMINATION OF ANDERSON’S ‘PLAYER’ HYPOTHESIS  

PubMed Central

We investigate the social and behavioral characteristics of male adolescents who self-identify as players, focusing particularly on Anderson’s claim that this social role is inextricably linked with poverty and minority status. Results indicate that African American respondents, those affiliated with liberal peers and young men who initially report a relatively high number of sexual partners are more likely to resonate with this identity label. Nevertheless, analyses reveal that a number of players within the sample are not disadvantaged African American youth, and there is considerable variability in their attitude and behavior profiles. Findings based on longitudinal analyses indicate that the player identity is a significant predictor of later variations in self-reported sexual behavior, net of traditional predictors, including prior behavior. Yet results of in-depth interviews conducted with a subset of the respondents complicate these quantitative findings, highlighting that young men’s perceptions of this identity are not as uniformly positive as Anderson’s depiction might lead us to expect. PMID:20161097

Giordano, Peggy C.; Longmore, Monica A.; Manning, Wendy D.; Northcutt, Miriam J.

2009-01-01

110

Anderson transition for Google matrix eigenstates  

E-print Network

We introduce a number of random matrix models describing the Google matrix G of directed networks. The properties of their spectra and eigenstates are analyzed by numerical matrix diagonalization. We show that for certain models it is possible to have an algebraic decay of PageRank vector with the exponent similar to real directed networks. At the same time the spectrum has no spectral gap and a broad distribution of eigenvalues in the complex plain. The eigenstates of G are characterized by the Anderson transition from localized to delocalized states and a mobility edge curve in the complex plane of eigenvalues.

Zhirov, O V

2015-01-01

111

Use of cluster computing for the Anderson model of localization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider parallelization strategies for the two most frequently used algorithms in numerical investigations of the Anderson model of localization, a paradigmatic model of disordered quantum systems. After a brief review of the physics of Anderson localization, we discuss the application of the Cullum-Willoughby implementation of the Lanczos diagonalization scheme and the transfer-matrix method to massively parallel cluster architectures.

Cain, Philipp; Milde, Frank; Römer, Rudolf A.; Schreiber, Michael

2002-08-01

112

Microwave-Driven Atoms: From Anderson Localization to Einstein's Photoeffect  

SciTech Connect

We study the counterpart of Anderson localization in driven one-electron Rydberg atoms. By changing the initial Rydberg state at fixed microwave frequency and interaction time, we numerically monitor the crossover from Anderson localization to the photoeffect in the atomic ionization signal.

Schelle, Alexej [Physikalisches Institut der Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4, Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Delande, Dominique [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4, Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Buchleitner, Andreas [Physikalisches Institut der Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

2009-05-08

113

The Economics of Censorship Resistance George Danezis and Ross Anderson  

E-print Network

The Economics of Censorship Resistance George Danezis and Ross Anderson University of Cambridge.Anderson)@cl.cam.ac.uk Abstract. We propose the first economic model of censorship resis- tance. Early peer-to-peer systems and resistance to censorship. Our results may have wider application too. 1 Introduction Peer-to-peer designs

Danezis, George

114

Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging illustrating Anderson–Fabry disease progression  

PubMed Central

Anderson–Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of the enzyme ?-galactosidase A (?-Gal A) and subsequent cellular storage of the enzyme's substrate globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and related glycosphingolipids. We report a case of Anderson–Fabry disease with cardiac involvement evaluated with cardiovascular MRI. Disease progression was observed despite enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:21088081

Imbriaco, M; Messalli, G; Avitabile, G; Cuocolo, A; Maurea, S; Soscia, F; Pisani, A

2010-01-01

115

Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging illustrating Anderson-Fabry disease progression.  

PubMed

Anderson-Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of the enzyme ?-galactosidase A (?-Gal A) and subsequent cellular storage of the enzyme's substrate globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and related glycosphingolipids. We report a case of Anderson-Fabry disease with cardiac involvement evaluated with cardiovascular MRI. Disease progression was observed despite enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:21088081

Imbriaco, M; Messalli, G; Avitabile, G; Cuocolo, A; Maurea, S; Soscia, F; Pisani, A

2010-12-01

116

A characterization of the Anderson metal-insulator transport transition  

E-print Network

A characterization of the Anderson metal-insulator transport transition Fran¸cois Germinet1, Abel on the occasion of his Sixtieth Birthday Abstract. We investigate the Anderson metal-insulator transition a characterization of the metal-insulator transport transition. Moreover, we show that if there is such a transition

117

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MD Anderson) was established by the Texas State Legislature in 1941and is a free-standing, degree-granting health institution within The University of Texas System. Mission areas include patient care, research, education, and prevention.

118

Fire Fighter Level I-II-III [and] Practical Skills Test. Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series. Final Revision.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Practical skills tests are provided for fire fighter trainees in the Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series, Fire Fighter Levels I, II, and III. A course introduction appears first and contains this information: recommended instructional sequence, required facilities, instructional methodology, requirements for certification, course…

Pribyl, Paul F.

119

UNLOCKING THE TREASURE CHEST OF LEVEL-II RADAR DATA: LESSONS IN TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER POLICY FOR THE ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES  

E-print Network

, but there are two overarching problems that could prevent future success stories. First, the current weather This analysis of Level-II radar data presents a great success story about partnerships in technology transfer in real time is a grand success story of collaboration between government, academic and private sector

120

Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1989-1992. Volume III: Level II Model Technology School Projects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report, the third in a series of six, evaluates the 10 school districts that received grants from the California Department of Education to develop Level II Model Technology School (MTS) Projects intended to enhance instruction and student learning through a combination of curriculum improvement and integration of technology within a single…

Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

121

Tactical\\/execution level coordination for hover control of the NPS AUV II using onboard sonar servoing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes work with the NPS AUV II vehicle in the further development of the execution level software to incorporate hover control behavior in the NPS hover tank. Of particular interest is the use of the ST 1000 and ST 725 high frequency sonars to provide data about the environment. Thus positioning can be accomplished without the use of

A. J. Healey; D. B. Marco; R. B. McGhee; D. P. Brutzman; R. Cristi; F. A. Papoulias; S. H. Kwak

1994-01-01

122

Evaluation of NOAA Climate Outlooks in Extended Great Lakes Water Levels Forecasts Thomas E. Croley II1  

E-print Network

1 Evaluation of NOAA Climate Outlooks in Extended Great Lakes Water Levels Forecasts Thomas E. Croley II1 Abstract The Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) simulates time series of daily Great Lakes hydrology by first estimating initial hydrological conditions and then using a daily

123

The Role of Contrast in the Perception of Achromatic Transparency: Comment on Singh and Anderson (2002) and Anderson (2003)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

M. Singh and B. L. Anderson proposed a perceptual theory of achromatic transparency in which the perceived transmittance of a perceived transparent filter is determined by the ratio of the Michelson contrast seen in the region of transparency to that of the background seen directly. Subsequently, B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and J. Meng proposed that…

Albert, Marc K.

2008-01-01

124

Anderson localization in metamaterials and other complex media (Review Article)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is a review of some recent (mostly ours) results on Anderson localization of light and electron waves in complex disordered systems, including: (i) left-handed metamaterials, (ii) magnetoactive optical structures, (iii) graphene superlattices, and (iv) nonlinear dielectric media. First, we demonstrate that left-handed metamaterials can significantly suppress localization of light and lead to an anomalously enhanced transmission. This suppression is essential at the long-wavelength limit in the case of normal incidence, at specific angles of oblique incidence (Brewster anomaly), and in vicinity of zero-? or zero-? frequencies for dispersive metamaterials. Remarkably, in disordered samples comprised of alternating normal and left-handed metamaterials, the reciprocal Lyapunov exponent and reciprocal transmittance increment can differ from each other. Second, we study magnetoactive multilayered structures, which exhibit nonreciprocal localization of light depending on the direction of propagation and on polarization. At resonant frequencies or realizations such nonreciprocity results in effectively unidirectional transport of light. Third, we discuss the analogy between wave propagation through multilayered samples with metamaterials and charge transport in graphene, which provides a simple physical explanation of unusual conductive properties of disordered graphene superlatices. We predict disorder-induced resonance of the transmission coefficient at oblique incidence of Dirac quasiparticles. Finally, we demonstrate that an interplay of nonlinearity and disorder in dielectric media can lead to bistability of individual localized states excited inside the medium at resonant frequencies. This results in nonreciprocity of wave transmission and unidirectional transport of light.

Gredeskul, Sergey A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Asatryan, Ara A.; Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Bliokh, Yuri P.; Freilikher, Valentin D.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.

2012-07-01

125

Anderson's impurity-model analysis on CeO1-xFxBiS2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have investigated the impact of F-doing on CeO1-xFxBiS2 in terms of the electronic-structural parameters of Anderson's impurity-model analysis. It was recently reported using Ce L3-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) that CeOBiS2 falls in the Ce valence fluctuation regime and the F-doping drives the system into the Kondo regime. The Ce L3- edge XAS spectra with the various F-doping levels can be reproduced by adjusting the transfer integral in the Anderson's impurity model. The present analysis indicates that the F-doping to the system corresponds to the decrease of the Ce-Bi transfer integral.

Sugimoto, Takuya; Joseph, Boby; Paris, Eugenio; Iadecola, Antonella; Demura, Satoshi; Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu; Takano, Yoshihiko; Mizokawa, Takashi; Saini, Naurang L.

2015-03-01

126

Anderson localization makes adiabatic quantum optimization fail.  

PubMed

Understanding NP-complete problems is a central topic in computer science (NP stands for nondeterministic polynomial time). This is why adiabatic quantum optimization has attracted so much attention, as it provided a new approach to tackle NP-complete problems using a quantum computer. The efficiency of this approach is limited by small spectral gaps between the ground and excited states of the quantum computer's Hamiltonian. We show that the statistics of the gaps can be analyzed in a novel way, borrowed from the study of quantum disordered systems in statistical mechanics. It turns out that due to a phenomenon similar to Anderson localization, exponentially small gaps appear close to the end of the adiabatic algorithm for large random instances of NP-complete problems. This implies that unfortunately, adiabatic quantum optimization fails: The system gets trapped in one of the numerous local minima. PMID:20616043

Altshuler, Boris; Krovi, Hari; Roland, Jérémie

2010-07-13

127

Anderson localization makes adiabatic quantum optimization fail  

PubMed Central

Understanding NP-complete problems is a central topic in computer science (NP stands for nondeterministic polynomial time). This is why adiabatic quantum optimization has attracted so much attention, as it provided a new approach to tackle NP-complete problems using a quantum computer. The efficiency of this approach is limited by small spectral gaps between the ground and excited states of the quantum computer’s Hamiltonian. We show that the statistics of the gaps can be analyzed in a novel way, borrowed from the study of quantum disordered systems in statistical mechanics. It turns out that due to a phenomenon similar to Anderson localization, exponentially small gaps appear close to the end of the adiabatic algorithm for large random instances of NP-complete problems. This implies that unfortunately, adiabatic quantum optimization fails: The system gets trapped in one of the numerous local minima. PMID:20616043

Altshuler, Boris; Krovi, Hari; Roland, Jérémie

2010-01-01

128

Outline and examples for integrated evaluations of data from the intensive (Level II) monitoring of forest ecosystems in Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data are collected at plots of the intensive forest monitoring programme (Level II monitoring) in Germany by the federal states\\u000a and stored in a nation-wide database with the main task of contributing to a better understanding of the impacts of air pollutants\\u000a and other environmental factors on forest ecosystems. Within this feasibility study these data were screened with the intention

Walter Seidling

2005-01-01

129

From Extreme Values of I.I.D. Random Fields to Extreme Eigenvalues of Finite-volume Anderson Hamiltonian  

E-print Network

The aim of this paper is to study asymptotic geometric properties almost surely or/and in probability of extreme order statistics of an i.i.d. random field (potential) indexed by sites of multidimensional lattice cube, the volume of which unboundedly increases. We discuss the following topics: (I) high level exceedances, in particular, clustering of exceedances; (II) decay rate of spacings in comparison with increasing rate of extreme order statistics; (III) minimum of spacings of successive order statistics; (IV) asymptotic behavior of values neighboring to extremes and so on. The conditions of the results are formulated in terms of regular variation (RV) of the cumulative hazard function and its inverse. A relationship between RV classes of the present paper as well as their links to the well-known RV classes (including domains of attraction of max-stable distributions) are discussed. The asymptotic behavior of functionals (I)--(IV) determines the asymptotic structure of the top eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the large-volume discrete Schr\\" odinger operators with an i.i.d. potential (Anderson Hamiltonian). Thus, another aim of the present paper is to review and comment a recent progress on extreme value theory for eigenvalues of random Schr\\"odinger operators as well as to provide a clear and rigorous understanding of the relationship between the top eigenvalues and extreme values of i.i.d. potentials.

Arvydas Astrauskas

2015-01-05

130

Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography  

PubMed Central

In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

SHIMA, HIROAKI; KUTOMI, GORO; SATOMI, FUKINO; MAEDA, HIDEKI; TAKAMARU, TOMOKO; KAMESHIMA, HIDEKAZU; OMURA, TOSEI; MORI, MITSURU; HATAKENAKA, MASAMITSU; HASEGAWA, TADASHI; HIRATA, KOICHI

2014-01-01

131

Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography.  

PubMed

In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

Shima, Hiroaki; Kutomi, Goro; Satomi, Fukino; Maeda, Hideki; Takamaru, Tomoko; Kameshima, Hidekazu; Omura, Tosei; Mori, Mitsuru; Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Hirata, Koichi

2014-11-01

132

MD Anderson study finds cancer related pain often undertreated  

Cancer.gov

More than one third of patients with invasive cancer are undertreated for their pain, with minorities twice as likely to not receive analgesics, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

133

Ferromagnetic order in the one-dimensional Anderson lattice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using bosonization an effective Hamiltonian is derived for the one-dimensional Anderson lattice model in the Toulouse limit. The effective Hamiltonian exhibits ferromagnetic ground state in the intermediate coupling regime.

Gulacsi, M.

2015-01-01

134

STS-107 M.S Michael Anderson at SPACEHAB  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, STS-107 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson (gloved, in center) gets hands-on experience with equipment. Identified as a research mission, STS-107 is scheduled for launch July 19, 2001

2000-01-01

135

Applications of cluster computing for the Anderson model of localization  

E-print Network

systems. After a brief review of the physics of Anderson localiza- tion, we outline the Cullum-Willoughby algorithms considered, namely the Cullum-Willoughby version of the Lanczos method and the transfer

Chemnitz, Technische Universität

136

MD Anderson study shows why some brain cancers resist treatment  

Cancer.gov

Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center may have discovered why some brain cancer patients develop resistance to standard treatments including radiation and the chemotherapy agent temozolomide.

137

Anderson localization of light: A little disorder is just right  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As with most things in life, some disorder can cause unexpected new phenomena. But when it comes to disorder-induced Anderson localization of light in a photonic crystal, simulations suggest that moderation may be the best policy.

López, Cefe

2008-10-01

138

Observing transverse Anderson localization in random air line based fiber  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept of Anderson localization has been applied to electromagnetic waves for decades and strong photon localization effect has been observed in many two-dimensional systems including optical lattice and optical fibers. Among different types of optical fibers, both fibers with and without air hole were investigated. Air hole based fiber has significant higher refractive index contrast than other fibers which allow much lower filling fraction in order to observe Anderson localization. In a previous research, Anderson localization was observed near the fiber edge with an air fillfraction of 5.5%. At the fiber center region with only 2.2% air fill-fraction, Anderson localization disappeared. However, we observed Anderson localization in fibers with much lower air fill-fraction. In our experiments, random air line fibers with 150, 250 and 350 ?m diameters were fabricated and characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Averaged air line diameters were 177, 247 and 387 nm for the 150, 250 and 350 ?m diameter fibers, respectively. Air fill-fraction was also measured at fiber center, middle and edge regions. Beam profiles were imaged into a charge couple device (CCD) and Anderson localization was observed. Unlike the previous research in which Anderson localization was only observed at the fiber edge due to non-uniform air line distribution, we observed Anderson localization within the fiber area with air fill-fraction significantly lower than the previous investigation. This is because with smaller air line diameter our fiber has higher air lines density than the previous report.

Chen, Minghan; Li, Ming-Jun

2014-02-01

139

COURSE OUTLINE FOR FIRST SIX WEEKS FOR SCIENCE-LEVEL II, TALENT PRESERVATION CLASSES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE FIRST 6-WEEK UNIT CONCERNS ANIMAL LIFE, AND TOPICS INCLUDE PROTOZOA, INVERTEBRATES, AND VERTEBRATES. UNIT II, "THE HUMAN BODY", INCLUDES BODY SYSTEMS, HEALTH, AND SAFETY. TEXTBOOK REFERENCES, CONTENT OUTLINE, TEACHING SUGGESTIONS, REFERENCE READINGS, AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS ARE GIVEN UNDER EACH TOPIC. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT FIRST EXPERIENCES WITH…

Houston Independent School District, TX.

140

ScriptEase II: Platform Independent Story Creation Using High-Level Patterns  

E-print Network

, mcarbona, jonathan}@ualberta.ca Abstract As the video game industry grows, both developers and creative most event-based games. Cutumisu et al. (2007), and Trenton et al. (2010) have shown the effectiveness- scribes a story model and its software implementation, ScriptEase II, designed to solve this game design

Szafron, Duane

141

THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II  

SciTech Connect

A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

2011-03-28

142

Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

Ma,H.; Rose, J.

2009-05-04

143

PRESTO-II: a low-level waste environmental transport and risk assessment code  

Microsoft Academic Search

PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed for the evaluation of possible health effects from shallow-land and, waste-disposal trenches. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal

D. E. Fields; C. J. Emerson; R. O. Chester; C. A. Little; G. Hiromoto

1986-01-01

144

Reproducible conductance fluctuations in macroscopic Anderson insulators  

SciTech Connect

We study theoretically the reproducible magnetoconductance fluctuations in macroscopic Anderson insulators where complex random interferences yield localization at a scale {xi} larger than the elastic mean free path {ital l}. Based on the hypothesis of large ergodic quantum fluctuations of {xi} when a flux quantum is applied through an area {xi}{sup 2}, we show that the normalized magnetoconductance fluctuations {delta}{ital G}{sub tot}/{ital G}{sub tot} is ({xi}{sub {ital p}}{sup {ital D}}/{Omega}{sub {ital e}{ital f}{ital f}}){sup 1/2} for ergodic field changes {Delta}{ital B}{similar to}{phi}{sub 0}/{xi}{sup 2}, where {xi}{sub {ital p}} is a percolation correlation length which approaches macroscopic length scales at very low temperatures, and {Omega}{sub {ital e}{ital f}{ital f}} is an effective volume for th classical self-averaging of the fluctuations.

Feng, S. (Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (USA)); Pichard, J. (Service de Physique du Solide et de Resonance Magnetique, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX, France (FR))

1991-08-05

145

Portuguese validation of the Symptom Inventory of the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.  

PubMed

Objective To analyze the reliability and validity of the psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the instrument for symptom assessment, titled MD Anderson Symptom Inventory - core. Method A cross-sectional study with 268 cancer patients in outpatient treatment, in the municipality of Ijuí, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Results The Cronbach's alpha for the MDASI general, symptoms and interferences was respectively (0.857), (0.784) and (0.794). The factor analysis showed adequacy of the data (0.792). In total, were identified four factors of the principal components related to the symptoms. Factor I: sleep problems, distress (upset), difficulties in remembering things and sadness. Factor II: dizziness, nausea, lack of appetite and vomiting. Factor III: drowsiness, dry mouth, numbness and tingling. Factor IV: pain, fatigue and shortness of breath. A single factor was revealed in the component of interferences with life (0.780), with prevalence of activity in general (59.7%), work (54.9%) and walking (49.3%). Conclusion The Brazilian version of the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory - core showed adequate psychometric properties in the studied population.Objetivo Analisar a confiabilidade e a validade das propriedades psicométricas da versão brasileira do instrumento de avaliação de sintomas, intitulado Inventário de Sintomas do M.D. Anderson - core. Método Estudo transversal do qual participaram 268 pacientes com câncer em tratamento ambulatorial, do Município de Ijuí, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Resultados O Alfa de Cronbach MDASI geral, os sintomas e as interferências foram respectivamente (0,857), (0,784) e (0,794). A análise fatorial demonstrou adequação dos dados (0,792). Identificaram-se quatro fatores dos principais componentes relacionados aos sintomas. Fator I: problemas de sono, preocupações, dificuldades de lembrar-se das coisas e tristeza. Fator II: enjoo, náuseas, falta de apetite e vômito. Fator III: sonolência, boca seca, dormência e formigamento. Fator IV: dor, fadiga e falta de ar. Evidenciou-se um único fator no componente interferências na vida (0,780), prevalecendo para atividade em geral (59,7%), trabalho (54,9%) e para caminhar (49,3%). Conclusão A versão brasileira do Inventário de M.D. Anderson-core mostrou propriedades psicométricas adequadas na população avaliada. PMID:25626498

Kolankiewicz, Adriane Cristina Bernat; Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes De; Lopes, Luís Felipe Dias; Magnago, Tânia Solange Bosi de Souza

2014-12-01

146

Evidence for linkage of the apolipoprotein A-II locus to plasma apolipoprotein A-II and free fatty acid levels in mice and humans  

SciTech Connect

Although it has been hypothesized that the synteny between mouse and human genes provides an approach to the localization of genes that determine quantitative traits in humans, this has yet to be demonstrated. The authors tested this approach with two quantitative traits, plasma apolipoprotein A-II (apoAII) and free fatty acid (FFA) levels. ApoAII is the second most abundant protein of high density lipoprotein particles, but its function remains largely unknown. The authors show that, in a backcross between strains Mus spretus and C56BL/6J, apoAII levels correlate with plasma FFA concentrations on both chow (P<0.0001) and high-fat (P < 0.0003) diets and that apoAII levels are linked to the apoAII gene (P<0.0002). To test whether variations of the apoAII gene influence plasma lipid metabolism in humans, the authors studied 306 individuals in 25 families enriched for coronary artery disease. The segregation of the apoAII gene was followed by using an informative simple sequence repeat in the second intron of the gene and two nearby genetic markers. Robust sib-pair linkage analysis was performed on members of these families using the SAGE linkage programs. The results suggest linkage between the human apoAII gene and a gene controlling plasma apoAII levels (P = 0.03). Plasma apoAII levels were also significantly correlated with plasma FFA levels (P = 0.007). Moreover, the apoAII gene exhibited linkage with a gene controlling FFA levels (P = 0.003). Evidence for nonrandom segregation was seen with markers as far as 6-12 centimorgans from the apoAII structural locus. These data provide evidence, in two species, that the apoAII gene is linked to a gene that controls plasma apoAII levels and that apoAII influences, by an unknown mechanism, plasma FFA level. The results illustrate the utility of animal studies for analysis of complex traits.

Warden, C.H.; Daluiski, A.; Purcell-Huynh, D.A.; De Meester, C.; Shieh, B.H.; Lusis, A.J.; Puppione, D.L. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Bu, Xiangdong; Gray, R.M.; Rotter, J.I. (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)) (and others)

1993-11-15

147

Climate change and sea level rise in Bangladesh, part II: Effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global climate is changing as a consequence of global warming clue to industrial, agricultural, and other human activities. The major effects of global warming are changes in the hydrological cycle and rise in sea level. Bangladesh is most vulnerable to the effects of climate change and sea level rise due to the low elevation of the land areas, the low

Selina Begum; George Fleming

1997-01-01

148

Teaching Games Level Design Using the StarCraft II Editor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Level design is often characterised as "where the rubber hits the road" in game development. It is a core area of games design, alongside design of game rules and narrative. However, there is a lack of literature dedicated to documenting teaching games design, let alone the more specialised topic of level design. Furthermore, there…

Sweetser, Penelope

2013-01-01

149

Topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the phenomena of Anderson localization in the presence of nonlinear interaction on a lattice. A class of nonlinear Schrödinger models with arbitrary power nonlinearity is analyzed. We conceive the various regimes of behavior, depending on the topology of resonance overlap in phase space, ranging from a fully developed chaos involving Lévy flights to pseudochaotic dynamics at the onset of delocalization. It is demonstrated that the quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. We describe this localization-delocalization transition as a percolation transition on the infinite Cayley tree (Bethe lattice). It is found in the vicinity of the criticality that the spreading of the wave field is subdiffusive in the limit t ?+?. The second moment of the associated probability distribution grows with time as a power law ? t?, with the exponent ? =1/3 exactly. Also we find for superquadratic nonlinearity that the analog pseudochaotic regime at the edge of chaos is self-controlling in that it has feedback on the topology of the structure on which the transport processes concentrate. Then the system automatically (without tuning of parameters) develops its percolation point. We classify this type of behavior in terms of self-organized criticality dynamics in Hilbert space. For subquadratic nonlinearities, the behavior is shown to be sensitive to the details of definition of the nonlinear term. A transport model is proposed based on modified nonlinearity, using the idea of "stripes" propagating the wave process to large distances. Theoretical investigations, presented here, are the basis for consistency analysis of the different localization-delocalization patterns in systems with many coupled degrees of freedom in association with the asymptotic properties of the transport.

Milovanov, Alexander V.; Iomin, Alexander

2014-06-01

150

The lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine, increases cell surface BMPR-II levels and restores BMP9 signalling in endothelial cells harbouring BMPR-II mutations  

PubMed Central

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by dysregulated pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) proliferation, apoptosis and permeability. Loss-of-function mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type-II (BMPR-II) are the most common cause of heritable PAH, usually resulting in haploinsufficiency. We previously showed that BMPR-II expression is regulated via a lysosomal degradative pathway. Here, we show that the antimalarial drug, chloroquine, markedly increased cell surface expression of BMPR-II protein independent of transcription in PAECs. Inhibition of protein synthesis experiments revealed a rapid turnover of cell surface BMPR-II, which was inhibited by chloroquine treatment. Chloroquine enhanced PAEC expression of BMPR-II following siRNA knockdown of the BMPR-II transcript. Using blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs), we confirmed that signalling in response to the endothelial BMPR-II ligand, BMP9, is compromised in BOECs from patients harbouring BMPR-II mutations, and in BMPR-II mutant PAECs. Chloroquine significantly increased gene expression of BMP9-BMPR-II signalling targets Id1, miR21 and miR27a in both mutant BMPR-II PAECs and BOECs. These findings provide support for the restoration of cell surface BMPR-II with agents such as chloroquine as a potential therapeutic approach for heritable PAH. PMID:23669347

Dunmore, Benjamin J.; Drake, Kylie M.; Upton, Paul D.; Toshner, Mark R.; Aldred, Micheala A.; Morrell, Nicholas W.

2013-01-01

151

Levels of Family Assessment: II. Impact of Maternal Psychopathology on Family Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association of maternal and contextual risk factors with whole-family, marital, and parent–child levels of family functioning was examined. Maternal mental illness and multiple contextual risk best predicted whole-family functioning, but each was related to marital and parent–child levels as well. Nonspecific indicators of maternal illness, rather than diagnostic category, were the better predictors of family functioning. The multiple contextual

Susan Dickstein; Ronald Seifer; Lisa C. Hayden; Masha Schiller; Arnold J. Sameroff; Gabor Keitner; Ivan Miller; Steven Rasmussen; Marilyn Matzko; Karin Dodge Magee

1998-01-01

152

Investigating the Causes for Decreased Levels of Glutathione in Individuals with Type II Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) remains an eminent global burden with one third of the world’s population latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). Individuals with compromised immune systems are especially vulnerable to M. tb infection. In fact, individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) are two to three times more susceptible to TB than those without T2DM. In this study, we report that individuals with T2DM have lower levels of glutathione (GSH) due to compromised levels of GSH synthesis and metabolism enzymes. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?), a cytokine that is known to decrease the expression of the catalytic subunit of glutamine-cysteine ligase (GCLC) was found in increased levels in the plasma samples from individuals with T2DM, explaining the possible underlying mechanism that is responsible for decreased levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM. Moreover, increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) were observed in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. Increased levels of IL-6 and IL-17 was accompanied by enhanced production of free radicals further indicating an alternative mechanism for the decreased levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM. Augmenting the levels of GSH in macrophages isolated from individuals with T2DM resulted in improved control of M. tb infection. Furthermore, cytokines that are responsible for controlling M. tb infection at the cellular and granuloma level such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), interleukin-1? (IL-1?), interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-?), and interleukin-12 (IL-12), were found to be compromised in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. On the other hand, interleukin-10 (IL-10), an immunosuppressive cytokine was increased in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. Overall, these findings suggest that lower levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM lead to their increased susceptibility to M. tb infection. PMID:25790445

Lagman, Minette; Ly, Judy; Saing, Tommy; Morris, Devin; Chi, Po-Ting; Ochoa, Cesar; Sathananthan, Airani; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

2015-01-01

153

Interpretation of high-dimensional numerical results for the Anderson transition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The existence of the upper critical dimension d c2 = 4 for the Anderson transition is a rigorous consequence of the Bogoliubov theorem on renormalizability of ?4 theory. For d ? 4 dimensions, one-parameter scaling does not hold and all existent numerical data should be reinterpreted. These data are exhausted by the results for d = 4, 5 from scaling in quasi-one-dimensional systems and the results for d = 4, 5, 6 from level statistics. All these data are compatible with the theoretical scaling dependences obtained from Vollhardt and Wolfle's self-consistent theory of localization. The widespread viewpoint that d c2 = ? is critically discussed.

Suslov, I. M.

2014-12-01

154

MD Anderson study finds depression and shortened telomeres increase bladder cancer mortality  

Cancer.gov

The combination of shortened telomeres, a biological marker of aging associated with cancer development, and elevated depression significantly impacted bladder cancer mortality, according to data presented at the 11th Annual AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research. As part of an ongoing, large-scale epidemiologic study of bladder cancer, researchers from the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston collected clinical and mental health information on 464 patients with bladder cancer. They assessed patients' depression levels with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale.

155

The Innocence Project, Marvin AndersonSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interviewee: Marvin Anderson DNAi Location:Applications>Human identification>Innocence>DNA and the Innocence Project On February 28, 2003, Marvin Anderson spoke at a function celebrating the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the structure of DNA.

2008-03-26

156

Flavor physics in the Randall-Sundrum model: II. Tree-level weak-interaction processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive analysis of tree-level weak interaction processes at low energy is presented for the Randall-Sundrum (RS)\\u000a model with SU(2)\\u000a L\\u000a × U(1)\\u000a Y\\u000a bulk gauge symmetry and brane-localized Higgs sector. The complete form of the effective weak Hamiltonian is obtained, which\\u000a results from tree-level exchange of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gluons and photons, the W\\u000a ± and Z\\u000a 0 bosons and

M. Bauer; S. Casagrande; U. Haisch; M. Neubert

2010-01-01

157

MARVEL: Measured active rotational-vibrational energy levels. II. Algorithmic improvements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When determining energy levels from several, in cases many, measured and assigned high-resolution molecular spectra according to the Ritz principle, it is advantageous to investigate the spectra via the concept of spectroscopic networks (SNs). Experimental SNs are finite, weighted, undirected, multiedge, rooted graphs, whereby the vertices are the energy levels, the edges are the transitions, and the weights are provided by transition intensities. A considerable practical problem arises from the fact that SNs can be very large for isotopologues of molecules widely studied; for example, the experimental dataset for the H2 16O molecule contains some 160,000 measured transitions and 20,000 energy levels. In order to treat such large SNs and extract the maximum amount of information from them, sophisticated algorithms are needed when inverting the transition data. To achieve numerical effectiveness, we found the following efficient algorithms applicable to very large SNs: reading the input data employs hash codes, building the components of the SN utilizes a recursive depth-first search algorithm, solving the linear least-squares problem is via the conjugate gradient method, and determination of the uncertainties of the energy levels takes advantage of the robust reweighting algorithm.

Furtenbacher, Tibor; Császár, Attila G.

2012-07-01

158

Homemade Equipment for the Teaching of Electrochemistry at Advanced Level. Part II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a detailed description for the construction of equipment needed to investigate acid/base equilibria through the measurement of pH and potentiometric titrations. Suggested experiments and calibration techniques are explained. This information helps to solve the problems of inadequate, expensive equipment required for A-level chemistry…

Chan, K. M.

1985-01-01

159

ENERGY LEVELS OF PLATINUM(II) COMPLEXES ON THE BASIS OF LIGAND FIELD THEORY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The energy levels of square planar platmnum (Il) complexes are ; calculated on the basls of ligand field theory in which a point dipole model was ; used for the lugands. Configuration interaction, including spin-orbit coupling, ; was taken into account by the appropriate choice of basic functions for the ; irreducible representatlons of the D\\/sub 4h\\/ group. The resultant

R. F. Fenske; D. S. Martin

1961-01-01

160

Community-Based Career Guidance Practices. Vol. II--Secondary Level.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of eighty-six secondary level career guidance practices contains the following nine types of activities: novel practices such as games and role enactments, volunteering, field trips, special career emphases, intern/extern practices, work experience and exploration practices, exchanges, mobile practices, and educator in-services. A…

Manatee Junior Coll., Bradenton, FL.

161

Modern Standard Arabic: Intermediate Level, Part II, Lessons 14-30.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume, the second of three texts for use in intermediate Arabic language courses, contains 17 lessons, each consisting of five main parts. Lessons 11 to 20 do not provide English translations for full sentences. The remaining lessons (21-30) are devoted to developing reading skills and bringing the student to the advanced level. The lessons…

Abboud, Peter; And Others

162

STS-89 M.S. Michael Anderson suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-89 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson smiles as he completes the donning of his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. A major in the U.S. Air Force, Anderson has a master of science degree in physics from Creighton University. He and six fellow crew members will soon depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour will lift off during a launch window that opens at 9:43 p.m. EST, Jan. 22. STS-89 is the eighth of nine planned missions to dock the Space Shuttle with Russia's Mir space station.

1998-01-01

163

Anderson Localization for radial tree-like random quantum graphs  

E-print Network

We prove that certain random models associated with radial, tree-like, rooted quantum graphs exhibit Anderson localization at all energies. The two main examples are the random length model (RLM) and the random Kirchhoff model (RKM). In the RLM, the lengths of each generation of edges form a family of independent, identically distributed random variables (iid). For the RKM, the iid random variables are associated with each generation of vertices and moderate the current flow through the vertex. We consider extensions to various families of decorated graphs and prove stability of localization with respect to decoration. In particular, we prove Anderson localization for the random necklace model.

Peter D. Hislop; Olaf Post

2008-06-16

164

Basic Goals for Elementary Children: Volume I, Beginners Level and Level One; Volume II, Levels Two and Three; Volume III, Levels Four, Five and Six; Volume IV, Levels Seven and Eight.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These curriculum guides were developed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs to be used by teachers and administrators of Indian students from the beginning level through the eighth. The four volumes provide a structuring and sequencing of themes and concepts designed to prepare Indian children to compete favorably with their peers in other school…

Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

165

PRESTO-II: a low-level waste environmental transport and risk assessment code  

SciTech Connect

PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed for the evaluation of possible health effects from shallow-land and, waste-disposal trenches. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal operations. Human exposure scenarios considered include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and limited site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include ground-water transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, suspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, external exposure, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Both population doses and individual doses, as well as doses to the intruder and farmer, may be calculated. Cumulative health effects in terms of cancer deaths are calculated for the population over the 1000-year period using a life-table approach. Data are included for three example sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. A code listing and example input for each of the three sites are included in the appendices to this report.

Fields, D.E.; Emerson, C.J.; Chester, R.O.; Little, C.A.; Hiromoto, G.

1986-04-01

166

Frontal Plane Motion of the Pelvis and Hip during Gait Stance Discriminates Children with Diplegia Levels I and II of the GMFCS  

PubMed Central

Objective. To determine if gait waveform could discriminate children with diplegic cerebral palsy of the GMFCS levels I and II. Patients. Twenty-two children with diplegia, 11 classified as level I and 11 as level II of the GMFCS, aged 7 to 12 years. Methods. Gait kinematics included angular displacement of the pelvis and lower limb joints during the stance phase. Principal components (PCs) analyses followed by discriminant analysis were conducted. Results. PC1s of the pelvis and hip in the frontal plane differ significantly between groups and captured 80.5% and 86.1% of the variance, respectively. PC1s captured the magnitude of the pelvic obliquity and hip adduction angle during the stance phase. Children GMFCS level II walked with reduced pelvic obliquity and hip adduction angles, and these variables could discriminate the groups with a cross-validation of 95.5%. Conclusion. Reduced pelvic obliquity and hip adduction were observed between children GMFCS level II compared to level I. These results could help the classification process of mild-to-moderate children with diplegia. In addition, it highlights the importance of rehabilitation programs designed to improve pelvic and hip mobility in the frontal plane of diplegic cerebral palsy children level II of the GMFCS. PMID:22792478

Kirkwood, Renata Noce; Franco, Rosa de Lourdes Lima Dias; Furtado, Sheyla Cavalcanti; Barela, Ana Maria Forti; Deluzio, Kevin John; Mancini, Marisa Cotta

2012-01-01

167

75 FR 8346 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Settlement; Anderson-Calhoun Mine and Mill Site, Leadpoint, WA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Proposed CERCLA Administrative Settlement; Anderson-Calhoun Mine and Mill Site, Leadpoint...associated with a removal action at the Anderson-Calhoun Mine and Mill Site in Leadpoint...553-0242. Comments should reference the Anderson-Calhoun Mine and Mill Site in...

2010-02-24

168

Generation of the S boxes of Tiger Ross Anderson 1 and Eli Biham 2  

E-print Network

Generation of the S boxes of Tiger Ross Anderson 1 and Eli Biham 2 1 Cambridge University, England is the title of the paper describing Tiger: ''Tiger ­ A Fast New Hash Function, by Ross Anderson and Eli Biham New Hash Function, by Ross Anderson and Eli Biham'',5); */ /* This code is written for little

Biham, Eli

169

Hemispheric differences in protein kinase C ?II levels in the rat amygdala: baseline asymmetry and lateralized changes associated with cue and context in a classical fear conditioning paradigm  

PubMed Central

The amygdala is critically important for fear learning, and specific kinases have been implicated as contributors to the mechanisms that underlie learning. We examined levels of protein kinase C ?II (PKC ?II) in the left and right lateral and basolateral nuclei (LA/BLA) of the amygdala from animals that were classically fear conditioned with tones as cues and footshocks. Groups consisted of animals that received neither tones nor shocks, paired tones and shocks, or unpaired tones and shocks. At 1 hour after conditioning, some animals from each group were used for biochemical measurements of PKC ?II levels and other animals were given probe trials to assess freezing behavior to cue and context. The levels of PKC ?II were greater in the left hemisphere in animals receiving neither tones nor shocks and animals receiving paired tones and shocks. PKC ?II levels were greater in the right hemisphere of animals receiving randomly presented tones and shocks. Freezing times to cue were long (>80% of probe trial time) in both the paired tone/shock and randomly unpaired tone/shock groups. Freezing times to context were long in the unpaired tone/shock group, but not the paired tone/shock group. Correlational analyses showed that freezing times to context, but not cue, precisely predicted the right/left relation of PKC ?II levels in the LA/BLA: the greater the time spent freezing to context, the greater the increase in right hemisphere PKC ?II levels. We conclude that fear conditioning causes hemisphere and input specific increases in PKC ?II in the rat LA/BLA. PMID:17118565

Orman, Rena; Stewart, Mark

2007-01-01

170

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 29 (HUNTTH00290029) on Town Highway 29, crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00290029 on Town Highway 29 crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 4.16-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream and downstream of the bridge. In the study area, Cobb Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.024 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 53 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 112.0 mm (0.367 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 29 crossing of Cobb Brook is a 36-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 11, 1995) and a wooden deck. The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 27 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway was measured to be 20 degrees. VTAOT records indicate an opening-skew-to-roadway of zero degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed extending from 12 ft upstream of the upstream end of the left abutment to 10 ft under the bridge in the center of the channel during the Level I assessment. Another scour hole approximately 1.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream end of the right abutment during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream end of the right abutment and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the upstream end of the upstream left retaining wall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was computed to be zero ft. Abutment scour ranged from 9.9 to 12.5 ft along the left abutment and from 6.2 to 8.6 ft along the right abutment. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gi

Flynn, Robert H.

1997-01-01

171

Professions Shannon Anderson, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

) 1 Phys 122 General Physics II Lab 1 #12;Supplementary Courses BIOL 328/9 Human Anatomy..................................................3 BIOL 357 Molecular Genetics................................3 BIOL 361 Human Genetics.............................3 BIOL 612/613 Human Physiology & Lab*..................3/2 BIOL 614 Vertebrate Histology

172

Sorption of copper(II) on amorphous silica and {gamma}-alumina - macroscopic and molecular level information  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the sorption of Cu(II) onto amorphous silica and {gamma}-alumina as a function of solution conditions and have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine the molecular level structure of the sorption complexes formed. Under the same reaction conditions (Cu concentrations, ionic strength, and total surface area of oxide), Cu(II) uptake on silica is shifted to a higher pH compared to Cu(II) uptake on {gamma}-alumina. These differences correspond to different surface species on the two oxide surfaces. XAS analysis of sorption samples shows that, at 0.05{mu}M/m{sup 2}: (a) on {gamma}-alumina, Cu adsorbs as a outer-sphere, mononuclear complex or resides in the diffuse double layer; (b) on silica, Cu adsorbs in the binuclear, inner-sphere mode with a Cu neighbor at 2.58{Angstrom}, and a Si second neighbor at 3.13{Angstrom}. At higher coverage (Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 1{mu}M/m{sup 2} Cu/SiO{sub 2}, 0.8{mu}M/m{sup 2}), XAS analysis indicates that the number of 2nd neighbor, hydroxo-bridged Cu atoms (i.e., cluster size) is larger on silica than on {gamma}-alumina. Since both of these samples were prepared at about the same pH (pH=6.4), we can deduce that the surface influences the cluster size. This, combined with the binuclear Cu arrangement for low coverage on silica, suggests that the silica surface promotes the formation of a more ordered arrangement of Cu and the growth of Cu(OH){sub 2} clusters.

Cheah, Sing-Foong; Brown, G.E. Jr.; Parks, G.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1995-12-01

173

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 31 (HUNTTH00220031) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220031 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, obtained from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 5.01-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of trees and brush. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.06 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 44 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from boulder to gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 107.0 mm (0.352 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 34-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot steel I-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 31.2 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. The VTAOT computed opening-skewto-roadway is 2 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed at the downstream end of the left abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was computed to be zero ft. Abutment scour ranged from 7.0 to 10.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the left abutment and at the incipient-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical p

Flynn, Robert H.; Degnan, James R.

1997-01-01

174

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 17 (LYNDTH00020017) on Town Highway 2, crossing Hawkins Brook, Lyndon, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure LYNDTH00020017 on Town Highway 2 crossing Hawkins Brook, Lyndon, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 7.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest on the left and right upstream overbanks. The downstream left and right overbanks are brushland. In the study area, Hawkins Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 78 ft and an average bank height of 7.3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 46.6 mm (0.153 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 4, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable with the presence of point bars and side bars. The Town Highway 2 crossing of Hawkins Brook is a 49-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 46-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 27, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 43 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 0.75 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream left abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the downstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 0.9 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 3.8 to 6.6 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessm

Wild, Emily C.; Medalie, Laura

1997-01-01

175

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (BURKTH00070016) on Town Highway 7, crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BURKTH00070016 on Town Highway 7 crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 6.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the left bank upstream which is brushland. In the study area, Dish Mill Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 40 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 94.1 mm (0.309 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 7 crossing of Dish Mill Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 35 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left and right abutments during the Level I assessment. In front of the upstream and downstream left wingwalls the scour depth was only 0.5 ft, while in front of the downstream right wingwall it was 0.75 ft and in front of the upstream right wingwall it was 0.3 ft. The scour countermeasures at the site include type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream end of the right abutment and along the downstream right wingwall. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is along the upstream left bank, the upstream and downstream left wingwalls, and at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.7 to 9.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the left abutment and at the incipient road-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of

Burns, Ronda L.; Severance, Tim

1997-01-01

176

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 32 (HUNTTH00220032) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220032 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 5.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right overbank which is pasture. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.05 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 58 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 127 mm (0.416 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 36-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 34-foot steel-beam span and a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 12, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 35.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls on the left. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment and downstream left wingwall during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.4 to 10.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopt

Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

177

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 26 (ROYATH00540026) on Town Highway 54, crossing Broad Brook, Royalton, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROYATH00540026 on Town Highway 54 crossing Broad Brook, Royalton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 11.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture with trees and brush on the immediate banks. The right bank, upstream and downstream of the bridge, is forested. In the study area, Broad Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 37 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 66.3 mm (0.218 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 13, 1995 and the Level II site visit on July 11, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 54 crossing of Broad Brook is a 29-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.3 ft. The bridge is supported by a vertical, concrete face laid-up stone abutment with concrete wingwalls on the left and a laid-up stone abutment on the right. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream end of the right abutment during the Level I assessment. Also, at the upstream end of the left abutment, the footing is exposed 0.5 ft. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left bank, at the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall, along the entire length of the downstream left wingwall, and at the upstream end of the right abutment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 2.2 to 7.4 ft on the left and from 14.7 to 17.7 ft on the right. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge for the left and at the 500-year discharge for the right. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is prese

Burns, Ronda L.; Weber, Matthew A.

1997-01-01

178

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 44 (LINCTH00330044) on Town Highway 33, crossing the New Haven River, Lincoln, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure LINCTH00330044 on Town Highway 33 crossing the New Haven River, Lincoln, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 6.3-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, the New Haven River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 56 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 101.9 mm (0.334 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 10, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 33 crossing of the New Haven River is a 33-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot timber-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 14, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 29.3 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, wood-beam crib abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream end of the downstream left wingwall and along the downstream right bank, type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 9.4 to 12.6 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 100-year discharge for the left abutment and at the incipient overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribut

Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

1997-01-01

179

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 12 (CHESVT01030012) on State Highway 103, crossing the Williams River, Chester, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESVT01030012 on State Route 103 crossing the Williams River, Chester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in eastern Vermont. The 23.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the downstream right and upstream left overbank areas and short grass on the downstream left and upstream right overbank areas. The surface cover along the upstream and downstream immediate banks consists of trees and brush. In the study area, the the Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.0054 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 75 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 52.4 mm (0.172 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 18, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The State Route 103 crossing of the Williams River is a 99-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of three concrete T-beam spans (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The bridge is supported by two piers and vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls and spill-through slopes. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Downstream of the bridge are the remains of a dam which is acting as a drop structure. A scour hole, approximately 3 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth, was observed along the upstream left bank extending from 78 ft upstream of the upstream bridge face to 25 ft downstream of the downstream bridge face during the Level I assessment. Lateral migration of the channel has resulted in flow being directed at an angle to the piers, which has resulted in increased local scour at the bridge. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) under the bridge along the entire base length of the left and right spill-through slopes and extending up to the abutments. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) scour protection was also found along the upstream left bank from the bridge to 46 ft upstream and along the downstream right bank from the bridge to 70 ft downstream. Rock walls were found along the left bank from 88 ft to 200 ft downstream and along the right bank from 124 ft to 224 ft downstream. There are two wood pile drop structures located at 47 ft and 61 ft downstream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharg

Flynn, Robert H.; Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

180

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 68 (NFIETH00960068) on Town Highway 96, crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NFIETH00960068 on Town Highway 96 crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 30.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The right bank upstream is forested and the downstream right bank is pasture. Vermont state route 12A runs parallel to the river on the right bank. In the study area, the Dog River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 70 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 47.9 mm (0.157 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 96 crossing of the Dog River is a 45-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 43-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 41.5 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. Channel scour 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth, was observed under the bridge during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left bank upstream and type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream and downstream right banks that extends partially in front of the right wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.8 to 1.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 8.5 to 12.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson a

Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

181

Detecting level crossings without solving the Hamiltonian. II. Applications to atoms and molecules  

SciTech Connect

A number of interesting phenomena occur at points where the energy levels of an atom or a molecule (anti) cross as a function of some parameter such as an external field. In a previous paper [M. Bhattacharya and C. Raman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 140405 (2006)] we have outlined powerful mathematical techniques useful in identifying the parameter values at which such (avoided) crossings occur. In the accompanying article [M. Bhattacharya and C. Raman, Phys. Rev A 75, 033405 (2007)] we have developed the mathematical basis of these algebraic techniques in some detail. In this article we apply these level-crossing methods to the spectra of atoms and molecules in a magnetic field. In the case of atoms the final result is the derivation of a class of invariants of the Breit-Rabi Hamiltonian of magnetic resonance. These invariants completely describe the parametric symmetries of the Hamiltonian. In the case of molecules we present an indicator which can tell when the Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down without using any information about the molecular potentials other than the fact that they are real. We frame our discussion in the context of Feshbach resonances in the atom-pair {sup 23}Na-{sup 85}Rb which are of current interest.

Bhattacharya, M.; Raman, C. [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2007-03-15

182

Effect of Age-Related Cartilage Turnover on Serum C-Telopeptide of Collagen Type II and Osteocalcin Levels in Growing Rabbits with and without Surgically Induced Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

This study aims to determine the effect of age-related cartilage turnover on the serum C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and osteocalcin (OC) levels in growing rabbits with and without surgically induced osteoarthritis. Twenty-four New Zealand male 3-month-old rabbits were randomized into three operated groups (n = 6 per group, with surgically induced osteroarthritis in the right knee; after blood sampling, the knees were harvested following euthanization at 2, 3, and 6 months after surgery) and a control group (n = 6, blood samples were obtained monthly between 3 and 15 months). Histomorphologically, the medial femoral condyles, particularly the central parts, harbored the most severe osteoarthritic changes among the operated rabbits. The serum levels of CTX-II and OC decreased in the controls from 3 to 11 months and then remained stable. No significant differences in the serum CTX-II and OC levels between the osteoarthritic rabbits and controls were observed. The osteoarthritic-to-normal ratios (ONRs, the ratios of serum CTX-II or OC levels in osteoarthritic rabbits to those of the controls at same ages) enabled an overall assessment of osteoarthritis and age-related cartilage turnover. Elevated CTX-II ONRs were observed in rabbits with mild to advanced osteoarthritis. However, the OC ONRs were unhelpful in assessing osteoarthritic growing rabbits. PMID:24729965

Huang, Chung-Cheng; Lee, Chen-Chang; Wang, Ching-Jen; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Ng, Shu-Hang; Tseng, Chia-Yi; Ko, Sheung-Fat

2014-01-01

183

First participation by the NMISA in a low-level comparison: CCRI(II)-S9 exercise.  

PubMed

The NMISA Radioactivity Standards Laboratory participated in the CCRI(II)-S9 inter-comparison of the measurement of the activity concentration of (137)Cs and (40)K in rice material, piloted by the KRISS. The paper describes the equipment used, the measurement set-up and data analysis. The efficiency of the detector for (137)Cs and (40)K was determined by comparison against a spiked standard solution, and Monte Carlo simulations performed to estimate the difference in ?-ray escape probability between the solution standard and starch (as an approximation for milled rice) due to attenuation disparities. The uncertainty budget was estimated rather conservatively, since these were the first low-level measurements performed by the NMISA using an HPGe detector. PMID:23562433

van Wyngaardt, W M; van Staden, M J; Lubbe, J

2013-11-01

184

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (JAMATH00010025) on Town Highway 1, crossing Ball Mountain Brook, Jamaica, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure JAMATH00010025 on Town Highway 1 crossing Ball Mountain Brook, Jamaica, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southern Vermont. The 29.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right bank which is pasture with some trees along the channel. In the study area, Ball Mountain Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.021 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 86 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 222 mm (0.727 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 13, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Ball Mountain Brook is a 78-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 75-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 73 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed at the upstream bridge face. The scour protection measures at the site were type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream banks and along both abutments, and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the downstream banks. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour only occurred at the 500-year discharge and was 0.1 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 11.2 to 15.7 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTA

Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

185

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 20 (GRAFTH00010020) on Town Highway 1, crossing the Saxtons River, Grafton Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure GRAFTH00010020 on Town Highway 1 crossing the Saxtons River, Grafton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 33.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream of the bridge and shrub and brush downstream. In the study area, the Saxtons River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 97 ft and an average bank height of 2 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 58.6 mm (0.192 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 21, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to distinctive cut bank development on the upstream right bank and point bar development on the upstream left bank and downstream right bank. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Saxtons River is a 191-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of three steel-beam spans (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through embankments and two piers. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening. The opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees in the VTAOT records but measured 50 degrees from surveyed points. The scour protection measures at the site were type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) on the left abutment, type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on the right abutment and downstream right bank, and a stone wall is noted on the left bank downstream. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.9 feet. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.0 to 14.9 feet. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the right abutment. There are two piers for which computed pier scour ranged from 8.7 to 26.0 feet. The left and right piers in this report are presented as pier 1 and pier 2 respectively. The worst-case pier scour occurred at pier 2 for the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives

Boehmler, Erick M.; Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

186

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (ANDOTH00230025) on Town Highway 23, crossing Andover Branch, Andover, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOTH00230025 on Town Highway 23 crossing the Andover Branch, Andover, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 6.74-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the right overbank and forest on the left overbank while the immediate banks, both upstream and downstream, are forested. In the study area, the Andover Branch has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 55 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 78.4 mm (0.257 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 27, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 23 crossing of the Andover Branch is a 25-ft-long, two-lane structure consisting of a multi-plate corrugated steel arch culvert with concrete footings (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The culvert is mitered at the inlet and outlet. The channel is skewed approximately zero degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. The footings are exposed approximately 1.25 ft, with the exception of the downstream end of the right footing which is exposed approximately 0.5 ft. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for modelled flows ranged from 1.6 to 2.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 10.0 to 11.7 ft along the left footing and from 11.8 to 16.7 along the right footing. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A crosssection of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the resu

Flynn, Robert H.; Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

187

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 40 (ANDOVT00110040) on State Route 11, crossing Lyman Brook, Andover, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOVT00110040 on State Route 11 crossing Lyman Brook, Andover, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 4.18-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, Lyman Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 42 ft and an average bank height of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 86.0 mm (0.282 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 9, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The State Route 11 crossing of Lyman Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 27-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 0 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall and the downstream ends of the downstream left and right wingwalls. There was also a stone wall along the top of the left bank from 36 to 76 feet upstream. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge which was more than the 100-year discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 1.2 to 7.5 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 5.2 to 6.7 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

188

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (CONCTH00580033) on Town Highway 58, crossing Miles Stream, Concord, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CONCTH00580033 on Town Highway 58 crossing Miles Stream, Concord, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 17.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture upstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. Downstream of the bridge, the right bank is forested and the left bank has shrubs and brush. In the study area, Miles Stream has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 91 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 61.6 mm (0.188 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 15, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 58 crossing of Miles Stream is a 44-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 39-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 37.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with stone fill in front creating spillthrough embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. The only scour countermeasure at the site was type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the left and right banks upstream, in front of the abutments forming spill through embankments, and extending along the banks downstream. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 4.0 to 9.7 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the right abutment and at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge for the left abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour

Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

189

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 34 (HUNTTH00210034) on Town Highway 21, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00210034 on Town Highway 21 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 6.23-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 90.0 mm (0.295 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 26, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 21 crossing of Brush Brook is a 28-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 26-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 25.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with a wingwall on the upstream right. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening and the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 5 degrees. A tributary enters Brush Brook on the right bank immediately downstream of the bridge. At the confluence, the left bank of Brush Brook is eroded and there is a small void under the downstream end of the left abutment footing which is completely exposed. The right abutment footing is also exposed. The scour countermeasures at the site include type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream banks and in front of the right abutment and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream right wingwall and along the downstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.9 to 10.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogen

Burns, Ronda L.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

1997-01-01

190

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (HUNTTH00220033) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220033 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 8.65-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right overbank which is pasture. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 42 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 76.7 mm (0.252 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 26, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 40-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 23.5-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 36.9 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. The scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the left and right banks upstream that extended through the bridge and along the downstream banks. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is analyzed since it has the potential of being the worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.5 to 14.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection mea

Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

1997-01-01

191

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30 (BRIDTH00330030) on Town Highway 33, crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00330030 on town highway 33 crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 7.51-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Branch has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 45 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 60.7 mm (0.199 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 33 crossing of Dailey Hollow Branch is a 31-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Type-2 stone-fill (less than 36 inches diameter) protection was found at all four wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.5 to 3.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge, which is between the 100- and 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.9 to 14.6 ft. with the worst-case scenario also occurring at the incipient-roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

192

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 43 (CHELTH00460043) on Town Highway 46, crossing Jail Brook, Chelsea, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHELTH00460043 on Town Highway 46 crossing Jail Brook, Chelsea, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.68-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is best described as suburban with homes, lawns, and a few trees. In the study area, Jail Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 32 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from coarse sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 43.0 mm (0.141 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 18, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of Jail Brook is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 23-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.8 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately zero degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is also zero degrees. Channel scour was not observed. However, the left abutment footing was exposed one foot. Scour countermeasures at the site consisted of type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on the banks and road embankments upstream and downstream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.1 to 1.2 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 5.0 to 6.5 ft at the left abutment and 4.7 to 6.2 ft at the right abutment. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths

Olson, Scott A.

1997-01-01

193

Effect of adjuvant endocrine therapy on hormonal levels in premenopausal women with breast cancer: the ProBONE II study.  

PubMed

Endocrine therapy (ET) is a key treatment modality in hormone receptor positive (HR+) early breast cancer (BC) patients. Although the anticancer activity of adjuvant ET + zoledronic acid (ZOL) has been investigated, the potential effects of ET ± ZOL on endocrine hormones in premenopausal women with HR+ early BC are not well understood. ProBONE II was prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Premenopausal patients with histologically confirmed invasive BC with no evidence of metastases and a T score >-2.5 received ET ± ZOL 4 mg every 3 months for 2 years. Serum levels of estradiol (E2), follicle-stimulating hormone, anti-muellerian hormone (AMH), inhibins A and B, sex hormone-binding globulin, parathyroid hormone, total testosterone, and vitamin D were evaluated at baseline and at every scheduled visit. Of 71 women enrolled, 70 were evaluable (n = 34, ZOL; n = 36, placebo). No statistically significant differences were observed in hormone levels, except E2 and AMH, which showed minor differences. These included decreases in serum E2 levels, which reached a nadir after 3 and 9 months in placebo and ZOL groups, respectively, and decrease in serum AMH levels throughout the study with ZOL, but remained constant with placebo after 6 months. Adverse events in ZOL-treated group were influenza-like illness (32.4 %), bone pain (32.4 %), chills (20.6 %), and nausea (23.5 %). ET ± ZOL was well tolerated. This study showed no influence of ZOL on hormonal level changes that accompany ET, supporting inclusion of ZOL in adjuvant therapy for premenopausal women with HR + BC. PMID:24519387

Hadji, Peyman; Kauka, Annette; Ziller, May; Birkholz, Katrin; Baier, Monika; Muth, Mathias; Kann, Peter

2014-04-01

194

Nuclear liability and the Price--Anderson Act  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Price-Anderson Act is viewed as meeting public needs in a unique and responsible way, reflecting the far-sightedness of those involved in the early development of nuclear power who saw the importance of building safety into each step of the program. An extension of the Act is advised as a first step in recognizing that many potential and real disasters

2009-01-01

195

Federal Technology Transfer Data 1987-2009 Gary Anderson  

E-print Network

. Among other things, this Act explicitly incorporated technology transfer into the mission of all federalFederal Technology Transfer Data 1987-2009 Gary Anderson Economist National Institute of Standards and Technology Economic Analysis Office October 2011 #12;1. Background In 1980, the Stevenson-Wydler Technology

Perkins, Richard A.

196

Interpolation Processes in Object Perception: Reply to Anderson (2007)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, & T. F. Shipley presented a theory of 3-D interpolation in object perception. Along with results from many researchers, this work supports an emerging picture of how the visual system connects separate visible fragments to form objects. In his commentary, B. L. Anderson challenges parts of that view, especially the idea…

Kellman, Philip J.; Garrigan, Patrick; Shipley, Thomas F.; Keane, Brian P.

2007-01-01

197

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and the professionalism of medical publicity  

Microsoft Academic Search

A B S T R A C T • This article examines how early women doctors managed their professional and public images in the second half of the nineteenth century through a case study of the career of the first medical woman to qualify in Britain: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (1836—1917). In fighting for their cause, Victorian women doctors had to

Claire Brock

2008-01-01

198

Periodic Anderson model for four-site clusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The periodic Anderson model is applied to three different four-site clusters (square, rhombus, and tetrahedron) with periodic boundary conditions. We consider one extended orbital per site per spin with an interatomic transfer integral t and with the mean energy chosen to be zero. We also consider one localized f orbital per site per spin with energy Ef with a Coulomb

P. K. Misra; D. G. Kanhere; Joseph Callaway

1987-01-01

199

Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy: prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.  

PubMed

Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by the inappropriate accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in tissues due to a deficiency in the enzyme ?-galactosidase A (?-Gal A). Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is characterized by structural, valvular, vascular and conduction abnormalities, and is now the most common cause of mortality in patients with AFD. Large-scale metabolic and genetic screening studies have revealed AFD to be prevalent in populations of diverse ethnic origins, and the variant form of AFD represents an unrecognized health burden. Anderson-Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder, and genetic testing is critical for the diagnosis of AFD in women. Echocardiography with strain imaging and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late enhancement and T1 mapping are important imaging tools. The current therapy for AFD is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which can reverse or prevent AFD progression, while gene therapy and the use of molecular chaperones represent promising novel therapies for AFD. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially reversible cause of heart failure that involves LVH, increased susceptibility to arrhythmias and valvular regurgitation. Genetic testing and cardiac MRI are important diagnostic tools, and AFD cardiomyopathy is treatable if ERT is introduced early. PMID:25030479

Putko, Brendan N; Wen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard B; Mullen, John; Shanks, Miriam; Yogasundaram, Haran; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

2015-03-01

200

Supporting Information Anderson and Natland 10.1073/pnas.1410229111  

E-print Network

at the 650-km discontinuity; SUMA mantle mixing; perched eclogite layer; and tracking slabs--an exerciseSupporting Information Anderson and Natland 10.1073/pnas.1410229111 SI Text Tomography and Mantle than 40 y. The plume vs. plate debate is part of the broader issue of mantle dynamics and geochemistry

Low, Steven H.

201

Parabolic Anderson model with a finite number of moving catalysts  

E-print Network

Parabolic Anderson model with a finite number of moving catalysts F. Castell, O. G¨un and G- actant" u under the influence of a "catalyst" . In the present paper we focus on the case where of particles A and B. A-particles represent "catalysts", B-particles represent "reactants" and the dynamics

Maillard, Grégory

202

TILING RECTANGLES, CYLINDERS, AND MOBIUS PETER G. ANDERSON  

E-print Network

TILING RECTANGLES, CYLINDERS, AND MOBIUS STRIPS PETER G. ANDERSON Abstract. We present a method the repertoires show in Figure 1: (1) Vertical dominoes and squares. (2) L-trimonoes and squares. (3) Large and small squares. (4) Vertical and horizontal dominoes. In all cases here, the short dimensions are 1

Anderson, Peter G.

203

Poisson statistics of eigenvalues in the hierarchical Anderson model  

E-print Network

We study the eigenvalue statistics for the hieracharchial Anderson model of Molchanov. We prove Poisson fluctuations at arbitrary disorder, when the the model has spectral dimension d<1. The proof is based on Minami's technique and we give an elementary exposition of the probabilistic arguments.

Evgenij Kritchevski

2007-10-13

204

A characterization of the Anderson metal-insulator transport transition  

E-print Network

A characterization of the Anderson metal-insulator transport transition Fran#24;cois Germinet 1) provides a characterization of the metal-insulator transport transition. Moreover, we show metallic regime characterized by extended states. The energy Eme at which this metal-insulator transition

205

Contemporary Mathematics The Anderson metal-insulator transport transition  

E-print Network

Contemporary Mathematics The Anderson metal-insulator transport transition Fran#24;cois Germinet and Abel Klein Abstract. We discuss a new approach to the metal-insulator transition for random operators exponent #12;(E) provides a characterization of the metal-insulator transport transition

206

What Do Consumers Believe About Future Gasoline Soren T. Anderson  

E-print Network

What Do Consumers Believe About Future Gasoline Prices? Soren T. Anderson Michigan State University of consumers about their expectations of future gasoline prices. Overall, we find that consumer beliefs follow a random walk, which we deem a reasonable forecast of gasoline prices, but we find a deviation from

Silver, Whendee

207

INET 2000 Anderson, Camp The Telecom Road Less Traveled  

E-print Network

Grameen Bank #12;3 INET 2000 Anderson, Camp GrameenPhone · Competes in urban and rural areas · Rural Rural Telecommunications Authority · TMIB (since 1997), · International Communication Technologies · Village entrepreneurs · Advantages ­ Rural population settled in villages ­ Billing infrastructure from

Camp, L. Jean

208

THE HULL OF RUDIN'S KLEIN BOTTLE JOHN T. ANDERSON  

E-print Network

THE HULL OF RUDIN'S KLEIN BOTTLE JOHN T. ANDERSON Abstract. In 1981 Walter Rudin exhibited a totally real embedding of the Klein bottle into C2. We show that the polynomially convex hull of Rudin's Klein bottle contains an open subset of C2. We also describe another totally real Klein bottle in C2

Anderson, John T.

209

Post-processing V&V level II ASC milestone (2360) results.  

SciTech Connect

The 9/30/2007 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2360) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include loading of edge and face data on an Exodus mesh, run-time computation of an exact solution to a verification problem, delivery of results data from the server to the client, computation of an integral-based error metric, simultaneous loading of simulation and test data, and comparison of that data using visual and quantitative methods. The capabilities were tested extensively by performing a typical ALEGRA HEDP verification task. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including completion of a verification task on a 13 million element mesh.

Chavez, Elmer; Karelitz, David B.; Brunner, Thomas A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Weirs, V. Gregory; Shead, Timothy M.

2007-09-01

210

Frequency response testing at Experimental Breeder Reactor II using discrete-level periodic signals  

SciTech Connect

The Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-2) reactivity-to-power frequency-response function was measured with pseudo-random, discrete-level, periodic signals. The reactor power deviation was small with insignificant perturbation of normal operation and in-place irradiation experiments. Comparison of results with measured rod oscillator data and with theoretical predictions show good agreement. Moreover, measures of input signal quality (autocorrelation function and energy spectra) confirm the ability to enable this type of frequency response determination at EBR-2. Measurements were made with the pseudo-random binary sequence, quadratic residue binary sequence, pseudo-random ternary sequence, and the multifrequency binary sequence. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Rhodes, W.D.; Larson, H.A. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (USA). Coll. of Engineering); Dean, E.M. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-01-01

211

The M. D. Anderson proton therapy system  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe University of Texas M. D. Anderson proton therapy system (PTC-H) including the accelerator, beam transport, and treatment delivery systems, the functionality and clinical parameters for passive scattering and pencil beam scanning treatment modes, and the results of acceptance tests. Methods: The PTC-H has a synchrotron (70-250 MeV) and four treatment rooms. An overall control system manages the treatment, physics, and service modes of operation. An independent safety system ensures the safety of patients, staff, and equipment. Three treatment rooms have isocentric gantries and one room has two fixed horizontal beamlines, which include a large-field treatment nozzle, used primarily for prostate treatments, and a small-field treatment nozzle for ocular treatments. Two gantry treatment rooms and the fixed-beam treatment room have passive scattering nozzles. The third gantry has a pencil beam scanning nozzle for the delivery of intensity modulated proton treatments (IMPT) and single field uniform dose (SFUD) treatments. The PTC-H also has an experimental room with a fixed horizontal beamline and a passive scattering nozzle. The equipment described above was provided by Hitachi, Ltd. Treatment planning is performed using the Eclipse system from Varian Medical Systems and data management is handled by the MOSAIQ system from IMPAC Medical Systems, Inc. The large-field passive scattering nozzles use double scattering systems in which the first scatterers are physically integrated with the range modulation wheels. The proton beam is gated on the rotating range modulation wheels at gating angles designed to produce spread-out-Bragg peaks ranging in size from 2 to 16 g/cm{sup 2}. Field sizes of up to 25x25 cm{sup 2} can be achieved with the double scattering system. The IMPT delivery technique is discrete spot scanning, which has a maximum field size of 30x30 cm{sup 2}. Depth scanning is achieved by changing the energy extracted from the synchrotron (energy can be changed pulse to pulse). The PTC-H is fully integrated with DICOM-RT ION interfaces for imaging, treatment planning, data management, and treatment control functions. Results: The proton therapy system passed all acceptance tests for both passive scattering and pencil beam scanning. Treatments with passive scattering began in May 2006 and treatments with the scanning system began in May 2008. The PTC-H was the first commercial system to demonstrate capabilities for IMPT treatments and the first in the United States to treat using SFUD techniques. The facility has been in clinical operation since May 2006 with up-time of approximately 98%. Conclusions: As with most projects for which a considerable amount of new technology is developed and which have duration spanning several years, at project completion it was determined that several upgrades would improve the overall system performance. Some possible upgrades are discussed. Overall, the system has been very robust, accurate, reproducible, and reliable. The authors found the pencil beam scanning system to be particularly satisfactory; prostate treatments can be delivered on the scanning nozzle in less time than is required on the passive scattering nozzle.

Smith, Alfred; Gillin, Michael; Bues, Martin; Zhu, X. Ronald; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Mohan, Radhe; Woo, Shiao; Lee, Andrew; Komaki, Ritsko; Cox, James; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishida, Takayuki; Sasaki, Toshie; Matsuda, Koji [Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston Texas 77030 (United States); Energy and Environmental Systems Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 2-1, Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Hitachi Works, Hitachi, Ltd. Power Systems, 1-1, Saiwai-cho, 3-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 317-8511 (Japan)

2009-09-15

212

Variable induction of vitellogenin genes in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) by the honeybee, Apis mellifera L, host and its environment  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Transcript levels of vitellogenins (Vgs) in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) were variably induced by interactions between the developing honeybee as a food source and the capped honeybee cell environment. Transcripts for 2 Vgs of varroa mites were sequenced and putative Vg pr...

213

Numerical calculation of the fidelity for the Kondo and the Friedel-Anderson impurities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fidelities of the Kondo and the Friedel-Anderson (FA) impurities are calculated numerically. The ground states of both systems are calculated with the FAIR (Friedel artificially inserted resonance) theory. The ground state in the interacting systems is compared with a nullstate in which the interaction is zero. The different multi-electron states are expressed in terms of Wilson states. The use of N Wilson states simulates the use of a large effective number N eff of states. A plot of ln( F) versus N ? ln( N eff ) reveals whether one has an Anderson orthogonality catastrophe at zero energy. The results are at first glance surprising. The ln( F) - ln( N eff ) plot for the Kondo impurity diverges for large N eff . On the other hand, the corresponding plot for the symmetric FA impurity saturates for large N eff when the level spacing at the Fermi level is of the order of the singlet-triplet excitation energy. The behavior of the fidelity allows one to determine the phase shift of the electron states in this regime.

Bergmann, G.; Thompson, R. S.

2011-11-01

214

Diagnostic Value of Serum Level of Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor II? in Egyptian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background: The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unfavorable and needs serum markers that could detect it early to start therapy at a potentially curable phase. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the value of serum soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-II? (sTNFR-II?) in diagnosis of HCC in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Patients and Methods: The study was performed on 110 subjects who were classified into five groups. Group I included 20 patients with chronic noncirrhotic HCV infection and persistently normal transaminases for ?6 months. Group II included 20 patients with chronic noncirrhotic HCV infection and elevated transaminases. Group III included 20 patients with Chronic HCV infection and liver cirrhosis. Group IV included 20 patients with chronic HCV infection with liver cirrhosis and HCC. Group V included 30 healthy age and sex-matched controls. Medical history was taken from all participants and they underwent clinical examination and abdominal ultrasonography. in addition, the following laboratory tests were requested: liver function tests, complete blood count, HBsAg, anti-HCVAb, HCV-RNA by qualitative PCR, and serum levels of ?-fetoprotein (AFP) and sTNFR-II?. Results: The serum level of sTNFR-II? was significantly higher in patients with HCC in comparison to the other groups. A positive correlation was found between the serum levels of sTNFR-II? and AST and ALT in patients of group-II. Diagnosis of HCC among patients with HCV infection and cirrhosis could be ascertained when sTNFR-II? is assessed at a cutoff value of ? 250 pg/mL. Conclusions: Serum sTNFR-II? could be used as a potential serum marker in diagnosing HCC among patients with HCV infection. PMID:25386197

Fouad, Shawky A; Elsaaid, Nehal H; Mohamed, Nagwa A; Abutaleb, Osama M

2014-01-01

215

Effect of donor chimerism to reduce the level of glycosaminoglycans following bone marrow transplantation in a murine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type II.  

PubMed

Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient activity of the iduronate-2-sulfatase. This leads to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the lysosomes of various cells. Although it has been proposed that bone marrow transplantation (BMT) may have a beneficial effect for patients with MPS II, the requirement for donor-cell chimerism to reduce GAG levels is unknown. To address this issue, we transplanted various ratios of normal and MPS II bone marrow cells in a mouse model of MPS II and analyzed GAG accumulation in various tissues. Chimerism of whole leukocytes and each lineage of BMT recipients' peripheral blood was similar to infusion ratios. GAGs were significantly reduced in the liver, spleen, and heart of recipients. The level of GAG reduction in these tissues depends on the percentage of normal-cell chimerism. In contrast to these tissues, a reduction in GAGs was not observed in the kidney and brain, even if 100 % donor chimerism was achieved. These observations suggest that a high degree of chimerism is necessary to achieve the maximum effect of BMT, and donor lymphocyte infusion or enzyme replacement therapy might be considered options in cases of low-level chimerism in MPS II patients. PMID:25503568

Yokoi, Kentaro; Akiyama, Kazumasa; Kaneshiro, Eiko; Higuchi, Takashi; Shimada, Yohta; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Masaharu; Otsu, Makoto; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Ohashi, Toya; Ida, Hiroyuki

2015-03-01

216

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (BETHTH00070038) on Town Highway 007, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The town highway 5 crossing of the Black River is a 70-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 65-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. There is also a retaining wall along the upstream side of the road embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 3.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment. The scour hole was 27 feet long, 15 feet wide, and was 2.5 feet below the abutment footing at the time of the Level I assessment. This right abutment had numerous cracks and had settled. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

217

GIS based Cadastral level Forest Information System using World View-II data in Bir Hisar (Haryana)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identification and demarcation of Forest lands on the ground remains a major challenge in Forest administration and management. Cadastral forest mapping deals with forestlands boundary delineation and their associated characterization (forest/non forest). The present study is an application of high resolution World View-II data for digitization of Protected Forest boundary at cadastral level with integration of Records of Right (ROR) data. Cadastral vector data was generated by digitization of spatial data using scanned mussavies in ArcGIS environment. Ortho-images were created from World View-II digital stereo data with Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system with WGS 84 datum. Cadastral vector data of Bir Hisar (Hisar district, Haryana) and adjacent villages was spatially adjusted over ortho-image using ArcGIS software. Edge matching of village boundaries was done with respect to khasra boundaries of individual village. The notified forest grids were identified on ortho-image and grid vector data was extracted from georeferenced cadastral data. Cadastral forest boundary vectors were digitized from ortho-images. Accuracy of cadastral data was checked by comparison of randomly selected geo-coordinates points, tie lines and boundary measurements of randomly selected parcels generated from image data set with that of actual field measurements. Area comparison was done between cadastral map area, the image map area and RoR area. The area covered under Protected Forest was compared with ROR data and within an accuracy of less than 1 % from ROR area was accepted. The methodology presented in this paper is useful to update the cadastral forest maps. The produced GIS databases and large-scale Forest Maps may serve as a data foundation towards a land register of forests. The study introduces the use of very high resolution satellite data to develop a method for cadastral surveying through on - screen digitization in a less time as compared to the old fashioned cadastral parcel boundaries surveying method.

Mothi Kumar, K. E.; Singh, S.; Attri, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.; Sarika; Hooda, R. S.; Sapra, R. K.; Garg, V.; Kumar, V.; Nivedita

2014-11-01

218

Spin-polarized density-matrix functional theory of the single-impurity Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lattice density functional theory (LDFT) is used to investigate spin excitations in the single-impurity Anderson model. In this method, the single-particle density matrix ?ij? with respect to the lattice sites replaces the wave function as the basic variable of the many-body problem. A recently developed two-level approximation (TLA) to the interaction-energy functional W[?] is extended to systems having spin-polarized density distributions and bond orders. This allows us to investigate the effect of external magnetic fields and, in particular, the important singlet-triplet gap ?E, which determines the Kondo temperature. Applications to finite Anderson rings and square lattices show that the gap ?E as well as other ground-state and excited-state properties are very accurately reproduced. One concludes that the spin-polarized TLA is reliable in all interaction regimes, from weak to strong correlations, for different hybridization strengths and for all considered impurity valence states. In this way the efficiency of LDFT to account for challenging electron-correlation effects is demonstrated.

Töws, W.; Pastor, G. M.

2012-12-01

219

Classroom Presentation from the Tablet PC Richard J. Anderson* Ruth Anderson* Tammy VanDeGrift* Steven A. Wolfman* Ken Yasuhara*  

E-print Network

Classroom Presentation from the Tablet PC Richard J. Anderson* Ruth Anderson* Tammy Van the instructor uses a Tablet PC as a presentation device. The system was deployed in six university courses projector. The instructor displays slides from the tablet and can write on top of them. Various navigation

VanDeGrift, Tammy

220

STS-107 Crew Interviews: Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-107 Mission Specialist 3 and Payload Commander Michael Anderson is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting onboard science experiments. He discusses the following instruments and sets of experiments in detail: CM2 (Combustion Module 2), FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enabling Science Technology and Research, MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) and MGM (Mechanics of Granular Materials). Anderson also mentions on-board activities and responsibilities during launch and reentry, mission training, and microgravity research. In addition, he touches on the dual work-shift nature of the mission, the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety during training and the value of international cooperation.

2002-01-01

221

Anderson Localization Phenomenon in One-dimensional Elastic Systems  

E-print Network

The phenomenon of Anderson localization of waves in elastic systems is studied. We analyze this phenomenon in two different set of systems: disordered linear chains of harmonic oscillators and disordered rods which oscillate with torsional waves. The ?rst set is analyzed numerically whereas the second one is studied both experimentally and theoretically. In particular, we discuss the localization properties of the waves as a function of the frequency. In doing that we have used the inverse participation ratio, which is related to the localization length. We ?nd that the normal modes localize exponentially according to Anderson theory. In the elastic systems, the localization length decreases with frequency. This behavior is in contrast with what happens in analogous quantum mechanical systems, for which the localization length grows with energy. This difference is explained by means of the properties of the re ection coefficient of a single scatterer in each case.

Mendez-Sanchez, R A; Morales, A; Flores, J; Diaz-de-Anda, A; Monsivais, G

2013-01-01

222

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 7H (HUNTTH0001007H) on Town Highway 1, crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.20-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream of the bridge. Downstream of the bridge is brushland and pasture. In the study area, the Cobb Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 65.5 mm (0.215 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 24, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Cobb Brook is a 23-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 20-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, June 21, 1996). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 2.8 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. Protection measures at the site include type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream right wingwall, type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream right wingwall and the downstream end of the downstream left wingwall, and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.2 to 1.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 4.0 to 8.7 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 10. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson a

Wild, Emily C.

1997-01-01

223

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 43 (BETHTH00070043) on Town Highway 07, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 19, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 7 crossing of Gilead Brook is a 31-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 27-foot concrete slab type superstructure (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 24, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed at the right side of the downstream bridge face during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures in place at the site were type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the right abutment and both downstream banks, type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on all of the road approach embankments, both upstream banks, and along the entire base length of the wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 6.6 to 11.0 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abut

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Olson, Scott A.

1996-01-01

224

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 12 (HUNTTH00010012) on Town Highway 001, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

frequency data contained in the Flood Insurance Study for the Town of Huntington (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1978). The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 9.19-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have some woody vegetation. In the study area, the Brush Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 100.0 mm (0.328 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Brush Brook is a 64-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 62-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 6 degrees. Channel scour 2.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right bank and along the base of the spill-through protection for the right abutment during the Level I assessment. Scour protection measured at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left and right banks and in front of all four wingwalls. In front of the abutments, there was type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) forming a spill-through slope. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. There was no computed contraction scour for any modelled flow. Abutment scour ranged from 1.4 to 2.8 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 9. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and

Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

1997-01-01

225

Accuracy of density functionals for molecular electronics: The Anderson junction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The exact ground-state exchange-correlation functional of Kohn-Sham density functional theory yields the exact transmission through an Anderson junction at zero bias and temperature. The exact impurity charge susceptibility is used to construct the exact exchange-correlation potential. We analyze the successes and limitations of various types of approximations, including smooth and discontinuous functionals of the occupation, as well as symmetry-broken approaches.

Liu, Zhen-Fei; Bergfield, Justin P.; Burke, Kieron; Stafford, Charles A.

2012-04-01

226

A density functional that works for transport through Anderson junction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transport through an Anderson junction can be exactly described by density functional theory, at zero temperature and in the linear response regime. Using Bethe ansatz, we calculate the exact Kohn-Sham potential delivering the exact transmission. We propose a simple parametrization for the Kohn-Sham potential, using a known exact condition. Our parametrization faithfully reproduces numerical results, including the gradual development of the derivative discontinuity that is essential in describing Coulomb blockade correctly.

Liu, Zhenfei; Bergfield, Justin; Burke, Kieron; Stafford, Charles

2012-02-01

227

UT MD Anderson scientists discover secret life of chromatin:  

Cancer.gov

Chromatin--the intertwined histone proteins and DNA that make up chromosomes--constantly receives messages that pour in from a cell’s intricate signaling networks... But chromatin also talks back, scientists at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center report today in the journal Cell, issuing orders affecting a protein that has nothing to do with chromatin’s central role in gene transcription--the first step in protein formation.

228

Anderson localization and the theory of dirty superconductors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study is made of the effect of Anderson localization in dirty superconductors. The scale dependence of the diffusion in the vicinity of the mobility edge results in a strong renormalization of the zero-temperature coherence length. This implies the breakdown of the Ginzburg criterion close to the metal-insulator transition and thus the importance of fluctuations in this regime. The upper critical field is calculated, and possible experiments are also discussed.

Kapitulnik, A.; Kotliar, G.

1985-01-01

229

STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson suits up for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson completes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

2002-01-01

230

Ground-state properties of the periodic Anderson model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ground-state energy, hybridization matrix element, local moment, and spin-density correlations of a one-dimensional, finite-chain, periodic, symmetric Anderson model are obtained by numerical simulations and compared with perturbation theory and strong-coupling results. It is found that the local f-electron spins are compensated by correlation with other f-electrons as well as band electrons leading to a nonmagnetic ground state.

Blankenbecler, R.; Fulco, J. R.; Gill, W.; Scalapino, D. J.

1987-01-01

231

Anderson and Belnap’s Invitation to Sin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quine has argued that modal logic began with the sin of confusing use and mention. Anderson and Belnap, on the other hand,\\u000a have offered us a way out through a strategy of nominalization. This paper reviews the history of Lewis’s early work in modal\\u000a logic, and then proves some results about the system in which “A is necessary” is intepreted

Alasdair Urquhart

2010-01-01

232

Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

1978-01-01

233

Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

1987-10-01

234

Clinical and economic impact of using generic 7.3-mm cannulated screws at a level II trauma center.  

PubMed

We retrospectively studied the clinical and economic impact of a cost-containment program using high quality generic 7.3-mm screws for fixation of femoral neck fractures and pelvic ring injuries at a level II trauma center. Included in the study were 174 patients with femoral neck fractures or posterior pelvic ring injuries. These injuries were managed with 203 conventional and 178 generic implants. Study results showed no significant differences in age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, or fracture pattern; no differences in operative time, estimated blood loss, or complication rates; no increase in varus collapse, shortening, screw cutout, screw deformation, loosening, or conversion to arthroplasty; and no differences in hospital complications of deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, urinary tract infection, or pressure sores. Overall, our hospital realized a 70% reduction in implant costs, resulting in calendar-year savings of $50,531. At our institution, use of generic 7.3-mm cannulated screws has been a success. Hospital implant costs decreased significantly without any associated increase in complication rate or change in radiographic outcome. Generic implants have the potential to markedly reduce operative costs as long as quality products are used. PMID:25251525

Althausen, Peter L; Kurnik, Chris G; Shields, Troy; Anderson, Scott R; Gurnea, Taylor P; Coll, Daniel; Lu, Minggen

2014-09-01

235

Climate Change and CRAIG A. ANDERSON  

E-print Network

-lying small islands; (4) severe water shortages in Australia and New Zealand; (5) drought in southern Europe suggests that the new best case scenario will be worse than the old worst case scenario, with sea levels- tures increase physical aggression. The second type, geographic region studies, compare violence rates

Debinski, Diane M.

236

Trace elements, stable isotopes, and clay mineralogy of the Elles II K–T boundary section in Tunisia: indications for sea level fluctuations and primary productivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trace elements and stable isotopes in bulk rocks and foraminifera, bulk rock and clay mineral compositions, are used as palaeoproxies to evaluate sea level fluctuations, climatic changes and variations in primary productivity across the K–T transition at Elles II in Tunisia from 1 m (?33 kyr) below to 1 m (?70 kyr) above the K–T boundary. Results on clay minerals,

D Stüben; U Kramar; Z Berner; W Stinnesbeck; G Keller; T Adatte

2002-01-01

237

Can serial monitoring of serum Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Nitric Oxide (NO), and Angiotensin II (ANGII) levels have predictive role during Bevacizumab treatment?  

PubMed Central

Background Standard treatment of colorectal cancer includes both cytostatic chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Bevacizumab, targeting the VEGF receptor, is one of the primary targeted therapies that achieve better response rate and survival rate as compared to combination chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge, there is no established single marker that can be used as a predictive marker in bevacizumab therapy. Material/Methods We enrolled 24 patients with the diagnosis of metastatic colorectal cancer in our study. During the study, 2 blood samples were drawn from patients before the first cycle and after the sixth cycle of bevacizumab therapy. Serum levels of VEGF, ANG II, and NO were recorded. Results While the change across VEGF levels was found to be a statistically significant decreasing trend (p=0.009), this decrease was not found to be correlated with treatment response and hypertension development. Additionally, no statistically significant difference was found in terms of NO and ANG II levels. Conclusions This study showed a significant decrease in serum VEGF, but failed to show a significant change in NO and ANG II levels during bevacizumab treatment. Although no significant correlation was found between the presence of hypertension and markers, most patients (83%) had an increase in their blood pressure. Our results suggest that dynamic monitoring of NO and ANG II, along with VEGF, may not be useful as predictive markers for bevacizumab treatment in colorectal cancer. PMID:24632679

Sümbül, Ahmet Taner; Di?el, Umut; Sezgin, Nurzen; Sezer, Ahmet; Köse, Fatih; Be?en, Ali Ayberk; Sümbül, Zehra; Abal?, Hüseyin; Özy?lkan, Özgür

2014-01-01

238

Collinear Laser-Beam Ion-Beam Measurement of the Mean Lifetime of the Ar Ii 4p'2f-Degrees-7/2 Level  

E-print Network

The mean lifetime tau of the 4p'F-2(7/2)-degrees level of Ar II has been measured using a variant of the collinear laser-beam-fast-ion-beam spectroscopy technique. Our variant requires no mechanical motion or laser frequency tuning. The result...

Jin, J.; Church, David A.

1993-01-01

239

Follicular Development and Hormonal Levels Following Highly Purified or Recombinant Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Administration in Ovulatory Women and WHO Group II Anovulatory Infertile Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose:Our purpose was to compare ovarian performance and hormonal levels, after ovulation induction, in both normal ovulatory women undergoing intrauterine insemination (group 1) and World Health Organization (WHO) group II anovulatory infertile patients (group 2), using two different gonadotropin drugs.

Juan Balasch; Francisco Fábregues; Joana Peñarrubia; Montserrat Creus; Ricard Vidal; Roser Casamitjana; Dolors Manau; Juan A. Vanrell

1998-01-01

240

Block Lanczos density-matrix renormalization group method for general Anderson impurity models: Application to magnetic impurity problems in graphene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce a block Lanczos (BL) recursive technique to construct quasi-one-dimensional models, suitable for density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations, from single- as well as multiple-impurity Anderson models in any spatial dimensions. This new scheme, named BL-DMRG method, allows us to calculate not only local but also spatially dependent static and dynamical quantities of the ground state for general Anderson impurity models without losing elaborate geometrical information of the lattice. We show that the BL-DMRG method can be easily extended to treat a multiorbital Anderson impurity model where not only inter- and intraorbital Coulomb interactions but also Hund's coupling and pair hopping interactions are included. We also show that the symmetry adapted BL bases can be utilized, when it is appropriate, to reduce the computational cost. As a demonstration, we apply the BL-DMRG method to three different models for graphene with a structural defect and with a single hydrogen or fluorine absorbed, where a single Anderson impurity is coupled to conduction electrons in the honeycomb lattice. These models include (i) a single adatom on the honeycomb lattice, (ii) a substitutional impurity in the honeycomb lattice, and (iii) an effective model for a single carbon vacancy in graphene. Our analysis of the local dynamical magnetic susceptibility and the local density of states at the impurity site reveals that, for the particle-hole symmetric case at half-filling of electron density, the ground state of model (i) behaves as an isolated magnetic impurity with no Kondo screening, while the ground state of the other two models forms a spin-singlet state where the impurity moment is screened by the conduction electrons. We also calculate the real-space dependence of the spin-spin correlation functions between the impurity site and the conduction sites for these three models. Our results clearly show that, reflecting the presence or absence of unscreened magnetic moment at the impurity site, the spin-spin correlation functions decay as ? r-3, differently from the noninteracting limit (? r-2), for model (i) and as ? r-4, exactly the same as the noninteracting limit, for models (ii) and (iii) in the asymptotic r , where r is the distance between the impurity site and the conduction site. Finally, based on our results, we shed light on recent experiments on graphene where the formation of local magnetic moments as well as the Kondo-like behavior have been observed.

Shirakawa, Tomonori; Yunoki, Seiji

2014-11-01

241

Micro Level Data Analysis in Continuous Commissioning®: A Case Study  

E-print Network

" level data analysis to evaluate individual measures. This paper presents a case study of a CC project at Anderson High School in Austin, Texas. Measures for optimizing air and hydronic systems were implemented. Concurrently, building automation system...

Khan, S.; Bible, M.

2012-01-01

242

Highly sensitive determination of Cu(II) iron in ng/mL level in natural waters using Sulfochlorophenol S.  

PubMed

The highly sensitive complexation of Cu(II) with Sulfochlorophenol S (SCPS) at pH 4.03 was characterized by the spectral correction technique. This reaction was used to determine the Cu(II) content in various sources by the light-absorption ratio variation approach (LARVA). The limit of detection of Cu(II) was only 1.35 ng/mL, thus facilitating the direct monitoring of natural water. The Cu(II) contents in the Huangpu River, Yangtze River, and Taihu Lake of China were determined with satisfactory results, and the recovery rates of Cu(II) using SCPS were between 94.5 and 102.6 %. PMID:25647804

Zhao, Danhua; Zhang, Guoping

2015-03-01

243

Astronaut Clay Anderson Speaks With S.C. Students - Duration: 25:29.  

NASA Video Gallery

From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA astronaut Clay Anderson participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at Crayton Middle School, Columbia,...

244

Cranial location of level II lymph nodes in laryngeal cancer: Implications for elective nodal target volume delineation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the cranial distribution of level II lymph nodes in patients with laryngeal cancer to optimize the elective radiation nodal target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: The most cranially located metastatic lymph node was delineated in 67 diagnostic CT data sets. The minimum distance from the base of the skull (BOS) to the lymph node was determined. Results: A total of 98 lymph nodes were delineated including 62 ipsilateral and 36 contralateral lymph nodes. The mean ipsilateral and contralateral distance from the top of the most cranial metastatic lymph node to the BOS was 36 mm (range, -9-120; standard deviation [SD], 17.9) and 35 mm (range, 14-78; SD 15.0), respectively. Only 5% and 12% of the ipsilateral and 3% and 9% of the contralateral metastatic lymph nodes were located within 15 mm and 20 mm below the BOS, respectively. No significant differences were found between patients with only ipsilateral metastatic lymph nodes and patients with bilateral metastatic lymph nodes. Between tumors that do cross the midline and those that do not, no significant difference was found in the distance of the most cranial lymph node to the BOS and the occurrence ipsilateral or contralateral. Conclusions: Setting the cranial border of the nodal target volume 1.5 cm below the base of the skull covers 95% of the lymph nodes and should be considered in elective nodal irradiation for laryngeal cancer. Bilateral neck irradiation is mandatory, including patients with unilateral laryngeal cancer, when elective irradiation is advised.

Braam, Petra M. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: P.M.Braam@umcutrecht.nl; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Terhaard, Chris [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

2007-02-01

245

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 27 (ANDOTH00290027) on Town Highway 29, crossing Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank and downstream left bank and around the upstream left and right wingwalls. Type- 3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) is located along the base of the left abutment in the scour hole, at the end of the downstream left wingwall and along the upstream left bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.4 to 0.9 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge and the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 10.7 to 13.6 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives

Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

1997-01-01

246

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BRNATH00680035) on Town Highway 68, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

abutments with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment and downstream right wingwall during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure in place at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the left abutment and wingwalls except the downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 11.5 to 25.7 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled "Scour Results". Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives "excessively conservative estimates of scour depths" (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineerin

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

1996-01-01

247

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 45 (CHELTH00440045) on Town Highway 44, crossing first Branch White River, Chelsea, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

bridge consisting of one 27-foot clear-span concrete-encased steel beam deck superstructure (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 5 degrees. Both abutment footings were reported as exposed and the left abutment was reported to be undermined by 0.5 ft at the time of the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left abutment which was reported as failed. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.4 to 5.1 ft. with the worst-case occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 9.9 to 20.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly ass

Ayotte, Joseph D.; Hammond, Robert E.

1996-01-01

248

STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson suits up for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson smiles as he undergoes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

2002-01-01

249

STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment at SPACEHAB  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment during training at SPACEHAB. STS-107 is a research mission. The primary payload is the first flight of the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM). The experiments range from material sciences to life sciences (many rats). Also part of the payload is the Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research (FREESTAR) that incorporates eight high priority secondary attached shuttle experiments. STS-107 is scheduled to launch July 11, 2002

2002-01-01

250

STS-118 Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Clay Anderson Perform EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist Rick Mastracchio was anchored on the foot restraint of the Canadarm2 as he participated in the third session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. Assisting Mastracchio was Expedition 15 flight engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame). During the 5 hour, 28 minute space walk, the two relocated the S-band Antenna Sub-Assembly from the Port 6 (P6) truss to the Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1 and retrieved the P6 transponder.

2007-01-01

251

Transversal Anderson localization of sound in acoustic waveguide arrays.  

PubMed

We present designs of one-dimensional acoustic waveguide arrays and investigate wave propagation inside. Under the condition of single identical waveguide mode and weak coupling, the acoustic wave motion in waveguide arrays can be modeled with a discrete mode-coupling theory. The coupling constants can be retrieved from simulations or experiments as the function of neighboring waveguide separations. Sound injected into periodic arrays gives rise to the discrete diffraction, exhibiting ballistic or extended transport in transversal direction. But sound injected into randomized waveguide arrays readily leads to Anderson localization transversally. The experimental results show good agreement with simulations and theoretical predictions. PMID:25812602

Ye, Yangtao; Ke, Manzhu; Feng, Junheng; Wang, Mudi; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

2015-04-22

252

The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and a weak delocalization of the 5f-electrons. We calculate the Kondo and Curie temperatures and we can account for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of UTe.

Thomas, C.; Simões, A. S. R.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

2011-01-01

253

Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1996 Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This first annual report on DOE`s Price Anderson Amendments Act enforcement program covers the activities, accomplishments, and planning for calendar year 1996. It also includes the infrastructure development activities of 1995. It encompasses the activities of the headquarters` Office of Enforcement in the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) and Investigation and the coordinators and technical advisors in DOE`s Field and Program Offices and other EH Offices. This report includes an overview of the enforcement program; noncompliances, investigations, and enforcement actions; summary of significant enforcement actions; examples where enforcement action was deferred; and changes and improvements to the program.

NONE

1996-01-01

254

Strong coupling to two-dimensional Anderson localized modes.  

PubMed

We use a scattering formalism to derive a condition of strong coupling between a resonant scatterer and an Anderson localized mode for electromagnetic waves in two dimensions. The strong coupling regime is demonstrated based on exact numerical simulations, in perfect agreement with theory. The strong coupling threshold can be expressed in terms of the Thouless conductance and the Purcell factor. This connects key concepts in transport theory and cavity quantum electrodynamics, and provides a practical tool for the design or analysis of experiments. PMID:23952400

Cazé, A; Pierrat, R; Carminati, R

2013-08-01

255

Quantum Criticality of Quasi-One-Dimensional Topological Anderson Insulators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analytic theory of quantum criticality in the quasi-one-dimensional topological Anderson insulators of class AIII and BDI. We describe the systems in terms of two parameters (g, ?) representing localization and topological properties, respectively. Surfaces of half-integer valued ? define phase boundaries between distinct topological sectors. Upon increasing system size, the two parameters exhibit flow similar to the celebrated two-parameter flow describing the class A quantum Hall insulator. However, unlike the quantum Hall system, an exact analytical description of the entire phase diagram can be given. We check the quantitative validity of our theory by comparison to numerical transfer matrix computations.

Altland, Alexander; Bagrets, Dmitry; Fritz, Lars; Kamenev, Alex; Schmiedt, Hanno

2014-05-01

256

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BETHTH00190035) on Town Highway 19, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream wingwalls, left abutment, and upstream right road embankment; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is at the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 2.1 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 3.9 to 9.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic assessment, scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses, must be considered to properly assess the validity of abutment scour results. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein, based on the consideration of additional contributing factors and experienced engineering judgement.

Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

1996-01-01

257

Mercaptoacetamide-based class II HDAC inhibitor lowers A? levels and improves learning and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease  

PubMed Central

Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) alter gene expression epigenetically by interfering with the normal functions of HDAC. Given their ability to decrease A? levels, HDACIs area potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is unclear how HDACIs alter A? levels. We developed two novel HDAC inhibitors with improved pharmacological properties, such as a longer half-life and greater penetration of the blood-brain barrier: mercaptoacetamide-based class II HDACI (coded as W2) and hydroxamide-based class I and IIHDACI (coded as I2) and investigated how they affect A? levels and cognition. HDACI W2 decreased A?40 and A?42 in vitro. HDACI I2 also decreased A?40, but not A?42. We systematically examined the molecular mechanisms by which HDACIs W2 and I2 can decrease A? levels. HDACI W2 decreased gene expression of ?-secretase components and increased the A? degradation enzyme Mmp2. Similarly, HDACI I2 decreased expression of ?- and ?-secretase components and increased mRNA levels of A? degradation enzymes. HDACI W2 also significantly decreased A? levels and rescued learning and memory deficits in aged hAPP 3x Tg AD mice. Furthermore, we found that the novel HDACI W2 decreased tau phosphorylation at Thr181, an effect previously unknown for HDACIs. Collectively, these data suggest that class II HDACls may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:23063601

Sung, You Me; Lee, Taehee; Yoon, Hyejin; DiBattista, Amanda Marie; Song, JungMin; Sohn, Yoojin; Moffat, Emily Isabella; Turner, R. Scott; Jung, Mira; Kim, Jungsu; Hoe, Hyang-Sook

2013-01-01

258

77 FR 67057 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Anderson County, TN  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Transportation, Inc.--Discontinuance of Service Exemption--in Anderson County, TN CSX Transportation, Inc. (CSXT) filed a verified...milepost 0AE 256.0 at the end of the track in Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tenn. The line traverses United States Postal...

2012-11-08

259

Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Adam K. Anderson  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adam K. Anderson, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for his outstanding contribution to understanding the representation of emotion and its influence on cognition. By combining psychological and neuroscience techniques with rigorous and creative experimental designs, Anderson has…

American Psychologist, 2009

2009-01-01

260

How Large is Large? Estimating the Critical Disorder for the Anderson Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Complete localization is shown to hold for the d-dimensional Anderson model with uniformly distributed random potentials provided the disorder strength where satisfies with the self-avoiding walk connective constant for the lattice . Notably, is precisely the large disorder threshold proposed by Anderson in 1958.

Schenker, Jeffrey

2015-01-01

261

The Innovation Butterfly E.G. Anderson Jr. The Innovation Butterfly  

E-print Network

. Innovation is Complex Innovation process has "lifelike behavior," much like the weather ­It can be stableThe Innovation Butterfly E.G. Anderson Jr. The Innovation Butterfly: Managing Emergent Risks & Opportunities During Distributed Innovation Edward G. Anderson Jr. University of Texas McCombs School Nitin R

Ghosh, Joydeep

262

Low temperature behavior of the thermopower in disordered systems near the Anderson transition  

E-print Network

Low temperature behavior of the thermopower in disordered systems near the Anderson transition C investigate the behavior of the thermoelectric power S in disordered systems close to the Anderson­type metal In this paper, we study the low temperature behavior of the thermoelectric power S in disordered systems near

Chemnitz, Technische Universität

263

78 FR 41835 - Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...sold by the Superintendent of Documents. Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL...3150-AJ25 Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations...standard deferred premiums specified in the Price-Anderson Act for inflation at least...

2013-07-12

264

The MITLL/AFRL MT System Wade Shen, Brian Delaney, and Tim Anderson  

E-print Network

The MITLL/AFRL MT System Wade Shen, Brian Delaney, and Tim Anderson MIT Lincoln Laboratory 244. WrightPatterson AFB, OH 45433 Timothy.Anderson@wpafb.af.mil Abstract The MITLL/AFRL MT system for SpeechtoSpeech MT applications. This paper will discuss the architecture of the MITLL/AFRL MT

265

An assessment of global and regional sea level for years 1993-2007 in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We provide an assessment of sea level simulated in a suite of global ocean-sea ice models using the interannual CORE atmospheric state to determine surface ocean boundary buoyancy and momentum fluxes. These CORE-II simulations are compared amongst themselves as well as to observation-based estimates. We focus on the final 15 years of the simulations (1993-2007), as this is a period where the CORE-II atmospheric state is well sampled, and it allows us to compare sea level related fields to both satellite and in situ analyses. The ensemble mean of the CORE-II simulations broadly agree with various global and regional observation-based analyses during this period, though with the global mean thermosteric sea level rise biased low relative to observation-based analyses. The simulations reveal a positive trend in dynamic sea level in the west Pacific and negative trend in the east, with this trend arising from wind shifts and regional changes in upper 700 m ocean heat content. The models also exhibit a thermosteric sea level rise in the subpolar North Atlantic associated with a transition around 1995/1996 of the North Atlantic Oscillation to its negative phase, and the advection of warm subtropical waters into the subpolar gyre. Sea level trends are predominantly associated with steric trends, with thermosteric effects generally far larger than halosteric effects, except in the Arctic and North Atlantic. There is a general anti-correlation between thermosteric and halosteric effects for much of the World Ocean, associated with density compensated changes.

Griffies, Stephen M.; Yin, Jianjun; Durack, Paul J.; Goddard, Paul; Bates, Susan C.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus W.; Bozec, Alexandra; Chassignet, Eric; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Domingues, Catia M.; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Holland, David M.; Ilicak, Mehmet; Large, William G.; Lorbacher, Katja; Lu, Jianhua; Marsland, Simon J.; Mishra, Akhilesh; George Nurser, A. J.; Salas y Mélia, David; Palter, Jaime B.; Samuels, Bonita L.; Schröter, Jens; Schwarzkopf, Franziska U.; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Treguier, Anne Marie; Tseng, Yu-heng; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Winton, Michael; Zhang, Xuebin

2014-06-01

266

Dual landscapes in Anderson localization on discrete lattices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The localization subregions of stationary waves in continuous disordered media have been recently demonstrated to be governed by a hidden landscape that is the solution of a Dirichlet problem expressed with the wave operator. In this theory, the strength of Anderson localization confinement is determined by this landscape, and continuously decreases as the energy increases. However, this picture has to be changed in discrete lattices in which the eigenmodes close to the edge of the first Brillouin zone are as localized as the low energy ones. Here we show that in a 1D discrete lattice, the localization of low and high energy modes is governed by two different landscapes, the high energy landscape being the solution of a dual Dirichlet problem deduced from the low energy one using the symmetries of the Hamiltonian. We illustrate this feature using the one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian with random on-site potentials as a prototype model. Moreover we show that, besides unveiling the subregions of Anderson localization, these dual landscapes also provide an accurate overall estimate of the localization length over the energy spectrum, especially in the weak-disorder regime.

Lyra, M. L.; Mayboroda, S.; Filoche, M.

2015-02-01

267

Dual hidden landscapes in Anderson localization on discrete lattices  

E-print Network

The localization subregions of stationary waves in continuous disordered media have been recently demonstrated to be governed by a hidden landscape that is the solution of a Dirichlet problem expressed with the wave operator. In this theory, the strength of Anderson localization confinement is determined by this landscape, and continuously decreases as the energy increases. However, this picture has to be changed in discrete lattices in which the eigenmodes close to the edge of the first Brillouin zone are as localized as the low energy ones. Here we show that in a 1D discrete lattice, the localization of low and high energy modes is governed by two different landscapes, the high energy landscape being the solution of a dual Dirichlet problem deduced from the low energy one using the symmetries of the Hamiltonian. We illustrate this feature using the one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian with random on-site potentials as a prototype model. Moreover we show that, besides unveiling the subregions of Anderson localization, these dual landscapes also provide an accurate overal estimate of the localization length over the energy spectrum, especially in the weak disorder regime.

Marcelo Leite Lyra; Svitlana Mayboroda; Marcel Filoche

2014-10-09

268

Combined Linkage and Association Studies Show that HLA Class II Variants Control Levels of Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens  

PubMed Central

Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA) or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p?=?5×10–5 for rs9268403). The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p?=?0.02). In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL. PMID:25025336

Cobat, Aurélie; Guergnon, Julien; Brice, Pauline; Fermé, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Pendeven, Catherine Le-; Amiel, Corinne; Taoufik, Yassine; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Theodorou, Ioannis; Besson, Caroline; Abel, Laurent

2014-01-01

269

MHC class II deletion mutant expresses normal levels of transgene encoded class II molecules that have abnormal conformation and impaired antigen presentation ability.  

PubMed

Successive transfers of HLA-DR alpha and beta genes restored expression of HLA-DR antigens to human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, LCL .174, from which all known expressible class II genes are deleted. While transferent cells displayed large amounts of DR on their surfaces, transgene-encoded DR3 molecules lacked a conformation-dependent epitope. DR1-restricted CTL lysis of DR1-expressing transferents pulsed with native influenza virus proteins was greatly reduced; the same cells were efficiently lysed in the presence of CTL-recognized influenza peptides. The properties of DR-expressing transferents of .174 suggest they are defective in producing peptides from exogenous proteins or in forming DR/peptide complexes. Comparison with other DR-expressing deletion mutants indicates that at least one gene in an approximately 230 kb DNA segment between the DQ1 and Ring 7 loci is needed for normal DR-mediated processing and presentation. Production of DR3 molecules having the conformation-dependent 16.23 epitope and efficient DR1-restricted presentation of influenza viral epitopes occurred in a B cell line that has a mutation specifically eliminating expression of the TAP1 transporter gene, which is in the approximately 230 kb interval and is needed for production of HLA class I/peptide complexes. PMID:1634767

Ceman, S; Rudersdorf, R; Long, E O; Demars, R

1992-08-01

270

MAE 155B (4 units) Engineering Design II  

E-print Network

MAE 155B (4 units) Engineering Design II Class/Laboratory Schedule: four hours of lecture, three hours of lab, five hours outside preparation. 12 hours/week total Course Coordinator(s): Mark Anderson, manufacturability, reporting, and professionalism. Team design projects (initiated in MAE 155A) of an integrated

Wang, Deli

271

Elevated testosterone levels during rat pregnancy cause hypersensitivity to angiotensin II and attenuation of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in uterine arteries.  

PubMed

Elevated testosterone levels increase maternal blood pressure and decrease uterine blood flow in pregnancy, resulting in abnormal perinatal outcomes. We tested whether elevated testosterone alters uterine artery adaptations during pregnancy, and whether these alterations depend on endothelium-derived factors such as nitric oxide, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, and prostacyclin, or endothelium-independent mechanisms such as angiotensin II (Ang-II). Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with vehicle (n=20) or testosterone propionate (0.5 mg/kg per day from gestation day 15 to 19; n=20). Plasma testosterone levels increased 2-fold in testosterone-injected rats compared with controls. Elevated testosterone significantly decreased placental and pup weights compared with controls. In endothelium-intact uterine arteries, contractile responses to thromboxane, phenylephrine, and Ang-II were greater in testosterone-treated rats compared with controls. In endothelium-denuded arteries, contractile responses to Ang-II (pD2=9.1±0.04 versus 8.7±0.04 in controls; P<0.05), but not thromboxane and phenylephrine, were greater in testosterone-treated rats. Ang-II type 1b receptor expression was increased, whereas Ang-II type 2 receptor was decreased in testosterone-exposed arteries. In endothelium-denuded arteries, relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were unaffected. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was significantly lower in arteries from testosterone-treated dams (Emax=51.80±6.9% versus 91.98±1.4% in controls; P<0.05). The assessment of endothelial factors showed that nitric oxide-, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-, and prostacyclin-mediated relaxations were blunted in testosterone-treated dams. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase, small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel-3, and prostacyclin receptor expressions were significantly decreased in arteries from testosterone-treated dams. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1?, Ankrd37, and Egln were significantly increased in testosterone-exposed placentas. These results suggest that elevated maternal testosterone impairs uterine vascular function, which may lead to an increased vascular resistance and a decrease in uterine blood flow. PMID:24842922

Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; Blesson, Chellakkan S; Vincent, Kathleen L; Saade, George R; Hankins, Gary D; Yallampalli, Chandra; Sathishkumar, Kunju

2014-08-01

272

Universal Knight shift anomaly in the periodic Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a determinant Quantum Monte Carlo investigation which quantifies the behavior of the susceptibility and the entropy in the framework of the periodic Anderson model, focusing on the evolution with different degree of conduction electron (c )-local moment (f ) hybridization. These results capture the behavior observed in several experiments, including the universal behavior of the NMR Knight shift anomaly below the crossover temperature T*. We find that T* is a measure of the onset of c - f correlations and grows with increasing hybridization. These results suggest that the NMR Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements in non-Fermi-liquid materials are strongly influenced by the temperature dependence of the c - f kinetic energy. Our results provide a microscopic basis for the phenomenological two-fluid model of Kondo lattice behavior, and its evolution with pressure and temperature.

Jiang, M.; Curro, N. J.; Scalettar, R. T.

2014-12-01

273

Photon transport enhanced by transverse Anderson localization in disordered superlattices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Controlling the flow of light at subwavelength scales provides access to functionalities such as negative or zero index of refraction, transformation optics, cloaking, metamaterials and slow light, but diffraction effects severely restrict our ability to control light on such scales. Here we report the photon transport and collimation enhanced by transverse Anderson localization in chip-scale dispersion-engineered anisotropic media. We demonstrate a photonic crystal superlattice structure in which diffraction is nearly completely arrested by cascaded resonant tunnelling through transverse guided resonances. By modifying the geometry of more than 4,000 scatterers in the superlattices we add structural disorder controllably and uncover the mechanism of disorder-induced transverse localization. Arrested spatial divergence is captured in the power-law scaling, along with exponential asymmetric mode profiles and enhanced collimation bandwidths for increasing disorder. With increasing disorder, we observe the crossover from cascaded guided resonances into the transverse localization regime, beyond both the ballistic and diffusive transport of photons.

Hsieh, P.; Chung, C.; McMillan, J. F.; Tsai, M.; Lu, M.; Panoiu, N. C.; Wong, C. W.

2015-03-01

274

Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities in the Department of Energy's Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Enforcement Program in calendar year 1997 and highlights improvements planned for 1998. The DOE Enforcement Program involves the Office of Enforcement and Investigation in the DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health, as well as numerous PAAA Coordinators and technical advisors in DOE Field and Program Offices. The DOE Enforcement Program issued 13 Notices of Violation (NOV`s) in 1997 for cases involving significant or potentially significant nuclear safety violations. Six of these included civil penalties totaling $440,000. Highlights of these actions include: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory Radiological Control Violations / Associated Universities, Inc.; (2) Bioassay Program Violations at Mound / EG and G, Inc.; (3) Savannah River Crane Operator Uptake / Westinghouse Savannah River Company; (4) Waste Calciner Worker Uptake / Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company; and (5) Reactor Scram and Records Destruction at Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin).

NONE

1998-01-01

275

Multifractality and electron-electron interaction at Anderson transitions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mesoscopic fluctuations and correlations of the local density of states are studied near metal-insulator transitions in disordered interacting electronic systems. We show that the multifractal behavior of the local density of states survives in the presence of Coulomb interaction. We calculate the spectrum of multifractal exponents in 2 +? spatial dimensions for symmetry classes characterized by broken (partially or fully) spin-rotation invariance and show that it differs from that in the absence of interaction. We also estimate the multifractal exponents at the Anderson metal-insulator transition in 2D systems with preserved spin-rotation invariance. Our results for multifractal correlations of the local density of states are in qualitative agreement with recent experimental findings.

Burmistrov, I. S.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

2015-02-01

276

Topology versus Anderson localization: Nonperturbative solutions in one dimension  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analytic theory of quantum criticality in quasi-one-dimensional topological Anderson insulators. We describe these systems in terms of two parameters (g ,? ) representing localization and topological properties, respectively. Certain critical values of ? (half-integer for Z classes, or zero for Z2 classes) define phase boundaries between distinct topological sectors. Upon increasing system size, the two parameters exhibit flow similar to the celebrated two-parameter flow of the integer quantum Hall insulator. However, unlike the quantum Hall system, an exact analytical description of the entire phase diagram can be given in terms of the transfer-matrix solution of corresponding supersymmetric nonlinear sigma models. In Z2 classes we uncover a hidden supersymmetry, present at the quantum critical point.

Altland, Alexander; Bagrets, Dmitry; Kamenev, Alex

2015-02-01

277

Melissa L. Anderson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.  

PubMed

Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association/American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. The 2012 winner is Melissa L. Anderson for her ongoing commitment to understanding, treating, and preventing domestic violence in Deaf women and underserved populations in general. Anderson is passionate in her efforts to study the factors underlying violence toward women and in applying psychological science to intervene in and prevent such abuse. She is dedicated to improving the quality of life and well-being of underserved women and ensuring that services and programs become accessible to them. Anderson's Award citation is also presented. PMID:23163470

2012-11-01

278

March 17 - 19, 2004: Low-level processing of proteomics spectra, Kevin Coombes  

Cancer.gov

Low-level processing of proteomics spectra Kevin Coombes Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics UT M.D.Anderson Cancer Center Overview z Background and motivation z Description of data set for methodology development and testing z Wavelet

279

Polymorphism in the tumour necrosis factor receptor II gene is associated with circulating levels of soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors in rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Levels of soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors (sTNFRs) are elevated in the circulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although these receptors can act as natural inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor-?, levels of sTNFRs in RA appear to be insufficient to prevent tumour necrosis factor-? induced inflammation. The factors that regulate circulating levels of sTNFRs are unclear, but polymorphisms in the tumour necrosis factor receptor genes may play a role. We investigated the relationship between polymorphisms in the tumour necrosis factor receptor I (TNF-RI) and II (TNF-RII) genes and levels of sTNFRs in two groups of Caucasian RA patients: one with early (disease duration ?2 years; n = 103) and one with established disease (disease duration ?5 years; n = 151). PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to genotype patients for the A36G polymorphism in the TNF-RI gene and the T676G polymorphism in TNF-RII. Levels of sTNFRs were measured using ELISA. We also isolated T cells from peripheral blood of 58 patients with established RA with known TNF-R genotypes, and release of sTNFRs into the culture medium was measured in cells incubated with or without phytohaemagglutinin. Serum levels of the two sTNFRs (sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII) were positively correlated in both populations, and the level of each sTNFR was significantly higher in the patients with established disease (P < 0.0001). Multiple regression analyses corrected for age, sex and disease duration revealed a significant trend toward decreasing sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII levels across the TNF-RII genotypes (TT > TG > GG) of patients with established disease (P for trend = 0.01 and P for trend = 0.03, respectively). A similar nonsignificant trend was seen for early disease. No relationship with the TNF-RI A36G polymorphism was observed. sTNFRs released by isolated T cells exhibited a similar trend toward decreasing levels according to TNF-RII genotype, although only the association with levels of sTNF-RII was significant. Strong correlations were found between levels of circulating sTNFRs and levels released by T cells in vitro. Our data indicate that the T676G polymorphism in TNF-RII is associated with levels of sTNFRs released from peripheral blood T cells, and with circulating levels of sTNFR in patients with RA. PMID:16277675

Glossop, John R; Dawes, Peter T; Nixon, Nicola B; Mattey, Derek L

2005-01-01

280

Health assessment for Anderson Development Company, Adrian, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID002931228. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Anderson Development Company (ADC) site has been placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). From approximately 1968 to 1979 ADC manufactured 4,4'-methylene-bis(2-chloroaniline) (MBOCA), also known under the trademark names of MOCA and Curene 422. In 1978 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommended that MBOCA be regulated as a human carcinogen. Discharges of waste waters and air emissions from ADC during the production of MBOCA eventually caused contamination in company lagoons, sludges, and effluents; in municipal sewer influent, effluent, and sludges; in surface-water drains and the Raisin River; and in soil, street sweepings, and residences within a 1-mile radius of the plant. In 1979 and 1980, detectable levels of MBOCA were found in urine specimens collected from ADC and user-plant employees and members of their families. MBOCA may have been carried out of the manufacturing plant on the shoes and clothing of the employees and deposited in their residence. Detectable concentrations of MBOCA were also found in urine specimens of some children living near the site. Because the documented contamination created a continuing potential for environment and human exposure, comprehensive remedial measures were implemented during 1980 and 1981. The site is of potential public health concern because a risk to human health may exist from possible exposure to a hazardous substance at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time; human exposure to MBOCA has occurred/may be still occurring via contaminated soil and garden sources of food.

Not Available

1989-03-10

281

Angiotensin II receptor blockers decreased blood glucose levels: a longitudinal survey using data from electronic medical records  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: A beneficial effect on glucose metabolism is reported with angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) treatment of hypertension. The effect on blood glucose level during the course of treatment with ARBs in clinical cases is uncertain. Our objectives were to survey the changes in glucose and HbA1c levels in patients with hypertension over a one-year period, and to study the correlations

Noboru Kitamura; Yasuo Takahashi; Shuukoh Yamadate; Satoshi Asai

2007-01-01

282

M.D. Anderson scientists identify a specialized regulatory T cell that stifles antibody production centers:  

Cancer.gov

A regulatory T cell that expresses three specific genes shuts down the mass production of antibodies launched by the immune system to attack invaders, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported...

283

MD Anderson studies find proton therapy treatment preserves quality of life for men with prostate cancer  

Cancer.gov

Two studies led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found that proton therapy preserves the quality of life, specifically urinary and bowel function, in men treated with this targeted radiation modality for prostate cancer.

284

What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider? Edward Anderson , Tim Coltman*  

E-print Network

1 What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider? Edward Anderson , Tim Coltman of Economics and Business, University of Sydney, Australia Tim Coltman, Associate Professor, University Byron Keating, Associate Professor, University of Canberra, Australia *Corresponding author: Tim Coltman

Coltman, Tim

285

Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson - Duration: 2 minutes, 45 seconds.  

NASA Video Gallery

When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

286

Multipactor experiment on a dielectric surface R. B. Anderson, W. D. Getty,a)  

E-print Network

Multipactor experiment on a dielectric surface R. B. Anderson, W. D. Getty,a) M. L. Brake, Y. Y of excessive noise in communication sat- ellites, detuning of resonant cavities, and increased outgas- sing

Valfells, Ágúst

287

MD Anderson researchers find that cancer cells adapt energy needs to spread illness to other organs  

Cancer.gov

Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found that cancer cells traveling to other sites have different energy needs from their “stay-at-home” siblings which continue to proliferate at the original tumor site.

288

A guide to source materials of the life and work of Lawrence B. Anderson '30  

E-print Network

From 1933 to 1976, Professor Lawrence B. Anderson taught in the MIT Department of Architecture, and from 1947 to 1971, he served as its chairman and dean. Concurrently, from 1937 to 1972 , he was principal partner in the ...

Laguette, Victoria, 1953-

1998-01-01

289

MD Anderson study finds fetal exposure to radiation increases risk of testicular cancer  

Cancer.gov

Male fetuses of mothers that are exposed to radiation during early pregnancy may have an increased chance of developing testicular cancer, according to a study in mice at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

290

MD Anderson study finds biologic therapies for rheumatoid arthritis not associated with increased cancer risk  

Cancer.gov

Biologic therapies developed in the last decade for rheumatoid arthritis are not associated with an increased risk of cancer when compared with traditional treatments for the condition, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

291

MD Anderson researchers find that drug combination acts against aggressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

Cancer.gov

A two-prong approach combining ibrutinib and rituximab (Rituxin) to treat aggressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) produced responses with minor side effects in a Phase 2 clinical trial at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

292

MD Anderson researchers discover gene that might predict aggressive prostate cancer at diagnosis  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified a biomarker living next door to the KLK3 gene that could predict which GS7 prostate cancer patients will have a more aggressive form of cancer.

293

Characterization of the Anderson metal-insulator transition for non ergodic operators and application  

E-print Network

We study the Anderson metal-insulator transition for non ergodic random Schr\\"odinger operators in both annealed and quenched regimes, based on a dynamical approach of localization, improving known results for ergodic operators into this more general setting. In the procedure, we reformulate the Bootstrap Multiscale Analysis of Germinet and Klein to fit the non ergodic setting. We obtain uniform Wegner Estimates needed to perform this adapted Multiscale Analysis in the case of Delone-Anderson type potentials, that is, Anderson potentials modeling aperiodic solids, where the impurities lie on a Delone set rather than a lattice, yielding a break of ergodicity. As an application we study the Landau operator with a Delone-Anderson potential and show the existence of a mobility edge between regions of dynamical localization and dynamical delocalization.

Constanza Rojas-Molina

2011-10-31

294

75 FR 34170 - Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...TA-W-73,230; TA-W-73,230A] Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Troy...March 18, 2010, applicable to workers of Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC,...

2010-06-16

295

Efficient red organic electroluminescent devices by doping platinum(II) Schiff base emitter into two host materials with stepwise energy levels.  

PubMed

In this work, organic electroluminescent (EL) devices with double light-emitting layers (EMLs) having stepwise energy levels were designed to improve the EL performance of a red-light-emitting platinum(II) Schiff base complex. A series of devices with single or double EML(s) were fabricated and characterized. Compared with single-EML devices, double-EML devices showed improved EL efficiency and brightness, attributed to better balance in carriers. In addition, the stepwise distribution in energy levels of host materials is instrumental in broadening the recombination zone, thus delaying the roll-off of EL efficiency. The highest EL current efficiency and power efficiency of 17.36 cd/A and 14.73 lm/W, respectively, were achieved with the optimized double-EML devices. At high brightness of 1000 cd/m², EL efficiency as high as 8.89 cd/A was retained. PMID:23939052

Zhou, Liang; Kwok, Chi-Chung; Cheng, Gang; Zhang, Hongjie; Che, Chi-Ming

2013-07-15

296

On fluctuations and localization length for the Anderson model on a strip  

E-print Network

We consider the Anderson model on a strip. Assuming that potentials have bounded density with considerable tails we get a lower bound for the fluctuations of the logarithm of the Green's function in a finite box. This implies an effective estimate by $ \\exp(CW^2) $ for the localization length of the Anderson model on the strip of width $ W $. The results are obtained, actually, for a more general model with a non-local operator in the vertical direction.

Ilia Binder; Michael Goldstein; Mircea Voda

2014-05-04

297

Adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer approach to inverse Ising problems with quenched random fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer equation is derived for inverse Ising problems in the presence of quenched random fields. We test the proposed scheme on Sherrington-Kirkpatrick, Hopfield, and random orthogonal models and find that the adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer approach allows accurate inference of quenched random fields whose distribution can be either Gaussian or bimodal. In particular, another competitive method for inferring external fields, namely, the naive mean field method with diagonal weights, is compared and discussed.

Huang, Haiping; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

2013-06-01

298

Respiratory health associated with exposure to automobile exhaust. II. Personal NO2 exposure levels according to distance from the roadside.  

PubMed

We have conducted several studies to investigate the effect of automobile exhaust on respiratory symptoms. This study was designed to explore differences in personal exposure levels among residents of zones located varying distances from trunk roads with heavy traffic in Tokyo. Personal nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentration levels for residents and NO2 concentrations inside and outside the residences of each study participant were measured during ten seasons over three years. Three residential zones were determined as follows: Zone A was 0-20 m from the roadside; Zone B was 20-150 m; and Zone C, a reference zone, was a residential district in a suburban area. Approximately fifty residents were selected as the subjects of NO2 measurements. Study participants were female, between 40 and 60 years of age, and nonsmokers. All participants used gas cooking stoves with electric ignition. Outdoor NO2 concentrations in Zone A were always the greatest among the three zones during the study periods, and those in Zone C were consistently the lowest. Personal exposure levels in Zone A were generally higher than those in the other zones, and concentrations in Zone C were the lowest during seasons when no indoor heating was used. The highest mean values for personal exposure levels in Zones A, B, and C were 63.4, 61.0, and 55.3 ppb, respectively. In analyses in which participants were stratified by heater type, the mean personal exposure levels in Zone A were the highest and the levels in Zone C were the lowest for participants without unvented heaters; differences of NO2 levels between Zones A and C ranged from 10.0 to 23.9 ppb. When there were no indoor NO2 sources except gas cooking stoves, both indoor and personal levels of NO2 were attributable primarily to motor vehicle exhaust. In contrast, the use of unvented heaters during the heating seasons could cause NO2 exposures comparable to those attributable to motor vehicles. PMID:7492902

Nakai, S; Nitta, H; Maeda, K

1995-01-01

299

Cardiovascular risk factors levels and their relationships with overweight and fat distribution in children. The Fleurbaix Laventie Ville Sant II  

E-print Network

of four skinfold thicknesses. Results: High plasma triglycerides, high insulin concentration and low children were excluded, overweight children already had high triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol levels at least two risk factors among high blood pressure, high plasma triglycerides or glucose, and low HDL

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

300

The National Council for Geographic Education Competency-Based Geography Test. Secondary Level. Form I. Parts I, II, and III.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 3-part test measures the geography knowledge, skills, and understanding of secondary level students. Part 1, map skills and location, contains 20 questions involving the use of three maps: an imaginary sketch map, a contour map, and a political map of the world. Part 2 consists of 20 questions covering physical geography. Students analyze…

Kurfman, Dana G.; And Others

301

Competency-Based Adult Education Classroom Management Guide for Adult Basic Education Curriculum (Level II, 5-8).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Competency-Based Adult Basic Education (CBABE) Classroom Management Guide was developed to aid the Adult Basic Education (ABE) facilitator in implementing a model CBABE Level 5-8 curriculum. First, introductory material provides background on the CBABE project at Brevard Community College (Florida) and the rationale for the development of the…

Singer, Elizabeth

302

DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT TOXICITY: II. COMPARISON OF GENERIC BENCHMARK DOSE ESTIMATES WITH NO OBSERVED ADVERSE EFFECT LEVELS  

EPA Science Inventory

Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses (RfDDTS) or reference concentrations (RfCDTS) based on the use of no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELS) divided by uncertainty factors (UFs)The benchmark dose (BUD) has been proposed...

303

Phobic anxiety in 11 nations: part II. Hofstede’s dimensions of national cultures predict national-level variations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hofstede’s dimensions of national cultures termed Masculinity–Femininity (MAS) and Uncertainty Avoidance (UAI) (Hofstede, 2001) are proposed to be of relevance for understanding national-level differences in self-assessed fears. The potential predictive role of national MAS was based on the classical work of Fodor (Fodor, 1974). Following Fodor, it was predicted that masculine (or tough) societies in which clearer differentiations are made

W. A. Arrindell; Martin Eisemann; Tian P. S. Oei; Vicente E. Caballo; Ezio Sanavio; Claudio Sica; Nuri Bagés; Lya Feldman; Bárbara Torres; Saburo Iwawaki; Chryse Hatzichristou; Josefina Castro; Gloria Canalda; Adrian Furnham; Jan van der Ende

2004-01-01

304

Conductance noise in interacting Anderson insulators driven far from equilibrium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The combination of strong disorder and many-body interactions in Anderson insulators leads to a variety of intriguing nonequilibrium transport phenomena. These include slow relaxation and a variety of memory effects characteristic of glasses. Here we show that when such systems are driven with sufficiently high current and in a liquid-helium bath, a peculiar type of conductance noise can be observed. This noise appears in the conductance versus time traces as downward-going spikes. The characteristic features of the spikes (such as typical width) and the threshold current at which they appear are controlled by the sample parameters. We show that this phenomenon is peculiar to hopping transport and does not exist in the diffusive regime. Observation of conductance spikes hinges also on the sample being in direct contact with the normal phase of liquid helium; when this is not the case, the noise exhibits the usual 1/f characteristics independent of the current drive. A model based on the percolative nature of hopping conductance explains why the onset of the effect is controlled by the current density. It also predicts the dependence on disorder as confirmed by our experiments. To account for the role of the bath, the hopping transport model is augmented by a heuristic assumption involving nucleation of cavities in the liquid helium in which the sample is immersed. The suggested scenario is analogous to the way high-energy particles are detected in a Glaser’s bubble chamber.

Orlyanchik, V.; Ovadyahu, Z.

2005-07-01

305

Parabolic Anderson model with a finite number of moving catalysts  

E-print Network

We consider the parabolic Anderson model (PAM) which is given by the equation $\\partial u/\\partial t = \\kappa\\Delta u + \\xi u$ with $u\\colon\\, \\Z^d\\times [0,\\infty)\\to \\R$, where $\\kappa \\in [0,\\infty)$ is the diffusion constant, $\\Delta$ is the discrete Laplacian, and $\\xi\\colon\\,\\Z^d\\times [0,\\infty)\\to\\R$ is a space-time random environment that drives the equation. The solution of this equation describes the evolution of a ``reactant'' $u$ under the influence of a ``catalyst'' $\\xi$. In the present paper we focus on the case where $\\xi$ is a system of $n$ independent simple random walks each with step rate $2d\\rho$ and starting from the origin. We study the \\emph{annealed} Lyapunov exponents, i.e., the exponential growth rates of the successive moments of $u$ w.r.t.\\ $\\xi$ and show that these exponents, as a function of the diffusion constant $\\kappa$ and the rate constant $\\rho$, behave differently depending on the dimension $d$. In particular, we give a description of the intermittent behavior of the sys...

Castell, Fabienne; Maillard, Grégory

2010-01-01

306

Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities  

SciTech Connect

We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude W{sub c}, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, W{sub c} is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

Jung, Daniel [School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH, Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen, Germany and Division of Advanced Materials Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kettemann, Stefan [School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH,Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen, Germany and Division of Advanced Materials Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-08-20

307

Application of the S=1 underscreened Anderson lattice model to Kondo uranium and neptunium compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing the coexistence of the Kondo screening effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the Anderson lattice Hamiltonian with a two-fold degenerate f level in each site, corresponding to 5f2 electronic configuration with S=1 spins. A derivation of the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation is presented and the resulting Hamiltonian has an effective f-band term, in addition to the regular exchange Kondo interaction between the S=1 f spins and the s=1/2 spins of the conduction electrons. The resulting effective Kondo lattice model can describe both the Kondo regime and a weak delocalization of the 5f electrons. Within this model we compute the Kondo and Curie temperatures as a function of model parameters, namely the Kondo exchange interaction constant JK, the magnetic intersite exchange interaction JH, and the effective f bandwidth. We deduce, therefore, a phase diagram of the model which yields the coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and also accounts for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of uranium compounds such as UTe.

Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

2011-01-01

308

SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

2014-06-01

309

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 3 (EASTTH00010003) on Town Highway 1, crossing the East Branch Passumpsic River, East Haven, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure EASTTH00010003 on Town Highway 1 crossing the East Branch Passumpsic River, East Haven, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 50.4-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream is forest. On the remaining three banks the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the East Branch Passumpsic River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 61.5 mm (0.187 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 14, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the East Branch Passumpsic River is a 89-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 87-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 17, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 84.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with sloped stone fill in front that creates a spill through embankment. The channel is skewed approximately zero degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is also zero degrees. Channel scour 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed to the left of the center of the channel under the bridge during the Level I assessment. The scour countermeasures at the site are type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the downstream left bank and type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) in front of the abutments creating spill through slopes. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0 to 1.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.4 to 11.7 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others,

Burns, Ronda L.; Boehmler, Erick M.

1997-01-01

310

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (RIPTTH00110016) on Town Highway 11, crossing the Middle Branch Middlebury River, Ripton, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure RIPTTH00110016 on Town Highway 11 crossing the Middle Branch Middlebury River, Ripton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 6.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of shrubs, brush and trees except for the upstream left bank which is completely forested. In the study area, the Middle Branch Middlebury River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 68 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 97.6 mm (0.320 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 11, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 11 crossing of the Middle Branch Middlebury River is a 44-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 42-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 15, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 40.2 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening. The opening-skew-to-roadway value from the VTAOT database is 20 degrees while 30 degrees was computed from surveyed points. A scour hole, 3 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth, was observed along the left abutment and upstream left wingwall during the Level I assessment. In addition, 1 ft of channel scour was observed just downstream of the downstream left wingwall along the left bank. Scour countermeasures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left and right banks and along the upstream end of the downstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 0.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 7.2 to 8.6 ft along the right abutment and from 11.7 to 13.7 ft along the left abutment. The worstcase abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equat

Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

311

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30 (NEWHTH00050030) on Town Highway 5, crossing the New Haven River, New Haven, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NEWHTH00050030 on Town Highway 5 crossing the New Haven River, New Haven, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (Federal Highway Administration, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Champlain section of the St. Lawrence Valley physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 115-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the right bank upstream and downstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The upstream left bank is also pasture. The downstream left bank is forested. In the study area, the New Haven River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 127 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from silt to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 20.4 mm (0.067 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 19, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The stream bends through the bridge and impacts the left bank where there is a cut bank and scour hole. The Town Highway 5 crossing of the New Haven River is a 181-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of four 45-ft concrete tee-beam spans (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 15, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 175.9 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with stone fill spill-through embankments and three concrete piers. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 4.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream left bank during the Level I assessment. Also observed was a scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth at the upstream end of the middle pier. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) in front of the left and right abutments creating spill through slopes. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and Davis, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.7 to 2.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 6.8 to 8.4 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 11.2 to 14.0 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Pier scour ranged from 12.9 to 19.3 ft. The worst-case pier scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are

Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

1998-01-01

312

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (REDSTH00360025) on Town Highway 36, crossing the West Branch Deerfield River, Readsboro, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure REDSTH00360025 on Town Highway 36 crossing the West Branch Deerfield River, Readsboro, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 14.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the upstream right bank and forest on the upstream left bank. The surface cover on the downstream right and left banks is primarily grass, shrubs and brush. In the study area, the West Branch Deerfield River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 65 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders, with a median grain size (D50) of 117 mm (0.383 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 1, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 36 crossing of the West Branch Deerfield River is a 59-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 57-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, September 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 54 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. During the Level I assessment, a scour hole approximately 2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right wingwall and a scour hole approximately 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the downstream left wingwall. The scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the downstream end of the downstream left wingwall, at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall, at the downstream end of the right abutment, along the entire base length of the downstream right wingwall, along the upstream right bank and along the downstream left bank. A stone wall was noted along the upstream left bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.6 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 15.1 to 16.3 ft along the left abutment and from 7.4 to 9.2 ft along the right abutment. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping and 500-year discharges for the left abutment and at the 500-year discharge for the right abutment. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on t

Flynn, Robert H.; Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

313

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 17 (RIPTTH00180017) on Town Highway 18, crossing the South Branch Middlebury River, Ripton, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure RIPTTH00180017 on Town Highway 18 crossing the South Branch Middlebury River, Ripton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 15.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the upstream left bank where it is shrubs and brush. In the study area, the South Branch Middlebury River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 86 ft and an average bank height of 10 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 111 mm (0.364 ft). In addition, there is a bedrock outcrop across the channel downstream of the bridge. The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 10, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 18 crossing of the South Branch Middlebury River is a 61-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 58-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 56.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 30. A scour hole 1.25 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment and the downstream right wingwall during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site include type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the left abutment and it’s wingwalls and at the upstream end of the right abutment. Also, type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) is along the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 1.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 5.6 to 9.0 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted

Burns, Ronda L.; Medalie, Laura

1997-01-01

314

Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part II: Transport and Diffusion of Tracer under Stable Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Differences in nighttime transport and diffusion of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer in an urban complex-terrain setting (Salt Lake City, Utah) are investigated using surface and Doppler lidar wind data and large-scale surface pressure differences. Interacting scales of motion, as studied through the URBAN 2000 field program combined with the Vertical Transport and Mixing (VTMX) experiment, explained the differences in the tracer behavior during three separate intensive operating periods. With an emphasis on nighttime stable boundary layer conditions, these field programs were designed to study flow features responsible for the nighttime transport of airborne substances. This transport has implications for air quality, homeland security, and emergency response if the airborne substances are hazardous. The important flow features investigated included thermally forced canyon and slope flows and a low-level jet (LLJ) that dominated the basin-scale winds when the surface pressure gradient was weak. The presence of thermally forced flows contributed to the complexity and hindered the predictability of the tracer motion within and beyond the city. When organized thermally forced flows were present, the tracer tended to stay closer to the city for longer periods of time, even though a strong basin-scale LLJ did develop. When thermally forced flows were short lived or absent, the basin-scale low-level jet dominated the wind field and enhanced the transport of tracer material out of the city.

Darby, Lisa S.; Allwine, K. Jerry; Banta, Robert M.

2006-05-01

315

Plant Desiccation and Protein Synthesis: II. On the Relationship between Endogenous Adenosine Triphosphate Levels and Protein-synthesizing Capacity.  

PubMed

Rehydration of Tortula ruralis in 2,4-dinitrophenol inhibits protein synthesis, polysome formation, and ATP production. Polysomes are conserved intact and are active in vitro in hydrated Tortula placed in this chemical, although in vivo protein synthesis is inhibited. Hydrated moss placed under nitrogen in the dark shows a reduced capacity for ATP and protein synthesis, but polysomes are conserved. During anaerobiosis in light, ATP and protein synthesis are unaffected. Rehydration of slow-dried Tortula in nitrogen in the dark results in reduced in vivo protein synthesis, but not polysome formation; this reduction is much less in the light. Slow-dried moss, but not fast-dried, has a greatly reduced ATP content in the dry state, but this rapidly returns to normal levels on rehydration. The prolonged burst in respiration observed previously on rehydration of Tortula is not paralleled by ATP accumulation. Changes in energy charge in all treatments tested follow the changes in ATP. The aquatic moss, Hygrohypnum luridum, which is intolerant to drought, loses ATP during fast drying and this is not replenished on subsequent rehydration.We consider that the relationship between levels of ATP and protein synthesis is more meaningful during rehydration of mosses (the time when repair to desiccation-induced cellular damage can occur) than during desiccation, and that drought-induced cessation of protein synthesis may not be mediated directly through ATP availability. PMID:16659221

Bewley, J D; Gwó?d?, E A

1975-06-01

316

A novel magnetic ion imprinted nano-polymer for selective separation and determination of low levels of mercury(II) ions in fish samples.  

PubMed

In this work a novel ion imprinted polymer (IIP) based on N-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethenamine (V-Pic) was coated on Fe3O4 nano-particles and characterized by thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), IR spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and also elemental analysis. The application of this novel magnetic sorbent was investigated in rapid extraction, preconcentration and also determination of trace amounts of Hg(II) ions by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Effect of various parameters such as sample pH, adsorption time and desorption time, maximum capacity and also eluent type and concentration was investigated in this study. The relative standard deviation (RSD%) and limit of detection (LOD) of the method were found to be 1.47% and 0.03 ng mL(-1), respectively. The amounts of mercury in some standard reference materials was Also determined using this sorbent in order to confirm the accuracy of this method. Finally, this sorbent was successfully applied for determination of low levels of Hg(II) ions in various fish samples. PMID:23993582

Najafi, Ezzatolla; Aboufazeli, Forouzan; Zhad, Hamid Reza Lotfi; Sadeghi, Omid; Amani, Vahid

2013-12-15

317

Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI  

SciTech Connect

Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

Abou El-Maaref, A., E-mail: aahmh@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Uosif, M.A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt)] [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M. [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)] [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

2012-07-15

318

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (BENNUS00070010) on U.S. Route 7, crossing the Walloomsac River, Bennington, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BENNUS00070010 on U.S. Route 7, also known as North Street, crossing of the Walloomsac River, Bennington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southwestern Vermont. The 30.1-mi2 drainage area is a predominantly rural and forested basin. The bridge site is located within an urban setting in the Town of Bennington with buildings, parking lots, lawns, and a playground on the overbank areas. In the study area, the Walloomsac River has a straight channel with constructed channel banks through much of the reach. The channel is located on a delta and has a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 37 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The predominant channel bed material is cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 96.0 mm (0.315 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 5, 1996, indicated that the constructed reach was stable. The U.S. Route 7 crossing of the Walloomsac River is a 53-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 50-foot steel span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, September 27, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The wingwalls are angled in toward the channel because the widths of the upstream and downstream constructed channel banks are narrower than the bridge opening. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. Scour countermeasures at the site include masonry and stone walls on both the upstream and downstream banks. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour computed for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.1 ft. The worstcase contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Computed left abutment scour ranged from 5.9 to 6.8 ft. with the worst-case scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Computed right abutment scour for all modelled flows was 6.8 ft. Total scour depths for all modelled flows did not exceed the depth of the abutment footings. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other informatio

Olson, Scott A.; Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

319

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 39 (ANDOVT00110039) on State Route 11, crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOVT00110039 on State Route 11 crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southern Vermont. The 5.75-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest on the upstream left bank and downstream right bank. The surface cover on the upstream right and downstream left banks is brush. In the study area, the Middle Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 58 ft and an average bank height of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 96.8 mm (0.317 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 9, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The State Route 11 crossing of the Middle Branch Williams River is a 43-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 41-foot concrete-beam span and two additional steel beams on the upstream face (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. The only scour protection measures at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall and type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.9 to 11.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measu

Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

1997-01-01

320

Smaller sample sizes for phase II trials based on exact tests with actual error rates by trading-off their nominal levels of significance and power  

PubMed Central

Background: Sample sizes for single-stage phase II clinical trials in the literature are often based on exact (binomial) tests with levels of significance (alpha (?) <5% and power >80%). This is because there is not always a sample size where ? and power are exactly equal to 5% and 80%, respectively. Consequently, the opportunity to trade-off small amounts of ? and power for savings in sample sizes may be lost. Methods: Sample-size tables are presented for single-stage phase II trials based on exact tests with actual levels of significance and power. Trade-off in small amounts of ? and power allows the researcher to select from several possible designs with potentially smaller sample sizes compared with existing approaches. We provide SAS macro coding and an R function, which for a given treatment difference, allow researchers to examine all possible sample sizes for specified differences are provided. Results: In a single-arm study with P0 (standard treatment)=10% and P1 (new treatment)=20%, and specified ?=5% and power=80%, the A'Hern approach yields n=78 (exact ?=4.53%, power=80.81%). However, by relaxing ? to 5.67% and power to 77.7%, a sample size of 65 can be used (a saving of 13 patients). Interpretation: The approach we describe is especially useful for trials in rare disorders, or for proof-of-concept studies, where it is important to minimise the trial duration and financial costs, particularly in single-arm cancer trials commonly associated with expensive treatment options. PMID:23169334

Khan, I; Sarker, S-J; Hackshaw, A

2012-01-01

321

Training Level, Acculturation, Role Ambiguity, and Multicultural Discussions in Training and Supervising International Counseling Students in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research partially replicated Nilsson and Anderson's "Professional Psychology: Research and Practice" (2004) study on training and supervising international students. It investigated the relationships among international counseling students' training level, acculturation, supervisory working alliance (SWA), counseling self-efficacy (COSE),…

Ng, Kok-Mun; Smith, Shannon D.

2012-01-01

322

Clinical prodromes of neurodegeneration in Anderson-Fabry disease  

PubMed Central

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of prodromal clinical features of neurodegeneration in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) in comparison to age-matched controls. Methods: This is a single-center, prospective, cross-sectional study in 167 participants (60 heterozygous females and 50 hemizygous males with genetically confirmed AFD, 57 age-matched controls) using a clinical screening program consisting of structured interview, quantitative tests of motor function, and assessments of cognition, depression, olfaction, orthostatic intolerance, pain, REM sleep behavior disorder, and daytime sleepiness. Results: In comparison to age-matched controls (mean age 48.3 years), patients with AFD (mean age 49.0 years) showed slower gait and transfer speed, poorer fine manual dexterity, and lower hand speed, which was independent of focal symptoms due to cerebrovascular disease. Patients with AFD were more severely affected by depression, pain, and daytime sleepiness and had a lower quality of life. These motor and nonmotor manifestations significantly correlated with clinical disease severity. However, patients with AFD did not reveal extrapyramidal motor features or signs of significant cognitive impairment, hyposmia, orthostatic intolerance, or REM sleep behavior disorder, which commonly precede later neurodegenerative disease. In our cohort, there were no differences in neurologic manifestations of AFD between heterozygous females and hemizygous males. Conclusions: Aside from cerebrovascular manifestations and small fiber neuropathy, AFD results in a distinct neurologic phenotype comprising poorer motor performance and specific nonmotor features. In contrast to functional loss of glucocerebrosidase in Gaucher disease, ?-galactosidase deficiency in AFD is not associated with a typical cluster of clinical features prodromal for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease. PMID:25762709

Hughes, Derralynn; Milligan, Alan; Richfield, Linda; Reichmann, Heinz; Mehta, Atul; Schapira, Anthony H.V.

2015-01-01

323

Critical charge fluctuations in a pseudogap Anderson model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Anderson impurity model with a density of states ? (? ) ?|?| r containing a power-law pseudogap centered on the Fermi energy (? =0 ) features for 0

Chowdhury, Tathagata; Ingersent, Kevin

2015-01-01

324

VizieR Online Data Catalog: The HII Region Discovery Survey (HRDS). II. (Anderson+, 2011)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our observations were made with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) 100m telescope from 2008 June through 2010 October. We assembled our target list from the following multi-frequency, large solid angle Galactic surveys: the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) Galactic Plane Survey at 21cm HI and continuum (VGPS: Stil et al. 2006AJ....132.1158S), the NRAO VLA Sky Survey at 20cm continuum (NVSS: Condon et al. 1998, Cat. VIII/65), the Southern Galactic Plane Survey at 21cm HI and continuum (SGPS: Haverkorn et al. 2006ApJS..167..230H), the VLA MAGPIS at 20cm continuum (Helfand et al. 2006, Cat. J/AJ/131/2525), and the Spitzer 24um MIPSGAL survey (Carey et al. 2009PASP..121...76C). Our analysis here also uses 8.0um data from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE: Benjamin et al. 2003PASP..115..953B), which were obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. (4 data files).

Anderson, L. D.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, D. S.; Rood, R. T.

2011-08-01

325

On-line measurements of ozone surface fluxes: Part II. Surface-level ozone fluxes onto the Sahara desert  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Surface-level ozone concentrations, the vertical turbulent ozone flux as well as the fluxes of sensible and latent heat were continuously monitored by the eddy covariance method in the Lybian desert, 30 km south of the Dakhla Oasis in Egypt, from 23 March until 9 April 1993. An automatic station powered by a photovoltaics generator system was used to measure the vertical turbulent ozone flux to the desert ecosystem. Fairly high ozone volume fractions up to 60 ppb were recorded when northerly winds prevailed. When southerly winds were blowing, the ozone volume fractions were lower and reached maximum values slightly above 40 ppb. On-line eddy correlation measurements of the vertical turbulent ozone flux to the desert were performed with a novel fast-response ozone sensor. The fairly small ozone fluxes were corrected for effects of micro-turbulent density fluctuations caused by the concomitant fluxes of heat and water vapour in the air volume (Webb correction). While ozone fluxes to the desert ecosystem are below 2 ppb cm s - in the night, maximum daytime ozone fluxes of 20 ppb cm s -1 were measured which yielded a maximum daily dry deposition velocity of 0.15 cm s -1. During the whole measurement campaign of 16 d a mean deposition velocity of Vd = 0.065 cm s -1 for ozone is calculated. For global numerical models in which the sources and sinks of ozone in the troposphere are taken into account, a daytime Vdof 0.1 cm s -1 and a nighttime value of 0.04 cm s -1 are recommended for the desert ecosystem.

Güsten, Hans; Heinrich, Günther; Mönnich, Erbo; Sprung, Detlev; Weppner, Joseph; Ramadan, Abou Bakr; Ezz El-Din, Mohammed R. M.; Ahmed, Darwish M.; Hassan, Galal K. Y.

326

Role of RAAS and adipokines in cardiovascular protection: effect of different doses of angiotensin II receptor blocker on adipokines level in hypertensive patients.  

PubMed

The present study was designed to determine the effect of different doses of the angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), candesartan, on circulating adiponectin and leptin levels as well as leptin adiponectin ratio (LAR) in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors.Sixty-nine hypertensive patients were randomized to three groups: group 1 included patients treated with high doses of Candesartan (32 mg); group 2 included patients treated with conventional doses of Candesartan (16 mg); and group 3 included patients that received antihypertensive treatment other than ARBs or angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors. Patients were evaluated for lipid profile, HbA1C, insulin, C-peptide, c-reactive protein, aldosterone, renin, Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, leptin, adiponectin and LAR. Baseline adiponectin, leptin, and LAR levels did not differ significantly between the three groups. After 6 months of treatment, LAR was significantly higher in group 3 than group 1 (P = .007) or group 2 (P = .023). Differences between effects of high (32 mg) and conventional doses (16 mg) of Candesartan on LAR were not observed (P = .678). Marginal across-group differences were detected for posttreatment circulating adiponectin level (P = .064). Univariate general linear model (GLM) analysis of posttreatment LAR detected significant by-group differences even after adjustment for age, gender, baseline values of LAR, and blood pressure. In this model, group was the only significant predictor of LAR after controlling for these variables. Treatment with high doses of the ARB, candesartan, is associated with significantly reduced LAR and marginally increased circulating adiponectin levels in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25418492

Hass, Anat; Oz, Hadar; Mashavi, Margarita; Shargorodsky, Marina

2014-10-01

327

Polymorphisms of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing and DNA repair genes and in vitro N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea–induced O6-ethylguanine levels in human lymphocytes  

PubMed Central

This study tested the hypothesis that genetic variants of phase II detoxification enzymes and DNA repair proteins affect individual response to DNA damage from alkylating agents. In 171 healthy individuals, an immunoslot blot assay was used to measure O6-ethylguanosine (O6-EtGua) adduct levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes treated with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) in vitro. The genotypes of GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 I105V and A114V, MGMT L84F and I143V, XPD D312N and K751Q, and XRCC3 T241M were determined. Demographic and exposure information was collected by in-person interview. Student’s t test, analysis of (co)variance, and multiple linear regression models were used in statistical analyses. The mean and median (range) O6-EtGua levels were 94.6 and 84.8 (3.2–508.1) fmol/g DNA, respectively. The adduct level was significantly lower in people who smoked ? 25 years than that in never-smokers (square-root transformed mean values 8.20 versus 9.37, P = 0.03). Multiple linear regression models revealed that GSTT1 (? = ?2.36, P = 0.009) polymorphism was a significant predictor of the level of adducts in 82 never-smokers, whereas the number of years smoked (? = ?0.08, P = 0.005) and XRCC3 T241M (? = 2.22, P = 0.007) in 89 ever-smokers. The association between GSTP1 I105V, MGMT I143V, and XPD D312N with the level of adducts was not conclusive. Each polymorphism could explain 2% to 10% of the variation of the adduct level. These observations suggest that GSTT1 null and XRCC3 T241M polymorphism may have some functional significance in modulating the level of ENU-induced DNA damage and these effects are smoking-dependent. Results from this exploratory study need to be confirmed in other experimental systems. PMID:17158087

Jiao, Li; Chang, Ping; Firozi, Pervez F.; Lai, Dejian; Abbruzzese, James L; Li, Donghui

2007-01-01

328

A report documenting the completion of the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the ASC level II milestone ""Visualization on the supercomputing platform  

SciTech Connect

This report provides documentation for the completion of the Los Alamos portion of the ASC Level II 'Visualization on the Supercomputing Platform' milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The milestone text is shown in Figure 1 with the Los Alamos portions highlighted in boldfaced text. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is the most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors (GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the perfromance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. In conclusion, we improved CPU-based rendering performance by a a factor of 2-10 times on our tests. In addition, we evaluated CPU and CPU-based rendering performance. We encourage production visualization experts to consider using CPU-based rendering solutions when it is appropriate. For example, on remote supercomputers CPU-based rendering can offer a means of viewing data without having to offload the data or geometry onto a CPU-based visualization system. In terms of comparative performance of the CPU and CPU we believe that further optimizations of the performance of both CPU or CPU-based rendering are possible. The simulation community is currently confronting this reality as they work to port their simulations to different hardware architectures. What is interesting about CPU rendering of massive datasets is that for part two decades CPU performance has significantly outperformed CPU-based systems. Based on our advancements, evaluations and explorations we believe that CPU-based rendering has returned as one viable option for the visualization of massive datasets.

Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patchett, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lo, Li - Ta [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mr Marle, David [KITWARE INC.; Brownlee, Carson [UNIV OF UTAH

2011-01-24

329

Cardiovascular risk factor levels and their relationships with overweight and fat distribution in children: the Fleurbaix Laventie Ville Santé II study  

PubMed Central

Objectives To document for the first time in a general population of French children, the prevalence and levels of cardiovascular risk factors, and to assess, separately in boys and girls, whether these risk factors were associated with fat mass distribution independently of subcutaneous overall adiposity. Subjects and design A cross sectional analysis of baseline data from 452 children (235 boys and 217 girls) aged 8–17 years included in 1999 in a population-based epidemiologic study, the Fleurbaix Laventie Ville Santé II (FLVS II) study. Methods Overweight was defined according to the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) references and to the 90th percentiles of the French BMI curves. The thresholds of parameters defining cardiovascular and metabolic risk were the 95th percentile of the Task Force Report on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents for blood pressure, and those of the American Academy of Pediatrics for lipids. Anthropometric and biologic parameters were described by gender and according to overweight. Partial correlations between cardiovascular risk factors and anthropometric measures of adiposity (BMI, sum of four skinfold thicknesses, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio) were calculated. In a second step, these correlations were additionally adjusted for the sum of four skinfold thicknesses. Results High plasma triglycerides, high insulin concentration and low plasma HDL cholesterol were associated with all measures of adiposity (|r|?0.20; p<0.002). When obese children were excluded, overweight children already had high triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol levels respectively 2 and 20 times more frequently than normal weight children. Among overweight children, 7.7% had at least two risk factors among high blood pressure, high plasma triglycerides or glucose, and low HDL concentrations, versus 0.25% among normal weight children (p=0.002). After adjusting for the sum of skinfolds, an independent association between the risk factors and waist circumference was found in girls. Conclusions (a) Modest excess weight is associated with increased levels of cardiovascular risk factors. (b) In girls, abdominal fat distribution is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, independently of overall adiposity. (c) International definition of abdominal obesity in children is required to standardize studies and progress in the evaluation of childhood obesity and its consequences. PMID:17445535

Botton, Jérémie; Heude, Barbara; Kettaneh, Adrien; Borys, Jean-Michel; Lommez, Agnès; Bresson, Jean-Louis; Ducimetière, Pierre; Charles, Marie-Aline

2007-01-01

330

Linalool decreases HepG2 viability by inhibiting mitochondrial complexes I and II, increasing reactive oxygen species and decreasing ATP and GSH levels.  

PubMed

Coriander is used as an appetizer, a common food seasoning in Mediterranean dishes, and a remedy for many ailments. In this study we tested the biochemical effect of its essential oil components, in particular linalool, its main component. The oil extract was prepared by hydro-distillation of coriander seeds. The various components were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy. The effect of the various oil components on the viability of different cell lines (HepG2, Caco2, NIH3t3, MCF7 and Hek293) was examined using MTT assay. Linalool was the most potent and HepG2 cells the most sensitive. A 50% and 100% decrease in the viability of HepG2 was obtained at 0.4 microM and 2 microM linalool, respectively. Whereas none of the other components exerted a significant effect at concentrations lower than 50 microM, myrcene and nerolidol, the structural analogues of linalool, were more potent at 100 microM than the other components decreasing HepG2 viability to 26%. The biochemical effect of linalool on mitochondria isolated from HepG2 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition in complexes I and II activities of the respiratory chain, and a time-dependent decrease in ATP level. In addition, a time-dependent decrease in glutathione (GSH) level and in the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium was obtained, indicating increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Pretreatment with the antioxidants: N-acetyl cysteine (2mM), Trolox (100 microM) and different flavonoids (50 microM) was partially protective against the linalool-induced cell death; the most effective response was that of rutin and apigenin which restored 91% of HepG2 viability. We hereby report a decrease in cell viability of HepG2 cells by linalool and identify the mitochondria as one possible target for its site of action, inhibiting complexes I and II and decreasing ATP. In addition linalool increased ROS generation and decreased GSH level. PMID:19428344

Usta, Julnar; Kreydiyyeh, Sawsan; Knio, Khuzama; Barnabe, Pascale; Bou-Moughlabay, Yolla; Dagher, Shawki

2009-06-15

331

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW--Due Process and Equal Protection--Price-Anderson Act's $560,000,000 Limit on Liability From A nuclear Power Plant Accident Is Unconstitutional  

Microsoft Academic Search

Article summarizes Carolina Environmental Study Group v United States Atomic Energy Commission and congressional intent of the Price-Anderson Act. Article then speculates that the Price-Anderson Act will be found to be unconstitutional by the Supreme Court

Michael Fitzgerald

1978-01-01

332

Abrupt physical and chemical changes during 1992-1999, Anderson Springs, SE Geyser Geothermal Field, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Anderson Springs area is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. Patrons drank a variety of cool to hot mineral waters from improved springs, swam in various baths and pools, and hiked in the rugged hills flanking Anderson Creek and its tributaries. In the bluffs to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. By the early 1970s, the higher ridges south and west of Anderson Springs became part of the southeast sector of the greater Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric power plants are built on these ridges, producing energy from a vapor-dominated 240 °C reservoir. Only the main hot spring at Anderson Springs has maintained a recognizable identity since the 1930s. The hot spring is actually a cluster of seeps and springs that issue from a small fault in a ravine southwest of Anderson Creek. Published and unpublished records show that the maximum temperature (Tm) of this cluster fell gradually from 63°C in 1889 to 48°C in 1992. However, Tm of the cluster climbed to 77°C in 1995 and neared boiling (98°C) in 1998. A new cluster of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm = 99.3°C) formed in 1998 about 30 m north of the old spring cluster. Several evergreen trees on steep slopes immediately above these vents apparently were killed by the new activity. Thermal waters at Anderson Hot Springs are mostly composed of near-surface ground waters with some added gases and condensed steam from The Geysers geothermal system. Compared to gas samples from Southeast Geysers wells, the hot spring gases are higher in CO2 and lower in H2S and NH3. As the springs increased in temperature, however, the gas composition became more like the mean composition of steam discharges from the Southeast Geysers. The hot spring waters are low in ions of Cl, B, and Li, but relatively high in HCO3, SO4 and NH4. The stable-isotope compositions (deuterium and oxygen-18) of these waters plot near the global meteoric water line. Geochemical data through time reveal apparent maxima in the concentrations of SO4, Fe, and Mn in 1991 to 1992, before the cluster became hotter. The black-to-gray deposits from the new spring cluster are rich in pyrite and contain anomalous metals. About one-half mile to the east of the hot springs, mineralized water discharges intermittently from an old adit of the Schwartz (Anderson) mine, and enters a tributary of Anderson Creek. This drainage increased substantially in July 1998, and a slurry of mine water and precipitates were transported down the tributary and into Anderson Creek. In December 1998, the adit water was 22°C, and had a chemical composition that was similar to spring waters that once discharged in the ravines surrounding the old Anderson Springs resort. The cause for the abrupt changes that have occurred in thermal features at Anderson Springs is still not resolved. One possibility is that these changes are a response to withdrawal of steam from The Geysers geothermal field over more than 20 years of production. Pressure declines in the geothermal reservoir may have caused a "drying out" of the overlying condensation zone. Induced boiling in this zone and upflow of deep steam to shallower depths would cause heating and vaporization of shallow ground waters. In addition, earthquakes occurring in the vicinity of Anderson Springs have increased significantly after nearby geothermal power plants began operation. These earthquakes may have enhanced surface discharge of thermal fluids along fractures and faults.

Janik, Cathy J.; Goff, Fraser; Walter, Stephen R.; Sorey, Michael L.; Counce, Dale; Colvard, Elizabeth M.

2000-01-01

333

John Anderson's development of (situational) realism and its bearing on psychology today.  

PubMed

In 1927, the Scottish philosopher John Anderson arrived in Australia to take up the chair of Philosophy at the University of Sydney. By the late 1930s, the "macrostructure" of his realist system was in place. It includes a theory of process and a substantial metaphysics, one that opposes positivism, linguistic philosophy and all forms of idealism. However, beyond Australia it remains largely unknown, despite its bearing on a number of current issues in psychology and the social sciences generally. This article outlines Anderson's transition from Hegelian idealism to realism, describes aspects of his ontology and epistemology, compares some of Anderson's ideas with Dewey's pragmatism and explains their relevance to present-day psychology. PMID:20027696

Hibberd, Fiona J

2009-10-01

334

Damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and photosystem II after water shortage and high-temperature stress in two lines of maize which differ in endogenous levels of abscisic acid and drought resistance  

SciTech Connect

This study examines damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and photosystem II (PS II), and the rate of CO{sub 2} fixation after exposure to 7-d water shortage followed by 6-h (WTS-6) or 24-h (WTS-24) high temperature (45C) stress in the high-level. Abscisic acid (ABA) drought-resistant (DR) line of maize ZPBL 1304 and the low-level ABA drought-sensitive line ZPL 389. Seven-day water shortage followed by 6-h high-temperature stress slightly damaged PS II in the DR line ZPBL 1304. The DS line ZPL 389 was affected by WTS-6 to a great extent; however, the stress-caused damage to this line was reversible. Exposure to WTS-24 caused reversible damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and PS II in DR line. The DS line was not capable of withstanding severe stress conditions; WTS-24 killed almost all the plants. The results on the rate of CO{sub 2} fixation were in agreement with those on the damage to the plasmalemma, chloroplasts and PS II. Considerable drought and heat resistance was apparent in the line (ZPBL 1304) which synthesizes a unique band of heat-shock protein(s) of 45 KDa. In conclusion, the high-level ABA DR line ZPBL 1304 showed much greater capability of withstanding WTS than the low-level ABA DS line ZPL 389.

Ristic, Z.; Cass, D.D. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

1991-05-01

335

Serum levels of soluble Fas, soluble tumor necrosis factor-receptor II, interleukin-2 receptor and interleukin-8 as early predictors of hepatocellular carcinoma in Egyptian patients with hepatitis C virus genotype-4  

PubMed Central

Background Liver disease progression from chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with an imbalance between T-helper 1 and T-helper 2 cytokines. Evaluation of cytokines as possible candidate biomarkers for prediction of HCC was performed using soluble Fas (sFas), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-II (sTNFR-II), interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Results The following patients were recruited: 79 with HCV infection, 30 with HCC, 32 with chronic liver disease associated with elevated liver enzyme levels (with or without cirrhosis) in addition to 17 with chronic HCV with persistent normal alanine aminotransferase levels (PNALT). Nine normal persons negative either for HCV or for hepatitis B virus were included as a control group. All persons were tested for sFas, sTNFR-II, IL-2R and IL-8 in their serum by quantitative ELISA. HCC patients had higher levels of liver enzymes but lower log-HCV titer when compared to the other groups. HCC patients had also significantly higher levels of sFas, sTNFR-II and IL-2R and significantly lower levels of IL-8 when compared to the other groups. Exclusion of HCC among patients having PNALT could be predicted with 90% sensitivity and 70.6% specificity when sTNFR-II is ? 389 pg/ml or IL-8 is < 290 pg/ml. Conclusions Serum TNFR-II, IL-2R? and IL-8, may be used as combined markers in HCV-infected cases for patients at high risk of developing HCC; further studies, however, are mandatory to check these findings before their application at the population level. PMID:20051112

2010-01-01

336

R. E. Estell, E. L. Fredrickson, D. M. Anderson and M. D. Remmenga mixtures on alfalfa pellet intake by lambs  

E-print Network

R. E. Estell, E. L. Fredrickson, D. M. Anderson and M. D. Remmenga mixtures on alfalfa pellet and sesquiterpene mixtures on alfalfa pellet intake by lambs1 R. E. Estell,*2 E. L. Fredrickson,* D. M. Anderson. Four experiments were conducted to determine the effects of terpenes on intake of alfalfa pellets

337

A Knowledge Base for Dependability and Security Research H. Glaser, I. Millard, T. Anderson, Z. Andrews, J. Fitzgerald, B. Randell.  

E-print Network

COMPUTING SCIENCE A Knowledge Base for Dependability and Security Research H. Glaser, I. Millard, T Research Hugh Glaser, Ian Millard, Tom Anderson, Zoe Andrews, John Fitzgerald, Brian Randell. Abstract, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, England. #12;Bibliographical details GLASER, H., MILLARD, I., ANDERSON, T

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

338

Example of self-averaging in three dimensions: Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in random distributions of pointlike scatterers  

E-print Network

Example of self-averaging in three dimensions: Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves is used to study Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in three-dimensional disordered dielectric of localized electromagnetic waves, emerging in the limit of an infinite system, is numerically observed. S1063

Rusek, Marian

339

BIOLOGY 3079.03 PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY PART II, 2009-2010  

E-print Network

. Zanetti and A. Lokuta. 2008. PhysioEx 8.0 for Human Physiology Laboratory Simulations in PhysiologyBIOLOGY 3079.03 PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY PART II, 2009-2010 LECTURES: Monday, Wednesday. Anderson. 2008. Animal Physiology. Second edition. Sinauer Associates. Sunderland, MA. Knisely, Karin. 2005

Adl, Sina

340

Anderson localization in one-dimension with Levy-type disorder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract: Quantum transport through disordered systems has been the subject of extensive research since Anderson's seminal theory of localization. Motivated by experimental realizations of light transport across media exhibiting Levy-type fluctuations, we study the one-dimensional Anderson model where the random site energies are governed by a probability distribution with a broad tail, otherwise known as Levy-type. We numerically compute the Lyapunov exponent and its variance. This exponent is a self-averaging quantity whose inverse in certain cases can be used to define the localization length. Furthermore, we check for the validity of single parameter scaling (SPS), and its dependence on the Levy index.

Mayett, David; Schwarz, Jennifer

2013-03-01

341

143 nature reports climate change | VOL 3 | DECEMBER 2009 | www.nature.com/reports/climatechange Mark New, DiaNa LiverMaN aND keviN aNDersoN  

E-print Network

the pre-industrial level, and to understand the implications for nature and society. Brave New worLD.nature.com/reports/climatechange Mindthegap Mark New, DiaNa LiverMaN aND keviN aNDersoN R educing greenhouse gas emissions soon and fast essential to explore the terra quasi-incognita of a world in which the average temperature is 4 °C above

342

Fasting Glucose Level Modulates Cell Surface Expression of CD11b and CD66b in Granulocytes and Monocytes of Patients with Type II Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular complications are the leading cause of mortality in type II diabetes (T2DM), in which onset and progression of atherosclerosis is linked to chronic inflammation. Activation status of innate immune cells (granulocytes Gc, monocytes Mc), as reflected by increased CD11b, CD66b and other surface markers, increases their endothelial and cytokines/chemokines release. While this inflammatory activation appears inversely related to poor glycemic control, the effect of acute spontaneous hyperglycemia on innate immune cell activation remains unclear. Expression of key markers (CD11b, CD14, CD16, CD62L, and CD66b) was therefore determined by flow cytometry on whole blood of healthy subjects and patients with T2DM with spontaneous, fasting eu- or hyper-glycemia both at baseline and after 30, 90, and 240 min. of room temperature incubation. Hyperglycemic patients with T2DM had significantly higher Gc and Mc CD11b and Gc CD66b surface mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) as compared to euglycemic patients with T2DM whose values were similar to healthy controls. CD16 expression in CD14+CD16+ Mc was elevated in all patients with T2DM, regardless of glycemic levels. Our data suggest that while the presence of diabetes per se may have a pro-inflammatory effect, hyperglycemia seems further acutely exacerbate innate cell inflammatory status, and their consequent endothelial adhesion and vascular damage potential. PMID:23686079

Horvath, Peter; Oliver, Stacy R.; Ganesan, Goutham; Zaldivar, Frank P.; Radom-Aizik, Shlomit; Galassetti, Pietro R.

2013-01-01

343

Differences in strength and conditioning coach self-perception of leadership style behaviors at the National Basketball Association, Division I-A, and Division II levels.  

PubMed

Leader behaviors have been found to vary by competitive level (6,9,11,26). Similar differences based on the competitive environment have been reported with strength coaches and their training emphases (15,28) but not their leadership style behaviors. This latter area is important to explore because strength coach leader behaviors may result in enhanced cooperation, improved communication, and improved athlete psychological and emotional well-being (14,23,25,27). Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to examine the differences in self-perceived leadership styles of National Basketball Association, Division I-A (DI-A) men's basketball, and Division II (DII) men's basketball strength and conditioning coaches. The self-perceived leadership styles of 145 men's basketball strength coaches (National Basketball Association [NBA]=22, DI-A=92, and DII=31) were obtained using the Revised Leadership Scale for Sport (26,41). Frequency data about demographics and training methods were also collected. No significant differences were reported for positive feedback. Otherwise, NBA strength coaches reported more democratic leadership style behaviors than DI-A strength coaches. Division I-A strength coaches were found to be more autocratic than NBA or DII strength coaches. Both NBA and DI-A strength coaches indicated a higher level of training and instruction than did DII strength coaches. National Basketball Association strength coaches also reported engaging in more situational and socially supportive leader behaviors than DI-A and DII strength coaches. Leader behaviors can positively and negatively impact an athlete (23); thus, strength coaches need to evaluate their competitive environment and reflect on the impact of their behaviors and how their approach to leading athletes may need to vary based on the situation. PMID:20453682

Magnusen, Marshall J

2010-06-01

344

Simultaneous trace-levels determination of Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions in various samples using a modified carbon paste electrode based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a new synthesized Schiff base.  

PubMed

A modified carbon paste electrode based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and 3-(4-methoxybenzylideneamino)-2-thioxothiazolodin-4-one as a new synthesized Schiff base was constructed for the simultaneous determination of trace amounts of Hg(II) and Pb(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The modified electrode showed an excellent selectivity and stability for Hg(II) and Pb(II) determinations and for accelerated electron transfer between the electrode and the analytes. The electrochemical properties and applications of the modified electrode were studied. Operational parameters such as pH, deposition potential and deposition time were optimized for the purpose of determination of traces of metal ions at pH 3.0. Under optimal conditions the limits of detection, based on three times the background noise, were 9.0×10(-4) and 6.0×10(-4) ?mol L(-1) for Hg(II) and Pb(II) with a 90 s preconcentration, respectively. In addition, the modified electrode displayed a good reproducibility and selectivity, making it suitable for the simultaneous determination of Hg(II) and Pb(II) in real samples such as sea water, waste water, tobacco, marine and human teeth samples. PMID:22975186

Afkhami, Abbas; Bagheri, Hasan; Khoshsafar, Hosein; Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Tabatabaee, Masoumeh; Shirzadmehr, Ali

2012-10-01

345

LEGO MindStorms: Not Just for K-12 Anymore Frank Klassner, Scott D. Anderson  

E-print Network

LEGO MindStorms: Not Just for K-12 Anymore Frank Klassner, Scott D. Anderson Department the possibility of using the Lego Mindstorms robots to support the ACM Computing Curriculum 2001, using them 2001, curriculum development, robotics, Lego Mindstorms Introduction The fields of Robotics

Klassner, Frank

346

MD Anderson develops prognostic model for MDS related to prior cancer therapy  

Cancer.gov

A large-scale analysis of patients whose myelodysplastic syndrome is related to earlier cancer treatment overturns the notion that all of them have a poor prognosis, researchers from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

347

MD Anderson study finds everolimus prolongs progression-free survival for patients with neuroendocrine tumors:  

Cancer.gov

Combination treatment with everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target rapamycin (mTOR), and octreotide has shown to improve progression-free survival for patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors and a history of carcinoid syndrome, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

348

MD Anderson study finds inflammatory mediator promotes colorectal cancer by stifling protective genes:  

Cancer.gov

Chronic inflammation combines with DNA methylation, a process that shuts down cancer-fighting genes, to promote development of colorectal cancer, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report today in the advance online publication of the journal Nature Medicine.

349

MD Anderson study finds tamoxifen causes significant side effects in male breast cancer patients:  

Cancer.gov

About half of male breast cancer patients who take the drug tamoxifen to prevent their disease from returning report side effects such as weight gain and sexual dysfunction, which prompts more than 20 percent of them to discontinue treatment, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

350

M.D. Anderson study finds previously unconnected molecular networks conspire to promote cancer:  

Cancer.gov

An inflammation-promoting protein triggers deactivation of a tumor-suppressor that usually blocks cancer formation via the NOTCH signaling pathway, a team of researchers led by scientists at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center reports today in Molecular Cell.

351

UT MD Anderson study finds metabolic protein plays unexpected role in tumor cell formation and growth:  

Cancer.gov

The embryonic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has a well-established role in metabolism and is highly expressed in human cancers. Now, a team led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in advance online publication of the journal Nature that PKM2 has important non-metabolic functions in cancer formation.

352

Decadal climate cycles and declining Columbia River salmon James J. Anderson  

E-print Network

1 Decadal climate cycles and declining Columbia River salmon James J. Anderson School of Fisheries - This paper explores the effects of the interaction of anthropogenic trends and climate cycles on salmon river salmon production resulted from the interactions of human activities and climatic regime shifts

Washington at Seattle, University of

353

Community of Inquiry in e-Learning: A Critical Analysis of the Garrison and Anderson Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is based on a constructively critical analysis of the "community of inquiry" model developed by Garrison and Anderson (2003) as part of their "e-learning" research. The authors claim that certain collaborative interactions create "distant presence" fostering the emergence of a "community of inquiry" which has a positive influence on…

Jezegou, Annie

2010-01-01

354

Melissa L. Anderson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association/American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. The 2012 winner is Melissa L. Anderson for her ongoing commitment to understanding, treating, and preventing domestic violence in Deaf women…

American Psychologist, 2012

2012-01-01

355

Nonperturbative spectral-density function for the Anderson model at arbitrary temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using a nonperturbative self-energy solution for the nondegenerate Anderson model, the temperature-dependent spectral-density function is calculated in the symmetric limit. The function is found to give reliable results for all values of the parameter u and inverse temperature beta.

Neal, Henry L.

1991-01-01

356

CO2 Mitigation Costs for Canada and the Alberta Oil Sands Justin David Anderson  

E-print Network

CO2 Mitigation Costs for Canada and the Alberta Oil Sands By Justin David Anderson Bachelor. Impact and cost assessments aim to alleviate some of these difficulties by attempting to treat the costs individually to estimate costs associated with different regulations since across regions the impacts from

357

Counting statistics for the Anderson impurity model: Bethe ansatz and Fermi liquid study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the counting statistics of charge transport in the Anderson impurity model (AIM) employing both Keldysh perturbation theory in a Fermi liquid picture and the Bethe ansatz. In the Fermi liquid approach, the object of our principal interest is the generating function for the cumulants of the charge current distribution. We derive an exact analytic formula relating the full

A. O. Gogolin; R. M. Konik; A. W. W. Ludwig; H. Saleur

2007-01-01

358

Wireless Sensor Network Localization Techniques Guoqiang Mao, Baris Fidan and Brian D.O. Anderson  

E-print Network

1 Wireless Sensor Network Localization Techniques Guoqiang Mao, Baris¸ Fidan and Brian D.O. Anderson Abstract-- Wireless sensor network localization is an important area that attracted significant on possible approaches to them. Index Terms-- wireless sensor networks, localization, AOA, RSS, TDOA. I

Scheuermann, Peter

359

Plate Tectonics as a Far-From-Equilibrium Self-Organized System Don L. Anderson  

E-print Network

Plate Tectonics as a Far- From- Equilibrium Self-Organized System By Don L. Anderson Word Count: 3 and other forces at the top. Plate tectonics was once regarded as passive motion of plates on top of mantle convection cells but it now appears that continents and plate tectonics organize the flow in the mantle

Anderson, Don L.

360

CAPSTONE PROJECTS AS COMMUNITY CONNECTORS Ruth E. Anderson, Gaetano Borriello, Hlne Martin  

E-print Network

learned. INTRODUCTION Course projects based on real-world needs can serve as the basis for an engagingCAPSTONE PROJECTS AS COMMUNITY CONNECTORS Ruth E. Anderson, Gaetano Borriello, Hélène Martin and faculty at Heritage University to create an on-line store for marketing crafts made by artists in rural

Anderson, Richard

361

Shouting to be Heard in Advertising Simon P. Anderson and Andr de Palma  

E-print Network

Shouting to be Heard in Advertising Simon P. Anderson and André de Palma July 2011 revised October 2012 Abstract Advertising competes for scarce consumer attention, so more profitable advertisers send of loud shouters or large range of quiet whisperers. All advertisers prefer there to be less shouting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

362

PLAYING SMART ANOTHER LOOK AT ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN COMPUTER GAMES Eike F Anderson  

E-print Network

1 PLAYING SMART ­ ANOTHER LOOK AT ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN COMPUTER GAMES Eike F Anderson12 5BB, UK E-mail: eanderson@bournemouth.ac.uk KEYWORDS artificial intelligence, computer games, non intelligence in general and artificial intelligence in the context of its use in modern computer games

Davies, Christopher

363

A Novel Low-Power FPGA Routing Switch Jason H. Anderson and Farid N. Najm  

E-print Network

A Novel Low-Power FPGA Routing Switch Jason H. Anderson and Farid N. Najm Department of Electrical FPGA routing switch that can operate in three different modes: high-speed, low-power or sleep. High in industrial FPGA designs. Specifi- cally, we show that a considerable fraction of routing switches may

Najm, Farid N.

364

Yield maps for nanoscale metallic multilayers Adrienne V. Lamm *, Peter M. Anderson  

E-print Network

Yield maps for nanoscale metallic multilayers Adrienne V. Lamm *, Peter M. Anderson Department for the macroscopic, in-plane, bi-axial tension to macroscopically yield a nanoscale multilayered thin film consisting mismatch on the macroscopic yield strength of metallic multilayer thin films. This will be accomplished

Anderson, Peter M.

365

SILK { a playful blend of Scheme and Java Kenneth R. Anderson, BBN Technologies, Cambridge, MA  

E-print Network

. Java pro- vides standard libraries that support web programming. It has the goal of being portableSILK { a playful blend of Scheme and Java Kenneth R. Anderson, BBN Technologies, Cambridge, MA sym- bols: (loop (print (eval (read)))) Consider what we would have to do to write a Lisp (or Java

Strickland, Stevie

366

Main-Chain Conformational Tendencies of Amino Acids Robert J. Anderson,1,2  

E-print Network

Main-Chain Conformational Tendencies of Amino Acids Robert J. Anderson,1,2 Zhiping Weng,2 Robert K tendencies of an amino acid. Despite forty years of research, the shape of Ramachandran plots is still tendencies among amino acids, and showed that the conformational relationships of amino ac- ids are well

Weng, Zhiping

367

MD Anderson study finds that AML patients have high response rate with Vorinostat added to treatment  

Cancer.gov

Adding a drug that activates genes to frontline combination therapy for acute myeloid leukemia resulted in an 85 percent remission rate after initial treatment, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

368

AUTO ANSWER CIRCUIT DESIGN FOR AN ANDERSON JACOBSON AD 342 MODEM  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes a circuit which connects a Western Electric Model 1001F Data Accessing Arrangement to an Anderson Jacobson Model AD 342 Modem. It automatically answers the phone and holds a data connection as long as a received carrier is present. It self resets upon loss of...

369

MD Anderson study finds ovarian cancer patients survive longer with BRCA2 mutated in tumors:  

Cancer.gov

Women with high-grade ovarian cancer live longer and respond better to platinum-based chemotherapy when their tumors have BRCA2 genetic mutations, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Institute for Systems Biology report in the Oct. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

370

JILL T. ANDERSON Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Telephone: 773-255-1996  

E-print Network

): Social behavior of capuchin monkeys (Cebus capuchinus). 1998-2000 Plant taxonomist and research assistant. 2006-2008 National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant. Evolution of plant 447: 775. POSTERS AND PRESENTATIONS Anderson, J.T., 2007. Evolution of a native blueberry (Vaccinium

Geber, Monica A.

371

UT MD Anderson study finds advances in breast cancer don't extend to older women:  

Cancer.gov

The survival rates for older women with breast cancer lag behind younger women diagnosed with the disease, indicating that the elder population may be missing out on improvements in treatment and detection, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

372

PDF tails and self-organization of shear flows Johan Anderson  

E-print Network

results · Instanton method · Coherent structures · Model equations + instanton solutions · Model of shearPDF tails and self-organization of shear flows Johan Anderson Department of Applied Mathematics, but large amplitude (e.g. large heat load on the wall.) Radial velocity PDF measured at TCV, Garcia EPS2006

373

Potential energy surface for the hydrogen-iodine reaction James B. Anderson  

E-print Network

Potential energy surface for the hydrogen-iodine reaction James B. Anderson Department of Chemistry valenceelectronsand with effectivepotentials for the iodine core electrons.The favored pathway for the overall-H-H-I. The pathway is accessibleto bound and unbound iodine atom pairs and it allows the bimolecular and termolecular

Anderson, James B.

374

MD Anderson study identifies novel therapeutic targets for small cell lung cancer  

Cancer.gov

Newly discovered molecular differences between small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer have revealed PARP1 and EZH2 as potential therapeutic targets for patients with small cell lung cancer, according to the results of a University of Texas MD Anderson study published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

375

Bio390 Glucose and the Kidney ANSWERS thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson,  

E-print Network

is freely filterable the amount that is filtered is a function of the GFR and its concentration in the blood1 Bio390 Glucose and the Kidney ANSWERS thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson, Dept Zoology Univ of Florida of urine formation: 1.0 ml min plasma glucose concentration: 80 mg 100 ml plasma urine glucose

Prestwich, Ken

376

Relativistic ionized gases: Ohm and Fourier laws from Anderson and Witting model equation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relativistic laws of Ohm and Fourier are determined for binary mixtures of electrons with protons or photons subjected to external electromagnetic fields, by using the Anderson and Witting model equation. General expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities for relativistic degenerate ionized gas mixtures are determined and explicit expressions for the transport coefficients are given for the particular cases:

G. M. Kremer; C. H. Patsko

2003-01-01

377

MD Anderson study finds telomere failure, telomerase activation drive prostate cancer progression  

Cancer.gov

Genomic instability caused by an erosion of the protective caps on chromosomes, followed by activation of an enzyme that reinforces those caps, allows malignant cells to evade destruction and acquire more deadly characteristics, MD Anderson Cancer Center researchers report in an Online Now article at the journal Cell.

378

MD Anderson researchers find that chemotherapy is as effective before breast cancer surgery as after  

Cancer.gov

Whether chemotherapy is given before or after breast-conserving therapy does not have an impact on long-term local-regional outcomes, suggesting treatment success is due more to biologic factors than chemotherapy timing, according to a study by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

379

MD Anderson researchers compare treatments, survival benefits for early-stage lung cancer  

Cancer.gov

Removal of the entire lobe of lung may offer patients with early-stage lung cancer better overall survival when compared with a partial resection, and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) may offer the same survival benefit as a lobectomy for some patients, according to a study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.Click here to read the full press release.

380

A Genetic Algorithm for Evolving Stochastic Context-Free James Anderson, Joe Staines & Paula Tataru  

E-print Network

A Genetic Algorithm for Evolving Stochastic Context-Free Grammars James Anderson, Joe Staines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.1.1 Modifications to the Grammar Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.5 Modification to CYK and Inside/Outside Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 3.5.1 CYK Algorithm

Goldschmidt, Christina

381

Assessment of the risk of pile driving to juvenile fish James J. Anderson  

E-print Network

page 1 Assessment of the risk of pile driving to juvenile fish James J. Anderson Fisheries Research-12, 1990, Seattle, WA. The problem In this talk I will report on an effort to reassess the risk of pile industry concerns that provisions restricting pile driving during the spring migration are resulting

Washington at Seattle, University of

382

Low-Power Programmable Routing Circuitry for FPGAs Jason H. Anderson  

E-print Network

generations. Subthreshold leakage current flows between the source and drain termi- nals of an OFF MOSLow-Power Programmable Routing Circuitry for FPGAs Jason H. Anderson Department of ECE University designs that are programmable to operate in three different modes: high- speed, low-power or sleep. High

Najm, Farid N.

383

RMP Colloquia The role of the Josephson-Anderson equation in superfluid helium*  

E-print Network

a simple equation describing the time evolution of a superfluid's quantum phase can be used as a powerful vortex motion. The equation has been used to simplify the understanding of new phenomena, such as vortex of the phase evolution equation, introduced by Josephson and developed further by Anderson. The utility

Packard, Richard E.

384

Real-Time Character Animation for Computer Games Eike F Anderson  

E-print Network

Real-Time Character Animation for Computer Games Eike F Anderson National Centre for Computer Animation Bournemouth University ABSTRACT The importance of real-time character animation in computer games is continuously growing. This paper will present and discuss various methods of 3D character animation

Davies, Christopher

385

Inference of Tamoxifen's Effects on Prevention of Breast U T M. D. Anderson Cancer Center  

E-print Network

Inference of Tamoxifen's Effects on Prevention of Breast Cancer by Yu Shen U T M. D. Anderson to breast cancer. We propose a flexible semiparametric model to assess the effects of tamoxifen Cancer Center Department of Biostatistics, Unit 1411 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 EMAIL yshen

Jin, Jiashun

386

Dystopian Visions of Global Capitalism: Philip Reeve's "Mortal Engines" and M.T Anderson's "Feed"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines Philip Reeve's novel for children, "Mortal Engines", and M.T. Anderson's young adult novel, "Feed", by assessing these dystopias as prototypical texts of what Ulrich Beck calls risk society. Through their visions of a fictional future, the two narratives explore the hazards created by contemporary techno-economic progress,…

Bullen, Elizabeth; Parsons, Elizabeth

2007-01-01

387

Enzyme replacement therapy in Anderson-Fabry's disease: beneficial clinical effect on vital organ function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two recent randomized trials pointed out the bene- ficial effect of enzyme replacement therapy on bio- chemical parameters in patients with Anderson-Fabry's disease. Clinical end-points, such as amelioration or stabilization of renal function deterioration, or improve- ment of left ventricular hypertrophy have not been evaluated in depth. We report the case of a patient whose moderately impaired renal function was

Dominique Chauveau; Jean-Pierre Grunfeld

388

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 83, 033813 (2011) Anderson localization of light near boundaries of disordered photonic lattices  

E-print Network

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 83, 033813 (2011) Anderson localization of light near boundaries of disordered distortion in the periodicity and induces the formation of localized surface states. One would expect that the presence of boundaries in random lattices would enhance the localization. However, a recent experimental

389

MD Anderson study finds side effects, complications, and mastectomy are more likely after partial breast irradiation:  

Cancer.gov

Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) brachytherapy, the localized form of radiation therapy growing increasingly popular as a treatment choice for women with early-stage breast cancer, is associated with higher rate of later mastectomy, increased radiation-related toxicities and post-operative complications, compared to traditional whole breast irradiation (WBI), according to researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

390

A Limit Study of JavaScript Parallelism Emily Fortuna Owen Anderson Luis Ceze Susan Eggers  

E-print Network

A Limit Study of JavaScript Parallelism Emily Fortuna Owen Anderson Luis Ceze Susan Eggers Computer on the potential parallelism of JavaScript appli- cations, including popular web pages and standard JavaScript benchmarks. We examine dependency types and looping behavior to better understand the potential for JavaScript

Anderson, Richard

391

MD Anderson-led preclinical research shows normal gene hinders breast cancer chemotherapy  

Cancer.gov

Presence of normal p53, a tumor suppressor gene, instead of a mutated version, makes breast cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin less effective. The preclinical study led by MD Anderson scientists was published today in the journal Cancer Cell. The research, which challenges the existing paradigm, is another step closer to personalized cancer medicine for breast cancer.

392

MD Anderson-led study finds two targeted therapies act against Ewing's sarcoma tumors  

Cancer.gov

A pair of targeted therapies shrank tumors in some patients with treatment-resistant Ewing's sarcoma or desmoplastic small-round-cell tumors, according to research led by investigators from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2012.

393

MD Anderson scientists discover marker to identify, attack breast cancer stem cells  

Cancer.gov

Breast cancer stem cells wear a cell surface protein that is part nametag and part bull’s eye, identifying them as potent tumor-generating cells and flagging their vulnerability to a drug, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report online in Journal of Clinical Investigation.

394

MD Anderson study finds gene therapy kills breast cancer stem cells, boosts chemotherapy:  

Cancer.gov

Gene therapy delivered directly to a particularly stubborn type of breast cancer cell causes the cells to self-destruct, lowers the chance of recurrence and helps increase the effectiveness of some types of chemotherapy, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported in the Sept. 13 edition of Cancer Cell.

395

MOOD: A Concurrent C++-Based Music Language David Anderson Jeff Bilmes  

E-print Network

are applied going up the tree. Thus the time values (lengths of notes and rests) generated by a NP, time shifting, and tempo. Some of these classes are simple objects (e.g., adding a constant to volumeMOOD: A Concurrent C++-Based Music Language David Anderson Jeff Bilmes

Noble, William Stafford

396

On the Stability of Web Crawling and Web Reid Anderson1  

E-print Network

On the Stability of Web Crawling and Web Search Reid Anderson1 , Christian Borgs1 , Jennifer Chayes moti- vated by web crawling. We introduce a notion of stable cores, which is the set of web pages that are usually contained in the crawling buffer when the buffer size is smaller than the total number of web

Chaudhuri, Surajit

397

ANALYSIS OF SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF CERIUM COMPOUNDS IN THE ANDERSON MODEL  

E-print Network

E 1105 ANALYSIS OF SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF CERIUM COMPOUNDS IN THE ANDERSON MODEL P the theory of Lacroix-Lyon-Caen et al., who have calculated the magnetic susceptibility of a cerium Kondo of the exchange parameter 0393n(EF) and the Kondo temperature TK of some cerium compounds from susceptibility

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

398

Baseline Glutamate Levels Affect Group I and II mGluRs in Layer V Pyramidal Neurons of Rat Sensorimotor Cortex  

PubMed Central

Possible functional roles for glutamate that is detectable at low concentrations in the extracellular space of intact brain and brain slices have not been explored. To determine whether this endogenous glutamate acts on metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), we obtained whole cell recordings from layer V pyramidal neurons of rat sensorimotor cortical slices. Blockade of mGluRs with (+)-?-amino-4-carboxy-?-methyl-benzeacetic acid (MCPG, a general mGluR antagonist) increased the mean amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs), an effect attributable to a selective increase in the occurrence of large amplitude sEPSCs. 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropyl-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoic acid (LY341495, a group II antagonist) increased, but R(?)-1-amino-2,3-dihydro-1H-indene-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) and (RS)-hexyl-HIBO (group I antagonists) decreased sEPSC amplitude, and (R, S)-?-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (CPPG, a group III antagonist) did not change it. The change in sEPSCs elicited by MCPG, AIDA, and LY341495 was absent in tetrodotoxin, suggesting that it was action potential-dependent. The increase in sEPSCs persisted in GABA receptor antagonists, indicating that it was not due to effects on inhibitory interneurons. AIDA and (S)-3,5-dihy-droxyphenylglycine (DHPG, a group I agonist) elicited positive and negative shifts in holding current, respectively. LY341495 and (2S,2?R,3?R)-2-(2?,3?-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV, a group II agonist) elicited negative and positive shifts in holding current, respectively. The AIDA and LY341495 elicited currents persisted in TTX. Finally, in current clamp, LY341495 depolarized cells by ~2 mV and increased the number of action potentials to a given depolarizing current pulse. Thus ambient levels of glutamate tonically activate mGluRs and regulate cortical excitability. PMID:12626613

BANDROWSKI, A. E.; HUGUENARD, J. R.; PRINCE, D. A.

2010-01-01

399

Cardiovascular risk factor levels and their relationships with overweight and fat distribution in children: the Fleurbaix Laventie Ville Santé II study.  

PubMed

This study aimed to document for the first time in a general population of French children the prevalence and levels of cardiovascular risk factors and to assess separately in boys and girls whether these risk factors were associated with fat mass distribution independently of subcutaneous overall adiposity. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 452 children (235 boys and 217 girls) aged 8 to 17 years included in a 1999 population-based epidemiologic study (the Fleurbaix Laventie Ville Santé II study) was made. Overweight was defined according to the International Obesity Task Force references and the 90th percentiles of the French body mass index curves. The thresholds of parameters defining cardiovascular and metabolic risks were the 95th percentile of the Task Force Report on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents for blood pressure and those of the American Academy of Pediatrics for lipids. Anthropometric and biological parameters were described by sex and according to overweight status. Partial correlations between cardiovascular risk factors and anthropometric measures of adiposity (body mass index, sum of 4 skinfold thicknesses, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio) were calculated. Then, these correlations were additionally adjusted for the sum of 4 skinfold thicknesses. High plasma triglycerides, high insulin concentration, and low plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration were associated with all measures of adiposity (|r| > or = 0.20, P < .002). When obese children were excluded, overweight children already had high triglycerides and low HDL-C levels, respectively, 2 and 20 times more frequently than normal-weight children did. Among overweight children, 7.7% had at least 2 risk factors among high blood pressure, high plasma triglycerides or glucose, and low HDL-C concentration vs 0.25% among normal-weight children (P = .002). After adjusting for the sum of skinfolds, an independent association between the risk factors and waist circumference was found in girls. In conclusion, (a) modest excess weight is associated with increased levels of cardiovascular risk factors. (b) In girls, abdominal fat distribution is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, independently of overall adiposity. (c) International definition of abdominal obesity in children is required to standardize studies and to progress in the evaluation of childhood obesity and its consequences. PMID:17445535

Botton, Jérémie; Heude, Barbara; Kettaneh, Adrien; Borys, Jean-Michel; Lommez, Agnès; Bresson, Jean-Louis; Ducimetiere, Pierre; Charles, Marie-Aline

2007-05-01

400

A struggle for freedom; Maxwell Anderson, 1938-1952  

E-print Network

plays and other writings are examined to analyze the author's per- spective on certain crises faced by the American people during this period. The Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War and the period of intense national fear of communist... and defended, and the This thesis will follow the form and style of the American Historical Review. restrictions he believed should be placed on those Americans who threatened society. The playwright advocated that American Communists should be denied...

Odeski, Thomas Francis

1979-01-01

401

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

Meuleman, G. Allyn

1987-06-01

402

The Planning of Higher Education. The Social Demand. Educational Studies and Social Sciences: A Third Level Course. Economics and Education Policy II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two papers comprising Block II of a course in economics and education policy are presented along with a conclusion to Block I and II of the series published by the Open University. The first paper, "Education as a Social Investment," by Vera Morris, focuses on such areas as the identification of costs and benefits, the return on the social…

Morris, Vera; And Others

403

Visual test of subparts per billion-level copper(ii) by Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction coupled with a functionalized gold nanoparticle probe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By combining Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction with a gold nanoparticle-based visual test, a novel method was developed for the field assay of Cu(ii) in environmental water at subparts per billion-levels within 30 min. When a 200 mL water sample was treated with 12.5 mg L-1 Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the proposed procedure, the detection limit with the naked eye was 0.2 ?g L-1 Cu(ii). The proposed method is very specific to Cu(ii), with tolerance against at least 100-fold amounts of other environmentally relevant metal ions except for Hg(ii) (25-fold), and was successfully applied to the detection of trace Cu(ii) in tap water, river water, and treated wastewater, and results agreed well with that determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).By combining Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction with a gold nanoparticle-based visual test, a novel method was developed for the field assay of Cu(ii) in environmental water at subparts per billion-levels within 30 min. When a 200 mL water sample was treated with 12.5 mg L-1 Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the proposed procedure, the detection limit with the naked eye was 0.2 ?g L-1 Cu(ii). The proposed method is very specific to Cu(ii), with tolerance against at least 100-fold amounts of other environmentally relevant metal ions except for Hg(ii) (25-fold), and was successfully applied to the detection of trace Cu(ii) in tap water, river water, and treated wastewater, and results agreed well with that determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, synthesis, and characterization of Cys-AuNPs and Fe3O4 NPs, magnetic-solid phase extraction and colorimetric test procedures, and effects of parameters on the extraction efficiency. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31753b

Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Jing-Fu; Jiang, Gui-Bin

2012-10-01

404

Evidence of Non-Mean-Field-Like Low-Temperature Behavior in the Edwards-Anderson Spin-Glass Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The three and four-dimensional Edwards-Anderson and mean-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin glasses are studied via large-scale Monte Carlo simulations at low temperatures, deep within the spin-glass phase. Performing a careful statistical analysis of several thousand independent disorder realizations and using an observable that detects peaks in the overlap distribution, we show that the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and Edwards-Anderson models have a distinctly different low-temperature behavior. The structure of the spin-glass overlap distribution for the Edwards-Anderson model suggests that its low-temperature phase has only a single pair of pure states.

Yucesoy, Burcu; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Machta, Jonathan

2013-03-01

405

Induction of a Stem Lexicon for Two-level Morphological Analysis Erika F. de Lima  

E-print Network

natural language processing tasks. Hand-coded lists used in morphological processing are expensive!1 II II II II II II I! II II II II II Induction of a Stem Lexicon for Two-level Morphological Analysis Erika F. de Lima Institute for Natural Language Processing Stuttgart University Azenbergstr. 12

406

TRIHALOMETHANE LEVELS IN HOME TAP WATER AND SEMEN QUALITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Trihalomethane Levels in Home Tap Water and Semen Quality Laura Fenster, 1 Kirsten Waller, 2 Gayle Windham, 1 Tanya Henneman, 2 Meredith Anderson, 2 Pauline Mendola, 3 James W. Overstreet, 4 Shanna H. Swan5 1California Department of Health Services, Division of Environm...

407

MD Anderson researchers find that breast cancer spread may be tied to cells that regulate blood flow  

Cancer.gov

Scientists at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center believe that targeting blood vessel cells known as pericytes may offer a potential new therapeutic approach when combined with vascular growth factors responsible for cell death.

408

77 FR 72906 - Chessie Logistics Co., LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Board [Docket No. FD 35700] Chessie Logistics Co., LLC--Acquisition and Operation...Emil Anderson & Son, Inc. Chessie Logistics Co., LLC (Chessie), a noncarrier...Erbacher, Legal Counsel, Chessie Logistics Co., LLC, 1001 Green Bay Rd.,...

2012-12-06

409

Fixation techniques for the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: early follow-up. A systematic review of level I and II therapeutic studies.  

PubMed

The purpose of our study was that to systematically review the fixation techniques for the ACL reconstruction and associated clinical outcomes at the early follow-up. Systematic search on three electronic databases (Cochrane register, Medline and Embase) of fixation devices used for primary ACL reconstruction with doubled semitendinosus and gracilis and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts in randomized clinical trials of level I and II of evidence published from January 2001 to December 2011. Therapeutic studies collected were with a minimum 12-month follow-up, and the clinical outcomes were evaluated by at least one of International Knee Documentation Committee, Lysholm and Tegner functional scales and at least one of the following knee stability tests: arthrometric AP tibial translation, Lachman test and pivot-shift test. Nineteen articles met the inclusion criteria. At the femoral side cross-pin, metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable interference screw, and suspensory device were used in 32.3, 27.3, 24.8, 15.5% of patients, respectively. At the tibial side fixation was achieved with metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable interference screw, screw and plastic sheath, screw post and cross-pin in 38.7, 31, 15.7, 12.8, and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Side-to-side anterior-posterior tibial translation was 1.9 ± 0.9, 1.5 ± 0.9, 1.5 ± 0.8, 2.2 ± 0.4 mm for metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable screw, cross-pin and suspensory device, respectively. At least two-third of all the patients achieved good-to-excellent clinical outcomes. Rate of failure was 6.1, 3.3, 1.7 and 1.2% for bioabsorbable interference screw, metallic interference screw, cross-pin and suspensory device, respectively. Clinical outcomes are good to excellent in almost two-third of the patients but several pitfalls that affect the current fixation techniques as graft tensioning such as graft-tunnel motion are still unaddressed. PMID:25269758

Speziali, Andrea; Delcogliano, Marco; Tei, Matteo; Placella, Giacomo; Bartoli, Matteo; Menghi, Amerigo; Cerulli, Giuliano

2014-12-01

410

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 43 (CHESVT00110043) on State Highway 11, crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Chester, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

76-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of two 37-foot concrete Tee-beam spans (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening. The computed opening-skew-to-roadway was 30 degrees but the historical records indicate this angle is 25 degrees. Scour protection measures at the site consist of type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the downstream banks and the upstream right wing wall. Type-2 (less than 36 inches diameter) stone fill protection is noted on the upstream and downstream left wingwalls and upstream along the left bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 7.2 to 10.7 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for the right abutment. Pier scour ranged from 7.3 to 8.6 ft. The worst-case pier scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths

Striker, Lora K.; Burns, Ronda L.

1997-01-01

411

Effective models for Anderson impurity and Kondo problems from continuous unitary transformations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The method of continuous unitary transformations (CUTs) is applied to the Anderson impurity and the Kondo model aiming at the systematic derivation of convergent effective models. If CUTs are applied in a conventional way, diverging differential equations occur. Similar to poor man's scaling, the energy scale, below which the couplings diverge, corresponds to the Kondo temperature TK. We present a way to apply CUTs to the Kondo and to the Anderson impurity model so that no divergences occur but a converged effective low-energy model is derived with small finite parameters at arbitrarily small energies. The ground state corresponds to a bound singlet with a binding energy given by the Kondo temperature TK.

Krones, Jörn; Uhrig, Götz S.

2015-03-01

412

A finite-frequency functional RG approach to the single impurity Anderson model  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use the Matsubara functional renormalization group (FRG) to describe\\u000aelectronic correlations within the single impurity Anderson model. In contrast\\u000ato standard FRG calculations, we account for the frequency-dependence of the\\u000atwo-particle vertex in order to address finite-energy properties (e.g, spectral\\u000afunctions). By comparing with data obtained from the numerical renormalization\\u000agroup (NRG) framework, the FRG approximation is shown to

C. Karrasch; R. Hedden; R. Peters; Th. Pruschke; K Schonhammer; V. Meden

2008-01-01

413

A finite-frequency functional renormalization group approach to the single impurity Anderson model  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use the Matsubara functional renormalization group (FRG) to describe electronic correlations within the single impurity Anderson model. In contrast to standard FRG calculations, we account for the frequency dependence of the two-particle vertex in order to address finite-energy properties (e.g, spectral functions). By comparing with data obtained from the numerical renormalization group (NRG) framework, the FRG approximation is shown

C. Karrasch; R. Hedden; R. Peters; Th Pruschke; K. Schönhammer; V. Meden

2008-01-01

414

Anderson Localization of Expanding Bose-Einstein Condensates in Random Potentials  

Microsoft Academic Search

We show that the expansion of an initially confined interacting 1D Bose-Einstein condensate can exhibit Anderson localization in a weak random potential with correlation length sigmaR. For speckle potentials the Fourier transform of the correlation function vanishes for momenta k>2\\/sigmaR so that the Lyapunov exponent vanishes in the Born approximation for k>1\\/sigmaR. Then, for the initial healing length of the

Laurent Sanchez-Palencia; D. Clément; Pierre Lugan; Philippe Bouyer; Georgy V. Shlyapnikov; Alain Aspect

2007-01-01

415

Counting statistics for the Anderson impurity model: Bethe ansatz and Fermi liquid study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the counting statistics of charge transport in the Anderson impurity\\u000amodel (AIM) employing both Keldysh perturbation theory in a Fermi liquid\\u000apicture and the Bethe ansatz. In the Fermi liquid approach, the object of our\\u000aprincipal interest is the generating function for the cumulants of the charge\\u000acurrent distribution. We derive an exact analytic formula relating the full

A. O. Gogolin; R. M. Konik; A. W. W. Ludwig; H. Saleur

2007-01-01

416

Mott-Anderson freeze-out and the strange matter "horn"  

E-print Network

We discuss the $\\sqrt{s}$-dependence of the $K^+/\\pi^+$ ratio in heavy-ion collisions (the "horn" effect) within a Mott-Anderson localization model for chemical freeze-out. The different response of pion and kaon radii to the hot and dense hadronic medium results in different freeze-out conditions. We demonstrate within a simple model that this circumstance enhances the "horn" effect relative to statistical models with universal chemical freeze-out.

Naskret, M; Dubinin, A

2015-01-01

417

Direct observation of Anderson localization of matter waves in a controlled disorder.  

PubMed

In 1958, Anderson predicted the localization of electronic wavefunctions in disordered crystals and the resulting absence of diffusion. It is now recognized that Anderson localization is ubiquitous in wave physics because it originates from the interference between multiple scattering paths. Experimentally, localization has been reported for light waves, microwaves, sound waves and electron gases. However, there has been no direct observation of exponential spatial localization of matter waves of any type. Here we observe exponential localization of a Bose-Einstein condensate released into a one-dimensional waveguide in the presence of a controlled disorder created by laser speckle. We operate in a regime of pure Anderson localization, that is, with weak disorder-such that localization results from many quantum reflections of low amplitude-and an atomic density low enough to render interactions negligible. We directly image the atomic density profiles as a function of time, and find that weak disorder can stop the expansion and lead to the formation of a stationary, exponentially localized wavefunction-a direct signature of Anderson localization. We extract the localization length by fitting the exponential wings of the profiles, and compare it to theoretical calculations. The power spectrum of the one-dimensional speckle potentials has a high spatial frequency cutoff, causing exponential localization to occur only when the de Broglie wavelengths of the atoms in the expanding condensate are greater than an effective mobility edge corresponding to that cutoff. In the opposite case, we find that the density profiles decay algebraically, as predicted in ref. 13. The method presented here can be extended to localization of atomic quantum gases in higher dimensions, and with controlled interactions. PMID:18548065

Billy, Juliette; Josse, Vincent; Zuo, Zhanchun; Bernard, Alain; Hambrecht, Ben; Lugan, Pierre; Clément, David; Sanchez-Palencia, Laurent; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain

2008-06-12

418

High prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with Anderson–Fabry disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Anderson–Fabry disease is a rare lysosomal storage disorder. It results from a deficiency of the lysosomal ?-galactosidase\\u000a A and leads to progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in the endothelium and tissue cells of various organs. Some\\u000a of the typical clinical findings such as tiredness, dry skin, myalgia and arthralgia as well as vague gastrointestinal complaints\\u000a are also symptoms of hypothyroidism. Therefore,

A. C. Hauser; A. Gessl; M. Lorenz; T. Voigtländer; M. Födinger; G. Sunder-Plassmann

2005-01-01

419

Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty in horseshoe kidney in children: is it effective without symphysiotomy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contemporary reports on surgery for horseshoe kidney (HK) still recommend isthmotomy and lateropexy to complete an open pyeloplasty.\\u000a To evaluate whether simple Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty without symphysiotomy is effective for relief of ureteropelvic junction\\u000a obstruction (UPJO) in HK, we studied the records of ten children, two of whom had bilateral UPJO. Only one child presented\\u000a with calculi; 11 units were operated

T. Schuster; H. G. Dietz; S. Schütz

1999-01-01

420

MD Anderson study finds Black patients with kidney cancer have poorer survival than whites  

Cancer.gov

Among patients with the most common form of kidney cancer, whites consistently have a survival advantage over blacks, regardless of patient and tumor characteristics or surgical treatment. That is the conclusion of a new University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study's results suggest that additional efforts are needed to prolong the survival of all patients with kidney cancer.

421

MD Anderson study finds qigong improves quality of life for breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy  

Cancer.gov

Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found qigong, an ancient mind-body practice, reduces depressive symptoms and improves quality of life in women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. The study, published in the journal Cancer, is the first to examine qigong in patients actively receiving radiation therapy and includes a follow-up period to assess benefits over time.

422

Efficient localization bounds in a continuous multi-particle Anderson model with long-range interaction  

E-print Network

We establish strong dynamical localization for a class of multi-particle Anderson models in a Euclidean space with an alloy-type random potential and a sub-exponentially decaying interaction of infinite range. For the first time in the mathematical literature, the uniform decay bounds on the eigenfunction correlators at low energies are proved, in the multi-particle continuous configuration space, in the norm-distance and not in the Hausdorff pseudo-metric.

Victor Chulaevsky

2014-07-17

423

MD Anderson-led study finds LIFR protein suppresses breast cancer metastasis  

Cancer.gov

A receptor protein suppresses local invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells, the most lethal aspect of the disease, according to a research team headed by scientists from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Reporting in Nature Medicine, the team described using high-throughput RNA sequencing to identify the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) as a novel suppressor of breast cancer metastasis, the spread of the disease to other organs.

424

MD Anderson study shows new approach connecting smokers to quit lines increases smoking cessation treatment enrollment  

Cancer.gov

Self-identified smokers directly connected to a tobacco cessation quit line are 13 times more likely to enroll in a treatment program as compared to smokers who are handed a quit line referral card and encouraged to call on their own, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and published online in JAMA Internal Medicine.

425

Anderson Localization and Nonlinearity in One-Dimensional Disordered Photonic Lattices  

Microsoft Academic Search

We experimentally investigate the evolution of linear and nonlinear waves in a realization of the Anderson model using disordered one-dimensional waveguide lattices. Two types of localized eigenmodes, flat-phased and staggered, are directly measured. Nonlinear perturbations enhance localization in one type and induce delocalization in the other. In a complementary approach, we study the evolution on short time scales of delta-like

Yoav Lahini; Assaf Avidan; Francesca Pozzi; Marc Sorel; Roberto Morandotti; Demetrios N. Christodoulides; Yaron Silberberg

2008-01-01

426

The Anderson Mine (Arizona)--An early diagenetic uranium deposit in Miocene Lake Sediments  

SciTech Connect

The Anderson mine is located in Yavapai County, West-Central Arizona, an area forming part of the Basin and Range province. The uranium deposit occurs in the Miocene Chapin Wash Formation, a sequence of interbedded lacustrine and alluvial sediments. Uranium mineralization is confined to the lacustrine facies of Chapin Wash sediments, composed of tuffaceous mudstones, fine-grained sandstones, and silicified marlstones. South of the Anderson mine outcrop zone, the lacustrine sequence reaches an average thickness of 150 m, including two basal carbonaceous horizons of 37 and 35 m in thickness. Uranium is locally associated with high values of Mo, As, and V. In drill core samples, highgrade mineralization (up to 2.2% U) is confined to individual seams of lignitic coal, forms halos around rootlet remains, and fills burrows or irregular fractures. Spotlike concentrations are associated with framboidal pyrite spheres. Uranyl-bearing opaline silica and colloform coffinite have been identified as main ore minerals. Uranium was preconcentrated during early diagenesis by sorption onto colloidal humic substance, silica gel, and zeolites. Subsequent precipitation as coffinite was mainly controlled by bacteriogenic H/sub 2/S gas. At present, both mineralized carbonaceous horizons are in a state of radiogenic equilibrium. Uranium mineralization was displaced by late Miocene to early Pliocene tectonic movements along Basin and Range normal faults. The Anderson mine may be classified as a strata-bound, low-temperature deposit in lacustrine sediments formed by complex sorption and precipitation processes in an early diagenetic environment.

Mueller, A.; Halbach, P.

1983-03-01

427

Approximation of modified Anderson-Darling test statistics for extreme value distributions with unknown shape parameter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies of the goodness-of-fit test, which describes how well a model fits a set of observations with an assumed distribution, have long been the subject of statistical research. The selection of an appropriate probability distribution is generally based on goodness-of-fit tests. This test is an effective means of examining how well a sample data set agrees with an assumed probability distribution that represents its population. However, the empirical distribution function test gives equal weight to the differences between the empirical and theoretical distribution functions corresponding to all observations. The modified Anderson-Darling test, suggested by Ahmad et al. (1988), uses a weight function that emphasizes the tail deviations at the upper or lower tails. In this study, we derive new regression equation forms of the critical values for the modified Anderson-Darling test statistics considering the effect of unknown shape parameters. The regression equations are derived using simulation experiments for extreme value distributions such as the log-Gumbel, generalized Pareto, GEV, and generalized logistic models. In addition, power test and at-site frequency analyses are performed to evaluate the performance and to explain the applicability of the modified Anderson-Darling test.

Heo, Jun-Haeng; Shin, Hongjoon; Nam, Woosung; Om, Juseong; Jeong, Changsam

2013-08-01

428

The 2012 Thomas Hunt Morgan medal: Kathryn V. Anderson.  

PubMed

The Genetics Society of America annually honors members who have made outstanding contributions to genetics. The Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal recognizes a lifetime contribution to the science of genetics. The Genetics Society of America Medal recognizes particularly outstanding contributions to the science of genetics over the past 31 years. The George W. Beadle Medal recognizes distinguished service to the field of genetics and the community of geneticists. The Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education recognizes individuals or groups who have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level, from kindergarten through graduate school and beyond. The Novitski Prize recognizes an extraordinary level of creativity and intellectual ingenuity in solving significant problems in biological research through the application of genetic methods. We are pleased to announce the 2012 awards. PMID:22701044

Wolfner, Mariana F; Schedl, Tim

2012-06-01

429

Competency-Based Adult Basic Education Manual for Level I (0-4.9) and Level II (5-8). A Training Manual for CBABE Instruction and Program Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This training manual was developed as a source of information about Competency-Based Adult Basic Education (CBABE) for administrators, counselors, and teachers involved in the implementation of a CBABE program. After section I provides an introduction to Brevard Community College's development of CBABE curricula, section II explains the purposes…

Singer, Elizabeth; And Others

430

Effects of stabilized rice bran, its soluble and fiber fractions on blood glucose levels and serum lipid parameters in humans with diabetes mellitus Types I and II  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stabilized rice bran (SRB), a source of complex carbohydrates, tocols, ?-oryzanols, and polyphenols, was treated with carbohydrases and heat to yield two fractions, rice bran water solubles (RBWS), and rice bran fiber concentrates (RBFC). Stabilized rice bran and its fractions were fed for 60 days to insulin-dependent and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM = Type I and NIDDM = Type II)

Asaf A Qureshi; Saeed A Sami; Farooq A Khan

2002-01-01

431

Duplication, balancing selection and trans-species evolution explain the high levels of polymorphism of the DQA MHC class II gene in voles (Arvicolinae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play important role in host–parasite interactions and parasites are crucial factors influencing the population dynamics of hosts. We described the structure and diversity of exon 2 of the MHC class II DQA gene in three species of voles (Arvicolinae) exhibiting regular multi-annual fluctuations of population density and analysed the processes leading to the observed MHC

J. Bryja; M. Galan; N. Charbonnel; J. F. Cosson

2006-01-01

432

Xylosyltransferase II is the predominant isoenzyme which is responsible for the steady-state level of xylosyltransferase activity in human serum.  

PubMed

In mammals, two active xylosyltransferase isoenzymes (EC 2.4.2.16) exist. Both xylosyltransferases I and II (XT-I and XT-II) catalyze the transfer of xylose from UDP-xylose to select serine residues in the proteoglycan core protein. Altered XT activity in human serum was found to correlate directly with various diseases such as osteoarthritis, systemic sclerosis, liver fibrosis, and pseudoxanthoma elasticum. To interpret the significance of the enzyme activity alteration observed in disease states it is important to know which isoenzyme is responsible for the XT activity in serum. Until now it was impossible for a specific measurement of XT-I or XT-II activity, respectively, because of the absence of a suitable enzyme substrate. This issue has now been solved and the following experimental study demonstrates for the first time, via the enzyme activity that XT-II is the predominant isoenzyme responsible for XT activity in human serum. The proof was performed using natural UDP-xylose as the xylose donor, as well as the artificial compound UDP-4-azido-4-deoxyxylose, which is a selective xylose donor for XT-I. PMID:25748573

Kuhn, Joachim; Götting, Christian; Beahm, Brendan J; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Faust, Isabel; Kuzaj, Patricia; Knabbe, Cornelius; Hendig, Doris

2015-04-10

433

Drosophila Casein Kinase I Alpha Regulates Homolog Pairing and Genome Organization by Modulating Condensin II Subunit Cap-H2 Levels  

PubMed Central

The spatial organization of chromosomes within interphase nuclei is important for gene expression and epigenetic inheritance. Although the extent of physical interaction between chromosomes and their degree of compaction varies during development and between different cell-types, it is unclear how regulation of chromosome interactions and compaction relate to spatial organization of genomes. Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying chromosomal interactions including homolog pairing. Recent work has shown that condensin II governs both interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing and condensin II activity is controlled by the turnover of its regulatory subunit Cap-H2. Specifically, Cap-H2 is a target of the SCFSlimb E3 ubiquitin-ligase which down-regulates Cap-H2 in order to maintain homologous chromosome pairing, chromosome length and proper nuclear organization. Here, we identify Casein Kinase I alpha (CK1?) as an additional negative-regulator of Cap-H2. CK1?-depletion stabilizes Cap-H2 protein and results in an accumulation of Cap-H2 on chromosomes. Similar to Slimb mutation, CK1? depletion in cultured cells, larval salivary gland, and nurse cells results in several condensin II-dependent phenotypes including dispersal of centromeres, interphase chromosome compaction, and chromosome unpairing. Moreover, CK1? loss-of-function mutations dominantly suppress condensin II mutant phenotypes in vivo. Thus, CK1? facilitates Cap-H2 destruction and modulates nuclear organization by attenuating chromatin localized Cap-H2 protein. PMID:25723539

Nguyen, Huy Q.; Nye, Jonathan; Buster, Daniel W.; Klebba, Joseph E.; Rogers, Gregory C.; Bosco, Giovanni

2015-01-01

434

Massive bowel resection upregulates the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II and apolipoprotein A-IV and alters the intestinal vitamin A status in rats.  

PubMed

Short bowel (SB) syndrome causes the malabsorption of various nutrients. Among these, vitamin A is important for a number of physiological activities. Vitamin A is absorbed by epithelial cells of the small intestine and is discharged into the lymphatic vessels as a component of chylomicrons and is delivered to the liver. In the present study, we used a rat model of SB syndrome in order to assess its effects on the expression of genes associated with the absorption, transport and metabolism of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II (CRBP II, gene symbol Rbp2) and apolipoprotein A-IV (gene symbol Apoa4) were higher than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by RT-qPCR. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that absorptive epithelial cells stained positive for both CRBP II and lecithin retinol acyltransferase, which are both required for the effective esterification of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the retinol content in the ileum and the retinyl ester content in the jejunum were lower than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by quantitative analysis of retinol and retinyl esters by high performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that the elevated mRNA expression levels of Rbp2 and Apoa4 in the rats with SB contribute to the effective esterification and transport of vitamin A. PMID:25585692

Hebiguchi, Taku; Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Morii, Mayako; Watanabe, Ryo; Yoshikawa, Kiwamu; Miura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Katsuyuki; Senoo, Haruki; Yoshino, Hiroaki

2015-03-01

435

In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 2. Federal Regions I, II, and III  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 and EPA regulations set up stringent requirements for the control of emissions in areas where the National Ambient Air Quality Standards were being exceeded. Implementation plans have been devised by the various states for the attainment of those standards. This second volume of the five-volume series presents outlines of the plans in Federal Regions I, II, and III and maps of the nonattainment status of counties and subcounty areas in each state. Federal Region I consists of the following states: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region II is made up of New Jersey and New York; Federal Region III is composed of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. (JGB)

Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

1980-02-01

436

Zyflamend, a polyherbal mixture, down regulates class I and class II histone deacetylases and increases p21 levels in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Background Zyflamend, a mixture containing extracts of ten herbs, has shown promise in a variety of preclinical cancer models, including prostate cancer. The current experiments were designed to investigate the effects of Zyflamend on the expression of class I and II histone deacetylases, a family of enzymes known to be over expressed in a variety of cancers. Methods CWR22Rv1 cells, a castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell line, were treated with Zyflamend and the expression of class I and II histone deacetylases, along with their downstream target the tumor suppressor gene p21, was investigated. Involvement of p21 was confirmed with siRNA knockdown and over expression experiments. Results Zyflamend down-regulated the expression of all class I and II histone deacetylases where Chinese goldthread and baikal skullcap (two of its components) appear to be primarily responsible for these results. In addition, Zyflamend up regulated the histone acetyl transferase complex CBP/p300, potentially contributing to the increase in histone 3 acetylation. Expression of the tumor suppressor gene p21, a known downstream target of histone deacetylases and CBP/p300, was increased by Zyflamend treatment and the effect on p21 was, in part, mediated through Erk1/2. Knockdown of p21 with siRNA technology attenuated Zyflamend-induced growth inhibition. Over expression of p21 inhibited cell growth and concomitant treatment with Zyflamend enhanced this effect. Conclusions Our results suggest that the extracts of this polyherbal combination increase histone 3 acetylation, inhibit the expression of class I and class II histone deacetylases, increase the activation of CBP/p300 and inhibit cell proliferation, in part, by up regulating p21 expression. PMID:24555771

2014-01-01

437

Effect of Cd(II) and Se(IV) exposure on cellular distribution of both elements and concentration levels of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in Lepidium sativum.  

PubMed

In this work, the effect of cadmium (0-5.0 mg L(-1) as cadmium chloride, Cd(II)) and selenium (0-2.0 mg L(-1) as sodium selenite, Se(IV)) was studied in Lepidium sativum with specific focus on glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MGO) and on the cellular distribution of both elements under different exposure conditions. The concentrations of two reactive ?-ketoaldehydes present as natural metabolites and as by-products of lipid peroxidation, were increased in plants treated with Cd(II), providng complementary experimental evidence on element phytotoxicity in garden cress, in terms of oxidative damage. Even though for higher than 1.0 mg L(-1) Se in medium similar adverse effect was found, under simultaneous exposure to both elements the changes in GO and MGO concentrations were clearly attenuated as compared to a single stressor treatment. This effect was accompanied by lower uptake of the two elements, significant decrease of their relative distribution in the fraction containing polar compounds and their increase in fraction corresponding to insoluble cell fragments/components, suggesting that the direct in vivo interaction between two element forms might be involved in the favorable effects of simultaneous treatment with Cd(II) + Se(IV). The fluorescence spectra obtained for biomass extracts corresponding to different exposure conditions suggested possible in vivo formation of CdSe quantum dots; however further studies are needed for ultimate identification and characterization of such nanoparticulate species. PMID:23799538

Gómez Ojeda, Armando; Corrales Escobosa, Alma Rosa; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Yanez Barrientos, Eunice; Wrobel, Katarzyna

2013-09-01

438

Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240°C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85°C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63°C in 1889, 42–52°C from 1974 through 1991, and 77°C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98°C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3°C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring. During August–October 1999, several field trips were conducted in the vicinity of Anderson Springs to continue monitoring and sampling the thermal manifestations. The new fumarolic area had increased in temperature and in discharge intensity since 1998, and a zone of dead trees had developed on the steep bank directly west of the fumaroles. Ground temperatures and diffuse flow of CO2 flow through soils were measured in the area surrounding the main spring and new fumaroles and in the zone of tree-kill.

Janik, C.J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M.L.; Rytuba, J.J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E.M.; Huebner, M.; White, L.D.; Foster, A.

1999-01-01

439

Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.  

PubMed

For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault." PMID:25423683

O'Connell, William D

2014-11-01

440

Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.  

PubMed

For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeate