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Sample records for andes centrales del

  1. Tectonics of the central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Arthur L.; Isacks, Bryan L.; Fielding, Eric J.; Fox, Andrew N.; Gubbels, Timothy L.

    1989-01-01

    Acquisition of nearly complete coverage of Thematic Mapper data for the central Andes between about 15 to 34 degrees S has stimulated a comprehensive and unprecedented study of the interaction of tectonics and climate in a young and actively developing major continental mountain belt. The current state of the synoptic mapping of key physiographic, tectonic, and climatic indicators of the dynamics of the mountain/climate system are briefly reviewed.

  2. LANDSAT imagery of the Central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komer, C. A.; Morgan, P.

    1986-01-01

    The central Andes of South America extend from approximately 14 deg. S to 28 deg. S as an unbroken chain of mountains and volcanoes over 2000 km long. It is here that the Nazca plate dives under the South American plate at angles varying from 10 deg to 30 deg. Very little is known about the volcanoes comprising this classic, subduction-type plate margin. A catalogue of the volcanoes in the central Andes is being prepared by Dr. P.W. Francis and Dr. C.A. Wood at the NASA Lunar and Planetary Institute. At present, more than 800 volcanoes of Cenozoic age have been recognized in the chain, with an estimated 75-80 major, active Quarternary volcanoes. Approximately one hundred 1536 x 1536 pixel color composite Optronics positives were produced from six full LANDSAT Thermatic Mapper scenes and three partial TM scenes. These positives cover a large portion of the central Andes. The positives were produced from LANDSAT data using the VAX imaging package, LIPS. The scenes were first transferred from magnetic tape to disk. The LIPS package was then used to select volcanically interesting areas which were then electronically enhanced. Finally, the selected areas were transferred back to tape and printed on the Optronics equipment. The pictures are color composites using LANDSAT TM bands 7,4, and 2 in the red, green, and blue filters, respectively.

  3. Trench investigation on the main strand of the Boconó fault in its central section, at Mesa del Caballo, Mérida Andes, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard M., Franck A.; Ollarves, Reinaldo; Bechtold, Michel; Díaz, Gustavo; Beck, Christian; Carrillo, Eduardo; Pantosti, Daniela; Diederix, Hans

    2008-11-01

    The Mesa del Caballo trench assessment confirms the Holocene activity of the main strand of the Boconó fault at the Apartaderos pull-apart basin. Fifteen earthquakes, of which fourteen have been radiocarbon dated, have been recognized, spanning the last 20,500 yr. Recurrence intervals of these ≥ 7 magnitude events are variable. The dominant mode of recurrence is 400-450 yr, and the second one is 900 yr. Eventually some events are 1400-1800 yr apart. We suspect that our seismic record may be incomplete. This could be easily justified by several conditions: most of the earthquake recognitions is based on open-crack filling and they superpose spatially (eventually masking or destroying older fills), trenching may miss some events because the fault is made of en echelon Riedel shears, and a short return period may lead to faint differences between paleosoils few hundreds years of age apart. This trench also images an older activity of the fault, as evidenced by plentiful earthquake-triggered liquefaction features, as well as slumping and rotational sliding. By comparing paleoseismic results between the Morro de Los Hoyos and Mesa del Caballo trenches, it appears that both fault strands bounding the Apartaderos pull-apart basin move simultaneously. Besides, the main strand also coseismically slips twice in between those common events. In other words, the seismic scenario could be that the northern strand recurs every 1200-1350 yr while the southern does every 400-450 yr. This is also in agreement with a respective slip share of 25 and 75% of the 9-10 mm/yr average slip of the Boconó fault in the Mérida Andes central sector.

  4. 3D density model of the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezzi, Claudia B.; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Schmidt, Sabine

    2009-12-01

    We developed a 3D density model of the continental crust, the subducted plate and the upper mantle of the Central Andes between 20-29°S and 74-61°W through the forward modelling of Bouguer anomaly. The goal of this contribution is to gain insight on the lithospheric structure integrating the available information (geophysical, geologic, petrologic, and geochemical) in a single model. The geometry of our model is defined and constrained by hypocentre location, reflection and refraction on and offshore seismic lines, travel time and attenuation tomography, receiver function analysis, magnetotelluric studies, thermal models and balanced structural cross-sections. The densities allocated to the different bodies are calculated considering petrologic and geochemical data and pressure and temperature conditions. The model consists of 31 parallel E-W vertical planes, where the continental crust comprises distinct bodies, which represent the different morphotectonic units of the Central Andes. We include a partial melting zone at midcrustal depths under the Altiplano-Puna (low-velocity zone) and consider the presence of a rheologically strong block beneath the Salar de Atacama basin, according to recent seismic studies. Contour maps of the depth of the continental Moho, the thickness of the lower crust and the depth to the bottom of the lithosphere below South America are produced. The possible percentage of partial melt in the Central Andes low-velocity zone is estimated. The residual anomaly is calculated by subtracting from the Bouguer anomaly the gravimetric effect of the modelled subducted slab and of the modelled Moho. Isostatic anomalies are calculated from regional and local isostatic Mohos calculated with and without internal loads, derived from our gravity model, which are then compared to the modelled continental Moho. This study contributes to a more detailed knowledge of the lithospheric structure of this region of the Andes and provides an integrated 3D

  5. Paleoatimetry of southern Tibet and the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quade, J.; Dettinger, M. P.; DeCelles, P. G.; Leary, R.; Kapp, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Here we explore a variety of isotopic systems to reconstruct paleoatitude in southern Tibet and the central Andes. A multi-system approach is essential since the necessary mineral archives are not always available, and because diagenetic resetting of some systems clearly occurs. In the central Andes at ~24°S, carbonate is rare due to hyperaridity, and where present, evaporation in soils and lakes completely alters the primary meteoric signal. Waters of hydration of volcanic glass are a much more promising target in this region given the prevalence of volcanic tuffs. We have analyzed the δD value of a suite of modern and ancient glasses back to 34 Ma that show little change in elevation in the western Cordillera of the Andes. By contrast, the eastern Cordillera of the Andes rose in the last 15 Ma. This pattern is consistent with gradual eastward propagation of the whole orogen at this latitude, including the trench, forearc, magmatic arc, and foreland. The paleoaltimetry of Tibet poses quite different challenges to those in South America. Volcanic glass archives are so far unavailable, whereas carbonate archives are common but in some cases diagenetically reset. We have focused on records of conventional δ18O values and clumped isotope thermometry. One must treat both archives with great caution due to resetting, especially clumped isotopes. Available evidence suggests that southern Tibet has been near current elevations since the early Miocene. For the pre- Miocene we present new isotopic/paleosol records found along the suture zone of India and Asia that we believe partly chronicle the rise of the suture zone from near sea-level to >4000 m today.

  6. Crustal-thickness variations in the central Andes

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, S.L.; Myers, S.C.; Wallace, T.C.; Zandt, G. |; Silver, P.G.; Drake, L.

    1996-05-01

    We estimated the crustal thickness along an east-west transect across the Andes at lat 20{degree}S and along a north-south transect along the eastern edge of the Altiplano from data recorded on two arrays of portable broadband seismic stations (BANJO and SEDA). We found crustal-thickness variations of nearly 40 km across the Andes. Maximum crustal thicknesses of 70-74 km under the Western Cordillera and the Eastern Cordillera thin to 32-38 km 200 km east of the Andes in the Chaco Plain. The central Altiplano at 20{degree}S has crustal thicknesses of 60 to 65 km. The crust also appears to thicken from north (16{degree}S, 55-60 km) to south (20{degree}S, 70-74 km) along the Eastern Cordillera. The Subandean zone crust has intermediate thicknesses of 43 to 47 km. Crustal-thickness predictions for the Andes based on Airy-type isostatic behavior show remarkable overall correlation with observed crustal thickness in the regions of high elevation. In contrast, at the boundary between the Eastern Cordillera and the Subandean zone and in the Chaco Plain, the crust is thinner than predicted, suggesting that the crust in these regions is supported in part by the flexural rigidity of a strong lithosphere. With additional constraints, we conclude that the observation of Airy-type isostasy is consistent with thickening associated with compressional shortening of a weak lithosphere squeezed between the stronger lithosphere of the subducting Nazca plate and the cratonic lithosphere of the Brazilian craton. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Giant evaporite belts of the Neogene central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Ricardo N.; Jordan, Teresa E.; Tabbutt, Kenneth T.; Vandervoort, Dirk S.

    1991-04-01

    Large volumes of continental evaporites accumulated within the central Andes during Neogene uplift of the Altiplano-Puna plateau and development of the Andean volcanic arc. Halite and gypsum are dominant minerals, along with local and economically important borates. Playa conditions have existed since ca. 15 Ma; halite and borate deposition has occurred for the past 7 to 8 m.y. Evaporites formed in salar environments (e.g., playa lakes) and are characterized by complex mineral assemblages, occurrence, zonation, and geochemistry. Evaporite deposition was controlled by volcanism, geothermal activity, closed drainage, and climate. These Andean deposits, and their controls, differ from evaporites in other continental and marine environments.

  8. Altiplano-Puna volcanic complex of the central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Silva, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    A model is presented accounting for many features of the Altiplano-Puna volcanic complex situated in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes which contains 50 recently active volcanoes. The dominant elements of the complex are several large nested caldera complexes which are the source structures for the major regionally distributed ignimbrite sheets that characterize the complex. The study of the complex reveals the importance of the intersection of subsidiary axis-oblique tectonic trends related to regional stress fields peculiar to individual oceanic ridge sections with the axis-parallel trends predominant at all spreading centers in localizing hydrothermal discharge zones.

  9. Heinrich I and Younger Dryas Glaciation in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, J.; Zech, R.; May, J.; Kubik, P. W.; Veit, H.

    2009-12-01

    Short term climate reversals, such as Heinrich I (H-I) and the Younger Dryas (YD), are well documented in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the respective response of the climate system in the Southern Hemisphere during these events remains enigmatic. Here we present 10Be surface exposure ages from the Wara Wara Valley (17°S, 66°W), Cordillera Cochabamba, that reveal glacial advances in the Central Andes before 14.3 ka and 11.9 ka. These advances correlate with H-I and YD and coincide with the lake transgression phases Tauca (18-14 ka) and Coipasa (13-11 ka) on the Altiplano. They corroborate the precipitation sensitivity of glacier mass balances in the semi-arid Central Andes. We suggest that sufficient moisture for glacial advances can be explained by enhanced upper tropospheric easterlies as a response to an intensified tropical circulation and sustained la Niña like patterns in the eastern Pacific. This redistribution of the ocean and atmospheric circulation was caused by a southward shift of the ITCZ due to northern hemispheric cooling. At 10.8 ka glacier advanced again attributed to increased moisture supply by enhanced polar advection and SE trade winds during the Early Holocene. Final deglaciation started only at 9.2 ka induced by a change to drier conditions.

  10. Seismic Imaging of a Nascent Batholith in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Christensen, D. H.; Mcfarlin, H. L.

    2013-12-01

    Cordilleran mountain belts, such as the modern central Andes and Mesozoic western North American Cordillera formed in regions of significant upper plate compression and were punctuated by high flux magmatic events that coalesced into large composite batholiths. Unlike the North American Cordillera, compressive mountain building is still active in the central Andes and any large modern batholith still at depth must be inferred from surface volcanics and geophysical data. In the Andes it has been suggested that a modern batholith exists beneath the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC), the location of a 11-1 Ma ignimbrite flare-up, however, the magmatic underpinnings has only been geophysically investigated in a few widely spaced locations and a migmatite zone of crustal melt with minimal mantle input remains a viable competing interpretation. We present new high-resolution 3-D seismic images of the APVC crust based on a joint inversion of ambient noise surface-wave dispersion data and receiver functions from broadband stations and identify a shallow (<20 km depth) low-velocity body that we interpret as a magmatic mush zone, the Altiplano-Puna Mush Body (APMB). Below the APMB, we observe near-vertical zones of low velocity that bifurcate near the base of the crust with one arm of low velocity migrating under the main volcanic arc and a second separate arm of low velocity below the voluminous backarc volcanism. Previous attenuation tomography studies have traced these zones through the mantle where they intersect the top of the subducting Nazca slab at locations with elevated seismic activity, providing strong evidence that the deeper near-vertical zones of low velocity we are imaging are related to dewatering of the slab and associated mantle-sourced melt pathways. Based on these considerations, we suggest the ~200 km diameter and ~20 km thick body is a nascent silicic batholith compatible with the magma mush model of batholith formation. The direct imaging of this

  11. Did Andean Uplift Control Climate Change in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, A. J.

    2003-12-01

    Sedimentological data indicate that a semi-arid/arid climate has prevailed across the Central Andes from over 25 Ma to 4 Ma. Between 4 and 3 Ma a marked switch to hyperaridity occurred along the western margin of South America between 10 and 27 degrees South. Palaeoaltitude data, although poorly constrained, suggest that a substantial proto-Central Andean mountain range was in place between 15 and 9 Ma. Evidence for this is provided by the presence of thick successions of evaporates developed within endorheic basins in the Altiplano/Puna area. These data support the idea that the Andean rain shadow existed by 15 Ma or earlier, and that rather than changing the pre-existing climatic regime it reinforced the already arid climate. The change to hyperaridity in western South America is attributed to a combination of global climate cooling and enhanced upwelling of the Humboldt current generated by closure of the Central American Seaway between 3.5 and 3 Ma, and did not result from the rain shadow generated by Andean orogenesis. Evidence for a global causal mechanism is seen in the Namib Desert. The switch to hyperaridity in the Namib also occurred around 3 Ma but was independent of orographic effects generated by a large mountain range.

  12. Moho topography in the central Andes and its geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X.; Sobolev, S. V.; Kind, R.

    2002-06-01

    P-to-S converted waves at the continental Moho together with waves multiply reflected between the Earth's surface and the Moho have been used to estimate the Moho depth and average crustal Vp/ Vs variations in the central Andes. Our analysis confirms and significantly complements the Moho depth estimates previously obtained from wide-angle seismic studies and receiver functions. The resulting crustal thickness varies from about 35 km in the forearc region to more than 70 km beneath the plateau and thins (30 km) further to the east in the Chaco plains. Beneath the Andean plateau, the Moho is deeper in the north (Altiplano) and shallower in the south (Puna), where the plateau attains its maximum elevation. A non-linear relation exists between crustal thickness and elevation (and Bouguer gravity), suggesting that the crust shallower than 50-55 km is predominately felsic in contrast to a predominately mafic crust below. Such a relation also implies a 100 km thick thermal lithosphere beneath the Altiplano and with a lithospheric thinning of a few tens of kilometers beneath the Puna. Absence of expected increase in lithospheric thickness in regions of almost doubled crust strongly suggests partial removal of the mantle lithosphere beneath the entire plateau. In the Subandean ranges at 19-20°S, the relation between altitude and crustal thickness indicates a thick lithosphere (up to 130-150 km) and lithospheric flexure. Beneath a relative topographic low at the Salar de Atacama, a thick crust (67 km) suggests that the lithosphere in this region is abnormally cold and dynamically subsided, possibly due to coupling with the subducting plate. This may be related to the strongest (Ms=8.0) known intra-slab earthquake in the central Andes that happened very close to this region in 1950. The average crustal Vp/ Vs ratio is about 1.77 for the Altiplano-Puna and it reaches the highest values (1.80-1.85) beneath the volcanic arc, indicating high ambient crustal temperatures and

  13. Moho Topography In The Central Andes and Its Geodynamic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X.; Sobolev, S. V.; Kind, R.

    P-to-S converted waves at the continental Moho together with waves multiply reflected between the Earth's surface and the Moho have been used to estimate the Moho depth and average crustal Vp/Vs variations in the central Andes. Our analysis confirms and significantly complements the Moho depth estimates previously obtained from wide angle seismic studies and receiver functions. The resulting crustal thickness varies from about 35 km in the forearc region to more than 70 km beneath the plateau and thins (30 km) further to the east in the Chaco plains. Beneath the Andean plateau, the Moho is deeper in the north (Altiplano) and shallower in the south (Puna), where the plateau attains its maximum elevation. A non-linear relation exists between crustal thickness and elevation (and Bougeur gravity) suggesting that the crust shallower than 50­55 km is predominately felsic in contrast to a predominately mafic crust below. Such a relation also implies a 100 km thick thermal lithosphere beneath the Alti- plano and with a lithospheric thinning of a few tens of kilometers beneath the Puna. Absence of expected increase in lithospheric thickness in regions of almost doubled crust strongly suggests partial removal of the mantle lithosphere beneath the entire plateau. In the Subandean ranges at 19­20S, the relation between altitude and crustal thickness indicates a thick lithosphere (up to 130­150 km) and lithospheric flexure. Beneath a relative topographic low at the Salar de Atacama, a thick crust (67 km) suggests that the lithosphere in this region is abnormally cold and dynamically sub- sided, possibly due to coupling with the subducting plate. This may be related to the strongest (Ms=8.0) known intra-slab earthquake in the central Andes that happened very close to this region in 1950. The average crustal Vp/Vs ratio is about 1.77 for the Altiplano-Puna and it reaches the highest values (1.80­1.85) beneath the volcanic arc, indicating high ambient crustal temperatures and

  14. Tectonic control on denudation rates in the central Bolivian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Gerold; Kober, Florian; Hippe, Kristina; Lendzioch, Theodora; Grischott, Reto; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro; Christl, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Effects of a positive feedback loop between erosion and tectonics have been shown by analogue and numerical models and have been inferred from field observations at the scale of mountain ranges. We present new data from the Bolivian Andes supporting these observations, although common geomorphic parameters do not indicate a simple correlation. The upper Rio Grande segment, located between Cochabamba, Santa Cruz and Sucre, drains a major catchment in the central Bolivian Cordillera, from the Eastern Cordillera (EC) in the W, through the Interandean Zone (IAZ) and the Subandes (SA) in the E. The catchment covers an area of 58939 km² with an altitude range from 400 to 5150 m above sea level. Geologically, the Bolivian Andes comprise (from W to E) the Altiplano, the EC, the IAZ and the SA fold and thrust belts. The Altiplano represents an almost perfectly closed basin with distinct barriers defined by the Western Cordillera and Eastern Cordillera. The Rio Grande does not reach the Altiplano (unlike Rio La Paz and Rio Consata) but has its western drainage divide along the high peaks of the EC that experienced a period of intense shortening between Late Oligocene and Miocene. Near Cochabamba, the EC comprises metasedimentary siliciclastic rocks of Ordovician age. These rocks are overlain by Cretaceous to Paleocene and / or Neogene sediments with an angular unconformity. The IAZ and SA form an east-vergent fold and thrust belt and comprise Paleozoic and Mesozoic units. Farther east, the structures of the SA progressively include Neogene foreland strata of the Chaco foreland basin. The Chaco basin rests on the Brazilian shield east of the Subandean Belt and forms the modern foreland basin, where the lower Rio Grande catchment is sited. We obtained 58 cosmogenic 10Be catchment wide denudation rates for the Rio Grande catchments upstream of Abapó. They range from 7 mm/kyr to 1550 mm/kyr thus integrating at maximum over the last 10.000 years, with a mean of 262 mm/kyr. In

  15. Evolution of Irruputuncu volcano, Central Andes, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, I.; Roche, O.; Moune, S.; Aguilera, F.; Campos, E.; Pizarro, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Irruputuncu is an active volcano located in northern Chile within the Central Andean Volcanic Zone (CAVZ) and that has produced andesitic to trachy-andesitic magmas over the last ˜258 ± 49 ka. We report petrographical and geochemical data, new geochronological ages and for the first time a detailed geological map representing the eruptive products generated by the Irruputuncu volcano. The detailed study on the volcanic products allows us to establish a temporal evolution of the edifice. We propose that the Irruputuncu volcanic history can be divided in two stages, both dominated by effusive activity: Irruputuncu I and II. The oldest identified products that mark the beginning of Irruputuncu I are small-volume pyroclastic flow deposits generated during an explosive phase that may have been triggered by magma injection as suggested by mingling features in the clasts. This event was followed by generation of large lava flows and the edifice grew until destabilization of its SW flank through the generation of a debris avalanche, which ended Irruputuncu I. New effusive activity generated lavas flows to the NW at the beginning of Irruputuncu II. In the meantime, lava domes that grew in the summit were destabilized, as shown by two well-preserved block-and-ash flow deposits. The first phase of dome collapse, in particular, generated highly mobile pyroclastic flows that propagated up to ˜8 km from their source on gentle slopes as low as 11° in distal areas. The actual activity is characterized by deposition of sulfur and permanent gas emissions, producing a gas plume that reaches 200 m above the crater. The maximum volume of this volcanic system is of ˜4 km3, being one of the smallest active volcano of Central Andes.

  16. Bayesian spatiotemporal interpolation of rainfall in the Central Chilean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossa-Moreno, Juan; Keir, Greg; McIntyre, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Water availability in the populous and economically significant Central Chilean region is governed by complex interactions between precipitation, temperature, snow and glacier melt, and streamflow. Streamflow prediction at daily time scales depends strongly on accurate estimations of precipitation in this predominantly dry region, particularly during the winter period. This can be difficult as gauged rainfall records are scarce, especially in the higher elevation regions of the Chilean Andes, and topographic influences on rainfall are not well understood. Remotely sensed precipitation and topographic products can be used to construct spatiotemporal multivariate regression models to estimate rainfall at ungauged locations. However, classical estimation methods such as kriging cannot easily accommodate the complicated statistical features of the data, including many 'no rainfall' observations, as well as non-normality, non-stationarity, and temporal autocorrelation. We use a separable space-time model to predict rainfall using the R-INLA package for computationally efficient Bayesian inference, using the gridded CHIRPS satellite-based rainfall dataset and digital elevation models as covariates. We jointly model both the probability of rainfall occurrence on a given day (using a binomial likelihood) as well as amount (using a gamma likelihood or similar). Correlation in space and time is modelled using a Gaussian Markov Random Field (GMRF) with a Matérn spatial covariance function which can evolve over time according to an autoregressive model if desired. It is possible to evaluate the GMRF at relatively coarse temporal resolution to speed up computations, but still produce daily rainfall predictions. We describe the process of model selection and inference using an information criterion approach, which we use to objectively select from competing models with various combinations of temporal smoothing, likelihoods, and autoregressive model orders.

  17. Characteristics of Precipitation Features and Annual Rainfall during the TRMM Era in the Central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Slayback, Daniel; Yager, Karina

    2014-01-01

    The central Andes extends from 7 deg to 21 deg S, with its eastern boundary defined by elevation (1000m and greater) and its western boundary by the coastline. The authors used a combination of surface observations, reanalysis, and the University of Utah Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation features (PF) database to understand the characteristics of convective systems and associated rainfall in the central Andes during the TRMM era, 1998-2012. Compared to other dry (West Africa), mountainous (Himalayas), and dynamically linked (Amazon) regions in the tropics, the central Andes PF population was distinct from these other regions, with small and weak PFs dominating its cumulative distribution functions and annual rainfall totals. No more than 10% of PFs in the central Andes met any of the thresholds used to identify and define deep convection (minimum IR cloud-top temperatures, minimum 85-GHz brightness temperature, maximum height of the 40-dBZ echo). For most of the PFs, available moisture was limited (less than 35mm) and instability low (less than 500 J kg(exp -1)). The central Andes represents a largely stable, dry to arid environment, limiting system development and organization. Hence, primarily short-duration events (less than 60 min) characterized by shallow convection and light to light-moderate rainfall rates (0.5-4.0 mm h(exp -1)) were found.

  18. Evolution of crustal thickening in the central Andes, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, Nathan; McQuarrie, Nadine; Ryan, Jamie; Karimi, Bobak; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George

    2015-09-01

    Paleoelevation histories from the central Andes in Bolivia have suggested that the geodynamic evolution of the region has been punctuated by periods of large-scale lithospheric removal that drive rapid increases in elevation at the surface. Here, we evaluate viable times and locations of material loss using a map-view reconstruction of the Bolivian orocline displacement field to forward-model predicted crustal thicknesses. Two volumetric models are presented that test assumed pre-deformation crustal thicknesses of 35 km and 40 km. Both models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved first in the northern Eastern Cordillera (EC) by 30-20 Ma but remained below modern in the southern EC until ≤10 Ma. The Altiplano is predicted to have achieved modern crustal thickness after 10 Ma but only with a pre-deformation thickness of 50 km, including 10 km of sediment. At the final stage, the models predict 8-25% regional excess crustal volume compared to modern thickness, largely concentrated in the northern EC. The excess predicted volume from 20 to 0 Ma can be accounted for by: 1) crustal flow to the WC and/or Peru, 2) localized removal of the lower crust, or 3) a combination of the two. Only models with initial crustal thicknesses >35 km predict excess volumes sufficient to account for potential crustal thickness deficits in Peru and allow for lower crustal loss. However, both initial thickness models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved over the same time periods that paleoelevation histories indicate the development of modern elevations. Localized removal of lower crust is only necessary in the northern EC where crustal thickness exceeds modern by 20 Ma, prior to paleoelevation estimates of modern elevations by 15 Ma. In the Altiplano, crustal thicknesses match modern values at 10 Ma and can only exceed modern values by 5 Ma, post-dating when modern elevations were thought to have been established. Collectively, these models predict that

  19. Contrasting response of glacierized catchments in the Central Himalaya and the Central Andes to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragettli, Silvan; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Immerzeel, Walter

    2015-04-01

    The Andes of South America and the Himalaya in high-mountain Asia are two regions where advanced simulation models are of vital importance to anticipate the impacts of climate change on water resources. The two mountain systems hold the largest ice masses outside the polar regions. Major rivers originate here and downstream regions are densely populated. In the long run, glacier recession generates concerns about the sustainability of summer runoff. This study benefits from recent efforts of carefully planned short-term field experiments in two headwater catchments in the Central Andes of Chile and in the Central Himalaya in Nepal. The two study catchments contrast in terms of their climate and in the characteristics of their glaciers. A systematic approach is developed, built upon the available local data, to reduce the predictive uncertainty of a state-of-the-art glacio-hydrological model used for the projection of 21st century glacier changes and catchment runoff. The in-situ data are used for model development and step-wise, multivariate parameter calibration. Catchment runoff and remotely sensed MODIS and Landsat snow cover are used for model validation. The glacio-hydrological model simulates the water cycle with a high temporal (hourly time steps) and spatial (100 m grid cells) resolution and accounts for processes typical of both regions like glacier melt under debris cover or mass redistribution through avalanching. Future projections are based on the outputs of twelve stochastically downscaled global climate models for two emission scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). This is one of the first truly intercomparative modeling studies at the catchment scale across mountain regions of the world to assess and compare future changes in glaciers and snow cover and associated impacts on streamflow production. Both catchments will experience significant glacier mass loss throughout the twenty-first century. However, the trajectories of simulated future runoff and

  20. The Largest Holocene Eruption of the Central Andes Found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Turiel, J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J.; Esteban, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading ˜110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high content of arsenic and other trace elements in the groundwaters of the Chacopampean Plain. The recognition of this significant volcanic event may shed new light on interpretations of critical changes observed in the mid-Holocene paleontological and archaeological records, and offers researchers an excellent, extensive regional chronostratigraphic marker for reconstructing mid-Holocene geological history over a wide geographical area of South America. More than 100 ashes were sampled in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay during different field campaigns. Ash samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), grain size distributions laser diffraction, and geochemically by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-HR-ICP-MS. New and published 14C ages were calibrated to calendar years BP. The age of the most recent CBVC eruption is 4407-4093 cal y BP, indirectly dated by 14C of associated organic sediment within the lower part of a proximal fall deposit of this event (26°53'16.05"S-67°44'48.68"W). This is the youngest record of a major volcanic event in the Southern Puna. This age is consistent with other radiocarbon dates of organic matter in palaeosols underlying or overlying distal ash fall deposits. Based on their products, all of rhyolitic composition, we have distinguished 8 main episodes during the evolution of the most recent CBVC eruption: 1) the eruption began with a white rhyolite lava dome extrusion; 2) followed by a Plinian

  1. Late Tertiary northwestward-vergent thrusting in Valle del Cauca, Colombian Andes

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso, C.A.; Sacks, P.E.; Secor, D.T. Jr.; Cordoba, F.

    1989-03-01

    The Valle del Cauca is a topographic basin situated between the Cordillera Central and the Cordillera Occidental in the Colombian Andes. The basement is Mesozoic mafic igneous rock of the Volcanic and Amaime Formations and clastic sediments and chert of the Espinal and Cisneros Formations. The basement was intruded by middle Cretaceous granodiorites (including the Batolito de Buga) and was deformed and metamorphosed to greenschist facies. The Mesozoic rocks originated in an oceanic setting and were accreted to northwestern South America during the Cretaceous or early Tertiary. Unconformably overlying the Mesozoic basement are the Eocene and Oligocene Vijes (marine limestone) and Guachinte and Cinta de Piedra (fluvial and deltaic sandstone and mudstone). In the Cordillera Central, the Cinta de Piedra is unconformably overlain by fanglomerate of the Miocene La Paila Formation. These clastics coarsen and thicken eastward. Geologic mapping and structural analyses show that the Mesozoic basement and its Tertiary cover are faulted and folded. Folds are asymmetric and overturned westward. Faults dip at shallow to moderate angles to the east and carry older sedimentary or basement rocks westward over younger rocks.

  2. Ancient ice islands in salt lakes of the Central Andes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurlbert, S.H.; Chang, Cecily C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Massive blocks of freshwater ice and frozen sediments protrude from shallow, saline lakes in the Andes of southwestern Bolivia and northeastern Chile. These ice islands range up to 1.5 kilometers long, stand up to 7 meters above the water surface, and may extend out tens of meters and more beneath the unfrozen lake sediments. The upper surfaces of the islands are covered with dry white sediments, mostly aragonite or calcite. The ice blocks may have formed by freezing of the fresh pore water of lake sediments during the "little ice age." The largest blocks are melting rapidly because of possibly recent increases in geothermal heat flux through the lake bottom and undercutting by warm saline lake water during the summer.

  3. Prediction of extreme floods in the eastern Central Andes based on a complex networks approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boers, N.; Bookhagen, B.; Barbosa, H. M. J.; Marwan, N.; Kurths, J.; Marengo, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    Changing climatic conditions have led to a significant increase in the magnitude and frequency of extreme rainfall events in the Central Andes of South America. These events are spatially extensive and often result in substantial natural hazards for population, economy and ecology. Here we develop a general framework to predict extreme events by introducing the concept of network divergence on directed networks derived from a non-linear synchronization measure. We apply our method to real-time satellite-derived rainfall data and predict more than 60% (90% during El Niño conditions) of rainfall events above the 99th percentile in the Central Andes. In addition to the societal benefits of predicting natural hazards, our study reveals a linkage between polar and tropical regimes as the responsible mechanism: the interplay of northward migrating frontal systems and a low-level wind channel from the western Amazon to the subtropics.

  4. Glaciological studies in the central Andes using AIRSAR/TOPSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forster, Richard R.; Klein, Andrew G.; Blodgett, Troy A.; Isacks, Bryan L.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of climate and topography in mountainous regions is dramatically expressed in the spatial distribution of glaciers and snowcover. Monitoring existing alpine glaciers and snow extent provides insight into the present mountain climate system and how it is changing, while mapping the positions of former glaciers as recorded in landforms such as cirques and moraines provide a record of the large past climate change associated with the last glacial maximum. The Andes are an ideal mountain range in which to study the response of snow and ice to past and present climate change. Their expansive latitudinal extent offers the opportunity to study glaciers in diverse climate settings from the tropical glaciers of Peru and Bolivia to the ice caps and tide-water glaciers of sub-polar Patagonia. SAR has advantages over traditional passive remote sensing instruments for monitoring present snow and ice and differentiating moraine relative ages. The cloud penetrating ability of SAR is indispensable for perennially cloud covered mountains. Snow and ice facies can be distinguished from SAR's response to surface roughness, liquid water content and grain size distribution. The combination of SAR with a coregestered high-resolution DEM (TOPSAR) provides a promising tool for measuring glacier change in three dimensions, thus allowing ice volume change to be measured directly. The change in moraine surface roughness over time enables SAR to differentiate older from younger moraines. Polarimetric SAR data have been used to distinguish snow and ice facies and relatively date moraines. However, both algorithms are still experimental and require ground truth verification. We plan to extend the SAR classification of snow and ice facies and moraine age beyond the ground truth sites to throughout the Cordillera Real to provide a regional view of past and present snow and ice. The high resolution DEM will enhance the SAR moraine dating technique by discriminating relative ages

  5. Morphologic evolution of the Central Andes of Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Laura; Pfiffner, O. Adrian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the morphology of the Andes of Peru and its evolution based on the geometry of river channels, their bedrock profiles, stream gradient indices and the relation between thrust faults and morphology. The rivers of the Pacific Basin incised Mesozoic sediments of the Marañon thrust belt, Cenozoic volcanics and the granitic rocks of the Coastal Batholith. They are mainly bedrock channels with convex upward shapes and show signs of active ongoing incision. The changes in lithology do not correlate with breaks in slope of the channels (or knick points) such that the high gradient indices (K) with values between 2,000-3,000 and higher than 3,000 suggest that incision is controlled by tectonic activity. Our analysis reveals that many of the ranges of the Western Cordillera were uplifted to the actual elevations where peaks reach to 6,000 m above sea level by thrusting along steeply dipping faults. We correlate this uplift with the Quechua Phase of Neogene age documented for the Subandean thrust belt. The rivers of the Amazonas Basin have steep slopes and high gradient indices of 2,000-3,000 and locally more than 3,000 in those segments where the rivers flow over the crystalline basement of the Eastern Cordillera affected by vertical faulting. Gradient indices decrease to 1,000-2,000 within the east-vergent thrust belt of the Subandean Zone. Here a correlation between breaks in river channel slopes and location of thrust faults can be established, suggesting that the young, Quechua Phase thrust faults of the Subandean thrust belt, which involve Neogene sediments, influenced the channel geometry. In the eastern lowlands, these rivers become meandering and flow parallel to anticlines that formed in the hanging wall of Quechua Phase thrust faults, suggesting that the river courses were actively displaced outward into the foreland.

  6. Two new species of Siphocampylus (Campanulaceae, Lobelioideae) from the Central Andes.

    PubMed

    Lagomarsino, Laura P; Santamaría-Aguilar, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Two species of Siphocampylus (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae) from the Central Andes of Peru and Bolivia are described, illustrated, and discussed with reference to related species. One species, Siphocampylus antonellii, is endemic to high elevation grasslands of Calca, Peru, while the second, Siphocampylus siberiensis, is endemic to cloud forests of Cochabamba, Bolivia. Both species are robust shrubs that produce tubular pink flowers that are likely pollinated by hummingbirds. PMID:26884710

  7. Two new species of Siphocampylus (Campanulaceae, Lobelioideae) from the Central Andes

    PubMed Central

    Lagomarsino, Laura P.; Santamaría-Aguilar, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Two species of Siphocampylus (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae) from the Central Andes of Peru and Bolivia are described, illustrated, and discussed with reference to related species. One species, Siphocampylus antonellii, is endemic to high elevation grasslands of Calca, Peru, while the second, Siphocampylus siberiensis, is endemic to cloud forests of Cochabamba, Bolivia. Both species are robust shrubs that produce tubular pink flowers that are likely pollinated by hummingbirds. PMID:26884710

  8. Facing unprecedented drying of the Central Andes? Precipitation variability over the period AD 1000-2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukom, Raphael; Rohrer, Mario; Calanca, Pierluigi; Salzmann, Nadine; Huggel, Christian; Acuña, Delia; Christie, Duncan A.; Morales, Mariano S.

    2015-08-01

    Projected future trends in water availability are associated with large uncertainties in many regions of the globe. In mountain areas with complex topography, climate models have often limited capabilities to adequately simulate the precipitation variability on small spatial scales. Also, their validation is hampered by typically very low station density. In the Central Andes of South America, a semi-arid high-mountain region with strong seasonality, zonal wind in the upper troposphere is a good proxy for interannual precipitation variability. Here, we combine instrumental measurements, reanalysis and paleoclimate data, and a 57-member ensemble of CMIP5 model simulations to assess changes in Central Andes precipitation over the period AD 1000-2100. This new database allows us to put future projections of precipitation into a previously missing multi-centennial and pre-industrial context. Our results confirm the relationship between regional summer precipitation and 200 hPa zonal wind in the Central Andes, with stronger Westerly winds leading to decreased precipitation. The period of instrumental coverage (1965-2010) is slightly dryer compared to pre-industrial times as represented by control simulations, simulations from the past Millennium, ice core data from Quelccaya ice cap and a tree-ring based precipitation reconstruction. The model ensemble identifies a clear reduction in precipitation already in the early 21st century: the 10 year running mean model uncertainty range (ensemble 16-84% spread) is continuously above the pre-industrial mean after AD 2023 (AD 2028) until the end of the 21st century in the RCP2.6 (RCP8.5) emission scenario. Average precipitation over AD 2071-2100 is outside the range of natural pre-industrial variability in 47 of the 57 model simulations for both emission scenarios. The ensemble median fraction of dry years (defined by the 5th percentile in pre-industrial conditions) is projected to increase by a factor of 4 until 2071-2100 in

  9. Lower bound on the amount of crustal shortening in the central Bolivia Andes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffels, B.M. )

    1990-09-01

    Balanced cross sections across the Cordillera Oriental and Subandean zone of the central Bolivian Andes indicate that crustal shortening probably has played the dominant role in orogeny in this convergent margin setting. A minimum amount of shortening, 210 km, is documented, which can account for two-thirds of the present-day crustal cross-sectional area along a transect spanning the entire mountain range. Substantial crustal shortening may also require loss of the lower lithosphere to the asthenosphere. A large, minimum amount of crustal shortening in the Bolivian Andes shows, contrary to common assumptions about orogeny, that (1) magmatic addition may be volumetrically less important in orogeny in Andean-type margins and (2) crustal shortening is not uniquely associated with continental or island-arc collision.

  10. Impact of Andes uplift and Central American Seaway closure on Miocene climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulchre, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The Miocene (ca. 23-5.3 Ma) was an epoch of important paleogeographic changes, especially in the Neotropical region, with the rise of the Andes, the restriction of the Central American Seaway (CAS) and major modifications over the continent, with changing Amazon river-routing and long-standing inland seaways. To understand how these perturbations have altered climate, we use the fully coupled general circulation model (GCM) IPSL-CM4 and quantify the impact of the uplift of the Andes and the closure of the CAS on atmospheric and oceanic dynamics. A simulation with lower Andes helps understanding how the mechanical effect of this barrier affects surface winds and in turn, the freshwater balance between Atlantic and Pacific oceans. By including the continental effect of the Andean uplift, i.e. the changes in river routing within the Amazon basin and modified location of its freshwater outflow to the ocean, we show that mechanical and hydrological effects of the uplift are not acting in the same direction. We compare these signals to the CAS closure, which latest model-data studies and geological surveys have shown to occur between 15 and 10 million-years ago.

  11. The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans originated in central Mexico rather than the Andes.

    PubMed

    Goss, Erica M; Tabima, Javier F; Cooke, David E L; Restrepo, Silvia; Fry, William E; Forbes, Gregory A; Fieland, Valerie J; Cardenas, Martha; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2014-06-17

    Phytophthora infestans is a destructive plant pathogen best known for causing the disease that triggered the Irish potato famine and remains the most costly potato pathogen to manage worldwide. Identification of P. infestan's elusive center of origin is critical to understanding the mechanisms of repeated global emergence of this pathogen. There are two competing theories, placing the origin in either South America or in central Mexico, both of which are centers of diversity of Solanum host plants. To test these competing hypotheses, we conducted detailed phylogeographic and approximate Bayesian computation analyses, which are suitable approaches to unraveling complex demographic histories. Our analyses used microsatellite markers and sequences of four nuclear genes sampled from populations in the Andes, Mexico, and elsewhere. To infer the ancestral state, we included the closest known relatives Phytophthora phaseoli, Phytophthora mirabilis, and Phytophthora ipomoeae, as well as the interspecific hybrid Phytophthora andina. We did not find support for an Andean origin of P. infestans; rather, the sequence data suggest a Mexican origin. Our findings support the hypothesis that populations found in the Andes are descendants of the Mexican populations and reconcile previous findings of ancestral variation in the Andes. Although centers of origin are well documented as centers of evolution and diversity for numerous crop plants, the number of plant pathogens with a known geographic origin are limited. This work has important implications for our understanding of the coevolution of hosts and pathogens, as well as the harnessing of plant disease resistance to manage late blight. PMID:24889615

  12. Climate in the Western Cordillera of the Central Andes over the last 4300 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Zbyněk; Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Chuman, Tomáš; Šefrna, Luděk; Mihaljevič, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The Distichia peat core obtained in the Carhuasanta valley near Nevado Mismi, Cordillera Chila, provides information on climatic and environmental conditions over the last ˜4300 years. The relative changes in the stable carbon isotope composition of plant remains preserved in the core reflect major temperature fluctuations in the Western Cordillera of the southern Peruvian Andes. These temperature variations can be additionally linked with the changes in precipitation patterns by analysing C% and C/N ratio in the core. Relatively warm and moist conditions prevailed from 4280 to 3040 cal. yrs BP (BC 2330-1090) with a short colder dry episode around 3850 cal. yrs BP (BC 1900). The most prominent climate changes recorded in the peat occurred between 3040 and 2750 cal. yrs BP (BC 1090-800) when the initial warming turned to a rapid cooling to temperatures at least 2 °C lower than the mean for the Late Holocene. Initially drier conditions within this event turned to a short wet phase after 2780 cal. yrs BP (BC 830) when the temperature increased again. This event coincides with significant changes in peat and ice core records in the Central Andes matching the timing of the global climate event around 2.8 cal. ka BP. Climatic conditions in the study area became relatively dry and stable after the event for about 800 years. Highly variable temperatures and humidity prevailed during the last 2000 years when an extended warm and relatively humid period occurred between 640 and 155 cal. yrs BP (AD 1310-1795) followed by predominantly colder and drier conditions. The established δ13C peat record represents the first continuous proxy for the temperature in the southern Peruvian Andes dated by the AMS 14C. Distichia peat is wide spread in the Andes and the proposed approach can be applied elsewhere in high altitudes, where no other traditional climate proxies are available.

  13. Revisiting mountain-building in the Andes of Central Chile: constraints from structural geology and thermochronology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesner, M.; Lacassin, R.; Simoes, M.; Armijo, R.; Carrizo, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Andes, one of the most significant reliefs on Earth, is the case example of a subduction-type mountain belt. In central Chile and western Argentina, the particular east-vergent structure of the Aconcagua fold-and-thrust belt (AFTB) is found atop a huge basement high with elevations > 4000 m, the Frontal Cordillera. Classical conceptual models consider the Andes as an east-vergent orogen, opposite to the Nazca subduction, and describe the exhumation of the Frontal Cordillera as an eastward in-sequence event that occurred late in the andean deformation (by ~10My). An alternative model recently challenged this view by proposing that the Andes have mainly a primary westward vergence. Within this scheme, the exhumation of the Frontal Cordillera would have begun earlier, by ~25My, synchronous with formation of the AFTB on the western side of the basement high. Here we test these two models by revisiting structural cross-sections of the Andes at the latitude of Santiago de Chile and of the Aconcagua (~33°S). We provide thermochronological constraints on the timing of exhumation of the Frontal Cordillera by (U-Th)/He dating on apatites retrieved from paleozoic granitoids along a 2,3km high nearly vertical section in the core of the basement high. Preliminary results suggest that the Frontal Cordillera exhumation was not a late event and likely began around 25 Ma. Therefore it appears to be synchronous with deformation within the AFTB and the westernmost fold-and-thrust belt at this latitude. We discuss these results and their implications while building a crustal-scale cross section of the range at the latitude of Santiago de Chile.

  14. Human impacts on headwater fluvial systems in the northern and central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harden, Carol P.

    2006-09-01

    South America delivers more freshwater runoff to the ocean per km 2 land area than any other continent, and much of that water enters the fluvial system from headwaters in the Andes Mountains. This paper reviews ways in which human occupation of high mountain landscapes in the Andes have affected the delivery of water and sediment to headwater river channels at local to regional scales for millennia, and provides special focus on the vulnerability of páramo soils to human impact. People have intentionally altered the fluvial system by damming rivers at a few strategic locations, and more widely by withdrawing surface water, primarily for irrigation. Unintended changes brought about by human activities are even more widespread and include forest clearance, agriculture, grazing, road construction, and urbanization, which increase rates of rainfall runoff and accelerate processes of water erosion. Some excavations deliver more sediment to river channels by destabilizing slopes and triggering processes of mass-movement. The northern and central Andes are more affected by human activity than most high mountain regions. The wetter northern Andes are also unusual for the very high water retention characteristics of páramo (high elevation grass and shrub) soils, which cover most of the land above 3000 m. Páramo soils are important regulators of headwater hydrology, but human activities that promote vegetation loss and drying cause them to lose water storage capacity. New data from a case study in southern Ecuador show very low bulk densities (median 0.26 g cm - 3 ), high organic matter contents (median 43%), and high water-holding capacities (12% to 86% volumetrically). These data document wetter soils under grass than under tree cover. Effects of human activity on the fluvial system are evident at local scales, but difficult to discern at broader scales in the regional context of geomorphic adjustment to tectonic and volcanic processes.

  15. On Restoring Sedimentary Basins for Post-Depositional Deformation - Paleozoic Basins of the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlburg, H.

    2015-12-01

    The reconstruction and interpretation of sedimentary basins incorporated into folded and thrusted mountain belts is strongly limited by the style and intensity of shortening. This problem is exacerbated if deformation is polyphasic as is the case for the Paleozoic basins in the central Andes. Some of these have been deformed by folding and thrusting during at least 3 events in the Late Ordovician, the Late Paleozoic and Cenozoic. A realistic reconstruction of the original basin dimensions and geometries from outcrops and maps appears to be almost impossible. We present results of a stepwise reconstruction of the Paleozoic basins of the central Andes by restoring basin areas and fills accounting for crustal shortening. The structurally most prominent feature of the central Andes is the Bolivian Orocline which accomodated shortening in the last 45 Ma on the order of between 300 and 500 km. In a first step basins were restored by accounting for Cenozoic rotation and shortening by deconvolving the basins using an enhanced version of the oroclinal bending model of Ariagada et al. (2008). Results were then restored stepwise for older deformation. Constraints on these subsequent steps are significantly poorer as values of shortening can be derived only from folds and thusts apparent in outcrops. The amount of shortening accomodated on unexposed and therefore unknown thrusts can not be quantified and is a significant source of error very likely leading to an underestimation of the amount of shortening. Accepting these limitations, basin restoration results in an increase in basin area by ≥100%. The volumes of stratigraphically controlled basin fills can now be redistributed over the wider, restored area, translating into smaller rates of accumulation and hence required subsidence. The restored rates conform to those of equivalent modern basin settings and permit a more realistic and actualistic analysis of subsidence drivers and the respective tectonic framework.

  16. Prediction of extreme floods in the Central Andes by means of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boers, Niklas; Bookhagen, Bodo; Barbosa, Henrique; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen; Marengo, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Based on a non-linear synchronisation measure and complex network theory, we present a novel framework for the prediction of extreme events of spatially embedded, interrelated time series. This method is general in the sense that it can be applied to any type of spatially sampled time series with significant interrelations, ranging from climate observables to biological or stock market data. In this presentation, we apply our method to extreme rainfall in South America and show how this leads to the prediction of more than 60% (90% during El Niño conditions) of extreme rainfall events in the eastern Central Andes of Bolivia and northern Argentina, with only 1% false alarms. From paleoclimatic to decadal time scales, the Central Andes continue to be subject to pronounced changes in climatic conditions. In particular, our and past work shows that frequency as well as magnitudes of extreme rainfall events have increased significantly during past decades, calling for a better understanding of the involved climatic mechanisms. Due to their large spatial extend and occurrence at high elevations, these extreme events often lead to severe floods and landslides with disastrous socioeconomic impacts. They regularly affect tens of thousands of people and produce estimated costs of the order of several hundred million USD. Alongside with the societal value of predicting natural hazards, our study provides insights into the responsible climatic features and suggests interactions between Rossby waves in polar regions and large scale (sub-)tropical moisture transport as a driver of subseasonal variability of the South American monsoon system. Predictable extreme events result from the propagation of extreme rainfall from the region of Buenos Aires towards the Central Andes given characteristic atmospheric conditions. Our results indicate that the role of frontal systems originating from Rossby waves in polar latitudes is much more dominant for controlling extreme rainfall in

  17. Surface control on contrasts in deformation between eastern and western margins of the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlunegger, F.; Norton, K. P.

    2012-04-01

    The deformation style and climate between the eastern and western escarpments of the Central Andes are strikingly different. The eastern side is in a tropical climate; it receives annual precipitation amounts of >3500 mm and experiences active shortening and thrusting, while the western side is one of the driest places on Earth and is deformed by long-wavelength warping. Indeed, climate is so dry that the western slopes can go decades without recorded rainfall. Here we show that the modern distribution of deformation in the Central Andes can be a result of enhanced orographic precipitation pattern beginning ca. 7-10 Ma (Norton and Schlunegger, 2011). Reduced erosion on the western side would have steepened the orogen, forcing deformation to shift to the east where high precipitation amounts would have enhanced erosion. We support this hypothesis with low erosion rates and a well-defined retreating knickzone in the Western Andes, and likewise by high erosion rates and channel morphologies indicative of transient orographic feedbacks in the east. Indeed, erosion rates as measured by cosmogenic nuclides are < 0.01 mm yr-1 in the west (Kober et al., 2007) and more than an order of magnitude higher, > 0.2 mm yr-1, in the east (Safran et al. 2005). Stream profiles from the Western Escarpment are indicative of slow knickzone retreat in the absence of modern tectonic forcing while streams on the Eastern Escarpment are the product of strong climate-tectonic feedbacks, indicated by steep and strongly concave segments in the orographically-affected reach. Reconstructions of the accretionary wedge geometry and high angle fault movements between the Miocene and today further support an erosion driven shift in the locus of deformation. In particular, at orogenic scales, critical taper calculations indicate that the near cessation of erosion on the western side ca. 7-10 Ma ago shifted the orogen into a super-critical state where deformation only occurs along the basal d

  18. Salar de Atacama basin: A record of compressional tectonics in the central Andes since the mid-Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriagada, Cesar; Cobbold, Peter R.; Roperch, Pierrick

    2006-02-01

    The Salar de Atacama basin lies in the inner fore arc of northern Chile. Topographically and structurally, it is a first-order feature of the central Andes. The sedimentary fill of the basin constrains the timing and extent of crustal deformation since the mid-Cretaceous. We have studied good exposures along the western edge of the basin and have correlated them with seismic reflection sections and data from an exploration well. Throughout most of its history, the basin developed in a foreland setting, during periods of thin-skinned and thick-skinned thrusting. Growth strata provide evidence for coeval sedimentation and thrust motions during mid-Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene times. Pre-Neogene deformation was significant in the basin and in surounding areas of the early central Andes. Models that attempt to explain the current thickness of the central Andes should consider Late Cretaceous and Paleogene shortening, as well as the more obvious Neogene and Quaternary shortening.

  19. Multiethnicity, pluralism, and migration in the south central Andes: An alternate path to state expansion.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Paul S

    2015-07-28

    The south central Andes is known as a region of enduring multiethnic diversity, yet it is also the cradle of one the South America's first successful expansive-state societies. Social structures that encouraged the maintenance of separate identities among coexistent ethnic groups may explain this apparent contradiction. Although the early expansion of the Tiwanaku state (A.D. 600-1000) is often interpreted according to a centralized model derived from Old World precedents, recent archaeological research suggests a reappraisal of the socio-political organization of Tiwanaku civilization, both for the diversity of social entities within its core region and for the multiple agencies behind its wider program of agropastoral colonization. Tiwanaku's sociopolitical pluralism in both its homeland and colonies tempers some of archaeology's global assumptions about the predominant role of centralized institutions in archaic states. PMID:26195732

  20. Multiethnicity, pluralism, and migration in the south central Andes: An alternate path to state expansion

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    The south central Andes is known as a region of enduring multiethnic diversity, yet it is also the cradle of one the South America’s first successful expansive-state societies. Social structures that encouraged the maintenance of separate identities among coexistent ethnic groups may explain this apparent contradiction. Although the early expansion of the Tiwanaku state (A.D. 600–1000) is often interpreted according to a centralized model derived from Old World precedents, recent archaeological research suggests a reappraisal of the socio-political organization of Tiwanaku civilization, both for the diversity of social entities within its core region and for the multiple agencies behind its wider program of agropastoral colonization. Tiwanaku’s sociopolitical pluralism in both its homeland and colonies tempers some of archaeology’s global assumptions about the predominant role of centralized institutions in archaic states. PMID:26195732

  1. Bird conservation would complement landslide prevention in the Central Andes of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia; Pimm, Stuart L

    2015-01-01

    Conservation and restoration priorities often focus on separate ecosystem problems. Inspired by the November 11th (2011) landslide event near Manizales, and the current poor results of Colombia's Article 111 of Law 99 of 1993 as a conservation measure in this country, we set out to prioritize conservation and restoration areas where landslide prevention would complement bird conservation in the Central Andes. This area is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth, but also one of the most threatened. Using the case of the Rio Blanco Reserve, near Manizales, we identified areas for conservation where endemic and small-range bird diversity was high, and where landslide risk was also high. We further prioritized restoration areas by overlapping these conservation priorities with a forest cover map. Restoring forests in bare areas of high landslide risk and important bird diversity yields benefits for both biodiversity and people. We developed a simple landslide susceptibility model using slope, forest cover, aspect, and stream proximity. Using publicly available bird range maps, refined by elevation, we mapped concentrations of endemic and small-range bird species. We identified 1.54 km(2) of potential restoration areas in the Rio Blanco Reserve, and 886 km(2) in the Central Andes region. By prioritizing these areas, we facilitate the application of Article 111 which requires local and regional governments to invest in land purchases for the conservation of watersheds. PMID:25737819

  2. Bird conservation would complement landslide prevention in the Central Andes of Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Conservation and restoration priorities often focus on separate ecosystem problems. Inspired by the November 11th (2011) landslide event near Manizales, and the current poor results of Colombia’s Article 111 of Law 99 of 1993 as a conservation measure in this country, we set out to prioritize conservation and restoration areas where landslide prevention would complement bird conservation in the Central Andes. This area is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth, but also one of the most threatened. Using the case of the Rio Blanco Reserve, near Manizales, we identified areas for conservation where endemic and small-range bird diversity was high, and where landslide risk was also high. We further prioritized restoration areas by overlapping these conservation priorities with a forest cover map. Restoring forests in bare areas of high landslide risk and important bird diversity yields benefits for both biodiversity and people. We developed a simple landslide susceptibility model using slope, forest cover, aspect, and stream proximity. Using publicly available bird range maps, refined by elevation, we mapped concentrations of endemic and small-range bird species. We identified 1.54 km2 of potential restoration areas in the Rio Blanco Reserve, and 886 km2 in the Central Andes region. By prioritizing these areas, we facilitate the application of Article 111 which requires local and regional governments to invest in land purchases for the conservation of watersheds. PMID:25737819

  3. The Bolivian Orocline and its implications for the origin of the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriagada, C.

    2015-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Central Andes includes a complex combination of thrusting, wrenching and block rotation leading progressively to the curvature of the orogenic system of the South American continental margin at 18ºS (Bolivian Orocline). Tectonic deformation in the Bolivian Orocline cannot be realistically restored using information from balanced cross sections alone, as the deformation includes an important component of block rotation, associated to counterclockwise block rotation in southern Peru and clockwise rotation in northern Chile. Recent work shows that block rotations in the forearc are essentially pre-early Miocene, predating the onset of Neogene shortening in the Sub Andean zone. Most rotations in the forearc of northern Chile where acquired through a single tectonic event during the Paleogene-early Miocene which probably coincides with the Eocene orogen-wide Incaic event which affected large regions of the central Andes between ca. 50 and 40 Ma. Results from 2D restoration experiments support the hypothesis of the Paleogene formation of the Bolivian Orocline, as a consequence of differential shortening, concentrated in the Eastern Cordillera of Bolivia, southern Peru and northwestern Argentina. Within the southern central Andes four additional curvatures including striking changes in the pattern of rotations have been discovered. From north to south these are the Antofagasta-Calama Lineament, Vallenar, Maipo and Arauco oroclines. However, an important part of rotation needs to be balanced, in the forearc region, by two major conjugate oblique shear zones (Abancay Deflection and Antofagasta-Calama Lineament). These structural features are probably related to inherited lithospheric discontinuities associated with the accretion of basement terranes which could be responsible for producing and delimitating significant and abrupt changes in the magnitude of the Central Andean Rotation Pattern along the margin. While shortening and crustal

  4. Climate Change Driven Implications on Spatial Distribution of High Andean Peatlands in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Marco; Gibbons, Richard E.

    2013-04-01

    High Andean peatlands are among the most unique habitats in the tropical Andes and certainly among the least studied. High Andean peatlands occur patchily in montane grassland and scrub below snow line and above tree line. These high-elevation peatlands are sustained by glacial runoff and seasonal precipitation. We used remote sensing data to estimate that peatland habitat is approximately 2.5 % of our study region in the Puna, an ecoregion located in the high Andes above 4000 m a.s.l. Individual sizes of our estimated peatland polygons ranged from 0.72 ha to 1079 ha with a mean size of 4.9 ha. Climate change driven implications on spatial distribution of high Andean peatlands were assessed in two ways. First, we estimated the effect of predicted regional temperature increase by using the standard lapse rate of 2° C per 300 m for assessing peatland habitat patches that would remain above a critical thermocline. Nearly 80% of peatland habitat patches were predicted to occur below the thermocline if the prediction of 4° C temperature increase is realized. The second assessment relied on the quantified assumption that permanent snow or glacier cover, topographic characteristics (e.g. slope) and precipitation of a basin are essential variables in the occurrence of high Andean peatlands. All 17 basins were predicted to have a decrease in peatland habitat due to snow line uplift, decrease in precipitation and consequent insufficient wetland inflows. Total habitat loss was predicted for two basins in the semi-arid part of the study area with a snow line uplift to 5600 m and a projected decrease in precipitation of 1 mm per year over the next 40 years. A combined result of both assessments provides important information on climate change driven implications on the hydrology of high Andean peatlands and potential consequences for their spatial distribution within the Central Andes.

  5. Intraseasonal variability of organized convective systems in the Central Andes: Relationship to Regional Dynamical Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, K. I.; Slayback, D. A.; Nicholls, S.; Yager, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Andes extend from the west coast of Colombia (10N) to the southern tip of Chile (53S). In southern Peru and Bolivia, the Central Andes is split into separate eastern and western cordilleras, with a high plateau (≥ 3000 m), the Altiplano, between them. Because 90% of the Earth's tropical mountain glaciers are located in the Central Andes, our study focuses on this region, defining its zonal extent as 7S-21S and the meridional extent as the terrain 1000 m and greater. Although intense convection occurs during the wet season in the Altiplano, it is not included in the lists of regions with frequent or the most intense convection. The scarcity of in-situ observations with sufficient density and temporal resolution to resolve individual storms or even mesoscale-organized cloud systems and documented biases in microwave-based rainfall products in poorly gauged mountainous regions have impeded the development of an extensive literature on convection and convective systems in this region. With the tropical glaciers receding at unprecedented rates, leaving seasonal precipitation as an increasingly important input to the water balance in alpine valley ecosystems and streams, understanding the nature and characteristics of the seasonal precipitation becomes increasingly important for the rural economies in this region. Previous work in analyzing precipitation in the Central Andes has emphasized interannual variability with respect to ENSO, this is the first study to focus on shorter scale variability with respect to organized convection. The present study took advantage of the University of Utah's Precipitation Features database compiled from 14 years of TRMM observations (1998-2012), supplemented by field observations of rainfall and streamflow, historical gauge data, and long-term WRF-simulations, to analyze the intraseasonal variability of precipitating systems and their relationship regional dynamical features such as the Bolivian High. Through time series and

  6. What controls millennial-scale denudation rates across the Central Andes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Gerold; Korup, Oliver; Schlunegger, Fritz; Kober, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable planning of erosion control measures in the Central Andes requires robust knowledge about natural denudation rates. We explore a large dataset combining new and published 10Be (and 26Al) catchment-wide denudation rates from a swath at 17 to 19° S spanning the Western Cordillera that rises from sea level to 5500 m elevation; the Altiplano at ~4000 m; the Eastern Cordillera with elevations up to 6500 m; the Interandean Zone; the Subandean Zone; and the Chaco Plain at 300 m. The selected catchments span a large spread regarding morphometric and climate properties where mean slope angles range from 1 to 31°, and mean precipitation from 100 to 3900 mm/a. The denudation rates (0.0036 to 1.93 mm/a) are averaged over millennia, and reveal two to three magnitudes difference across the Central Andes. The regional distribution of denudation rates clearly demonstrates a more complex interaction of geomorphological, geological and meteorological parameters with the dominant geomorphological processes. In order to elucidate the key controls on denudation, we use multivariate statistics such as principal component analysis in order to remove potentially redundant predictors of denudation in the studied catchments. These predictors include catchment elevation, topographic relief, hillslope inclination, mean precipitation, tree cover, specific stream power, channel steepness indices, sinuosity, drainage density and hypsometric index that we derived from the SRTM 90 m Digital Elevation Database, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, and the Terra MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields dataset. Additionally, the rock strength index (PLI) was estimated based on geological units. Preliminary results allow distinguishing five different longitudinal domains of denudation on the basis of climatic regime, hillslope steepness, and the degree of accumulated crustal deformation. We find that the pattern of 10Be catchment-wide denudation rates in the Central Andes

  7. Subduction Zone Science - Examples of Seismic Images of the Central Andes and Subducting Nazca Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Scire, A. C.; Ward, K. M.; Portner, D. E.; Bishop, B.; Ryan, J. C.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction has shaped large regions of the Earth and constitute over 55,000 km of convergent plate margin today. The subducting slabs descend from the surface into the lower mantle and impacts earthquake occurrence, surface uplift, arc volcanism and mantle convection as well as many other processes. The subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South America plate is one example and constitutes the largest present day ocean-continent convergent margin system and has built the Andes, one of the largest actively growing mountain ranges on Earth. This active margin is characterized by along-strike variations in arc magmatism, upper crustal shortening, crustal thickness, and slab geometry that make it an ideal region to study the relationship between the subducting slab, the mantle wedge, and the overriding plate. After 20 years of portable seismic deployments in the Central Andes seismologists have combined data sets and used multiple techniques to generate seismic images spanning ~3000 km of the South American subduction zone to ~800 km depth with unprecedented resolution. For example, using teleseismic P- waves we have imaged the Nazca slab penetrating through the mantle transition zone (MTZ) and into the uppermost lower mantle. Our tomographic images show that there is significant along-strike variation in the morphology of the Nazca slab in the upper mantle, MTZ, and the lower mantle, including possible tears, folding, and internal deformation. Receiver function studies and surface wave tomography have revealed major changes in lithospheric properties in the Andes. Improved seismic images allow us to more completely evaluate tectonic processes in the formation and uplift of the Andes including: (1) overthickened continental crust driven by crustal shortening, (2) changes in slab dip and coupling with the overlying plate (3) localized lithospheric foundering, and (4) large-scale mantle and crustal melting leading to magmatic addition and/or crustal flow. Although

  8. Mitochondrial Variation among the Aymara and the Signatures of Population Expansion in the Central Andes

    PubMed Central

    BATAI, KEN; WILLIAMS, SLOAN R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The exploitation of marine resources and intensive agriculture led to a marked population increase early in central Andean prehistory. Constant historic and prehistoric population movements also characterize this region. These features undoubtedly affected regional genetic variation, but the exact nature of these effects remains uncertain. Methods Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region I sequence variation in 61 Aymara individuals from La Paz, Bolivia, was analyzed and compared to sequences from 47 other South American populations to test hypotheses of whether increased female effective population size and gene flow influenced the mtDNA variation among central Andean populations. Results The Aymara and Quechua were genetically diverse showing evidence of population expansion and large effective population size, and a demographic expansion model fits the mtDNA variation found among central Andean populations well. Estimated migration rates and the results of AMOVA and multidimensional scaling analysis suggest that female gene flow was also an important factor, influencing genetic variation among the central Andeans as well as lowland populations from western South America. mtDNA variation in south central Andes correlated better with geographic proximity than with language, and fit a population continuity model. Conclusion The mtDNA data suggests that the central Andeans experienced population expansion, most likely because of rapid demographic expansion after introduction of intensive agriculture, but roles of female gene flow need to be further explored. PMID:24449040

  9. Cold Episodes, Their Precursors and Teleconnections in the Central Peruvian Andes (1958-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulca, J. C.; Vuille, M. F.; Trasmonte, G.; Silva, Y.; Takahashi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Mantaro valley (MV) is located in the central Peruvian Andes. Occasionally, cold episodes are observed during the austral summer (January-March), which strongly damage crops. However, little is known about the causes and impacts of such cold episodes in the MV. The main goal of this study is thus to characterize cold episodes in the MV and assess their large-scale circulation and teleconnections over South America (SA) during austral summer. To identify cold events in the MV daily minimum temperature for the period 1958-2009 from Huayao station, located within the MV was used. We defined a cold episode as the period when daily minimum temperature drops below the 10-percentile for at least one day. Several gridded reanalysis and satellite products were used to characterize the large-scale circulation, cloud cover and rainfall over SA associated with these events for same period. Cold episodes in the MV are associated with positive OLR anomalies, which extend over much of the central Andes, indicating reduced convective cloud cover during these extremes, but also affirm the large-scale nature of these events. At the same time, northeastern Brazil (NEB) registers negative OLR anomalies, strong convective activity and enhanced cloud cover because displacement of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) toward the northeast of its climatologic position. Further, it is associated with a weakening of the Bolivian High - Nordeste Low (BH-NL) system at upper levels, but also influenced by a low-level migratory high-pressure center develops at 30°S, 50°W; propagating from mid- to low latitudes as part of an extratropical Rossby wave train. In conclusion, cold episodes in the MV appear to be caused by radiative cooling associated with reduced cloudiness, rather than cold air advection. The reduced cloud cover in turn results from a robust large-scale pattern of westerly wind anomalies over central Peruvian Andes, inhibiting moisture influx, convective activity and

  10. Late Pleistocene glaciation in the Central Andes: Temperature versus humidity control — A case study from the eastern Bolivian Andes (17°S) and regional synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kull, C.; Imhof, S.; Grosjean, M.; Zech, R.; Veit, H.

    2008-01-01

    A glacier-climate model was used to calculate climatic conditions in a test site on the east Andean slope around Cochabamba (17°S, Bolivia) for the time of the maximum Late Pleistocene glaciation. Results suggest a massive temperature reduction of about - 6.4 °C (+ 1.4/- 1.3 °C), combined with annual precipitation rates of about 1100 mm (+ 570 mm/- 280 mm). This implies no major change in annual precipitation compared with today. Summer precipitation was the source for the humidity in the past, as is the case today. This climate scenario argues for a maximum advance of the paleo-glaciers in the eastern cordillera during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 20 ka BP), which is confirmed by exposure age dates. In a synthesized view over the central Andes, the results point to an increased summer precipitation-driven Late Glacial (15-10 ka BP) maximum advance in the western part of the Altiplano (18°S-23°S), a temperature-driven maximum advance during full glacial times (LGM) in the eastern cordillera, and a pre- and post-LGM (32 ka BP/14 ka BP) maximum advance around 30°S related to increased precipitation and reduced temperature on the western slope of the Andes. The results indicate the importance of understanding the seasonality and details of the mass balance-climate interaction in order to disentangle drivers for the observed regionally asynchronous past glaciations in the central Andes.

  11. Landsat Thematic Mapper observations of debris avalanche deposits in the Central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. W.; Wells, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    Remote sensing with the Landsat Thematic Mapper of debris avalanche deposits in the Central Andes between 18 and 27 deg S revealed, for the first time, the presence of 28 breached volcanic cones and 11 major volcanic debris avalanche deposits, several of which cover areas in excess of 100 sq km. It is concluded that such avalanche deposits are normal products of the evolution of large composite volcanoes, comparable with lava and pyroclastic flow deposits. A statistical survey of 578 composite volcanoes in the same area indicated that a majority of cones which achieve edifice heights between 2000 and 3000 m may undergo sector collapse. The paper describes morphological criteria for identifying breached composite cones and volcanic debris avalanches using orbital images.

  12. The Bolivian and Maipo Oroclines: Two first scale structural features of the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriagada, C. A.

    2013-05-01

    Two remarkable curvatures of the orogenic system of the Central Andes are the Bolivian and the Maipo Oroclines. While the former has been widely studied, the latter in central Chile, where few, geographically restricted, paleomagnetic studies have been carried out, knowledge about vertical-axis rotations is scarce. Here we show the results of the paleomagnetic studies carried out in the last years along the Central Andes within the Bolivian and Maipo Oroclines. Along-strike variations in horizontal shortening in the back- arc provided an efficient mechanism to explain the Bolivian Orocline and block rotations of the forearc region in northern Chile and southern Peru. As a first approximation, it appears reasonable that the arcuate shape of the Maipo Orocline could be accompanied by a significant pattern of rotations about a vertical axis in the forearc region and by a progressive decrease of crustal shortening and the resulting topography from north to south in the back-arc region. Furthermore, although the Maipo Orocline is located more than 1000 km south of the axial zone of the Central Andes, south of 30, clockwise rotations of up to 20 could have occurred during the evolution of the Bolivian Orocline. While the northern segment of the Maipo orocline corresponds with the ongoing subduction of the Pampean flat slab segment which proceeds nearly horizontally beneath the South American lithosphere, the southern segment coincides with the normal subduction segment developed to the south of 33S. The Maipo Orocline is thought to be result of collision of the Challenger Fracture Zone and Juan Fernández Ridge with the continent since 25 Ma. The southern flank of the Maipo Orocline can be traced along strike to around 38S. North of 33S, previous studies show no evidence for significant tectonic rotations. In contrary, south of 33S, both in the Coastal Cordillera and High Andes, clockwise block rotations have been observed and attributed to in situ block rotations in

  13. Subduction and collision processes in the Central Andes constrained by converted seismic phases.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X; Sobolev, S V; Kind, R; Oncken, O; Bock, G; Asch, G; Schurr, B; Graeber, F; Rudloff, A; Hanka, W; Wylegalla, K; Tibi, R; Haberland, C; Rietbrock, A; Giese, P; Wigger, P; Röwer, P; Zandt, G; Beck, S; Wallace, T; Pardo, M; Comte, D

    The Central Andes are the Earth's highest mountain belt formed by ocean-continent collision. Most of this uplift is thought to have occurred in the past 20 Myr, owing mainly to thickening of the continental crust, dominated by tectonic shortening. Here we use P-to-S (compressional-to-shear) converted teleseismic waves observed on several temporary networks in the Central Andes to image the deep structure associated with these tectonic processes. We find that the Moho (the Mohorovicić discontinuity--generally thought to separate crust from mantle) ranges from a depth of 75 km under the Altiplano plateau to 50 km beneath the 4-km-high Puna plateau. This relatively thin crust below such a high-elevation region indicates that thinning of the lithospheric mantle may have contributed to the uplift of the Puna plateau. We have also imaged the subducted crust of the Nazca oceanic plate down to 120 km depth, where it becomes invisible to converted teleseismic waves, probably owing to completion of the gabbro-eclogite transformation; this is direct evidence for the presence of kinetically delayed metamorphic reactions in subducting plates. Most of the intermediate-depth seismicity in the subducting plate stops at 120 km depth as well, suggesting a relation with this transformation. We see an intracrustal low-velocity zone, 10-20 km thick, below the entire Altiplano and Puna plateaux, which we interpret as a zone of continuing metamorphism and partial melting that decouples upper-crustal imbrication from lower-crustal thickening. PMID:11140679

  14. Evolution of Rhyolite at Laguna del Maule, a Rapidly Inflating Volcanic Field in the Southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, N. L.; Singer, B. S.; Jicha, B. R.; Hildreth, E. W.; Fierstein, J.; Rogers, N. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field (LdM) is host to both the foremost example of post-glacial rhyolitic volcanism in the southern Andes and rapid, ongoing crustal deformation. The flare-up of high-silica eruptions was coeval with deglaciation at 24 ka. Rhyolite and rhyodacite domes and coulees totaling 6.5 km3 form a 20 km ring around the central lake basin. This spatial and temporal concentration of rhyolite is unprecedented in the history of the volcanic field. Colinear major and trace element variation suggests these lavas share a common evolutionary history (Hildreth et al., 2010). Moreover, geodetic observations (InSAR & GPS) have identified rapid inflation centered in the western side of the rhyolite dome ring at a rate of 17 cm/year for five years, which has accelerated to 30 cm/yr since April 2012. The best fit to the geodetic data is an expanding magma body located at 5 km depth (Fournier et al., 2010; Le Mevel, 2012). The distribution of high-silica volcanism, most notably geochemically similar high-silica rhyolite lavas erupted 12 km apart of opposite sides of the lake within a few kyr of each other, raises the possibility that the shallow magma intrusion represents only a portion of a larger rhyolitic body, potentially of caldera forming dimensions. We aim to combine petrologic models with a precise geochronology to formulate a model of the evolution of the LdM magma system to its current state. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations show rhyolitic volcanism beginning at 23 ka with the eruption of the Espejos rhyolite, followed by the Cari Launa Rhyolite at 14.5 ka, two flows of the Barrancas complex at 6.4 and 3.9 ka, and the Divisoria rhyolite at 2.2 ka. In contrast, significant andesitic and dacitic volcanism is largely absent from the central basin of LdM since the early post-glacial period suggesting a coincident basin-wide evolution from andesite to dacite to rhyolite and is consistent with a shallow body of low-density rhyolite blocking the eruption

  15. Trench investigation along the Merida section of the Bocono fault (central Venezuelan Andes), Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Audemard, F.; Pantosti, D.; Machette, M.; Costa, C.; Okumura, K.; Cowan, H.; Diederix, H.; Ferrer, C.

    1999-01-01

    The Bocono fault is a major NE-SW-trending, dextral fault that extends for about 500 km along the backbone of the Venezuelan Andes. Several large historical earthquakes in this region have been attributed to the Bocono fault, and some of these have been recently associated with specific parts through paleoseismologic investigations. A new trench study has been performed, 60 km to the northeast of Merida in the central Venezuelan Andes, where the fault forms a releasing bend, comprising two conspicuous late Holocene fault strands that are about 1 km apart. The southern and northern strands carry about 70% and 30% (respectively) of the 7-10 mm/yr net slip rate measured in this sector, which is based on a 40 vs. 85-100 m right-lateral offset of the Late Pleistocene Los Zerpa moraines. A trench excavated on the northern strand of the fault (near Morros de los Hoyos, slightly northeast of Apartaderos) across a twin shutter ridge and related sag pond exposed two main fault zones cutting Late Pleistocene alluvial and Holocene peat deposits. Each zone forms a shutter ridge with peat deposits ponded against the uplifted block. The paleoearthquake reconstruction derived from this trench allow us to propose the occurrence of at least 6-8 earthquakes in the past 9000 yr, yielding a maximum average recurrence interval of about 1100-1500 yr. Based on the northern strands average slip rate (2.6 mm/yr), such as earthquake sequence should have accommodated about 23 m of slip since 9 ka, suggesting that the maximum slip per event ranges between 3 and 4 m. No direct evidence for the large 1812 earthquake has been found in the trench, although this earthquake may have ruptured this section of the fault. Further paleoseismic studies will investigate the possibility that this event occurred in the Bocono fault, but ruptured mainly its southern strand in this region.

  16. Energy Balance of High Altitude Glaciarised Basins In The Central Andes: Climatic and Hydrological Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corripio, J.; Purves, R.

    The Central Andes of Chile and Argentina can be classified as climatic deserts, yet they support very large populations and a rich agriculture, thanks to melt water from snow melt and glaciers. Meteorological data from one automatic weather station in- stalled on two different glaciers at 3300m and 4600m a.s.l. in the Chilean Andes (700 W, 330 S), are presented and discussed. The relative importance of the terms in the en- ergy balance equation shows substantial differences from that of mid-latitude Alpine glaciers, with turbulent heat transfer accounting for 10 to 20% of the net energy bal- ance. Extremely low relative humidity (up to 8%) and moderate winds result in high evaporation rates. Intense evaporation, together with effective radiative cooling, dew point well below freezing and intense solar radiation favour differential ablation of the snow surface, which results in the formation of snow penitentes, these unique forms result in a further modification of the energy balance. The intense solar radia- tion enhances the effect of the surrounding topography on snow-covered areas, which is modelled using terrain algorithms for digital elevation models. Stable conditions and a clear atmosphere permit effective use of solar radiative models with good re- sults. Remoteness and lack of infrastructures complicate access, which was made us- ing traditional transportation methods in the region: mules! Lack of data and limited budget was partially overcome by developing an alternative simple and economical remote sensing tool for snow cover monitoring and albedo estimation using terrestrial photography. Finally, the output of a distributed snow melt model is compared to dis- charge data from a glacier whose outflow is monitored by the Chilean Water Board, as it is the main source of drinking water for Santiago de Chile.

  17. Tectonic and lithological controls on denudation rates in the central Bolivian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kober, F.; Zeilinger, G.; Hippe, K.; Marc, O.; Lendzioch, T.; Grischott, R.; Christl, M.; Kubik, P. W.; Zola, R.

    2015-08-01

    The topographic signature of a mountain belt depends on the interplay of tectonic, climatic and erosional processes, whose relative importance changes over times, while quantifying these processes and their rates at specific times remains a challenge. The eastern Andes of central Bolivia offer a natural laboratory in which such interplay has been debated. Here, we investigate the Rio Grande catchment which crosses orthogonally the eastern Andes orogen from the Eastern Cordillera into the Subandean Zone, exhibiting a catchment relief of up to 5000 m. Despite an enhanced tectonic activity in the Subandes, local relief, mean and modal slopes and channel steepness indices are largely similar compared to the Eastern Cordillera and the intervening Interandean Zone. Nevertheless, a dataset of 57 new cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al catchment wide denudation rates from the Rio Grande catchment reveals up to one order of magnitude higher denudation rates in the Subandean Zone (mean 0.8 mm/yr) compared to the upstream physiographic regions. We infer that tectonic activity in the thrusting dominated Subandean belt causes higher denudation rates based on cumulative rock uplift investigations and due to the absence of a pronounced climate gradient. Furthermore, the lower rock strength of the Subandean sedimentary units correlates with mean slopes similar to the ones of the Eastern Cordillera and Interandean Zone, highlighting the fact, that lithology and rock strength can control high denudation rates at low slopes. Low denudation rates measured at the outlet of the Rio Grande catchment (Abapo) are interpreted to be a result of a biased cosmogenic nuclide mixing that is dominated by headwater signals from the Eastern Cordillera and the Interandean zone and limited catchment sediment connectivity in the lower river reaches. Therefore, comparisons of short- (i.e., sediment yield) and millennial denudation rates require caution when postulating tectonic and/or climatic forcing without

  18. Geometry and State of Stress of the Slab Beneath the North Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    The central Andean plateau of southern Peru and Bolivia is one of the largest topographic features on Earth. It has strongly influenced the local and regional climate since the early Miocene by affecting the regional dynamics that control circulation and precipitation. The surface and subsurface processes responsible for the plateau formation and evolution are still unclear. There are two end member models proposed for this uplift: (1) Slow and steady rise since the late Eocene (~40 Ma) with maximum upper crustal shortening between 30 and 10 Ma or (2) rapid surface uplift of ~2.5 km in the late Miocene between 10.3 and 6.7 Ma. The rapid uplift theory argues for the wholesale removal of a thick portion of the lower eclogitic crust and upper mantle lithosphere. A slow and steady uplift of the Andes would suggest a continuous removal of the lower lithosphere or piecemeal delamination, proportional to the rate of shortening. We present earthquake locations and focal mechanisms using data from two ongoing temporary arrays: the network of 50 broadband seismic stations that was part of the NSF-Continental Dynamics-funded project "CAUGHT" (Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography) and the 40 station NSF- Geophysics funded "PULSE" array (PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment). Our new earthquake locations provide an improved insight about the geometry of subducting Nazca slab and also put an upper bound on the thickness of overriding lithosphere. Obvious clustering of intermediate depth earthquakes suggests strong and localized release of tectonic stress in the slab at ~15.5oS. The seismic section drawn from the precisely located slab events provide a better idea about the lateral variations of the slab geometry and the geometry of asthenoshperic corner flow to help understand its geodynamic effect on the lithospheric delamination or ablative subduction process. . Focal mechanisms of the slab events are helpful in understanding the stress state of the

  19. The Continental Distillery: Building Thick Continental Crust in the Central Andes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.; Minaya, E.; Biryol, C. B.; Bishop, B.; Eakin, C. M.; Franca, G.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kumar, A.; Ryan, J. C.; Scire, A. C.; Ward, K. M.; Young, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of stable continental crust and the associated development and destruction of mantle lithospheric roots is central to our understanding of plate tectonics, both at its inception and as an ongoing process today. Subduction zones play an important role in the creation and refinement of continental crust, and also serve as a possible mechanism for the removal of residual mantle material. The central Andes provide an intriguing laboratory for the study of these processes. Up to 400 km wide, 1500 km long, and with an average elevation of 4 km, the Altiplano Plateau is the largest orogen on earth associated with an ocean-continent subduction zone. This is much larger than adjacent 'normal' sections of the Andes, raising the question of why this portion of South American crust became so much more substantial than surrounding areas. Over the past several years, new seismic data have made it possible for us to develop a more complete picture of the lithospheric and asthenospheric processes involved in the development of the Altiplano Plateau and the adjacent narrower orogen further to the north. The 'Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography' (CAUGHT) comprises in part a broadband deployment of 50 stations across the northern flank of the Altiplano Plateau in southern Peru and northern Bolivia. The adjacent 'PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment' (PULSE) includes 40 broadband stations that cover the region directly north of the CAUGHT deployment, encompassing the northern edge of the Altiplano, the transition to 'normal' width orogen, and the transition in slab geometry from normal to flat from south to north across the study area. Uplift of the Altiplano Plateau is likely due to some combination shortening, isostasy due to lithospheric destruction or changes in crustal density, magmatic addition to the crust, and/or flow within the thickened crust. Our studies indicate pervasive low velocities across the Altiplano consistent with a

  20. Interseismic coupling and seismic potential along the Central Andes subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlieh, Mohamed; Perfettini, Hugo; Tavera, Hernando; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Remy, Dominique; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Rolandone, FréDéRique; Bondoux, Francis; Gabalda, Germinal; Bonvalot, Sylvain

    2011-12-01

    We use about two decades of geodetic measurements to characterize interseismic strain build up along the Central Andes subduction zone from Lima, Peru, to Antofagasta, Chile. These measurements are modeled assuming a 3-plate model (Nazca, Andean sliver and South America Craton) and spatially varying interseismic coupling (ISC) on the Nazca megathrust interface. We also determine slip models of the 1996 Mw = 7.7 Nazca, the 2001 Mw = 8.4 Arequipa, the 2007 Mw = 8.0 Pisco and the Mw = 7.7 Tocopilla earthquakes. We find that the data require a highly heterogeneous ISC pattern and that, overall, areas with large seismic slip coincide with areas which remain locked in the interseismic period (with high ISC). Offshore Lima where the ISC is high, a Mw˜8.6-8.8 earthquake occurred in 1746. This area ruptured again in a sequence of four Mw˜8.0 earthquakes in 1940, 1966, 1974 and 2007 but these events released only a small fraction of the elastic strain which has built up since 1746 so that enough elastic strain might be available there to generate a Mw > 8.5 earthquake. The region where the Nazca ridge subducts appears to be mostly creeping aseismically in the interseismic period (low ISC) and seems to act as a permanent barrier as no large earthquake ruptured through it in the last 500 years. In southern Peru, ISC is relatively high and the deficit of moment accumulated since the Mw˜8.8 earthquake of 1868 is equivalent to a magnitude Mw˜8.4 earthquake. Two asperities separated by a subtle aseismic creeping patch are revealed there. This aseismic patch may arrest some rupture as happened during the 2001 Arequipa earthquake, but the larger earthquakes of 1604 and 1868 were able to rupture through it. In northern Chile, ISC is very high and the rupture of the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake has released only 4% of the elastic strain that has accumulated since 1877. The deficit of moment which has accumulated there is equivalent to a magnitude Mw˜8.7 earthquake. This study thus

  1. Surface uplift and convective rainfall along the southern Central Andes (Angastaco Basin, NW Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingel, Heiko; Mulch, Andreas; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Cottle, John; Hynek, Scott A.; Poletti, Jacob; Rohrmann, Alexander; Schmitt, Axel K.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-04-01

    Stable-isotopic and sedimentary records from the orogenic Puna Plateau of NW Argentina and adjacent intermontane basins to the east furnish a unique late Cenozoic record of range uplift and ensuing paleoenvironmental change in the south-central Andes. Today, focused precipitation in this region occurs along the eastern, windward flanks of the Eastern Cordillera and Sierras Pampeanas ranges, while the orogen interior constitutes high-elevation regions with increasingly arid conditions in a westward direction. As in many mountain belts, such hydrologic and topographic gradients are commonly mirrored by a systematic relationship between the oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope ratios of meteoric water and elevation. The glass fraction of isotopically datable volcanic ash intercalated in sedimentary sequences constitutes an environmental proxy that retains a signal of the hydrogen-isotopic composition of ancient precipitation. This isotopic composition thus helps to elucidate the combined climatic and tectonic processes associated with topographic growth, which ultimately controls the spatial patterns of precipitation in mountain belts. However, between 25.5 and 27°S present-day river-based hydrogen-isotope lapse rates are very low, possibly due to deep-convective seasonal storms that dominate runoff. If not accounted for, the effects of such conditions on moisture availability in the past may lead to misinterpretations of proxy-records of rainfall. Here, we present hydrogen-isotope data of volcanic glass (δDg), extracted from 34 volcanic ash layers in different sedimentary basins of the Eastern Cordillera and the Sierras Pampeanas. Combined with previously published δDg records and our refined U-Pb and (U-Th)/He zircon geochronology on 17 tuff samples, we demonstrate hydrogen-isotope variations associated with paleoenvironmental change in the Angastaco Basin, which evolved from a contiguous foreland to a fault-bounded intermontane basin during the late Mio

  2. Controls on supergene enrichment of porphyry copper deposits in the Central Andes: A review and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Adrian J.; Rice, Clive M.

    2005-12-01

    The Central Andes host some of the world’s largest porphyry copper deposits. The economic viability of these deposits is dependent on the size and quality of their supergene enrichment blanket. Published models that have strongly influenced exploration policy suggest that supergene enrichment ceased at 14 Ma due to an increase in aridity. Here we discuss these models using published geochronological, geomorphological and geological data. Geochronological data indicate that supergene oxidation and enrichment has been active between 17 and 27°S across the forearc of northern Chile and southern Peru from 44 to 6 Ma, and on the Bolivian Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera of Argentina from 11 Ma to present. There is evidence for cessation at 20, 14 and 6 Ma. However, a major problem is that as more geochronological data become available the age ranges and periods of enrichment increase. This suggests that the full spectrum of enrichment ages may not have been sampled. The relationship between supergene enrichment and the age of regional pediplain surface development is not well constrained. Only in two areas have surfaces related to enrichment been directly dated (southern Peru and south of 26°S in Chile) and suggest formation post 14 Ma. Sedimentological data indicate that a fluctuating arid/semi-arid climate prevailed across the Atacama Desert until between 4 and 3 Ma, climatic conditions that are thought to be favourable for supergene enrichment. The balance between uplift, erosion, burial and sufficient water supply to promote enrichment is complex. This suggests that a simple model for controlling supergene enrichment is unlikely to be widely applicable in northern Chile. General models that involve climatic desiccation at 14 Ma related to rainshadow development and/or the presence of an ancestral cold-upwelling Humboldt Current are not supported by the available geological evidence. The integration of disparate sedimentological, geomorphological and supergene

  3. Surface exposure dating of moraines and alluvial fans in the Southern Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; García Morabito, Ezequiel; Haghipour, Negar; Christl, Marcus; Likermann, Jeremías; Tobal, Jonathan; Yamin, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    The role of tectonics versus climate in controlling the evolution of alluvial fans in discussed controversially. The southern Central Andes and their forelands provide a perfect setting to study climate versus tectonic control of alluvial fans. On the one hand, the region is tectonically active and alluvial fan surfaces are offset by faults. The higher summits, on the other hand, are glaciated today, and glacial deposits document past periods of lower temperatures and increased precipitation. We applied 10Be surface exposure dating on 5 fan terraces 4 moraines of the Ansilta range (31.6°S - 69.8°W) using boulders and amalgamated pebbles to explore their chronological relationship. From youngest to oldest, the alluvial fan terraces yield minimum ages of 15 ± 1 ka (T1), 97 ± 9 ka (T2), 141 ± 9 ka (T3), 286 ± 14 ka (T4) and 570 ± 57 ka (T5). Minimum ages derived from moraines are 14 ± 1 ka (M1), 22 ± 2 ka (M2), 157 ± 14 ka (M3) and 351 ± 33 ka (M4), all calculations assuming no erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. The moraines document glacial advances during cold periods at the marine isotope stages (MIS) 2, 6 and 10. The terraces T1, T3 seem to be geomorphologic counterparts during MIS 2 and 6. We suggest that T2, T4 and T5 document aggradation during the cold periods MIS 5d, 8 and 14 in response to glacial advances, although the respective moraines are not preserved. Our results highlight: i) the arid climate in the Southern Central Andes favors the preservation of glacial and alluvial deposits allowing landscape and climate reconstructions back to ~570 ka), ii) alluvial deposits correlate with moraines or fall into cold glacial times, so that climate, and in particular the existence of glaciers, seems to be the main forcing of alluvial fan formation at our study site. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary

  4. Glacialmorphological reconstruction of glacier advances and glacial lake outburst floods at the Cachapoal glacier in the Dry Central Andes of Chile (34°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrizaga, Lasafam; Charrier, Reynaldo

    2013-04-01

    Throughout the Andes Mountain range of South America a general trend of glacier shrinkage has taken place in the last century. Only a few glaciers have shown a rather non-continuous trend of glacier retreat and temporally advanced or even surged during the mid-19th to 20th century. One of the earliest assumed glacier surges has occurred in the upper Cachapoal catchment area at the homonymous glacier. In climatic respect the Cachapoal glacier is located in the transition zone from the most southern part of the Dry Central Andes of Chile to the more humid zone of the Wet Andes. The region is affected mainly by winter precipitation deriving from the Westerlies. The debris-covered, 12 km-long Cachapoal glacier represents one of the largest valley glaciers in the Central Andes. It is an avalanche-fed glacier with an almost 1500 m-high head wall in its upper catchment area flowing down from Picos del Barroso (5180 m) and terminates at an elevation of 2630 m a.s.l. with a bifurcated glacier tongue. A large moraine complex, almost 2 km in length and 500 m in width, separates the two glacier lobes. During times of advanced glacier tongue positions the Ríos Molina and Cachapoal may be have blocked independently at two distinct localities which are situated about 2300 m apart from each other. A blockage with temporal lake formation has occurred at least in the years 1848, 1955 and 1981 (cf. Plagemann 1887, Peña 1981), from which the rupture of the earliest glacier barrier has been the most devastating. This event is locally reminded as "la gran avenida en seco" in the historical record. Geomorphological evidence of the past historical and modern glacier expansions is given in the proglacial area by a fresh dead-ice hummocky topography and glacial trimlines at the valley flanks. More down valley broad outwash plains and boulder clusters indicate past high energy floods produced by glacier lake outbursts. Regarding the small size of the catchment area of the Río Molina

  5. Geodetic observations of megathrust earthquakes and backarc wedge deformation across the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J. R.; Brooks, B. A.; Foster, J. H.; Bevis, M. G.; Echalar, A.; Caccamise, D.; Heck, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) data offer an opportunity to investigate active orogenic wedges yet surface velocity fields are available for only a few examples worldwide. More observations are needed to link deformation processes across multiple timescales and to better understand strain accumulation and release in active wedge settings. Here we present a new GPS velocity field for the central Andes and the backarc orogenic wedge comprising the southern Subandes of Bolivia (SSA), a region previously thought to be mostly isolated from the plate boundary earthquake cycle. The time span of our observations (2000 to mid-2014) includes two megathrust earthquakes along the Chile trench that affected the SSA. The 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake resulted in a regional postseismic decrease in the eastward component of horizontal surface velocities. Preliminary analysis of the deformation field from the April 01 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua, Chile earthquake also indicates a postseismic signal extending into the SSA. We create an interseismic velocity field for the SSA by correcting campaign GPS site velocities for the seasonal cycles estimated from continuous GPS site time series. We remove the effects of both megathrust events by estimating coseismic steps and fitting linear and logarithmic functions to the postseismic GPS site motions. The velocity estimates at most locations increase after correcting for the transients. This finding suggests that forces leading to shortening and earthquakes in the backarc wedge are not as temporally consistent as previously considered.

  6. A satellite geodetic survey of large-scale deformation of volcanic centres in the central Andes.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Matthew E; Simons, Mark

    2002-07-11

    Surface deformation in volcanic areas usually indicates movement of magma or hydrothermal fluids at depth. Stratovolcanoes tend to exhibit a complex relationship between deformation and eruptive behaviour. The characteristically long time spans between such eruptions requires a long time series of observations to determine whether deformation without an eruption is common at a given edifice. Such studies, however, are logistically difficult to carry out in most volcanic arcs, as these tend to be remote regions with large numbers of volcanoes (hundreds to even thousands). Here we present a satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey of the remote central Andes volcanic arc, a region formed by subduction of the Nazca oceanic plate beneath continental South America. Spanning the years 1992 to 2000, our survey reveals the background level of activity of about 900 volcanoes, 50 of which have been classified as potentially active. We find four centres of broad (tens of kilometres wide), roughly axisymmetric surface deformation. None of these centres are at volcanoes currently classified as potentially active, although two lie within about 10 km of volcanoes with known activity. Source depths inferred from the patterns of deformation lie between 5 and 17 km. In contrast to the four new sources found, we do not observe any deformation associated with recent eruptions of Lascar, Chile. PMID:12110886

  7. Genesis of adakite-like lavas of Licancabur volcano (Chile—Bolivia, Central Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Oscar; Déruelle, Bernard; Demaiffe, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    The Licancabur volcano is located on the Bolivia—Chile Altiplano (Central Andes). The lavas are andesites and dacites. Numerous mineralogic features attest that magma mixing occurred. Andesites have concave (spoon-shaped) REE patterns whereas dacites have steep slopes. A spectacular crossover of patterns occurs with increasing SiO 2. Most geochemical discrimination criteria of adakites are satisfied by Licancabur dacites, except their high Sr-isotope compositions (> 0.7075). For the genesis of the Licancabur adakite-like lavas, a four-step model is proposed: (1) partial melting (5 to 10 wt %) of a subducted altered oceanic crust; (2) hybridation (< 10 wt %) of the magmas with melts derived from the overlying lithospheric mantle; (3) contamination (≈ 1 wt %) of these hybrid magmas by TTG-type granodiorites of the Archean lower continental crust (with present-day Sr-isotope ratios ≈ 0.820); (4) evolution and differentiation by crystal fractionation (< 6 wt %) and magma mixing at upper crustal levels.

  8. A satellite geodetic survey of large-scale deformation of volcanic centres in the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, Matthew E.; Simons, Mark

    2002-07-01

    Surface deformation in volcanic areas usually indicates movement of magma or hydrothermal fluids at depth. Stratovolcanoes tend to exhibit a complex relationship between deformation and eruptive behaviour. The characteristically long time spans between such eruptions requires a long time series of observations to determine whether deformation without an eruption is common at a given edifice. Such studies, however, are logistically difficult to carry out in most volcanic arcs, as these tend to be remote regions with large numbers of volcanoes (hundreds to even thousands). Here we present a satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey of the remote central Andes volcanic arc, a region formed by subduction of the Nazca oceanic plate beneath continental South America. Spanning the years 1992 to 2000, our survey reveals the background level of activity of about 900 volcanoes, 50 of which have been classified as potentially active. We find four centres of broad (tens of kilometres wide), roughly axisymmetric surface deformation. None of these centres are at volcanoes currently classified as potentially active, although two lie within about 10km of volcanoes with known activity. Source depths inferred from the patterns of deformation lie between 5 and 17km. In contrast to the four new sources found, we do not observe any deformation associated with recent eruptions of Lascar, Chile.

  9. Hydrothermal System of the Lastarria Volcano (Central Andes) Imaged by Magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, D.

    2015-12-01

    Lazufre volcanic complex, located in the central Andes, is recently undergoing an episode of uplift, conforming one of the most extensive deforming volcanic systems worldwide. Recent works have focused on the subsurface of this volcanic system at different scales, using surface deformation data, seismic noise tomography and magnetotellurics. Here we image the electrical resistivity structure of the Lastarria volcano, one of the most important features in the Lazufre area, using broadband magnetotelluric data at 30 locations around the volcanic edifice. Results from 3-D modeling show a conductive zone at 6 km depth south of the Lastarria volcano interpreted as a magmatic heat source, which is connected to a shallower conductive area beneath the volcanic edifice and its close vicinity. This shallow highly conductive zone fits with geochemical analysis results of thermal fluid discharges, related to fumaroles present in this area, in terms of depth extent and possible temperatures of fluids, and presents also a good correlation with seismic tomography results. The horizontal extension of this shallow conductive zone, related to the hydrothermal system of Lastarria, suggests that it has been draining one of the lagoons in the area (Laguna Azufrera), forming a sulfur rich area which can be observed at the southern side of this lagoon. Joint modeling of the hydrothermal system using magnetotellurics and seismic data is part of the current work.

  10. A new species of Phrynopus (Anura: Craugastoridae) from the central Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Mamani, Luis; Malqui, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new species of Phrynopus from the humid grassland of Distrito de Comas, Provincia Concepcion, Department of Junin. The new species is diagnosed by the lack of dentigerous processes of vomers, tympanic annulus and membrane imperceptible through the skin, males with nuptial pads and vocal slits, warty dorsal skin, and aerolate throat, belly and ventral surfaces of thighs, by possessing pronounced subconical tubercles in the post-tympanic area, by having rounded finger and toe tips with no disc structure, and by its overall dark brown to black coloration with few white and yellow spots in the dorsum and a dark-brown belly with white to gray blotches. Specimens were found under stones at a single area of the central Peruvian Andes at elevations between 4205-4490 m.a.s.l. The eggs had an average diameter of 4.3 mm. With the description and naming of the new species, the genus Phrynopus now contains 26 species, all of them endemic to Peru, and five of which are restricted to Departamento Junin. PMID:25081770

  11. Snow Cover Quantification in the Central Andes Derived from Multi-Sensor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, G.; Cornwell, E.; McPhee, J. P.; Margulis, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we analyze time series of MODIS MOD10A1 and Landsat fractional snow cover images over the central-southern Andes (30°-34°S) with the objective of quantifying snow cover persistence over the region. Data from 2000-2011 is analyzed, and a snow cover persistence index (SCPI) is computed for each pixel at different resolutions over four test watersheds. The annual SCPI is calculated as the number of acquisitions during a year on which a pixel is covered by a fraction of snow greater than a defined threshold. We calculate the SCPI at the nominal Landsat resolution (30m) and at the MODIS resolution (500m) for each of the pixels of the different watersheds and for different thresholds. Furthermore, for each watershed, the correlation of SCPI with slope, aspect and elevation is calculated for Landsat at 30m, and aggregated at 100m and 500m, and for MODIS at 500m. Both MODIS and Landsat show significant differences in annual SCPI for the 500m resolution. The difference in correlation between SCP and physiographic variables is largest when comparing Landsat 30m to MODIS, suggesting that sensor resolution is an important limiting factor for the analyzed region. Trend analysis using both products show differences in terms of changes in SCPI for the 2000-2011 period, however the conclusions are not robust due to the short period analyzed.

  12. Geometric evolution of the Horcones Inferior Glacier (Mount Aconcagua, Central Andes) during the 2002-2006 surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitte, Pierre; Berthier, Etienne; Masiokas, Mariano H.; Cabot, Vincent; Ruiz, Lucas; Ferri Hidalgo, Lidia; Gargantini, Hernán.; Zalazar, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The Central Andes of Chile and Argentina (31-35°S) contain a large number and variety of ice masses, but only two surging glaciers have been studied in this region. We analyzed the 2002-2006 surge of the Horcones Inferior Glacier, Mount Aconcagua, Argentina, based on medium spatial resolution (15-30 m) satellite images and digital elevation models. During the buildup phase the glacier was stagnant, with velocities lower than 0.1 m/d. In the active-phase velocities reached 14 m/d and the glacier front advanced 3.1 km. At the peak of the active phase (2003-2004), the area-averaged elevation change was -42 m in the reservoir zone (2.53 km2) and +30 m in the receiving zone (3.31 km2). The estimated ice flux through a cross section located at 4175 meter above sea level was 108 m3 during a period of 391 days, a flux that suggests a mean glacier thickness at this location of ~90 m. The depletion phase showed a recovery of the reservoir zone elevation, the down wasting of the receiving zone (-17 m, 2007-2014), and a return to quiescent velocities. The short active phase, the abrupt change in the velocities, and the high level of the proglacial stream indicate a hydrological switch (Alaska type) trigger. The 2002-2006 and 1984-1990 surges of Horcones Inferior were synchronous with the surges of nearby Grande del Nevado Glacier. These events occurred after periods of positive mass balance, so we hypothesize a climate driver.

  13. Future runoff from glacierized catchments in the Central Andes could substantially decrease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Marlene; Schauwecker, Simone; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Drenkhan, Fabian; Frey, Holger; Giráldez, Claudia; Gurgiser, Wolfgang; Kaser, Georg; Suarez, Wilson; García Hernández, Javier; Fluixá-Sanmartín, Javier; Ayros, Edwin; Rohrer, Mario

    2016-04-01

    In Peru, about 50% of the energy is produced from hydropower plants. An important amount of this energy is produced with water from glaciated catchments. In these catchments river streamflow is furthermore needed for other socio-economic activities such as agriculture. However, the amount and seasonality of water from glacial melt is expected to undergo strong changes. As glaciers are projected to further decline with continued warming, runoff will become more and more sensitive to possible changes in precipitation patterns. Moreover, as stated by a recent study (Neukom et al., 2015), wet season precipitation sums in the Central Andes could decrease up to 19-33 % by the end of the 21st century compared to present-day conditions. Here, we investigate future runoff availability for selected glacierized catchments in the Peruvian Andes. In a first step, we apply a simplified energy balance and runoff model (ITGG-2.0-R) for current conditions. Thereafter, we model future runoff for different climate scenarios, including the possibility of strongly reduced precipitation. Preliminary findings indicate (i) changes in the seasonal distribution of runoff and (ii) significant reductions of the annual runoff in future for the mentioned scenario with significant precipitation decreases. During early phases of glacier recession, melt leads to increased runoff - respectively compensates for the precipitation reduction in the corresponding scenario - depending on the fraction of catchment glaciation. Glaciers are acting as natural water reservoirs and may buffer the decreasing precipitation in glacierized catchments for a limited period. However, strongly reduced precipitation will have noticeable consequences on runoff, particularly when glacier melt contribution gets smaller and finally is completely missing. This will have consequences on the water availability for hydropower production, agriculture, mining and other water uses. Critical conditions may emerge in particular

  14. Interpretation of gravity and geoid in the Central Andes between 20 ° and 29 ° S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Kirchner, Andreas

    1997-03-01

    Most recently the MIGRA group with participants from Chile, Argentina and Germany has surveyed some 3.500 new gravity observations in an Andean Geotraverse covering N-Chile and NW-Argentina between 64 °-71 °W and 20 °-29 °S. MIGRA is an international gravity research group which was established under the umbrella of the "Collaborative Research Center" "Deformation Processes in the Andes" at Freie Universität Berlin (Germany). Oil and mining industry gravity data were reprocessed and included into the MIGRA data base which contains more than 15.000 gravity data at present. Due to big logistical problems (terrain access, no maps, no levelling lines etc.) the overall error of the calculated gravity anomalies results of approximately 4-5 mGal which is about 1% compared with the magnitude of about 450 mGal of the Bouguer anomaly. Under the framework of the interdisciplinary research project CINCA (Crustal Investigations Off- and Onshore Nazca/Central Andes) gravity surveys of the MIGRA group has been extended to the Pacific ocean. In summer 1995 MIGRA took part in the "CINCA" offshore experiment SO-104 of the German Research Vessel "Sonne" between the latitudes 20 °S and 24 °S. The data base which includes point data and 10 km ∗ 10 km data grids of free-air-, different types of Bouguer- and isostatic-residual anomalies are presented here in maps of the isostatic residual field along with an interpretation by 3D density modelling. Constraints were mainly taken from results of 2D ray tracing refraction seismics and tectonics. Offset-free modelling is achieved by fitting both gravity field and geoid with one density structure of the lithosphere-system and by modelling relative to a reference density structure derived from the Preliminary Referende Earth Model (PREM, Dziewonski and Anderson, 1981). mGal is used throughout this paper: 1 mGal = 10 -5 m s -1.

  15. Classification of debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers in the Andes of central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janke, Jason R.; Bellisario, Antonio C.; Ferrando, Francisco A.

    2015-07-01

    In the Dry Andes of Chile (17 to 35° S), debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers are differentiated from true glaciers based on the percentage of surface debris cover, thickness of surface debris, and ice content. Internal ice is preserved by an insulating cover of thick debris, which acts as a storage reservoir to release water during the summer and early fall. These landforms are more numerous than glaciers in the central Andes; however, the existing legislation only recognizes uncovered or semicovered glaciers as a water resource. Glaciers, debris-covered glaciers, and rock glaciers are being altered or removed by mining operations to extract valuable minerals from the mountains. In addition, agricultural expansion and population growth in this region have placed additional demands on water resources. In a warmer climate, as glaciers recede and seasonal water availability becomes condensed over the course of a snowmelt season, rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers contribute a larger component of base flow to rivers and streams. As a result, identifying and locating these features to implement sustainable regional planning for water resources is important. The objective of this study is to develop a classification system to identify debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers based on the interpretation of satellite imagery and aerial photographs. The classification system is linked to field observations and measurements of ice content. Debris-covered glaciers have three subclasses: surface coverage of semi (class 1) and fully covered (class 2) glaciers differentiates the first two forms, whereas debris thickness is critical for class 3 when glaciers become buried with more than 3 m of surface debris. Based on field observations, the amount of ice decreases from more than 85%, to 65-85%, to 45-65% for semi, fully, and buried debris-covered glaciers, respectively. Rock glaciers are characterized by three stages. Class 4 rock glaciers have pronounced

  16. Genome of Plant Maca (Lepidium meyenii) Illuminates Genomic Basis for High-Altitude Adaptation in the Central Andes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Tian, Yang; Yan, Liang; Zhang, Guanghui; Wang, Xiao; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Jiajin; Ma, Xiao; Tan, Yuntao; Long, Ni; Wang, Yangzi; Ma, Yujin; He, Yuqi; Xue, Yu; Hao, Shumei; Yang, Shengchao; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Liangsheng; Dong, Yang; Chen, Wei; Sheng, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp, 2n = 8x = 64), belonging to the Brassicaceae family, is an economic plant cultivated in the central Andes sierra in Peru (4000-4500 m). Considering that the rapid uplift of the central Andes occurred 5-10 million years ago (Ma), an evolutionary question arises regarding how plants such as maca acquire high-altitude adaptation within a short geological period. Here, we report the high-quality genome assembly of maca, in which two closely spaced maca-specific whole-genome duplications (WGDs; ∼6.7 Ma) were identified. Comparative genomic analysis between maca and closely related Brassicaceae species revealed expansions of maca genes and gene families involved in abiotic stress response, hormone signaling pathway, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis via WGDs. The retention and subsequent functional divergence of many duplicated genes may account for the morphological and physiological changes (i.e., small leaf shape and self-fertility) in maca in a high-altitude environment. In addition, some duplicated maca genes were identified with functions in morphological adaptation (i.e., LEAF CURLING RESPONSIVENESS) and abiotic stress response (i.e., GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEINS and DNA-DAMAGE-REPAIR/TOLERATION 2) under positive selection. Collectively, the maca genome provides useful information to understand the important roles of WGDs in the high-altitude adaptation of plants in the Andes. PMID:27174404

  17. The paradigm of paraglacial megafans of the San Juan river basin, Central Andes, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvires, Graciela M.

    2014-11-01

    The spatial distribution and several morphometric characteristics of the Quaternary alluvial fans of the San Juan River, in the province of San Juan, at the Central and Western part of Argentina, have been studied to classify them as paraglacial megafans, as well to ratify its depositional environmental conditions. The high sedimentary load exported by San Juan river from the Central Andes to the foreland depressions is estimated about 3,682,200 hm3. The large alluvial fans of Ullum-Zonda and Tulum valleys were deposited into deep tectonic depressions, during the Upper Pleistocene deglaciation stages. The outcome of collecting remotely sensed data, map and DEM data, geophysical data and much fieldwork gave access to morphometric, morphographic and morphogenetic data of these alluvial fans. The main drainage network was mapped on processed images using QGis (vers.2.0.1). Several fan morphometric parameters were measured, such as the size, the shape, the thickness, the surface areas and the sedimentary volume of exported load. The analyzed fans were accumulated in deep tectonic depressions, where the alluvium fill reaches 700 to 1200 m thick. Such fans do not reach the large size that other world megafans have, and this is due to tectonic obstacles, although the sedimentary fill average volume surpasses 514,000 hm3. The author proposes to consider Ullum-Zonda and Tulum alluvial fans as paraglacial megafans. According to the stratigraphic relationships of the tropical South American Rivers, the author considers that the San Juan paraglacial megafans would have occurred in the period before 24 ka BP , possibly corresponding to Middle Pleniglacial (ca 65-24ka BP). They record colder and more humid conditions compared with the present arid and dry conditions.

  18. Preliminary Results From the CAUGHT Experiment: Investigation of the North Central Andes Subsurface Using Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2011-12-01

    Jamie Ryan, Kevin M. Ward, Ryan Porter, Susan Beck, George Zandt, Lara Wagner, Estela Minaya, and Hernando Tavera The University of Arizona The University of North Carolina San Calixto Observatorio, La Paz, Bolivia IGP, Lima, Peru In order to investigate the interplay between crustal shortening, lithospheric removal, and surface uplift we have deployed 50 broadband seismometers in northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru as part of the interdisciplinary Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project. The morphotectonic units of the central Andes from west to east, consist of the Western Cordillera, the active volcanic arc, the Altiplano, an internally drained basin (~4 km elevation), the Eastern Cordillera, the high peaks (~6 km elevation) of an older fold and thrust belt, the Subandean zone, the lower elevation active fold and thrust belt, and the foreland Beni basin. Between northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru, the Altiplano pinches out north of Lake Titicaca as the Andes narrow northward. The CAUGHT seismic instruments were deployed between 13° to 18° S latitudes to investigate the crust and mantle lithosphere of the central Andes in this transitional zone. In northwest Bolivia, perpendicular to the strike of the Andes, there is a total of 275 km of documented upper crustal shortening (15° to 17°S) (McQuarrie et al, 2008). Associated with the shortening is crustal thickening and possibly lithospheric removal as the thickening lithospheric root becomes unstable. An important first order study is to compare upper crustal shortening estimates with present day crustal thickness. To estimate crustal thickness, we have calculated receiver functions using an iterative deconvolution method and used common conversion point stacking along the same profile as the geologically based shortening estimates. In our preliminary results, we observed a strong P to S conversion corresponding to the Moho at approximately 60-65 km depth underneath the

  19. Giant magmatic water reservoir beneath Uturuncu volcano and Altiplano-Puna region (Central Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laumonier, Mickael; Gaillard, Fabrice; Muir, Duncan; Blundy, Jon; Unsworth, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism at continental arcs is the surface manifestation of long-lived crustal magmatic processes whereby mantle-derived hydrous basalt magma differentiates to more silica-rich magmas by a combination of crystallization and crustal melting. What erupts is just a fraction of the total volume of magma produced by these processes; the unerupted, plutonic residues solidify and are inaccessible to direct study until millions of years of uplift and erosion bring them to the surface. In contrast, geophysical surveys, using electromagnetic and seismic waves, can provide real-time images of subduction zone magmatic systems. Several such studies have revealed that arc volcanoes are underlain by large partially molten regions at depths of >10 km, the largest known example being the Altiplano-Puna magma body (APMB) in central Andes. Interpreting such geophysical images in terms of amount, composition and distribution of partial melts is limited by our lack of knowledge of the physical properties of silicate melts at elevated pressures and temperatures. Here we present high-pressure, in situ experimental data showing that the electrical conductivity of andesitic melts is primarily controlled by their dissolved water contents. Linking our new measurements to petrological constraints from andesites erupted on the Altiplano, we show that the APMB is composed of 10-20% of an andesitic melt containing 8-10 wt% dissolved water. This implies that the APMB is a giant water anomaly in the global subduction system, with a total mass of dissolved magmatic water about half of the water contained within the Adriatic Sea. In addition to the controls on the physical properties of the melts, the abundance of dissolved water governs the structural levels of magma ponding, equivalent to the depth of water saturation, where degassing and crystallisation promote partial melting and weakening of the upper crust. Unexpectedly, very high concentrations of water in andesite magmas shall impede their

  20. Drought increases the freezing resistance of high-elevation plants of the Central Chilean Andes.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Almeida, Angela; Reyes-Bahamonde, Claudia; Cavieres, Lohengrin A

    2016-08-01

    Freezing temperatures and summer droughts shape plant life in Mediterranean high-elevation habitats. Thus, the impacts of climate change on plant survival for these species could be quite different to those from mesic mountains. We exposed 12 alpine species to experimental irrigation and warming in the Central Chilean Andes to assess whether irrigation decreases freezing resistance, irrigation influences freezing resistance when plants are exposed to warming, and to assess the relative importance of irrigation and temperature in controlling plant freezing resistance. Freezing resistance was determined as the freezing temperature that produced 50 % photoinactivation [lethal temperature (LT50)] and the freezing point (FP). In seven out of 12 high-Andean species, LT50 of drought-exposed plants was on average 3.5 K lower than that of irrigated plants. In contrast, most species did not show differences in FP. Warming changed the effect of irrigation on LT50. Depending on species, warming was found to have (1) no effect, (2) to increase, or (3) to decrease the irrigation effect on LT50. However, the effect size of irrigation on LT50 was greater than that of warming for almost all species. The effect of irrigation on FP was slightly changed by warming and was sometimes in disagreement with LT50 responses. Our data show that drought increases the freezing resistance of high-Andean plant species as a general plant response. Although freezing resistance increases depended on species-specific traits, our results show that warmer and moister growing seasons due to climate change will seriously threaten plant survival and persistence of these and other alpine species in dry mountains. PMID:27053321

  1. Multi-sensor geophysical constraints on crustal melt in the central Andes: the PLUTONS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Comeau, M. J.; West, M. E.; Christensen, D. H.; Mcfarlin, H. L.; Farrell, A. K.; Del Potro, R.; Gottsmann, J.; McNutt, S. R.; Michelfelder, G.; Diez, M.; Elliott, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Keyson, L.; Delgado, F.; Unsworth, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Andes is a key global location to quantify storage, transport, and volumes of magma in the Earth's crust as it is home to the world's largest zone of partial melt (the Altiplano-Puna Magma or Mush Body, APMB) as well as the more recently documented Southern Puna Magma Body (SPMB). We describe results from the recently completed international PLUTONS project that focused inter-disciplinary study on two sites of large-scale surface uplift that presumably represent ongoing magmatic intrusions in the mid to upper crust - Uturuncu, Bolivia (in the center of the APMB) and Lazufre on the Chile-Argentina border (on the edge of the SPMB). In particular, a suite of geophysical techniques (seismology, gravity, surface deformation, and electro-magnetic methods) have been used to infer the current subsurface distribution and quantity of partial melts in combination with geochemical and lab studies on samples from the area. Both Uturuncu and Lazufre show separate geophysical anomalies in the upper and mid/lower crust (e.g., low seismic velocity, low resistivity, etc.) indicating multiple distinct reservoirs of magma and/or hydrothermal fluids with different properties. The characteristics of the geophysical anomalies differ somewhat depending on the technique used - reflecting the different sensitivity of each method to subsurface melt of different compositions, connectivity, and volatile content. For example, the depth to the top of the APMB is shallower in a joint ambient noise tomography and receiver function analysis compared to a 3D magnetotelluric inversion. One possibility is that the seismic methods are detecting brines above the APMB that do not have a large electromagnetic signature. Comparison of the geophysical measurements with laboratory experiments at the APMB indicate a minimum of 4-25% melt averaged over the region is needed -- higher melt volumes are permitted by the gravity and MT data and may exist in small regions. However, bulk melt values above

  2. Neogene paleoelevation of intermontane basins in a narrow, compressional mountain range, southern Central Andes of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoke, Gregory D.; Giambiagi, Laura B.; Garzione, Carmala N.; Mahoney, J. Brian; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2014-11-01

    The topographic growth of mountain ranges at convergent margins results from the complex interaction between the motion of lithospheric plates, crustal shortening, rock uplift and exhumation. Constraints on the timing and magnitude of elevation change gleaned from isotopic archives preserved in sedimentary sequences provide insight into how these processes interact over different timescales to create topography and potentially decipher the impact of topography on atmospheric circulation and superposed exhumation. This study uses stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates collected from seven different stratigraphic sections spanning different tectonic and topographic positions in the range today, to examine the middle to late Miocene history of elevation change in the central Andes thrust belt, which is located immediately to the south of the Altiplano-Puna Plateau, the world's second largest orogenic plateau. Paleoelevations are calculated using previously published local isotope-elevation gradients observed in modern rainfall and carbonate-formation temperatures determined from clumped isotope studies in modern soils. Calculated Neogene basin paleoelevations are between 1 km and 1.9 km for basins that today are located between 1500 and 3400 m elevation. Considering the modern elevation and δ18O values of precipitation at the sampling sites, three of the intermontane basins experienced surface uplift between the end of deposition during the late Miocene and present. The timing of elevation change cannot be linked to any documented episodes of large-magnitude crustal shortening. Paradoxically, the maximum inferred surface uplift in the core of the range is greatest where the crust is thinnest. The spatial pattern of surface uplift is best explained by eastward migration of a crustal root via ductile deformation in the lower crust and is not related to flat-slab subduction.

  3. Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model Simulations of Precipitation in the Central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    The meridional extent and complex orography of the South American continent contributes to a wide diversity of climate regimes ranging from hyper-arid deserts to tropical rainforests to sub-polar highland regions. In addition, South American meteorology and climate are also made further complicated by ENSO, a powerful coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. Modelling studies in this region have typically resorted to either atmospheric mesoscale or atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate models. The latter offers full physics and high spatial resolution, but it is computationally inefficient typically lack an interactive ocean, whereas the former offers high computational efficiency and ocean-atmosphere coupling, but it lacks adequate spatial and temporal resolution to adequate resolve the complex orography and explicitly simulate precipitation. Explicit simulation of precipitation is vital in the Central Andes where rainfall rates are light (0.5-5 mm hr-1), there is strong seasonality, and most precipitation is associated with weak mesoscale-organized convection. Recent increases in both computational power and model development have led to the advent of coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale models for both weather and climate study applications. These modelling systems, while computationally expensive, include two-way ocean-atmosphere coupling, high resolution, and explicit simulation of precipitation. In this study, we use the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST), a fully-coupled mesoscale atmosphere-ocean modeling system. Previous work has shown COAWST to reasonably simulate the entire 2003-2004 wet season (Dec-Feb) as validated against both satellite and model analysis data when ECMWF interim analysis data were used for boundary conditions on a 27-9-km grid configuration (Outer grid extent: 60.4S to 17.7N and 118.6W to 17.4W).

  4. Comparative phylogeography of co-distributed Phrygilus species (Aves, Thraupidae) from the Central Andes.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Varas, R; González-Acuña, D; Vianna, J A

    2015-09-01

    The Neotropical ecoregion has been an important place of avian diversification where dispersal and allopatric events coupled with periods of active orogeny and climate change (Late Pliocene-Pleistocene) have shaped the biogeography of the region. In the Neotropics, avian population structure has been sculpted not only by geographical barriers, but also by non-allopatric factors such as natural selection and local adaptation. We analyzed the genetic variation of six co-distributed Phrygilus species from the Central Andes, based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers in conjunction with morphological differentiation. We examined if Phrygilus species share patterns of population structure and historical demography, and reviewed the intraspecific taxonomy in part of their geographic range. Our results showed different phylogeographic patterns between species, even among those belonging to the same phylogenetic clade. P. alaudinus, P. atriceps, and P. unicolor showed genetic differentiation mediated by allopatric mechanisms in response to specific geographic barriers; P. gayi showed sympatric lineages in northern Chile, while P. plebejus and P. fruticeti showed a single genetic group. We found no relationship between geographic range size and genetic structure. Additionally, a signature of expansion was found in three species related to the expansion of paleolakes in the Altiplano region and the drying phase of the Atacama Desert. Morphological analysis showed congruence with molecular data and intraspecific taxonomy in most species. While we detected genetic and phenotypic patterns that could be related to natural selection and local adaptation, our results indicate that allopatric events acted as a major factor in the population differentiation of Phrygilus species. PMID:25987531

  5. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from (210)Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning ~1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our (14)C and (210)Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins ~1925 AD, rapidly increasing after ~1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 microg g(-1). The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude of atmospheric metal pollution. PMID

  6. Central Andes mountains, Chile/Argentina as seen from STS-67

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Chilean coastline and the arid Atacama Desert stretch the length of the view with the high Andes on the eastern margin where hundreds of volcanoes dot the landscape. The wider (250-350 kilometers) Altiplano ('plains') sector of the Andes appears in the top half of the view, and the narrow (120 kilometers) 'mountain-chain-dominated' sector to the bottom. The northern half of Chile can be seen, with the 'hammer-head' peninsula at the city of Antofagasta, top left. Up welling of cold water as the Humboldt Current immediately offshore gives rise to low stratus cloud. The extensive cloud mass on the right lies beyond the Andes in the low country of Argentina's 'pampas' grasslands and Chaco semi-desert.

  7. Exceptional Isotopic Variability in Stream Waters of the Central Andes: Large-Scale or Local Controls?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorella, R. P.; Poulsen, C. J.; Ehlers, T. A.; Jeffery, M. L.; Pillco Zola, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    Modern precipitation on the Altiplano in central South America shows large seasonal and interannual variability and is dominated by seasonal convection during austral summer. The stable isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen in precipitation and surface waters may be useful in diagnosing atmospheric processes over the Altiplano as they reflect the atmospheric history of the water vapor forming precipitation. Few data exist about the spatial and temporal isotopic variability of precipitation or surface water in the region, however, and therefore, the controls governing isotope distribution over the Altiplano are poorly understood. Samples of stream water were collected from small catchments on the Altiplano and along two elevation transects on the eastern cordillera of the Andes (at 17°30' and 21°15'S) between April 2009 and April 2012. As precipitation over the Altiplano is highly seasonal and the environment is otherwise arid, the isotopic signature of these streams is thought integrate the composition of rainy season precipitation. We limit our analysis to ephemeral streams with no groundwater component. Sampled waters show high spatial and interannual isotopic variability. As expected, stream water becomes increasingly depleted with increased elevation along a transect, but the isotopic lapse rates along the two transects are different and show high interannual variability. The average isotopic lapse rate for the northern transect was 1.09‰/km, but varied from 0.79‰/km in 2010 to 1.36‰/km in 2011 (only collected 2010-2012), while the average isotopic lapse rate for the southern transect was 1.74‰/km and varied between 1.50‰/km in 2010 and 1.92‰/km in 2009. Across the Altiplano itself, stream water varies by over 10‰ (δ18O) within a single season (2011), and by over 13‰ across the entire collection period. The high spatial variability of the stream water isotopic composition on the Altiplano suggests that simple Rayleigh fractionation is

  8. Along-Strike Variations in Crustal Seismicity in the Central Andes and Geodynamic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, K.; Pearson, D. M.; Kapp, P. A.; McGroder, M.; Kendall, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    For the central Andes, we compiled relocated crustal earthquakes (magnitude ≥ 4.5) from the EHB Bulletin and Nipress et al. [2007] and focal mechanisms from the Global CMT catalog and published literature [Alvarado et al., 2005]. These data were plotted in map, cross section, and 3D views in the context of local tomography [Koulakov et al., 2006] and lithospheric boundaries [Tassara et al., in prep]. The results imply major along-strike variations in the mechanisms of crustal deformation. At the latitude of the Altiplano, there is scarce forearc seismicity. The thin-skinned Bolivian retroarc thrust belt shows no seismic events (magnitude ≥ 4.5), suggesting that it is deforming aseismically or locked. In contrast, at the latitude of the Puna to the south (20-25°S), crustal seismicity is more prevalent in both the forearc and retroarc. Within this region, active deformation in the Coastal Cordillera near Antofagasta is occurring along steeply east-dipping normal faults at 15-41 km depth; this is the only part of the central Andean forearc that displays prominent extension. Outboard of this, thrust events at ~15 km depth in the forearc wedge display gently dipping nodal planes, and may be signatures of underplating crust that was tectonically eroded at the trench. Underplating is a likely process by which this region of the forearc has undergone ~1 km of surface uplift during the Neogene. Seismicity with thrust or reverse and oblique focal mechanisms in the retroarc wedge is localized beneath the frontal part of the thick-skinned Eastern Cordilleran thrust belt and the Santa Barbara ranges. Seismicity along discrete, east- and west-dipping planes occurs to near Moho depths (~50 km). While retroarc crustal seismicity continues to the south toward the Juan Fernandez flat slab, there is a concentration of seismic events in the retroarc at the latitude (22-23°S) where there is prominent normal faulting in the forearc. We interpret the compiled data to suggest that

  9. Reconstruction of cryospheric changes in the Maipo and Juncal river basins, central Andes of Chile: an integrative geomorphological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Samuel U.; García, Juan L.; Gómez, Gabriel; Vega, Rodrigo M.; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Salzmann, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    Water in the central Andes (32-38° S), a semi-arid mountainous area with elevations over 6000 m asl., is of great importance and a critical resource especially in the dry summer months. Ice bodies, such as glaciers and rock glaciers (permafrost) in the high mountains, provide a substantial part of the fresh-water resources but also for intensive economical use for the lowlands including Santiago metropolitan region, Chile. However the evolution of these ice bodies since the last deglaciation (i.e., Holocene, last ˜12,000 years), and in particular during historical times, and their feedback with climate is fairly unknown. In view of projected climate change, this is striking because it is also unknown whether these natural resources could be used as sustainable fresh-water source in the future. Within the presented project, we develop and apply an integrative geomorphologic approach to study glaciers and their long-term evolution in the central Andes of Chile. Apart from glaciers (with variable debris-coverage), rock glaciers have evolved over time as striking geomorphological landforms in this area. We combine geomorphologic mapping using remote-sensing and in-situ data with an innovative surface exposure dating technique to determine the ages of distinct moraine ridges at three study sites in watersheds of the Santiago region: Juncal Norte, Loma Larga and Nieves Negras glaciers. First results of the project are presented, including a detailed geomorphological mapping and first analysis of the landform dynamics. At all three sites, we distinguished at least three moraine systems of a Holocene putative age. These prominent moraine belts show that glaciers were at least 5 km longer than at present. Deglaciation from these ice marginal positions was gradual and complex in response to the detrital cover on the glaciers. Differences in ice thickness of the main glaciers in the respective valleys amount to about 100 m. Due to the partial, extensive debris coverage, the

  10. Regional distance shear-coupled PL propagation within the northern Altiplano, central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Jennifer L.; Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George

    1999-12-01

    Properties of the shear-coupled P wavetrain (SPL) from regional earthquakes provide important information about the structure of the crust and upper mantle. We investigate broad-band seismic data from intermediate-depth earthquakes and develop a grid search technique using synthetic seismograms to study the sensitivity of SPL and to model the crustal structure of the northern Altiplano, central Andes. Waveforms from an earthquake that occurred on 1994 December 12 within the Nazca slab beneath the Altiplano display a clear SPL wavetrain at the temporary stations deployed during the BANJO and SEDA experiments. We relocate this event and determine the moment tensor by inverting the complete long-period waveforms. With these source parameters fixed, we perform sensitivity analyses using a reflectivity technique to compute synthetic seismograms at a distance of 313 km (BANJO station 2, SALI). We find that, at this distance, the long-period SPL wavetrain is sensitive to the following model parameters, in order of decreasing sensitivity: crustal VP/VS, mantle VP/VS, average crustal velocity, crustal thickness, focal depth, distance (location), crustal Qα and Qβ, and mantle velocity. We develop a grid search method to investigate the four parameters of the crust/upper mantle model to which the synthetic seismograms are most sensitive at SALI (crustal VP/VS, mantle VP/VS, average crustal velocity, crustal thickness). Trade-offs exist among all four of the model parameters, resulting in a range of acceptable crustal models that provide excellent fits between the data and synthetic seismograms in the passband of 15-100 s at a single station. However, by using data at a range of distances (150-450 km) we find that the model that provides the best overall fit between the data and synthetic seismograms, and thus best approximates the average characteristics of the crust and upper mantle structure of the northern Altiplano, is characterized by an average crustal velocity of 6

  11. Asynchronous Glacial Chronologies in the Central Andes (15-40°S) and Paleoclimatic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, R.; Kull, C.; Kubik, P. W.; Veit, H.

    2006-12-01

    We have established glacial chronologies along a N-S transect over the Central Andes using 10Be surface exposure dating. Our results show that maximum glacial advances occurred asynchronously and reflect the varying influence and shifts of the major atmospheric circulation systems during the Late Quaternary: the tropical circulation in the north and the westerlies in the south. In Bolivia (three research areas in the Cordillera Real and the Cordillera Cochabamba, ~15°S) glacial advances could be dated to ~20 and 12 ka BP. This is in good agreement with published exposure age data from moraines in Bolivia and Peru (provided that all ages are calculated following the same scaling system). Accordingly, the maximum glaciation there probably occurred roughly synchronous to the temperature minimum of the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the lateglacial cold reversals. Strict correlation with neither the Younger Dryas in the northern hemisphere, nor the Antarctic Cold Reversal is possible due to the current systematic exposure age uncertainties (~10%). Glacier-Climate-Modelling corroborates the sensitivity of the reconstructed glaciers to temperature changes, rather than precipitation. On the contrary, there is good evidence for the dominant role of precipitation changes on the glacial chronologies in the lee of the Cordillera Occidental, i.e. on the Altiplano and further south. The pronounced lateglacial wet phase, which is well documented in lake transgression phases as far south as 28°S (-> tropical moisture source), seems to have caused glacial advances even at ~30°S. In two research areas in Chile at that latitude, we were able to date several lateglacial moraines. Besides, the maximum datable glaciation there occurred at ~30 ka BP. That is significantly earlier than the LGM (sensu strictu) and points to favourable climate conditions for glaciation at that time (particularly increased precipitation). We conclude that the westerlies were more intensive or

  12. Precipitation intensity and vegetation controls on geomorphology of the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, M. L.; Poulsen, C. J.; Ehlers, T. A.; Yanites, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    Field observations and landscape evolution models indicate that landscape processes in active mountain belts are strongly dependent on vegetation and climate. In fluvial landscapes, erosional efficiency is commonly thought to depend on the intensity, frequency, and duration of precipitation events. We use Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations to test the importance of precipitation intensity in determining geomorphology at the mountain belt scale. Precipitation metrics, including mean annual precipitation, and the mean intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation events, are derived from the TRMM 3B42v7 product. The new precipitation datasets are then compared with different topographic metrics of the central Andes. Statistical analyses, including multiple linear regression, are used to quantify the importance of different precipitation metrics in controlling the regional topographic characteristics. In addition to climate properties, spatial variations in tectonic regime, bedrock lithology, and the amount and type of vegetation cover are accounted for in the statistical analyses. Our analysis indicates that in regions with high vegetation cover (>80%), mean precipitation intensity and mean interval correlate most strongly with mean hillslope (r = -0.51 and r = -0.66 respectively). In these regions, mean hillslope decreases from ~25° to ~ 10° with increasing mean event precipitation intensity (from 10 to 40 mm/day). In contrast, in sparsely vegetated (<40%) or shrub-dominated landscapes, precipitation intensity does not correlate with mean hillslope (r < 0.1). In regions with high vegetation cover, mean annual precipitation is weakly correlated with mean hillslope (r = 0.24). However, mean hillslope increases with increasing mean annual precipitation (r = 0.52) when all vegetation cover is considered. We interpret the results as evidence that vegetation is a key control on critical erosion thresholds at the landscape scale. Furthermore

  13. Eocene extensional exhumation of basement and arc rocks along southwesternmost Peru, Central Andes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noury, Mélanie; Bernet, Matthias; Sempéré, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    The overthickened crust of the current Central Andes is commonly viewed as the result of tectonic shortening. However, in the present-day terrestrial forearc and arc of southwesternmost Peru, crustal thickness increases from 30 km along the coastline to >60 km below the active arc, whereas the upper crust exhibits little to no evidence of crustal shortening and, in constrast, many extensional features. How (and when) crustal overthickness was acquired in this region is thus little understood. Because crustal overthickening often results in extensional collapse and/or significant erosion, here we address this issue through a regional-scale study of exhumation using fission-track thermochronology. The limited fission-track data previously available in the area suggested that exhumation began during the Mesozoic. In this study, we present new apatite and zircon fission-track data obtained along the current terrestrial forearc of southwesternmost Peru. This relatively restricted area presents the interest of providing extensive outcrops of Precambrian to Ordovician basement and Early Jurassic to Late Cretaceous arc plutons. In order to compare the chronology of exhumation of these units, we performed extensive sampling for fission-track dating, as well as structural mapping. Our results indicate that the basement rocks and Jurassic plutons that crop out in the Arequipa region, where the crust is now >50 km-thick, experienced a rapid cooling through the 240-110°C temperature range between ~65 and ~35 Ma. This period of rapid exhumation coincided in time with the accumulation of terrestrial forearc deposits (the Lower Moquegua Group), that exhibit many syn-sedimentary extensional features and are bounded by conspicuous normal faults, specifically along the region where intense activity of the main arc between ~90 and ~60 Ma had led to voluminous magma emplacement. This close succession of (1) intense magmatic activity and (2) regional-scale exhumation associated with

  14. Broadband regional waveform modeling to investigate crustal structure and tectonics of the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Jennifer Lyn

    We use broadband regional waveform modeling of earthquakes in the central Andes to determine seismic properties of the Altiplano crust. Properties of the shear-coupled P-wavetrain (SPL ) from intermediate-depth events provide particularly important information about the structure of the crust. We utilize broadband seismic data recorded at the BANJO and SEDA stations, and synthetic seismograms computed with a reflectivity technique to study the sensitivity of SPL to crustal and upper mantle parameters at regional distances. We find that the long-period SPL-wavetrain is most sensitive to crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios, average crustal velocity, and crustal thickness. A comprehensive grid search method developed to investigate these four parameters suggests that although trade-offs exist between model parameters, models of the Altiplano which provide the best fit between the data and synthetic seismograms are characterized by low Poisson's ratios, low average crustal velocity and thick crust. We apply our grid search technique and sensitivity analysis results to model the full waveforms from 6 intermediate-depth and 2 shallow-focus earthquakes recorded at regional distances by BANJO and SEDA stations. Results suggest that the Altiplano crust is much thicker (55--65 km) and slower (5.75--6.25 km/s) than global average values. Low crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios together with the lack of evidence for a high-velocity lower crust suggests a bulk felsic crustal composition, resulting in an overall weak crust. Our results favor a model of crustal thickening involving large-scale tectonic shortening of a predominantly felsic crust. To better understand the mechanics of earthquake rupture along the South American subduction zone, we have analyzed broadband teleseismic P-waves and utilize single- and multi-station inversion techniques to constrain source characteristics for the 12 November 1996 Peru subduction zone earthquake. Aftershock locations, intensity reports

  15. Estimation of slip scenarios of mega-thrust earthquakes and strong motion simulations for Central Andes, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido, N.; Tavera, H.; Aguilar, Z.; Chlieh, M.; Calderon, D.; Sekiguchi, T.; Nakai, S.; Yamazaki, F.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a methodology for the estimation of slip scenarios for megathrust earthquakes based on a model of interseismic coupling (ISC) distribution in subduction margins obtained from geodetic data, as well as information of recurrence of historical earthquakes. This geodetic slip model (GSM) delineates the long wavelength asperities within the megathrust. For the simulation of strong ground motion it becomes necessary to introduce short wavelength heterogeneities to the source slip to be able to efficiently simulate high frequency ground motions. To achieve this purpose we elaborate "broadband" source models constructed by combining the GSM with several short wavelength slip distributions obtained from a Von Karman PSD function with random phases. Our application of the method to Central Andes in Peru, show that this region has presently the potential of generating an earthquake with moment magnitude of 8.9, with a peak slip of 17 m and a source area of approximately 500 km along strike and 165 km along dip. For the strong motion simulations we constructed 12 broadband slip models, and consider 9 possible hypocenter locations for each model. We performed strong motion simulations for the whole central Andes region (Peru), spanning an area from the Nazca ridge (16^o S) to the Mendana fracture (9^o S). For this purpose we use the hybrid strong motion simulation method of Pulido et al. (2004), improved to handle a general slip distribution. Our simulated PGA and PGV distributions indicate that a region of at least 500 km along the coast of central Andes is subjected to a MMI intensity of approximately 8, for the slip model that yielded the largest ground motions among the 12 slip models considered, averaged for all assumed hypocenter locations. This result is in agreement with the macroseismic intensity distribution estimated for the great 1746 earthquake (M~9) in central Andes (Dorbath et al. 1990). Our results indicate that the simulated PGA and PGV for

  16. Lithologic discrimination of volcanic and sedimentary rocks by spectral examination of Landsat TM data from the Puma, Central Andes Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielding, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Central Andes are widely used as a modern example of noncollisional mountain-building processes. The Puna is a high plateau in the Chilean and Argentine Central Andes extending southward from the altiplano of Bolivia and Peru. Young tectonic and volcanic features are well exposed on the surface of the arid Puna, making them prime targets for the application of high-resolution space imagery such as Shuttle Imaging Radar B and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). Two TM scene quadrants from this area are analyzed using interactive color image processing, examination, and automated classification algorithms. The large volumes of these high-resolution datasets require significantly different techniques than have been used previously for the interpretation of Landsat MSS data. Preliminary results include the determination of the radiance spectra of several volcanic and sedimentary rock units and the use of the spectra for automated classification. Structural interpretations have revealed several previously unknown folds in late Tertiary strata, and key zones have been targeted to be investigated in the field. The synoptic view of space imagery is already filling a critical gap between low-resolution geophysical data and traditional geologic field mapping in the reconnaissance study of poorly mapped mountain frontiers such as the Puna.

  17. Boron isotope composition of geothermal fluids and borate minerals from salar deposits (central Andes/NW Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasemann, Simone A.; Meixner, Anette; Erzinger, Jörg; Viramonte, José G.; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Franz, Gerhard

    2004-06-01

    We have measured the boron concentration and isotope composition of regionally expansive borate deposits and geothermal fluids from the Cenozoic geothermal system of the Argentine Puna Plateau in the central Andes. The borate minerals borax, colemanite, hydroboracite, inderite, inyoite, kernite, teruggite, tincalconite, and ulexite span a wide range of δ11B values from -29.5 to -0.3‰, whereas fluids cover a range from -18.3 to 0.7‰. The data from recent coexisting borate minerals and fluids allow for the calculation of the isotope composition of the ancient mineralizing fluids and thus for the constraint of the isotope composition of the source rocks sampled by the fluids. The boron isotope composition of ancient mineralizing fluids appears uniform throughout the section of precipitates at a given locality and similar to values obtained from recent thermal fluids. These findings support models that suggest uniform and stable climatic, magmatic, and tectonic conditions during the past 8 million years in this part of the central Andes. Boron in fluids is derived from different sources, depending on the drainage system and local country rocks. One significant boron source is the Paleozoic basement, which has a whole-rock isotopic composition of δ11B=-8.9±2.2‰ (1 SD); another important boron contribution comes from Neogene-Pleistocene ignimbrites ( δ11B=-3.8±2.8‰, 1 SD). Cenozoic andesites and Mesozoic limestones ( δ11B≤+8‰) provide a potential third boron source.

  18. Summer energy balance and ablation of high elevation glaciers in the central Chilean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Benjamin; Rivera, Andres; Burger, Flavia; Bravo, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    Glaciers of the semi-arid central Chilean Andes are an important freshwater source for the populous Central Valley region of Chile, but have been shrinking in recent decades. The surface energy balance of these glaciers is of high scientific interest as summer ablation occurs through both sublimation and melt. During the 2012-13 Austral Summer a glacio-meteorological monitoring programme was established on Olivares Alfa (3.9 km2, 4130-4800 m elevation) and Beta (8.3 km2, 3620-4850 m elevation) Glaciers and their forelands in the Upper Olivares Valley, 33°00'-33°11' S, 70°05'-70°15' W, approximately 50 km north-east of Santiago. This included complete automatic weather stations (AWSs) with sonic rangers to record surface ablation on the ablation zones of the two glaciers, and one AWS in the proglacial area of Olivares Alfa Glacier including precipitation gauge. To complement these point data, daily images of the glaciers were captured with fixed cameras in order to calculate snow cover and albedo distributions. To calculate the surface energy balance and rates of melt and sublimation, a model was developed which uses direct AWS measurements of the radiative fluxes and calculates the turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat using the bulk aerodynamic approach. The model also calculates the subsurface heat flux and includes a simple scheme to estimate refreezing of melt water within surface snow or ice. Meteorological data and model results for the December to May period will be presented in this paper. Model calculations match closely the cumulative ablation curve of the sonic ranger at Olivares Alfa, with a slight overestimation, and overestimate cumulative ablation recorded by the sonic ranger at Olivares Beta, possibly due, at least in part, to uncertain snow density values. Modelled cumulative ablation in the December-April period is 2.2 m water equivalent (w.e.) at Olivares Alfa (0.10 m sublimation, 2.10 m melt) and 2.34 m w.e. at Olivares Beta (0.18 m

  19. Paleozoic evolution of active margin basins in the southern Central Andes (northwestern Argentina and northern Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlburg, H.; Breitkreuz, C.

    The geodynamic evolution of the Paleozoic continental margin of Gondwana in the region of the southern Central Andes is characterized by the westward progression of orogenic basin formation through time. The Ordovician basin in the northwest Argentinian Cordillera Oriental and Puna originated as an Early Ordovician back-arc basin. The contemporaneous magmatic arc of an east-dipping subduction zone was presumably located in northern Chile. In the back-arc basin, a ca. 3500 meter, fining-up volcaniclastic apron connected to the arc formed during the Arenigian. Increased subsidence in the late Arenigian allowed for the accomodation of large volumes of volcaniclastic turbidites during the Middle Ordovician. Subsidence and sedimentation were caused by the onset of collision between the para-autochthonous Arequipa Massif Terrane (AMT) and the South American margin at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. This led to eastward thrusting of the arc complex over its back-arc basin and, consequently, to its transformation into a marine foreland basin. As a result of thrusting in the west, a flexural bulge formed in the east, leading to uplift and emergence of the Cordillera Oriental shelf during the Guandacol Event at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. The basin fill was folded during the terminal collision of the AMT during the Oclóyic Orogeny (Ashgillian). The folded strata were intruded post-tectonically by the presumably Silurian granitoids of the "Faja Eruptiva de la Puna Oriental." The orogeny led to the formation of the positive area of the Arco Puneño. West of the Arco Puneño, a further marine basin developed during the Early Devonian, the eastern shelf of which occupied the area of the Cordillera Occidental, Depresión Preandina, and Precordillera. The corresponding deep marine turbidite basin was located in the region of the Cordillera de la Costa. Deposition continued until the basin fill was folded in the early Late Carboniferous Toco Orogeny. The basin

  20. Population genetic structure of traditional populations in the Peruvian Central Andes and implications for South American population history.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Graciela S; Lewis, Cecil M; Tito, Raúl Y; Covey, R Alan; Cáceres, Angela M; Cruz, Augusto F De La; Durand, Diana; Housman, Genevieve; Hulsey, Brannon I; Iannacone, Gian Carlo; López, Paul W; Martínez, Rolando; Medina, Ángel; Dávila, Olimpio Ortega; Pinto, Karla Paloma Osorio; Santillán, Susan I Polo; Domínguez, Percy Rojas; Rubel, Meagan; Smith, Heather F; Smith, Silvia E; Massa, Verónica Rubín de Celis; Lizárraga, Beatriz; Stone, Anne C

    2014-01-01

    Molecular-based characterizations of Andean peoples are traditionally conducted in the service of elucidating continent-level evolutionary processes in South America. Consequently, genetic variation among "western" Andean populations is often represented in relation to variation among "eastern" Amazon and Orinoco River Basin populations. This west-east contrast in patterns of population genetic variation is typically attributed to large-scale phenomena, such as dual founder colonization events or differing long-term microevolutionary histories. However, alternative explanations that consider the nature and causes of population genetic diversity within the Andean region remain underexplored. Here we examine population genetic diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes using data from the mtDNA first hypervariable region and Y-chromosome short tandem repeats among 17 newly sampled populations and 15 published samples. Using this geographically comprehensive data set, we first reassessed the currently accepted pattern of western versus eastern population genetic structure, which our results ultimately reject: mtDNA population diversities were lower, rather than higher, within Andean versus eastern populations, and only highland Y-chromosomes exhibited significantly higher within-population diversities compared with eastern groups. Multiple populations, including several highland samples, exhibited low genetic diversities for both genetic systems. Second, we explored whether the implementation of Inca state and Spanish colonial policies starting at about ad 1400 could have substantially restructured population genetic variation and consequently constitute a primary explanation for the extant pattern of population diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes. Our results suggest that Peruvian Central Andean population structure cannot be parsimoniously explained as the sole outcome of combined Inca and Spanish policies on the region's population demography: highland populations

  1. Magma evolution of Quaternary minor volcanic centres in southern Peru, Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacour, Adélie; Gerbe, Marie-Christine; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Wörner, Gerhard; Paquereau-Lebti, Perrine

    2007-04-01

    Minor centres in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of the Andes occur in different places and are essential indicators of magmatic processes leading to formation of composite volcano. The Andahua Orcopampa and Huambo monogenetic fields are located in a unique tectonic setting, in and along the margins of a deep valley. This valley, oblique to the NW SE-trend of the CVZ, is located between two composite volcanoes (Nevado Coropuna to the east and Nevado Sabancaya to the west). Structural analysis of these volcanic fields, based on SPOT satellite images, indicates four main groups of faults. These faults may have controlled magma ascent and the distribution of most centres in this deep valley shaped by en-echelon faulting. Morphometric criteria and 14C age dating attest to four main periods of activity: Late Pleistocene, Early to Middle Holocene, Late Holocene and Historic. The two most interesting features of the cones are the wide compositional range of their lavas (52.1 to 68.1 wt.% SiO2) and the unusual occurrence of mafic lavas (olivine-rich basaltic andesites and basaltic andesites). Occurrence of such minor volcanic centres and mafic magmas in the CVZ may provide clues about the magma source in southern Peru. Such information is otherwise difficult to obtain because lavas produced by composite volcanoes are affected by shallow processes that strongly mask source signatures. Major, trace, and rare earth elements, as well as Sr-, Nd-, Pb- and O-isotope data obtained on high-K calc-alkaline lavas of the Andahua Orcopampa and Huambo volcanic province characterise their source and their evolution. These lavas display a range comparable to those of the CVZ composite volcanoes for radiogenic and stable isotopes (87Sr/86Sr: 0.70591 0.70694, 143Nd/144Nd: 0.512317 0.512509, 206Pb/204Pb: 18.30 18.63, 207Pb/204Pb: 15.57 15.60, 208Pb/204Pb: 38.49 38.64, and δ 18O: 7.1 10.0‰ SMOW), attesting to involvement of a crustal component. Sediment is absent from the Peru Chile

  2. Climatic and paleoclimatic forcing of erosion in the southern Central Andes and the northwestern Himalaya (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The windward flanks of the tectonically active southern Central Andes and the NW Himalaya are characterized by steep climatic, tectonic, and topographic gradients. The first windward topographic rise of these mountain ranges constitutes a significant orographic barrier resulting in high orographic rainfall causing some of the wettest places on Earth. However, the higher-elevation areas of the windward flanks of both regions become progressively drier, until arid conditions are attained in the orogen interiors (i.e., the Altiplano-Puna and Tibet plateaus). Both areas have experienced significant paleoclimatic changes with deeper penetration of moisture into the orogen and thus an orogenward shift of the climate gradient. Some of the world's largest rivers with high sediment loads emerge from these mountain belts, and understanding the relation between climate and erosion is key in predicting mass fluxes, assessing the impacts of climate variability, and long-term climate forcing of erosion on landscape evolution. Here, we quantify the impact of the climatic gradients and their spatial shifts during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. We rely on sedimentary archives, digital topography, and cosmogenic inventories of river sands (10Be) and bedrock-erosion rates (10Be and 26Al) from the Puna Plateau in NW Argentina and the interior of the western Himalaya in NW India. We make three key observations that underline the importance of present-day climatic parameters and paleoclimatic changes on the effiency of surface processes in both areas: (1) First-order spatial erosion patterns follow the climatic gradient and catchment-mean erosion rates vary by three orders of magnitude from the wet mountain fronts to the dry orogen interior. In NW Argentina, our measurements represent the fluvial transport rates and indicate very low fluvial activity in the interior of the Puna Plateau during the Late Pleistocene; (2) the spatial distribution of erosion rates can be explained by a

  3. Neotectonic deformation versus climate control in the Central Andes of Argentina, insights from 10Be Surface Exposure Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; Garcia Morabito, Ezequiel; Yamin, Marcela; Haghipour, Negar; Wüthrich, Lorenz; Christl, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    Mountainous regions and their forelands commonly supports a suite of landforms sensitive to climate change and tectonics, providing -if addressed with appropriate geomorphological and geochronological approaches- record for landscape, climate, and tectonic evolution. In particular, alluvial fans are valuable archives of Quaternary climate and tectonics. The southern Central Andes and their forelands provide a perfect setting to study such forcings, since first, the extreme aridity favors the geomorphological preservation of the fan surfaces, so that 10Be surface exposure dating can be applied to establish robust and precise chronologies. And second, the neotectonic activity in this region results in widespread deformation of Quaternary deposits and recent devastating earthquakes. However, rates of uplift and shortening on the reverse faults remain largely unknown and very little is known yet about the Pleistocene climate history in the southern Central Andes, which limits a robust evaluation of the role of climate for the alluvial fan formation and landscape evolution. We combined structural and geomorphic investigations with 10Be surface exposure dating in the western Precordillera of the Southern Central Andes of Argentina (31°30'-31°53' SL/69°20' WL) in order to establish a numeric chronology for four deformed alluvial fan surfaces, to estimate uplift rates and to evaluate the potential climate role in controlling the fan construction and evolution. Surface exposure ages were determined for a few large boulders, amalgamated pebbles, and via depth profiles on sand samples. Boulder ages range from 145 to 212 ka for the oldest well-preserved fan remnants (Q1a, n=3), from 63 to 108 ka (Q2, n=3) and 21-28 ka (Q3, n=2), amalgamated pebbles yield ages range from 106 to 127 ka for the oldest fan surface (Q1b, n=79), all calculations assuming no erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. Boulders from current channels have 10Be

  4. Cold episodes in the Peruvian Central Andes: Composites, Types, and their Impacts over South America (1958-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulca, J. C.; Vuille, M. F.; Roundy, P. E.; Trasmonte, G.; Silva, Y.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Mantaro basin (MB) is located in the central Peruvian Andes. Occasionally, cold episodes are observed during austral summer (January-March), that strongly damage crops. However, little is known about the causes and impacts of such cold episodes. The main goal of this study is thus to characterize cold episodes in the MB and assess their large-scale circulation and teleconnections over South America (SA) during austral summer. To identify cold events in the MB daily minimum temperature (Tmin) for the period 1958-2014 from Huayao station, located within the MB was used. A cold episode is defined when daily minimum temperature drops below its 10-percentile for at least one day. Additionally, to study the sensitivity between physical mechanisms associated with cold episodes and temperature, cold episodes are classified in three groups: Weak cold episodes (7.5 ≤ Tmin ≤ 10 percentile), strong cold episodes (Tmin ≤ 2.5 percentile), but excluding the 9 coldest events (Tmin ≤ 0 ͦ C), henceforth referred to as extraordinary cold episodes. Several gridded reanalysis were used to characterize the large-scale circulation, cloud cover and rainfall over SA associated with these events. Weak and strong cold episodes in the MB are mainly associated with a weakening of the Bolivian High-Nordeste Low system by tropical-extratropical interactions. Both types of cold episodes are associated with westerly wind anomalies at mid- and upper-tropospheric levels aloft the Peruvian Central Andes, which inhibit the influx of humid air masses from the lowlands to the east and hence limit the development of cloud cover (e.g., positive OLR anomalies over MB). The resulting clear sky conditions cause nighttime temperatures to drop, leading to cold extremes below 10-percentile. Simultaneously, northeastern Brazil (NEB) registers negative OLR anomalies, strong convection and enhanced cloud cover because displacement of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) toward the northeast of

  5. Surface Uplift History of the Central Andes: Implications for the Growth of Orogenic Plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzione, C. N.; Hoke, G. D.; Libarkin, J. C.; MacFadden, B. J.; Withers, S.

    2007-05-01

    Sedimentation, paleoelevation, and incision histories provide important constraints on the timing and magnitude of regional surface uplift of mountain belts that point to specific processes that led to surface uplift. The sedimentary record and stable isotopic compositions of carbonates are used to reconstruct the late Miocene subsidence history, paleoenvironment, and paleoelevation of the northern Altiplano basin. Multiple paleoelevation proxies, including paleoleaf physiognomy, δ18O paleoaltimetry, and Δ47 paleothermometry, suggest that the Altiplano rose by 2.5±0.5 km to 3.5±0.5 km to its current elevation between ~10 and 7 Ma. Geomorphic evidence from widespread, low-relief paleosurfaces on both the eastern and western flanks of the Andes also shows that the onset of rapid incision of paleosurfaces occurred between ~10 and 6.5 Ma over the entire width of the mountain belt and over at least 5° latitude. Stream profile analysis of the drainage systems that incise these paleosurfaces has been inferred to reflect ~1 to 2 km of surface uplift of the flanks of the Andes. Combining geomorphic evidence with paleoelevation constraints, the paleotopographic evolution of the Andes is reconstructed over the late Miocene. Late Miocene regional surface uplift requires the removal of mantle lithosphere as the dominant geodynamic mechanism for raising the plateau during this time. However, crustal thickening and redistribution of crust by erosion/sedimentation and/or lower crustal flow set the limit of surface uplift. Regional surface uplift of the Andean plateau in the late Miocene predicts a decrease in the horizontal deviatoric stress in the plateau that is consistent with observations of upper crustal shortening, sedimentation rates, and magmatism in the plateau. Shortening ceased across the plateau between 10 and 7 Ma, coincident with widespread ignimbrite eruptions and an abrupt decrease in sedimentation rates. The combination of geodynamic processes that appear to

  6. Changes in maximum and minimal temperatures at high elevation stations in the central Andes of South America

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana-Gomez, R.A.

    1997-11-01

    Temperature trends and deviations were evaluated for the central Andes portion of Bolivia. Data were collected primarily from stations located at very high altitude (3,000 m above sea level and higher) for a 73-year period from 1918 to 1990. The analysis determined maximum and minimum temperature trends and the daily temperature range (DTR) at each station. The minimum temperature series showed a rather sustained increase starting in the 1960s and continuing to the present, and a reduction of the differential rate of warming for the same interval. The high elevation, rural area data appears to reinforce evidence of a global and generalized rise of minimum temperature and decrease of the DTR. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Investigating links between climate and orography in the central Andes: Coupling erosion and precipitation using a physical-statistical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowman, Lauren E. L.; Barros, Ana P.

    2014-06-01

    Prior studies evaluated the interplay between climate and orography by investigating the sensitivity of relief to precipitation using the stream power erosion law (SPEL) for specified erosion rates. Here we address the inverse problem, inferring realistic spatial distributions of erosion rates for present-day topography and contemporaneous climate forcing. In the central Andes, similarities in the altitudinal distribution and density of first-order stream outlets and precipitation suggest a direct link between climate and fluvial erosion. Erosion rates are estimated with a Bayesian physical-statistical model based on the SPEL applied at spatial scales that capture joint hydrogeomorphic and hydrometeorological patterns within five river basins and one intermontane basin in Peru and Bolivia. Topographic slope and area data were generated from a high-resolution (˜90 m) digital elevation map, and mean annual precipitation was derived from 14 years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42v.7 product and adjusted with rain gauge data. Estimated decadal-scale erosion rates vary between 0.68 and 11.59 mm/yr, with basin averages of 2.1-8.5 mm/yr. Even accounting for uncertainty in precipitation and simplifying assumptions, these values are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than most millennial and million year timescale estimates in the central Andes, using various geological dating techniques (e.g., thermochronology and cosmogenic nuclides), but they are consistent with other decadal-scale estimates using landslide mapping and sediment flux observations. The results also reveal a pattern of spatially dependent erosion consistent with basin hypsometry. The modeling framework provides a means of remotely estimating erosion rates and associated uncertainties under current climate conditions over large regions. 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Geodynamical evolution of Central Andes at 24°S as inferred by magma composition along the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro transversal volcanic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, M.; Mazzuoli, R.; Omarini, R.; Cas, R.; Maas, R.

    2002-11-01

    Miocene to Recent volcanism on the Puna plateau (Central Andes) developed in three geological settings: (a) volcanic arc in the Western Cordillera (Miocene-Recent); (b) trans-arc along the main NW-SE transverse fault systems (Miocene); and (c) back-arc, mainly monogenic volcanic centres (Pliocene-Quaternary). We have studied the evolution of the arc-trans-arc volcanism along one of the most extensive transverse structures of Central Andes, the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro, at 24°S. Compositional variations from arc to trans-arc volcanism provide insights into petrogenesis and magma source regions. Puntas Negras and Rincon volcanic centres are arc-type and have typical calc-alkaline geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic characteristics. East of the arc, lavas of the Tul-Tul, Del Medio and Pocitos complexes (TUMEPO) are heavy rare earth element-depleted and could be derived from 20-30% of partial melting of a lower crustal garnet-bearing metabasite. These liquids could be variably mixed with arc magmas at the base of the crust (MASH). This suggests important contributions from lower crustal sources to TUMEPO centres. Products at the Quevar and Aguas Calientes volcanic complexes to the east of TUMEPO show a prominent upper crustal signature (high 86Sr/ 87Sr, low 143Nd/ 144Nd) and could represent mixtures of 20-30% TUMEPO-type liquids with up to 70-80% of upper crustal melts. We propose a geodynamic model to explain geochemical variations for the arc-trans-arc transverse volcanism from the Upper Miocene to Recent. In our model, arc volcanism is linked to dehydration of the subducting Nazca plate, which produces typical calc-alkaline compositions. During the Upper Miocene (10-5 Ma), lithospheric evolution in the Puna plateau was dominated by thickening of ductile lower crust and thinning of the lithosphere. Lower crustal melting was promoted by concomitant asthenospheric upwelling and water release from the amphibolite-eclogite transformation, yielding TUMEPO magmas with lower

  9. The Vallenar Discontinuity and the Maipo Orocline: Regional significance of clockwise vertical-axis rotations in the central Chilean Andes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriagada, C.; Roperch, P.; Mpodozis, C.; Charrier, R.; Yanez, G.; Farias, M.

    2009-05-01

    One of the most prominent tectonic features of the Andes is the Central Andean Rotation Pattern (CARP), which is closely related to the Bolivian Orocline and characterized by paleomagnetically determined clockwise rotations in northern Chile and counterclockwise rotations in southern Peru (Arriagada et al., 2008). Along the Chilean margin, between 29°S and 38°S, three prominent curvatures are observed. The Vallenar Discontinuity near ˜29°S corresponds to the southern limit of the Bolivian Orocline. North of 29°S the major structural elements (Paleozoic basement highs and thrusts) are NNE oriented while from 29°S down to 32°S the structures are mainly NS. The central Chilean margin presents also significant bends near Santiago (˜33°S, Maipo Orocline) and in the Arauco region (˜38°S). Near Santiago, the Maipo bend coincides with the subduction of the Juan Fernandez Ridge (JFR). During the last five years we have undertaken new paleomagnetic and structural studies along the forearc of northern and central Chile in order to understand the origin of the bends in the Chilean margin and the consequence of its indentation by the JFR. Clockwise rotations are, consistently large (30°S- 45°) north of the Vallenar discontinuity, but south of the Vallenar discontinuity, the segment between 29°S to 32°S was not subjected to significant clockwise rotation. South of ˜33°S, significant clockwise deflections up to 39° of the declinations are again observed. Rotations occur both in Mesozoic rocks of the Coastal Cordillera and Tertiary rocks of the Main Cordillera. Whereas most of the CARP rotations, involving bending of the Bolivian Orocline and clockwise rotations north of the Vallenar Discontinuity, occurred essentially during the Paleogene, the paleomagnetic rotations obtained in Tertiary formations of central Chile constrain the maximum possible age for the occurrence of rotations of the Maipo Orocline to the Miocene. Neogene shortening in the foreland belt

  10. On the uplift anomaly of the Arica Bend, Western Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madella, Andrea; Delunel, Romain; Szidat, Sönke; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2015-04-01

    The architecture of the Western Andes is remarkably constant between southern Peru and northern Chile. An exception, however, is present near Arica at 18°S, where the Andes change their strike direction by ca. 50° and the Coastal Cordillera is absent over a lateral width of 50 km. Here, we propose a large-scale model to explain the Ma-long low-uplift rate of the Arica Bend in connection with interplate coupling and continental wedge-top basin evolution. We complement new geomorphic and sedimentological observations with structural, stratigraphic and seismic data compiled from the literature. We additionally present a new set of 14C ages to infer the Holocene uplift pattern of the region, which we support with stream profile analysis. Results show that the absence of a sediment barrier and the amphitheater-shaped topography at the Arica Bend has conditioned a relatively high sediment discharge to the corresponding trench segment since 2.7 Ma and possibly earlier. However, the 14C ages and the river profile analyses yield contradicting high coastal uplift rates for the past 10 ka. It appears that, at the large scale, higher sediment supply likely reduced the friction at the interplate boundary, keeping the uplift push at lower levels and the Coastal Cordillera submerged below Arica, thereby explaining the lower frequency of large subduction earthquakes in the area. Nonetheless, at a smaller scale, Quaternary sea-level fluctuations repeatedly shifted the water-load on the accretionary wedge, thereby inducing short-term elastic buckling, which has perturbed the trunk stream's profile.

  11. Carbonatite diversity in the Central Andes: the Ayopaya alkaline province, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Frank; Lehmann, Bernd; Tawackoli, Sohrab; Rössling, Reinhard; Belyatsky, Boris; Dulski, Peter

    2004-12-01

    The Ayopaya province in the eastern Andes of Bolivia, 100 km NW of Cochabamba, hosts a Cretaceous alkaline rock series within a Palaeozoic sedimentary sequence. The alkaline rock association comprises nepheline-syenitic/foyaitic to ijolitic intrusions, carbonatite, kimberlite, melilititic, nephelinitic to basanitic dykes and diatremes, and a variety of alkaline dykes. The carbonatites display a wide petrographic and geochemical spectrum. The Cerro Sapo area hosts a small calciocarbonatite intrusion and a multitude of ferrocarbonatitic dykes and lenses in association with a nepheline-syenitic stock. The stock is crosscut by a spectacular REE-Sr-Th-rich sodalite-ankerite-baryte dyke system. The nearby Chiaracke complex represents a magnesiocarbonatite intrusion with no evidence for a relationship to igneous silicate rocks. The magnesiocarbonatite (Σ REE up to 1.3 wt%) shows strong HREE depletion, i.e. unusually high La/Yb ratios (520 1,500). Calciocarbonatites (Σ REE up to 0.5 wt%) have a flatter REE distribution pattern (La/Yb 95 160) and higher Nb and Zr contents. The sodalite-ankerite-baryte dyke system shows geochemical enrichment features, particularly in Na, Ba, Cl, Sr, REE, which are similar to the unusual natrocarbonatitic lavas of the recent volcano of Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania. The Cerro Sapo complex may be regarded as an intrusive equivalent of natrocarbonatitic volcanism, and provides an example for carbonatite genesis by late-stage crystal fractionation and liquid immiscibility. The magnesiocarbonatite intrusion of Chiaracke, on the other hand, appears to result from a primary carbonatitic mantle melt. Deep seated mantle magmatism/metasomatism is also expressed by the occurrence of a kimberlite dyke. Neodymium and strontium isotope data (ɛNd 1.4 5.4, 87Sr/86 Sr

  12. Climatic Controls on Fluvial Cut-and-Fill Cycles in Drainages with In-stream Wetlands in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rech, J. A.; Latorre, C.

    2004-12-01

    Fluvial systems that possess in-stream wetlands, or marshes, are common in arid environments where water-tables are emergent and large discharge events uncommon. These streambeds are protected from erosion by a dense cover of hydrophyllic and phreatophytic vegetation. Along the Pacific slope of the Central Andes in northern Chile (~20°-26°S), which includes some of the driest sectors of the Atacama Desert, in-stream wetlands occur in deeply incised bedrock canyons on the Andean slope and piedmont. Over the last several years we have compiled a detailed record of late Pleistocene and Holocene vegetation changes along the Pacific slope of the Andes through the collection, analysis, and radiocarbon determination of over 180 rodent middens. Rodent middens record past changes in precipitation levels by tracking the downslope migrations of plant species into the hyperarid desert. We have also assembled a record of the cut-and-fill cycles of several fluvial systems with in-stream wetlands located at various distances (5-50 km) from the zone of ground-water recharge in the High Andes through stratigraphic mapping and the radiocarbon dating of over 100 samples of organic material within these wetlands. Combined, this well-dated record of hillslope vegetation and stream aggradation and incision allows us to assess the influence of climatic change on stream processes, including the nature of stream response, the sensitivity of different stream systems to climatic change, and the response times of streams to climate changes that vary in distance from ground-water recharge zones. The combined data set shows that in-stream wetland aggradation is directly linked to changes in climate, with aggradation occurring during wetter climatic periods when water tables are high. Incision occurs during dry climatic periods when water tables are lower and streambed sediments are no longer anchored by dense vegetation. Streams that are closer to ground-water recharge zones are more

  13. Cenozoic uplift of the Central Andes in northern Chile and Bolivia - reconciling paleoaltimetry with the geological evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Cenozoic geological evolution of the Central Andes, along two transects between ~17.5°S and 21°S, is compared with paleo-topography, determined from published paleo-altimetry studies. Surface and rock uplift are quantified using simple 2-D models of crustal shortening and thickening, together with estimates of sedimentation, erosion and magmatic addition. Prior to ~25 Ma, during a phase of amagmatic flat-slab subduction, thick skinned crustal shortening and thickening was focused in the Eastern and Western Cordilleras, separated by a broad basin up to 300 km wide and close to sea level, which today comprises the high Altiplano. Surface topography in the Eastern Cordillera appears to be ~1 km lower than anticipated from crustal thickening, which may be due to the pull-down effect of the subducted slab, coupled to the overlying lithosphere by a cold mantle wedge. Oligocene steepening of the subducted slab is indicated by the initiation of the volcanic arc at ~27 - 25 Ma, and widespread mafic volcanism in the Altiplano between 25 and 20 Ma. This may have resulted in detachment of mantle lithosphere and possibly dense lower crust, triggering 1 - 1.5 km of rapid uplift (over << 5 Myrs) of the Altiplano and western margin of the Eastern Cordillera and establishing the present day lithospheric structure beneath the high Andes. Since ~25 Ma, surface uplift has been the direct result of crustal shortening and thickening, locally modified by the effects of erosion, sedimentation and magmatic addition from the mantle. The rate of crustal shortening and thickening varies with location and time, with two episodes of rapid shortening in the Altiplano, lasting < 5 Myrs, that are superimposed on a long term history of ductile shortening in the lower crust, driven by underthrusting of the Brazilian Shield on the eastern margin.

  14. Trench investigation along the Mérida section of the Boconó fault (central Venezuelan Andes), Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard, Franck; Pantosti, Daniela; Machette, Michael; Costa, Carlos; Okumura, Koji; Cowan, Hugh; Diederix, Hans; Ferrer, Carlos; participants of the South American Field Workshop on Paleoseismology

    1999-07-01

    The Boconó fault is a major NE-SW-trending, dextral fault that extends for about 500 km along the backbone of the Venezuelan Andes. Several large historical earthquakes in this region have been attributed to the Boconó fault, and some of these have been recently associated with specific parts through paleoseismologic investigations. A new trench study has been performed, 60 km to the northeast of Mérida in the central Venezuelan Andes, where the fault forms a releasing bend, comprising two conspicuous late Holocene fault strands that are about 1 km apart. The southern and northern strands carry about 70% and 30% (respectively) of the 7-10 mm/yr net slip rate measured in this sector, which is based on a 40 vs. 85-100 m right-lateral offset of the Late Pleistocene Los Zerpa moraines. A trench excavated on the northern strand of the fault (near Morros de los Hoyos, slightly northeast of Apartaderos) across a twin shutter ridge and related sag pond exposed two main fault zones cutting Late Pleistocene alluvial and Holocene peat deposits. Each zone forms a shutter ridge with peat deposits ponded against the uplifted block. The paleoearthquake reconstruction derived from this trench allows us to propose the occurrence of at least 6-8 earthquakes in the past 9000 yr, yielding a maximum average recurrence interval of about 1100-1500 yr. Based on the northern strands average slip rate (2.6 mm/yr), such an earthquake sequence should have accommodated about 23 m of slip since 9 ka, suggesting that the maximum slip per event ranges between 3 and 4 m. No direct evidence for the large 1812 earthquake has been found in the trench, although this earthquake may have ruptured this section of the fault. Further paleoseismic studies will investigate the possibility that this event occurred on the Boconó fault, but ruptured mainly its southern strand in this region.

  15. Tectonic Evolution of the Central Andes during Mesozoic-Cenozoic times: Insights from the Salar de Atacama Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Gomez, M. A.; Bascunan, S. A.; Becerra, J.; Rubilar, J. F.; Gómez, I.; Narea, K.; Martínez, F.; Arriagada, C.; Le Roux, J.; Deckart, K.

    2015-12-01

    The classic Salar de Atacama Basin, located in the Central Andes of northern Chile, holds a remarkable yet not fully understood record of tectonic events since mid-Cretaceous times. Based on the growing amount of data collected over the last years, such as high-detail maps and U-Pb geochronology, we present an updated model for the development of this area after the Triassic. A major compressional event is recorded around the mid-Late Cretaceous (ca. 107 Ma) with the deposition of synorogenic continental successions reflecting the uplift of the Coastal Cordillera area farther to the west, and effectively initiating the foreland basin. The deformation front migrated eastwards during the Late Campanian (ca. 79 Ma), where it exhumed and deformed the Late Cretaceous magmatic arc and the crystalline basement of Cordillera de Domeyko. The K-T Event (ca. 65 Ma), recently identified in the basin, involved the same source areas, though the facies indicate a closer proximity to the source. The compressional record of the basin is continued by the Eocene Incaic Event (ca. 45 Ma), with deep exhumation of the Cordillera de Domeyko and the cannibalization of previous deposits. A change to an extensional regime during the Oligocene (ca. 28 Ma) is shown by the deposition of more than 4 km of evaporitic and clastic successions. A partial inversion of the basin occurred during the Miocene (ca.10 Ma-present), as shown by the deformation seen in the Cordillera de la Sal. As such, the basin shows that the uplift of the Cordillera de Domeyko was not one isolated episode, but a prolonged and complex event, punctuated by episodes of major deformation. It also highlights the need to take into account the Mesozoic-Cenozoic deformation events for any model trying to explain the building of the modern-day Andes.

  16. Seismic imaging of a convergent continental margin and plateau in the central Andes (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncken, O.; Asch, G.; Haberland, C.; Metchie, J.; Sobolev, S.; Stiller, M.; Yuan, X.; Brasse, H.; Buske, S.; Giese, P.; GöRze, H.-J.; Lueth, S.; Scheuber, E.; Shapiro, S.; Wigger, P.; Yoon, M.-K.; Bravo, P.; Vieytes, H.; Chong, G.; Gonzales, G.; Wilke, H.-G.; Lüschen, E.; Martinez, E.; RöSsling, R.; Ricaldi, E.; Rietbrock, A.

    2003-07-01

    A 400-km-long seismic reflection profile (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96)) and integrated geophysical experiments (wide-angle seismology, passive seismology, gravity, and magnetotelluric depth sounding) across the central Andes (21°S) observed subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American continent. An east dipping reflector (Nazca Reflector) is linked to the down going oceanic crust and shows increasing downdip intensity before gradual breakdown below 80 km. We interpret parts of the Nazca Reflector as a fluid trap located at the front of recent hydration and shearing of the mantle, the fluids being supplied by dehydration of the oceanic plate. Patches of bright (Quebrada Blanca Bright Spot) to more diffuse reflectivity underlie the plateau domain at 15-30 km depth. This reflectivity is associated with a low-velocity zone, P to S wave conversions, the upper limits of high conductivity and high Vp/Vs ratios, and to the occurrence of Neogene volcanic rocks at surface. We interpret this feature as evidence of widespread partial melting of the plateau crust causing decoupling of the upper and lower crust during Neogene shortening and plateau growth. The imaging properties of the continental Moho beneath the Andes indicate a broad transitional character of the crust-mantle boundary owing to active processes like hydration of mantle rocks (in the cooler parts of the plate margin system), magmatic underplating and intraplating under and into the lowermost crust, mechanical instability at Moho, etc. Hence all first-order features appear to be related to fluid-assisted processes in a subduction setting.

  17. Seismic imaging of a convergent continental margin and plateau in the central Andes (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ANCORP Working Group,

    2003-07-01

    A 400-km-long seismic reflection profile (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96)) and integrated geophysical experiments (wide-angle seismology, passive seismology, gravity, and magnetotelluric depth sounding) across the central Andes (21°S) observed subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American continent. An east dipping reflector (Nazca Reflector) is linked to the down going oceanic crust and shows increasing downdip intensity before gradual breakdown below 80 km. We interpret parts of the Nazca Reflector as a fluid trap located at the front of recent hydration and shearing of the mantle, the fluids being supplied by dehydration of the oceanic plate. Patches of bright (Quebrada Blanca Bright Spot) to more diffuse reflectivity underlie the plateau domain at 15-30 km depth. This reflectivity is associated with a low-velocity zone, P to S wave conversions, the upper limits of high conductivity and high V p /V s ratios, and to the occurrence of Neogene volcanic rocks at surface. We interpret this feature as evidence of widespread partial melting of the plateau crust causing decoupling of the upper and lower crust during Neogene shortening and plateau growth. The imaging properties of the continental Moho beneath the Andes indicate a broad transitional character of the crust-mantle boundary owing to active processes like hydration of mantle rocks (in the cooler parts of the plate margin system), magmatic underplating and intraplating under and into the lowermost crust, mechanical instability at Moho, etc. Hence all first-order features appear to be related to fluid-assisted processes in a subduction setting.

  18. A glassy lava flow from Toconce volcano and its relation with the Altiplano-Puna Magma Body in Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy, B.; Rodriguez, I.; Aguilera, F.

    2012-12-01

    Toconce is a composite stratovolcano located at the San Pedro - Linzor volcanic chain (SPLVC). This volcanic chain distributes within the Altiplano-Puna region (Central Andes) which is characterized by extensive rhyodacitic-to-rhyolitic ignimbritic fields, and voluminous domes of dacitic-to-rhyolitic composition (de Silva, 1989). The felsic melts that gave origin to ignimbrites and domes at this area were generated by mixing of mantle-derived magmas and anatectic melts assimilated during their ascent through the thick crust. Thus, partially molten layers exist in the upper crust below the APVC (de Silva et al., 2006). Evidence of large volumes of such melts has been also proposed by geophysical methods (i.e. the Altiplano-Puna Magma Body; Chmielowsky et al., 1999) In this work, petrography and whole rock, mineralogical and melt inclusions geochemistry of a glassy lava flow of Toconce volcano are presented. Petrographically, this lava flow shows a porphyric texture, with euhdral to subhedral plagioclase, ortho- and clino-pyroxene phenocrysts immersed in a glassy groundmass. Geochemically, the lava flow has 64.7% wt. SiO2. The glassy groundmass (~70% wt. SiO2) is more felsic than all the lavas in the volcanic chain (47-68% wt., Godoy et al., 2011). Analyzed orthopyroxene-hosted melt inclusions show an even higher SiO2 content (72-75% wt.), and a decreasing on Al2O3, Na2O, and CaO content with differentiation. Crystallization pressures of this lava flow, obtained using Putirka's two-pyroxene and clinopyroxene-liquid models (Putirka, 2008), range between 6 and 9 kbar. According to crystallization pressures, and major element composition, a felsic source located at shallow crustal pressures - where plagioclase is a stable mineralogical phase - originated the inclusions. This could be related to the presence of the Altiplano-Puna Magma Body (APMB) located below SPLVC. On the other hand, glassy groundmass, and disequilibrium textures in minerals of this lava flow could

  19. Historical Glacier Variations in Southern South America since the Little Ice Age: Examples from Lago Viedma (Southern Patagonia) and Mendoza (Central Andes), Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, S. U.; Masiokas, M.; Pitte, P.; Berthier, E.; Guerrido, C.; Luckman, B. H.; Villalba, R.

    2013-12-01

    The evaluation of historical information can give valuable insight into past glacier dynamics, especially before the onset of modern measurements. Early photographs and maps depict changes for selected glaciers in southern South America. Within this study, written documents and pictorial historical records (drawings, sketches, engravings, photographs, chronicles, topographic maps) are analysed critically, with a particular focus on two regions: Lago Viedma (El Chaltén, southern Patagonia, 49.5°S, 73.0°W) and the Río Mendoza basin (Mendoza, central Andes, 33.1°S, 69.9°W). For the Lago Viedma area, early historical data for the end of the 19th century stem from the expedition of the Chilean-Argentinean border commission. In addition, the expedition by the German Scientific Society, conducted between 1910 and 1916, and the later photographs by Alberto M. de Agostini give an excellent depiction of the glaciers. Glaciar Viedma is a calving glacier which shows distinct retreat from 1896 until the present (though with a stationary or possibly advancing glacier front between 1930/31 and 1951/52), similar to the neighbouring glaciers. On the contrary, nearby Glaciar Perito Moreno shows an exceptional behaviour: the glacier front has been advancing during the first half of the 20th century, staying in an advanced position until the present. At the beginning of the 20th century, Robert Helbling explored the Argentinean-Chilean Andes together with his friend Friedrich Reichert. In the summer of 1909/10, they started a detailed survey of the highly glacierized Juncal-Tupungato mountains (Río Mendoza basin), leading to the first accurate topographic map of the area published in 1914. Its outstanding quality allows a comparison with contemporary satellite imagery. The area received attention in 1934, when the sudden drainage of a glacier-dammed lake in the upper Río del Plomo valley caused fatalities and considerable damage to constructions and the Transandine Railway. A

  20. U-Pb Geochronologic Evidence for the Evolution of the Gondwanan Margin of the North- Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Schaltegger, U.; Košler, J.; Whitehouse, M.; Gutjahr, M.; Spikings, R.; Miškovic, A.

    2007-05-01

    The Neoproterozoic - Early Paleozoic evolution of the Gondwanan margin of the north-central Andes has been investigated by a U-Pb zircon geochronology study in the Eastern Cordilleras of Peru and Ecuador, combining LA- ICPMS detrital zircon analysis with dating of syn- and post-tectonic intrusives by TIMS and ion microprobe. The majority of detrital zircon samples exhibit prominent peaks in the ranges 0.45 - 0.65 Ga and 0.9 - 1.3 Ga, with minimal older detritus from the Amazonian craton. The detrital zircon data demonstrate that the basement to the western Gondwanan margin was likely composed of a metamorphic belt of Grenvillian age, upon which an Early Paleozoic magmatic belt was situated in a similar way to the Sierra Pampeanas and Famatina Terranes of northern Argentina. These two orogenic belts are interpreted to be either buried underneath the present-day Andean chain or adjacent foreland sediments. Plutons associated with the Early Paleozoic subduction-related magmatic belt have been identified in the Eastern Cordillera of Peru, and have been dated by U-Pb zircon TIMS and ion microprobe to 474 - 442 Ma. This is in close agreement with the ages of subduction-related magmatism in the Arequipa - Antofalla Basement (e.g. Loewy et al., 2004). This Early Paleozoic arc is clearly not linear as it jumps from a coastal location in the Arequipa - Antofalla Basement to several hundred kilometers inland in the Eastern Cordillera further to the north. This is interpreted as an embayment on the Proto-Andean margin at the time the arc was initiated; if this is the case the northern termination of the Arequipa-Antofalla Basement in the vicinity of Lima is an Ordovician or older feature. The arc magmatism pre- and post dates phases of regional metamorphism in the Eastern Cordillera of Peru. U- Pb zircon ion microprobe dating of zircon overgrowths in high-grade leucosomes demonstrates that the presence of a metamorphic event at c. 478 Ma, and refutes the previously

  1. The ash deposits of the 4200 BP Cerro Blanco eruption: the largest Holocene eruption of the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Turiel, Jose-Luis; Saavedra, Julio; Perez-Torrado, Francisco-Jose; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Carracedo, Juan-Carlos; Lobo, Agustin; Rejas, Marta; Gallardo, Juan-Fernando; Osterrieth, Margarita; Carrizo, Julieta; Esteban, Graciela; Martinez, Luis-Dante; Gil, Raul-Andres; Ratto, Norma; Baez, Walter

    2015-04-01

    We present new data about a major eruption -spreading approx. 110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in the Central Andes of NW Argentina (Southern Puna, 26°45' S, 67°45' W). This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. Discrimination and correlation of pyroclastic deposits of this eruption of Cerro Blanco was conducted comparing samples of proximal (domes, pyroclastic flow and fall deposits) with distal ash fall deposits (up to 400 km from de vent). They have been characterized using optical and electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction, particle-size distribution by laser diffraction and electron microprobe and HR-ICP-MS with laser ablation for major and trace element composition of glass, feldspars and biotite. New and published 14C ages were calibrated using Bayesian statistics. An one-at-a-time inversion method was used to reconstruct the eruption conditions using the Tephra2 code (Bonadonna et al. 2010, https://vhub.org/resources/tephra2). This method allowed setting the main features of the eruption that explains the field observations in terms of thickness and grain size distributions of the ash fall deposit. The main arguments that justify the correlation are four: 1) Compositional coincidence for glass, feldspars, and biotite in proximal and distal materials; 2) Stratigraphic and geomorphological relationships, including structure and thickness variation of the distal deposits; 3) Geochronological consistency, matching proximal and distal ages; and 4) Geographical distribution of correlated outcrops in relation to the eruption centre at the coordinates of Cerro Blanco. With a magnitude of 7.0 and a volcanic explosivity index or VEI 7, this eruption of ~4200 BP at Cerro Blanco is the largest in the last five millennia known in the Central

  2. Modern and long-term evaporation of central Andes surface waters suggests paleo archives underestimate Neogene elevations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorella, Richard P.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro S.; Jeffery, M. Louise; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2015-12-01

    Central Andean paleoelevations reconstructed from stable isotope and paleofloral data imply a large magnitude (>2 km) Miocene-to-modern surface uplift. However, the isotopic relationships between precipitation, surface waters, and soil waters upon which these reconstructions are based remain poorly constrained for both past, and in many cases, modern conditions. We quantify the relationships between central Andean precipitation and surface waters by measuring the isotopic composition of 249 stream water samples (δ18O and δD) collected between April 2009 and October 2012. The isotopic compositions of stream waters match precipitation along the eastern flank. In contrast, Altiplano surface waters possess a lower δD-δ18O slope (4.59 vs ∼8 for meteoric waters) not observed in precipitation, which signals heavy isotope evaporative enrichment in surface waters. Paleoclimate models indicate that highly evaporative conditions have persisted on the plateau throughout Andean uplift, and that conditions may have been more evaporative when the Andes were lower. Thus, more ancient proxy materials may have a greater evaporative bias than previously recognized and paleoelevation reconstructions from stable isotope based central Andean plateau proxy materials likely overstate Miocene-to-present surface uplift. We propose Altiplano paleoelevations of 1-2 km at 24.5 Ma, 1.5-2.9 km by 11.45 Ma, and modern elevations by ∼6 Ma based on the lightest isotopic compositions observed in Altiplano proxy materials, which are least likely to be influenced by evaporation. These constraints limit total late-Miocene-to-modern uplift to <2.2 km, are more consistent with crustal shortening records, and suggest that plateau uplift may have been more spatially uniform than suggested by previous interpretations of stable isotope proxies.

  3. Zonda downslope winds in the central Andes of South America in a 20-year climate simulation with the Eta model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antico, Pablo L.; Chou, Sin Chan; Mourão, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    The Zonda wind is a local version of the alpine foehn in the central Andes Mountains in South America. It blows on the eastern slopes and produces an extremely warm and dry condition in Argentina. In this study, the occurrence of Zonda wind events during a 20-year simulation from the regional Eta model is analyzed and results are compared to previous studies of Zonda wind events based on weather observations. We define a set of parameters to account for the zonal pressure gradient across the mountain, vertical movement, and air humidity typical of Zonda wind events. These parameters are applied to characterize Zonda wind events in model run and to classify them as surface-level or high-level episodes. The resulting annual distribution of Zonda occurrences based on composite analyses shows a preference for winter and spring with rare occurrences during summer. For the surface-level Zonda wind events, the highest frequency occurs during spring. Whereas surface-level Zonda wind episodes more commonly initiate in the afternoon, high-level Zonda wind events show no preference for a given initiation time. Our results are mostly in agreement with previous observational results.

  4. A glaciological baseline for the upper Olivares basin, Chilean Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loriaux, T.; Bown, F.; Burger, F.; Cisternas, S.; Gacitúa, G.; Hernández, J.; Malmros, J.; Muñoz, C.; Oberreuter, J.; Rivera, A.; Silva, R.

    2013-12-01

    Santiago de Chile, with near 6.7 million of inhabitants, is located at the foot of the Andes, in the Maipo river basin, where there are approximately 424 km2 of ice, being the biggest glaciers, those located at the upper Olivares basin. Very little has been researched in recent years about the ongoing changes taking place in the area or about the glacier meltwater contribution or about the human impact on the glaciers. In order to tackle this deficiency, we began a research program in 2012, aiming to complete a glaciological baseline for this area, including glacier mass, energy and hydrological studies. For this purpose, we have established a detailed monitoring program on two glaciers where we installed 3 automatic weather stations, two arrays of stakes for mass balance studies, two automatic photographic cameras for monitoring albedo changes and two runoff stations, among several other instruments. Also, we have surveyed 5 glaciers with our airborne radar and lidar systems, allowing mapping their surface topographies at different seasons and the bedrocks underneath the ice. Analysis of satellite images shows generalized glacier area shrinkage, with a mean area lost of 25.5% since 1967 (total of 68.6 km2 in 1967 among 6 studied glaciers). The collected radar ice thickness data (maximum ice thickness of 223 m), allowed calculating a total volume of water equivalent of 3 km3 storage in 5 main glaciers of the basin. The GPS surveys of several stakes resulted in surface ice velocities between 1 and 5 m/yr. The mass balance studies showed high summer ablation rates, with an important role of sublimation, expressed as penitentes with heights of up to 1.5 m. Runoff contributed by Olivares Alfa glacier averaged 461 l/s between January and April 2013 with peaks of up to 2000 l/s, confirming the importance of glacier meltwater for the basin during summer months (January-March). The above numbers are some of the results obtained in the area, illustrating the importance of

  5. Cloud forest restoration for erosion control in a Kichwa community of the Ecuadorian central Andes Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backus, L.; Giordanengo, J.; Sacatoro, I.

    2013-12-01

    The Denver Professional Chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) has begun conducting erosion control projects in the Kichwa communities of Malingua Pamba in the Andes Mountains south of Quito, Ecuador. In many high elevation areas in this region, erosion of volcanic soils on steep hillsides (i.e., < 40%) is severe and often associated with roads, water supply systems, and loss of native cloud forests followed by burning and cultivation of food crops. Following a 2011 investigation of over 75 erosion sites, the multidisciplinary Erosion Control team traveled to Malingua Pamba in October 2012 to conduct final design and project implementation at 5 sites. In partnership with the local communities, we installed woody cloud forest species, grass (sig-sig) contour hedges, erosion matting, and rock structures (toe walls, plunge pools, bank armoring, cross vanes, contour infiltration ditches, etc.) to reduce incision rates and risk of slump failures, facilitate aggradation, and hasten revegetation. In keeping with the EWB goal of project sustainability, we used primarily locally available resources. High school students of the community grew 5000 native trees and some naturalized shrubs in a nursery started by the school principal, hand weavers produced jute erosion mats, and rocks were provided by a nearby quarry. Where possible, local rock was harvested from landslide areas and other local erosion features. Based on follow up reports and photographs from the community and EWB travelers, the approach of using locally available materials installed by the community is successful; plants are growing well and erosion control structures have remained in place throughout the November to April rainy season. The community has continued planting native vegetation at several additional erosion sites. Formal monitoring will be conducted in October 2013, followed by analysis of data to determine if induced meandering and other low-maintenance erosion control techniques are working

  6. Inner structure of La Pacana Caldera (Central Andes, Chile) using gravimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, F.; Pavez Alvarado, A.

    2010-12-01

    La Pacana caldera is located in the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex in the Chilean Andes and is a 60 by 35 km NS elongated body. It is one of the largest resurgent calderas in the world, comparable to the supervolcanoes of La Garita, Toba and Yellowstone. It has been described as being formed 4 My ago during an eruption with a VEI of 8,7, which makes it the fifth largest eruption ever in the geological record. This eruption was followed by a subsidence of 0,9 up to 2 km according to previous studies. Different models for this caldera formation were proposed but with a lack of sub surface information. We hence carried a gravimetry study to investigate its inner structure and to better off constrains on these proposed models. The residual Bouguer anomaly (figure 1) is asymetric with multiple high and low gravity, with an average amplitude of -14 mGal, which reaches -24 mGal near the resurgent dome, interpreted as the deepest part of the caldera. Based on this, we propose that the main collapse zone is not related to the topographic border, but to resurgent dome edges. This is compatible with a piecemeal collapse geometry. There are several gravity highs below strato-volcanoes and postcaldera domes within La Pacana caldera, which are interpreted as magmatic reservoirs. Our data combined with previous geological studies allowed us to separate La Pacana in two nested calderas and to trace its NNW, N and NNE borders, previously unrecognized features. The 2,5 D forward modelling cross sections constrained with geological data showed that the maximum caldera depth is 1,3 km with a minimum of 0,6 km in its southern part. We finally suggest that caldera rims are surrounded by paleozoic basement uplifted by thrust fault systems. La Pacana's residual Bouguer anomaly is small (1/2) when compared with the ones associated to other supervolcanoes (Toba, Yellowstone). La Pacana caldera constitutes then an anomaly for supervolcanoes internal structure due to its interpreted low

  7. Phylogeny and biogeography of the New World siskins and goldfinches: rapid, recent diversification in the Central Andes.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Elizabeth J; Witt, Christopher C

    2015-06-01

    Time-calibrated molecular phylogenies can help us to understand the origins of the diverse and unique Andean avifauna. Previous studies have shown that the tempo of diversification differed between the Andes and adjacent lowland regions of South America. Andean taxa were found to have speciated more recently and to have avoided the decelerated diversification that is typical of Neotropical lowland clades. The South American siskins, a Pleistocene finch radiation, may typify this Andean pattern. We investigated the phylogenetic biogeography of all the New World siskins and goldfinches in new detail. To understand the specific role of the Andes in siskin diversification, we asked: (1) Was diversification faster in Andean siskin lineages relative to non-Andean ones? (2) Did siskin lineages move into and out of the Andes at different rates? We found that siskin lineages in the Andes had higher diversification rates and higher outward dispersal rates than siskin lineages outside the Andes. We conclude that páramo expansion and contraction in response to Pleistocene climatic cycles caused accelerated diversification and outward dispersal in Andean siskins. The younger average age of bird species in the Andes compared to lowland South America may be attributable to bursts of recent diversification in siskins and several other vagile, open-habitat clades. PMID:25796324

  8. Early Cenozoic Shortening and Foreland Basin Sedimentation in the Marañon Fold-thrust Belt, Central Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, L. J.; Carlotto, V.; Horton, B. K.; Rosell, L. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Marañon fold-thrust belt in the westernmost Andes of Peru has long been considered a robust signature of early Cenozoic shortening in the Andean orogenic belt. However, the structural details and potential records of coeval synorogenic sedimentation remain elusive. We report results from new geologic mapping (1:50,000), cross-section construction, and U-Pb geochronology for the Matucana-Ticlio region at 11-12°S along the Lima-La Oroya highway. Zircon U-Pb age data from volcanic rocks and clastic basin fill provide a maximum depositional age of ~43 Ma for a middle Eocene syndeformational unit that we identify as the Anta Formation, which overlies the Paleocene Casapalca Formation. Sedimentary lithofacies and unconformable relationships within the volcaniclastic Anta Formation reveal mixed fluvial, alluvial-fan, and volcanic depositional conditions during shortening accommodated by a NE-verging thrust/reverse fault and corresponding backthrust (here named the Chonta fault system). Our cross-section reconstruction and geochronological data indicate that the region is a critical, possibly unique, zone of the broader NE-directed Marañon fold-thrust belt where pre-Neogene synorogenic sediments and their associated structures are preserved. We interpret this combined structural and basin system as an Eocene-age (Incaic) frontal thrust belt and corresponding foredeep to wedge-top depozone in central Peru. As one of the better-constrained segments of the Marañon fold-thrust belt, this zone provides insight into potential linkages with elusive early Cenozoic (Incaic) structures and foreland basin fill of the Western Cordillera and Altiplano farther south in the central Andean plateau.

  9. Crustal structure of the south-central Andes Cordillera and backarc region from regional waveform modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, P.; Beck, S.; Zandt, G.

    2007-08-01

    We investigate the crustal structure in the Andes Cordillera and its backarc region using regional broadband waveforms from crustal earthquakes. We consider seismic waveforms recorded at regional distances by the CHile-ARgentina Geophysical Experiment (CHARGE) during 2000-2002 and utilize previous seismic moment tensor inversion results. For each single station-earthquake pair, we fixed the source parameters and performed forward waveform modelling using ray paths that sample the crust of the highest elevation Cordillera and the accreted terranes in the backarc region. Our investigation indicates that synthetic seismograms for our earthquake-station geometry are most sensitive to crustal parameters and less sensitive to mantle parameters. We performed a grid search around crustal thickness, P-wave seismic velocity (Vp) and P- to S-wave seismic velocity ratio (Vp/Vs), fixing mantle parameters. We evaluated this waveform analysis by estimating an average correlation coefficient between observed and synthetic data over the three broadband components. We identified all acceptable crustal models that correspond to high correlation coefficients that provide best overall seismogram fits for the data and synthetic waveforms filtered mainly between 10 and 80 s. Our results indicate along strike variations in the crustal structure for the north-south high Cordillera with higher P-wave velocity and thickness in the northern segment (north of 33°S), and persistently high Vp/Vs ratio (>1.85) in both segments. This is consistent with a colder mafic composition for the northern segment and a region of crustal thickening above the flat slab region. In contrast, the results for the current volcanic arc (south of 33°S) agree with a warmer crust consistent with partial melt related to Quaternary volcanism presumably of an intermediate to mafic composition. A distinctive feature in the backarc region is the marked contrast between the seismic properties of the Cuyania and Pampia

  10. Dynamics of rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers in the Central Chilean Andes over the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Xavier; Brenning, Alexander; Rojas Marchini, Fernanda

    2010-05-01

    In the semiarid Central Andes of Chile at 33.5°S., mountain permafrost is widely present above 3500-4000 m asl, especially in the form of rock glaciers, which often coexist with glaciers and debris-covered glaciers. This peculiar configuration of the cryosphere involves complex and poorly known responses of its components to climate change. Our study area in the Laguna Negra catchment is part of a watershed that provides up to two-thirds of the drinking water supplies to Chile's capital Santiago (5.5 million inhabitants) during the dry summer months. The 35 km² watershed contains 2.3 km² of uncovered glaciers, 0.9 km² of debris-covered glacier area and 4.3 km² of rock glaciers, and hosts the longest series of glacier mass balance measurement in Chile (Echaurren Norte glacier). Using orthorectified aerial photographs of 1956 and 1996 and a high resolution satellite image of 2008, we mapped the geometric changes that affected the glacier and the debris-covered glacier of the Punta Negra sub-catchment during the last 50 years. Surface displacements and volume changes were estimated based on 1956 and 1996 digital elevation models (DEMs), and the total loss of water equivalent in the catchment was quantified. At a shorter time scale, rock glaciers and a debris-covered glacier are being monitored since 2004, providing insights into their kinematics and near-surface thermal regime. The orthophotos reveal a 44.7% reduction of the uncovered glacier area between 1955 and 1996, and only small surface changes between 1996 and 2008. The volume reduction of both uncovered and debris-covered glaciers is estimated at at least 3.9 million m3 water equivalent between 1955 and 1996. The second noticeable change is the growth of the thermokarst areas on the debris-covered glacier, with the formation of new and the widening and deepening of existing melt-out depressions between 1955 and 2008. The thermal monitoring revealed that, in 2003/04, the mean annual ground surface

  11. Photosynthetic responses of trees in high-elevation forests: comparing evergreen species along an elevation gradient in the Central Andes.

    PubMed

    García-Plazaola, José I; Rojas, Roke; Christie, Duncan A; Coopman, Rafael E

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth at extremely high elevations is constrained by high daily thermal amplitude, strong solar radiation and water scarcity. These conditions are particularly harsh in the tropics, where the highest elevation treelines occur. In this environment, the maintenance of a positive carbon balance involves protecting the photosynthetic apparatus and taking advantage of any climatically favourable periods. To characterize photoprotective mechanisms at such high elevations, and particularly to address the question of whether these mechanisms are the same as those previously described in woody plants along extratropical treelines, we have studied photosynthetic responses in Polylepis tarapacana Philippi in the central Andes (18°S) along an elevational gradient from 4300 to 4900 m. For comparative purposes, this gradient has been complemented with a lower elevation site (3700 m) where another Polylepis species (P. rugulosa Bitter) occurs. During the daily cycle, two periods of photosynthetic activity were observed: one during the morning when, despite low temperatures, assimilation was high; and the second starting at noon when the stomata closed because of a rise in the vapour pressure deficit and thermal dissipation is prevalent over photosynthesis. From dawn to noon there was a decrease in the content of antenna pigments (chlorophyll b and neoxanthin), together with an increase in the content of xanthophyll cycle carotenoids. These results could be caused by a reduction in the antenna size along with an increase in photoprotection. Additionally, photoprotection was enhanced by a partial overnight retention of de-epoxized xanthophylls. The unique combination of all of these mechanisms made possible the efficient use of the favourable conditions during the morning while still providing enough protection for the rest of the day. This strategy differs completely from that of extratropical mountain trees, which uncouple light-harvesting and energy-use during long

  12. Structural inheritance and selective reactivation in the central Andes: Cenozoic deformation guided by pre-Andean structures in southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Nicholas D.; Horton, Brian K.; Carlotto, Victor

    2016-03-01

    Structural, stratigraphic, and geochronologic constraints from the Eastern Cordillera in the central Andean plateau of southern Peru (14-15°S) demonstrate the existence and position of major pre-Andean structures that controlled the accumulation of Triassic synrift fill and guided subsequent Cenozoic deformation. The timing of initial clastic deposition of the Triassic Mitu Group is here constrained to ~ 242-233 Ma on the basis of detrital and volcanic zircon U-Pb geochronology. Regionally distinct provenance variations, as provided by U-Pb age populations from localized synrift accumulations, demonstrate Triassic erosion of multiple diagnostic sources from diverse rift-flank uplifts. Stratigraphic correlations suggest synchronous initiation of extensional basins containing the Mitu Group, in contrast with previous interpretations of southward rift propagation. Triassic motion along the NE-dipping San Anton normal fault accommodated up to 7 km of throw and hanging-wall deposition of a synrift Mitu succession > 2.5 km thick. The contrasting orientation of a non-reactivated Triassic normal fault suggests selective inversion of individual structures in the Eastern Cordillera was dependent on fault dip and strike. Selective preservation of a ~ 4 km thick succession of Carboniferous-Permian strata in the down-dropped San Anton hanging wall, beneath the synrift Mitu Group, suggests large-scale erosional removal in the uplifted footwall. Field and map observations identify additional pre-Andean thrust faults and folds attributed to poorly understood Paleozoic orogenic events preserved in the San Anton hanging wall. Selective thrust reactivation of normal and reverse faults during later compression largely guided Cenozoic deformation in the Eastern Cordillera. The resulting structural compartmentalization and across-strike variations in kinematics and deformation style highlight the influence of inherited Paleozoic structures and Triassic normal faults on the long

  13. Cenozoic foreland basin system in the central Andes of northwestern Argentina: Implications for Andean geodynamics and modes of deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decelles, P. G.; Carrapa, B.; Horton, B. K.; Gehrels, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Cenozoic strata in the central Andes of northwestern Argentina record the development and migration of a regional foreland basin system analogous to the modern Chaco-Paraná alluvial plain. Paleocene-lower Eocene fluvial and lacustrine deposits are overlain by middle-upper Eocene hypermature paleosols or an erosional disconformity representing 10-15 Myr. This `supersol/disconformity' zone is traceable over a 200,000 km2 area in the Andean thrust belt, and is overlain by 2-6 km of upward coarsening, eastward thinning, upper Eocene through lower Miocene fluvial and eolian deposits. Middle Miocene-Pliocene fluvial, lacustrine, and alluvial fan deposits occupy local depocenters with contractional growth structures. Paleocurrent and petrographic data demonstrate westerly provenance of quartzolithic and feldspatholithic sediments. Detrital zircon ages from Cenozoic sandstones cluster at 470-491, 522-544, 555-994, and 1024-1096 Ma. Proterozoic-Mesozoic clastic and igneous rocks in the Puna and Cordillera Oriental yield similar age clusters, and served as sources of the zircons in the Cenozoic deposits. Arc-derived zircons become prominent in Oligo-Miocene deposits and provide new chronostratigraphic constraints. Sediment accumulation rate increased from ˜20 m/Myr during Paleocene-Eocene time to 200-600 m/Myr during the middle to late Miocene. The new data suggest that a flexural foreland basin formed during Paleocene time and migrated at least 600 km eastward at an unsteady pace dictated by periods of abrupt eastward propagation of the orogenic strain front. Despite differences in deformation style between Bolivia and northwestern Argentina, lithosphere in these two regions flexed similarly in response to eastward encroachment of a comparable orogenic load beginning during late Paleocene time.

  14. Photosynthetic responses of trees in high-elevation forests: comparing evergreen species along an elevation gradient in the Central Andes

    PubMed Central

    García-Plazaola, José I.; Rojas, Roke; Christie, Duncan A.; Coopman, Rafael E.

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth at extremely high elevations is constrained by high daily thermal amplitude, strong solar radiation and water scarcity. These conditions are particularly harsh in the tropics, where the highest elevation treelines occur. In this environment, the maintenance of a positive carbon balance involves protecting the photosynthetic apparatus and taking advantage of any climatically favourable periods. To characterize photoprotective mechanisms at such high elevations, and particularly to address the question of whether these mechanisms are the same as those previously described in woody plants along extratropical treelines, we have studied photosynthetic responses in Polylepis tarapacana Philippi in the central Andes (18°S) along an elevational gradient from 4300 to 4900 m. For comparative purposes, this gradient has been complemented with a lower elevation site (3700 m) where another Polylepis species (P. rugulosa Bitter) occurs. During the daily cycle, two periods of photosynthetic activity were observed: one during the morning when, despite low temperatures, assimilation was high; and the second starting at noon when the stomata closed because of a rise in the vapour pressure deficit and thermal dissipation is prevalent over photosynthesis. From dawn to noon there was a decrease in the content of antenna pigments (chlorophyll b and neoxanthin), together with an increase in the content of xanthophyll cycle carotenoids. These results could be caused by a reduction in the antenna size along with an increase in photoprotection. Additionally, photoprotection was enhanced by a partial overnight retention of de-epoxized xanthophylls. The unique combination of all of these mechanisms made possible the efficient use of the favourable conditions during the morning while still providing enough protection for the rest of the day. This strategy differs completely from that of extratropical mountain trees, which uncouple light-harvesting and energy-use during long

  15. Erosion and Sediment Transport Across and Along Pronounced Topographic and Climatic Gradients: Examples from the Central Andes and Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred; Olen, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Moisture impinging on high topographic barriers results in effective orographic barriers. For example, the interaction of the Indian Monsoon with the southern Himalaya and the South American Monsoon System with the eastern central Andes result in some of the most efficient orographic barriers on Earth. The steep topographic gradients, the impact of focused rainfall along the southern and eastern flanks of the range, and the northward and westward shifts of rainfall during frequent intensified storm systems are responsible for an efficient erosional regime, with some of the highest known erosion rates. The spatiotemporal correlation between various topographic, tectonic, climatic, and exhumational phenomena in these regions has resulted in the formulation of models of possible long-term erosional and tectonic feedback processes that drive the lateral expansion and vertical growth of mountain belts. However, despite an increase in thermochronologic, cosmogenic radionuclide, and sedimentological datasets that help explain some underlying mechanisms, the true nature of these relationships is still unclear and controversies particularly exist concerning the importance of the different forcing factors that drive sediment transport on different time scales. Here, we synthesize and assess these controversies with observations from studies conducted perpendicular to and along strike of the orogens, and combine them with new basin-wide erosion-rate data from the Sutlej Valley in the NW Himalaya and from the southern central Andean Plateau (Puna) in NW Argentina. At first order and across strike, erosion rates based on cosmogenic nuclide inventories on river sands suggest a correlation with rainfall rates. But along-strike rainfall gradients in the Himalaya indicate additional moderating factors, such as vegetation. Leeward of the orographic barrier, fluvial erosion variability increases and erosion processes become more stochastic. Further leeward in the high-elevation and

  16. Constraining the Lithospheric Structure of the Central Andes Using P- and S- wave Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Central Andean Plateau (CAP) has elevations in excess of 3 km, and is part of the Andean Cordillera that resulted in part from shortening along the western edge of South America as it was compressed between the subducting Nazca plate and underthrusting Brazilian cratonic lithosphere. We calculated P- and S-wave receiver functions for the Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) temporary deployment of broadband seismometers in the Bolivian orocline (12°-20°S) region to investigate crustal thickness and lithospheric structure. Migration of the receiver functions is done using common conversion point (CCP) stacks through a 3D shear velocity model from ambient noise tomography (Ward et al., 2013). The P- and S-wave receiver functions provide similar estimates of the depth to Moho under the CAP. Crustal thicknesses include 60-65 km thick crust underneath the Bolivian Altiplano, crust that varies from ~70 km to ~50 km underneath the Eastern Cordillera and Interandean zone, and thins to 50 to 40 km crust in the Subandes and the edge of the foreland. The variable crustal thickness of the Eastern Cordillera and Interandean zone ranges from >70 km associated with the Los Frailes volcanic field at 19°-20°S to ~55 km beneath the 6 km peaks of the Cordillera Real at ~16°S. From our S-wave receiver functions, that have no multiples that can interfere with deeper structure, we also identify structures below the Moho. Along a SW-NE line that runs near La Paz where we have our highest station density, the S-wave CCP receiver-function stacks show a strong negative polarity arrival at a depth of ~120 km from the eastern edge of the Altiplano to the Subandean zone. We suggest this may be a good candidate for the base of the CAP lithosphere. In addition, above this depth the mantle is strongly layered, suggesting that there is not a simple high velocity mantle lithosphere associated with the continental lithosphere underthrusting the Andean orogen

  17. Soil n-alkane δD and Branched GDGTs Distributions Track Elevation-induced Precipitation and Temperature Changes along the South Central Andes (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Moreno, V.; Rohrmann, A.; van der Meer, M.; S Sinninghe Damsté, J.; Sachse, D.; Tofelde, S.; Niedermeyer, E. M.; Strecker, M. R.; Mulch, A.

    2015-12-01

    Orogenic surface uplift and topographic evolution of tectonically active mountain belts exert a strong impact on climatic teleconnections and Earth surface processes, including changes in global atmospheric circulation patterns, erosion rates, distribution of biomes, and precipitation patterns. Hence, quantifying the driving processes shaping the evolution of topography in ancient and active orogens is required in order to disentangle the dynamic interactions and feedbacks among surface uplift, climate, erosion and sedimentation. The south central Andes of Argentina provide a particularly suitable setting to study the interplay between the tectonic and climatic evolution of an actively subduction orogen over short and long time-scales. We present δD values of soil-derived n-alkane and brGDGTs distributions to assess their suitability for paleoelevation reconstructions in the southern central Andes. We collected soil samples from two different environmental and hydrological gradients, across the hillslope (26-28°S) and along a river-valley (22-24°S) of two individual mountain ranges. δD n-alkane and brGDGTs distributions are both linearly related with elevation and may be used for paleoaltimetry studies along the windward flanks of the south central Andes. δD n-alkane and brGDGT-derived temperature lapse rates broadly follow regional lapse rates along steep orographic fronts. The observed lapse rates are lower than the annual mean values of satellite-derived temperatures but approach those of temperature loggers along each transect. Instead, δD n-alkane lapse rates are in line with regional stream-water data. These linear relationships along the windward slopes break down when entering the internally drained part of the Puna plateau. Our data document that δD n-alkane and brGDGTs distributions can be used over time scales relevant for paleoclimate/-altimetry reconstructions but also stress that such reconstructions require knowledge of the depositional

  18. Magmatism and the Shallowing of the Chilean Flatslab in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magmatic history of the flatslab region between the Central and Southern Andean volcanic zones reflects shallowing of the slab, lithospheric thinning, narrowing of the asthenospheric wedge, crustal thickening and forearc removal by subduction erosion. Newly revised contours on the northern margin of the modern flatslab (Mulcahy et al. 2014) show the flattest part extends from ~28° to 33°S and is bounded by Pleistocene volcanic activity. An eastward broadening of the magmatic arc began after 18 Ma as westward drift of South America accelerated, but the most distinctive retroarc magmatism occurred after near normal subduction of the southward drifting Juan Fernandez Ridge began at ~11 Ma and ended as magmatism ceased in the Pampean ranges, ~ 700 km east of the trench at ~4.7 Ma. Recent seismic work in the retroarc area indicate a ~60 km thick crust under the Precordillera fold-thrust belt with transitions at ~20 and ~40 km that are considered to be the top of crystalline basement and an eclogitic facies transition. Chemical constraints from ~15-7 Ma magmatic rocks suggest eclogization is related to crustal thickening over the shallowing slab in accord with field relations for major thrusting in the region by ~8-7 Ma. High Ba/Th ratios in <9 Ma volcanic rocks are interpreted to reflect phengite breakdown in the mantle wedge with the fluids facilitating eclogization of the lower crust. Evidence for mantle melt contributions in the magmas up until ~7 Ma comes from more primitive isotopic values in 1088-1251 Ma amphibolite and granulite facies xenoliths (eNd = 0 to -3; 87Sr/86Sr =704-0.710) than in Miocene volcanic rocks (eNd = 0-1.7; 0.70325-0.70345; zircon eHf ~ 0). From ~8 to 3 Ma, the active volcanic arc front near 28°S and 33°S was translated ~ 40-50 km eastward in a suspected response to forearc removal by subduction erosion. Given the position of the arc and distance to the trench, the same amount of forearc was likely removed in the intervening flatslab

  19. Sedimentation and provenance of the Antofagasta region of the southern Puna Plateau, central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renjie; Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Sobel, Edward R.; Carrapa, Barbara; Davis, Donald W.

    2014-05-01

    Stratigraphic and provenance studies of Cenozoic non-marine sedimentary basins in the Central Andean Puna Plateau provide insight into the regional development and dynamics. The southern plateau hosts several poorly exposed intramontane basins bounded by basement-involved ~N-S striking thrust faults; their origin is explained differently by contrasting geodynamic models. This study focuses on the Antofagasta region (NW Argentina). The top of the studied basin was over-thrust by basement rocks along a west-dipping thrust fault, which was likely active during exhumation of the Calalaste range to the west (25-29 Ma, Carrapa et al., 2005). We studied three sections SW of Antofagasta de la Sierra. S3 (552 m) is the lowest section and is composed of mud playa to sandflat sediments, with at least two paleosol horizons. Lower S2 (1,263 m) contains ~300 meters of proximal alluvial fan sediments. Upper S2 is composed of fluvial to shallow lacustrine sediments. The separation between the top of S2 and the bottom of S1 (1,062 m) is ~540 m. The lower ~600 m of S1 is composed of thick, distal alluvial fan and braided river sediments. In the upper S1, the depositional environment changes to fluvial-alluvial, with a paleosol developed at the top of S1. Imbricated pebbles suggest prevailing eastward paleoflow. Modal compositions of 18 sandstones plot in the mixed zone on a Qm-F-Lt plot, and the transitional continental and recycled orogenic zones on a Qt-F-L plot (Dickinson, 1985). Their compositions cluster and do not show any evolutionary trends, despite being sampled from a ~3000 m-thick sedimentary column. However, when combined with data from the Quinoas Formation (Late Eocene to Late Oligocene) and the Chacras Formation (Late Oligocene to Early Miocene), outcropped west of the study site (Carrapa et al., 2005), the Antofagasta samples mark the beginning of an evolving trend towards the dissected arc and transitional arc zones. We analyzed U-Pb ages of detrital zircons from

  20. Stress patterns of the Plio-Quaternary brittle deformation along the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro Fault, Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, F.; Tibaldi, A.; Waite, G. P.; Corazzato, C.; Bonali, F.; Nardin, A.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the geometry and kinematics of the major structures of an orogen is essential to elucidate its style of deformation, as well as its tectonic evolution. We describe the temporal and spatial changes in the state of stress of the trans-orogen area of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT) Fault Zone in the Central Andes, at about 24° S within the northern portion of the Puna Plateau between the Argentina-Chile border. The importance of the COT derives principally from the Quaternary-Holocene activity recognized on some segments, which may shed new light on its possible control on Quaternary volcanism and on the seismic hazard assessment of the area. Field geological surveys along with kinematic analysis and numerical inversion of ~ 280 new fault-slip measurements have revealed that this portion of the COT consists mainly of NW-SE striking faults, which have been reactivated under three different kinematic regimes: 1) a Miocene transpressional phase with the maximum principal stress (σ1) chiefly trending NW-SE; 2) an extensional phase that started by 9 Ma, with a horizontal NW-SE-trending minimum principal stress (σ3) - permutations between σ2 and σ3 axes have been recognized at three sites - and 3) a left-lateral strike-slip phase with an ~ ENE-WSW σ1 and a ~ NNW-SSE σ3 dating to the late Pliocene-Quaternary. Spatially, in the Quaternary, the left-lateral component decreases toward the westernmost tip of the COT, where it transitions to extension; this produced to a N-S horst and graben structure. Hence, even if trascurrence is still active in the eastern portion of the COT, as focal mechanisms of crustal earthquakes indicate, our study demonstrates that extension is becoming the predominant structural style of deformation, at least in the western region. These major temporal and spatial changes in the tectonic regimes are attributed in part to changes in the magnitude of the boundary forces due to subduction processes. The overall perpendicular

  1. Regional Deformation of the Southern Puna Plateau, Central Andes, Recorded by Basin Evolution and Bedrock Exhumation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, R.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Sobel, E. R.; Carrapa, B.; Davis, D. W.; Glodny, J.; Stockli, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The regional deformation history of the southern Puna Plateau remains poorly constrained but is key to understanding the growth and dynamics of the central Andes, an important example of orogeny along a non-collisional plate boundary. Several lines of evidence lead us to propose that the southern Puna Plateau was occupied by an uninterrupted sedimentary basin during the late Eocene to early Oligocene (~38-28 Ma). First, oldest strata in the Antofagasta de la Sierra region (SW Puna) and the Pasto Ventura region (SE Puna) both contain little volcanic material, suggesting they predate the most recent arc activity at ~28 Ma. Second, detrital zircons from the Antofagasta de la Sierra region yield youngest U-Pb ages of ~39 Ma and detrital apatites from the Pasto Ventura region yield youngest fission-track ages of ~38 Ma, giving a maximum depositional age. Third, provenance analysis reveals a single, western source for the Antofagasta de la Sierra region (SW Puna) and dual, eastern and western sources for the Pasto Ventura region (SE Puna), supporting the presence of a regional basin. This regional basin was disrupted and compartmentalized by uplift of ~N-S trending bedrock ranges starting as early as in late Oligocene time. Bedrock samples from the eastern foot of the Sierra de Calalaste (SW Puna) yield an apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He age of 19.9±2.0 Ma, consistent with modeled apatite fission-track data that show onset of exhumation at ~25-20 Ma. Modeling of apatite fission-track and (U-Th-Sm)/He data shows that the Sierra Laguna Blanca (SE Puna) experienced exhumation at ~15-10 Ma, the youngest bedrock exhumation documented in the plateau region, implying that deformation and erosion of basement-bounding structures continued into the middle Miocene. We suggest that the post-late Eocene regional deformation history of the southern Puna Plateau documents an important dynamic shift from flexure-controlled foreland dynamics to flexure-limited broken foreland dynamics during the

  2. Characterizing Magmatic Sources in the Central Andes Volcanic Zone with a Regional InSAR Time Series Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. T.; Pritchard, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Central Andes Volcanic Zone (CVZ) contains many intriguing areas of ongoing crustal deformation detectable with InSAR. Foremost among these are the 1-2cm/yr radar line-of-sight (LOS) inflations near Uturuncu Volcano in Bolivia and the Lazufre volcanic area spanning the border of Chile and Argentina (Pritchard and Simons 2002). These two deformation sources are intriguing in that they are long-lived (>10yrs), have large diameters (>50km), and have modeled sources at mid-crustal depths (10-20km). For Uturuncu, the best-fitting source depths coincide with the seismically imaged Altiplano-Puna Magma Body (eg. Chimielowsi et al. 1999, Zandt et al. 2003). Regional InSAR time series analysis enables the spatial and temporal comparison of the Uturuncu and Lazufre signals with other deformations in a sub-region of the CVZ from 1992 to the present. Our study focuses on volcanic deformation, but we also resolve non-magmatic deformation signals including landslides and salars. The study region benefits from a large InSAR dataset of 631 ERS and ENVISAT interferograms, distributed between two descending tracks and two ascending tracks, covering up to 870 kilometers along the volcanic arc. We employ an inversion method based on the SBAS algorithm (Berardino 2002), but modified to avoid interpolation across dates with incoherent values. This modification effectively deals with the heterogeneous spatial extents and data gaps present in individual interferograms for long tracks. With our time series results we investigate the timing of possible magma migrations and we explore the parameters of forward models that match observations. Results indicate continuing monotonic inflation styles at Uturuncu and Lazufre with maximum LOS uplift at 1.0cm/yr and 2.5cm/yr respectively (Pritchard and Simons 2004, Froger et al. 2007, Ruch et al. 2009). We discuss evidence for 2mm/yr broad LOS deflation collocated with the Uturuncu inflation signal and comment on possible models for its origin

  3. Dynamics of a large, restless, rhyolitic magma system at Laguna del Maule, southern Andes, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Brad S.; Andersen, Nathan L.; Le Mével, Hélène; Feigl, Kurt L.; DeMets, Charles; Tikoff, Basil; Thurber, Clifford H.; Jicha, Brian R.; Cardonna, Carlos; Córdova, Loreto; Gil, Fernando; Unsworth, Martyn J.; Williams-Jones, Glyn; Miller, Craig W.; Fierstein, Judith; Hildreth, Edward; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Explosive eruptions of large-volume rhyolitic magma systems are common in the geologic record and pose a major potential threat to society. Unlike other natural hazards, such as earthquakes and tsunamis, a large rhyolitic volcano may provide warning signs long before a caldera-forming eruption occurs. Yet, these signs—and what they imply about magma-crust dynamics—are not well known. This is because we have learned how these systems form, grow, and erupt mainly from the study of ash flow tuffs deposited tens to hundreds of thousands of years ago or more, or from the geophysical imaging of the unerupted portions of the reservoirs beneath the associated calderas. The Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Chile, includes an unusually large and recent concentration of silicic eruptions. Since 2007, the crust there has been inflating at an astonishing rate of at least 25 cm/yr. This unique opportunity to investigate the dynamics of a large rhyolitic system while magma migration, reservoir growth, and crustal deformation are actively under way is stimulating a new international collaboration. Findings thus far lead to the hypothesis that the silicic vents have tapped an extensive layer of crystal-poor, rhyolitic melt that began to form atop a magmatic mush zone that was established by ca. 20 ka with a renewed phase of rhyolite eruptions during the Holocene. Modeling of surface deformation, magnetotelluric data, and gravity changes suggest that magma is currently intruding at a depth of ~5 km. The next phase of this investigation seeks to enlarge the sets of geophysical and geochemical data and to use these observations in numerical models of system dynamics.

  4. The Under-side of the Andes: Using Receiver Functions to Map the North Central Andean Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project is an interdisciplinary project to investigate connections between lithospheric removal, crustal shortening and surface uplift in the northern Bolivia and southern Peru region of the South American Andean orogen. The central Andes are defined by six major tectonomorphic provinces; the forearc, the volcanically active Western Cordillera (WC, ~6 km elevation), the internally drained Altiplano (~4 km elevation), an inactive fold and thrust belt in the Eastern Cordillera (EC, ~6 km elevation), a lower elevation active fold and thrust belt in the Subandean (SA) zone and the Beni, a foreland basin. Forty seismic stations installed for the CAUGHT project were deployed between 13° and 18° S latitude, covering the transition zone where the Altiplano region pinches out in southern Peru, in an effort to better constrain the changing character of the crust and mantle lithosphere. Geologic studies across the northern Bolivian portion of the eastern Andean margin (15-17° S) have documented a total of 275 km of upper crustal shortening (McQuarrie et al, Tectonics, v27, 2008), which may be associated with crustal thickening and/or the removal of lithospheric material as a thickened lithosphere root becomes unstable. For this receiver function (converted wave) study, we have little coverage in the forearc and foreland, ~75 km spacing in most of the array, and a relatively dense ~20 km spaced profile along the Charaña-La Paz-Yucumo transect, the eastern portion of which is nearly coincident with the balanced cross-section of McQuarrie et al. (2008). Using the first year of available data, more than 1200 receiver functions have been calculated using an iterative deconvolution method, and stacked using the common conversion point (CCP) method, along profiles parallel to and nearly coincident to those used for the geologic shortening estimates. We identified arrivals for the Moho and generated a 3D map of

  5. Rapid magma production rates, underplating and remelting in the Andes: isotopic evidence from northern-central Peru (9 11 °S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford, N.; Atherton, M. P.; Halliday, A. N.

    1996-03-01

    Combined strontium and neodymium isotope data on the Miocene-Pliocene Cordillera Blanca batholith (9-11 °S) are compared with acid plutonic and volcanic rocks of similar age and composition from the central Andes (ca. 16-23 °S). Although intruded through 50-60 km of continental crust the batholith rocks, which range in composition from quartz diorite to high silica leucogranodiorite, show little sign of contamination by mature continental basement. Initial {87Sr }/{86Sr } ratios define a range of 0.7041 to 0.7057, with average ɛNd values close to bulk earth (-0.5), over a relatively large range in SiO 2. It is difficult to reconcile the isotopic composition of the batholith rocks with simple AFC models involving fractionation of either clinopyroxene (deep-level) or plagioclase (high-level) dominated assemblages, and the isotopic variation in these rocks is instead considered to be inherited from a primary subcontinental lithosphere source through a two-stage process of crustal underplating and subsequent partial melting. Estimated (mantle) magma production rates during underplating are 0.1-0.3 km 3 yr -1. Comparisons with Miocene plutonic rocks from the western and eastern Cordillera at 11 °S show no clear trends in isotopic compositions in time or space. Furthermore, the isotopic compositions of Nd and Sr in the batholith rocks contrast strongly with basaltic to high silica volcanic and plutonic rocks of similar age exposed in the central Andes, where {143Nd }/{144Nd }and{87Sr }/{86Sr } are thought to reflect contamination of mantle-derived magmas and/or tectonic reworking of old basement material during crustal thickening. The lack of significant involvement of basement material in the petrogenesis of the batholith magmas may be due to differences in the mechanism of crustal thickening along the Andean chain during the Late Miocene, with thickening in the central Andes being caused predominantly by tectonic shortening, while in northern-central Peru

  6. Inversion of Pn travel times for lateral variations of moho geometry beneath the central Andes and comparison with the receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumont, David; Paul, Anne; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan L.

    We inverted the Pn travel times to characterize the geometry of the Moho along a profile across the Central Andes (20°S) where previous workers have estimated the crustal thickness using receiver functions. Contrary to receiver functions, this technique is not sensitive to the crustal Vs. Therefore, the comparison of the two approaches provides valuable complementary information. Overall, our results are in good agreement with those based on receiver functions. However, some important discrepancies are observed beneath the Western Cordillera and the Subandes, where we find crusts 10-km thinner than in previous models. We confirm that the central part of the orogen appears to be isostatically compensated by the presence of a thick crust. However, at both edges, the topography probably requires additional support, low-density mantle beneath the Western Cordillera and a strong flexural support of the Brazilian shield beneath the Subandes.

  7. Recent temperature trends in the South Central Andes reconstructed from sedimentary chrysophyte stomatocysts in Laguna Escondida (1742 m a.s.l., 38°28 S, Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Jong, R.; Schneider, T.; Hernández-Almeida, I.; Grosjean, M.

    2016-02-01

    In this study we present a quantitative, high resolution reconstruction of past austral winter length in the Chilean Andes at 38°S from AD 1920 to 2009. For Laguna Escondida, a nearly pristine lake situated on the flanks of the Andes at 1740 m above sea level, past variability in the duration of the winter season (Days T4 °C) was reconstructed. Because high elevation meteorological stations are absent in this region, the reconstruction provides novel insights into recent temperature trends in the central-southern Andes. As a cold-season temperature proxy, we used chrysophyte stomatocysts. This novel proxy for cold season temperature was so far applied successfully in the European Alps and Pyrenees but has not yet been tested in the Southern Hemisphere. The reconstruction in this study was based on a newly developed Transfer Function to estimate Days T4 °C (number of consecutive days with surface water temperatures at or below 4 °C) from sedimentary stomatocyst assemblages (R2boot = 0.8, RMSEPboot = 28.7 days (= half the standard deviation)). To develop a high quality TF model, sediment traps and thermistors were placed in thirty remote lakes along an altitude gradient (420-2040 m a.s.l.). Complete materials and data were collected in 24 lakes after one year. Detailed statistical analyses indicate that modern stomatocysts primarily respond to the length of the cold season. The TF model was then applied to the sedimentary stomatocysts from a 210Pb-dated short core of L. Escondida. Comparison to independent reanalysis data showed that reconstructed changes in Days T4°C provides detailed information on winter-spring temperature variability since AD 1920. The reconstruction shows that recent warming (onset in AD 1980) in the southern Chilean Andes was not exceptional in the context of the past century. This is in strong contrast to studies from the Northern Hemisphere. The finding is also in contrast to the cooling temperature trends which were detected using

  8. Reverse Faulting as a Crucial Mechanism for Magma Ascent in Compressional Volcanic Arcs: Field Examples from the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, F. A.; Gonzalez, G.; Cembrano, J. M.; Veloso, E. E.

    2010-12-01

    The nature of crustal deformation in active arcs and the feedback mechanisms between tectonics and magma transport constitute fundamental problems in the understanding of volcanic systems. Additionally, for geothermal energy exploration, a better understanding of how crustal architecture and stress field controls fluid ascent and heat transfer from deep levels to the surface is crucial. The Central Andes volcanic belt is an excellent, modern example of such systems but, the scarcity of good outcrops has limited our ability to define the relations between structure and volcanism. In the Salar de Atacama Basin of northern Chile, there are good exposures of folded and faulted Neogene units (continental sediments, volcanic rocks and ignimbrites) and reverse faults spatially and temporally related to volcanic edifices. The subsurface of the study area has been interpreted by previous authors as a thin-skinned, 6-8 km-deep, east-vergent compressional belt. We carried out structural mapping, Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) analyses, strain tensor analyses and fault-related fold kinematic modelling to assess the causal relationship between compressional deformation and magmatism in this region. Field observations indicate that the structures deformed progressively Oligocene-Miocene continental sedimentary units, the upper sedimentary infill of the Salar de Atacama basin (Pliocene-Present), and Pliocene-Pleistocene Ignimbrites. The topographic expression of the compressional belt corresponds to a set of subparallel, asymmetric, fault-related-folds, which can be seen in the field as prominent NS-trending ridges with heights ranging between 50 and 400 m. Furthermore, we found evidence of a ~100 km-long structure along the active magmatic arc, so-called Miscanti Fault. This fault represents the easternmost expression of the above mentioned compressional belt. Pleistocene-Holocene monogenetic cones and strato-volcanoes are located either at the hinge zone of fault

  9. Migrating Ignimbrite Flares in the Central Andes, Implications for Crustal Evolution Based on Chemical, Isotopic, Geochronological, and GIS-Based Volumetric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worner, G.; Brandmeier, M.; Freymuth, H.; Heistek, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Temporal and compositional patterns of Neogene ignimbrites in the Central Andes were analysed using GIS and geostatistical modelling based on 203 digitized ignimbrite sheets for which geochronological, geochemical, and Sr-Nd-Pb-isotopic data on pumices as well as Sr-O isotopes on minerals from selected samples were compiled and compared to compositional and isotopic data from andesite lavas. Composition, timing, volumes and sources of erupted ignimbrite deposits are thus constrained and magma volumes through space and time are calculated. The total erupted ignimbrite magma volume of 31,000 km3 (minimum value) in the past 30 Ma indicate an average magmatic addition of 20-30 km3*Ma/km, similar to the basaltic "base"-flux for arc magmatism. Ignimbrite flare-ups are, however, rather punctuated, short-lived events well separated in space and time. There is a clear N-S "younging" of ignimbrite pulses from N to S at 19-24 Ma, 13-14 Ma, 6-10 Ma and 3-6 Ma. Ignimbrite eruptions occurred in the wake of subduction of the Juan-Fernandez ridge on the Nazca Plate passing below the Central Andes from N to S. Low angle subduction caused compression and fluid release is followed by massive inflow and melting of asthenospheric mantle when the slab steepened again after the passing of the ridge. This in turn caused massive melting within the crust aided by advective heat transport. Differences in chemical and isotopic composition of the large-volume ignimbrites are related to changes in crustal thickness, and different "preconditioning" during the Andean orogeny at a given space in time. Isotope data and whole rock compositional data suggest a higher degree of crustal assimilation for the younger Altiplano ignimbrites in the S (c. 50%) compared to the older (22-19 Ma) ignimbrites in the N were the crustal component is significantly less (20%). REE compositions reflect changes in crustal thickness with a "transition" at c. 13-9 Ma that can be related to accelerated crustal shortening

  10. Studies in Neotropical Paleobotany. XV. A Mio-Pliocene palynoflora from the Eastern Cordillera, Bolivia: implications for the uplift history of the Central Andes.

    PubMed

    Graham, A; Gregory-Wodzicki, K M; Wright, K L

    2001-09-01

    An assemblage of 33 fossil pollen and spores, recovered from the 3600-m high Pislepampa locality of E. W. Berry, Eastern Cordillera, Bolivia, adds considerably to our knowledge of three aspects of the region in late Neogene time: (1) the paleovegetation, (2) the paleoclimate, and (3) the paleoelevation of the Central Andes. The plant microfossils recognized are Isoetes, Lycopodium (three types), Cnemidaria, Cyathea (three types), Grammitis, Hymenophyllum, Pteris, trilete fern spores (two types), Danaea, monolete fern spores (four types), Podocarpus, Gramineae, Palmae, Ilex, cf. Oreopanax, Cavanillesia, cf. Pereskia, Compositae (three types), Ericaceae, Tetrorchidium, and unknowns (three types). The diversity of the Compositae suggest that this flora has a maximum age around the Miocene-Pliocene boundary, that is, 6-7 million years. All members of the paleocommunity presently grow in the bosque montano húmedo (cloud forest) along the eastern slope of the Central Andes of Bolivia, which occurs between MATs (mean annual temperatures) of ∼10° and 20°C. The Pislepampa flora probably represents the lower limits of this forest because the fossil leaves collected by Berry from the same locality all have entire margins, suggesting that the flora grew near the cloud forest-tropical forest transition. Presently, the lower limit of the cloud forest forest has MATs of ∼20°C, a mean annual precipitation between 1000 and 1500 mm, and that part containing most of the identified genera of fossil pollen is found at elevations ∼1200-1400 m. These conditions are thus inferred for the Pislepampa flora; however, because of the uncertainty of the magnitude of global climate change and of possible changes in the ecological range of plant genera, we estimate an error of at least ±1000 m for the paleoelevation estimate. When the total uplift is corrected for probable amounts of erosionally driven isostatic rebound, the paleoelevation estimate suggests that from one-third to one

  11. Evaluation of TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) performance in the Central Andes region and its dependency on spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, M. L. M.; Rohrer, M.; Huggel, Ch.; Santos Villar, D.; Silvestre, E.; Huffman, G. J.

    2011-08-01

    Climate time series are of major importance for base line studies for climate change impact and adaptation projects. However, for instance, in mountain regions and in developing countries there exist significant gaps in ground based climate records in space and time. Specifically, in the Peruvian Andes spatially and temporally coherent precipitation information is a prerequisite for ongoing climate change adaptation projects in the fields of water resources, disasters and food security. The present work aims at evaluating the ability of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) to estimate precipitation rates at daily 0.25° × 0.25° scale in the Central Andes and the dependency of the estimate performance on changing spatial and temporal resolution. Comparison of the TMPA product with gauge measurements in the regions of Cuzco, Peru and La Paz, Bolivia were carried out and analysed statistically. Large biases are identified in both investigation areas in the estimation of daily precipitation amounts. The occurrence of strong precipitation events was well assessed, but their intensities were underestimated. TMPA estimates for La Paz show high false alarm ratio. The dependency of the TMPA estimate quality with changing resolution was analysed by comparisons of 1-, 7-, 15- and 30-day sums for Cuzco, Peru. The correlation of TMPA estimates with ground data increases strongly and almost linearly with temporal aggregation. The spatial aggregation to 0.5°, 0.75° and 1° grid box averaged precipitation and its comparison to gauge data of the same areas revealed no significant change in correlation coefficients and estimate performance. In order to profit from the TMPA combination product on a daily basis, a procedure to blend it with daily precipitation gauge measurements is proposed. Different sources of errors and uncertainties introduced by the sensors, sensor-specific algorithm aspects and the TMPA processing scheme

  12. Evaluation of TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) performance in the Central Andes region and its dependency on spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, M. L. M.; Rohrer, M.; Huggel, C.; Santos Villar, D.; Silvestre, E.; Huffman, G. J.

    2010-10-01

    Climate time series are of major importance for base line studies for climate change impact and adaptation projects. However, in mountain regions and in developing countries there exist significant gaps in ground based climate records in space and time. Specifically, in the Peruvian Andes spatially and temporally coherent precipitation information is a prerequisite for ongoing climate change adaptation projects in the fields of water resources, disasters and food security. The present work aims at evaluating the ability of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) to estimate precipitation rates at daily 0.25° × 0.25° scale in the Central Andes and the dependency of the estimate performance on changing spatial and temporal resolution. Comparison of the TMPA product with gauge measurements in the regions of Cuzco, Peru and La Paz, Bolivia were carried out and analysed statistically. Large biases are identified in both investigation areas in the estimation of daily precipitation amounts. The occurrence of strong precipitation events was well assessed, but their intensities were underestimated. TMPA estimates for La Paz show high false alarm ratio. The dependency of the TMPA estimate quality with changing resolution was analysed by comparisons of 1-, 7-, 15- and 30-day sums for Cuzco, Peru. The correlation of TMPA estimates with ground data increases strongly and almost linearly with temporal aggregation. The spatial aggregation to 0.5°, 0.75° and 1° grid box averaged precipitation and its comparison to gauge data of the same areas revealed no significant change in correlation coefficients and estimate performance. In order to profit from the TMPA combination product on a daily basis, a procedure to blend it with daily precipitation gauge measurements is proposed. Different sources of errors and uncertainties introduced by the sensors, sensor-specific algorithm aspects and the TMPA processing scheme are discussed

  13. A new tectonic model for the development of the Eastern Cordillera, Altiplano, and Subandean zones, Bolivian Central Andes, 20[degrees]S latitude

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbels, T.L.; Isacks, B.L. ); Koch, R.W. )

    1993-02-01

    Construction of a regional transect across the central Andes at 20[degrees]S sheds new light on the relationship between the Altiplano, Eastern Cordillera (EC), and Subandean zones and allows us to refine the two-stage model of Isacks (1988) for the growth of the Central Andes. This new model is based on examination of the regional geology and geophysics, coupled with field investigations, satellite image analysis, and new Ar-Ar geochronology. In this model, widespread Oligocene to mid-Miocene compressional deformation in the Altiplano and EC was followed in the late-Miocene and Pliocene by thrusting localized east of the EC within the Subandean fold-thrust belt. During the first stage of deformation, the Altiplano basin underwent important subsidence and internal deformation. The EC was both deformed internally and thrust westwards over the Altiplano basin, while the present Subandean zone was the site of an early, broad foreland basin which received material eroded from the EC. During the second stage, beginning at [approximately]10 ma, deformation terminated within the EC and became concentrated within the fold-thrust belt in response to large scale overthrusting of the EC above the Brazilian shield; this resulted in major thrusting along the Cabalgamiento Frontal Principal (CFP), which soles into the master Subandean decollement, and [approximately]100 km of telescoping within the early, broad foreland basin. In the EC, this second stage is marked by the elaboration of a regionally extensive erosion surface, ponding of gravels in shallow basins, and the emplacement of giant ignimbrite sheets. The Eastern Cordillera can thus be thought of as a crustal-scale wedge which has been extruded upward and outward on alternate sides during successive stages of late Cenozoic deformation. This motion has served to drive subsidence in both the Altiplano and Subandean foreland basins, as well as shortening in the fold-thrust belt.

  14. Neotectonic reactivation of the western section of the Malargüe fold and thrust belt (Tromen volcanic plateau, Southern Central Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagripanti, Lucía; Rojas Vera, Emilio A.; Gianni, Guido M.; Folguera, Andrés; Harvey, Jonathan E.; Farías, Marcelo; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-03-01

    This study examines the neotectonic deformation and development of the Tromen massif, a Quaternary retroarc volcanic field located in the western section of the Malargüe fold and thrust belt in the Southern Central Andes. The linkages between neotectonic deformation in the intra-arc zone and the recent retroarc structures of the Tromen volcanic plateau are not clearly understood. These retroarc deformations affect the mid-section of the fold and thrust belt, leaving to the east a 200 km-wide deformed zone that can be considered inactive over the last 12-10 Ma. This out-of-sequence deformation west of the orogenic front area has not been previously addressed in detail. In this study, exhaustive mapping is used to describe and discriminate structures with a neotectonic component from those fossilized by Pleistocene strata. Two balanced cross-sections are constructed showing the distribution of the youngest deformations and their relation to pre-Miocene structures. An important means for evaluating this is the morphometric and morphological analyses that allowed identification of perturbations in the fluvial network associated with active structures. In a broader perspective, neotectonic activity in the fold and thrust belt is discussed and inferred to be caused by local mechanical weakening of the retroarc zone, due to injection of asthenospheric material evidenced by magnetotelluric surveys. Thus, deformation imposed by the oblique convergence between South American and Nazca plates, while to the south being limited to the Liquiñe-Ofqui fault system that runs through the arc zone, in the retroarc area is located at the site of magmatic emplacement, presumably in association with a thermally weakened-upper crust. This control exemplifies the relationship that exists between surficial processes, magmatic emplacement and upper asthenospheric dynamics in the Southern Central Andes.

  15. Can stable isotopes ride out the storms? The role of convection for water isotopes in models, records, and paleoaltimetry studies in the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, Alexander; Strecker, Manfred R.; Bookhagen, Bodo; Mulch, Andreas; Sachse, Dirk; Pingel, Heiko; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Schilgen, Taylor F.; Montero, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    Globally, changes in stable isotope ratios of oxygen and hydrogen (δ18O and δD) in the meteoric water cycle result from distillation and evaporation processes. Isotope fractionation occurs when air masses rise in elevation, cool, and reduce their water-vapor holding capacity with decreasing temperature. As such, d18O and dD values from a variety of sedimentary archives are often used to reconstruct changes in continental paleohydrology as well as paleoaltimetry of mountain ranges. Based on 234 stream-water samples, we demonstrate that areas experiencing deep convective storms in the eastern south-central Andes (22 - 28° S) do not show the commonly observed relationship between δ18O and δD with elevation. These convective storms arise from intermontane basins, where diurnal heating forces warm air masses upward, resulting in cloudbursts and raindrop evaporation. Especially at the boundary between the tropical and extra-tropical atmospheric circulation regimes where deep-convective storms are very common (~ 26° to 32° N and S), the impact of such storms may yield non-systematic stable isotope-elevation relationships as convection dominates over adiabatic lifting of air masses. Because convective storms can reduce or mask the depletion of heavy isotopes in precipitation as a function of elevation, linking modern or past topography to patterns of stable isotope proxy records can be compromised in mountainous regions, and atmospheric circulation models attempting to predict stable isotope patterns must have sufficiently high spatial resolution to capture the fractionation dynamics of convective cells. Rohrmann, A. et al. Can stable isotopes ride out the storms? The role of convection for water isotopes in models, records, and paleoaltimetry studies in the central Andes. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 407, 187-195 (2014).

  16. Topaz magmatic crystallization in rhyolites of the Central Andes (Chivinar volcanic complex, NW Argentina): Constraints from texture, mineralogy and rock chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioncada, Anna; Orlandi, Paolo; Vezzoli, Luigina; Omarini, Ricardo H.; Mazzuoli, Roberto; Lopez-Azarevich, Vanina; Sureda, Ricardo; Azarevich, Miguel; Acocella, Valerio; Ruch, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Topaz-bearing rhyolite lavas were erupted as domes and cryptodomes during the early history of the Late Miocene Chivinar volcano, in Central Andes. These are the only topaz rhyolite lavas recognized in Central Andes. Textural, mineralogical and geochemical data on the Chivinar rhyolites suggest that topaz crystallized from strongly residual, fluorine-rich, peraluminous silicate melts of topazite composition before the complete solidification of the lava domes. Crystallization of the rhyolitic magma began with sodic plagioclase and alkali feldspar phenocrysts in the magma chamber, followed by groundmass quartz + alkali feldspar + minor sodic plagioclase during dome emplacement, and terminated with quartz + topaz + vapour bubbles forming small scattered miaroles. Fluorine partitioning into the fluid phase occurred only in the final stage of groundmass crystallization. The magmatic origin of topaz indicates the presence of a fluorine-rich highly differentiated magma in the early history of the Chivinar volcano and suggests the possibility of rare metals mineralizations related to the cooling and solidification of a silicic magma chamber. A late fluid circulation phase, pre-dating the andesitic phase of the Chivinar volcano, affected part of the topaz rhyolite lavas. The presence of Nb, Ta and Mn minerals as primary accessories in the rhyolites and as secondary minerals in veins suggests a connection of the fluid circulation phase with the silicic magmatic system. Although at the edge of the active volcanic arc, the Chivinar topaz rhyolites are in correspondence of the transtensive Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system, suggesting preferred extensional conditions for the formation of magmatic topaz in convergent settings, consistently with evidence from other known cases worldwide.

  17. Linking Modern, Rapid, Surface Uplift at the Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Chilean Andes, to Rhyolitic Magma-Driven Uplift Spanning the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.; Tikoff, B.; Le Mével, H.; Andersen, N. L.; Cordova, L.; Licciardi, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field includes an unusually large and recent concentration of silicic eruptions across a 23x17 km lake basin atop the southern Andes. We present findings that allow us to link currently observed deformation with a geological record of surface change spanning the Holocene. Since 2007 the crust here has been inflating at more than 20 cm/y. Geological, petrological, and geophysical findings have led to the hypothesis that the silicic vents have tapped an extensive, but ephemeral, layer of crystal-poor rhyolitic melt that began to form atop a mush zone that was established by ~20 ka, with a renewed phase of rhyolite eruptions concentrated around the southern flank of the basin during the Holocene (Singer et al., 2014). One of the earliest rhyolites, the 1 km3 Espejos coulée, 40Ar/39Ar-dated at 19 ka, dammed the northern outlet of Laguna del Maule raising the lake level ~200 m to form a prominent basin-wide shoreline. This shoreline was abandoned during an outbreak flood in the earliest Holocene. Surface exposure and 14C dating underway aims to refine the timing of the drop in lake level. Using an initial series of 40 short static GPS measurements around the basin, referenced to a set of 5 continuous GPS receivers, the elevation of this paleo-shoreline was determined to be 67 m higher at the southern end of the lake compared to the north. Interpretations of current surface deformation (Le Mével et al., in press), magnetotelluric data, earthquake distribution, and gravity changes suggest that magma is currently intruding at about 0.03 km3/yr at ~5 km depth. The amount of magma required to raise the surface 2 m during 8 yr is ~0.25 km3. If similar episodes of intrusion raised the roof of the magma reservoir by >60 m during the Holocene, it implies: (1) rapid accumulation of ~6 km3 of magma within the shallow crust, and (2) the locus of magma intrusion has shifted northward several km during the last 10 ky. It remains unclear whether any of

  18. Orographic barrier development along the eastern flanks of the southern central Andes, Argentina: new insights from stable hydrogen isotopes in hydrated volcanic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingel, H.; Mulch, A.; Strecker, M. R.; Cottle, J. M.; Rohrmann, A.; Alonso, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Andes constitute one of the most important orographic barriers in the S hemisphere, which impacts atmospheric circulation, the amount and distribution of rainfall, and resulting surface processes. In the central Andes of Argentina the orogenic Puna Plateau and the intermontane basins within the adjacent Eastern Cordillera (EC) constitute archives that furnish spatiotemporal information on the uplift of the orogen and ensuing paleoenvironmental changes. Presently, rainfall in NW Argentina is focused along the windward flanks of the EC, while its intermontane basins and the Puna constitute high-elevation regions with decreasing rainfall and steep topographic gradients. The influence of topography on hydrologic conditions is reflected in the stable isotopic composition of meteoric water. Importantly, in light of these systematic present-day isotope characteristics, proxy materials retrieved from basin strata may record analogous conditions in the past and provide insight concerning topographic growth through time. Here, we present isotopic data of volcanic glass (δDg), extracted from volcanic ash deposits interbedded with strata in different sedimentary basins across the E flank of the plateau. Combined with geochronology, our data show clear spatiotemporal variations in δDg within the different basins that are correlated with regional topographic growth and associated orographic effects during the Mio-Pliocene. For example, the Humahuaca basin (23.5°S) shows a gradual δDg-decrease that documents uplift of the basin catchment and possibly enhanced rainout along a paleo-Andean front, followed by a strong shift towards modern δDg values (-100‰) after 3 Ma, associated with aridification due to range uplift and orographic shielding to the E. In the Angastaco basin (25.5°S), δDg is more variable prior to 3.5 Ma (-70 to -95‰). Conditions similar to today (-65‰) were established by at least 1 Ma. Isotopic and sedimentologic data from the Toro basin (24.5

  19. The origin of the Loncopué Trough in the retroarc of the Southern Central Andes from field, geophysical and geochemical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Vera, E. A.; Sellés, D.; Folguera, A.; Gímenez, M.; Ruíz, F.; Orts, D.; Zamora Valcarce, G.; Martínez, P.; Bechis, F.; Ramos, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    This work analyzes through field, geophysical, geochemical and geochronological data, a particular setting of the Southern Andes in which an extensional system is flanking the mountain front. This setting is represented by the Loncopué Trough, whose origin is discussed for this part of the Andes. This work reconstructs 3-dimensionally the structure of this basin and its evolution through time, since Jurassic times as a series of isolated depocenters, to Late Cretaceous-Eocene times with the construction of a positive relief that subsequently was relaxed through two extensional stages during the late Oligocene-early Miocene and the Pliocene-Quaternary respectively. The last episode of extension is characterized by an initial stage with a series of caldera-collapses in the latest Pliocene-early Quaternary. This passed to a stage of development of a broad basaltic plateau in pre- and inter-glacial times, circumscribed with new radiometric data to the Pleistocene. Quaternary products in northern and central Loncopué Trough have chemical relations that are intermediate between the arc front and the southern Loncopué Trough volcanic rocks studied in previous works. Thus, retroarc eruptions would be part of an extended arc configuration that goes from typical arc series in the northern part of the trough to within-plate series in the south. Low elastic thicknesses computed from gravity data in this work correlate with the area of retroarc volcanic activity. Magnetic data have allowed determining the Curie isotherm, showing two areas of relatively abnormal heat flow, one along the Loncopué Trough itself and the other in the foreland zone. This scenario is discussed through three main hypotheses: an occurrence linked to a slab-steepening after a shallow subduction in the area; co-seismic crustal stretching linked to giant earthquakes in the subduction zone; and, finally slab-tearing associated with asthenospheric upwelling.

  20. Fissural volcanism, polygenetic volcanic fields, and crustal thickness in the Payen Volcanic Complex on the central Andes foreland (Mendoza, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarini, F.; Fornaciai, A.; Bistacchi, A.; Pasquarè, F. A.

    2008-09-01

    Shield volcanoes, caldera-bearing stratovolcanoes, and monogenetic cones compose the large fissural Payen Volcanic Complex, located in the Andes foreland between latitude 35°S and 38°S. The late Pliocene-Pleistocene and recent volcanic activity along E-W trending eruptive fissures produced basaltic lavas showing a within-plate geochemical signature. The spatial distribution of fractures and monogenetic vents is characterized by self-similar clustering with well defined power law distributions. Vents have average spacing of 1.27 km and fractal exponent D = 1.33 defined in the range 0.7-49.3 km. The fractal exponent of fractures is 1.62 in the range 1.5-48.1 km. The upper cutoffs of fractures and vent fractal distributions (about 48-49 km) scale to the crustal thickness in the area, as derived from geophysical data. This analysis determines fractured media (crust) thickness associated with basaltic retroarc eruptions. We propose that the Payen Volcanic Complex was and is still active under an E-W crustal shortening regime.

  1. Applications of clumped-isotope thermometry: Precipitation season as a control on the timing of pedogenic carbonate growth in the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgener, L. K.; Huntington, K. W.; Hoke, G. D.; Schauer, A. J.; Samek, K.

    2013-12-01

    Pedogenic carbonates are an important source of near-surface paleotemperature records, which inform our understanding of how continental climate and tectonics have evolved through time; however, accurate interpretation of paleosol isotope/temperature records depends on an understanding of the seasonality of soil carbonate precipitation. Although several studies have presented evidence of a warm-season bias in the timing of soil carbonate growth from different locations around the globe, a recent clumped-isotope thermometry (T(Δ47)) study of Holocene soil carbonates from the central Andes in Argentina (~33 °S) suggests that soil carbonate formation may depend in part on the seasonality of precipitation and soil de-watering. While T(Δ47) values for Holocene soil carbonates collected above 2 km elevation reflect summer soil temperatures (consistent with the timing of soil drying after the winter precipitation season), values for soil carbonates collected below 2 km are near mean annual soil temperature. Previous researchers hypothesized that these results reflect the dominance of summer precipitation below 2 km; however, vegetation, soil texture, and the influence of snowmelt on soil moisture vary with elevation in this area and may also influence the timing and temperature of soil carbonate formation. We address this issue with new T(Δ47) data for Holocene soil carbonates from an elevation transect similar in climate and geology to the study area in central Argentina, but with a single moisture source and a uniform (winter) wet season on the western flank of the Andes in north-central Chile (~29 °S). The new sample suite spans a transect covering a ~4 km of relief and an 18 °C range in mean annual air temperature. δ13C and δ18O results from carbonates collected at 20 to 100 cm depths become progressively more enriched near the surface, confirming that the samples come from undisturbed profiles. Preliminary T(Δ47) results from carbonates collected at 60 cm

  2. Hydro-isostatic deflection and tectonic tilting in the central Andes: Initial results of a GPS survey of Lake Minchin shorelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bills, Bruce G.; De Silva, Shanaka L.; Currey, Donald R.; Emenger, Robert S.; Lillquist, Karl D.; Donnellan, Andrea; Worden, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Sufficiently large lake loads provide a means of probing rheological stratification of the crust and upper mantle. Lake Minchin was the largest of the late Pleistocene pluvial lakes in the central Andes. Prominent shorelines, which formed during temporary still-stands in the climatically driven lake level history, preserve records of lateral variations in subsequent net vertical motions. At its maximum extent the lake was 140 m deep and spanned 400 km N-S and 200 km E-R. The load of surficial water contained in Lake Minchin was sufficient to depress the crust and underlying mantle by 20-40 m, depending on the subjacent rheology. Any other differential vertical motions will also be recorded as departures from horizontality of the shorelines. We recently conducted a survey of shoreline elevations of Lake Minchin with the express intent of monitoring the hydro-isostatic deflection and tectonic tilting. Using real-time differential Global Positioning System (GPS), we measured topographic profiles across suites of shorelines at 15 widely separated locations throughout the basin. Horizontal and vertical accuracies attained are roughly 30 and 70 cm, respectively. Geomorphic evidence suggests that the highest shoreline was occupied only briefly (probably less than 200 years) and radiocarbon dates on gastropod shells found in association with the shore deposits constrain the age to roughly 17 kyr. The basin-side pattern of elevations of the highest shoreline is composed of two distinct signals: (27 +/- 1) m of hydro-isostatic deflection due to the lake load, and a planar tilt with east and north components of (6.8 +/- 0.4) 10(exp -5) and 9-5.3 +/- 0.3) 10(exp -5). This rate of tilting is too high to be plausibly attributed to steady tectonism, and presumably reflects some unresolved combination of tectonism plus the effects of oceanic and lacustrine loads on a laterally heterogeneous substrate. The history of lake level fluctuations is still inadequately known to allow

  3. Applications of satellite imagery and digital topography to the construction of a crustal-scale transect across the central Andes at 20[degrees]S latitude

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbels, T.L.; Isacks, B.L. ); Ellis, J.M. )

    1993-02-01

    The central Andean plateau is one of the Earth's most remote and poorly mapped regions. The plateau has an average elevation of 3.7 km, and extends from central Peru to at least 30[degrees]S latitude. The plateau and flanking Subandean foldthrust belt (FTB) reach their greatest width near 20[degrees]S, and at this latitude both the FTB and the basin within the plateau (Altiplano basin) are areas of active hydrocarbon exploration. We have used Landsat TM imagery, stereoscopic SPOT imagery, and digital topography to construct a crustal-scale transect across the central Andes in order to better understand Andean tectonics at this latitude. Beginning at the Peru-Chile trench and continuing to the east, the transect crosses the Coastal Cordillera, Longitudinal Valley, Active Magmatic Arc, Altiplano basin, Eastern Cordillera, Subandean fold-thrust belt, and Subandean foreland basin. A digital elevation model across the entire region illustrates that the magmatic arc, Altiplano basin, and Eastern cordillera all lie within the plateau region. Satellite imagery across the transect illustrates the characteristic geology, structure, and geomorphology of each of the major morphotectonic regions, as well as the nature of their boundaries. The transect has led us to a number of new insights on Andean tectonics at this latitude. Most importantly, it supports a two-stage model of Andean Cenozoic growth in which a widespread Oligocene to mid-Miocene compressional deformation in the Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera is followed in the late Miocene and Pliocene by thrusting localized east of the Eastern Cordillera, forming the Subandean fold-thrust belt.

  4. Late Miocene high and rapid surface uplift and its erosional response in the Andes of central Chile (33°-35°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FaríAs, Marcelo; Charrier, Reynaldo; Carretier, SéBastien; Martinod, Joseph; Fock, AndréS.; Campbell, David; CáCeres, JoaquíN.; Comte, Diana

    2008-02-01

    We address the question of the late Cenozoic geomorphological evolution of the central Chile Andes (33°-35°S), using uplift markers, river incision, previous and new ages of volcanic bodies, and new fission track ages. The uplift markers consist of relicts of high elevated peneplains that evidence >2 km of regional surface uplift lasting ˜2 Ma with variable amount along an E-W transect. The eastern Coastal Cordillera was uplifted 1.5-2.1 km at 33-34°S and <1 km at 35°S, the western Principal Cordillera was uplifted ˜2 km, and the central eastern Principal Cordillera was uplifted >2.5 at 33°45'S and ˜1.5 km at 34°30'S. Erosional response to uplift was characterized by the retreat of a sharp knickpoint with celerities between 10 and 40 mm a-1. Extrapolation using a stream power law shows that uplift began shortly before 4 Ma or at 10.5-4.6 Ma (7.6 Ma central age) depending on the morphostructural units involved. The first alternative implies simultaneous uplift of the continental margin. The second model (the most reliable one) implies that the uplift affected together the eastern Coastal Cordillera and the Principal Cordillera, while the rest of the western fore arc subsided. This regional uplift can be mostly balanced by crustal thickening resulting from coeval shortening related to the out-of-sequence thrusting event in the Principal Cordillera and the uplift of the Frontal Cordillera. Simultaneously, emplacement of the southern edge of the flat slab subduction zone might have partially contributed to this uplift event.

  5. Surnames and genetic structure of a high-altitude Quechua community from the Ichu River Valley, Peruvian Central Andes, 1825-1914.

    PubMed

    Pettener, D; Pastor, S; Tarazona-Santos, E

    1998-10-01

    Changes in isolation, inbreeding, population subdivision, and isonymous relationships are examined in six Quechua communities from the upper valley of the Ichu River in the Peruvian Central Andes (3700 m). All marriages registered between 1825 and 1914 in the Parish of Santa Ana were analyzed. The data (1680 marriages) were divided into 2 periods (1825-1870 and 1871-1914) and into the 6 villages that constitute the parish. Endogamy rates are between 81% and 100%, indicating high levels of reproductive isolation. The inbreeding indicated by isonymy (Ft, Fr, and Fn) is lower than in other mountain populations studied. Isonymy values, calculated from the different surname combinations made possible by the Ibero-American Surnames System, indicate a strong rejection of consanguineous marriages, particularly between patrilineal relatives, in agreement with the parental structure typical of Andean populations. The comparison between observed and expected repeated-pair values reveals a moderate level of subdivision within populations, which could be related to cultural and socioeconomic factors. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling was used to investigate temporal changes in the isonymous relationships among the communities. The results reveal a decrease in the interpopulational variability measured by surnames, in agreement with an increase in exogamy. Surnames and data contained in historical and demographic records yield reliable information, and they can be used to reconstruct the biological history of Amerindian populations over the last few centuries. PMID:9780516

  6. Tectonic inversion and magmatism in the Lautaro Basin, northern Chile, Central Andes: A comparative approach from field data and analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Fernando; Bonini, Marco; Montanari, Domenico; Corti, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a series of analog models addressing the relationships between tectonic inversion and magmatism, taking the Lautaro Basin in northern Chile (27-28° S), Central Andes as a natural case. The experiments consisted of extension and orthogonal shortening of sand-silicone models to reproduce the tectonic inversion of a previous extensional system synchronous with the emplacement of analog magma. We analyzed how the variation in the rate of magma intrusion, shortening, and syn-compressive sedimentation may affect the final configuration of an inverted system, and the results were compared with field observations. Our results showed that (i) folding of syn-rift deposits and increased steepness of the master faults accommodate the shortening of the extensional system, (ii) magmatic intrusions condition the final geometries (top view and cross-section) of inverted normal faults in the models and in the Lautaro Basin, (iii) magma tends to migrate preferentially along the inverted faults, and accumulates beneath the faults and in the core of the inversion anticlines, (iv) the syn-inversion magmatism may indicate the migration pathways, which favor major lubrication and slip on the structures during their reactivation.

  7. Clay mineralogy and thermal history of the Neogene Vinchina Basin, central Andes of Argentina: Analysis of factors controlling the heating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collo, Gilda; DáVila, Federico M.; Nóbile, Julieta; Astini, Ricardo A.; Gehrels, George

    2011-08-01

    The Vinchina Foreland Basin, western Argentina, contains a ˜7 km thick nonmarine stratigraphy, chronologically constrained within the Mio-Pliocene (circa 19-3.4 Ma), and where distribution of Illite/Smectite interstratified phases has shown a progressive smectite-illitization progress (R0 → R1 → R3), is consistent with an incipient burial history. R0 represents randomly mixed-layered illite/smectite normally found at shallow depths, as this ordering is not stable at ˜120°C. In the Vinchina Basin, however, the R0 is still persistent at ˜7 km depth, and its appearance even in the deepest levels is consistent with previous interpretations of low burial temperatures based on thermochronologic studies of detrital apatites. The maximum paleotemperature estimation and basin depth imply geothermal gradient as low as ˜15°C/km, which allowed an estimate of heat flow values between 33 and 42 mW/m2, that would rise to between ˜40 and 51 mW/m2 when the sedimentation rate (thermal blanketing) is taken into account. These values were only reported for cold basins and represent a paleothermal state of a refrigerated lithosphere. We suggest the central Andes were dominated since the Miocene by heat transfer derived mostly from crustal contributions with a minimum input from the asthenosphere. This refrigerated lithosphere is typical of segments affected by flat subduction. Preliminary thermal models based on previous geodynamic approaches support our conclusions.

  8. Improved 3D density modelling of the Central Andes from combining terrestrial datasets with satellite based datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Theresa; Sobiesiak, Monika; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Ebbing, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    As horizontal gravity gradients are proxies for large stresses, the uniquely high gravity gradients of the South American continental margin seem to be indicative for the frequently occurring large earthquakes at this plate boundary. It has been observed that these earthquakes can break repeatedly the same respective segment but can also combine to form M>9 earthquakes at the end of longer seismic cycles. A large seismic gap left behind by the 1877 M~9 earthquake existed in the northernmost part of Chile. This gap has partially been ruptured in the Mw 7.7 2007 Tocopilla earthquake and the Mw 8.2 2014 Pisagua earthquake. The nature of this seismological segmentation and the distribution of energy release in an earthquake is part of ongoing research. It can be assumed that both features are related to thickness variations of high density bodies located in the continental crust of the coastal area. These batholiths produce a clear maximum in the gravity signal. Those maxima also show a good spatial correlation with seismic asperity structures and seismological segment boundaries. Understanding of the tectonic situation can be improved through 3D forward density modelling of the gravity field. Problems arise in areas with less ground measurements. Especially in the high Andes severe gaps exist due to the inaccessibility of some regions. Also the transition zone between on and offshore date data displays significant problems, particularly since this is the area that is most interesting in terms of seismic hazard. We modelled the continental and oceanic crust and upper mantle using different gravity datasets. The first one includes terrestrial data measured at a station spacing of 5 km or less along all passable roads combined with satellite altimetry data offshore. The second data set is the newly released EIGEN-6C4 which combines the latest satellite data with ground measurements. The spherical harmonics maximum degree of EIGEN-6C4 is 2190 which corresponds to a

  9. Tectonic styles and crustal shortening of the Central Andes "Pampean" flat-slab segment in northern Chile (27-29°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Fernando; Arriagada, César; Peña, Matías; Deckart, Katja; Charrier, Reynaldo

    2016-01-01

    The Andean orogenic belt, located in the Central Andes "Pampean flat-slab" segment in northern Chile (27-29°S), is composed of two major tectonic regions: the Coastal Cordillera and the Frontal Cordillera. To understand their internal tectonic styles, history of growth and the shortening absorbed by the upper crustal structure of this segment, we combined regional geological mapping data, new ages obtained from radiometric U-Pb dating, and a semibalanced and restored cross-section 225.18 km in length. The results as shown in the previous Mesozoic extensional fault systems, established in northern Chile by the Gondwana breakup, have played a fundamental role in the orogenic buildup. The central structure is characterized by an asymmetric basin (Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene) confined by a doubly vergent fault system composed of inverted faults related to the edges of the Mesozoic Chañarcillo and Lautaro Basins. The U-Pb geochronological data obtained from synorogenic volcano-sedimentary deposits and the angular unconformities recorded between the Cenozoic geological units have revealed that the compressive deformation in this segment started at around ~ 80 Ma by tectonic inversion in the eastern Coastal Cordillera and western Frontal Cordillera, however, the presence of Paleocene and Miocene synorogenic successions at the footwall of the basement reverse faults of the Frontal Cordillera suggests a migration of Andean deformation from the west to the east during the Paleocene-Miocene by propagation of ramps involving inherited basement highs. The pre-compression restoration makes it possible to estimate 40.94 km of minimum shortening, concentrated by inversion anticlines and fault-controlled basement highs across the Frontal Cordillera.

  10. Petrology and mineralogy of the La Peña igneous complex, Mendoza, Argentina: An alkaline occurrence in the Miocene magmatism of the Southern Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Diego Sebastián; Galliski, Miguel Ángel; Márquez-Zavalía, María Florencia; Colombo, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The La Peña alkaline igneous complex (LPC) is located in the Precordillera (32°41‧34″ S - 68°59‧48″ W) of Mendoza province, Argentina, above the southern boundary of the present-day flat-slab segment. It is a 19 km2 and 5 km diameter subcircular massif emplaced during the Miocene (19 Ma) in the Silurian-Devonian Villavicencio Fm. The LPC is composed of several plutonic and subvolcanic intrusions represented by: a cumulate of clinopyroxenite intruded by mafic dikes and pegmatitic gabbroic dikes, isolated bodies of malignite, a central intrusive syenite that develops a wide magmatic breccia in the contact with clinopyroxenite, syenitic and trachytic porphyries, a system of radial and ring dikes of different compositions (trachyte, syenite, phonolite, alkaline lamprophyre, tephrite), and late mafic breccias. The main minerals that form the LPC, ordered according to their abundance, are: pyroxene (diopside, hedenbergite), calcium amphibole (pargasite, ferro-pargasite, potassic-ferro-pargasite, potassic-hastingsite, magnesio-hastingsite, hastingsite, potassic-ferro-ferri-sadanagaite), trioctahedral micas (annite-phlogopite series), plagioclase (bytownite to oligoclase), K-feldspar (sanidine and orthoclase), nepheline, sodalite, apatite group minerals (fluorapatite, hydroxylapatite), andradite, titanite, magnetite, spinel, ilmenite, and several Cu-Fe sulfides. Late hydrothermal minerals are represented by zeolites (scolecite, thomsonite-Ca), epidote, calcite and chlorite. The trace element patterns, coupled with published data on Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes, suggest that the primary magma of the LPC was generated in an initially depleted but later enriched lithospheric mantle formed mainly by a metasomatized spinel lherzolite, and that this magmatism has a subduction-related signature. The trace elements pattern of these alkaline rocks is similar to other Miocene calc-alkaline occurrences from the magmatic arc of the Southern Central Andes. Mineral and whole

  11. ASTER Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this image of the Andes along the Chile-Bolivia border, the visible and infrared data have been computer enhanced to exaggerate the color differences of the different materials. The scene is dominated by the Pampa Luxsar lava complex, occupying the upper right two-thirds of the scene. Lava flows are distributed around remnants of large dissected cones, the largest of which is Cerro Luxsar. On the middle left edge of the image are the Olca and Parumastrato volcanoes, which appear in blue due to a lack of vegetation (colored red in this composite). This image covers an area 60 kilometers (37 miles) wide and 60 kilometers (37 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. It was acquired on April 7, 2000.

    The image is located at 21 degrees south latitude, 68.3 degrees west longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Examples of applications include monitoring glacial

  12. Spatial-temporal evolution of topography of the central Andes and implications for deep tectonic processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzione, C. N.; Auerbach, D. J.; Bershaw, J. T.; Kar, N.; Smith, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Resolving the spatial and temporal evolution of changes in the elevation of mountain belts provides constraints on the geodynamic mechanisms that caused surface uplift of these regions. Several recent studies in the Central Andean plateau (between 13°S and 28°S) have used multiple climate proxies to demonstrate punctuated (several myr) changes in the composition of meteoric water and surface temperature inferred to reflect significant (≥1000 m) surface uplift. These studies suggest that different regions experienced surface uplift at different times. In comparison with crustal thickening histories derived from reconstructions of crustal shortening, it is also clear that crustal thickening and surface uplift are temporally decoupled, with significant crustal thickening preceding punctuated surface uplift events by several tens of millions of years. Here we compile results from paleoclimate studies of the Central Andean plateau to infer regional patterns of surface uplift. Limited paleoclimate data and geologic evidence indicate that the Eastern Cordillera experienced an earlier pulse of surface uplift than the Altiplano zone, associated with an eastward sweep of magmatism that marks the current limits of the plateau. Within the Altiplano zone, the southern Altiplano appears to have risen beginning in middle Miocene time and continuing through late Miocene time. During this time, the north-central Altiplano remained low and experienced increasing rates of sedimentation. In late Miocene time, sedimentation rates slowed dramatically at the same time that climate proxy data suggest rapid surface uplift of the north-central Altiplano. The northernmost Altiplano of Peru experienced a pulse of surface uplift in middle Miocene to early Pliocene time, with the exact timing unconstrained as of yet. Crustal shortening reconstructions from the southern through the north-central plateau (between 17°S and 24°S) yield upper estimates that range between 300×20 km, sufficient

  13. Automated recognition of quasi-planar ignimbrite sheets and paleo-surfaces via robust segmentation of DTM - examples from the Western Cordillera of the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Székely, B.; Karátson, D.; Koma, Zs.; Dorninger, P.; Wörner, G.; Brandmeier, M.; Nothegger, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Western slope of the Central Andes between 22° and 17°S is characterized by large, quasi-planar landforms with tilted ignimbrite surfaces and overlying younger sedimentary deposits (e.g. Nazca, Oxaya, Huaylillas ignimbrites). These surfaces were only modified by tectonic uplift and tilting of the Western Cordillera preserving minor now fossilized drainage systems. Several deep, canyons started to form from about 5 Ma ago. Due to tectonic oversteepening in a arid region of very low erosion rates, gravitational collapses and landslides additionally modified the Andean slope and valley flanks. Large areas of fossil surfaces, however, remain. The age of these surfaces has been dated between 11 Ma and 25 Ma at elevations of 3500 m in the Precordillera and at c. 1000 m near the coast. Due to their excellent preservation, our aim is to identify, delineate, and reconstruct these original ignimbrite and sediment surfaces via a sophisticated evaluation of SRTM DEMs. The technique we use here is a robust morphological segmentation method that is insensitive to a certain amount of outliers, even if they are spatially correlated. This paves the way to identify common local planar features and combine these into larger areas of a particular surface segment. Erosional dissection and faulting, tilting and folding define subdomains, and thus the original quasi-planar surfaces are modified. Additional processes may create younger surfaces, such as sedimentary floodplains and salt pans. The procedure is tuned to provide a distinction of these features. The technique is based on the evaluation of local normal vectors (perpendicular to the actual surface) that are obtained by determination of locally fitting planes. Then, this initial set of normal vectors are gradually classified into groups with similar properties providing candidate point clouds that are quasi co-planar. The quasi co-planar sets of points are analysed further against other criteria, such as number of minimum

  14. Role of maca (Lepidium meyenii) consumption on serum interleukin-6 levels and health status in populations living in the Peruvian central Andes over 4000 m of altitude

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Gustavo F.; Gasco, Manuel; Lozada, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a plant that grows at over 4000 meters above sea level in the central Peruvian Andes. The hypocotyls of this plant are traditionally consumed for their nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to determine the health status based on a health related quality of life (HRQL) questionnaire (SF-20) and serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) in subjects that are maca consumers. For this, a cross-sectional study was designed to be performed in 50 subjects from Junin (4100 m): 27 subjects were maca consumers and 23 were non-consumers. The SF-20 survey is used to obtain a summary measure of health status. The stand up from a chair and sit down (SUCSD) test (to assess lower-extremity function), hemoglobin measurement, blood pressure, sexual hormone levels, serum IL-6 levels and the score of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) were evaluated. Testosterone/estradiol ratio (P≪0.05), IL-6 (P<0.05) and CMS score were lower, whereas the health status score was higher, in maca consumers when compared to non-consumers (P<0.01). A greater proportion of maca consumers successfully completed the SUCSD test compared to non-consumers (P<0.01), showing a significant association with lower values of serum IL-6 (P<0.05). In conclusion, consumption of maca was associated with low serum IL-6 levels and in turn with better health status scores in the SF-20 survey and low chronic mountain sickness scores. PMID:23934543

  15. Sedimentary record of regional deformation and dynamics of the thick-skinned southern Puna Plateau, central Andes (26-27°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renjie; Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Sobel, Edward R.; Carrapa, Barbara; Davis, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    The Puna Plateau, adjacent Eastern Cordillera and the Sierras Pampeanas of the central Andes are largely characterized by thick-skinned, basement-involved deformation. The Puna Plateau hosts ∼N-S trending bedrock ranges bounded by deep-seated reverse faults and sedimentary basins. We contribute to the understanding of thick-skinned dynamics in the Puna Plateau by constraining regional kinematics of the poorly understood southern Puna Plateau through a multidisciplinary approach. On the southeastern plateau, sandstone modal composition and detrital zircon U-Pb and apatite fission-track data from Cenozoic strata indicate basin accumulation during the late Eocene to early Oligocene (∼38-28 Ma). Provenance analysis reveals the existence of a regional-scale basin covering the southern Puna Plateau during late Eocene to early Oligocene time (∼38-28 Ma) that was sourced from both the western plateau and the eastern plateau margin and had a depocenter located to the west. Petrographic and detrital zircon U-Pb data reveal erosion of proximal western and eastern sources after ∼12 Ma, in mid-late Miocene time. This indicates that the regional basin was compartmentalized into small-scale depocenters by the growth of basement-cored ranges continuing into the late Miocene (∼12-8 Ma). We suggest that the Cenozoic history of the southern Puna Plateau records the formation of a regional basin that was possibly driven by lithospheric flexure during the late Eocene to early Oligocene, before the growth of distributed basement-cored ranges starting as early as the late Oligocene.

  16. Role of maca (Lepidium meyenii) consumption on serum interleukin-6 levels and health status in populations living in the Peruvian Central Andes over 4000 m of altitude.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Gasco, Manuel; Lozada-Requena, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a plant that grows at over 4,000 m above sea level in the central Peruvian Andes. The hypocotyls of this plant are traditionally consumed for their nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to determine the health status based on a health related quality of life (HRQL) questionnaire (SF-20) and serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) in subjects that are maca consumers. For this, a cross-sectional study was designed to be performed in 50 subjects from Junin (4,100 m): 27 subjects were maca consumers and 23 were non-consumers. The SF-20 survey is used to obtain a summary measure of health status. The stand up from a chair and sit down (SUCSD) test (to assess lower-extremity function), hemoglobin measurement, blood pressure, sexual hormone levels, serum IL-6 levels and the score of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) were evaluated. Testosterone/estradiol ratio (P <0.05), IL-6 (P < 0.05) and CMS score were lower, whereas the health status score was higher, in maca consumers when compared to non-consumers (P < 0.01). A greater proportion of maca consumers successfully completed the SUCSD test compared to non-consumers (P < 0.01), showing a significant association with lower values of serum IL-6 (P < 0.05). In conclusion, consumption of maca was associated with low serum IL-6 levels and in turn with better health status scores in the SF-20 survey and low chronic mountain sickness scores. PMID:23934543

  17. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Canete Basin, Lima, Peru, a plate tectonic model for the Mesozoic evolution of the Central Andes

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, A.M. )

    1993-02-01

    An arc-trench system has been active in the Central Andes since at least since Late Triassic. This Mesozoic margin was characterized by subduction-erosion processes, PreMesozoic metamorphic outer basement high, pervasive extension, tectonic inversion, sporadic igneous activity and segmentation of the arc. Episodic variations in the tectonic evolution of the associated basins were controlled by the variable angle of subduction, age of the subducted plate, rate and angle of convergence, and the relative motion of the Farallon and South America Plates. The Canete Basin is an elongate frontal arc basin, subparallel to the arc, which documents the early evolution of the Andean Orogeny. In the Canete Basin, the oldest arc volcanism is documented by the interbedded tuffs, lava flows and tuffaceous marine shales of the Late Jurassic Puente Piedra Group which was deposited along a series of isolated and elongated troughs that formed adjacent to the arc. During Late Berriasian the arc subsided and the lithofacies changed from arc to continental derived lithologies. The shallow marine, quartz rich Morro Solar Group was derived from the uplifted metamorphic basement high in the west, as the result of ensialic extension. Locally, volcanic quiescence was interrupted by deposition of the volcaniclastic rich Pucusana Formation. The Late Hauterivian to Aptian Lima Group consists of lime mudstones, shales and subordinated gypsum and bioclastic limestones with volcaniclastic and lava flow facies of the Chilca Group. Stratigraphic relationship rapid changes in thickness and facies of this unit document the development of an incipient arc and the persistence of ensialic extension prior to the maximum paroxysm of volcanic activity of the overlying Albian to Cenomanian Chillon Group. Interbedded volcaniclastic sandstones, lava flows, hyaloclastic breccias and the tuffaceous shales of the Chillon Group were coeval with the early phases of emplacement of the Coastal Batholith (CB).

  18. Can stable isotopes ride out the storms? The role of convection for water isotopes in models, records, and paleoaltimetry studies in the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, Alexander; Strecker, Manfred R.; Bookhagen, Bodo; Mulch, Andreas; Sachse, Dirk; Pingel, Heiko; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Montero, Carolina

    2014-12-01

    Globally, changes in stable isotope ratios of oxygen and hydrogen (δ 18O and δ D ) in the meteoric water cycle result from distillation and evaporation processes. Isotope fractionation occurs when air masses rise in elevation, cool, and reduce their water-vapor holding capacity with decreasing temperature. As such, δ 18O and δ D values from a variety of sedimentary archives are often used to reconstruct changes in continental paleohydrology as well as paleoaltimetry of mountain ranges. Based on 234 stream-water samples, we demonstrate that areas experiencing deep convective storms in the eastern south-central Andes (22-28° S) do not show the commonly observed relationship between δ 18O and δ D with elevation. These convective storms arise from intermontane basins, where diurnal heating forces warm air masses upward, resulting in cloudbursts and raindrop evaporation. Especially at the boundary between the tropical and extra-tropical atmospheric circulation regimes where deep-convective storms are very common (∼26° to 32° N and S), the impact of such storms may yield non-systematic stable isotope-elevation relationships as convection dominates over adiabatic lifting of air masses. Because convective storms can reduce or mask the depletion of heavy isotopes in precipitation as a function of elevation, linking modern or past topography to patterns of stable isotope proxy records can be compromised in mountainous regions, and atmospheric circulation models attempting to predict stable isotope patterns must have sufficiently high spatial resolution to capture the fractionation dynamics of convective cells.

  19. Geometry and kinematics of the Andean thick-skinned thrust systems: Insights from the Chilean Frontal Cordillera (28°-28.5°S), Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, F.; Arriagada, C.; Valdivia, R.; Deckart, K.; Peña, M.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of the Chilean Frontal Cordillera, located over the Central Andes flat-slab subduction segment (27°-28.5°S), is characterized by a thick-skinned deformation, affecting both the pre-rift basement and the Mesozoic and Cenozoic infill of the NNE-SSW Lautaro and Lagunillas Basins, which were developed during the Pangea-Gondwana break-up. The compressive deformation show a complex interaction between Mesozoic rift structures and thrust systems, affecting a suite of Permo-Triassic (258-245 Ma) granitic blocks. We used a combination of geological mapping, new structural data, balanced and restored cross sections and geochronological data to investigate the geometry and kinematics of the Andean thick-skinned thrust systems of the region. The thrust systems include double-vergent thick-skinned thrust faults, basement-cored anticlines and minor thin-skinned thrusts and folds. The presence of Triassic and Jurassic syn-rift successions along the hanging wall and footwall of the basement thrust faults are keys to suggest that the current structural framework of the region should be associated with the shortening of previous Mesozoic half grabens. Based on this interpretation, we propose a deformation mechanism characterized by the tectonic inversion of rift-related faults and the propagation of basement ramps that fold and cut both, the early normal faults and the basement highs. New U-Pb ages obtained from synorogenic deposits (Quebrada Seca and Doña Ana formations) indicate at least three important compressive pulses. A first pulse at ˜80 Ma (Late Cretaceous), a second pulse related to the K-T phase of Andean deformation and, finally, a third pulse that occurred during the lower Miocene.

  20. The Cerro Guacha Caldera complex: An Upper Miocene-Pliocene polycyclic volcano-tectonic structure in the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex of the Central Andes of Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriarte, R.; de Silva, S. L.; Jimenez, N.; Ort, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Four multicyclic complex calderas and smaller ignimbrite shields located within the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex of the Central Andes erupted 13000 km3 of magma within the last 11 Ma. One of the largest and most complex of these is the 5.6 to 1 Ma Cerro Guacha Caldera complex in SW Lipez, Bolivia. Ar-Ar age determinations and paleomagnetic signatures suggest that the Cerro Guacha Caldera was formed by two major eruptions, caldera collapse, resurgence cycles and several smaller eruptions. Two major ignimbrites of super-eruption magnitude are found with 40Ar-39Ar from biotites and sanidines of 5.65±0.01Ma for the 1300 km3 (magma volume) Guacha ignimbrite and 3.49±0.01Ma for the 800 km3 Tara Ignimbrite. The last major eruption occurred on the western flank producing the 1.72±0.02 Ma Puripica Chico Ignimbrite with a volume of approximately 10 km3. Characteristic remanent magnetization data (ChRM) for these ignimbrites show that the Guacha has reverse polarity, while the Tara is normally polarized and the magnetic fingerprints have allowed their current full extents to be identified. The Guacha ignimbrite extends over 70 km north and south of the caldera and is distributed over an area of almost 5000 km2. The Tara ignimbrite covers an area of almost 4000 km2 and extends southwards almost 70 km, where it ponded in La Pacana caldera. A conspicuous lineament of volcanic structures towards the caldera's easternmost edge, along with a flat surface (moat), welded ignimbrites, and sedimentary lacustrine sequences suggest an earlier 60x40 km outer collapse associated with the Guacha explosive episode. A central graben consisting of Guacha welded ignimbrite is related to the first episode of resurgence. Evidence of a second 30x15 km inner collapse scarp includes offset of welded Guacha ignimbrites and alignment of lava domes equivalent in age to the Tara ignimbrite. A second resurgence episode is suggested by the presence of a central block consisting primarily of welded

  1. Origin of the San Pedro-Linzor volcanic chain and its relation with the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex, Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy, B.; Wörner, G.; Kojima, S.; Aguilera, F.

    2011-12-01

    Mantle-derived magmas at the Central Andean magmatic province (26 Ma - Recent) had been generated by hydration of the asthenospheric mantle below this zone (Davidson, 1996). After generation, these magmas ascent through a thick continental crust (up to ~70 km) that mostly thickened by crustal shortening of the Andes during this time. The magmatic products erupted during this period of time are characterised by incresingly "crustal isotopic signatures" related with increased crustal assimilation of mantle-derived magmas. However, lavas with 87Sr/86Sr ratios higher than 0,708 indicate not only assimilation but rather attest to a large contribution of anatectic melts that are located at the upper crust. The existence of large volumes of such melts in the upper crust has been proposed by geophysical methods (i.e. the Altiplano-Puna magmatic body; Zandt, et al., 2003) and are related with voluminous silicic volcanism observed in the area (de Silva, 1989). In this work, we present new isotopic data from lavas with SiO2 from 56 to 70 wt. %. These lavas belong to volcanoes distributed in San Pedro-Linzor volcanic chain (22°-22°30'S, northern Chile) which is located completely within the APVC. Upper Pleistocene volcanoes that belong to this volcanic chain are aligned in a NW-SE trend and show 87Sr/86Sr ratios up to 0,709 at 65 to 68 % SiO2. These ratios are at the upper end of isotopic variation in Central Andean andesites (typically 0,706 to 0,708). Moreover, only low Sm/Yb ratios are observed (1,48 - 4,5) in the San Pedro-Linzor volcanic chain compared to Sm/Yb in other Quaternary Central Andean volcanics, which range from 5 to 10 (Mamani et al., 2010). High Sm/Yb are generally related to garnet during high-pressure magma evolution. High Sr isotope ratios unusually large degrees of contamination of primary magmas by anatectic melts from the Altiplano-Puna magmatic body in the upper crust. Low Sm/Yb ratios are not consistent with magma evolution at great depth even

  2. Arc-oblique fault systems: their role in the Cenozoic structural evolution and metallogenesis of the Andes of central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquer, Jose; Berry, Ron F.; Scott, Robert J.; Cooke, David R.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the Main Cordillera of Central Chile is characterized by the formation and subsequent inversion of an intra-arc volcano-tectonic basin. The world's largest porphyry Cu-Mo deposits were emplaced during basin inversion. Statistically, the area is dominated by NE- and NW-striking faults, oblique to the N-striking inverted basin-margin faults and to the axis of Cenozoic magmatism. This structural pattern is interpreted to reflect the architecture of the pre-Andean basement. Stratigraphic correlations, syn-extensional deposits and kinematic criteria on fault surfaces show several arc-oblique structures were active as normal faults at different stages of basin evolution. The geometry of syn-tectonic hydrothermal mineral fibers, in turn, demonstrates that most of these structures were reactivated as strike-slip ± reverse faults during the middle Miocene - early Pliocene. Fault reactivation age is constrained by 40Ar/39Ar dating of hydrothermal minerals deposited during fault slip. The abundance and distribution of these minerals indicates fault-controlled hydrothermal fluid flow was widespread during basin inversion. Fault reactivation occurred under a transpressive regime with E- to ENE-directed shortening, and was concentrated around major plutons and hydrothermal centers. At the margins of the former intra-arc basin, deformation was largely accommodated by reverse faulting, whereas in its central part strike-slip faulting was predominant.

  3. Discrimination and supervised classification of volcanic flows of the Puna-Altiplano, Central Andes Mountains using Landsat TM data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, J. H.; Fielding, E. J.; Isacks, B. L.

    1987-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images of portions of the Central Andean Puna-Altiplano volcanic belt have been tested for the feasibility of discriminating individual volcanic flows using supervised classifications. This technique distinguishes volcanic rock classes as well as individual phases (i.e., relative age groups) within each class. The spectral signature of a volcanic rock class appears to depend on original texture and composition and on the degree of erosion, weathering, and chemical alteration. Basalts and basaltic andesite stand out as a clearly distinguishable class. The age dependent degree of weathering of these generally dark volcanic rocks can be correlated with reflectance: older rocks have a higher reflectance. On the basis of this relationship, basaltaic lava flows can be separated into several subclasses. These individual subclasses would correspond to mappable geologic units on the ground at a reconnaissance scale. The supervised classification maps are therefore useful for establishing a general stratigraphic framework for later detailed surface mapping of volcanic sequences.

  4. Neogene to Quaternary ash deposits in the Coastal Cordillera in northern Chile: Distal ashes from supereruptions in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkreuz, Christoph; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Wilke, Hans G.; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Renno, Axel D.

    2014-01-01

    Silicic volcanic ash deposits investigated at 14 localities between 22° and 25°S in the Chilean Coastal Cordillera are found to be the distal ash fall from supereruptions in the Central Andean cordillera several hundreds of kilometers to the east. Depositional textures, modal composition and granulometry of the ashes and tuffs (the latter lithified by halite and gypsum under ultra-arid conditions) allow for a distinction between primary fallout/aeolian deposits (mean 4-5 Φ, sorting 1.5-2 Φ) and secondary deposits that formed by down wash from hill slopes during local rain fall. Primary volcanic components comprise two types of glass shards (with small stretched vesicles and coarse-walled with rounded to elliptic vesicles), and biotite.

  5. Evidence of the Timing and Rate of Uplift of Central Peruvian Andes from Deuterium Isotopes in Volcanic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winton, R.; Saylor, J. E.; Horton, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    The uplift history of the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) presents challenges to paleoelevation research with both the rate and timing of uplift debated. Two end-member models have been proposed: 1) gradual surface uplift driven primarily by tectonic shortening (e.g., Barnes and Ehlers, 2009); and 2) rapid uplift in the late Miocene driven primarily by convective removal of dense lower lithosphere (e.g., Garzione et al., 2008). Recently acquired stable isotope and paleotemperature data present a more complex picture of CAP uplift, with multiple spatially and temporally separate uplift pulses (e.g., Quade et al., 2011; Saylor et al., 2012; Leier et al., 2013). In particular, Quade et al. (2011) and Saylor et al. (2012) suggest that the southern and northern CAP may have been uplifted in the early Oligocene and early Miocene, respectively; earlier than the central Altiplano implying an 'edge-to-center' progression of uplift. Determining the rates, timing, and spatial patterns of uplift is hindered by the complex array of factors that influence paleoelevation proxies. While the isotopic composition in rising air masses, precipitation and surface water shows a systematic depletion of 18O and D at higher elevations, this lapse rate may have varied through time due to changes in topography or climate (e.g., Insel et al., 2012). Further complications arise when using carbonates as a proxy record because the fractionation factor between surface water and carbonate depends on the temperature of crystallization which is, in turn, also dependent primarily on elevation. Here we present new deuterium isotopic analyses of volcanic glass in the Ayacucho Basin (13.15° S, 74.2° W), central Peru. The Ayacucho Basin is located north of the Altiplano at 2.7-3.7 km elevation, north of the Abancay Deflection. Volcanic glass is well suited for this study because once hydrated, the isotopic composition of the waters of hydration remains distinct from the isotopic composition of modern

  6. Identification of the Calderas for Major Ignimbrites of the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex, Central Andes, Including Two New Super-eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ort, M. H.; de Silva, S. L.; Jiménez, N.

    2008-12-01

    The Neogene ignimbrite flare-up in the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC) in the central Andes produced calderas and ignimbrites covering >70,000 km2 in Chile, Bolivia, and Argentina and totaling >11,000 km3 of magma. One of the questions related to this extraordinary occurrence is how long it took for these ignimbrites to be emplaced. In an effort to determine this, we have combined field correlations, high-precision 40Ar/39Ar dating, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and characteristic remanent magnetism (ChRM) to constrain the dates of the eruptions. Herein we present the paleomagnetic data and preliminary interpretations, including the definition of two new super-eruptions in the APVC (including the youngest yet identified in the APVC). Several ignimbrites occupy similar stratigraphic positions. The Pastos Grandes and Tara Ignimbrites erupted 2.8-3.5 Ma, while the Chuhuilla, Alota, and Guacha Ignimbrites date between 5.3 and 5.6 Ma. The Pastos Grandes and Tara Ignimbrites have similar ChRM directions. The ChRM directions of the Alota and Guacha Ignimbrites are clearly distinct but the Chuhuilla Ignimbrite data have very large dispersion. The thermal demagnetization reveals a single component in nearly all the samples, which may indicate that the ignimbrites were emplaced above the magnetite Curie temperature. Current efforts center on refining and reducing the errors on the ChRM directions. AMS was used to determine flow directions and thus define the source areas for ignimbrites. The 3.51 Ma Tara Ignimbrite, first recognized as ponded ignimbrite in La Pacana caldera and thought to be erupted from there, is sourced in the Guacha caldera of Bolivia, likely from the western dome complex, which yields similar dates. Great thicknesses of Tara Ignimbrite are ponded within the Guacha caldera, and also around Cerro Zapaleri. This is the youngest super-eruption in the central APVC. The Pastos Grandes caldera was previously thought to have formed during

  7. Geochronology of pediments and marine terraces in north-central Chile and their implications for Quaternary uplift in the Western Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, María Pía; Carretier, Sébastien; Charrier, Reynaldo; Saillard, Marianne; Regard, Vincent; Hérail, Gérard; Hall, Sarah; Farber, Dan; Audin, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    In north-central Chile, a wide shore platform is morphologically connected with a high fluvial terrace and a pediment. The eastward extension of Quaternary coastal uplift in the Southern Central Andes is poorly constrained since no age correlation between marine and continental landforms has been reported. We use 26Al and 10Be concentrations to constrain the geomorphic evolution of these marine and continental landforms near the Choapa valley (31.6° S). 10Be ages for the shore platform indicate that this surface was repeatedly reoccupied during sea-level highstands between ~ 800 and 500 ka and uplifted after 500 ka. While 'zero erosion' ages for the pediment between ~ 600 and 300 ka only partly overlap the shore platform age range, more realistic exposure ages calculated for an erosion rate of 1 m/Ma are between ~ 945 and 475 ka, fitting the age range of the correlated shore platform. 10Be concentrations of the high fluvial terrace are highly scattered evidencing vertical mixing of clasts probably due to slow lowering of the surface. Although it is not possible to determine an age for this landform, the scattering among its 10Be concentrations implies that this marker is several hundreds of thousands of years old and that the high fluvial terrace began to form at ~ 1200 ka or after. Finally, 10Be concentrations of the high fluvial terrace, the pediment and the shore platform are of the same order of magnitude, which is consistent with the clear morphologic correlation between these three types of landforms. These data suggest that the marine and continental landforms studied formed synchronously, with some local differences, during a long period of relative tectonic stability between ~(1200?) 800 and 500 ka and uplifted after 500 ka. Our results confirm recent studies showing a post-400 ± 100 ka renewal of uplift along the Pacific coast after a Lower to Middle Pleistocene period of slow uplift. Moreover, the extension of the surfaces suggests that a broad region

  8. Coastal, valley, and oasis interaction: impact on the evolution of ancient populations in the South Central Andes.

    PubMed

    Varela, Héctor H; Cocilovo, Jose A; Fuchs, María L; O'Brien, Tyler G

    2014-12-01

    The existing biocultural links are analyzed among ancient inhabitants of the Cochabamba valleys (Bolivia) from the Formative and Tiwanaku periods, coastal and inland Azapa region (Chile) from the Late Archaic to the Late periods, and the Atacama Desert oases (Chile) from the Formative period to the time of European contact. Craniometric information obtained from a sample of 565 individuals from different sites of the studied regions was evaluated using methods derived from quantitative genetics and multivariate statistical analysis techniques. It is shown that during the Formative and Tiwanaku periods inhabitants of the Cochabamba valleys maintained contact with the population of northern Chile. This contact was more fluid with the people from the interior valley of Azapa than it was with the settlers of San Pedro Atacama (SPA). An important biological affinity in the Late Period between the inhabitants of the Azapa valley and the late SPA groups is also examined. The Late-Inca Catarpe SPA sample shows a broad genetic variability shared with the majority of the groups studied. The results reaffirm the differences between the coastal and interior Azapa valley groups and strengthen the hypothesis of two pathways to populating the south central Andean area. The divergence observed among subpopulations can be explained by the spatiotemporal dispersion between them, genetic drift dispersion compensated by the action of gene flow, and cultural norms that regulate within group mating. PMID:25234247

  9. Vivid valleys, pallid peaks? Hypsometric variations and rural–urban land change in the Central Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    What happens to the land cover within the hinterland's altitudinal belts while Central Andean cities are undergoing globalization and urban restructuring? What conclusions can be drawn about changes in human land use? By incorporating a regional altitudinal zonation model, direct field observations and GIS analyses of remotely sensed long term data, the present study examines these questions using the example of Huancayo Metropolitano – an emerging Peruvian mountain city of 420,000 inhabitants, situated at 3260 m asl in the Mantaro Valley. The study's results indicate that rapid urban growth during the late 1980s and early 1990s was followed by the agricultural intensification and peri-urban condominization at the valley floor (quechua) – since the beginning of Peru's neoliberal era. Moreover, regarding the adjoining steep slopes (suni) and subsequent grassland ecosystems (puna), the research output presents land cover change trajectories that clearly show an expansion of human land use, such as reforestation for wood production and range burning for livestock grazing, even at high altitudes – despite rural–urban migration trends and contrary to several results of extra-Andean studies. Consequently, rural–urban planners and policy makers are challenged to focus on the manifold impacts of globalization on human land use – at all altitudinal belts of the Andean city's hinterland: toward sustainable mountain development that bridges the social and physical gaps – from the bottom up. PMID:23564987

  10. Vivid valleys, pallid peaks? Hypsometric variations and rural-urban land change in the Central Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Haller, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    What happens to the land cover within the hinterland's altitudinal belts while Central Andean cities are undergoing globalization and urban restructuring? What conclusions can be drawn about changes in human land use? By incorporating a regional altitudinal zonation model, direct field observations and GIS analyses of remotely sensed long term data, the present study examines these questions using the example of Huancayo Metropolitano - an emerging Peruvian mountain city of 420,000 inhabitants, situated at 3260 m asl in the Mantaro Valley. The study's results indicate that rapid urban growth during the late 1980s and early 1990s was followed by the agricultural intensification and peri-urban condominization at the valley floor (quechua) - since the beginning of Peru's neoliberal era. Moreover, regarding the adjoining steep slopes (suni) and subsequent grassland ecosystems (puna), the research output presents land cover change trajectories that clearly show an expansion of human land use, such as reforestation for wood production and range burning for livestock grazing, even at high altitudes - despite rural-urban migration trends and contrary to several results of extra-Andean studies. Consequently, rural-urban planners and policy makers are challenged to focus on the manifold impacts of globalization on human land use - at all altitudinal belts of the Andean city's hinterland: toward sustainable mountain development that bridges the social and physical gaps - from the bottom up. PMID:23564987

  11. Volcanic hotspots of the central and southern Andes as seen from space by ASTER and MODVOLC between the years 2000-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jay, J.; Pritchard, M. E.; Mares, P. J.; Mnich, M. E.; Welch, M. D.; Melkonian, A. K.; Aguilera, F.; Naranjo, J.; Sunagua, M.; Clavero, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    We examine 153 volcanoes and geothermal areas in the central, southern, and austral Andes for temperature anomalies between 2000-2011 from two different spacebourne sensors: 1) those automatically detected by the MODVOLC algorithm (Wright et al., 2004) from MODIS and 2) manually identified hotspots in nighttime images from ASTER. Based on previous work, we expected to find 8 thermal anomalies (volcanoes: Ubinas, Villarrica, Copahue, Láscar, Llaima, Chaitén, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, Chiliques). We document 31 volcanic areas with pixel integrated temperatures of 4 to more than 100 K above background in at least two images, and another 29 areas that have questionable hotspots with either smaller anomalies or a hotspot in only one image. Most of the thermal anomalies are related to known activity (lava and pyroclastic flows, growing lava domes, fumaroles, and lakes) while others are of unknown origin or reflect activity at volcanoes that were not thought to be active. A handful of volcanoes exhibit temporal variations in the magnitude and location of their temperature anomaly that can be related to both documented and undocumented pulses of activity. Our survey reveals that low amplitude volcanic hotspots detectable from space are more common than expected (based on lower resolution data) and that these features could be more widely used to monitor changes in the activity of remote volcanoes. We find that the shape, size, magnitude, and location on the volcano of the thermal anomaly vary significantly from volcano to volcano, and these variations should be considered when developing algorithms for hotspot identification and detection. We compare our thermal results to satellite InSAR measurements of volcanic deformation and find that there is no simple relationship between deformation and thermal anomalies - while 31 volcanoes have continuous hotspots, at least 17 volcanoes in the same area have exhibited deformation, and these lists do not completely overlap. In

  12. Eruption and Degassing Processes in a Supervolcanic System: The Volatile Record Preserved in Melt Inclusions from the 3.49Ma Tara Ignimbrite in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocke, S.; de Silva, S. L.; Schmitt, A. K.; Wallace, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of H2O and CO2 in quartz and sanidine-hosted melt inclusions from one of the youngest supervolcanic eruptions in the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC) in the Central Andes provides information on crystallization depths and eruption and degassing processes. At least 740 km3 of high-K, metaluminous, rhyodacite to rhyolite magma erupted from the Guacha Caldera in southwest Bolivia, producing three phases of the 3.49 Ma Tara Ignimbrite: a Plinian fall-deposit, an extensive ignimbrite, and several post-caldera domes. Infrared spectroscopic analyses of quartz-hosted melt inclusions from Tara Plinian pumice have H2O contents of ~4.5 wt % and variable CO2 contents (110-300 ppm), corresponding to vapor saturation pressures up to 180 MPa. In contrast, sanidine-hosted melt inclusions from the Plinian-fall deposit contain bubbles, lower water contents (1.4-2.2 wt %) and lower CO2 (87-143 ppm). These vesiculated melt inclusions and low volatile contents suggest that the sanidine crystals leaked on their ascent to the surface and therefore do not record accurate pre-eruptive melt volatile contents. In contrast, quartz-hosted melt inclusions from post-caldera dome samples contain lower H2O contents of 2.5-3.5 wt % (average 2.9 wt %) and no detectable CO2, corresponding to vapor saturation pressures of 50-90 MPa. These data indicate that the preeruptive plinian stage Tara magma was vapor saturated at the time of melt inclusion entrapment and stored between 5-6 km, while those from the post-caldera domes were trapped at 2-3 km. Differences in CO2 between Plinian and dome melt inclusions require that the post-caldera dome quartzes represent a different generation of crystals that grew as the magma slowly rose and progressively degassed at 2-3 km. During this shallow crystallization, the magma evolved further and eventually fed the post-caldera domes, one of which is a high-Si rhyolite. Consistent with this interpretation, melt inclusions from post-caldera dome samples

  13. Mapping South American Summer Monsoon Changes during Heinrich Event 1 and the LGM: Insights from New Paleolake Records from the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; McGee, D.; Quade, J.

    2015-12-01

    Cave stalagmite records show strong evidence of abrupt changes in summer monsoons during Heinrich events, but we lack rigorous constraints on the amount of wetting or drying occurring in monsoon regions. Studies on shoreline deposits of closed-basin lakes can establish quantitative bounds on water balance changes through mapping-based estimates of lake volume variations. We present new dating constraints on lake level variations in Agua Caliente I and Laguna Loyoques, two closed-basin, high-altitude paleolakes on the Altiplano-Puna plateau of the Central Andes (23.1°S, 67.4°W, 4250 masl). Because this area receives >70% of its total annual precipitation during austral summer, the region is ideally suited to capture a pure response to changes in the South American summer monsoon (SASM). The plateau is home to several small (<40 km2) lakes surrounded by well-preserved paleoshorelines that indicate past wetter conditions. Agua Caliente I is unique, having multiple shorelines encrusted with biologically-mediated calcium carbonate "tufa" deposits. Initial U-Th dating of these massive shoreline tufas reveals that these deposits are dateable to within ±50 to 300 years due to high U concentrations and low initial Th content (as indicated by high 230Th/232Th). Our U-Th dates show that Agua Caliente I was greater in lake surface area during two periods: 17.5-14.5 kyrs BP, coincident with Heinrich Event 1 (HE1), and 24-23 kyrs BP, roughly coincident with the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). At these times, Agua Caliente I also overflowed into a neighboring lake basin (Loyoques) through an 8-km long southeast-trending stream channel. Thus, during HE1 and the LGM, the lake was ~9 times larger in surface area relative to modern. Hydrologic modeling constrained by paleotemperature estimates is used to provide bounds for these past precipitation changes. We also tentatively explore physical mechanisms linking Heinrich events and the regional hydroclimate by comparing freshwater

  14. P- and S- velocity images of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the Central Andes from local-source tomographic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, I.; Sobolev, S. V.; Asch, G.

    2003-04-01

    In this study we perform an iterative tomographic inversion of P- and S-travel times for the local sources in Central Andes with consequent relocalization of sources. The processing starts from a reference model constrained from various geophysical and mineral physics data. The entire 3-D tomographic-inversion region (600 x 600 x 250 km) is subdivided into three domains: (1) slab, with upper boundary defined as intraslab seismicity envelope, (2) continental crust, with Moho topography defined by receiver-function and wide-angle-reflection Moho, and (3) mantle wedge between the crust and the slab. A reference velocity distribution in each of 3 domains was set from information on average composition and temperature in the crust, slab and upper plate lithosphere. Iterative procedure consists of the following steps: (A) Relocation of sources using both P- and S-phases. A key feature of this step is a new precise and fast algorithm of two-points ray tracing in a 3-D velocity model containing seismic boundaries; (B) Parameterisation of the study volume. Each of three domains was parameterised by a mesh with the density of nodes proportional to the rays density; (C) Inversion that allows calculation of both velocity anomalies in nodes and station corrections; (D) Calculation of 3D field of smoothed velocity anomalies in a regular grid. Steps B-C-D are performed separately for P- and S- rays. As the results of inversion, after five iterations we achieved a RMS reduction of P- and S-residuals from 0.53 s to 0.23 s. We show that the similar variance reductions can be obtained with different starting models (for instance, for 1D model). This fact proves importance of use of available a-priory information to set the starting model. To check reliability of the obtained velocity anomalies, different tests were performed, in particular, reconstruction of synthetic anomalies and independent inversion of two subsets of data. The P and S- tomographic images contain many features

  15. Modelling the hydrological response of debris-free and debris-covered glaciers to present climatic conditions in the semiarid Andes of central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James; Vivero, Sebastián; Campos, Cristián; Egli, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the main contributors to runoff of a 62 km2 glacierized catchment in the semiarid Andes of central Chile, where both debris-free and debris-covered glaciers are present, combining an extensive set of field measurements, remote sensing products and an advanced glacio-hydrological model (TOPKAPI-ETH). The catchment contains two debris-free glaciers reaching down to 3900 m asl (Bello and Yeso Glaciers) and one debris-covered avalanche-fed glacier reaching to 3200 m asl (Piramide Glacier). A unique dataset of field measurements collected in the ablation seasons 2013-14 and 2014-15 included four automatic weather stations, manual measurements of snow depth and debris cover thickness, discharge measurements at glaciers outlets, photographic monitoring of surface albedo as well as ablation stakes measurements and snow pits. TOPKAPI-ETH combines physically-oriented parameterizations of snow and ice ablation, gravitational distribution of snow, snow albedo evolution, glacier dynamics, runoff routing and the ablation of debris-covered ice.We obtained the first detailed estimation of mass balance and runoff contribution of debris-covered glaciers in this mountainous region. Results show that while the mass balance of Bello and Yeso Glaciers is mostly controlled by air temperature lapse rates, the mass balance of Piramide Glacier is governed by debris thickness and avalanches. In fact, gravitational distribution by avalanching on wet years plays a key role and modulates the mass balance gradient of all glaciers in the catchment and can turn local mass balance from negative to positive. This is especially the case for Piramide Glacier, which shows large amounts of snow accumulation below the steep walls surrounding its upper area. Despite the thermal insulation effect of the debris cover, the contribution to runoff from debris-free and debris-covered glaciers is similar, mainly due to elevation differences. At the catchment scale, snowmelt represents more than 60

  16. Expanding Geophysical and Geochemical Investigation of Causes of Extraordinary Unrest at the Laguna del Maule (Rhyolitic) Volcanic Field, Southern Andes, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Chile, includes an unusually large and recent concentration of silicic eruptions. Since 2007 the crust here has been inflating at an astonishing rate of 25 cm/yr. Findings thus far lead to the hypothesis that the silicic vents have tapped an extensive layer of crystal-poor, rhyolitic melt that began to form atop a magmatic mush zone that was established by ~20 ka with a renewed phase of rhyolite eruptions during the Holocene. Modeling of surface deformation, magnetotelluric data, and gravity changes suggest that magma is currently intruding at a depth of ~5 km. Swarms of volcano-tectonic and long period earthquakes, mostly of M < 2, have occurred beneath the most recent rhyolite coulees on the southwestern and southern margins of the 20 km diameter ring of silicic vents. With support from the US NSF and the Chilean government (SERNAGEOMIN and OVDAS) we are seizing the unique opportunity to investigate, over the next 5 years, the dynamics of this large rhyolitic system while magma migration, reservoir growth, and crustal deformation are actively underway. This collaboration involves scientists and students at: University of Wisconsin-Madison, Georgia Tech, Cornell, University of Alberta, Simon Fraser University, University of Chile-Santiago, CONICET/University of San Juan-Argentina, Nanyang Technological University-Singapore, SERNAGEOMIN, OVDAS, USGS, and SEGEMAR-Argentina. Team members will be introduced in this presentation. Our approach includes augmenting the OVDAS array of 6 permanent seisic stations with 40 additional instruments to conduct tomographic, receiver function and ambient noise studies. We continue to collect 4-D gravity data from 37 stations. Surface deformation is monitored via cGPS at 5 permanent receivers and InSAR data. A magnetotelluric survey across the Andes at 36o S is planned. Geochemical studies include mineral zoning and U-Th disequilibrium of zircons to constrain the timing of magma intrusion and

  17. Geodynamic controls on the contamination of Cenozoic arc magmas in the southern Central Andes: Insights from the O and Hf isotopic composition of zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Rosemary E.; Kirstein, Linda A.; Kasemann, Simone A.; Dhuime, Bruno; Elliott, Tim; Litvak, Vanesa D.; Alonso, Ricardo; Hinton, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Subduction zones, such as the Andean convergent margin of South America, are sites of active continental growth and crustal recycling. The composition of arc magmas, and therefore new continental crust, reflects variable contributions from mantle, crustal and subducted reservoirs. Temporal (Ma) and spatial (km) variations in these contributions to southern Central Andean arc magmas are investigated in relation to the changing plate geometry and geodynamic setting of the southern Central Andes (28-32° S) during the Cenozoic. The in-situ analysis of O and Hf isotopes in zircon, from both intrusive (granitoids) and extrusive (basaltic andesites to rhyolites) Late Cretaceous - Late Miocene arc magmatic rocks, combined with high resolution U-Pb dating, demonstrates distinct across-arc variations. Mantle-like δ18O(zircon) values (+5.4‰ to +5.7‰ (±0.4 (2σ))) and juvenile initial εHf(zircon) values (+8.3 (±0.8 (2σ)) to +10.0 (±0.9 (2σ))), combined with a lack of zircon inheritance suggests that the Late Cretaceous (∼73 Ma) to Eocene (∼39 Ma) granitoids emplaced in the Principal Cordillera of Chile formed from mantle-derived melts with very limited interaction with continental crustal material, therefore representing a sustained period of upper crustal growth. Late Eocene (∼36 Ma) to Early Miocene (∼17 Ma) volcanic arc rocks present in the Frontal Cordillera have 'mantle-like' δ18O(zircon) values (+4.8‰ (±0.2 (2σ) to +5.8‰ (±0.5 (2σ))), but less radiogenic initial εHf(zircon) values (+1.0 (±1.1 (2σ)) to +4.0 (±0.6 (2σ))) providing evidence for mixing of mantle-derived melts with the Late Paleozoic - Early Mesozoic basement (up to ∼20%). The assimilation of both Late Paleozoic - Early Mesozoic Andean crust and a Grenville-aged basement is required to produce the higher than 'mantle-like' δ18O(zircon) values (+5.5‰ (±0.6 (2σ) to +7.2‰ (±0.4 (2σ))) and unradiogenic, initial εHf(zircon) values (-3.9 (±1.0 (2σ)) to +1.6 (±4.4 (2

  18. Glacier Sensitivity Across the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagredo, E. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Rupper, S.

    2010-12-01

    temperatures, while glaciers located in the wet Patagonian Andes seem to exhibit an opposite behavior. In an intermediate position are those glaciers located in the Tropical Andes, and Tierra del Fuego, which even though still more sensitive to temperature, they can be affected by temperature changes as well. With this regional approach towards the comprehension of climate-glacial dynamic interaction, we expect to contribute to the understanding the causes and mechanism driving former episodes of glacial fluctuations, and in turn, to the development of future scenarios of climate change.

  19. A Holocene Lake Record from Laguna Del Maule (LdM) in the Chilean Andes: Climatic and Volcanic Controls on Lake Depositional Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero-Garces, B. L.; Frugone Alvarez, M.; Barreiro-Lostres, F.; Carrevedo, M. L.; Latorre Hidalgo, C.; Giralt, S.; Maldonado, A.; Bernárdez, P.; Prego, R.; Moreno-Caballud, A.

    2014-12-01

    Central Chile is a tectonically active, drought-prone region sensitive to latitudinal variations in large-scale cold fronts associated with fluctuations of the Pacific subtropical high. Holocene high-resolution records of climate and volcanic events could help inform more on the frequency of extensive droughts as well as volcanic and seismic hazards. LdM is a high altitude, volcanic lake located in the Transition Southern Volcanic Zone (~36°S, 2200 m.a.s.l). The LdM volcanic field is a very seismically and volcanically active zone in the Andes, with several caldera-forming eruptions over the last 1.5 Ma, and intense postglacial activity. In 2013, we recovered over 40 m of sediment cores at four sites of LdM and collected > 20 km of seismic lines. The cores were imaged, their physical and geochemical properties analysed with a Geotek MSCL and XRF scanner respectively, and sampled for TOC, TIC, TS, TN, BioSi, and bulk mineralogy. The chronology was constructed with a Bayesian age-depth model including 210Pb-137Cs, the Quizapú volcanic ash (1932 AD) and 17 AMS 14C dates. The 4.8 m long composite sequence spans the Late glacial and Holocene.Sediments are massive to banded, quartz and plagioclase-rich silts with variable diatom (BioSi, 15- 30 %) and organic matter content (TOC, 1-5 %). Four main units have been defined based on sedimentological and geochemical composition. The transition from Unit 4 to 3 is ascribed to the onset of the Holocene; Unit 2 spans the mid Holocene, and Unit 1 the last 4 ka. Higher (lower) TOC, Br/Ti and Fe/Mn ratios in units 1 and 3 (2 and 4) suggest higher (lower) organic productivity in the lake and dominant oxic (anoxic) conditions at the bottom of the lake. Up to 17 ash and lapilli layers mark volcanic events, mostly grouped in units 1 and 3. Periods of higher lake productivity (units 1 and 3) are synchronous to higher frequency of volcanic events. Some climate transitions (LIA, 4ka, 8ka and 11ka) are evident in the LdM sequence

  20. Correlation and Analysis of Volcanic Ash in Marine Sediments From the Peru Margin: Explosive Volcanic Cycles of the North-Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D.; Miller, J.

    2003-12-01

    To decipher the episodicity of explosive volcanic activity in the North-Central Andes, we have measured the thickness and calculated the volume of ash layers from sites drilled along the Peru margin during Leg 201 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). The geographic distribution of the sites (over 3 degrees of latitude and from 50 to 300 km offshore) and correlation of ash units between sites form the basis for minimal estimates of explosive volcanic activity in the region (only eruptions large enough to deposit ash in excess of 100 km from source are represented). Pouclet et al., (1990), estimated the minimum explosive activity along the Andean Arc from ash-bearing sediments and ash layers within cores from sites along the Peru margin collected during ODP Leg 112. As a result of higher recovery (as much as ten times more core recovery in many intervals) and decreased disturbance in cores recovered during Leg 201, our documentation of ash content in cores from Leg 201 has led to a more complete record of the explosive volcanic activity along the Andean Arc. For example, Pouclet, et al., (1990), reports four ash layers from Sites 680 and 684, whereas we have documented fourteen ash layers from cores recovered from the same locations (Sites 1228 and 1227, respectively). Our stratigraphic record agrees with Pouclet, et al., (1990), suggesting that explosive activity began in the early Eocene ( ˜35Ma) and continued with explosive pulses during the Miocene. The greatest explosive activity occurred within the past 5 million years, with peak activity in the late Pliocene to early Pleistocene. Based on petrographic and geochemical analysis, most of the volcanic ash within cores from Leg 201 was derived from the Andean volcanic arc. These plinian eruptions produced acidic glasses and ash layers with abundant feldspar, hornblende, and biotite. Pouclet, et al., (1990), reports a transition from andesitic volcanism in the Middle to Late Miocene to a more shoshonitic

  1. Palaeoclimate reconstructions from lacustrine terraces and lake-balance modeling in the southern central Andes: New insights from Salar de Pocitos (Salta Province, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekeschus, Benjamin; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred R.; Freymark, Jessica; Eckelmann, Felix; Alonso, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    The arid Puna Plateau in the southern central Andes of NW-Argentina constitutes the southern part of Earth's second largest orogenic plateau. Numerous internally drained basins are restricted by ranges that peak 5-6 km above sea level, creating a compressional basin and range morphology. The conspiring effects of this structurally controlled topography and the high degree of aridity have resulted in low stream power of the fluvial network and internally drained basins. A steep rainfall gradient exists across this area ranging from a humid Andean foreland (>1m/yr annual rainfall) to progressively drier areas westwards. At the present-day, the interior of the plateau is widely characterized by < 0.1m/yr annual rainfall and high evaporation rates. Thus continuous lacustrine archives are limited and sediments are dominated by evaporites. Several closed basins contain vestiges of moister conditions from past pluvial periods. For example, the staircase morphology of lacustrine shorelines and abrasion platforms in the distal sectors of alluvial fans and pediments at Salar de Pocitos (24.5°S, 67°W, 3650 m asl) records repeated former lake highstands. This intermontane basin has existed since the late Tertiary, constituting a 435 km² salt flat in the region of Salta, NW Argentina. Comparison with palaeoclimate records from the neighboring Salar de Atacama suggests that the terrace systems at Salar de Pocitos were formed during the Late Pleistocene and early Holocene. Here we report on our preliminary results of the extent of several terrace generations in this region. We mapped terraces in the field and on satellite images and determined their elevations during a high-resolution DGPS field survey. Our analysis reveals 3-4 distinct terrace levels associated with individual lake-level highstands. However, basin-wide correlation is difficult due to ongoing tectonism and differential tilting of the basin. The highest lake terrace, ca. 25 m above modern base level, locally

  2. Present and future water resources supply and demand in the Central Andes of Peru: a comprehensive review with focus on the Cordillera Vilcanota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenkhan, Fabian; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Giráldez, Claudia; Suarez, Wilson; Rohrer, Mario; Molina, Edwin; Montoya, Nilton; Miñan, Fiorella

    2014-05-01

    Glaciers have been an important element of Andean societies and livelihoods as direct freshwater supply for agriculture irrigation, hydropower generation and mining activities. Peru's mainly remotely living population in the Central Andes has to cope with a strong seasonal variation of precipitations and river runoff interannually superimposed by El Niño impacts. Direct glacier and lake water discharge thus constitute a vital continuous water supply and represent a regulating buffer as far as hydrological variability is concerned. This crucial buffer effect is gradually altered by accelerated glacier retreat which leads most likely to an increase of annual river runoff variability. Furthermore, a near-future crossing of the 'peak water' is expected, from where on prior enhanced streamflow decreases and levels out towards a new still unknown minimum discharge. Consequently, a sustainable future water supply especially during low-level runoff dry season might not be guaranteed whereas Peru's water demand increases significantly. Here we present a comprehensive review, the current conditions and perspectives for water resources in the Cusco area with focus on the Vilcanota River, Cordillera Vilcanota, Southern Peru. With 279 km2 the Cordillera Vilcanota represents the second largest glacierized mountain range of the tropics worldwide. Especially as of the second half of the 1980s, it has been strongly affected by massive ice loss with around 30% glacier area decline until present. Furthermore, glacier vanishing triggers the formation of new lakes and increase of lake levels and therefore constitutes determining hazardous drivers for mass movements related to deglaciation effects. The Vilcanota River still lacks more profound hydrological studies. It is likely that its peak water has already been or might be crossed in near-future. This has strong implications for the still at 0.9% (2.2%) annually growing population of the Cusco department (Cusco city). People mostly

  3. Evaluation of Little Ice Age cooling in Western Central Andes, suggested by paleoELAs, in contrast with global warming since late 19th century deduced from instrumental records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubeda, Jose; Palacios, David; Campos, Néstor; Giraldez, Claudia; García, Eduardo; Quiros, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate climate cooling (°C) during the glacial expansion phases using the product GTV•ΔELA, where GTV is the vertical air temperature gradient (°C/m) and ΔELA (m) the difference in level observed between the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) reconstructions for current and past glaciers. With this aim the Area x Altitude Balance Ratio-(AABR) method was used to produce reconstructions of present ELAs (2002-2010) and paleoELAs corresponding to the last glacier advance phase. The reconstructions were produced in three study areas located along a N-S transect of the western cordillera in the Central Andes: the south-western sector of the Nevado Hualcán (9°S, 77°W; Giráldez 2011); the southern slope of the Cordillera Pariaqaqa (12°S, 76°W; Quirós, 2013) and the NW, NE, SE and SW quadrants of the Nevado Coropuna (16°S, 72°W; García 2013; Úbeda 2011; Campos, 2012). The three mountains exceed 6000 m altitude, their summit areas are covered by glaciers, and on their slopes there are existing well-conserved moraines deposited by the last advances near the present front of the ice masses. Although there are no absolute dates to confirm this hypothesis, it has been assumed that the last glacial advances occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA), which the oxygen isotopes of the Nevado Huascarán (9°S, 77°W) date to the period 1500-1890. For the Hualcán and Pariaqaqa the mean global value of the Earth's GTV (6.5°C/km) was used, considered valid for the Tropics. On the Coropuna a GTV=8.4°C/km was used, based on high resolution sensors installed in situ since 2007 (Úbeda 2011). This gradient is approaching the upper limit of the dry adiabatic gradient (9.8°C/km), as the Coropuna region is more arid than the other case study areas. The climate cooling estimates deduced from the product GTV•ΔELA were compared with the global warming shown by the 1880-2012 series, ΔT=0.85°C, and 1850/1900-2003/2012, ΔT=0.78°C. The differences are

  4. Reconstructing the annual mass balance of the Echaurren Norte glacier (Central Andes, 33.5° S) using local and regional hydroclimatic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiokas, Mariano H.; Christie, Duncan A.; Le Quesne, Carlos; Pitte, Pierre; Ruiz, Lucas; Villalba, Ricardo; Luckman, Brian H.; Berthier, Etienne; Nussbaumer, Samuel U.; González-Reyes, Álvaro; McPhee, James; Barcaza, Gonzalo

    2016-04-01

    Despite the great number and variety of glaciers in southern South America, in situ glacier mass-balance records are extremely scarce and glacier-climate relationships are still poorly understood in this region. Here we use the longest (> 35 years) and most complete in situ mass-balance record, available for the Echaurren Norte glacier (ECH) in the Andes at ˜ 33.5° S, to develop a minimal glacier surface mass-balance model that relies on nearby monthly precipitation and air temperature data as forcing. This basic model is able to explain 78 % of the variance in the annual glacier mass-balance record over the 1978-2013 calibration period. An attribution assessment identified precipitation variability as the dominant forcing modulating annual mass balances at ECH, with temperature variations likely playing a secondary role. A regionally averaged series of mean annual streamflow records from both sides of the Andes between ˜ 30 and 37° S is then used to estimate, through simple linear regression, this glacier's annual mass-balance variations since 1909. The reconstruction model captures 68 % of the observed glacier mass-balance variability and shows three periods of sustained positive mass balances embedded in an overall negative trend over the past 105 years. The three periods of sustained positive mass balances (centered in the 1920s-1930s, in the 1980s and in the first decade of the 21st century) coincide with several documented glacier advances in this region. Similar trends observed in other shorter glacier mass-balance series suggest that the Echaurren Norte glacier reconstruction is representative of larger-scale conditions and could be useful for more detailed glaciological, hydrological and climatological assessments in this portion of the Andes.

  5. Tectonic deformation of the Andes and the configuration of the subducted slab in central Peru: Results from a micro-seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, G.; Gagnepain, J. J.; Cisternas, A.; Hatzfeld, D.; Molnar, P.; Ocola, L.; Roecker, S. W.; Viode, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The vast majority of the microearthquakes recorded occurred to the east: on the Huaytapallana fault in the Eastern Cordillera or in the western margin of the sub-Andes. The sub-Andes appear to be the physiographic province subjected to the most intense seismic deformation. Focal depths for the crustal events here are as deep as 50 km, and the fault plane solutions, show thrust faulting on steep planes oriented roughly north-south. The Huaytapallana fault in the Cordillera Oriental also shows relatively high seismicity along a northeast-southwest trend that agrees with the fault scarp and the east dipping nodal plane of two large earthquakes that occurred on this fault in 1969. The recorded microearthquakes of intermediate depth show a flat seismic zone about 25 km thick at a depth of about 100 km. This agrees with the suggestion that beneath Peru the slab first dips at an angle of 30 deg to a depth of 100 km and then flattens following a quasi-horizontal trajectory. Fault plane solutions of intermediate depth microearthquakes have horizontal T axes oriented east-west.

  6. Classification of Debris-Covered Glaciers and Rock Glaciers in the Andes of Central Chile - An Approach Integrating Field Measurements, High-Resolution Satellite Imagery, and Coring Data to Estimate Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janke, J. R.; Bellisario, A. C.; Ferrando, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the Dry Andes of Chile (17 to 35° S), debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers are differentiated from "true" glaciers based on the percentage of surface debris cover, thickness of surface debris, and ice content. These landforms are more numerous than glaciers in the Central Andes; however, there are often omitted from inventories. Glaciers, debris covered glaciers, and rock glaciers are being removed by mining, while agricultural expansion and population growth have placed an additional demand on water resources. As a result, it is important to identify and locate these features to implement sustainable solutions. The objective of this study is to develop a classification system to identify debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers based on satellite imagery interpretation. The classification system is linked to field observations and measurements of ice content. Debris covered glaciers have three subclasses: surface coverage of semi (Class 1) and fully covered (Class 2) glaciers differentiates the first two forms, whereas debris thickness is critical for Class 3 when glaciers become buried with more than 3 m of surface debris. The amount of ice decreases from more than 85%, to 65-85%, to 45-65% for semi, fully, and buried debris-covered glaciers, respectively. Rock glaciers are characterized by three stages. Class 4 rock glaciers have pronounced transverse ridges and furrows that arch across the surface, which indicate flow produce via ice. Class 5 rock glaciers have ridges and furrows that appear linear in the direction of flow, and Class 6 rock glaciers have subdued surface topography that has been denudated as the rock glacier ceases movement. Ice content decreases from 25-45% ice, to 10-25% ice, to less than 10% ice from Class 4 to 6, respectively. The classification scheme can be used to identify and map debris covered glaciers and rock glaciers to create an inventory to better estimate available water resources at the basin-wide scale.

  7. Crustal Thickness in Northern Andes Using pP and sS Precursors at Teleseismic Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda Camacho, N. M.; Assumpcao, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Andean belt is a result of the subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South American continental plate. It has an extension of 8000 km from Venezuela to Tierra del Fuego. While the crustal-thickness is a well-known property in Southern and Central Andes, it is still poorly known in the Northern Andes (between 10°N and 4° S). The crustal thickness is a very important property to understand the crustal evolution such as in geodynamic models and in modeling wave-propagation in global and regional seismic studies. Due to the high seismic activity at intermediate depths in the Northern Andes, it is possible to use the teleseismic P-wave and S-wave trains to find the crustal-thickness. In this study, we analyze the reflections from the underside of the Moho for intermediate and deep earthquakes in the northern Andes recorded at teleseismic distances (between 40°- 85°), and estimate the crustal-thickness at the bounce points of the pP and sS wave by converting the delay time between the phases pP and pmP and also between sS and smS into crustal thickness. This method can be applied in zones with earthquakes having magnitude larger than 6 for that reason the Northern Andes is a favorable area to develop it. We analyzed five events from the Northern Andes with magnitude larger than 6 and deeper than 100 km. The crustal thickness was calculated using the P wave with the vertical component and the S wave using both transverse SH and radial SV components. We find that the crustal-thickness in this area varied from 27.9 × 2.4 km at (76.48 W, 4.82 N) to 55.7 × 5.2 km at (77.92 W, 2 S). Our results show a crustal-thickness consistent with a compilation made for a larger region that includes our research area, showing residuals between -4 km and 4 km in most of the bounce points . We are getting results in areas that have not been studied previously so it will help to increase the database of crustal-thicknesses for the Northern Andes.

  8. Exhumation of the Neuquén Basin in the southern Central Andes (Malargüe fold and thrust belt) from field data and low-temperature thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folguera, A.; Bottesi, G.; Duddy, I.; Martín-González, F.; Orts, D.; Sagripanti, L.; Rojas Vera, E.; Ramos, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Apatite fission-track analysis performed on eighteen Mesozoic sediment samples of the Neuquén Basin from the Southern Central Andes orogenic front between 35°30‧ and 37°S has revealed Campanian-Paleocene (75-55 Ma), late Eocene-early Oligocene (35-30 Ma) and middle Miocene (15-10 Ma) cooling episodes. Each cooling episode corresponds closely with major unconformities observed in the preserved sedimentary sequences, and is associated with kilometer-scale additional burial and subsequent exhumation. A similar degree of cooling is inferred from associated vitrinite reflectance data. Late Eocene-early Oligocene exhumation is recognized only near the eastern orogenic front adjacent to the foreland in the southernmost part of the study area and may be related partly to within-plate magmatism and associated extension in the Palaoco Basin. The Campanian-Paleocene and middle Miocene cooling episodes are recognized more widely in the fold and thrust belt and appear to coincide with periods of eastward arc expansion and mountain building processes.

  9. Geometry of the inverted Cretaceous Chañarcillo Basin based on 2-D gravity and field data - an approach to the structure of the western Central Andes of northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, F.; Maksymowicz, A.; Ochoa, H.; Díaz, D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses an integrated approach that provides new ideas about the structural geometry of the NNE-striking, Cretaceous Chañarcillo Basin located along the eastern Coastal Cordillera in the western Central Andes of northern Chile (27-28° S). The results obtained from the integration of two transverse (E-W) gravity profiles with previous geological information show that the architecture of this basin is defined by a large NNE-SSE-trending and east-vergent anticline ("Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium"), which is related to the positive reactivation of a former Cretaceous normal fault (Elisa de Bordos Master Fault). Moreover, intercalations of high and low gravity anomalies and steep gravity gradients reveal a set of buried, west-tilted half-grabens associated with a synthetic normal fault pattern. These results, together with the uplift and folding style of the Cretaceous synextensional deposits recognized within the basin, suggest that its structure could be explained by an inverted fault system linked to the shortening of pre-existing Cretaceous normal fault systems. Ages of the synorogenic deposits exposed unconformably over the frontal limb of the Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium confirm a Late Cretaceous age for the Andean deformation and tectonic inversion of the basin.

  10. Geometry of the inverted Cretaceous Chañarcillo Basin based on 2-D gravity and field data. An approach to the structure of the western Central Andes of northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, F.; Maksymowicz, A.; Ochoa, H.; Díaz, D.

    2015-08-01

    This paper discusses an integrated approach that provides new ideas about the structural geometry of the NNE-striking, Cretaceous Chañarcillo Basin located along the eastern Coastal Cordillera in the western Central Andes of northern Chile (27-28° S). The results obtained from the integration of two transverse (E-W) gravity profiles with previous geological information, show that the architecture of this basin is defined by a large NNE-SSE-trending and east-vergent anticline ("Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium"), which is related to the positive reactivation of a former Cretaceous normal fault (Elisa de Bordos Master Fault). Moreover, intercalations of high and low gravity anomalies and steep gravity gradients reveal a set of buried, west-tilted half-grabens associated with a synthetic normal fault pattern. These results, together with the uplift and folding style of the Cretaceous syn-rift recognized within the basin, suggest that their complete structural geometry could be explained by an inverted fault system linked to the shortening of pre-existing Cretaceous normal fault systems. Ages of the synorogenic deposits exposed unconformably over the frontal limb of the Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium confirm a Late Cretaceous age for the Andean deformation and tectonic inversion of the basin.

  11. A further contribution to the knowledge of two inadequately known species of geophilid centipedes from the Andes of South-Central Chile, currently assigned to the genus Plateurytion Attems, 1909 (Chilopoda: Geophilomorpha).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luis Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Two poorly known species of geophilid centipedes from the Andes of South-Central Chile, i.e., Plateurytion mundus (Chamberlin, 1955) and Plateurytion zapallar (Chamberlin, 1955) (Myriapoda: Chilopoda: Geophilomorpha), are herein redescribed and illustrated after type specimens of both taxa and new material of the latter, rectifying the condition of the coxosternites of the second maxillae, which are medially joined through a narrow, hyaline and non-areolate membranous isthmus only (instead of "broadly fused as in Pachymerium", as stated by Chamberlin), this being consistent with the current generic assignment of these species under Plateurytion Attems, 1909. New data on many morphological features of specific value, until now unknown, are also given for both taxa. Plateurytion zapallar is reported for the first time from Coquimbo region, 11 Km N of Los Vilos (Elqui province), Valparaíso region, Quebrada Huaquén, Pichicuy (Petorca province), La Campana National Park (Quillota province), and Quebrada el Tigre, Cachagua (Valparíso province). A key for identification of the South American species currently included in Plateurytion is given. PMID:26624194

  12. Description and phylogeny of three new species of Synophis (Colubridae, Dipsadinae) from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Echevarría, Lourdes Y; Venegas, Pablo J; Germán Chávez; Camper, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of three new species of Synophis snakes from the eastern slopes of the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru is reported. All previous records of Synophis bicolor from eastern Ecuador correspond to Synophis bogerti sp. n., which occurs between 1000-1750 m along a large part of the Amazonian slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes. In contrast, Synophis zamora sp. n. is restricted to southeastern Ecuador, including Cordillera del Cóndor, between 1543-1843 m. Synophis insulomontanus sp. n. is from the eastern slopes of the Andes in central and northern Peru, between 1122-1798 m, and represents the first record of Synophis from this country. All three new species share in common a large lateral spine at the base of the hemipenial body. A molecular phylogenetic tree based on three mitochondrial genes is presented, including samples of Diaphorolepis wagneri. Our tree strongly supports Synophis and Diaphorolepis as sister taxa, as well as monophyly of the three new species described here and Synophis calamitus. Inclusion of Synophis and Diaphorolepis within Dipsadinae as sister to a clade containing Imantodes, Dipsas, Ninia, Hypsiglena and Pseudoleptodeira is also supported. PMID:26798310

  13. Description and phylogeny of three new species of Synophis (Colubridae, Dipsadinae) from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Echevarría, Lourdes Y.; Venegas, Pablo J.; Germán Chávez; Camper, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The discovery of three new species of Synophis snakes from the eastern slopes of the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru is reported. All previous records of Synophis bicolor from eastern Ecuador correspond to Synophis bogerti sp. n., which occurs between 1000–1750 m along a large part of the Amazonian slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes. In contrast, Synophis zamora sp. n. is restricted to southeastern Ecuador, including Cordillera del Cóndor, between 1543–1843 m. Synophis insulomontanus sp. n. is from the eastern slopes of the Andes in central and northern Peru, between 1122–1798 m, and represents the first record of Synophis from this country. All three new species share in common a large lateral spine at the base of the hemipenial body. A molecular phylogenetic tree based on three mitochondrial genes is presented, including samples of Diaphorolepis wagneri. Our tree strongly supports Synophis and Diaphorolepis as sister taxa, as well as monophyly of the three new species described here and Synophis calamitus. Inclusion of Synophis and Diaphorolepis within Dipsadinae as sister to a clade containing Imantodes, Dipsas, Ninia, Hypsiglena and Pseudoleptodeira is also supported. PMID:26798310

  14. Combining point and distributed snowpack data with landscape-based discretization for hydrologic modeling of the snow-dominated Maipo River Basin, in the semi-arid Andes central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videla Giering, Y. A., III; McPhee, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Snow hydrology in mountain environments plays an important role in the availability of hydrological resources in warm climate areas and height effects, since the magnitude of snowpack, its spatial and temporal distribution is very important to determine the availability of water in the snowmelt season and take forward different productive activities This investigation models and assess the main phenomena hydrological cycle of snow using the software Cold Region Hydrological Model (Pomeroy et al., 2007). The software is a physically based model developed by the centre for hydrology, University of Saskatchewan. The aim of this model is to have a better understanding of hydrological processes involved in cold environments, which are particular in the sense that a host of specific phenomena such as snow and ice accumulation, transport and melt, infiltration through frozen soils, and the like, control the hydrograph timing) The analysis involved the development of a hydrologic model for the Upper Maipo River Basin, with elevations between 800 and 6500 meters above sea level and 5000-km^2 watershed in the Andes of Central Chile which supplies water resources to the capital city of Santiago (7 million inhabitants), to a thriving agricultural region, as well as to hydropower and large mining activities. The paper concludes that there is a differential distribution of snow cover in the study area, determined mainly by steep terrain geomorphology. These factors have been considered in the parameterization of the model, showing considerable variation in storage time, redistributions by blowing snow, melting intervals, infiltration rates and drainage basin. The fictional scenarios modeled demonstrate noticeable changes in the hydrograph, showing the fragile climate and hydrological condition of this basin of Central Chile.

  15. The Amazon-Laurentian connection as viewed from the Middle Proterozoic rocks in the central Andes, western Bolivia and northern Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tosdal, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Middle Proterozoic rocks underlying the Andes in western Bolivia, western Argentina, and northern Chile and Early Proterozoic rocks of the Arequipa massif in southern Peru?? from the Arequipa-Antofalla craton. These rocks are discontinuously exposed beneath Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks, but abundant crystalline clasts in Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the western altiplano allow indirect samples of the craton. Near Berenguela, western Bolivia, the Oligocene and Miocene Mauri Formation contains boulders of granodiorite augen gneiss (1171??20 Ma and 1158??12 Ma; U-Pb zircon), quartzose gneiss and granofels that are inferred to have arkosic protoliths (1100 Ma source region; U-Pb zircon), quartzofeldspathic and mafic orthogneisses that have amphibolite- and granulite-facies metamorphic mineral assemblages (???1080 Ma metamorphism; U-Pb zircon), and undeformed granitic rocks of Phanerozoic(?) age. The Middle Proterozoic crystalline rocks from Berenguela and elsewhere in western Bolivia and from the Middle Proterozoic Bele??n Schist in northern Chile generally have present-day low 206Pb/204Pb ( 15.57), and elevated 208Pb/204Pb (37.2 to 50.7) indicative of high time-averaged Th/U values. The Middle Proterozoic rocks in general have higher presentday 206Pb/204Pb values than those of the Early Proterozoic rocks of the Arequipa massif (206Pb/204Pb between 16.1 and 17.1) but lower than rocks of the southern Arequipa-Antofalla craton (206Pb/204Pb> 18.5), a difference inferred to reflect Grenvillian granulite metamorphism. The Pb isotopic compositions for the various Proterozoic rocks lie on common Pb isotopic growth curves, implying that Pb incorporated in rocks composing the Arequipa-Antofalla craton was extracted from a similar evolving Pb isotopic reservoir. Evidently, the craton has been a coherent terrane since the Middle Proterozoic. Moreover, the Pb isotopic compositions for the Arequipa-Antofalla craton overlap those of the Amazon craton, thereby supporting a link

  16. Orographic Barrier Uplift and Climate-System Interactions in the Southern Central Andes of NW Argentina; Insights from Stable Isotope Hydrogen Compositions of Hydrated Volcanic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingel, H.; Strecker, M. R.; Mulch, A.; Hynek, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most controversial issues concerning the late Cenozoic evolution of the Andean orogen is the timing of uplift of the Puna Plateau (Puna) and its eastern border, the Eastern Cordillera. The Eastern Cordillera separates the internally drained, arid Puna from semi-arid intermontane basins and the humid sectors of the Andean broken foreland and the Subandean fold-and-thrust belt in the east. The Andes thus form an efficient orographic barrier to easterly moisture-bearing winds, with pronounced gradients in topography, rainfall, and the efficiency of surface processes. The exact timing and style of topographic growth in the Puna and adjacent morphotectonic provinces is not well understood, often poorly constrained, and is the subject of ongoing studies. Periodic deformation within intermontane basins, and diachronous foreland uplifts associated with the reactivation of inherited basement structures make a rigorous assessment of the spatiotemporal uplift patterns difficult. Intermontane basins have retained vestiges of the sedimentary record that, in some cases, may reach back in time to when these areas represented contiguous and undeformed depositional areas. In NW Argentina these strata also contain datable volcanic ashes that are not only important horizons for tectono-sedimentary events, but also represent terrestrial recorders of the hydrogen-isotope composition of ancient meteoric waters and thus may track the development of rainfall barriers and the evolution of tectonically forced climate change. Hydrated volcanic glasses record the hydrogen-isotope composition averaged over thousands to ten thousand years. Hence, the isotopic signal is insensitive to daily to millennial climate variations and may be used to infer paleo-environmental changes on similar time scales as mountain-building processes. Here, we present more than 50 hydrogen stable-isotope compositions of hydrated volcanic glass shards and new radiometric ages (9 Ma - 22 ka). We relate

  17. Instantánea de los cánceres de cerebro y del sistema nervioso central

    Cancer.gov

    Información sobre las tendencias de incidencia, mortalidad y financiamiento del NCI sobre los cánceres de cerebro y del sistema nervioso central; así como ejemplos de actividades del NCI y adelantos en la investigación de estos tipos de cáncer.

  18. Quarterly progress report for Concilio Central - Agua Caliente Del Sol

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, E.

    1982-01-21

    The Concilio Central has completed the five (5) solar water heaters called for in the project. In total the project was a learning experience for all involved and did demonstrate the validity of using the sun's energy to heat water for residential use. Each of the five heaters constructed and installed produce sixty-six (66) gallons of 110/sup 0/ water (average temperature) every sunny day. The residents who received the water heaters are satisfied with the water temperature and amount and readily adapted to the availability of hot water in their homes.

  19. A tectonically controlled basin-fill within the Valle del Cauca, West-Central Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Rine, J.M.; Keith, J.F. Jr.; Alfonso, C.A.; Ballesteros, I.; Laverde, F.; Sacks, P.E.; Secor, D.T. Jr. ); Perez, V.E.; Bernal, I.; Cordoba, F.; Numpaque, L.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Tertiary strata of the Valle del Cauca reflect a forearc/foreland basin tectonic history spanning a period from pre-uplift of the Cordillera Central to initiation of uplift of the Cordillera Occidental. Stratigraphy of the Valle del Cauca begins with Jurassic-Cretaceous rocks of exotic and/or volcanic provenance and of oceanic origin. Unconformably overlying these are Eocene to Oligocene basal quartz-rich sandstones, shallow marine algal limestones, and fine-grained fluvial/deltaic mudstones and sandstones with coalbeds. These Eocene to Oligocene deposits represent a period of low tectonic activity. During late Oligocene to early Miocene, increased tectonic activity produced conglomeratic sediments which were transported from east to west, apparently derived from uplift of the Cordillera Central, and deposited within a fluvial to deltaic setting. East-west shortening of the Valle del Cauca basin folded the Eocene to early Miocene units, and additional uplift of the Cordillera Central during the later Miocene resulted in syn-tectonic deposition of alluvial fans. After additional fold and thrust deformation of the total Eocene-Miocene basin-fill, tectonic activity abated and Pliocene-Quaternary alluvial and lacustrine strata were deposited. Within the framework of this depositional and tectonic history of the Valle del Cauca, hydrocarbon exploration strategies can be formulated and evaluated.

  20. Crustal and Upper Mantle Investigations Using Receiver Functions and Tomographic Inversion in the Southern Puna Plateau Region of the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heit, B.; Yuan, X.; Bianchi, M.; Jakovlev, A.; Kumar, P.; Kay, S. M.; Sandvol, E. A.; Alonso, R.; Coira, B.; Comte, D.; Brown, L. D.; Kind, R.

    2011-12-01

    We present here the results obtained using the data form our passive seismic array in the southern Puna plateau between 25°S to 28°S latitude in Argentina and Chile. In first instance we have been able to calculate P and S receiver functions in order to investigate the Moho thickness and other seismic discontinuities in the study area. The RF data shows that the northern Puna plateau has a thicker crust and that the Moho topography is more irregular along strike. The seismic structure and thickness of the continental crust and the lithospheric mantle beneath the southern Puna plateau reveals that the LAB is deeper to the north of the array suggesting lithospheric removal towards the south. Later we performed a joint inversion of teleseismic and regional tomographic data in order to study the distribution of velocity anomalies that could help us to better understand the evolution of the Andean elevated plateau and the role of lithosphere-asthenosphere interactions in this region. Low velocities are observed in correlation with young volcanic centers (e.g. Ojos del Salado, Cerro Blanco, Galan) and agree very well with the position of crustal lineaments in the region. This is suggesting a close relationship between magmatism and lithospheric structures at crustal scale coniciding with the presence of hot asthenospheric material at the base of the crust probably induced by lithospheric foundering.

  1. Cenozoic sedimentation and exhumation of the foreland basin system preserved in the Precordillera thrust belt (31-32°S), southern central Andes, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levina, Mariya; Horton, Brian K.; Fuentes, Facundo; Stockli, Daniel F.

    2014-09-01

    Andean retroarc compression associated with subduction and shallowing of the oceanic Nazca plate resulted in thin-skinned thrusting that partitioned and uplifted Cenozoic foreland basin fill in the Precordillera of west-central Argentina. Evolution of the central segment of the Precordillera fold-thrust belt is informed by new analyses of clastic nonmarine deposits now preserved in three intermontane regions between major east directed thrust faults. We focus on uppermost Oligocene-Miocene basin fill in the axial to frontal Precordillera at 31-32°S along the Río San Juan (Albarracín and Pachaco sections) and the flank of one of the leading thrust structures (Talacasto section). The three successions record hinterland construction of the Frontal Cordillera, regional arc volcanism, and initial exhumation of Precordillera thrust sheets. Provenance changes recorded by detrital zircon U-Pb age populations suggest that initial shortening in the Frontal Cordillera coincided with an early Miocene shift from eolian to fluvial accumulation in the adjacent foreland basin. Upward coarsening of fluvial deposits and increased proportions of Paleozoic clasts reflect cratonward (eastward) advance of deformation into the Precordillera and resultant structural fragmentation of the foreland basin into isolated intermontane segments. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry of basin fill constrains to 12-9 Ma the most probable age of uplift-induced exhumation and cooling of Precordillera thrust sheets. This apparent pulse of exhumation is evident in each succession, suggestive of rapid, large-scale exhumation by synchronous thrusting above a single décollement linking major structures of the Precordillera.

  2. Diversity of extremophilic bacteria in the sediment of high-altitude lakes located in the mountain desert of Ojos del Salado volcano, Dry-Andes.

    PubMed

    Aszalós, Júlia Margit; Krett, Gergely; Anda, Dóra; Márialigeti, Károly; Nagy, Balázs; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2016-09-01

    Ojos del Salado, the highest volcano on Earth is surrounded by a special mountain desert with extreme aridity, great daily temperature range, intense solar radiation, and permafrost from 5000 meters above sea level. Several saline lakes and permafrost derived high-altitude lakes can be found in this area, often surrounded by fumaroles and hot springs. The aim of this study was to gain information about the bacterial communities inhabiting the sediment of high-altitude lakes of the Ojos del Salado region located between 3770 and 6500 m. Altogether 11 sediment samples from 4 different altitudes were examined with 16S rRNA gene based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and clone libraries. Members of 17 phyla or candidate divisions were detected with the dominance of Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community composition was determined mainly by the altitude of the sampling sites; nevertheless, the extreme aridity and the active volcanism had a strong influence on it. Most of the sequences showed the highest relation to bacterial species or uncultured clones from similar extreme environments. PMID:27315168

  3. Constraining Glacier Sensitivity across the Andes: A Modeling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagredo, E. A.; Rupper, S.; Lowell, T. V.

    2011-12-01

    Valley glaciers are sensitive indicators of climate change. Records of former glacial fluctuations have been extensively used to reconstruct paleoclimatic conditions at different temporal and spatial scales. These reconstructions typically do not account for variations in regional climate conditions. Based on modeling results, it has been suggested these regional climate conditions could play an important role modulating the magnitude of glacier response for large scale climate perturbations. The climatically diverse Andes mountain range represents an ideal setting to test hypothesis of glacier sensitivity variability. Here, we quantify glacier sensitivity to climate change in different climatic regimes across the Andean. By applying a regional Surface Energy Mass Balance model (SEMB), we analyze the change in the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) for a sample of 234 glaciers, under different climatic perturbations. Our results suggest that ELAs of Andean glaciers respond linearly to changes in temperature, with rates that oscillate between 153 and 186 m/°C. For example, with a perturbation of -6°C (~Global LGM), our model predicts a drop in the ELA of 916 m for the least sensitive glaciers and 1117 m for the more sensitive ones. This glacier sensitivity variability exhibits a very distinctive spatial distribution. The most sensitive glaciers are located in Central Chile (south of 31°C), and the Western Cordillera of Peru (north of 13°S). In contrast, lower sensitivity glaciers are situated in the inner Tropics, Eastern Cordillera of Peru and Bolivia (south of 13°S), and part of southern Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. When analyzing the response of glaciers to changes in accumulation, our results suggest that under a scenario of increasing precipitation, glacier behavior is nonlinear. A statistical cluster analysis of glacier sensitivity divides our 234 glaciers into three distinct groups. The most sensitive glaciers correspond to those situated in western

  4. Tectonic and climate history influence the geochemistry of large-volume silicic magmas: New δ18O data from the Central Andes with comparison to N America and Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, Chris B.; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Cas, Raymond A. F.

    2013-07-01

    New δ18O data from magmatic quartz, plagioclase and zircon crystals in Neogene large-volume, rhyodacitic ignimbrites from the Central Andean Ignimbrite Province reveal uniformly high-δ18O values (δ18O(Qtz) from + 8.1 to + 9.6‰ - 43 analyses from 15 ignimbrites; δ18O(Plag) from + 7.4 to + 8.3‰ - 10 analyses from 6 ignimbrites; δ18O(Zrc) from + 6.7 to + 7.8‰ - 5 analyses from 4 ignimbrites). These data, combined with crustal radiogenic isotopic signatures of Sr, Nd and Pb, imply progressive contamination of basaltic magmas with up to 50 vol.% upper crust in these large volume silicic systems. The narrow range of δ18O values also demonstrate that surprising homogeneity was achieved through space (100's km) and time (~ 10 Ma to recent) in these large-volume magmas, via residence in their parental middle to upper crustal bodies. Low-δ18O values of many large volume (> 10 km3) silicic magmas in North America and Kamchatka, discussed here for comparison, reflect the influence of meteoric-hydrothermal events and glaciations in lowering these δ18O values via the assimilation of hydrothermally-altered crustal material. Conversely, there is a scarcity of a low-δ18O signature in the Central Andes and subduction-related or influenced systems in North America, such as the Oligocene Great Basin of Nevada and Utah, the Southern Rocky Mountain Volcanic Field of Colorado, and the SW Nevada volcanic field system. In these regions, the generally heavy-δ18O magmatic signature is interpreted as a reflection of how a broadly compressional regime, high elevation, aridity and evaporation rates limit availability and infiltration of large amounts of surface meteoric water and hydrothermal alteration of the shallow crust. This leads us to speculate that the δ18O values of large volume silicic magmas in these areas record a paleoelevation and paleoclimate signal. If this is the case, δ18O values of ignimbrites can potentially be used to track the effects of a meteoric

  5. Field study and three-dimensional reconstruction of thrusts and strike-slip faults in the Central Andes: implications for deep-seated geothermal circulation and ore deposits exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Giordano, Guido; Baez, Walter; Becchio, Raul; Viramonte, Jose; Arnosio, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    The Puna plateau (NW Argentina), located in the back-arc of the Central Andes, is a plateau characterized by both orogen-parallel and orogen-oblique deformation styles, extensive magmatic and geothermal activity, and the broad occurrence of igneous and hydrothermal ore-forming minerals. In this area, like in other convergent margins, the behaviour of the magma-tectonics interplay can affect the circulation of hydrothermal fluids, so that the full comprehension of the tectonic control on the magmas and fluids paths in the continental crust is crucial to plan the geothermal and ore exploration. In this study, we present a structural analysis of the back-arc portion of the orogen-oblique Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the surrounding orogen-parallel thrust faults in the central-eastern Puna Plateau, comprising the Cerro Tuzgle-Tocomar geothermal volcanic area, with high geothermal potential, and silicic calderas and domes associated with epithermal ore deposits. We also focused on the tectonic and volcanotectonic structures of the Chimpa and Tuzgle stratovolcanoes, two of the most important polygenetic volcanic centres of the plateau. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of the tectonic structures of the studied area. These data and the available stratigraphic and geophysical data have been integrated with the software MOVE and PETREL in a three-dimensional reconstruction of the main fault planes, showing their attitude and intersections at depth. As a result of our study, we show that despite different geometry and kinematics of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the thrust faults, they formed and evolved under the same progressive evolving dynamic state, forming a single tectonic system and accommodating crustal shortening of a thickened crust. In this frame, the crust underwent simultaneous deformation along both the low-angle thrust faults and the vertical transcurrent strike-slip faults

  6. Discussion of ``relationships between mineralization and silicic volcanism in the Central Andes'' by P.W. Francis, C. Halls and M.C.W. Baker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, A. H.; Farrar, E.; Zentilli, M.

    1985-05-01

    In their stimulating paper, Francis et al. (1983) present convincing evidence for the association of several Central Andean tin and copper vein/stockwork deposits with felsic volcanic domes, rather than with stratovolcanoes (ef. Sillitoe, 1973). They also reexamine the problem of the relationships between caldera formation (and voluminous ash-flow tuff eruption) and large-scale hydrothermal activity (see e.g., McKee, 1979; Sillitoe, 1980), concluding that protracted cooling histories of sub-caldera plutons may be reflected in the long time lags (1-10 m.y.) documented between caldera collapse and superimposed mineralization. They cite, inter alia, the El Salvador porphyry copper deposit, northern Chile (lat. 26°17'S) as revealing such a sequence of events, and provide LANDSAT evidence for the presence of an extensively dissected, ca. 15 km wide, caldera in the mine area. We consider the authors' case to be persuasive in general, but suggest that their argument regarding El Salvador is weakened by an apparent mis-reading of Gustafson and Hunt's (1975) brief description of the pre-mineralization geological evolution of the Indio Muerto complex. In particular, they conflate two distinct episodes of subaerial volcanism. Because Mercado (1978) also in part misinterprets the regional and local stratigraphic relationships in her 1 : 25,000 geological map of the area, there is considerable potential for confusion.

  7. Clumped Isotope Thermometry Reveals Variations in Soil Carbonate Seasonal Biases Over >4 km of Relief in the Semi-Arid Andes of Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgener, L. K.; Huntington, K. W.; Hoke, G. D.; Schauer, A. J.; Ringham, M. C.; Latorre Hidalgo, C.; Díaz, F.

    2015-12-01

    The application of carbonate clumped isotope thermometry to soil carbonates has the potential to shed new light on questions regarding terrestrial paleoclimate. In order to better utilize this paleoclimate tool, outstanding questions regarding seasonal biases in soil carbonate formation and the relationship between soil carbonate formation temperatures (T(Δ47)) and surface temperatures must be resolved. We address these questions by comparing C, O, and clumped isotope data from Holocene/modern soil carbonates to modern meteorological data. The data were collected along a 170 km transect with >4 km of relief in central Chile (~30°S). Previous studies have suggested that soil carbonates should record a warm season bias and form in isotopic equilibrium with soil water and soil CO2. We identify two discrete climate zones separated by the local winter snow line (~3200 m). Below this boundary, precipitation falls as rain and soil carbonate T(Δ47) values at depths >40 cm resemble summer soil temperatures; at higher elevations, precipitation falls as snow and T(Δ47) values resemble mean annual soil temperatures. Soil carbonates from the highest sample site (4700 m), which is devoid of vegetation and located near perennial snow fields, yield anomalous δ18O, δ13C, and T(Δ47) values, indicative of kinetic isotope effects that we attribute to cryogenic carbonate formation. Our results suggest that soil carbonates from depths <40 cm are affected by large, high frequency variations in temperature and precipitation, and should not be used as paleotemperature proxies. These findings (1) highlight the role of soil moisture in modulating soil carbonate formation and the resulting T(Δ47) values, (2) underscore the importance of understanding past soil moisture conditions when attempting to reconstruct paleotemperatures using carbonate clumped isotope thermometry, and (3) suggest that soil carbonates from high elevation or high latitude sites may form under non

  8. Spatial diversity patterns of Pristimantis frogs in the Tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Meza-Joya, Fabio Leonardo; Torres, Mauricio

    2016-04-01

    Although biodiversity gradients have been widely documented, the factors governing broad-scale patterns in species richness are still a source of intense debate and interest in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology. Here, we tested whether spatial hypotheses (species-area effect, topographic heterogeneity, mid-domain null model, and latitudinal effect) explain the pattern of diversity observed along the altitudinal gradient of Andean rain frogs of the genus Pristimantis. We compiled a gamma-diversity database of 378 species of Pristimantis from the tropical Andes, specifically from Colombia to Bolivia, using records collected above 500 m.a.s.l. Analyses were performed at three spatial levels: Tropical Andes as a whole, split in its two main domains (Northern and Central Andes), and split in its 11 main mountain ranges. Species richness, area, and topographic heterogeneity were calculated for each 500-m-width elevational band. Spatial hypotheses were tested using linear regression models. We examined the fit of the observed diversity to the mid-domain hypothesis using randomizations. The species richness of Pristimantis showed a hump-shaped pattern across most of the altitudinal gradients of the Tropical Andes. There was high variability in the relationship between area and species richness along the Tropical Andes. Correcting for area effects had little impact in the shape of the empirical pattern of biodiversity curves. Mid-domain models produced similar gradients in species richness relative to empirical gradients, but the fit varied among mountain ranges. The effect of topographic heterogeneity on species richness varied among mountain ranges. There was a significant negative relationship between latitude and species richness. Our findings suggest that spatial processes partially explain the richness patterns of Pristimantis frogs along the Tropical Andes. Explaining the current patterns of biodiversity in this hot spot may require further studies on

  9. Structure and tectonic evolution of the Fuegian Andes (southernmost South America) in the framework of the Scotia Arc development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Carbonell, Pablo J.; Dimieri, Luis V.; Olivero, Eduardo B.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    The major structural and tectonic features of the Fuegian Andes provide an outstanding onshore geological framework that aids in the understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Scotia Arc, mainly known from offshore studies. The orogenic history of the Fuegian Andes (Late Cretaceous-Miocene) is thus compared and integrated with the tectonic history of the Scotia Sea. Late Cretaceous-Paleocene structures in the Fuegian Andes suggest a N-directed contraction consistent with an oroclinal bending of the southernmost South America-Antarctic Peninsula continental bridge. This N-directed contraction in the Fuegian Andes continued during the spreading of the West Scotia Ridge, between 40-50 and 10 Ma ago. The onset of major strike-slip faulting in Tierra del Fuego is considered here to be not older than the late Miocene, consistent with the recent history of the North Scotia Ridge; thus forming part of a tectonic regime superposed to the prior contraction in the Fuegian Andes.

  10. A Precambrian cratonic block in the west-central Chihuahua - The Sierra del Nido cratonic block

    SciTech Connect

    Goodell, P.C. . Dept. of Geological)

    1993-02-01

    Precambrian rocks in west-central Chihuahua have been recognized by Denison (1969) and Mauger et al. (1983), on the basis of radiometric dating. The rocks are rhyolite clasts, and an allucthonous block, respectively, however their source direction and vergence can be measured. They point back to and are on the edge of a large, uniform, negative Bouguer gravity anomaly, having values greater than 200 milligals. The isotopic geochemical character of several Tertiary felsic fields within this anomalous are has been determined, and initial strontium isotopic ratios are all greater than 0.7055. Outside the anomalous area these ratios are lower, and Basin and Range extension tectonism is more evident. It is proposed that a Precambrian cratonic block, the Sierra del Nido, is present in the crust in west-central Chihuahua. It is reasonable to propose that it was decreted from North America during a Precambrian extensional (1.1. By ) event, from somewhere along the Arizona Transition Zone-Texas Linament region. The Sierra del Nido Block is separated form the ATZ-TL by a region of disrupted craton and extended crust, the Basin and Range Province. Implications of the pressure of the Sierra del Nido Block on other regional tectonic events will be discussed.

  11. Mountain building processes in the Central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, A. L.; Isacks, B. L.

    1986-01-01

    False color composite images of the Thematic Mapper (TM) bands 5, 4, and 2 were examined to make visual interpretations of geological features. The use of the roam mode of image display with the International Imaging Systems (IIS) System 600 image processing package running on the IIS Model 75 was very useful. Several areas in which good comparisons with ground data existed, were examined in detail. Parallel to the visual approach, image processing methods are being developed which allow the complete use of the seven TM bands. The data was organized into easily accessible files and a visual cataloging of the quads (quarter TM scenes) with preliminary registration with the best available charts for the region. The catalog has proved to be a valuable tool for the rapid scanning of quads for a specific investigation. Integration of the data into a complete approach to the problems of uplift, deformation, and magnetism in relation to the Nazca-South American plate interaction is at an initial stage.

  12. Recent regional shortening in the interior of the orogenic Puna Plateau of the southern central Andes: New InSAR observations from the Salar de Pocitos, Salta, NW Argentina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckelmann, Felix; Motagh, Mahdi; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred; Freymark, Jessica; Bekeschus, Benjamin; Alonso, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Plateau of the southern central Andes, with an average elevation of about 3.5 km and an area of 500,000 km2, is the world's second highest plateau after the Tibetan plateau. The southern sector of the plateau, the Argentine Puna, is characterized by a pattern of basement-cored ranges with the highest peaks above 6000 m asl and intervening Cenozoic sedimentary basins. Most of the ranges have a nearly N-S trend and enclose the sedimentary basins which exhibit internal drainage and several km-thick continental evaporate and clastic deposits. Like its Cenozoic counterparts this plateau is thought to be characterized by active extension, which superseded contractile deformation in the late Miocene. Often, extensional structures are associated with mafic volcanism. In contrast, the plateau flanks are subjected to sustained contraction and a migration of deformation toward the foreland. Here, we present new Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements based on ENVISAT and ERS data to document that the southern central part of the Puna is still dominated by contraction, despite widespread evidence for extensional tectonism. We report a time series of InSAR from the Salar de Pocitos basin spanning about seven years (ENVISAT from 2005 to 2009; ERS from 2002 to 2009). The basin is located at approximately 24.5° S, 67° W, with a minimum elevation of 3650 m asl. In this region, the transition from regional shortening to horizontal extension associated with mafic volcanism is generally assumed to have taken place quite rapidly between 7 and 5 Ma. The Pocitos basin forms a N-S orientated, salt-bearing, hydrologically-isolated basin with a surface area of 435 Km2. To the west, it is bounded by an anticline involving Tertiary and Quaternary sediments; to the east it is bounded by a reverse-faulted range. Late Miocene volcanic edifices delimit the basin to the north, whereas structural blocks close it to the south. The Tertiary and Quaternary

  13. Charles Darwin in the Andes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizzo, Nelio; Bizzo, Luis Eduardo Maestrelli

    2006-01-01

    Considering geological time as an important epistemological obstacle to the construction of ideas on biological evolution, a study was carried out on the so-called "Darwin Papers". The conclusion was that Charles Darwin's excursion in the Andes during March-April 1835 was a crucial step in this regard. An expedition was carried out in March-April…

  14. Lithospheric scale model of Merida Andes, Venezuela (GIAME Project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, M.; Orihuela, N. D.; Klarica, S.; Gil, E.; Levander, A.; Audemard, F. A.; Mazuera, F.; Avila, J.

    2013-05-01

    Merida Andes (MA) is one of the most important orogenic belt in Venezuela and represents the northern culmination of South America Andes. During the last 60 years, several models have been proposed to explain the shallow and deep structure, using different geological, geophysical, seismological, geochemical and petrologic concepts; nevertheless, most of them have applied local observation windows, and do not represent the major structure of MA. Therefore, a multidisciplinary research group, coordinated by FUNVISIS, in close cooperation with UCV, ULA and PDVSA, is proposed in order to get the outlined goals in the project entitled GIAME ("Geociencia Integral de los Andes de MErida") was established, which aims to generate a lithospheric scale model and the development of a temporal dynamic model for the MA. As a base for lithospheric investigations of the Merida Andes, we are proposing three wide angle seismic profiles across the orogen on three representative sites, in order to determine the inner structure and its relation with the orogen's gravimetric root. To the date, there are no seismic studies at lithospheric scale which cross MA. The wide angle seismic will be complemented with the re-processing and re-interpretation of existing reflection seismic data, which will allow to establish a relationship between MA and its associated flexural basins (Maracaibo and Barinas-Apure basins). Depending on the results of the VENCORP Project (VENezuelan COntinental Reflection Profiling), which might show some reliable results about crustal features and Moho reflectors along three long seismic profiles at Caribbean Moutain system, a reflection seismic profile across the central portion of MA is proposed. Additional tasks, consisting in MA quaternary deformation studies, using research methods like neotectonics and paleoseismology, georadar, numerical modeling, cinematic GPS, SAR interferometry, thermocronology, detailed studies on regional geology, flexural modeling

  15. Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is a homeostatic factor in the central nervous system limiting neuroinflammation and demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Neuwirth, Ales; Economopoulou, Matina; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Chung, Kyoung-Jin; Bittner, Stefan; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Langer, Harald; Samus, Maryna; Kim, Hyesoon; Cho, Geum-Sil; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Bdeir, Khalil; Chavakis, Emmanouil; Koh, Jae-Young; Boon, Louis; Hosur, Kavita; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Meuth, Sven G.; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) and disruption of its immune privilege are major contributors to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and of its rodent counterpart, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have previously identified developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory factor, which inhibits integrin-dependent leukocyte adhesion. Here we show that Del-1 contributes to the immune privilege status of the CNS. Intriguingly, Del-1 expression decreased in chronic active MS lesions and in the inflamed CNS in the course of EAE. Del-1-deficiency was associated with increased EAE severity, accompanied by increased demyelination and axonal loss. As compared to control mice, Del-1−/− mice displayed enhanced disruption of the blood brain barrier and increased infiltration of neutrophil granulocytes in the spinal cord in the course of EAE, accompanied by elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines, including IL-17. The augmented levels of IL-17 in Del-1-deficiency derived predominantly from infiltrated CD8+ T cells. Increased EAE severity and neutrophil infiltration due to Del-1-deficiency was reversed in mice lacking both Del-1 and IL-17-receptor, indicating a crucial role for the IL-17/neutrophil inflammatory axis in EAE pathogenesis in Del-1−/− mice. Strikingly, systemic administration of Del-1-Fc ameliorated clinical relapse in relapsing-remitting EAE. Therefore, Del-1 is an endogenous homeostatic factor in the CNS protecting from neuroinflammation and demyelination. Our findings provide mechanistic underpinnings for the previous implication of Del-1 as a candidate MS susceptibility gene and suggest that Del-1-centered therapeutic approaches may be beneficial in neuroinflammatory and demyelinating disorders. PMID:25385367

  16. 77 FR 65574 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ...We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce that our draft comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) and environmental assessment (EA) for the Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Complex), which includes Lake Andes NWR (National Wildlife Refuge), Karl E. Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes Wetland Management District, is available for public review and comment. The draft CCP/EA......

  17. 78 FR 24228 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... review and comment following the announcement in the Federal Register on October 29, 2012 ] (77 FR 65574... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final... conservation plan and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for the Lake Andes National Wildlife...

  18. Epochs of intrusion-related copper mineralization in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillitoe, R. H.

    Seventy-four copper deposits and prospects related intimately to intrusive activity in the Andes have been dated radiometrically during the last 18 years by many different investigators, most of whom used the KAr method. The results are summarized and some of their local and regional implications are reviewed. A number of copper deposits, mainly of the porphyry type, were emplaced in, or near to, premineral volcanic sequences and (or) equigranular plutons. Such precursor volcanism lasted for as long as 9 Ma, and preceded mineralization by intervals of from less than 1 Ma to as much as 9 Ma. Precursor plutons were emplaced no more than 2 to 3 Ma prior to mineralization at several localities in Chile, but possibly as long as 10 to 30 Ma earlier in parts of Colombia and Peru. The time separating emplacement of progenitor stocks and hydrothermal alteration and accompanying copper mineralization, and the duration of alteration-mineralization sequences generally are both less than the analytical uncertainty of the KAr method. However, on the basis of a detailed study of the Julcani vein system in Peru and less clearcut evidence from elsewhere, it may be concluded that alteration and copper mineralization followed stock or dome emplacement by substantially less than 1 Ma and lasted for 0.5 to 2 Ma and, locally, possibly as long as 3 Ma. At several localities, post-mineral magmatic activity could not be separated by the KAr method from the preceding alteration-mineralization events. As many as nine epochs of copper mineralization, ranging in age from late Paleozoic to late Pliocene-Pleistocene, are recognizable in the central Andes of Chile, Peru, Bolivia, and Argentina, and at least four somewhat different epochs characterize the northern Andes of Colombia. Each epoch coincides with a discrete linear sub-belt, some of which extend for more than 2000 km along the length of the orogen. More than 90% of Andean copper resources, mainly as porphyry deposits, are

  19. Stepwise colonization of the Andes by ruddy ducks and the evolution of novel β-globin variants.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Fuentes, V; Cortázar-Chinarro, M; Lozano-Jaramillo, M; McCracken, K G

    2013-03-01

    Andean uplift played a key role in Neotropical bird diversification, yet past dispersal and genetic adaptation to high-altitude environments remain little understood. Here we use multilocus population genetics to study population history and historical demographic processes in the ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis), a stiff-tailed diving duck comprising three subspecies distributed from Canada to Tierra del Fuego and inhabiting wetlands from sea level to 4500 m in the Andes. We sequenced the mitochondrial DNA, four autosomal introns and three haemoglobin genes (α(A), α(D), β(A)) and used isolation-with-migration (IM) models to study gene flow between North America and South America, and between the tropical and southern Andes. Our analyses indicated that ruddy ducks dispersed first from North America to the tropical Andes, then from the tropical Andes to the southern Andes. While no nonsynonymous substitutions were found in either α globin gene, three amino acid substitutions were observed in the β(A) globin. Based on phylogenetic reconstruction and power analysis, the first β(A) substitution, found in all Andean individuals, was acquired when ruddy ducks dispersed from low altitude in North America to high altitude in the tropical Andes, whereas the two additional substitutions occurred more recently, when ruddy ducks dispersed from high altitude in the tropical Andes to low altitude in the southern Andes. This stepwise colonization pattern accompanied by polarized β(A) globin amino acid replacements suggest that ruddy ducks first acclimatized or adapted to the Andean highlands and then again to the lowlands. In addition, ruddy ducks colonized the Andean highlands via a less common route as compared to other waterbird species that colonized the Andes northwards from the southern cone of South America. PMID:23346994

  20. Sediment yield along the Andes: continental budget, regional variations, and comparisons with other basins from orogenic mountain belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, Edgardo M.; Restrepo, Juan D.

    2014-07-01

    We assess the sediment yield at 119 gauging stations distributed from Colombia to Patagonia, covering the different morphotectonic and morphoclimatic settings of the Andes. The most productive areas are the Meta River basin within the northern Andes and the Bolivian and northern Argentina-Chaco systems, which produce an average of 3345, 4909 and 2654 t km2 y- 1 of sediment, respectively. The rivers of the northern and central Andes (excluding the Pacific watersheds of Peru, northern Chile, and central Argentina) have a weighted mean sediment yield of 2045 t km- 2 y- 1 and produce 2.25 GTy- 1 of total sediment. A major constraint estimating the Andean continental budget of sediment yield lies in the lack of gauging data for the Peruvian region. Using the available gauge stations, the regional sediment yield appears underestimated. Assuming a higher value of sediment yield for the Peruvian Andes, the total budget for the whole central Andes could range between 2.57 GT y- 1 and 3.44 GT y- 1. A minimum of ~ 0.55 GT y- 1 and a probable maximum of ~ 1.74 GT y- 1 of sediment are deposited in the intramontane and surrounding proximal sedimentary basins. The magnitude of sediment yield in the Andes is comparable to other rivers draining orogenic belts around the world.

  1. Western Slope of Andes, Peru

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Along the western flank of the Andes, 400 km SE of Lima Peru, erosion has carved the mountain slopes into long, narrow serpentine ridges. The gently-sloping sediments have been turned into a plate of worms wiggling their way downhill to the ocean.

    The image was acquired September 28, 2004, covers an area of 38 x 31.6 km, and is located near 14.7 degrees south latitude, 74.5 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  2. Evolution of the east-central San Jose del Cabo basin, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTeague, M. S.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Schwennicke, T.; Ingle, J. C.; Cortes Martinez, M.

    2006-12-01

    The San Jose del Cabo basin at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula records the early tectonic evolution of the west side of the Gulf of California. This study focused on the east central margin of the basin. The basal La Calera Formation unconformably overlies Cretaceous granite and consists of conglomerate, pebbly sandstone and conglomerate, and sandstone deposited in alluvial fans and fan-deltas. Deposition of the La Calera Formation was from ca. 9-14 Ma. The lower member of the Trinidad Formation was deposited beginning ca. 9-13 Ma and consists of sandstone, mudstone, and shelly mudstone deposited in nearshore and estuarine environments. These age estimates are based on sedimentation rates and foraminifera and coccoliths from the NN 11A nannozone (7.4 8.6 Ma, GTS 2004). The middle member of the Trinidad Formation consists of deeper water mudstones deposited by turbidity currents and suspension settling in a shelf to slope and conglomerates deposited by submarine debris flows on the shelf. The basin began earlier than previously thought. The oldest marine rocks are ca.9-13 Ma, while sedimentation on the east side began at ca. 9-14 Ma, synchronous with estimates of initiation of offset on the San Jose del Cabo fault. The Zapote fault is a down-to-the-east normal and sinistral-oblique fault that exposes a wedge of granite and older strata in the footwall to the west. The fault was active during sedimentation in the late Miocene and possibly later. The fault divides the study area into an eastern hanging wall subbasin and western footwall subbasin. The eastern subbasin formed an embayment in the eastern margin of the Cabo basin. A regional flooding surface (ca. 8 Ma) can be correlated across the fault that marks a major marine incursion. Depositional systems evolved rapidly from coarse-grained terrestrial systems to fine-grained marine and estuarine systems. The Cabo basin provides an excellent analogue for comparison with offshore basins, which are

  3. Andes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... Peru, the northern portion of Chile, and the western part of Bolivia, which intersect near the inward "bend" in the coastline. Lake ... whose coastline forms part of the border between Peru and Bolivia, is prominently featured. At an altitude of 12,500 feet, it is said to ...

  4. Andes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... provide a striking demonstration of the power of water erosion. This image pair was acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging ... with the red filter placed over your left eye. Two main erosion formations can be seen. The one above image center is carved by the Rio ...

  5. Episodic Cenozoic volcanism and tectonism in the Andes of Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, D.C.; McKee, E.H.; Farrar, E.; Petersen, U.

    1974-01-01

    Radiometric and geologic information indicate a complex history of Cenozoic volcanism and tectonism in the central Andes. K-Ar ages on silicic pyroclastic rocks demonstrate major volcanic activity in central and southern Peru, northern Chile, and adjacent areas during the Early and Middle Miocene, and provide additional evidence for volcanism during the Late Eocene. A provisional outline of tectonic and volcanic events in the Peruvian Andes during the Cenozoic includes: one or more pulses of igneous activity and intense deformation during the Paleocene and Eocene; a period of quiescence, lasting most of Oligocene time; reinception of tectonism and volcanism at the beginning of the Miocene; and a major pulse of deformation in the Middle Miocene accompanied and followed through the Pliocene by intense volcanism and plutonism. Reinception of igneous activity and tectonism at about the Oligocene-Miocene boundary, a feature recognized in other circum-Pacific regions, may reflect an increase in the rate of rotation of the Pacific plate relative to fixed or quasifixed mantle coordinates. Middle Miocene tectonism and latest Tertiary volcanism correlates with and probably is genetically related to the beginning of very rapid spreading at the East Pacific Rise. ?? 1974.

  6. Late Paleozoic to Triassic magmatism in the north-central High Andes, Chile: New insights from SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology and O-Hf isotopic signatures in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández González, Álvaro; Deckart, Katja; Fanning, Mark; Arriagada, César

    2014-05-01

    The Chilean High Andes (28o- 31oS) comprises a vast number of late Paleozoic - Triassic granitoids which give information about the last stages of Gondwana assemblage. Particularly, previous studies determined two tectonic configurations during this time: subduction related compressional setting (late Carboniferous - Late Permian) and non-subduction post-collisional extensional setting (Late Permian - Triassic), as the last stage of Gondwana assemblage. However, new O-Hf isotopic data along new U-Pb SHRIMP ages in zircon have shown that this model should be modified and updated to the new analytical data available. δ18O values indicate a strong change in the tectonic configuration approximately 270 Ma (earliest middle Permian) and thus, units can be divided into 2 mayor groups: late Carboniferous to earliest middle Permian and middle Permian to Triassic. The oldest group shows slightly low values of ɛHfi (ca. +1 to -4) with high δ18O (ca. >6.5 o/oo), indicating an elevated supracrustal component and the addition of less radiogenic continental-like material, which along significant residence time (TDM2: Mesoproterozoic) can be interpreted as magmas formed at depth in a subduction-related continental arc, and contaminated with supracrustal material and/or oceanic sediments transported through the subducted slab to the mantle-wedge. Subsequently, middle Permian - Triassic rocks show a wider range of ɛHfi values (ca. +3 to -3) with relatively low, mantle-like δ18O (ca. 4.5-6.5 o/oo), indicating a source of magmas without the addition of supracrustal material for some plutons, whilst for others, a slight input. The higher positive values of ɛHfi can be related to the influence of new juvenile material in the source of some magmas. This isotopic data can be interpreted as rocks formed as the result of melting of an old thinned mafic crust (with mantle-like δ18O values characteristic of this type of rocks) with limited addition of supracrustal material; in

  7. Active tectonics of the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, J. F.; Lamb, S. H.

    1992-04-01

    Nearly 90 mm a -1 of relative plate convergence is absorbed in the Andean plate-boundary zone. The pattern of active tectonics shows remarkable variations in the way in which the plate slip vector is partitioned into displacement and strain and the ways in which compatibility between different segments is solved. Along any traverse across the plate-boundary zone, the sum of relative velocities between points must equal the relative plate motion. We have developed a kinematic synthesis of displacement and strain partitioning in the Andes from 47°S to 5°N relevant for the last 5 Ma based upon: (1) relative plate motion deduced from oceanic circuits giving a roughly constant azimuth between 075 and 080; (2) moment tensor solutions for over 120 crustal earthquakes since 1960; (3) structural studies of deformed Plio-Pleistocene rocks; (4) topographic/geomorphic studies; (5) palaeomagnetic data; and (6) geodetic data. We recognize four neotectonic zones, with subzones and boundary transfer zones, that are partitioned in different ways. These zones are not coincident with the 'classic' zones defined by the presence or absence of a volcanic chain or differences in finite displacements and strains and tectonic form; the long-term segmentation and finite evolution of the Andes may not occur in constantly defined segments in space and time. In Segment 1 (47°-39°S), the slip vector is partitioned into roughly orthogonal Benioff Zone slip with large magnitude/large slip-surface earthquakes and both distributed dextral shear giving clockwise rotations of up to 50° and dextral slip in the curved Liquine-Ofqui Fault System giving 5°-10° of anticlockwise fore-arc rotation. In Segment 2 (39°-20°S), the slip vector is partitioned into Benioff Zone slip roughly parallel with the slip vector, Andean crustal shortening and a very small component of dextral slip, including that on the Atacama Fault System. Between 39° and 34°S, a cross-strike dextral transfer, which deflects

  8. Magnetotelluric Studies of the Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordell, D. R.; Unsworth, M. J.; Diaz, D.; Pavez, M.; Blanco, B.

    2015-12-01

    Geodetic data has shown that the surface of the Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in central Chile has been moving upwards at rates >20 cm/yr since 2007 over a 200 km2 area. It has been hypothesized that this ground deformation is due to the inflation of a magma body at ~5 km depth beneath the lake (2.8 km b.s.l.). This magma body is a likely source for the large number of rhyolitic eruptions at this location over the last 25 ka. A dense broadband magnetotelluric (MT) array was collected from 2009 to 2015 and included data from a geothermal exploration project. MT phase tensor analysis indicates that the resistivity structure of the region is largely three-dimensional for signals with periods longer than 1 s, which corresponds to depths >5 km. The MT data were inverted using the ModEM inversion algorithm to produce a three-dimensional electrical resistivity model which included topography. Four primary features were identified in the model: 1) A north-south striking, 10 km by 5 km, low-resistivity zone (<5 Ωm) northwest of the inflation centre at a depth of ~5 km (2.8 km b.s.l.) is interpreted as a zone of partial melt which may be supplying material via conduits to account for the observed ground deformation; 2) A shallow low-resistivity feature ~400 m beneath the lake surface (1.8 km a.s.l.) and spatially coincident with the inflation centre is interpreted to be a zone of hydrothermal alteration; 3) A thin, low-resistivity feature to the west of LdM at a depth of ~250 m (2.2 km a.s.l.) is interpreted to be the clay cap of a potential geothermal prospect; 4) A large, low-resistivity zone beneath the San Pedro-Tatara Volcanic Complex to the west of LdM at a depth of ~10 km (8 km b.s.l.) is interpreted to be a zone of partial melt. Further MT data collection is planned for 2016 which will expand the current grid of MT stations to better constrain the lateral extent of the observed features and give greater insight into the dynamics of this restless magma system.

  9. What do Great Subduction Earthquakes tell us About Continental Deformation of the Upper Plate in the Central Andes Forearc? Insights From Seismotectonics, Continental Deformation and Coulomb Modelisation Along Southern Peru Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, L.; Perfettini, H.; Tavera, H.

    2007-05-01

    Calientes Fault system (parallel to the trench) and a crustal depth of about 20km. Such a magnitud and crustal depth in the area correlates perfectly with the Quaternary geomorphic evidences of tectonic activity along the Sama-Calientes thrust fault in the forearc in Southern Peru. Some questions are raised by the occurrence of such continental seismicity, just after a major subduction event, as none has been registered in the area since more than 40 years. Continental fault systems constitute a key to the understanding of the forearc deformation in the Arica Elbow, where the Andes obliquity with respect to the Nazca plate convergence direction. Also these results suggest that continental deformation should give us clues to define the pattern of segmentation of the subduction zone by studying seismotectonics and its relation to the segmentation of the upper continental plate.

  10. ANDES: An Underground Laboratory in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Claudio O.

    ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) is an underground laboratory, proposed to be built inside the Agua Negra road tunnel that will connect Chile (IV Region) with Argentina (San Juan Province) under the Andes Mountains. The Laboratory will be 1750 meters under the rock, becoming the 3rd deepest underground laboratory of this kind in the world, and the first in the Southern Hemisphere. ANDES will be an international Laboratory, managed by a Latin American consortium. The laboratory will host experiments in Particle and Astroparticle Physics, such as Neutrino and Dark Matter searches, Seismology, Geology, Geophysics and Biology. It will also be used for the development of low background instrumentation and related services. Here we present the general features of the proposed laboratory, the current status of the proposal and some of its opportunities for science.