Science.gov

Sample records for anemia disease locus

  1. Targeted Resequencing and Analysis of the Diamond-Blackfan Anemia Disease Locus RPS19

    PubMed Central

    Badhai, Jitendra; Fröjmark, Anne-Sophie; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Dahl, Niklas; Schuster, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Background The Ribosomal protein S19 gene locus (RPS19) has been linked to two kinds of red cell aplasia, Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA) and Transient Erythroblastopenia in Childhood (TEC). Mutations in RPS19 coding sequences have been found in 25% of DBA patients, but not in TEC patients. It has been suggested that non-coding RPS19 sequence variants contribute to the considerable clinical variability in red cell aplasia. We therefore aimed at identifying non-coding variations associated with DBA or TEC phenotypes. Methodology/Principal Findings We targeted a region of 19'980 bp encompassing the RPS19 gene in a cohort of 89 DBA and TEC patients for resequencing. We provide here a catalog of the considerable, previously unrecognized degree of variation in this region. We identified 73 variations (65 SNPs, 8 indels) that all are located outside of the RPS19 open reading frame, and of which 67.1% are classified as novel. We hypothesize that specific alleles in non-coding regions of RPS19 could alter the binding of regulatory proteins or transcription factors. Therefore, we carried out an extensive analysis to identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). A series of putative interaction sites coincide with detected variants. Sixteen of the corresponding transcription factors are of particular interest, as they are housekeeping genes or show a direct link to hematopoiesis, tumorigenesis or leukemia (e.g. GATA-1/2, PU.1, MZF-1). Conclusions Specific alleles at predicted TFBSs may alter the expression of RPS19, modify an important interaction between transcription factors with overlapping TFBS or remove an important stimulus for hematopoiesis. We suggest that the detected interactions are of importance for hematopoiesis and could provide new insights into individual response to treatment. PMID:19587786

  2. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia of inflammation; AOCD; ACD ... Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells in the blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as ...

  3. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is anemia? ... should. [ Top ] How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  4. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in CKD Page Content On this page: What ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ...

  5. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  6. An anemia of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Faux, N G; Rembach, A; Wiley, J; Ellis, K A; Ames, D; Fowler, C J; Martins, R N; Pertile, K K; Rumble, R L; Trounson, B; Masters, C L; Bush, A I

    2014-11-01

    Lower hemoglobin is associated with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since brain iron homeostasis is perturbed in AD, we investigated whether this is peripherally reflected in the hematological and related blood chemistry values from the Australian Imaging Biomarker and Lifestyle (AIBL) study (a community-based, cross-sectional cohort comprising 768 healthy controls (HC), 133 participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 211 participants with AD). We found that individuals with AD had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentrations, packed cell volume and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates (adjusted for age, gender, APOE-ɛ4 and site). In AD, plasma iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation and red cell folate levels exhibited a significant distortion of their customary relationship to hemoglobin levels. There was a strong association between anemia and AD (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.43, confidence interval (CI) (1.31, 4.54)). Moreover, AD emerged as a strong risk factor for anemia on step-down regression, even when controlling for all other available explanations for anemia (adjusted OR=3.41, 95% CI (1.68, 6.92)). These data indicated that AD is complicated by anemia, which may itself contribute to cognitive decline. PMID:24419041

  7. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  8. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia Idiopathic aplastic anemia Megaloblastic anemia Pernicious anemia Sickle cell anemia Thalassemia Causes Although many parts of the body ... Some forms of anemia, such as thalassemia or sickle cell anemia, which can be inherited Pregnancy Problems with bone ...

  9. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia Idiopathic aplastic anemia Megaloblastic anemia Pernicious anemia Sickle cell anemia Thalassemia ... Some forms of anemia, such as thalassemia or sickle cell anemia, which can be inherited Pregnancy Problems with bone ...

  10. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial. PMID:26818422

  11. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited. PMID:27191018

  12. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  13. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-08-15

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  14. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Thayu, Meena; Mamula, Petar

    2005-10-01

    Anemia is a frequent extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that is commonly overlooked, despite its significant impact on quality of life. Characteristic symptoms include chronic fatigue, headache, and subtle impairment of cognitive function, although some less common symptoms include dyspnea, dizziness, pica, angular stomatitis, shortened attention span, and esophageal webs. Several types of anemia are associated with IBD, but iron deficiency anemia (IDA) accounts for the majority of cases and others include anemia of chronic disease, anemia associated with vitamin deficiency (vitamin B12 and folate), autoimmune anemia, and anemia caused by medication used to treat IBD. The diagnosis of IDA relies on laboratory blood tests. Therefore, these tests should be obtained on a regular basis because characteristic symptoms may be absent or not readily recognized by patients and their clinicians. Complete blood count may suffice; however, iron studies and serum vitamin levels may be necessary to differentiate between specific types of anemia. During the diagnostic process, it is important to consider coexistence of different types of anemia, especially if no response to therapy is noted. The therapy for anemia is directed towards treatment of the underlying inflammatory process and supplemental therapy, depending on the type of deficiency. Iron deficiency anemia is treated with iron preparations, first orally, and if unresponsive or if associated with untoward adverse events leading to decrease in adherence with the therapeutic regimen, with intravenous preparations. Intramuscular therapy has been abandoned due to high rate of complications. Intravenous therapy may be administered as a multiple-dose regimen (intravenous iron sucrose and gluconate) or as a single intravenous dose (iron dextran), which is associated with a higher risk of allergic infusion reactions and requires obligatory test dose administration. Treatment with erythropoietin is

  15. Anemia and pregnancy: a link to maternal chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Raja; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Keith, Louis

    2011-11-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem. It has serious short- and long-term consequences during pregnancy and beyond. The anemic condition is often worsened by the presence of other chronic diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, and diabetes. Untreated anemia also leads to increased morbidity and mortality from these chronic conditions as well. It is surprising that despite these chronic conditions (such as malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV) often being preventable, they still pose a real threat to public health. This article aims to review the current understanding of the pathophysiology, risks, prevention, and treatment of anemia in the light of these chronic conditions. PMID:22099433

  16. Hypomutability in Fanconi anemia cells is associated with increased deletion frequency at the HPRT locus

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulo, D.; Guillouf, C.; Moustacchi, E. ); Mohrenweiser, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited human disorder associated with a predisposition to cancer and characterized by anomalies in the processing of DNA cross-links and certain monoadducts. The authors reported previously that the frequency of psoralen-photoinduced mutations at the HPRT locus is lower in FA cells than in normal cells. This hypomutability is shown here to be associated with an increased frequency of deletions in the HPRT gene when either a mixture of cross-links and monoadducts or monoadducts alone are induced. Molecular analysis of mutants in the HPRT gene was carried out. In normal cells the majority of spontaneous and induced mutants are point mutations whereas in FA deletion mutations predominate. In that case a majority of mutants were found to lack individual exons or small clusters of exons whereas in normal cells large (complete or major gene loss) and small deletions are almost equally represented. Thus they propose that the FA defect lies in a mutagenic pathway that, in normal cells, involves by passing lesions and subsequent gap filling by a recombinational process during replication.

  17. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough ... rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the ...

  18. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  19. Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Under-Estimated Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rogler, Gerhard; Vavricka, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most frequent complications and/or extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Iron deficiency is the most important cause of anemia in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Iron deficiency even without anemia may impact the quality of life of our IBD patients. In the last 10 years, the understanding of the pathology of iron-deficiency anemia and “anemia of chronic diseases” has increased; new diagnostic tools have been developed and new therapeutic strategies have been discussed. Hepcidin has been identified to be a central regulator of iron absorption from the intestine and of iron plasma levels. Hepcidin is regulated by iron deficiency but also as an acute phase protein by pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-6. Innovative diagnostic tools have not been introduced in clinical routine or are not available for routine diagnostics. As iron substitution therapy is easy these days with a preference for intravenous substitution, the impact of differential diagnosis of anemia in IBD patients is underestimated. PMID:25646159

  20. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ... Physicians The full report is titled “Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ...

  1. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  2. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Meseeha, Marcelle G; Attia, Maximos N; Kolade, Victor O

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  3. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD. PMID:27475656

  4. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Miguel; Oliva, Tereza; Pinto, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin's disease (HD) is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. Warm immune hemolytic anemia is mainly controlled with steroids and chemotherapy. We report a case of a pediatric patient with direct antiglobulin positive test at the diagnosis of a late relapse of stage III B mixed cellularity type HD. PMID:26904342

  5. Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Outpatients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Carla Valéria de Alvarenga; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias; Nascimento, Cristiano Rodrigo de Alvarenga; Chebli, Liliana Andrade; Moutinho, Ivana Lúcia Damásio; Pinheiro, Bruno do Valle; Reboredo, Maycon Moura; Malaguti, Carla; Castro, Antonio Carlos Santana; Chebli, Júlio Maria Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, epidemiological studies of nonwestern IBD populations are limited and may be confounded by demographic, socioeconomic, and disease-related influences. This study evaluated the prevalence, risk factors, and etiology of anemia in Brazilian outpatients with IBD. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, 100 Crohn's disease (CD) patients and 100 ulcerative colitis (UC) subjects were assessed. Anemia workup included complete blood count, ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration. Results. The overall prevalence of anemia in IBD was 21%. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of anemia between CD subjects (24%) and UC (18%). Moderate disease activity (OR: 3.48, 95% CI, 1.95–9.64, P = 0.002) and elevated CRP levels (OR: 1.8, 95% CI, 1.04–3.11, P = 0.02) were independently associated with anemia. The most common etiologies of anemia found in both groups were iron deficiency anemia (IDA; 10% on CD and 6% on UC) followed by the anemia of chronic disease (ACD; 6% for both groups). Conclusions. In Brazilian IBD outpatients, anemia is highly concurrent condition. Disease moderate activity as well as increased CRP was strongly associated with comorbid anemia. IDA and/or ACD were the most common etiologies. PMID:25705682

  6. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  7. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  8. Anemia in Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and potential impact.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Malay; Rajta, Puja Negi; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable lifestyle-related disease with high global prevalence. COPD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are important events in the natural history of the disease and have a negative effect on the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Cardiac diseases, lung cancer, osteoporosis, and depression are common comorbidities reported for COPD. Recently, anemia has been recognized as a frequent comorbidity in COPD patients. The prevalence of anemia in patients with COPD varies from 7.5% to 33%. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is probably the most common type of anemia associated with COPD. ACD is driven by COPD-mediated systemic inflammation. Anemia in COPD is associated with greater healthcare resource utilization, impaired quality of life, decreased survival, and a greater likelihood of hospitalization. We need large prospective studies to discern the association between anemia and COPD. PMID:25814799

  9. Anemia in Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and potential impact

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Rajta, Puja Negi; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable lifestyle-related disease with high global prevalence. COPD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are important events in the natural history of the disease and have a negative effect on the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Cardiac diseases, lung cancer, osteoporosis, and depression are common comorbidities reported for COPD. Recently, anemia has been recognized as a frequent comorbidity in COPD patients. The prevalence of anemia in patients with COPD varies from 7.5% to 33%. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is probably the most common type of anemia associated with COPD. ACD is driven by COPD-mediated systemic inflammation. Anemia in COPD is associated with greater healthcare resource utilization, impaired quality of life, decreased survival, and a greater likelihood of hospitalization. We need large prospective studies to discern the association between anemia and COPD. PMID:25814799

  10. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation. PMID:22864845

  11. [Aplastic anemia combined with an autoimmune disease (eosinophilic fasciitis or glomerulonephritis)].

    PubMed

    Stebler, C; Tichelli, A; Gratwohl, A; Dazzi, H; Nissen, C; Steiger, U; Speck, B

    1991-06-01

    We describe 3 patients with aplastic anemia and an autoimmune disease. Two had eosinophilic fasciitis and 1 glomerulonephritis. In all patients both diseases were successfully treated by immunosuppressive therapy. Pathophysiological aspects of this association are discussed. PMID:1857945

  12. Hemolytic Anemia as a Presenting Feature of Wilson’s Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Toppo, Anupa; Rath, B.; Harbhajanka, Aparna; Lalita Jyotsna, P.

    2010-01-01

    Wilson’s disease is a rare inherited disorder of copper metabolism causing severe damage to vital organs. Liver and brain disorders are the main manifestations. Severe hemolytic anemia is an unusual complication of Wilson’s disease. We present a case who developed spherocytic acute hemolytic anemia (Coomb’s negative) as the initial manifestation of Wilson’s disease. On examination Kayser- Fleischer ring was found. Laboratory data supported a diagnosis of Wilson’s disease. PMID:21886393

  13. [Sickle cell anemia causes varied symptoms and high morbidity. Serious prognosis in the most common genetic disease in the world].

    PubMed

    Kjellander, Christian; Sennström, Maria K B; Stiller, Viveka; Ågren, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a life-threatening disease, and the most common genetic disease in the world. The prevalence of sickle cell anemia in Sweden is unknown. Sickle cell anemia is an important disease, because of its variable complications, in many medical and surgical specialties. The overview highlights common medical problems encountered in sickle cell anemia presented through a case report of a pregnant woman. PMID:25734427

  14. [Approach to the diagnosis and treatment of chronic anemia secondary to gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Rodríguez-Alonso, Lorena; Guardiola Capón, Jordi

    2014-12-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and can cause asthenia, cognitive and functional impairment, and decompensation of underlying diseases. Iron deficiency anemia is not a disease but is the result of a potentially serious medical problem. Consequently, patients should always undergo investigation of the underlying cause. In men and postmenopausal women, the condition is caused by gastrointestinal loss and malabsorption of iron. In this group, recommended procedures are gastroscopy, colonoscopy and serological testing for celiac disease. If the results of these tests are negative, repeat examinations and iron therapy should be considered. In treatment-refractory or recurrent anemia, the small intestine should be investigated. In this case, the procedure of choice is capsule endoscopy. Iron deficiency anemia should always be treated until iron deposits have returned to normal levels. A wide variety of preparations are available, in both oral and parental formulations. PMID:25443541

  15. Analysis of the ABCA4 genomic locus in Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Zernant, Jana; Xie, Yajing Angela; Ayuso, Carmen; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel-Angel; Simonelli, Francesca; Testa, Francesco; Gorin, Michael B; Strom, Samuel P; Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Boone, Philip M; Yuan, Bo; Ayyagari, Radha; Nagy, Peter L; Tsang, Stephen H; Gouras, Peter; Collison, Frederick T; Lupski, James R; Fishman, Gerald A; Allikmets, Rando

    2014-12-20

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1, MIM 248200) is caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 in STGD patients identifies compound heterozygous or homozygous disease-associated alleles in 65-70% of patients and only one mutation in 15-20% of patients. This study was designed to find the missing disease-causing ABCA4 variation by a combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS), array-Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH) screening, familial segregation and in silico analyses. The entire 140 kb ABCA4 genomic locus was sequenced in 114 STGD patients with one known ABCA4 exonic mutation revealing, on average, 200 intronic variants per sample. Filtering of these data resulted in 141 candidates for new mutations. Two variants were detected in four samples, two in three samples, and 20 variants in two samples, the remaining 117 new variants were detected only once. Multimodal analysis suggested 12 new likely pathogenic intronic ABCA4 variants, some of which were specific to (isolated) ethnic groups. No copy number variation (large deletions and insertions) was detected in any patient suggesting that it is a very rare event in the ABCA4 locus. Many variants were excluded since they were not conserved in non-human primates, were frequent in African populations and, therefore, represented ancestral, and not disease-associated, variants. The sequence variability in the ABCA4 locus is extensive and the non-coding sequences do not harbor frequent mutations in STGD patients of European-American descent. Defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires exceptionally well characterized large cohorts and extensive analyses by a combination of various approaches. PMID:25082829

  16. Sideroblastic anemia as a preleukemic event in patients treated for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, M.; Cosgriff, T.M.; Eyre, H.J.

    1980-05-01

    Sideroblastic anemia after treatment for Hodgkin's disease was seen in two patients 3 years after completion of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This was followed in both by the development of myelomonoblastic leukemia. No evidence of recurrent Hodgkin's disease was present in either patient. Our observation suggests that development of sideroblastic anemia in patients previously treated for Hodgkin's disease is probably secondary to the treatment and is a preleukemic event.

  17. A polymorphism in the leptin gene promoter is associated with anemia in patients with HIV disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jee-Yeong; Tate, Janet; Bathulapalli, Harini; Anderson, Damon; Steen, Hanno; Fleming, Mark; Mattocks, Kristin; Telenti, Amalio; Fellay, Jacques; Justice, Amy C.; Berliner, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    To study factors associated with anemia and its effect on survival in HIV-infected persons treated with modern combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), we characterized the prevalence of anemia in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) and used a candidate gene approach to identify proinflammatory gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with anemia in HIV disease. The study comprised 1597 HIV+ and 865 HIV− VACS subjects with DNA, blood, and annotated clinical data available for analysis. Anemia was defined according to World Health Organization criteria (hemoglobin < 13 g/dL and < 12 g/dL in men and women, respectively). The prevalence of anemia in HIV+ and HIV− subjects was 23.1% and 12.9%, respectively. Independent of HIV status, anemia was present in 23.4% and 8% in blacks and whites, respectively. Analysis of our candidate genes revealed that the leptin −2548 G/A SNP was associated with anemia in HIV+, but not HIV−, patients, with the AA and AG genotypes significantly predicting anemia (P < .003 and P < .039, respectively, logistic regression). This association was replicated in an independent cohort of HIV+ women. Our study provides novel insight into the association between genetic variability in the leptin gene and anemia in HIV+ individuals. PMID:21926355

  18. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Sung; Bang, Ki Bae; Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Quality of life is closely related to anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several studies have reported on anemia in patients with IBD in Western countries. This study investigated the prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with IBD. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 92 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 76 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) who were followed regularly at a single tertiary medical center in Korea between January 2003 and December 2012. Hemoglobin (Hb) thresholds used to define anemia were <13.0 g/dL in men and <12.0 g/dL in women according to the World Health Organization criteria. We chose the lowest Hb level in each year as a representative value because Hb levels changed at each examination and anemia was associated with disease deterioration. The relationship between clinical variables and lowest Hb level was assessed. Results The prevalence of anemia was 36.3% in patients with UC and 41.6% in patients with CD. Anemia in patients with CD was associated with hospital admission, 5-aminosalicylate (5-ASA) and infliximab treatment in men. Anemia in patients with UC was associated with hospital admission, oral steroid use, thiopurine and infliximab treatment in men. Conclusions The prevalence of anemia in Korean patients with IBD was comparable to that of patients in Western countries. Anemia was associated with male patients with CD who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including 5-ASA and infliximab, and men with UC who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including oral steroids, thiopurine and infliximab. PMID:26884734

  19. [Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis caused by Crohn's disease and macrocytic anemia : a case report].

    PubMed

    Osawa, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Sachio; Yamada, Masaru; Fukushima, Yutaka; Utsuki, Satoshi; Shimizu, Satoru; Kurata, Akira; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Kan, Shinichi

    2007-06-01

    A 32-years-old man with a past history of hemorrhoids presenting with hemiparesis was diagnosed as having sagittal sinus thrombosis with hemorrtagic infarction. Laboratory data revealed macrocytic anemia (Hb 11.2 g/d/) with hypoproteinernia (5.5 g/d). After discharge the patient developed abdominal pain, diarrhea, edema in the leg and sustained anemia. Final diagnosis through colon fiberscope findings was Crohn's disease Macrocytic anemia seemed to be induced by Vit. B12 deficiency due to malabsorption. The mechanism and causal relationship between Crohn's disease and sinus thrombosis is discussed. PMID:17564049

  20. Advancing a vaccine to prevent hookworm disease and anemia.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Beaumier, Coreen M; Gillespie, Portia M; Strych, Ulrich; Hayward, Tara; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2016-06-01

    A human hookworm vaccine is under development and in clinical trials in Africa and the Americas. The vaccine contains the Na-APR-1 and Na-GST-1 antigens. It elicits neutralizing antibodies that interfere with establishment of the adult hookworm in the gut and the ability of the parasite to feed on blood. The vaccine target product profile is focused on the immunization of children to prevent hookworm infection and anemia caused by Necator americanus. It is intended for use in low- and middle-income countries where hookworm is highly endemic and responsible for at least three million disability-adjusted life years. So far, the human hookworm vaccine is being developed in the non-profit sector through the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership (PDP), in collaboration with the HOOKVAC consortium of European and African partners. We envision the vaccine to be incorporated into health systems as part of an elimination strategy for hookworm infection and other neglected tropical diseases, and as a means to reduce global poverty and address the Sustainable Development Goals. PMID:27040400

  1. Belgian recommendations for the management of anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hindryckx, P; Amininejad, L; Van De Vijver, E; Bossuyt, P

    2014-09-01

    Anemia is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) which, in most cases, results from an absolute or functional iron deficiency. Although anemia and iron deficiency may have a dramatic impact on the quality of life of IBD patients, they are underdiagnosed and undertreated. This paper provides evidence-based consensus guidelines and practical treatment algorithms that are directly applicable to the Belgian situation. In this way, the Belgian IBD research and development Group (BIRD) aims to increase awareness and knowledge among gastroenterologists in order to improve the management of anemia and iron deficiency in their IBD patients. PMID:25509205

  2. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Anemia Often, you can treat and control anemia. If ... by an inherited or chronic disease or trauma. Anemia and Children/Teens Infants and young children have ...

  3. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  4. Prevalence of High Blood Pressure, Heart Disease, Thalassemia, Sickle-Cell Anemia, and Iron-Deficiency Anemia among the UAE Adolescent Population

    PubMed Central

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities. PMID:23606864

  5. Management of iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease – a practical approach

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jürgen; Dignass, Axel U.

    2013-01-01

    Although anemia is the most common systemic manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), among the broad spectrum of extraintestinal disease complications encountered in IBD, including arthritis and osteopathy, it has generally received little consideration. However, not only in terms of frequency, but also with regard to its potential effect on hospitalization rates and on the quality of life and work, anemia is indeed a significant and costly complication of IBD. Anemia is multifactorial in nature, the most prevalent etiological forms being iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of chronic disease. In a condition associated with inflammation, such as IBD, the determination of iron status using common biochemical parameters alone is inadequate. A more accurate assessment may be attained using new iron indices including reticulocyte hemoglobin content, percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin. While oral iron supplementation has traditionally been a mainstay of IDA treatment, it has also been linked to extensive gastrointestinal side effects and possible disease exacerbation. However, many physicians are still reluctant to administer iron intravenously, despite the wide availability of a variety of new IV preparations with improved safety profiles, and despite the recommendations of international expert guidelines. This article discusses improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies based on new clinical insights into the regulation of iron homeostasis. PMID:24714874

  6. Mapping a disease locus by allelic association

    PubMed Central

    Collins, A.; Morton, N. E.

    1998-01-01

    Allelic association provides a means to map disease genes that, in a dense map of polymorphic markers, has considerably higher resolution than linkage methods. We describe here a composite likelihood estimate of location for a disease gene against a high-resolution marker map by using allele frequencies at linked loci. Data may be family-based, as in the transmission disequilibrium test, or from a case-control study. χ2 tests, logarithm of odds, standard errors, and information weights are provided. The method is illustrated by analysis of published cystic fibrosis haplotypes, in which ΔF508 is more accurately localized than by other association studies. This differs from current approaches by adopting a more general Malecot model for isolation by distance, where distance here is between marker and disease locus, allowance for errors in the map and model, and freedom from assumptions about demography, systematic pressures, and the ratio of physical to genetic distance. When these assumptions are introduced the number of generations since the original mutation may be estimated, but this is not required to determine location and its standard error, so that evidence from allelic association may be efficiently combined with linkage evidence to identify a region for positional cloning of a disease gene. PMID:9465087

  7. Prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in Chinese patients with nondialysis chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya; Shi, Hao; Wang, Wei-Ming; Peng, Ai; Jiang, Geng-Ru; Zhang, Jin-Yuan; Ni, Zhao-Hui; He, Li-Qun; Niu, Jian-Ying; Wang, Nian-Song; Mei, Chang-Lin; Xu, Xu-Dong; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Wei-Jie; Yan, Hai-Dong; Deng, Yue-Yi; Yu, Chen; Cen, Jun; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This was the first multicenter, cross-sectional survey to assess the prevalence of anemia, patient awareness, and treatment status in China. Data of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD; age, 18–75 years; both out- and inpatients) from 25 hospitals in Shanghai, seeking medical treatment at the nephrology department, were collected between July 1, 2012 and August 31, 2012. The prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in patients with nondialysis CKD (ND-CKD) were assessed. Anemia was defined as serum hemoglobin (Hb) levels ≤12 g/dL in women and ≤13 g/dL in men. A total of 2420 patients with ND-CKD were included. Anemia was established in 1246 (51.5%) patients: 639 (51.3%) men and 607 (48.7%) women. The prevalence of anemia increased with advancing CKD stage (χ2trend = 675.14, P < 0.001). Anemia was more prevalent in patients with diabetic nephropathy (68.0%) than in patients with hypertensive renal damage (56.6%) or chronic glomerulonephritis (46.1%, both P < 0.001). Only 39.8% of the anemic patients received treatment with erythropoietin and 27.1% patients received iron products; furthermore, 22.7% of the patients started receiving treatment when their Hb level reached 7 g/dL. The target-achieving rate (Hb at 11–12 g/dL) was only 8.2%. Of the 1246 anemia patients, only 7.5% received more effective and recommended intravenous supplementation. Anemia is highly prevalent in patients with ND-CKD in China, with a low target-achieving rate and poor treatment patterns. The study highlights the need to improve multiple aspects of CKD management to delay the progression of renal failure. PMID:27310973

  8. Locus coeruleus, norepinephrine and Aβ peptides in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jennifer A.; McGonigle, Paul; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Monoaminergic brainstem systems have widespread projections that participate in many central processes and, when dysregulated, contribute to a plethora of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Synapses are the foundation of these neuronal circuits, and their local dysfunction results in global aberrations leading to pathophysiological disease states. This review focuses on the locus coeruleus (LC) norepinephrine (NE) brainstem system and its underappreciated role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ), a peptide that accumulates aberrantly in AD has recently been implicated as a modulator of neuronal excitability at the synapse. Evidence is presented showing that disruption of the LC-NE system at a synaptic and circuit level during early stages of AD, due to conditions such as chronic stress, can potentially lead to amyloid accumulation and contribute to the progression of this neurodegenerative disorder. Additional factors that impact neurodegeneration include neuroinflammation, and network de-synchronization. Consequently, targeting the LC-NE system may have significant therapeutic potential for AD, as it may facilitate modulation of Aβ production, curtail neuroinflammation, and prevent sleep and behavioral disturbances that often lead to negative patient outcomes. PMID:26618188

  9. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Benjamin P.; Robertson, David L.; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorized according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest additional genes that may contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity. PMID:25538735

  10. Red blood cell abnormalities and the pathogenesis of anemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Georgatzakou, Hara T; Antonelou, Marianna H; Papassideri, Issidora S; Kriebardis, Anastasios G

    2016-08-01

    Anemia is the most common hematologic complication in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It is ascribed to decreased erythropoietin production, shortened red blood cell (RBC) lifespan, and inflammation. Uremic toxins severely affect RBC lifespan; however, the implicated molecular pathways are poorly understood. Moreover, current management of anemia in ESRD is controversial due to the "anemia paradox" phenomenon, which underlines the need for a more individualized approach to therapy. RBCs imprint the adverse effects of uremic, inflammatory, and oxidative stresses in a context of structural and functional deterioration that is associated with RBC removal signaling and morbidity risk. RBCs circulate in hostile plasma by raising elegant homeostatic defenses. Variability in primary defect, co-morbidity, and therapeutic approaches add complexity to the pathophysiological background of the anemic ESRD patient. Several blood components have been suggested as biomarkers of anemia-related morbidity and mortality risk in ESRD. However, a holistic view of blood cell and plasma modifications through integrated omics approaches and high-throughput studies might assist the development of new diagnostic tests and therapies that will target the underlying pathophysiologic processes of ESRD anemia. PMID:26948278

  11. Simplification of an erythropoiesis model for design of anemia management protocols in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Nichols, B; Shrestha, R P; Horowitz, J; Hollot, C V; Germain, M J; Gaweda, A E; Chait, Y

    2011-01-01

    Many end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients suffer from anemia due to insufficient endogenous production of erythropoietin (EPO). The discovery of recombinant human EPO (rHuEPO) over 30 years ago has shifted the treatment of anemia for patients on dialysis from blood transfusions to rHuEPO therapy. Many anemia management protocols (AMPs) used by clinicians comprise a set of experience-based rules for weekly-to-monthly titration of rHuEPO doses based on hemoglobin (Hgb) measurements. In order to facilitate the design of an AMP based on formal control design methods, we present a physiologically-relevant erythropoiesis model, and show that its nonlinear dynamics can be approximated using a static nonlinearity, a step that greatly simplifies AMP design. We demonstrate applicability of our results using clinical data. PMID:22254256

  12. Aplastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. But the disease may return (relapse). A bone marrow transplant with an unrelated donor may be tried if ... Untreated, severe aplastic anemia leads to rapid death. Bone marrow transplant can be very successful in young people. Transplant ...

  13. Aplastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... over time as the disease progresses. Low red cell count (anemia) can cause: Fatigue Pallor (paleness) Rapid heart ... with exercise Weakness Lightheadedness upon standing Low white cell count (leukopenia) causes an increased risk for infection. Low ...

  14. Evidence for a third genetic locus for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Daoust, M.C.; Bichet, D.G.; Reynolds, D.M.

    1995-02-10

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with loci on chromosomes 16p and 4q. It has a moderately high spontaneous mutation rate, although the relative frequency of such mutations at each gene locus is unknown. In studying genetic heterogeneity in the French-Canadian population, we identified a family in which a classical clinical presentation of ADPKD resulted from a mutation at a locus genetically distinct from either of the previously described loci for this disease. This suggests the existence of a third genetic locus for ADPKD. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Role of Anemia in Home Oxygen Therapy in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Copur, Ahmet Sinan; Fulambarker, Ashok; Molnar, Janos; Nadeem, Rashid; McCormack, Charles; Ganesh, Aarthi; Kheir, Fayez; Hamon, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a known comorbidity found in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Hypoxemia is common and basically due to ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch in COPD. Anemia, by decreasing arterial oxygen content, may be a contributing factor for decreased delivery of oxygen to tissues. The objective of this study is to determine if anemia is a factor in qualifying COPD patients for home oxygen therapy. The study was designed as a retrospective, cross-sectional, observational chart review. Patients who were referred for home oxygen therapy evaluation were selected from the computerized patient record system. Demographic data, oxygen saturation at rest and during exercise, pulmonary function test results, hemoglobin level, medications, reason for anemia, comorbid diseases, and smoking status were recorded. The χ tests, independent sample t tests, and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Only 356 of total 478 patient referrals had a diagnosis of COPD over a 2-year period. Although 39 of them were excluded, 317 patients were included in the study. The overall rate of anemia was 38% in all COPD patients. Anemia was found significantly more frequent in COPD patients on home oxygen therapy (46%) than those not on home oxygen therapy (18.5%) (P < 0.0001). Mean saturation of peripheral oxygen values were significantly lower in anemic COPD patients both at rest and during exercise (P < 0.0001). Also, in COPD patients, age, Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease class, smoking status, hemoglobin level, hematocrit, percent of forced expiratory volume in first second, forced expiratory volume in first second/forced vital capacity, residual volume/total lung volume, percent of carbon monoxide diffusion capacity were significantly different between home oxygen therapy and those not on home oxygen therapy (P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression showed that anemia remained a strong predictor for long-term oxygen therapy use in

  16. Sickle cell anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  17. Hemoptysis in patients of celiac disease with disproportionately severe anemia: tip of the iceberg?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis (IPH) is characterized by the triad of iron deficiency anemia, pulmonary infiltrates and haemoptysis with no recognizable cause. Since the first description of its association with Celiac Disease (CD) by Lane and Hamilton in 1971, only a few isolated cases have been reported in literature. Although it has been considered an uncommon association of two disease entities, recent reports indicate that prevalence of celiac disease is as high as one percent. Further, individually both celiac disease and IPH are known to present as refractory anemia only. We are reporting a young adult with Lane Hamilton Syndrome, who realized that he was having significant gastrointestinal complaints only when they disappeared on gluten free diet (GFD). This case report reiterates the fact that celiac disease should be considered in all patients of IPH because of the therapeutic implications. Further on review of literature, we believe that covert hemoptysis may be responsible for disproportionately severe anemia in patients of celiac disease. Thus, prevalence of this association may be more than currently believed. Further research in this regard may improve our understanding of pathogenesis of celiac disease. PMID:23514358

  18. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send ... develop during pregnancy due to low levels of iron and folic acid (folate) and changes in the ...

  19. Sickle Cell Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can You Do to Stay Well? en español Anemia falciforme What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell ... about 10 to 20 days. This usually causes anemia . Anemia is what happens when the body's number ...

  20. Hepcidin and HFE protein: Iron metabolism as a target for the anemia of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Canavesi, Elena; Alfieri, Carlo; Pelusi, Serena; Valenti, Luca

    2012-12-01

    The anemia of chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis is characterized by chronic inflammation and release of cytokines, resulting in the upregulation of the iron hormone hepcidin, also increased by iron therapy and reduced glomerular filtration, with consequent reduction in iron absorption, recycling, and availability to the erythron. This response proves advantageous in the short-term to restrain iron availability to pathogens, but ultimately leads to severe anemia, and impairs the response to erythropoietin (Epo) and iron. Homozygosity for the common C282Y and H63D HFE polymorphisms influence iron metabolism by hampering hepcidin release by hepatocytes in response to increased iron stores, thereby resulting in inadequate inhibition of the activity of Ferroportin-1, inappropriately high iron absorption and recycling, and iron overload. However, in hemodialysis patients, carriage of HFE mutations may confer an adaptive benefit by decreasing hepcidin release in response to iron infusion and inflammation, thereby improving iron availability to erythropoiesis, anemia control, the response to Epo, and possibly survival. Therefore, anti-hepcidin therapies may improve anemia management in hemodialysis. However, HFE mutations directly favor hemoglobinization independently of hepcidin, and reduce macrophages activation in response to inflammation, whereas hepcidin might also play a beneficial anti-inflammatory and anti-microbic action during sepsis, so that direct inhibition of HFE-mediated regulation of iron metabolism may represent a valuable alternative therapeutic target. Genetic studies may offer a valuable tool to test these hypotheses and guide the research of new therapies. PMID:24175256

  1. A rare association of celiac disease and aplastic anemia: case report of a child and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Badyal, Rama Kumari; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Varma, Neelam; Thapa, Babu Ram

    2014-01-01

    An association between severe aplastic anemia and other autoimmune diseases is rare and has been described in adults for eosinophilic fasciitis, thymomas, systemic lupus erythematosus, and thyroid disorders. Herein we report a patient with celiac disease who was not strictly following a gluten-free diet and presented with progressive pallor, fever, and weakness of 1 month's duration. On investigation, he had pancytopenia, which on subsequent evaluation revealed aplastic anemia. An association between aplastic anemia and celiac disease has rarely been reported. To the best of author's knowledge, only 1 pediatric case of celiac disease associated with aplastic anemia has been published. This is the second report to suggest such an association in children. PMID:25075625

  2. Dental Perspective of Rare Disease of Fanconi Anemia: Case Report with Review

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula; Bhushan, Urvashi; Goswami, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is an extremely rare genetic disease characterized by chromosomal instability that induces congenital alterations in individuals. It causes defective hemopoiesis ultimately leading to bone marrow failure. Patients are susceptible to recurrent infections and increased risk of hemorrhage, as well as delayed and poor wound healing. Herein, we report a case of Fanconi anemia in which various classical signs of the disease were present. The patient has been on regular follow-up since three and a half years for management of dental problems. The different aspects of this rare disorder are discussed with emphasis on oral manifestations and their influence on the general health of affected patients. Due to an increased susceptibility to developing cancers in this specific population, it is imperative for pediatric dentists to know about the common oral manifestations and potentially cancerous lesions, in order to make an early diagnosis and provide comprehensive care and maintenance of oral health in affected individuals. PMID:27013901

  3. Anemia of chronic kidney disease: Treat it, but not too aggressively.

    PubMed

    Nakhoul, Georges; Simon, James F

    2016-08-01

    Anemia of renal disease is common and is associated with significant morbidity and death. It is mainly caused by a decrease in erythropoietin production in the kidneys and can be partially corrected with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). However, randomized controlled trials have shown that using ESAs to target normal hemoglobin levels can be harmful, and have called into question any benefits of ESA treatment other than avoidance of transfusions. PMID:27505883

  4. Newly Diagnosed Anemia Increases Risk of Parkinson's disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chien Tai; Huang, Yao Hsien; Liu, Hung Yi; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chan, Lung; Chien, Li-Nien

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and low hemoglobin have been identified to increase Parkinson's disease (PD) risk. This population-based cohort study investigated PD risk in newly diagnosed anemic patients by using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. All newly diagnosed anemic patients (n = 86,334) without a history of stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, major operations, or blood loss diseases were enrolled. A cohort of nonanemic controls, 1:1 matched with anemic patients on the basis of the demographics and pre-existing medical conditions, was also included. Competing risk analysis was used to evaluate PD risk in anemic patients compared with that in their matched controls. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of PD risk in the anemic patients was 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-1.52, p < 0.001). Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) patients tended to exhibit a higher PD risk (aHR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.24-1.79, p < 0.001). Furthermore, Iron supplement did not significantly affect the PD risk: the aHRs for PD risk were 1.32 (95% CI: 1.07-1.63, p < 0.01) and 1.86 (95% CI: 1.46-2.35, p < 0.001) in IDA patients with and without iron supplementation, respectively. The population-based cohort study indicated newly diagnosed anemia increases PD risk. PMID:27412825

  5. The Cost-Effectiveness of Anemia Treatment for Persons with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yarnoff, Benjamin O.; Hoerger, Thomas J.; Simpson, Siobhan A.; Pavkov, Meda E.; Burrows, Nilka R.; Shrestha, Sundar S.; Williams, Desmond E.; Zhuo, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Background Although major guidelines uniformly recommend iron supplementation and erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESAs) for managing chronic anemia in persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD), there are differences in the recommended hemoglobin (Hb) treatment target and no guidelines consider the costs or cost-effectiveness of treatment. In this study, we explored the most cost-effective Hb target for anemia treatment in persons with CKD stages 3–4. Methods and Findings The CKD Health Policy Model was populated with a synthetic cohort of persons over age 30 with prevalent CKD stages 3–4 (i.e., not on dialysis) and anemia created from the 1999–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), computed as incremental cost divided by incremental quality adjusted life years (QALYs), were assessed for Hb targets of 10 g/dl to 13 g/dl at 0.5 g/dl increments. Targeting a Hb of 10 g/dl resulted in an ICER of $32,111 compared with no treatment and targeting a Hb of 10.5 g/dl resulted in an ICER of $32,475 compared with a Hb target of 10 g/dl. QALYs increased to 4.63 for a Hb target of 10 g/dl and to 4.75 for a target of 10.5 g/dl or 11 g/dl. Any treatment target above 11 g/dl increased medical costs and decreased QALYs. Conclusions In persons over age 30 with CKD stages 3–4, anemia treatment is most cost-effective when targeting a Hb level of 10.5 g/dl. This study provides important information for framing guidelines related to treatment of anemia in persons with CKD. PMID:27404556

  6. Thorough investigation of a canine autoinflammatory disease (AID) confirms one main risk locus and suggests a modifier locus for amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Mia; Tintle, Linda; Kierczak, Marcin; Perloski, Michele; Tonomura, Noriko; Lundquist, Andrew; Murén, Eva; Fels, Max; Tengvall, Katarina; Pielberg, Gerli; Dufaure de Citres, Caroline; Dorso, Laetitia; Abadie, Jérôme; Hanson, Jeanette; Thomas, Anne; Leegwater, Peter; Hedhammar, Åke; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Meadows, Jennifer R S

    2013-01-01

    Autoinflammatory disease (AID) manifests from the dysregulation of the innate immune system and is characterised by systemic and persistent inflammation. Clinical heterogeneity leads to patients presenting with one or a spectrum of phenotypic signs, leading to difficult diagnoses in the absence of a clear genetic cause. We used separate genome-wide SNP analyses to investigate five signs of AID (recurrent fever, arthritis, breed specific secondary dermatitis, otitis and systemic reactive amyloidosis) in a canine comparative model, the pure bred Chinese Shar-Pei. Analysis of 255 DNA samples revealed a shared locus on chromosome 13 spanning two peaks of association. A three-marker haplotype based on the most significant SNP (p<2.6×10(-8)) from each analysis showed that one haplotypic pair (H13-11) was present in the majority of AID individuals, implicating this as a shared risk factor for all phenotypes. We also noted that a genetic signature (F ST) distinguishing the phenotypic extremes of the breed specific Chinese Shar-Pei thick and wrinkled skin, flanked the chromosome 13 AID locus; suggesting that breed development and differentiation has played a parallel role in the genetics of breed fitness. Intriguingly, a potential modifier locus for amyloidosis was revealed on chromosome 14, and an investigation of candidate genes from both this and the chromosome 13 regions revealed significant (p<0.05) renal differential expression in four genes previously implicated in kidney or immune health (AOAH, ELMO1, HAS2 and IL6). These results illustrate that phenotypic heterogeneity need not be a reflection of genetic heterogeneity, and that genetic modifiers of disease could be masked if syndromes were not first considered as individual clinical signs and then as a sum of their component parts. PMID:24130694

  7. COEXISTENCE OF ADDISON'S DISEASE AND PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: IS THE NEW CLASSIFICATION OF AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME APPROPRIATE?

    PubMed

    Vrkljan, Ana Marija; Pašalić, Ante; Strinović, Mateja; Perić, Božidar; Kruljac, Ivan; Miroševć, Gorana

    2015-06-01

    A case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is presented. A 45-year-old man was admitted due to fatigue, malaise and inappetence. He had a history of primary hypothyroidism and was on levothyroxine substitution therapy. One year before, he was diagnosed with normocytic anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency, which was treated with vitamin B12 substitution therapy. Physical examination revealed hypotension and marked hyperpigmentation. Laboratory testing showed hyponatremia, hyperkaliemia and severe normocytic anemia. Endocrinological evaluation disclosed low morning cortisol and increased adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Hence, the diagnosis of Addison's disease was established. Additional laboratory workup showed positive parietal cell antibodies. However, his vitamin B12 levels were increased due to vitamin B12 supplementation therapy, which was initiated earlier. Gastroscopy and histopathology of gastric mucosa confirmed atrophic gastritis. Based on prior low serum vitamin B12 levels, positive parietal cell antibodies and atrophic gastritis, the patient was diagnosed with pernicious anemia. Hydrocortisone supplementation therapy was administered and titrated according to urinary-free cortisol levels. Electrolyte disbalance and red blood cell count were normalized. This case report demonstrates rather unique features of pernicious anemia in a patient with Addison's disease. It also highlights the link between type II and type III APS. Not only do they share the same etiological factors, but also overlap in pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. This case report favors older classification of APS, which consolidates all endocrine and other organ-specific autoimmune diseases into one category. This is important since it might help avoid pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with APS. PMID:26415323

  8. Perception of severity of disease and health locus of control in compliant and noncompliant diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Alogna, M

    1980-01-01

    Compliant and noncompliant obese, non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects were assessed using a variety of demographic variables, the health locus of control scale (HLC), and the perception of severity of disease index based on the health belief model. The complaint subjects were significantly older and viewed their illness as significantly more severe than the noncompliant patients. Additionally, they tended to exhibit more of an internal locus of control that the noncompliant patients. PMID:7460724

  9. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... achylic anemia; Congenital pernicious anemia; Juvenile pernicious anemia; Vitamin B12 deficiency (malabsorption) ... Pernicious anemia is a type of vitamin B12 anemia. The body needs ... cells. You get this vitamin from eating foods such as meat, ...

  10. [Hookworm disease. A differential diagnosis in iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Jensenius, M

    1995-01-30

    Hookworms are among the most widespread of human parasites and occur all over the tropics and subtropics. They are bloodsucking roundworms that inhabit the duodenum and jejunum. Usually the infection is mild (hookworm carrier state), but sometimes the infection is heavy and results in anaemia and/or hypoproteinemia (hookworm disease). Hookworms are occasionally imported to Norway by immigrants. This paper describes two cases of severe and life-threatening hookworm disease treated in our hospital. The first patient was a Pakistani woman born in 1929 who on admission was hypovolemic with severe hypochromic anaemia (haemoglobin 3.6 g/100 ml). The second patient was a Bolivian refugee born in 1946 with a similar clinical picture (haemoglobin 3.3 g/100 ml). Both patients were treated with blood transfusions followed by mebendazol and iron substitution. The article also reviews the current literature on the epidemiology, pathogenesis and therapy of hookworm infection. PMID:7855838

  11. Anemia of chronic kidney disease: when normalcy becomes undesirable.

    PubMed

    Demirjian, Sevag G; Nurko, Saul

    2008-05-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease and renal failure, hemoglobin levels have been rising in parallel with more intensive use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). However, several recent studies indicate that raising hemoglobin to normal levels with ESAs can be too much of a good thing. Compared with partial correction, normalization of hemoglobin did not improve outcome, and it may have led to more frequent adverse events. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) now recommends a hemoglobin goal in the range of 10 to 12 g/dL. PMID:18556877

  12. Attitude of physicians in Saudi Arabia towards anemia treatment strategies in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Souqiyyeh, Muhammad Ziad; Shaheen, Faissal A M

    2007-03-01

    We aimed in this study to evaluate the attitude of physicians in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) towards strategies for treatment of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A questionnaire was sent to 153 physicians in 148 active dialysis units in the KSA including centers under the Ministry of Health (MOH) (73.6%), centers in the governmental non-MOH sector (12.2%) and centers in private hospitals (14.2%) that together care for a population of more than 7900 chronic dialysis patients. The study was performed between April and June 2006. A total of 137 physicians (89.5%) answered the questionnaire from 129 (87.1%) dialysis centers that catered to 7052 (89.2%) dialysis patients. There were 104 respondents (75.9%) who staged their CKD patients according to the level of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The estimated mean prevalence of each stage of CKD in the respondents' clinics was 15%, 19%, 29%, 22%, and 29% for the stages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The estimated prevalence of anemia [hemoglobin (Hb) < 110 g/L] in the different stages of CKD were 11%, 17%, 38%, 59%, and 78% in stages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. However, only 69 respondents (48%) answered these two questions. Sixty-seven respondents (50.4 %) believed that any patient with Hb < 110 g/L should receive r-HuEPO irrespective of the CKD stage, and 133 (99.3%) believed that correction of anemia in the CKD patients has documented impact on morbidity and mortality. In case of availability of a long acting r-HuEPO such as darbepoetin, 88 (66.2%) respondents would use it as their first choice other than the current short acting drug. Our survey suggests that the current practices concerning anemia management in CKD patients in the KSA may not be satisfactory. There are many centers that do not have data on the prevalence of CKD or anemia in their units. More studies are required to explore the quality of services rendered to the CKD patients and guidelines need to be outlined for

  13. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy. PMID:26712750

  14. [Complementary treatment of acute heart failure in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or anemia].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Recio Iglesias, Jesús; Grau Amorós, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and anemia are comorbidities with a high prevalence and impact in heart failure (HF). The presence of these comorbidities considerably worsens the prognosis of HF. Diabetic patients have a higher likelihood of developing symptoms of HF and both the treatment of diabetes and that of acute HF are altered by the coexistence of both entities. The glycemic targets in patients with acute HF are not well-defined, but could show a U-shaped relationship. Stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients with HF could also have a deleterious effect on the medium-term prognosis. The inter-relationship between COPD and HF hampers diagnosis due to the overlap between the symptoms and signs of both entities and complementary investigations. The treatment of acute HF is also altered by the presence of COPD. Anemia is highly prevalent and is often the direct cause of decompensated HF, the most common cause being iron deficiency anemia. Iron replacement therapy, specifically intravenous forms, has helped to improve the prognosis of acute HF. PMID:24930086

  15. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy. PMID:26712750

  16. Genetic overlap between Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease at the MAPT locus

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Rahul S.; Schork, Andrew J.; Wang, Yunpeng; Witoelar, Aree; Sharma, Manu; McEvoy, Linda K.; Holland, Dominic; Brewer, James B.; Chen, Chi-Hua; Thompson, Wesley K.; Harold, Denise; Williams, Julie; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Mayeux, Richard; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Heutink, Peter; Singleton, Andrew B.; Brice, Alexis; Wood, Nicolas W.; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Choi, Seung Hoi; DeStefano, Anita; Ikram, M. Arfan; Bis, Joshua C.; Smith, Albert; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Launer, Lenore; van Duijn, Cornelia; Seshadri, Sudha; Ulstein, Ingun Dina; Aarsland, Dag; Fladby, Tormod; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hyman, Bradley T.; Snaedal, Jon; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Gasser, Thomas; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated genetic overlap between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Using summary statistics (p-values) from large recent genomewide association studies (GWAS) (total n = 89,904 individuals), we sought to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associating with both AD and PD. We found and replicated association of both AD and PD with the A allele of rs393152 within the extended MAPT region on chromosome 17 (meta analysis p-value across 5 independent AD cohorts = 1.65 × 10−7). In independent datasets, we found a dose-dependent effect of the A allele of rs393152 on intra-cerebral MAPT transcript levels and volume loss within the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Our findings identify the tau-associated MAPT locus as a site of genetic overlap between AD and PD and extending prior work, we show that the MAPT region increases risk of Alzheimer’s neurodegeneration. PMID:25687773

  17. Genetic overlap between Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease at the MAPT locus.

    PubMed

    Desikan, R S; Schork, A J; Wang, Y; Witoelar, A; Sharma, M; McEvoy, L K; Holland, D; Brewer, J B; Chen, C-H; Thompson, W K; Harold, D; Williams, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C; Pericak-Vance, M A; Mayeux, R; Haines, J L; Farrer, L A; Schellenberg, G D; Heutink, P; Singleton, A B; Brice, A; Wood, N W; Hardy, J; Martinez, M; Choi, S H; DeStefano, A; Ikram, M A; Bis, J C; Smith, A; Fitzpatrick, A L; Launer, L; van Duijn, C; Seshadri, S; Ulstein, I D; Aarsland, D; Fladby, T; Djurovic, S; Hyman, B T; Snaedal, J; Stefansson, H; Stefansson, K; Gasser, T; Andreassen, O A; Dale, A M

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the genetic overlap between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Using summary statistics (P-values) from large recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (total n=89 904 individuals), we sought to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associating with both AD and PD. We found and replicated association of both AD and PD with the A allele of rs393152 within the extended MAPT region on chromosome 17 (meta analysis P-value across five independent AD cohorts=1.65 × 10(-7)). In independent datasets, we found a dose-dependent effect of the A allele of rs393152 on intra-cerebral MAPT transcript levels and volume loss within the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Our findings identify the tau-associated MAPT locus as a site of genetic overlap between AD and PD, and extending prior work, we show that the MAPT region increases risk of Alzheimer's neurodegeneration. PMID:25687773

  18. Association of anemia and erythropoiesis stimulating agents with inflammatory biomarkers in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Keithi-Reddy, Sai Ram; Addabbo, Francesco; Patel, Tejas V; Mittal, Bharati V; Goligorsky, Michael S; Singh, Ajay K

    2008-09-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important predictors of cardiovascular mortality especially in patients with chronic kidney disease. Here we explored the relationship of anemia and epoetin treatment to inflammatory cytokine levels in patients with chronic kidney disease. One hundred non-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease over 18 years of age were evenly split into anemic and non-anemic cohorts. Of the 50 anemic patients, 23 were receiving erythropoiesis stimulating agents treatments. Levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were found to be significantly higher and serum albumin was significantly lower with trends towards higher interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in anemic compared to non-anemic patients. Further analysis by multiple logistic regression found that anemic patients treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents had significantly higher odds for the upper two quartiles for IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha compared to non-anemic patients. Our study found that the anemia of chronic kidney disease was associated with up regulation of TNF-alpha, and possibly IL-6 and IL-8 along with increased levels of these proinflammatory cytokines in patients treated with epoetin. PMID:18547996

  19. Diabetes mellitus increases the prevalence of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: A nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Loutradis, Charalampos; Skodra, Alexandra; Georgianos, Panagiotis; Tolika, Panagiota; Alexandrou, Dimitris; Avdelidou, Afroditi; Sarafidis, Pantelis A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare anemia prevalence between matched chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and to assess factors associated with anemia development. METHODS: This is a nested case-control study of 184 type-2 diabetic and 184 non-diabetic CKD patients from a prospectively assembled database of a Nephrology outpatient clinic, matched for gender, age and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin: Men: < 13 g/dL, women: < 12 g/dL and/or use of recombinant erythropoietin) was examined in comparison, in the total population and by CKD Stage. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with anemia. RESULTS: The total prevalence of anemia was higher in diabetics (47.8% vs 33.2%, P = 0.004). Accordingly, prevalence was higher in diabetics in CKD Stage 3 (53.5% vs 33.1%, P < 0.001) and particularly in Stage 3a (60.4% vs 26.4%, P < 0.001), whereas it was non-significantly higher in Stage 4 (61.3% vs 48.4%; P = 0.307). Serum ferritin was higher in diabetics in total and in CKD stages, while serum iron was similar between groups. In multivariate analyses, DM (OR = 2.206, 95%CI: 1.196-4.069), CKD Stages 3a, 3b, 4 (Stage 4: OR = 12.169, 95%CI: 3.783-39.147) and serum iron (OR = 0.976, 95%CI: 0.968-0.985 per mg/dL increase) were independently associated with anemia. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of anemia progressively increases with advancing stages of CKD and is higher in diabetic than matched non-diabetic CKD patients and diabetes is independently associated with anemia occurrence. Detection and treatment of anemia in diabetic CKD patients should be performed earlier than non-diabetic counterparts. PMID:27458564

  20. The APOE locus advances disease progression in late onset familial Alzheimer`s disease but is not causative

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.; Bennett, C.; Osborne, A.

    1994-09-01

    An association has been observed in several independent data sets between late onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and the APOE locus on chromosomes 19. We have examined the genotype in family history positive (FHP) and family history negative (FHN) cases and find a distortion of the APOE allele frequencies in accord with previous studies. However, when we examined the allele distribution of the at-risk siblings of the FHP group we found an excess of the {epsilon}4 allele which also differs significantly from historic controls but not from the affected siblings. The age distribution of the affected and unaffected siblings was similar, suggesting that the allelic frequency distortion in the unaffected siblings was not due to their being below the mean age of onset. Lod score linkage analysis, with age dependent onset and nonstringent specification of the genetic parameters, did not suggest linkage to the APOE locus. Furthermore, an analysis of variance of the age of disease-free survival suggested that APOE genotype contributes a small fraction of the total variance, indicating that the APOE locus is a poor predictor of disease-free survival time within late onset families. We suggest that the APOE locus enhances the rate of progression of the disease in otherwise predisposed individuals and that variation at this locus is not able in and of itself to cause this disease.

  1. Newly Diagnosed Anemia Increases Risk of Parkinson’s disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chien Tai; Huang, Yao Hsien; Liu, Hung Yi; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chan, Lung; Chien, Li-Nien

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and low hemoglobin have been identified to increase Parkinson’s disease (PD) risk. This population-based cohort study investigated PD risk in newly diagnosed anemic patients by using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. All newly diagnosed anemic patients (n = 86,334) without a history of stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, major operations, or blood loss diseases were enrolled. A cohort of nonanemic controls, 1:1 matched with anemic patients on the basis of the demographics and pre-existing medical conditions, was also included. Competing risk analysis was used to evaluate PD risk in anemic patients compared with that in their matched controls. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of PD risk in the anemic patients was 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22–1.52, p < 0.001). Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) patients tended to exhibit a higher PD risk (aHR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.24–1.79, p < 0.001). Furthermore, Iron supplement did not significantly affect the PD risk: the aHRs for PD risk were 1.32 (95% CI: 1.07–1.63, p < 0.01) and 1.86 (95% CI: 1.46–2.35, p < 0.001) in IDA patients with and without iron supplementation, respectively. The population-based cohort study indicated newly diagnosed anemia increases PD risk. PMID:27412825

  2. Sickle cell anemia, the first molecular disease: overview of molecular etiology, pathophysiology, and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Martin H

    2008-01-01

    The root cause of sickle cell disease is a single beta-globin gene mutation coding for the sickle beta-hemoglobin chain. Sickle hemoglobin tetramers polymerize when deoxygenated, damaging the sickle erythrocyte. A multifaceted pathophysiology, triggered by erythrocyte injury induced by the sickle hemoglobin polymer, and encompassing more general cellular and tissue damage caused by hypoxia, oxidant damage, inflammation, abnormal intracellular interactions, and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, sets off the events recognized clinically as sickle cell disease. This disease is a group of related disorders where sickle hemoglobin is the principal hemoglobin species. All have varying degrees of chronic hemolytic anemia, vasculopathy, vasoocclusive disease, acute and chronic organ damage, and shortened life span. Its complex pathophysiology, of which we have a reasonable understanding, provides multiple loci for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:19112541

  3. Severity of Anemia Predicts Hospital Length of Stay but Not Readmission in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garlo, Katherine; Williams, Deanna; Lucas, Lee; Wong, Rocket; Botler, Joel; Abramson, Stuart; Parker, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of severe anemia to hospital readmission and length of stay (LOS) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3–5. Compared with the general population, patients with moderate CKD have a higher hospital readmission rate and LOS. Anemia in patients with moderate CKD is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The influence of anemia on hospital outcomes in patients with moderate CKD has not been characterized. We conducted a retrospective cohort study at Maine Medical Center, a 606-bed academic tertiary care hospital. Patients with CKD stages 3–5 and not on dialysis admitted during February 2013 to January 2014 were eligible. Patients with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, kidney transplant, acute kidney injury, gastrointestinal bleeding, active malignancy, pregnancy, and surgery were excluded. The cohort was split into severe anemia (hemoglobin ≤9 g/dL) versus a comparison group (hemoglobin >9 g/dL), and examined for differences in 30-day hospital readmission and LOS. In this study, the data of 1141 patients were included, out of which 156 (13.7%) had severe anemia (mean hemoglobin 8.1 g/dL, SD 0.8). Severe anemia was associated with increased hospital LOS (mean 6.4 (SD 6.0) days vs mean 4.5 (SD 4.0) days, P < 0.001). The difference was 1.7 day longer (95% CI 0.94, 2.45). There was no difference in readmission rate (mean 11.5% vs 10.2%, P = 0.7). Patients with moderate CKD and severe anemia are at risk for increased hospital LOS. Interventions targeting this high-risk population, including outpatient management of anemia, may benefit patient care and save costs through improved hospital outcomes. PMID:26107682

  4. [Alleviated anemia by bendamustine in cold agglutinin disease associated with small lymphocytic lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Kuno, Masatomo; Inoue, Atsushi; Aimoto, Mizuki; Nakao, Takafumi; Kameda, Kazuaki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Kanashima, Hiroshi; Hirai, Manabu; Yamane, Takahisa

    2015-02-01

    A 77-year-old man was diagnosed with cold agglutinin disease in 2004. He had been treated with prednisolone with stabilization of hemoglobin in the 6- to 8-g/dl range. However, his hemolytic anemia worsened, and computed tomography showed systemic lymphadenopathy in May 2012. A pathological diagnosis of small lymphocytic lymphoma was made based on an inguinal lymph node biopsy. Treatment was started with rituximab. However, there was no response to 6 doses of rituximab monotherapy. He next received 6 courses of bendamustine in combination with rituximab. This resulted in stabilization of hemoglobin and independence from transfusion support. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second case report describing bendamustine plus rituximab treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma complicated by cold agglutinin disease. Our results in this case suggest bendamustine to potentially be a useful therapeutic option in patients with cold agglutinin disease. PMID:25765801

  5. Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... People with Fanconi anemia should avoid cancer-causing substances (carcinogens) and have regular check-ups to screen for cancer. Alternative Names Fanconi's anemia; Anemia - Fanconi's Images Formed elements of blood References Bagby GC. Aplastic anemia ...

  6. Interstitial lung disease in an adult with Fanconi anemia: Clues to the pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, W.S.; Wenger, S.L.; Hoffman, R.M.

    1997-03-31

    We have studied a 38-year-old man with a prior diagnosis of Holt-Oram syndrome, who presented with diabetes mellitus. He had recently taken prednisone for idiopathic interstitial lung disease and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for sinusitis. Thrombocytopenia progressed to pancytopenia. The patient had skeletal, cardiac, renal, cutaneous, endocrine, hepatic, neurologic, and hematologic manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). Chest radiographs showed increased interstitial markings at age 25, dyspnea began in his late 20s, and he stopped smoking at age 32. At age 38, computerized tomography showed bilateral upper lobe fibrosis, lower lobe honeycombing, and bronchiectasis. Pulmonary function tests, compromised at age 29, showed a moderately severe obstructive and restrictive pattern by age 38. Serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level was 224 (normal 85-213) mg/dL and PI phenotype was M1. Karyotype was 46,X-Y with a marked increase in chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by diepoxybutane. The early onset and degree of pulmonary disease in this patient cannot be fully explained by environmental or known genetic causes. The International Fanconi Anemia Registry (IFAR) contains no example of a similar pulmonary presentation. Gene-environment (ecogenetic) interactions in FA seem evident in the final phenotype. The pathogenic mechanism of lung involvement in FA may relate to oxidative injury and cytokine anomalies. 49 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed. PMID:24289102

  8. Prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in Chinese patients with nondialysis chronic kidney disease: First multicenter, cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya; Shi, Hao; Wang, Wei-Ming; Peng, Ai; Jiang, Geng-Ru; Zhang, Jin-Yuan; Ni, Zhao-Hui; He, Li-Qun; Niu, Jian-Ying; Wang, Nian-Song; Mei, Chang-Lin; Xu, Xu-Dong; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Wei-Jie; Yan, Hai-Dong; Deng, Yue-Yi; Yu, Chen; Cen, Jun; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Nan

    2016-06-01

    This was the first multicenter, cross-sectional survey to assess the prevalence of anemia, patient awareness, and treatment status in China. Data of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD; age, 18-75 years; both out- and inpatients) from 25 hospitals in Shanghai, seeking medical treatment at the nephrology department, were collected between July 1, 2012 and August 31, 2012. The prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in patients with nondialysis CKD (ND-CKD) were assessed. Anemia was defined as serum hemoglobin (Hb) levels ≤12 g/dL in women and ≤13 g/dL in men. A total of 2420 patients with ND-CKD were included. Anemia was established in 1246 (51.5%) patients: 639 (51.3%) men and 607 (48.7%) women. The prevalence of anemia increased with advancing CKD stage (χtrend = 675.14, P < 0.001). Anemia was more prevalent in patients with diabetic nephropathy (68.0%) than in patients with hypertensive renal damage (56.6%) or chronic glomerulonephritis (46.1%, both P < 0.001). Only 39.8% of the anemic patients received treatment with erythropoietin and 27.1% patients received iron products; furthermore, 22.7% of the patients started receiving treatment when their Hb level reached 7 g/dL. The target-achieving rate (Hb at 11-12 g/dL) was only 8.2%. Of the 1246 anemia patients, only 7.5% received more effective and recommended intravenous supplementation. Anemia is highly prevalent in patients with ND-CKD in China, with a low target-achieving rate and poor treatment patterns. The study highlights the need to improve multiple aspects of CKD management to delay the progression of renal failure. PMID:27310973

  9. Multi-locus models of genetic risk of disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence for genetic contribution to complex diseases is described by recurrence risks to relatives of diseased individuals. Genome-wide association studies allow a description of the genetics of the same diseases in terms of risk loci, their effects and allele frequencies. To reconcile the two descriptions requires a model of how risks from individual loci combine to determine an individual's overall risk. Methods We derive predictions of risk to relatives from risks at individual loci under a number of models and compare them with published data on disease risk. Results The model in which risks are multiplicative on the risk scale implies equality between the recurrence risk to monozygotic twins and the square of the recurrence risk to sibs, a relationship often not observed, especially for low prevalence diseases. We show that this theoretical equality is achieved by allowing impossible probabilities of disease. Other models, in which probabilities of disease are constrained to a maximum of one, generate results more consistent with empirical estimates for a range of diseases. Conclusions The unconstrained multiplicative model, often used in theoretical studies because of its mathematical tractability, is not a realistic model. We find three models, the constrained multiplicative, Odds (or Logit) and Probit (or liability threshold) models, all fit the data on risk to relatives. Currently, in practice it would be difficult to differentiate between these models, but this may become possible if genetic variants that explain the majority of the genetic variance are identified. PMID:20181060

  10. Hepcidin-Induced Iron Deficiency Is Related to Transient Anemia and Hypoferremia in Kawasaki Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Ling; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Li, Sung-Chou; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis that primarily affects children under the age of five years old. For sufferers of KD, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been found to successfully diminish the occurrence of coronary artery lesions. Anemia is commonly found in KD patients, and we have shown that in appropriately elevated hepcidin levels are related to decreased hemoglobin levels in these patients. In this study, we investigated the time period of anemia and iron metabolism during different stages of KD. A total of 100 patients with KD and 20 control subjects were enrolled in this study for red blood cell and hemoglobin analysis. Furthermore, plasma, urine hepcidin, and plasma IL-6 levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 20 KD patients and controls. Changes in hemoglobin, plasma iron levels, and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were also measured in patients with KD. Hemoglobin, iron levels, and TIBC were lower (p < 0.001, p = 0.009, and p < 0.001, respectively) while plasma IL-6 and hepcidin levels (both p < 0.001) were higher in patients with KD than in the controls prior to IVIG administration. Moreover, plasma hepcidin levels were positively and significantly correlated with urine hepcidin levels (p < 0.001) prior to IVIG administration. After IVIG treatment, plasma hepcidin and hemoglobin levels significantly decreased (both p < 0.001). Of particular note was a subsequent gradual increase in hemoglobin levels during the three weeks after IVIG treatment; nevertheless, the hemoglobin levels stayed lower in KD patients than in the controls (p = 0.045). These findings provide a longitudinal study of hemoglobin changes and among the first evidence that hepcidin induces transient anemia and hypoferremia during KD's acute inflammatory phase. PMID:27187366

  11. Hepcidin-Induced Iron Deficiency Is Related to Transient Anemia and Hypoferremia in Kawasaki Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Ling; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Li, Sung-Chou; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis that primarily affects children under the age of five years old. For sufferers of KD, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been found to successfully diminish the occurrence of coronary artery lesions. Anemia is commonly found in KD patients, and we have shown that in appropriately elevated hepcidin levels are related to decreased hemoglobin levels in these patients. In this study, we investigated the time period of anemia and iron metabolism during different stages of KD. A total of 100 patients with KD and 20 control subjects were enrolled in this study for red blood cell and hemoglobin analysis. Furthermore, plasma, urine hepcidin, and plasma IL-6 levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 20 KD patients and controls. Changes in hemoglobin, plasma iron levels, and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were also measured in patients with KD. Hemoglobin, iron levels, and TIBC were lower (p < 0.001, p = 0.009, and p < 0.001, respectively) while plasma IL-6 and hepcidin levels (both p < 0.001) were higher in patients with KD than in the controls prior to IVIG administration. Moreover, plasma hepcidin levels were positively and significantly correlated with urine hepcidin levels (p < 0.001) prior to IVIG administration. After IVIG treatment, plasma hepcidin and hemoglobin levels significantly decreased (both p < 0.001). Of particular note was a subsequent gradual increase in hemoglobin levels during the three weeks after IVIG treatment; nevertheless, the hemoglobin levels stayed lower in KD patients than in the controls (p = 0.045). These findings provide a longitudinal study of hemoglobin changes and among the first evidence that hepcidin induces transient anemia and hypoferremia during KD’s acute inflammatory phase. PMID:27187366

  12. Intravenous Versus Oral Iron for the Treatment of Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonovas, Stefanos; Fiorino, Gionata; Allocca, Mariangela; Lytras, Theodore; Tsantes, Argirios; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Danese, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most prevalent extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our aim was to evaluate the comparative efficacy and harm of intravenous (IV) versus oral iron supplementation for correcting anemia in adult IBD patients. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to integrate evidence from randomized controlled trials having enrolled adults with IBD, and comparing IV versus oral iron (head-to-head) for correcting iron-deficiency anemia. Medline, Embase, Scopus, and the Web of Science database were searched through July 2015. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, the ClinicalTrials.gov, and international conference proceedings were also investigated. Two reviewers independently abstracted study data and outcomes, and rated each trial's risk-of-bias. Pooled odds ratio (OR) estimates with their 95% CIs were calculated using fixed- and random-effects models. Five eligible studies, including 694 IBD patients, were identified. In meta-analysis, IV iron demonstrated a higher efficacy in achieving a hemoglobin rise of ≥2.0 g/dL as compared to oral iron (OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.13, 2.18). Treatment discontinuation rates, due to adverse events or intolerance, were lower in the IV iron groups (OR: 0.27, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.59). Similarly, the occurrence of gastrointestinal adverse events was consistently lower in the IV iron groups. On the contrary, serious adverse events (SAEs) were more frequently reported among patients receiving IV iron preparations (OR: 4.57, 95% CI: 1.11, 18.8); however, the majority of the reported SAEs were judged as unrelated or unlikely to be related to the study medication. We found no evidence of publication bias, or between-study heterogeneity, across all analyses. Risk of bias was high across primary studies, because patients and personnel were not blinded to the intervention. IV iron appears to be more effective and better tolerated

  13. [Maternal Crohn's disease-related vitamin B12 deficient megaloblastic anemia in an infant].

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Wataru; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Yokoi, Kentaro; Iwahashi, Megumi; Inage, Yuka; Arihiro, Seiji; Koganei, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Ida, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We report an 11-month-old breast-fed boy with feeding difficulties, lethargy, and developmental delay. Blood examination showed pancytopenia and decreased serum levels of vitamin B12. Anisocytosis and poikilocytes were detected in his peripheral blood, and increased megaloblastosis without leukemic cells was detected in his bone marrow. After the diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency, symptoms were improved by vitamin B12 administration. Further investigation of the mother identified Crohn's disease and suggested that the supply of vitamin B12 from the mother to the infant, via the placenta during pregnancy and via breast milk after birth, was decreased due to impaired absorption of vitamin B12 in the mother's small intestine. Magnetic resonance imaging of the boy's brain on admission showed cerebral cortex atrophy which had improved by the age of 1 year and 10 months after vitamin B12 treatment, though developmental delay was still evident at the age of 3 years. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency often presents with nonspecific manifestations, such as developmental delay and failure to thrive, in addition to anemia and is thus not easily diagnosed. To prevent severe neurological sequelae, this condition must be rapidly diagnosed, because a prolonged duration increases the risk of permanent disabilities. PMID:26861098

  14. The Huntington disease locus is most likely within 325 kilobases of the chromosome 4p telomere.

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, N A; Cheng, J F; Smith, C L; Cantor, C R

    1989-01-01

    The genetic defect responsible for Huntington disease was originally localized near the tip of the short arm of chromosome 4 by genetic linkage to the locus D4S10. Several markers closer to Huntington disease have since been isolated, but these all appear to be proximal to the defect. A physical map that extends from the most distal of these loci, D4S90, to the telomere of chromosome 4 was constructed. This map identifies at least two CpG islands as markers for Huntington disease candidate genes and places the most likely location of the Huntington disease defect remarkably close (within 325 kilobases) to the telomere. Images PMID:2557612

  15. Tomato mutants altered in bacterial disease resistance provide evidence for a new locus controlling pathogen recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Salmeron, J M; Barker, S J; Carland, F M; Mehta, A Y; Staskawicz, B J

    1994-01-01

    We have employed a genetic approach to study the resistance of tomato to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato. Resistance to P. s. tomato depends upon expression of the Pto locus in tomato, which encodes a protein with similarity to serine/threonine protein kinases and recognizes pathogen strains expressing the avirulence gene avrPto. Eleven tomato mutants were isolated with altered resistance to P. s. tomato strains expressing avrPto. We identified mutations both in the Pto resistance locus and in a new locus designated Prf (for Pseudomonas resistance and fenthion sensitivity). The genetic approach allowed us to dissect the roles of these loci in signal transduction in response to pathogen attack. Lines carrying mutations in the Pto locus vary 200-fold in the degree to which they are susceptible to P. s. tomato strains expressing avrPto. The pto mutants retain sensitivity to the organophosphate insecticide fenthion; this trait segregates with Pto in genetic crosses. This result suggested that contrary to previous hypotheses, the Pto locus controls pathogen recognition but not fenthion sensitivity. Interestingly, mutations in the prf locus result in both complete susceptibility to P. s. tomato and insensitivity to fenthion, suggesting that Prf plays a role in tomato signaling in response to both pathogen elicitors and fenthion. Because pto and prf mutations do not alter recognition of Xanthomonas campestris strains expressing avrBsP, an avirulence gene recognized by all tested tomato cultivars, Prf does not play a general role in disease resistance but possibly functions specifically in resistance against P. s. tomato. Genetic analysis of F2 populations from crosses of pto and prf homozygotes indicated that the Pto and Prf loci are tightly linked. PMID:7911348

  16. A Study of Human Leukocyte D Locus Related Antigens in Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Farid, Nadir R.; Sampson, Laura; Noel, Elke P.; Barnard, John M.; Mandeville, Robert; Larsen, Bodil; Marshall, William H.; Carter, Nicholas D.

    1979-01-01

    An association between Graves' disease and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has previously been reported. The disease was more strongly associated with the HLA D locus antigen Dw3 than with HLA B8. Products of the HLA D locus are determined by the interaction of test cells with standard typing lymphocytes, a technically difficult procedure. Recently, it has been possible to type serologically for D locus related (DRw) specificities on peripheral bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes. Blood B lymphocytes from 50 unrelated controls and 41 patients with Graves' disease were typed for seven HLA DRw specificities. 28 patients with Graves' disease (68%) were positive for DRw3, in contrast to 14 controls (28%); whereas only 21 patients (50%) were HLA B8 positive, compared with 13 (26%) controls. Thus, positivity for DRw3 afforded a relative risk for Graves' disease of 5.5, whereas that for HLA B8 amounted to 3.0. Additionally, a family with multiple cases of Graves' disease in which the disease was previously shown to be inherited with the haplotype, was linked to DRw2, which suggests that the susceptibility to the disease was inherited in association with that antigen. Two HLA B/glyoxalase recombination events were observed in this family; in both instances HLA DRw followed HLA B. This study thus demonstrates that the disease susceptibility gene for Graves' disease is in strong linkage disequilibrium with DRw3; however, it may be associated with other DRw specificities and inherited within family units in association with them. PMID:105012

  17. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Relation to Respiratory Disease and Social Behaviors In Low-Income Infants in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    1993-01-01

    Examined a sample of 177 infants (age 9 through 12 months) with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) from low-income French, African, and North African Muslim families in Paris. Found a higher than normal incidence of otitis media and respiratory diseases such as bronchitis among the infants. Also examined the relationship between infant IDA and child…

  18. Intestine-specific Disruption of Hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF)-2α Improves Anemia in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Das, Nupur; Xie, Liwei; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Campbell, Andrew; Rivella, Stefano; Shah, Yatrik M

    2015-09-25

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is caused by genetic defects in the β-globin chain. SCD is a frequently inherited blood disorder, and sickle cell anemia is a common type of hemoglobinopathy. During anemia, the hypoxic response via the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is highly activated in the intestine and is essential in iron absorption. Intestinal disruption of HIF-2α protects against tissue iron accumulation in iron overload anemias. However, the role of intestinal HIF-2α in regulating anemia in SCD is currently not known. Here we show that in mouse models of SCD, disruption of intestinal HIF-2α significantly decreased tissue iron accumulation. This was attributed to a decrease in intestinal iron absorptive genes, which were highly induced in a mouse model of SCD. Interestingly, disruption of intestinal HIF-2α led to a robust improvement in anemia with an increase in RBC, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. This was attributed to improvement in RBC survival, hemolysis, and insufficient erythropoiesis, which is evident from a significant decrease in serum bilirubin, reticulocyte counts, and serum erythropoietin following intestinal HIF-2α disruption. These data suggest that targeting intestinal HIF-2α has a significant therapeutic potential in SCD pathophysiology. PMID:26296885

  19. Epoetin zeta in the management of anemia associated with chronic kidney disease, differential pharmacology and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Davis-Ajami, Mary Lynn; Wu, Jun; Downton, Katherine; Ludeman, Emilie; Noxon, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Epoetin zeta was granted marketing authorization in October 2007 by the European Medicines Agency as a recombinant human erythropoietin erythropoiesis-stimulating agent to treat symptomatic anemia of renal origin in adult and pediatric patients on hemodialysis and adults on peritoneal dialysis, as well as for symptomatic renal anemia in adult patients with renal insufficiency not yet on dialysis. Currently, epoetin zeta can be administered either subcutaneously or intravenously to correct for hemoglobin concentrations ≤10 g/dL (6.2 mmol/L) or with dose adjustment to maintain hemoglobin levels at desired levels not in excess of 12 g/dL (7.5 mmol/L). This review article focuses on epoetin zeta indications in chronic kidney disease, its use in managing anemia of renal origin, and discusses its pharmacology and clinical utility. PMID:24790409

  20. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents for the management of anemia of chronic kidney disease: past advancements and current innovations.

    PubMed

    Dutka, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Over the last century, remarkable advances have been made in the care of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), resulting in improved prognosis. However, for decades after the advent of dialysis, anemia-associated symptoms continued to adversely affect patients' daily lives. The identification, isolation, and eventual cloning of erythropoietin and its receptor led to development of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, revolutionizing anemia management. Continued advancements have paved the way for the discovery of novel erythropoiesis stimulating agents with enhanced properties. This article charts the history of anemia management in patients with ESRD, including the discovery of erythropoietin, and briefly reviews the development, mechanism of action, and select attributes of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. PMID:23469411

  1. Allelic association at the D14S43 locus in early onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, A.; Tardieu, S.; Campion, D.; Martinez, M.

    1995-04-24

    The D14S43 marker is closely linked to the major gene for early onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer`s disease on chromosome 14. Allelic frequencies at the D14S43 locus were compared in 113 familial and isolated cases of early onset Alzheimer`s disease (<60 years of age at onset) (EOAD) and 109 unaffected individuals of the same geographic origin. Allele 7 was significantly (P = 0.033) more frequent in type 1 EOAD patients (13.2%), defined by the presence of at least another first degree relative with EOAD, than in controls (4.1%). Since an autosomal dominant gene is probably responsible for type 1 patients, allelic association may reflect linkage disequilibrium at the D14S43 locus. This would mean that some patients share a common ancestral mutation. However, since multiple tests were carried out, this result must be interpreted with caution, and needs confirmation in an independent sample. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They don' ... problem causes sickle cell anemia. People with the disease are born with two sickle cell genes, one ...

  3. Lafora disease is not linked to the Unverricht-Lundborg locus

    SciTech Connect

    Labauge, P.; Beck, C.; Bellet, H.; Baldy-Moulinier, M.; Malafosse, A.

    1995-02-27

    Lafora disease and Unverricht-Lundborg disease are two forms of progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PME). Recently the gene for Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1) was mapped to chromosome 21q22.3. Using three highly polymorphic DNA markers (D21S212, PFKL, and D21S171) which flank the EPM1 locus, we performed linkage analysis to investigate whether or not the EPM1 gene is also implicated in Lafora disease. Linkage was excluded in three North-African pedigrees each comprising at least two affected individuals. This result suggests that differential diagnosis of Lafora disease and Unverricht-Lundborg disease may be facilitated by molecular genetic analysis. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  5. Pernicious Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pernicious Anemia? Pernicious anemia (per-NISH-us uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... nervous system working properly. People who have pernicious anemia can't absorb enough vitamin B12 from food. ...

  6. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemolytic Anemia? Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ... blood cells to replace them. However, in hemolytic anemia, the bone marrow can't make red blood ...

  7. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow is unable to replace the red blood cells that are being destroyed. Immune hemolytic anemia occurs when the immune system mistakenly sees your ...

  8. Oxidative stress during erythropoietin hyporesponsiveness anemia at end stage renal disease: Molecular and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Samar K M; Amer, H A; El Behairy, Adel M; Warda, Mohamad

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are two faces of one coin in end stage renal disease patients (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis. Their interconnection induces anemia complicated with erythropoietin hyporesponsiveness. The biochemical bases behind the resistance to erythropoietin therapy with frequent hemoglobinemia, oxidative stress and iron status have not been fully understood. Here two equal groups (40 patients each) of responders and non-responders to recombinant human erythropoietin therapy (higher than 300 IU/kg/wk of epoetin) were investigated. Hematological and biochemical analyses of collected blood and serum samples were performed along with serum electrophoretic protein footprinting. The leukocytic DNA fragmentation was used to evaluate the degree of oxidative insult. The good responders showed lower erythrocyte malondialdehyde (E-MDA) level and less DNA fragmentation of circulating leukocytes than poor responders with elevated hemoglobin, albumin, A/G ratio, total iron, and ferritin levels. Contrariwise, lower erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (E-SOD) and catalase activities in EPO poor responder group were noticed. Neither other serum constituents nor electrophoretic protein pattern showed any difference between the two groups. There were higher levels of inflammatory markers, interleukin-6 (IL6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in EPO poor responder than good responder. The negative correlations between Hb and both IL6 and CRP levels in the present data remotely indicate a positive correlation between inflammatory markers and severity of anemia. A direct correlation between Hb and antioxidant enzymes (E-SOD and catalase) was noticed, while inverse correlation with E-MDA was recorded. The study proved that oral supplementation of vitamin C to ESRD patients might mitigate the previously elevated serum MDA level in these patients. PMID:27222740

  9. Erythropoiesis-stimulating Agents and Anemia in Patients with Non-dialytic Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is common in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Though erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) have been strongly endorsed in guidelines, it is of particular financial interest. Recently, the reimbursement of ESAs in non-dialytic patients was started by the Korean National Health Insurance System. Thus, we investigated the impact of the reimbursement of ESAs on the anemia care in non-dialytic CKD patients. Medical records of patients with advanced CKD (estimated GFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2) were reviewed. Use of ESAs, blood transfusion, and hemoglobin concentrations were analyzed from one year prior to reimbursement to three years following. We used multivariable modified Poisson regression to estimate the utilization prevalence ratio (PRs). A total of 1,791 medical records were analyzed. The proportion of patients receiving ESAs increased from 14.8% before reimbursement to a peak 33.6% in 1 yr after reimbursement; thereafter, ESA use decreased to 22.4% in 3 yr after reimbursement (compared with baseline; PR, 2.19 [95% CI, 1.40-3.42]). In patients with Hb <10 g/dL, the proportion of receiving ESAs increased from 32.1% before reimbursement to 66.7% in 3 yr after reimbursement (compared with baseline; PR, 2.04 [95% CI, 1.25-3.32]). Mean hemoglobin concentrations were 10.06±1.54 g/dL before reimbursement and increased to 10.78±1.51 g/dL in 3 yr after the reimbursement change (P=0.001). However, the requirement of blood transfusion was not changed over time. With the reimbursement of ESAs, the advanced CKD patients were more likely to be treated with ESAs, and the hemoglobin concentrations increased. PMID:26770038

  10. Oxidative stress during erythropoietin hyporesponsiveness anemia at end stage renal disease: Molecular and biochemical studies

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Samar K.M.; Amer, H.A.; El Behairy, Adel M.; Warda, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are two faces of one coin in end stage renal disease patients (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis. Their interconnection induces anemia complicated with erythropoietin hyporesponsiveness. The biochemical bases behind the resistance to erythropoietin therapy with frequent hemoglobinemia, oxidative stress and iron status have not been fully understood. Here two equal groups (40 patients each) of responders and non-responders to recombinant human erythropoietin therapy (higher than 300 IU/kg/wk of epoetin) were investigated. Hematological and biochemical analyses of collected blood and serum samples were performed along with serum electrophoretic protein footprinting. The leukocytic DNA fragmentation was used to evaluate the degree of oxidative insult. The good responders showed lower erythrocyte malondialdehyde (E-MDA) level and less DNA fragmentation of circulating leukocytes than poor responders with elevated hemoglobin, albumin, A/G ratio, total iron, and ferritin levels. Contrariwise, lower erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (E-SOD) and catalase activities in EPO poor responder group were noticed. Neither other serum constituents nor electrophoretic protein pattern showed any difference between the two groups. There were higher levels of inflammatory markers, interleukin-6 (IL6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in EPO poor responder than good responder. The negative correlations between Hb and both IL6 and CRP levels in the present data remotely indicate a positive correlation between inflammatory markers and severity of anemia. A direct correlation between Hb and antioxidant enzymes (E-SOD and catalase) was noticed, while inverse correlation with E-MDA was recorded. The study proved that oral supplementation of vitamin C to ESRD patients might mitigate the previously elevated serum MDA level in these patients. PMID:27222740

  11. Health locus of control and depression in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A J; Turner, C W; Smith, T W; Holman, J M; Gregory, M C

    1991-06-01

    Research on the association between health locus of control and depression in chronic illness has produced contradictory findings, perhaps because of a failure to consider contextual variables. In this study of 96 hemodialysis patients, the belief that one's health is controllable was associated with less depression among Ss who had not previously experienced a failed renal transplant. This belief was associated with greater depression for Ss who had returned to dialysis following an unsuccessful transplant. This interactive effect occurred among severely ill Ss, but health locus of control was unrelated to depression among Ss with less severe disease. This pattern occurred both when control perceptions reflected a belief in the Ss' own or powerful others' (i.e., health care providers) ability to influence health outcomes. Results underscore the adaptive value of congruence between control beliefs and objective circumstances in chronic illness. PMID:2071727

  12. Renal Cell Protection of Erythropoietin beyond Correcting The Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Currently many patients with chronic renal failure have profited from the use of erythropoietin to correct anemia (1,2). In chronic kidney disease, anemia is believed to be a surrogate index for tissue hypoxia that continues preexisting renal tissue injury (1-3). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and facilitates erythropoiesis. It is a 30.4 kD glycoprotein and class I cytokine containing 165 amino acids (3,4). Approximately 90% of systemic erythropoietin in adults is produced by peritubular interstitial fibroblasts in the renal cortex and outer medulla of the kidney (3-5). A feedback mechanism involving oxygen delivery to the tissues seems to regulate erythropoietin production. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates transcription of the erythropoietin gene in the kidney, which determines erythropoietin synthesis (3-5). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and mediates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow (4-6). Kidney fibrosis is the last common pathway in chronic renal failure irrespective of the initial etiology (5,6). Constant inflammatory cell infiltration and pericyte-myofibroblast transition lead to renal fibrosis and insufficiency which result in decreased production of erythropoietin (4-7). Thus far, therapeutic efforts to treat patients with chronic renal failure by administering erythropoietin have been made only to correct anemia and putative hypoxic tissue damage. The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin has marked a significant advance in the management of anemia associated with chronic renal failure (6-9). With an increasing number of patients with chronic renal failure receiving erythropoietin treatment, emerging evidence suggests that erythropoietin not only has an erythropoietic function, but also has renoprotective potential. In fact, in recent years, the additional non

  13. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  14. Homozygosity mapping of Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, M.; Botstein, D.; Kruglyak, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, recessive, genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by progressive insufficiency of the bone marrow and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Complementation tests among different FA cells have indicated the presence of at least 4 FA-causing genes. One of the genes, FACC, was identified by functional complementation but appears unlikely to account for many phenotypically indistinguishable FA caes. We have begun a linkage study of FA using {open_quotes}homozygosity mapping{close_quotes}, a method that involves genotyping with DNA markers on affected individuals whose parents are related. Because FA is a rare recessive disease, it is most likely that probands are homozygous by descent at the disease locus and, therefore, at nearby DNA markers. Although the probability that any given marker will be homozygous in an inbred individual is high, given markers with moderate heterozygosities, the chance that two unrelated inbred individuals will be homozygous at the same marker is considerably lower. By locating overlapping regions of homozygosity between different families we hope to identify genes that cause FA. Sixteen consanguineous non-FACC FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at Rockefeller University are under study. An efficient algorithm for data analysis was developed and incorporated into software that can quickly compute exact multipoint lod scores using all markers on an entire chromosome. At the time of this writing, 171 of 229 microsatellite markers spaced at 20 cM intervals across the genome have been analyzed.

  15. Eight closely linked loci place the Wilson disease locus within 13q14-q21

    PubMed Central

    Bowcock, A. M.; Farrer, L. A.; Hebert, J. M.; Agger, M.; Sternlieb, I.; Scheinberg, I. H.; Buys, C. H. C. M.; Scheffer, H.; Frydman, M.; Chajek-Saul, T.; Bonne-Tamir, B.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. L.

    1988-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in an accumulation of copper in the liver, brain, and other organs. The WD locus (WND) has previously been linked to esterase D (ESD) and localized to 13q14–22. With the large Centre d'Etude Polymorphisme Humain cohort, a refined map of DNA markers from this region was constructed, with the following locus order: D13S1-D13S21-D13S22-D13S10-ESD-RB-WND-D13S26-D13S12-D13S2. A significant excess of male recombination was observed between D13S21 and D13S22. Intervals distal to D13S22 showed an excess of female recombination. When these markers were tested on 19 WD families from a variety of ethnic backgrounds, the two closest loci were shown to be RB and D13S26. The retinoblastoma gene locus (RB) was shown to be proximal to WND at a distance of 4.4 centimorgans (cM), and D13S26 was placed distal to WND at a distance of 4.0 cM. ESD was assigned proximally at a distance of 9.4 cM. In all families studied WND was linked to one or more of the loci ESD, RB, or D13S26. PMID:3189332

  16. Hematologic Disorders: Anemia.

    PubMed

    Baltierra, David; Harper, Tiffany; Jones, Matthew Page; Nau, Konrad C

    2015-06-01

    Anemia occurs in up to 25% of the US population. Normal hemoglobin levels vary by race, sex, and age. Classification of anemia by mean corpuscular volume guides the differential diagnosis and evaluation. Iron studies, reticulocyte count, the red blood cell distribution width index, and blood test results are used to make the diagnosis. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common microcytic anemia and is managed with iron therapy. Parenteral iron is available when the oral route cannot be used. Patients who do not benefit from therapy should be evaluated for adherence, malabsorption, occult bleeding, systemic disease, or less common inherited disorders. A source of gastrointestinal bleeding is found in 60% to 70% of patients with iron deficiency anemia who are referred for endoscopy. Normocytic anemia has a broad differential, including nutritional deficiencies, blood loss, renal disease, malignancy (solid tumors or hematologic cancer), rheumatologic disorders, endocrine disorders, and other systemic diseases. Macrocytic anemias are seen with vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, alcohol use, thyroid disease, hydroxyurea, antiretroviral drugs, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloma. Oral vitamin B12 is underused, and can be as effective as intramuscular vitamin B12 in managing anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:26080453

  17. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

  18. Anemia resolved by thoracoscopic resection of a mediastinal mass: a case report of unicentric Castleman’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jong Hui; Hong, Sook Hee; Jeong, Seong Cheol; Park, Chan Beom; Choi, Kuk Bin; Shin, Ok Ran

    2015-01-01

    Castleman’s disease (CD) is an uncommon benign lymphoproliferative disorder that usually presents as a single or multiple mediastinal mass. In unicentric CD, constitutional symptoms are rare, but are curable with surgical resection. However, serious intraoperative bleeding often requires conversion to thoracotomy. We present a case of unicentric CD in a 25-year-old woman with anemia, who was successfully treated by thoracoscopic resection. We describe the clinical course from the initial presentation to diagnosis and surgical cure. PMID:26380750

  19. CD33 Alzheimer's disease locus: altered monocyte function and amyloid biology.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Chibnik, Lori B; Keenan, Brendan T; Ottoboni, Linda; Raj, Towfique; Tang, Anna; Rosenkrantz, Laura L; Imboywa, Selina; Lee, Michelle; Von Korff, Alina; Morris, Martha C; Evans, Denis A; Johnson, Keith; Sperling, Reisa A; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; De Jager, Philip L

    2013-07-01

    In our functional dissection of the CD33 Alzheimer's disease susceptibility locus, we found that the rs3865444(C) risk allele was associated with greater cell surface expression of CD33 in the monocytes (t50 = 10.06, P(joint) = 1.3 × 10(-13)) of young and older individuals. It was also associated with diminished internalization of amyloid-β 42 peptide, accumulation of neuritic amyloid pathology and fibrillar amyloid on in vivo imaging, and increased numbers of activated human microglia. PMID:23708142

  20. Genetic polymorphisms and cerebrovascular disease in children with sickle cell anemia from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Filho, Isaac Lima da Silva; Leite, Ana Claudia Celestino Bezerra; Moura, Patrícia Gomes; Ribeiro, Georgina Severo; Cavalcante, Andréa Cony; Azevedo, Flávia Carolina Marques de; Andrada-Serpa, Maria José de

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to examine possible genetic risk factors related to the occurrence of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in Brazilian population, the frequency of β(S)-globin gene haplotypes and co-inheritance with α-thalassemia (-α(3.7kb)) and single nucleotide polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-C677T), Factor V Leiden (FV-G1691A) and prothrombin (PT-G20210A) genes in children from Rio de Janeiro. Ninety four children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) were included, 24 patients with cerebrovascular involvement and 70 patients without CVD as control group. The mean age of children at the time of the cerebrovascular event was similar to the control group. The frequency of -α(3.7kb) thalassemia was similar in both groups (p=0.751). Children with Bantu/Atypical β(S)-globin gene haplotype presented 15 times more chance (OR=15.4 CI 95% 2.9-81.6) of CVD than the other β(S)-globin gene haplotypes. The C677T polymorphism of MTHFR gene was similar in both groups (p=0.085). No mutation in the FV Leiden or PT genes was found. A large study seems necessary to establish the role of these genetic polymorphisms in Brazilian miscegenated population. PMID:21755116

  1. Fine mapping of the celiac disease-associated LPP locus reveals a potential functional variant

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rodrigo; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Kumar, Vinod; Deelen, Patrick; Szperl, Agata; Trynka, Gosia; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Swertz, Morris A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Barisani, Donatella; Greco, Luigi; Mearin, Luisa; Wolters, Victorien M.; Mulder, Chris; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Sood, Ajit; Cukrowska, Bozena; Núñez, Concepción; Pratesi, Riccardo; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Using the Immunochip for genotyping, we identified 39 non-human leukocyte antigen (non-HLA) loci associated to celiac disease (CeD), an immune-mediated disease with a worldwide frequency of ∼1%. The most significant non-HLA signal mapped to the intronic region of 70 kb in the LPP gene. Our aim was to fine map and identify possible functional variants in the LPP locus. We performed a meta-analysis in a cohort of 25 169 individuals from six different populations previously genotyped using Immunochip. Imputation using data from the Genome of the Netherlands and 1000 Genomes projects, followed by meta-analysis, confirmed the strong association signal on the LPP locus (rs2030519, P = 1.79 × 10−49), without any novel associations. The conditional analysis on this top SNP-indicated association to a single common haplotype. By performing haplotype analyses in each population separately, as well as in a combined group of the four populations that reach the significant threshold after correction (P < 0.008), we narrowed down the CeD-associated region from 70 to 2.8 kb (P = 1.35 × 10−44). By intersecting regulatory data from the ENCODE project, we found a functional SNP, rs4686484 (P = 3.12 × 10−49), that maps to several B-cell enhancer elements and a highly conserved region. This SNP was also predicted to change the binding motif of the transcription factors IRF4, IRF11, Nkx2.7 and Nkx2.9, suggesting its role in transcriptional regulation. We later found significantly low levels of LPP mRNA in CeD biopsies compared with controls, thus our results suggest that rs4686484 is the functional variant in this locus, while LPP expression is decreased in CeD. PMID:24334606

  2. Oral manifestations compatible with chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Grein Cavalcanti, Laura; Fuentes Araújo, Renata L; Bonfim, Carmem; Torres-Pereira, Cassius C

    2015-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease that is characterized by several congenital abnormalities and progressive bone marrow failure and is associated with an increased susceptibility to malignant disorders. Currently, the only potential cure for hematological disorders is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, 1 of the most common complications after HSCT is the development of oral chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), which is also a risk factor for the development of cancer, particularly oral squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of oral manifestations compatible with cGVHD in patients diagnosed with FA according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus criteria. A total of 96 patients (51 females, 45 males; median age, 16 years) with FA, who were in medical follow-up after HSCT at the outpatient clinic of the bone marrow transplantation unit (Hospital de Clínicas from the Universidade Federal do Paraná) underwent an oral evaluation between January 2013 and December 2013. Post-HSCT periods varied from 1 to 261 months and were divided into 3 periods: immediate post-HSCT period; intermediate post-HSC period, and late post-HSCT period. Among the evaluated patients, 40 of 96 (42%) presented with oral manifestations of cGVHD, with 29 of 40 (73%) of these patients in the late post-HSCT period. NIH scale scores varied from 0 to 10, and lichenoid and hyperkeratotic lesions were the abnormalities most frequently observed (100%). Overall, a high prevalence of oral manifestations was observed for cGVHD patients with FA. These data highlight the importance of monitoring oral manifestations compatible with cGVHD to identify and treat individuals with a higher risk of developing oral cancer. PMID:25316110

  3. Erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. A recessive inherited ferrochelatase deficiency with anemia, photosensitivity, and liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tutois, S; Montagutelli, X; Da Silva, V; Jouault, H; Rouyer-Fessard, P; Leroy-Viard, K; Guénet, J L; Nordmann, Y; Beuzard, Y; Deybach, J C

    1991-01-01

    A viable autosomal recessive mutation (named fch, or ferrochelatase deficiency) causing jaundice and anemia in mice arose in a mutagenesis experiment using ethylnitrosourea. Homozygotes (fch/fch) display a hemolytic anemia, photosensitivity, cholestasis, and severe hepatic dysfunction. Protoporphyrin is found at high concentration in erythrocytes, serum, and liver. Ferrochelatase activity in various tissues is 2.7-6.3% of normal. Heterozygotes (+/fch) are not anemic and have normal liver function; they are not sensitive to light exposure; ferrochelatase activity is 45-65% of normal. Southern blot analysis using a ferrochelatase cDNA probe reveals no gross deletion of the ferrochelatase gene. This is the first spontaneous form of erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. Despite the presence in the mouse of clinical and biochemical features infrequent in the human, this mutation may represent a model for the human disease, especially in its severe form. Images PMID:1939658

  4. Positional cloning of the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.F.; Korenblat, K.M.; Goate, A.M.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic linkage analysis had indicated a locus for familial early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (FAD) on chromosome 14 at q24.3. The FAD locus has been shown previously to lie between the dinucleotide markers D14S61 and D14S63, a genetic distance of approximately 13 cM. We are currently attempting to identify the gene using a positional cloning strategy. The first step towards the isolation and characterization of this locus was the construction of an overlapping YAC contig covering the entire region. Over forty YACs which map to this region have been isolated from the St. Louis and CEPH libraries by a combination of YAC end sequence walking and sequence tagged site mapping. Our contig fully spans the complete domain, encompassing all genetic markers non-recombinant with FAD (i.e. D14S76, D14S43, D14S71, D14S77) and the two nearest flanking FAD-recombinant markers. With restriction mapping of the domain, we can determine the exact size of the region. As a second step, the YACs in this contig are currently being inspected for expressed sequences by exon trapping, initially on those YACs known to be nonchimeric. We have currently made exon-trapped libraries from YACs that have the markers D14S76 and D14S43. Sequence analysis of these libraries indicates that a trapped exon is identified on average for each 30 kb of YAC DNA. The trapped exons are being screened to identify likely candidate genes, which will be examined for mutations in FAD families.

  5. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  6. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... infections and bleeding. Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ...

  7. Insertional mutation of the motor endplate disease (med) locus on mouse chromosome 15

    SciTech Connect

    Kohrman, D.C.; Plummer, N.W.; Schuster, T.

    1995-03-20

    Homozygous transgenic mice from line A4 have an early-onset progressive neuromuscular disorder characterized by paralysis of the rear limbs, muscle atrophy, and lethality by 4 weeks of age. The transgene insertion site was mapped to distal chromosome 15 close to the locus motor endplate disease (med). The sequence of mouse DNA flanking the insertion site junctions was determined. A small (<20 kb) deletion was detected at the insertion site, with no evidence of additional rearrangement of the chromosomal DNA. Noncomplementation of the transgene-induced mutation and med was demonstrated in a cross with med{sup J}/ + mice. The new allele is designated med{sup TgNA4Bs}(med{sup tg}). The homologous human locus MED was assigned to chromosome 12. Synaptotagmin 1 and contactin 1 were eliminated as candidate genes for the med mutation. The transgene-induced allele provides molecular access to the med gene, whose function is required for synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction and long-term survival of cerebellar Purkinje cells. 49 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Fine mapping and resequencing of the PARK16 locus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina; Bjørnarå, Kari Anne; Dizdar, Nil; Fardell, Camilla; Forsgren, Lars; Holmberg, Björn; Larsen, Jan Petter; Linder, Jan; Nissbrandt, Hans; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Dietrichs, Espen; Toft, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    The PARK16 locus, spanning five genes on chromosome 1, was among the first genetic regions to show genome-wide association in Parkinson's disease (PD). Subsequent investigations have found variability in PARK16 top-hits and association patterns across populations, and the implicated genes and mechanisms are currently unclear. In the present study, we aimed to explore the contribution of PARK16 variability to PD risk in a Scandinavian population. We genotyped 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a case-control sample set of 2570 individuals from Norway and Sweden to fine map the locus. Targeted resequencing of the full coding regions of SLC45A3, NUCKS1, RAB7L1, SLC41A1 and PM20D1 was performed in DNA pools from a subset of 387 patient samples. We find evidence for an association with PD for rs1775143 as well as a haplotype located around the 5' region of RAB7L1, implicating variants which are not in high linkage disequilibrium with the strongest signal from a recent large meta-analysis in Caucasians. We also provide suggestive support for epistasis between RAB7L1 and LRRK2 as previously hypothesized by others. Comparing our results with previous work, allelic heterogeneity at PARK16 appears likely, and further studies are warranted to disentangle the complex patterns of association and pinpoint the functionally relevant variants. PMID:25855069

  9. Pentoxifylline for Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bolignano, Davide; D’Arrigo, Graziella; Pisano, Anna; Coppolino, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Pentoxifylline (PTX) is a promising therapeutic approach for reducing inflammation and improving anemia associated to various systemic disorders. However, whether this agent may be helpful for anemia management also in CKD patients is still object of debate. Study Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Population Adults with CKD (any KDOQI stage, including ESKD patients on regular dialysis) and anemia (Hb<13 g/dL in men or < 12 g/dL in women). Search Strategy and Sources Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, Ovid-MEDLINE and PubMed were searched for studies providing data on the effects of PTX on anemia parameters in CKD patients without design or follow-up restriction. Intervention PTX derivatives at any dose regimen. Outcomes Hemoglobin, hematocrit, ESAs dosage and resistance (ERI), iron indexes (ferritin, serum iron, TIBC, transferrin and serum hepcidin) and adverse events. Results We retrieved 11 studies (377 patients) including seven randomized controlled trials (all comparing PTX to placebo or standard therapy) one retrospective case-control study and three prospective uncontrolled studies. Overall, PTX increased hemoglobin in three uncontrolled studies but such improvement was not confirmed in a meta-analysis of seven studies (299 patients) (MD 0.12 g/dL, 95% CI -0.22 to 0.47). Similarly, there were no conclusive effects of PTX on hematocrit, ESAs dose, ferritin and TSAT in pooled analyses. Data on serum iron, ERI, TIBC and hepcidin were based on single studies. No evidence of increased rate of adverse events was also noticed. Limitations Small sample size and limited number of studies. High heterogeneity among studies with respect to CKD and anemia severity, duration of intervention and responsiveness/current therapy with iron or ESAs. Conclusions There is currently no conclusive evidence supporting the utility of pentoxifylline for improving anemia control in CKD patients. Future trials designed on hard, patient-centered outcomes with larger sample

  10. Linkage of Thomsen disease to the T-cell-receptor beta (TCRB) locus on chromosome 7q35

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, J.A.; Casley, W.L.; Cousin, H.K.; Hudson, A.J.; Hashimoto, L.; Ebers, G.C. ); Murphy, E.G. ); Cornelis, F.C. )

    1992-09-01

    The chromosomal localization of the gene for Thomsen disease, an autosomal dominant form of myotonia congenita, is unknown. Electrophysiologic data in Thomsen disease point to defects in muscle-membrane ion-channel function. A mouse model of myotonia congenita appears to result from transposon inactivation of a muscle chloride-channel gene which maps to a region of mouse chromosome 6. The linkage group containing this gene includes several loci which have human homologues on human chromosome 7q31-35 (synteny), and this is a candidate region for the Thomsen disease locus. Linkage analysis of Thomsen disease to the T-cell-receptor beta (TCRB) locus at 7q35 was carried out in four pedigrees (25 affected and 23 unaffected individuals) by using a PCR-based dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the TCRB gene. Two-point linkage analysis between Thomsen disease and TCRB showed a maximum cumulative lod score of 3.963 at a recombination fraction of .10 (1-lod support interval .048-.275). The authors conclude that the Thomsen disease locus is linked to the TCRB locus in these families. 30 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A mutagenesis-derived broad-spectrum disease resistance locus in wheat.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jackie; Zhang, Hongtao; Giroux, Michael J; Feiz, Leila; Jin, Yue; Wang, Meinan; Chen, Xianming; Huang, Li

    2012-07-01

    Wheat leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust, and powdery mildew caused by the fungal pathogens Puccinia triticina, P. graminis f. sp. tritici, P. striiformis f. sp. tritici, and Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, respectively, are destructive diseases of wheat worldwide. Breeding durable disease resistance cultivars rely largely on continually introgressing new resistance genes, especially the genes with different defense mechanisms, into adapted varieties. Here, we describe a new resistance gene obtained by mutagenesis. The mutant, MNR220 (mutagenesis-derived new resistance), enhances resistance to three rusts and powdery mildew, with the characteristics of delayed disease development at the seedling stage and completed resistance at the adult plant stage. Genetic analysis demonstrated that the resistance in MNR220 is conferred by a single semidominant gene mapped on the short arm of chromosome 2B. Gene expression profiling of several pathogenesis-related genes indicated that MNR220 has an elevated and rapid pathogen-induced response. In addition to its potential use in breeding for resistance to multiple diseases, high-resolution mapping and cloning of the disease resistance locus in MNR220 may lead to a better understanding of the regulation of defense responses in wheat. PMID:22446929

  12. 2002 E. Mead Johnson Award for Research in Pediatrics Lecture: the molecular biology of the anemia of chronic disease: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Cindy N; Weinstein, David A; Andrews, Nancy C

    2003-03-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is a common disorder that afflicts patients with a wide variety of inflammatory conditions including arthritis, malignancies, infections, and inflammatory bowel disease. It results in significant morbidity and may be severe enough to require blood transfusions. The pathogenesis of anemia of chronic disease is not fully understood, but poor maintenance of red blood cell mass has been observed at three levels: 1) iron is not efficiently recycled from reticuloendothelial macrophages to erythroid precursors, 2) erythroid precursors respond poorly to erythropoietin, and 3) red blood cell survival is decreased. Whether each of these changes is related to the same effector of the inflammatory process is unknown. We have had the opportunity to investigate severe anemia of chronic disease in an unusual group of patients with glycogen storage disease type 1a. We found that anemia was directly related to the presence of large hepatic adenomas that inappropriately produced a new peptide hormone, hepcidin. Hepcidin has recently been identified as part of the innate immune response and is a key regulator of cellular iron egress. Based on our findings in this patient group, we propose a central role for hepcidin in anemia of chronic disease, linking the inflammatory process with iron recycling and erythropoiesis. We present a hypothesis based on our findings. PMID:12595602

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) locus 12: is glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1) the relevant gene?

    PubMed

    Häuser, F; Rossmann, H; Laubert-Reh, D; Wild, P S; Zeller, T; Müller, C; Neuwirth, S; Blankenberg, S; Lackner, K J

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified and repeatedly confirmed the association of rs3197999 in MST1 with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the underlying pathophysiology remains unclear. rs3197999 is a non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism which modifies the function of macrophage stimulating protein-1 (MST1). We show by haplotyping that rs3197999 is in linkage disequilibrium with rs1050450 in GPX1, with almost complete cosegregation of the minor alleles. As shown by immunoassay, rs3197999 influences the MST-1 level in serum. But also rs1050450 causes an amino acid exchange in glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1) and reduced activity of this antioxidant enzyme. The association of GPx deficiency and IBD in mice was already shown. We propose that GPx-1 is a better candidate than MST1 for the pathophysiologic link between IBD locus 12 and IBD. PMID:26355565

  14. Feline porphyria associated with anemia, severe hepatic disease, and renal calculi

    PubMed Central

    Schnier, Jonathan J.; Hanna, Paul

    2010-01-01

    A 13-year-old, neutered male domestic cat presented with signs of weight loss, anemia, and hepatomegaly. Pathognomonic signs of porphyria were identified. Charcoal-like renal calculi and severe liver changes were observed, neither of which has been previously reported in association with feline porphyria. PMID:21197209

  15. PARK10 is a major locus for sporadic neuropathologically confirmed Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Beecham, Gary W.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Scott, William K.; Martin, Eden R.; Schellenberg, Gerard; Nuytemans, Karen; Larson, Eric B.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Hurtig, Howard I.; Mash, Deborah C.; Beach, Thomas G.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Pletnikova, Olga; Frosch, Matthew P.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Honig, Lawrence S.; Marder, Karen; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Goldman, Samuel M.; Vinters, Harry V.; Ross, Owen A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Wang, Liyong; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Leverenz, James B.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To minimize pathologic heterogeneity in genetic studies of Parkinson disease (PD), the Autopsy-Confirmed Parkinson Disease Genetics Consortium conducted a genome-wide association study using both patients with neuropathologically confirmed PD and controls. Methods: Four hundred eighty-four cases and 1,145 controls met neuropathologic diagnostic criteria, were genotyped, and then imputed to 3,922,209 variants for genome-wide association study analysis. Results: A small region on chromosome 1 was strongly associated with PD (rs10788972; p = 6.2 × 10−8). The association peak lies within and very close to the maximum linkage peaks of 2 prior positive linkage studies defining the PARK10 locus. We demonstrate that rs10788972 is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs914722, the single nucleotide polymorphism defining the PARK10 haplotype previously shown to be significantly associated with age at onset in PD. The region containing the PARK10 locus was significantly reduced from 10.6 megabases to 100 kilobases and contains 4 known genes: TCEANC2, TMEM59, miR-4781, and LDLRAD1. Conclusions: We confirm the association of a PARK10 haplotype with the risk of developing idiopathic PD. Furthermore, we significantly reduce the size of the PARK10 region. None of the candidate genes in the new PARK10 region have been previously implicated in the biology of PD, suggesting new areas of potential research. This study strongly suggests that reducing pathologic heterogeneity may enhance the application of genetic association studies to PD. PMID:25663231

  16. The Safety of Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents for the Treatment of Anemia Resulting from Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Robles, Nicolas Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) anemia treatment was revolutionized in the late 1980s with the introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin. This and related erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) greatly benefited patients by decreasing debilitating symptoms, improving their quality of life, and freeing them from dependence on blood transfusions with their associated complications such as infections, sensitization impeding transplantation, and secondary iron overload. However, even in the initial studies, untoward effects were noted in patients receiving ESAs, including worsening hypertension, seizures, and dialysis access clotting. Later, increased mortality, malignancy progression and even stroke were reported in renal patients. This review focuses on the safety issues of ESAs in CKD patients. PMID:26894799

  17. Severity of Anemia Predicts Hospital Length of Stay but Not Readmission in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Garlo, Katherine; Williams, Deanna; Lucas, Lee; Wong, Rocket; Botler, Joel; Abramson, Stuart; Parker, Mark G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of severe anemia to hospital readmission and length of stay (LOS) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3-5. Compared with the general population, patients with moderate CKD have a higher hospital readmission rate and LOS. Anemia in patients with moderate CKD is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The influence of anemia on hospital outcomes in patients with moderate CKD has not been characterized.We conducted a retrospective cohort study at Maine Medical Center, a 606-bed academic tertiary care hospital. Patients with CKD stages 3-5 and not on dialysis admitted during February 2013 to January 2014 were eligible. Patients with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, kidney transplant, acute kidney injury, gastrointestinal bleeding, active malignancy, pregnancy, and surgery were excluded. The cohort was split into severe anemia (hemoglobin ≤9  g/dL) versus a comparison group (hemoglobin >9 g /dL), and examined for differences in 30-day hospital readmission and LOS.In this study, the data of 1141 patients were included, out of which 156 (13.7%) had severe anemia (mean hemoglobin 8.1 g/dL, SD 0.8). Severe anemia was associated with increased hospital LOS (mean 6.4 (SD 6.0) days vs mean 4.5 (SD 4.0) days, P < 0.001). The difference was 1.7 day longer (95% CI 0.94, 2.45). There was no difference in readmission rate (mean 11.5% vs 10.2%, P = 0.7).Patients with moderate CKD and severe anemia are at risk for increased hospital LOS. Interventions targeting this high-risk population, including outpatient management of anemia, may benefit patient care and save costs through improved hospital outcomes. PMID:26107682

  18. Genetic variation at the PCSK9 locus, low density lipoproteins, response to pravastatin and coronary heart disease: results from PROSPER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caucasian carriers of the T allele at R46L in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) locus have been reported to have 15% lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (C) levels and 47% lower coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Our objective was to examine two PCSK9 single nucle...

  19. Information Needs of Cancer Patients and Perception of Impact of the Disease, of Self-Efficacy, and Locus of Control.

    PubMed

    Keinki, C; Seilacher, E; Ebel, M; Ruetters, D; Kessler, I; Stellamanns, J; Rudolph, I; Huebner, J

    2016-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between information needs and cancer patients' perceptions of the impact of the disease, self-efficacy, and locus of control. Using a standardized questionnaire, we obtained data from patients who attended a series of lectures. The questionnaire included questions on their information needs, sources of information, satisfaction with information, and short questionnaires on self-efficacy, perception of the disease, and locus of control of reinforcement. Data was obtained from 185 patients. Our results showed that the sources of information that were most often used were physicians (84 %), print media (68 %), and the Internet (59 %); online fora (7.5 %), non-medical practitioners (9.7 %), and telephone-based counseling (8.6 %) were only used by a minority. Patients with a high perception of their own control over the disease more often used any source of information available to them and were more often interested in acquiring additional information. Higher self-efficacy was significantly associated with the need for information on all topics. Patients with a higher external locus of control significantly more often used sources of information and had significantly more need for additional information. By contrast, there were no associations with an internal locus of control. Neither external nor internal locus of control showed any associations with satisfaction with information. Information needs seem to be higher in patients with a high external locus of control and low self-efficacy. Physicians, other professionals, and institutions that provide information may take these relationships into consideration for tailoring their services to patients. PMID:25994358

  20. Hepcidin as a predictive factor and therapeutic target in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment for anemia of chronic disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Theurl, Milan; Nairz, Manfred; Schroll, Andrea; Sonnweber, Thomas; Asshoff, Malte; Haschka, David; Seifert, Markus; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Wilflingseder, Doris; Posch, Wilfried; Murphy, Anthony T; Witcher, Derrick R; Theurl, Igor; Weiss, Günter

    2014-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease is a multifactorial disorder, resulting mainly from inflammation-driven reticuloendothelial iron retention, impaired erythropoiesis, and reduced biological activity of erythropoietin. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have been used for the treatment of anemia of chronic disease, although with varying response rates and potential adverse effects. Serum concentrations of hepcidin, a key regulator of iron homeostasis, are increased in patients with anemia of chronic disease and linked to the pathogenesis of this disease, because hepcidin blocks cellular iron egress, thus limiting availability of iron for erythropoiesis. We tested whether serum hepcidin levels can predict and affect the therapeutic efficacy of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment using a well-established rat model of anemia of chronic disease. We found that high pre-treatment hepcidin levels correlated with an impaired hematologic response to an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent in rats with anemia of chronic disease. Combined treatment with an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent and an inhibitor of hepcidin expression, LDN-193189, significantly reduced serum hepcidin levels, mobilized iron from tissue stores, increased serum iron levels and improved hemoglobin levels more effectively than did the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent or LDN-193189 monotherapy. In parallel, both the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent and erythropoiesis-stimulating agent/LDN-193189 combined reduced the expression of cytokines known to inhibit erythropoiesis. We conclude that serum hepcidin levels can predict the hematologic responsiveness to erythropoiesis-stimulating agent therapy in anemia of chronic disease. Pharmacological inhibition of hepcidin formation improves the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent's therapeutic efficacy, which may favor a reduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dosages, costs and side effects. PMID:24895335

  1. The ail locus is found uniquely in Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes commonly associated with disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, V L; Farmer, J J; Hill, W E; Falkow, S

    1989-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a heterogeneous group of organisms with more than 50 serotypes and several biotypes. Only a few of these serotypes cause gastrointestinal disease in otherwise healthy hosts; these serotypes are the pathogenic serotypes. Although Y. enterocolitica requires a high-molecular-weight plasmid to cause disease, chromosome-encoded determinants are required for the full expression of virulence. The ability of Yersinia spp. to invade eucaryotic cells is thought to be a virulence factor, because nonpathogenic serotypes are noninvasive in animals and in tissue culture cell models. Current evidence indicates that invasion ability is chromosome encoded. We recently reported cloning two loci, inv and ail, from Y. enterocolitica O8 strain 8081c that allow Escherichia coli to invade tissue culture cells. We investigated the link between invasion in an in vitro tissue culture invasion (TCI) model and hybridization to probes derived from the two invasion loci, inv and ail. We examined 177 Yersinia strains. Strains of serotypes and species associated with disease were TCI+, whereas strains of serotypes and species not associated with disease were TCI-. Only TCI+ strains had DNA homologous to probes derived from ail. All strains (TCI+ and TCI-) had DNA homologous to probes derived from inv, but there were certain restriction fragment-linked polymorphisms that were associated primarily with TCI+ strains. These observations held true for strains epidemiologically associated with disease. Both the inv and ail loci were found to be clearly located on the chromosome. No other genera, including other invasive organisms, had DNA homologous to inv or ail. These data support the hypothesis that the ail locus encodes a Y. enterocolitica invasion factor that may be involved in pathogenesis. Images PMID:2642465

  2. Diamond Blackfan anemia: a model for the translational approach to understanding human disease.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Adrianna; Blanc, Lionel; Lipton, Jeffrey M

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome. As with the other rare inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, the study of these disorders provides important insights into basic biology and, in the case of DBA, ribosome biology; the disruption of which characterizes the disorder. Thus DBA serves as a paradigm for translational medicine in which the efforts of clinicians to manage DBA have informed laboratory scientists who, in turn, have stimulated clinical researchers to utilize scientific discovery to provide improved care. In this review we describe the clinical syndrome Diamond Blackfan anemia and, in particular, we demonstrate how the study of DBA has allowed scientific inquiry to create opportunities for progress in its understanding and treatment. PMID:24665981

  3. IV iron use in patients with higher serum ferritin: case study on anemia in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Larson, Kristin

    2008-01-01

    Anemia management practices in patients on hemodialysis that incorporate a balanced approach to erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) and intravenous (IV) iron therapy, use the lowest effective dose of ESA, and provide IV iron therapy in patients with higher serum ferritin levels have become important treatment considerations. This case study, followed by an indepth discussion, addresses these issues and helps to identify safe and effective treatment strategies to assist nurses in improving patient outcomes. PMID:18472686

  4. Thalassemia and sickle cell anemia in Swedish immigrants: Genetic diseases have become global

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Li, Xinjun; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Some 15% of the Swedish population is born outside Sweden, originating from all continents of the world. Thalassemia and sickle cell anemia constitute the most common inherited recessive disorders globally and they are endemic in areas of Africa and Asia, origins of many immigrants to Sweden. We aimed at investigating the origins of the Swedish sickle cell and thalassemia patients. Methods: Patients were identified using data from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register since 1987 and from the Outpatient Register since 2001 up to year 2010. Results: A total of 3064 persons were diagnosed with thalassemia. The incidence was highest, 62.9/100,000 for immigrants from Thailand, followed by Iraqis (47.1/100,000); the rate was 0.7/100,000 among those born in Sweden. The total number of sickle cell anemia patients was 584 and the highest rate of 13.0/100,000 was found for Sub-Saharan immigrants. For thalassemia, 363 of the patients were siblings, while for sickle cell anemia, 180 were siblings. Conclusions: The data showed that >90% of sickle cell and thalassemia patients were first- or second-generation immigrants to Sweden and the endemic regions for these were the origins of immigrants with the highest incidence. Global immigration provides global challenges to national health care systems. PMID:27092253

  5. The co-occurrence of anemia and cardiometabolic disease risk demonstrates sex-specific sociodemographic patterning in an urbanizing rural region of southern India

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Andrew D.; Hayter, Arabella K.M.; Baker, Chris P.; Prabhakaran, Poornima; Gupta, Vipin; Kulkarni, Bharati; Davey Smith, George; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Radha Krishna, K.V.; Kumar, P. Uday; Kinra, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives To determine the extent and sociodemographic determinants of anemia, overweight, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the co-occurrence of anemia with cardiometabolic disease risk factors among a cohort of Indian adults. Subject/Methods Cross-sectional survey of adult men (n=3,322) and non-pregnant women (n=2,895) aged 18 y and older from the third wave of the Andhra Pradesh Children and Parents Study that assessed anemia, overweight based on Body Mass Index, and prevalence of MetS based on abdominal obesity, hypertension, and blood lipid and fasting glucose measures. We examined associations of education, wealth and urbanicity with these outcomes and their co-occurrence. Results The prevalence of anemia and overweight was 40% and 29% among women, respectively, and 10% and 25% among men (P<0.001), respectively, while the prevalence of MetS was the same across sexes (15%) (P=0.55). The prevalence of concurrent anemia and overweight (9%), and anemia and MetS (4.5%) was highest among women. Household wealth was positively associated with overweight and MetS across sexes (P<0.05). Independent of household wealth, higher education was positively correlated with MetS among men (OR (95% CI): MetS: 1.4 (0.99, 2.0)) and negatively correlated with MetS among women (MetS: 0.54 (0.29, 0.99)). Similar sex-specific associations were observed for the co-occurrence of anemia with overweight and MetS. Conclusion Women in this region of India may be particularly vulnerable to co-occurring anemia and cardiometabolic risk, and associated adverse health outcomes as the nutrition transition advances in India. PMID:26508461

  6. Second locus for Hirschsprung disease/Waardenburg syndrome in a large Mennonite kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, E.; Cross, S.; Williamson, R.; Mulligan, L.M.; Lyonnet, S.; Wolgemuth, D.J.; Mascari, M.; Ladda, R.

    1994-10-15

    We have studied a large Mennonite kindred in which 20 members were affected with Hirschburg disease (HSCR), 5 of whom had one or more manifestations of Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type II (WS2). Eleven additional relatives had signs of WS2 without HSCR. Since HSCR and WS2 each represent perturbations of neural crest migration/differentiation, this large pedigree with apparent cosegregation of HSCR and WS2 offered an opportunity to search for linkage between these loci, candidate genes, and random DNA markers, particularly in view of recent discoveries of genes for Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) and Hirschsprung disease (c-ret). We have examined the following possible linked markers in 69 relatives in this family: the c-ret gene (HSCR); the human PAX3 gene (HuP2) on chromosome 2q (WS1) and placental alkaline phosphatase (ALPP) on chromosome 2q (linked to WS1); argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) on chromosome 9q, close to ABO blood groups which have shown weak linkage to WS; and the {beta}1 GABA receptor gene (GABARB1) on chromosome 4q13-11, close to c-kit, deletions of which cause piebaldism. Linkage between any of these loci and HSCR/WS in this kindred was excluded, demonstrating that there is at least one further locus for HSCR other than c-ret. 45 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Fine mapping of the chromosome 3p susceptibility locus in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, J; Lynch, N; Daniels, S; Bridger, S; Macpherson, A; Stokkers, P; Forbes, A; Lennard-Jones, J; Mathew, C; Curran, M; Schreiber, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Genetic predisposition for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been demonstrated by epidemiological and genetic linkage studies. Genetic linkage of IBD to chromosome 3 has been observed previously. A high density analysis of chromosome 3p was performed to confirm prior linkages and elucidate potential genetic associations.
METHODS—Forty three microsatellite markers on chromosome 3 were genotyped in 353 affected sibling pairs of North European Caucasian extraction (average marker density 2 cM in the linkage interval). Marker order was defined by genetic and radiation hybrid techniques.
RESULTS—The maximum single point logarithm of odds (LOD) score was observed for Crohn's disease at D3S3591. Peak multipoint LOD scores of 1.65 and 1.40 for the IBD phenotype were observed near D3S1304 (distal 3p) and near D3S1283 in the linkage region previously reported. Crohn's disease contributed predominantly to the linkage. The transmission disequilibrium test showed significant evidence of association (p=0.009) between allele 4 of D3S1076 and the IBD phenotype (51 transmitted v 28 non-transmitted). Two known polymorphisms in the CCR2 and CCR5 genes were analysed, neither of which showed significant association with IBD. Additional haplotype associations were observed in the vicinity of D3S1076.
CONCLUSIONS—This study provides confirmatory linkage evidence for an IBD susceptibility locus on chromosome 3p and suggests that CCR2 and CCR5 are unlikely to be major susceptibility loci for IBD. The association findings in this region warrant further investigation.


Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease; fine mapping; chromosome 3 PMID:11156639

  8. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  9. Association of Increased Serum Leptin with Ameliorated Anemia and Malnutrition in Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease Patients after Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yao; Zhang, Jingjing; Yuan, Yanggang; Zha, Xiaoming; Xing, Changying; Shen, Chong; Shen, Zhixiang; Qin, Chao; Zeng, Ming; Yang, Guang; Mao, Huijuan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Xiangbao; Sun, Bin; Ouyang, Chun; Xu, Xueqiang; Ge, Yifei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lina; Cheng, Chen; Yin, Caixia; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Huimin; Ma, Haoyang; Wang, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that regulates various metabolism, but its association with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), a clinical manifestation of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), remains obscure. Parathyroidectomy (PTX) is recommended for severe SHPT patients. Here, the associations between circulating leptin and clinical characteristics in CKD patients were investigated. Effects of PTX on leptin production were analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Controls and CKD patients had approximate serum leptin levels in that a larger proportion of CKD patients with body mass index (BMI) <23 kg/m2. Serum leptin was related to anemia, albumin, and bone metabolism disorders in CKD patients. Lower intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) was related with higher leptin in PTX patients group. Severe SHPT inhibited uremia-enhanced leptin production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which was attenuated after PTX. High levels of PTH were found to reduce Akt phosphorylation and leptin production in vitro but high levels of calcium and phosphorus were not. Successful PTX was found to improve anemia and malnutrition in severe SHPT patients, and this was correlated with increased circulating leptin levels via up-regulated Akt signaling in adipocytes. These findings indicated the therapeutic potential of leptin and related target pathway for improving survival and quality of life in CKD. PMID:27307101

  10. Association of Increased Serum Leptin with Ameliorated Anemia and Malnutrition in Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease Patients after Parathyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yao; Zhang, Jingjing; Yuan, Yanggang; Zha, Xiaoming; Xing, Changying; Shen, Chong; Shen, Zhixiang; Qin, Chao; Zeng, Ming; Yang, Guang; Mao, Huijuan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Xiangbao; Sun, Bin; Ouyang, Chun; Xu, Xueqiang; Ge, Yifei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lina; Cheng, Chen; Yin, Caixia; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Huimin; Ma, Haoyang; Wang, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that regulates various metabolism, but its association with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), a clinical manifestation of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), remains obscure. Parathyroidectomy (PTX) is recommended for severe SHPT patients. Here, the associations between circulating leptin and clinical characteristics in CKD patients were investigated. Effects of PTX on leptin production were analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Controls and CKD patients had approximate serum leptin levels in that a larger proportion of CKD patients with body mass index (BMI) <23 kg/m(2). Serum leptin was related to anemia, albumin, and bone metabolism disorders in CKD patients. Lower intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) was related with higher leptin in PTX patients group. Severe SHPT inhibited uremia-enhanced leptin production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which was attenuated after PTX. High levels of PTH were found to reduce Akt phosphorylation and leptin production in vitro but high levels of calcium and phosphorus were not. Successful PTX was found to improve anemia and malnutrition in severe SHPT patients, and this was correlated with increased circulating leptin levels via up-regulated Akt signaling in adipocytes. These findings indicated the therapeutic potential of leptin and related target pathway for improving survival and quality of life in CKD. PMID:27307101

  11. Artificial intelligence for optimal anemia management in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Brier, Michael E; Gaweda, Adam E

    2016-08-01

    Computational intelligence for the prediction of hemoglobin to guide the selection of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dose results in improved anemia management. The models used for the prediction result from the use of individual patient data and help to increase the number of hemoglobin observations within the target range. The benefits of using these modeling techniques appear to be a decrease in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use and a decrease in the number of transfusions. This study confirms the results of previous smaller studies and suggests that additional beneficial results may be achieved. PMID:27418093

  12. Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells may result in fatigue ( anemia ). A lower-than-normal amount of platelets may lead to excess bleeding. Most people with Fanconi's anemia have some of these symptoms: Abnormal heart, lungs, and digestive tract Bone problems (especially the hips, spine or ...

  13. Meta-analysis of Parkinson disease: Identification of a novel locus, RIT2

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Beecham, Gary W.; DeStefano, Anita L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Factor, Stewart A.; Hamza, Taye H.; Hung, Albert Y.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Ivinson, Adrian J.; Krainc, Dmitri; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Clark, Lorraine N.; Marder, Karen; Martin, Eden R.; Mayeux, Richard; Ross, Owen A.; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Simon, David K.; Tanner, Caroline; Vance, Jeffery M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Myers, Richard H.; Payami, Haydeh; Scott, William K.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    Objective Genome-wide association (GWAS) methods have identified genes contributing to Parkinson disease (PD); we sought to identify additional genes associated with PD susceptibility. Methods A two stage design was used. First, individual level genotypic data from five recent PD GWAS (Discovery Sample: 4,238 PD cases and 4,239 controls) were combined. Following imputation, a logistic regression model was employed in each dataset to test for association with PD susceptibility and results from each dataset were meta-analyzed. Second, 768 SNPs were genotyped in an independent Replication Sample (3,738 cases and 2,111 controls). Results Genome-wide significance was reached for SNPs in SNCA (rs356165, G: odds ratio (OR)=1.37; p=9.3 × 10−21), MAPT (rs242559, C: OR=0.78; p=1.5 × 10−10), GAK/DGKQ (rs11248051, T:OR=1.35; p=8.2 × 10−9/ rs11248060, T: OR=1.35; p=2.0×10−9), and the HLA region (rs3129882, A: OR=0.83; p=1.2 × 10−8), which were previously reported. The Replication Sample confirmed the associations with SNCA, MAPT, and the HLA region and also with GBA (E326K OR=1.71; p=5 × 10−8 Combined Sample) (N370 OR=3.08; p=7 × 10−5 Replication sample). A novel PD susceptibility locus, RIT2, on chromosome 18 (rs12456492; p=5 × 10−5 Discovery Sample; p=1.52 × 10−7 Replication sample; p=2 × 10−10 Combined Sample) was replicated. Conditional analyses within each of the replicated regions identified distinct SNP associations within GBA and SNCA, suggesting that there may be multiple risk alleles within these genes. Interpretation We identified a novel PD susceptibility locus, RIT2, replicated several previously identified loci, and identified more than one risk allele within SNCA and GBA. PMID:22451204

  14. Anemia in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrakis, Michael G.; Tsirakis, George

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a very common disease, with severe morbidity and mortality, and a frequent reason of hospitalization. Anemia and a concurrent renal impairment are two major risk factors contributing to the severity of the outcome and consist of the cardio renal anemia syndrome. Anemia in heart failure is complex and multifactorial. Hemodilution, absolute or functional iron deficiency, activation of the inflammatory cascade, and impaired erythropoietin production and activity are some pathophysiological mechanisms involved in anemia of the heart failure. Furthermore other concomitant causes of anemia, such as myelodysplastic syndrome and chemotherapy, may worsen the outcome. Based on the pathophysiology of cardiac anemia, there are several therapeutic options that may improve hemoglobin levels, tissues' oxygenation, and probably the outcome. These include administration of iron, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and blood transfusions but still the evidence provided for their use remains limited. PMID:22536520

  15. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity. PMID:26472066

  16. Construction of a yeast artificial chromosome contig encompassing the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.; Bonnycastle, L.; Poorkai, P.

    1994-09-01

    We have constructed a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of chromosome 14q24.3 which encompasses the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus (AD3). Determined by linkage analysis of early-onset Alzheimer`s disease kindreds, this interval is bounded by the genetic markers D14S61-D14S63 and spans approximately 15 centimorgans. The contig consists of 29 markers and 74 YACs of which 57 are defined by one or more sequence tagged sites (STSs). The STS markers comprise 5 genes, 16 short tandem repeat polymorphisms and 8 cDNA clones. An additional number of genes, expressed sequence tags and cDNA fragments have been identified and localized to the contig by hybridization and sequence analysis of anonymous clones isolated by cDNA direct selection techniques. A minimal contig of about 15 YACs averaging 0.5-1.5 megabase in length will span this interval and is, at first approximation, in rough agreement with the genetic map. For two regions of the contig, our coverage has relied on L1/THE fingerprint and Alu-PCR hybridization data of YACs provided by CEPH/Genethon. We are currently developing sequence tagged sites from these to confirm the overlaps revealed by the fingerprint data. Among the genes which map to the contig are transforming growth factor beta 3, c-fos, and heat shock protein 2A (HSPA2). C-fos is not a candidate gene for AD3 based on the sequence analysis of affected and unaffected individuals. HSPA2 maps to the proximal edge of the contig and Calmodulin 1, a candidate gene from 4q24.3, maps outside of the region. The YAC contig is a framework physical map from which cosmid or P1 clone contigs can be constructed. As more genes and cDNAs are mapped, a highly resolved transcription map will emerge, a necessary step towards positionally cloning the AD3 gene.

  17. Unraveling Genomic Complexity at a Quantitative Disease Resistance Locus in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Jamann, Tiffany M.; Poland, Jesse A.; Kolkman, Judith M.; Smith, Laurie G.; Nelson, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple disease resistance has important implications for plant fitness, given the selection pressure that many pathogens exert directly on natural plant populations and indirectly via crop improvement programs. Evidence of a locus conditioning resistance to multiple pathogens was found in bin 1.06 of the maize genome with the allele from inbred line “Tx303” conditioning quantitative resistance to northern leaf blight (NLB) and qualitative resistance to Stewart’s wilt. To dissect the genetic basis of resistance in this region and to refine candidate gene hypotheses, we mapped resistance to the two diseases. Both resistance phenotypes were localized to overlapping regions, with the Stewart’s wilt interval refined to a 95.9-kb segment containing three genes and the NLB interval to a 3.60-Mb segment containing 117 genes. Regions of the introgression showed little to no recombination, suggesting structural differences between the inbred lines Tx303 and “B73,” the parents of the fine-mapping population. We examined copy number variation across the region using next-generation sequencing data, and found large variation in read depth in Tx303 across the region relative to the reference genome of B73. In the fine-mapping region, association mapping for NLB implicated candidate genes, including a putative zinc finger and pan1. We tested mutant alleles and found that pan1 is a susceptibility gene for NLB and Stewart’s wilt. Our data strongly suggest that structural variation plays an important role in resistance conditioned by this region, and pan1, a gene conditioning susceptibility for NLB, may underlie the QTL. PMID:25009146

  18. Genetic determinants of ulcerative colitis include the ECM1 locus and five loci implicated in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Sheila A; Tremelling, Mark; Anderson, Carl A; Gwilliam, Rhian; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Prescott, Natalie J; Nimmo, Elaine R; Massey, Dunecan; Berzuini, Carlo; Johnson, Christopher; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Cummings, Fraser R; Drummond, Hazel; Lees, Charlie W; Onnie, Clive M; Hanson, Catherine E; Blaszczyk, Katarzyna; Inouye, Mike; Ewels, Philip; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Keniry, Andrew; Hunt, Sarah; Carter, Martyn; Watkins, Nick; Ouwehand, Willem; Lewis, Cathryn M; Cardon, Lon; Lobo, Alan; Forbes, Alastair; Sanderson, Jeremy; Jewell, Derek P; Mansfield, John C; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G; Parkes, Miles; Satsangi, Jack

    2008-06-01

    We report results of a nonsynonymous SNP scan for ulcerative colitis and identify a previously unknown susceptibility locus at ECM1. We also show that several risk loci are common to ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (IL23R, IL12B, HLA, NKX2-3 and MST1), whereas autophagy genes ATG16L1 and IRGM, along with NOD2 (also known as CARD15), are specific for Crohn's disease. These data provide the first detailed illustration of the genetic relationship between these common inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:18438406

  19. Assessment and comparison of anemia of chronic disease in healthy subjects and chronic periodontitis patients: A clinical and hematological study

    PubMed Central

    Kolte, Rajashri A.; Kolte, Abhay P.; Deshpande, Neha M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bacteremia is associated with periodontal diseases whose extent is related to the severity of inflammation in periodontal tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the various blood parameters in healthy subjects and severe chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: 100 patients with severe chronic periodontitis (test group) and 100 periodontally healthy subjects (control group) in the age group 35-60 years participated in the study. Blood parameters were recorded with blood samples drawn from the antecubital fossa by venous puncture. Results: Periodontitis group showed lower erythrocyte count and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and increased total leukocyte count (TLC) and neutrophil, lymphocyte, and eosinophil count, compared to the healthy control group. Conclusions: To conclude, periodontitis may tend toward anemia and there is marked leukocytosis due to increased number of circulating neutrophils and lymphocytes. PMID:24872626

  20. Evidence that the APOE locus influences rate of disease progression in late onset familial Alzheimer`s disease but is not causative

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.; Crawford, F.; Osborne, A.; Diaz, P.

    1995-02-27

    An association has been observed in several independent data sets between late onset Alzheimer`s Disease (AD) and the APOE locus on chromosome 19. We have examined the genotype in family history positive (FHP) and family history negative (FHN) cases and find a distortion of the APOE allele frequencies in accord with previous studies. However, when we examined the allele distribution of the at-risk siblings of the FHP group we found an excess of the {epsilon}4 allele which also differs significantly from historic controls but not from the affected siblings. The age distribution of the affected and unaffected siblings was similar, suggesting that the allelic frequency distortion in the unaffected siblings was not due to their being below the mean age of onset. Lod score linkage analysis, with age dependent onset and non-stringent specification of the genetic parameters, did not suggest linkage to the APOE locus. Furthermore, an analysis of variance of the age of disease free survival suggested that APOE genotype contributes a small fraction of the total variance indicating that the APOE locus is a poor predictor of disease free survival age within late onset families. One explanation for the age dependent association reported by other groups, and our results, is that the APOE locus enhances the rate of progression of the disease process in otherwise predisposed individuals and that variation at this locus is not able in and of itself to cause the disease. We suggest this hypothesis is compatible with the current literature regarding APOE and AD. 19 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. The role of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Koduru, Pramoda; Abraham, Bincy P

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common form of nutritional anemia worldwide. Iron plays a pivotal role in vital functioning of almost every organ system. IDA affects both physical and psychological functioning of humans. Oral iron is considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of IDA due to low cost, good safety profile and ease of administration. However, the absorption of oral iron is affected by several factors and incidence of gastrointestinal side effects can lead to lack of adherence to therapy as well as poor efficacy. This has led to the emergence of intravenous iron therapy which is clearly superior to oral iron with higher increment of hemoglobin levels and rapid replenishment of iron stores. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) is a novel non-dextran intravenous iron form which has been approved for use in patients with iron deficiency who have had inadequate response to oral iron therapy, intolerance to oral iron, or nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease. The safety and efficacy of using FCM for the treatment of IDA has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. One dose can provide a large amount of iron and has a very short infusion time. It should be considered as first-line therapy in patients with active inflammation like inflammatory bowel disease when gastrointestinal absorption of oral iron may be compromised. It should also be given to patients who have inadequate response to oral iron therapy. It has been shown to be noninferior to other intravenous iron formulations with a good safety profile and produced fewer anaphylactic reactions. PMID:26770269

  2. The role of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Koduru, Pramoda; Abraham, Bincy P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common form of nutritional anemia worldwide. Iron plays a pivotal role in vital functioning of almost every organ system. IDA affects both physical and psychological functioning of humans. Oral iron is considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of IDA due to low cost, good safety profile and ease of administration. However, the absorption of oral iron is affected by several factors and incidence of gastrointestinal side effects can lead to lack of adherence to therapy as well as poor efficacy. This has led to the emergence of intravenous iron therapy which is clearly superior to oral iron with higher increment of hemoglobin levels and rapid replenishment of iron stores. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) is a novel non-dextran intravenous iron form which has been approved for use in patients with iron deficiency who have had inadequate response to oral iron therapy, intolerance to oral iron, or nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease. The safety and efficacy of using FCM for the treatment of IDA has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. One dose can provide a large amount of iron and has a very short infusion time. It should be considered as first-line therapy in patients with active inflammation like inflammatory bowel disease when gastrointestinal absorption of oral iron may be compromised. It should also be given to patients who have inadequate response to oral iron therapy. It has been shown to be noninferior to other intravenous iron formulations with a good safety profile and produced fewer anaphylactic reactions. PMID:26770269

  3. Diamond-Blackfan anemia and nutritional deficiency-induced anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Gelbart, David

    2014-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, inherited disease that characteristically presents as a chronic, normochromic macrocytosis due to red cell lineage bone marrow failure. Although studies are elaborating on the genetic basis for its associated comorbidities, little has been published comparing this anemia to other chronic anemias that have similar laboratory results in children. This article offers a global perspective of the disease and compares it with anemia due to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in children. PMID:24662257

  4. Linkage Analysis in Autoimmune Addison’s Disease: NFATC1 as a Potential Novel Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Anna L.; Bøe Wolff, Anette; MacArthur, Katie; Weaver, Jolanta U.; Vaidya, Bijay; Erichsen, Martina M.; Darlay, Rebecca; Husebye, Eystein S.; Cordell, Heather J.; Pearce, Simon H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Autoimmune Addison’s disease (AAD) is a rare, highly heritable autoimmune endocrinopathy. It is possible that there may be some highly penetrant variants which confer disease susceptibility that have yet to be discovered. Methods DNA samples from 23 multiplex AAD pedigrees from the UK and Norway (50 cases, 67 controls) were genotyped on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. Linkage analysis was performed using Merlin. EMMAX was used to carry out a genome-wide association analysis comparing the familial AAD cases to 2706 UK WTCCC controls. To explore some of the linkage findings further, a replication study was performed by genotyping 64 SNPs in two of the four linked regions (chromosomes 7 and 18), on the Sequenom iPlex platform in three European AAD case-control cohorts (1097 cases, 1117 controls). The data were analysed using a meta-analysis approach. Results In a parametric analysis, applying a rare dominant model, loci on chromosomes 7, 9 and 18 had LOD scores >2.8. In a non-parametric analysis, a locus corresponding to the HLA region on chromosome 6, known to be associated with AAD, had a LOD score >3.0. In the genome-wide association analysis, a SNP cluster on chromosome 2 and a pair of SNPs on chromosome 6 were associated with AAD (P <5x10-7). A meta-analysis of the replication study data demonstrated that three chromosome 18 SNPs were associated with AAD, including a non-synonymous variant in the NFATC1 gene. Conclusion This linkage study has implicated a number of novel chromosomal regions in the pathogenesis of AAD in multiplex AAD families and adds further support to the role of HLA in AAD. The genome-wide association analysis has also identified a region of interest on chromosome 2. A replication study has demonstrated that the NFATC1 gene is worthy of future investigation, however each of the regions identified require further, systematic analysis. PMID:26042420

  5. Genetic homogeneity of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: Tight linkage to the proteolipoprotein locus in 16 affected families

    SciTech Connect

    Boespflug-Tanguy, O.; Mimault, C.; Cavagna, A.; Giraud, G.; Dastugue, B.; Melki, J.; Dinh, D.P.; Dautigny, A.

    1994-09-01

    Among the numerous leukodystrophies that have an early onset and no biochemical markers, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is one that can be identified using strict clinical criteria and demonstrating an abnormal formation of myelin that is restricted to the CNS in electrophysiological studies and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In PMD, 12 different base substitutions and one total deletion of the genomic region containing the PLP gene have been reported, but, despite extensive analysis, PLP exon mutations have been found in only 10%-25% of the families analyzed. To test the genetic homogeneity of this disease, the authors have carried out linkage analysis with polymorphic markers of the PLP genomic region in 16 families selected on strict diagnostic criteria of PMD. They observed a tight linkage of the PMD locus with markers of the PLP gene (cDNA PLP, exon IV polymorphism) and of the Xq22 region (DXS17, DXS94, and DXS287), whereas the markers located more proximally (DXYS1X and DXS3) or distally (DXS11) were not linked to the PMD locus. Multipoint analysis gave a maximal location score for the PMD locus (13.98) and the PLP gene (8.32) in the same interval between DXS94 and DXS287, suggesting that in all families PMD is linked to the PLP locus. Mutations of the extraexonic PLP gene sequences or of another unknown close gene could be involved in PMD. In an attempt to identify molecular defects of this genomic region that are responsible for PMD, these results meant that RFLP analysis could be used to improve genetic counseling for the numerous affected families in which a PLP exon mutation could not be demonstrated. 39 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Exonic Re-Sequencing of the Chromosome 2q24.3 Parkinson’s Disease Locus

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Catherine; Ogaki, Kotaro; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Heckman, Michael G.; McCarthy, Allan; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Walton, Ronald L.; Lynch, Timothy; Siuda, Joanna; Opala, Grzegorz; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Barcikowska, Maria; Czyzewski, Krzysztof; Dickson, Dennis W.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ross, Owen A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) have identified over 20 genomic regions associated with disease risk. Many of these loci include several candidate genes making it difficult to pinpoint the causal gene. The locus on chromosome 2q24.3 encompasses three genes: B3GALT1, STK39, and CERS6. In order to identify if the causal variants are simple missense changes, we sequenced all 31 exons of these three genes in 187 patients with PD. We identified 13 exonic variants including four non-synonymous and three insertion/deletion variants (indels). These non-synonymous variants and rs2102808, the GWAS tag SNP, were genotyped in three independent series consisting of a total of 1976 patients and 1596 controls. Our results show that the seven identified 2q24.3 coding variants are not independently responsible for the GWAS association signal at the locus; however, there is a haplotype, which contains both rs2102808 and a STK39 exon 1 6bp indel variant, that is significantly associated with PD risk (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.11–1.64, P = 0.003). This haplotype is more associated than each of the two variants independently (OR = 1.23, P = 0.005 and 1.10, P = 0.10, respectively). Our findings suggest that the risk variant is likely located in a non-coding region. Additional sequencing of the locus including promoter and regulatory regions will be needed to pinpoint the association at this locus that leads to an increased risk to PD. PMID:26090850

  7. Memory Stem T Cells in Autoimmune Disease: High Frequency of Circulating CD8+ Memory Stem Cells in Acquired Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kohei; Muranski, Pawel; Feng, Xingmin; Townsley, Danielle M; Liu, Baoying; Knickelbein, Jared; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Ito, Sawa; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Taylor, James G; Kaplan, Mariana J; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Barrett, A John; O'Shea, John; Young, Neal S

    2016-02-15

    Memory stem T cells (TSCMs) constitute a long-lived, self-renewing lymphocyte population essential for the maintenance of functional immunity. Hallmarks of autoimmune disease pathogenesis are abnormal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation. We investigated the TSCM subset in 55, 34, 43, and 5 patients with acquired aplastic anemia (AA), autoimmune uveitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and sickle cell disease, respectively, as well as in 41 age-matched healthy controls. CD8(+) TSCM frequency was significantly increased in AA compared with healthy controls. An increased CD8(+) TSCM frequency at diagnosis was associated with responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy, and an elevated CD8(+) TSCM population after immunosuppressive therapy correlated with treatment failure or relapse in AA patients. IFN-γ and IL-2 production was significantly increased in various CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell subsets in AA patients, including CD8(+) and CD4(+) TSCMs. CD8(+) TSCM frequency was also increased in patients with autoimmune uveitis or sickle cell disease. A positive correlation between CD4(+) and CD8(+) TSCM frequencies was found in AA, autoimmune uveitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Evaluation of PD-1, CD160, and CD244 expression revealed that TSCMs were less exhausted compared with other types of memory T cells. Our results suggest that the CD8(+) TSCM subset is a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for AA. PMID:26764034

  8. IgG4-related Lung Disease Associated with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shingo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Jinbo, Mitsutaka; Yamada, Sohsuke; Shimabukuro, Ikuko; Yamasaki, Kei; Kido, Takashi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Chiharu; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of IgG4-related lung disease (IgG4-RLD) associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). A 73-year-old Japanese female visited our hospital for an examination following an abnormal chest X-ray in 1999. She was diagnosed with bronchiolitis and AIHA, and treatment with prednisolone was started. After seven years, she visited our department due to a cough. Chest computed tomography (CT) demonstrated focal consolidation with ground-glass attenuations and thickened bronchial walls in the bilateral lungs. She was clinically diagnosed and treated for bronchial asthma. CT findings had shown no changes, and a lung biopsy was performed using video-assisted thoracic surgery at eleven years from the first diagnosis of AIHA. The pathological findings demonstrated the presence of peribronchovascular lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates with stromal fibrotic changes, admixed with many IgG4-positive plasma cells. Furthermore, the patient's serum IgG4 level was high, and her CT findings did not show any obvious abnormal findings in the any organs other than the lungs. She was diagnosed with IgG4-RLD based on the findings. We believe that this case report of IgG4-RLD associated with AIHA is clinically helpful for a better understanding of these diseases, although there are five reported cases of IgG4-related disease associated with AIHA. PMID:27580552

  9. Divalent metal-ion transporter 1 is decreased in intestinal epithelial cells and contributes to the anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Song, Yang; He, Chong; Liu, Changqin; Wu, Ruijin; Fang, Leilei; Cong, Yingzi; Miao, Yinglei; Liu, Zhanju

    2015-01-01

    Divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) has been found to play an important role in the iron metabolism and hemogenesis. However, little is known about the potential role of DMT1 in the pathogenesis of anemia from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Herein, we investigated expression of DMT1 in the intestinal mucosa by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry, and found that DMT1 was significantly decreased in the inflamed mucosa of active IBD patients compared with that in those patients at remission stage and healthy controls. To further study the mechanism, we cultured HCT 116 cell line in vitro. Expression of DMT1 in HCT116 was demonstrated to be markedly decreased under stimulation with TNF for 24 and 48 h, while JNK inhibitor (JNK-IN-7) could significantly reverse the decrease. Interestingly, anti-TNF therapy successfully improved anemia in clinical responsive Crohn’s disease patients, and DMT1 was found to be markedly up-regulated in intestinal mucosa. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that decreased expression of DMT1 in intestinal mucosa leads to compromised absorption and transportation of iron and that blockade of TNF could rescue anemia and promote DMT1 expression in gut mucosa. This work provides a therapeutic approach in the management of anemia in IBD. PMID:26572590

  10. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Anemia? The three main causes of anemia are: Blood ... the blood and can lead to anemia. Aplastic Anemia Some infants are born without the ability to ...

  11. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Hemolytic Anemia There are many types of hemolytic anemia. The ... the condition, but you develop it. Inherited Hemolytic Anemias With inherited hemolytic anemias, one or more of ...

  12. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  13. About Anemia (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes About Anemia KidsHealth > For Kids > About Anemia Print A A ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia occurs when a person doesn't have ...

  14. UGT1A1 promoter polymorphisms and the development of hyperbilirubinemia and gallbladder disease in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shannon L; Lieff, Susan; Howard, Thad A; Eggleston, Barry; Ware, Russell E

    2008-10-01

    Genetic modifiers contribute to phenotypic variability in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA). The influence of the bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 (TA)(n)TAA promoter polymorphism on bilirubin levels and gallbladder disease in SCA was examined using prospectively collected data from the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease. A total of 324 children with HbSS (median age 6.9 years) had UGT1A1 genotyping; 243 (75%) had common (TA)(6) or (TA)(7) alleles, whereas 81 (25.0%) had variant (TA)(5) or (TA)(8) alleles. The UGT1A1 genotype significantly influenced average bilirubin levels for the common alleles: 6/6 genotype = 2.36 +/- 1.13 mg/dL, 6/7 genotype = 2.90 +/- 1.54 mg/dL, and 7/7 genotype = 4.24 +/- 2.11 mg/dL (P < 0.0001). Thirty-nine percent of children with the 7/7 genotype had documented gallbladder disease, compared with 18.2% with the 6/7 genotype and only 9.9% with the wildtype 6/6 UGT1A1 genotype (P = 0.001). To analyze the (TA)(5) and (TA)(8) variant alleles, three groups were generated, showing increasing bilirubin levels with increasing TA repeats and age. Group 3 (genotypes 6/8, 7/7, and 7/8) had a significantly greater rate of bilirubin change than Groups 1 (genotypes 5/6, 5/7, and 6/6) or 2 (genotype 6/7). These results validate previous smaller studies and confirm that the UGT1A1 promoter polymorphism exerts a powerful influence on bilirubin levels and the development of gallbladder disease in children with SCA. UGT1A1 genotyping should be considered as a screening tool for predicting children most likely to develop gallbladder disease at a young age. PMID:18756540

  15. Pathological and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin therapy in the remnant kidney rat model of chronic kidney disease associated anemia.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sandra; Garrido, Patrícia; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Costa, Elísio; Belo, Luís; Reis, Flávio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be corrected by treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO); however, some patients become hyporesponsive. The molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to study hyporesponsiveness to rHuEPO therapy using the remnant kidney rat model of anemia associated with CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. At starting, male Wistar rats were divided in 3 groups, for a 3-week protocol: Sham, CRF (vehicle) and two rHuEPO (200 k/kg body weight [BW]/week) treated groups; at the end of protocol, the rHuEPO treated rats were subdivided in responders (CRF200) and non-responders (CRF200NR), according to their hematologic response; blood, cellular and tissue studies were performed. The CRF200 group achieved correction of anemia, while the CRF200NR group developed anemia, after an initial response (1st week) to rHuEPO therapy. CRF and CRF200NR groups presented a trend to higher serum CRP levels; CRF200NR showed also high levels of renal inflammatory markers, such as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, nuclear factor kappa B, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1); no changes were found in iron metabolism. Our data suggest that the development of anemia/rHuEPO hyporesponsiveness is associated with a higher systemic and renal inflammatory condition, favoring hypoxia and triggering an increase in renal expression of HIF-1α, TGF-β1 and CTGF that will further aggravate renal fibrosis, which will enhance the inflammatory response, creating a cycle that promotes disease progression. New therapeutic strategies to reduce inflammation in CKD patients could improve the response to rHuEPO therapy and reduce hyporesponsiveness. PMID:27039028

  16. Anxiety, locus of control, and coping strategies among end-stage renal disease patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kohli, S; Batra, P; Aggarwal, H K

    2011-07-01

    End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) have a lot of anxiety. Anxiety and coping are associated with the locus of control; the present investigation aimed to study the state and trait anxiety, locus of control, and active and passive coping among patients on MHD. Thirty MHD patients and 30 controls were administered State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Rotter's Locus of Control Scale, and Coping Responses Inventory. There were significantly higher scores on state and trait anxiety, respectively (67.53 ± 10.89 vs. 59.40 ± 6.97, P < 0.01, and 62.97 ± 8.45 vs. 58.07 ± 7.06, P < 0.05), and locus of control (11.27 ± 3.55 vs. 9.04 ± 1.86, P < 0.01) in patients as compared to controls. On coping responses, patients and controls differed on positive reappraisal (54.33 ± 4.67 vs. 51.17 ± 3.12, P < 0.01), seeking guidance and support (58.07 ± 5.51 vs. 53.27 ± 4.22, P < 0.01), problem solving (51.03 ± 4.70 vs. 47.57 ± 4.73, P < 0.01), cognitive avoidance (60.27 ± 6.76 vs. 56.80 ± 4.08, P < 0.05), acceptance or resignation (61.67 ± 6.30 vs. 58.83 ± 4.23, P < 0.01), emotional discharge (68.07 ± 6.78 vs. 64.30 ± 4.50, P < 0.05), approach coping (205.57 ± 10.55 vs. 189.70 ± 11.37, P < 0.01), and avoidance coping (255.30 ± 16.45 vs. 241.10 ± 10.50, P < 0.01). A higher prevalence of anxiety trait could be the cause of anxiety in MHD patients besides the medical problems. The locus of control among patients though a mixed one was significantly more toward externalism. Thus, there is a need to identify this group well in advance and prepared not only medically but also psychologically for MHD. PMID:21886977

  17. A NOVEL ALZHEIMER DISEASE LOCUS LOCATED NEAR THE GENE ENCODING TAU PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Gyungah; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Vronskaya, Maria; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Chung, Jaeyoon; Naj, Adam C.; Kunkle, Brian W.; Wang, Li-San; Bis, Joshua C.; Bellenguez, Céline; Harold, Denise; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Destefano, Anita L.; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Sims, Rebecca; Beecham, Gary W.; Smith, Albert V.; Chouraki, Vincent; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Fievet, Nathalie; Denning, Nicola; Martin, Eden R.; Schmidt, Helena; Kamatani, Yochiro; Dunstan, Melanie L; Valladares, Otto; Laza, Agustin Ruiz; Zelenika, Diana; Ramirez, Alfredo; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Boland, Anne; Becker, Tim; Kukull, Walter A.; van der Lee, Sven J.; Pasquier, Florence; Cruchaga, Carlos; Beekly, Duane; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Hanon, Oliver; Gill, Michael; Barber, Robert; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Campion, Dominique; Love, Seth; Bennett, David A.; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Tsolaki, Magda; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Deramecourt, Vincent; Fox, Nick C; Cantwell, Laura B.; Tárraga, Lluis; Dufouil, Carole; Hardy, John; Crane, Paul K.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Hannequin, Didier; Clarke, Robert; Evans, Denis; Mosley, Thomas H.; Letenneur, Luc; Brayne, Carol; Maier, Wolfgang; De Jager, Philip; Emilsson, Valur; Dartigues, Jean-François; Hampel, Harald; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; de Bruijn, Renee F.A.G.; Tzourio, Christophe; Pastor, Pau; Larson, Eric B.; Rotter, Jerome I.; O’Donovan, Michael C; Montine, Thomas J.; Nalls, Michael A.; Mead, Simon; Reiman, Eric M.; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Holmes, Clive; St George-Hyslop, Peter H.; Boada, Mercè; Passmore, Peter; Wendland, Jens R.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Morgan, Kevin; Winslow, Ashley R.; Powell, John F; Carasquillo, Minerva; Younkin, Steven G.; Jakobsdóttir, Jóhanna; Kauwe, John SK; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.; Rujescu, Dan; Nöthen, Markus M; Hofman, Albert; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Holmans, Peter; Launer, Lenore J.; Mayeux, Richard; Lathrop, Mark; Goate, Alison M.; Escott-Price, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Amouyel, Philippe; Williams, Julie; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    2015-01-01

    APOE ε4, the most significant genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD), may mask effects of other loci. We re-analyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the International Genomics of Alzheimer’s Project (IGAP) Consortium in APOE ε4+ (10,352 cases and 9,207 controls) and APOE ε4− (7,184 cases and 26,968 controls) subgroups as well as in the total sample testing for interaction between a SNP and APOE ε4 status. Suggestive associations (P<1x10−4) in stage 1 were evaluated in an independent sample (stage 2) containing 4,203 subjects (APOE ε4+: 1,250 cases and 536 controls; APOE ε4-: 718 cases and 1,699 controls). Among APOE ε4− subjects, novel genome-wide significant (GWS) association was observed with 17 SNPs (all between KANSL1 and LRRC37A on chromosome 17 near MAPT) in a meta-analysis of the stage 1 and stage 2 datasets (best SNP, rs2732703, P=5·8x10−9). Conditional analysis revealed that rs2732703 accounted for association signals in the entire 100 kilobase region that includes MAPT. Except for previously identified AD loci showing stronger association in APOE ε4+ subjects (CR1 and CLU) or APOE ε4− subjects (MS4A6A/MS4A4A/ MS4A6E), no other SNPs were significantly associated with AD in a specific APOE genotype subgroup. In addition, the finding in the stage 1 sample that AD risk is significantly influenced by the interaction of APOE with rs1595014 in TMEM106B (P=1·6x10−7) is noteworthy because TMEM106B variants have previously been associated with risk of frontotemporal dementia. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed that rs113986870, one of the GWS SNPs near rs2732703, is significantly associated with four KANSL1 probes that target transcription of the first translated exon and an untranslated exon in hippocampus (P≤1.3x10−8), frontal cortex (P≤1.3x10−9), and temporal cortex (P≤1.2x10−11). Rs113986870 is also strongly associated with a MAPT probe that targets transcription of alternatively

  18. A novel Alzheimer disease locus located near the gene encoding tau protein.

    PubMed

    Jun, G; Ibrahim-Verbaas, C A; Vronskaya, M; Lambert, J-C; Chung, J; Naj, A C; Kunkle, B W; Wang, L-S; Bis, J C; Bellenguez, C; Harold, D; Lunetta, K L; Destefano, A L; Grenier-Boley, B; Sims, R; Beecham, G W; Smith, A V; Chouraki, V; Hamilton-Nelson, K L; Ikram, M A; Fievet, N; Denning, N; Martin, E R; Schmidt, H; Kamatani, Y; Dunstan, M L; Valladares, O; Laza, A R; Zelenika, D; Ramirez, A; Foroud, T M; Choi, S-H; Boland, A; Becker, T; Kukull, W A; van der Lee, S J; Pasquier, F; Cruchaga, C; Beekly, D; Fitzpatrick, A L; Hanon, O; Gill, M; Barber, R; Gudnason, V; Campion, D; Love, S; Bennett, D A; Amin, N; Berr, C; Tsolaki, Magda; Buxbaum, J D; Lopez, O L; Deramecourt, V; Fox, N C; Cantwell, L B; Tárraga, L; Dufouil, C; Hardy, J; Crane, P K; Eiriksdottir, G; Hannequin, D; Clarke, R; Evans, D; Mosley, T H; Letenneur, L; Brayne, C; Maier, W; De Jager, P; Emilsson, V; Dartigues, J-F; Hampel, H; Kamboh, M I; de Bruijn, R F A G; Tzourio, C; Pastor, P; Larson, E B; Rotter, J I; O'Donovan, M C; Montine, T J; Nalls, M A; Mead, S; Reiman, E M; Jonsson, P V; Holmes, C; St George-Hyslop, P H; Boada, M; Passmore, P; Wendland, J R; Schmidt, R; Morgan, K; Winslow, A R; Powell, J F; Carasquillo, M; Younkin, S G; Jakobsdóttir, J; Kauwe, J S K; Wilhelmsen, K C; Rujescu, D; Nöthen, M M; Hofman, A; Jones, L; Haines, J L; Psaty, B M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Holmans, P; Launer, L J; Mayeux, R; Lathrop, M; Goate, A M; Escott-Price, V; Seshadri, S; Pericak-Vance, M A; Amouyel, P; Williams, J; van Duijn, C M; Schellenberg, G D; Farrer, L A

    2016-01-01

    APOE ɛ4, the most significant genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD), may mask effects of other loci. We re-analyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP) Consortium in APOE ɛ4+ (10 352 cases and 9207 controls) and APOE ɛ4- (7184 cases and 26 968 controls) subgroups as well as in the total sample testing for interaction between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and APOE ɛ4 status. Suggestive associations (P<1 × 10(-4)) in stage 1 were evaluated in an independent sample (stage 2) containing 4203 subjects (APOE ɛ4+: 1250 cases and 536 controls; APOE ɛ4-: 718 cases and 1699 controls). Among APOE ɛ4- subjects, novel genome-wide significant (GWS) association was observed with 17 SNPs (all between KANSL1 and LRRC37A on chromosome 17 near MAPT) in a meta-analysis of the stage 1 and stage 2 data sets (best SNP, rs2732703, P=5·8 × 10(-9)). Conditional analysis revealed that rs2732703 accounted for association signals in the entire 100-kilobase region that includes MAPT. Except for previously identified AD loci showing stronger association in APOE ɛ4+ subjects (CR1 and CLU) or APOE ɛ4- subjects (MS4A6A/MS4A4A/MS4A6E), no other SNPs were significantly associated with AD in a specific APOE genotype subgroup. In addition, the finding in the stage 1 sample that AD risk is significantly influenced by the interaction of APOE with rs1595014 in TMEM106B (P=1·6 × 10(-7)) is noteworthy, because TMEM106B variants have previously been associated with risk of frontotemporal dementia. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed that rs113986870, one of the GWS SNPs near rs2732703, is significantly associated with four KANSL1 probes that target transcription of the first translated exon and an untranslated exon in hippocampus (P ⩽ 1.3 × 10(-8)), frontal cortex (P ⩽ 1.3 × 10(-9)) and temporal cortex (P⩽1.2 × 10(-11)). Rs113986870 is also strongly associated with a MAPT probe

  19. Bed bugs reproductive life cycle in the clothes of a patient suffering from Alzheimer's disease results in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Sabou, Marcela; Imperiale, Delphine Gallo; Andrès, Emmanuel; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Foeglé, Jacinthe; Lavigne, Thierry; Kaltenbach, Georges; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of an 82-year-old patient, hospitalized for malaise. Her clothes were infested by numerous insects and the entomological analysis identified them as being Cimex lectularius (bed bugs). The history of the patient highlighted severe cognitive impairment. The biological assessment initially showed a profound microcytic, aregenerative, iron deficiency anemia. A vitamin B12 deficiency due to pernicious anemia (positive intrinsic factor antibodies) was also highlighted, but this was not enough to explain the anemia without macrocytosis. Laboratory tests, endoscopy and a CT scan eliminated a tumor etiology responsible for occult bleeding. The patient had a mild itchy rash which was linked to the massive colonization by the bed bugs. The C. lectularius bite is most often considered benign because it is not a vector of infectious agents. Far from trivial, a massive human colonization by bed bugs may cause such a hematic depletion that severe microcytic anemia may result. PMID:23673315

  20. Tumor necrosis factor alpha -308 gene locus promoter polymorphism: an analysis of association with health and disease.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Asotra, Kamlesh; Matata, Bashir M; Mastana, Sarabjit S

    2009-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a potent immunomediator and proinflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a large number of human diseases. The location of its gene within major histocompatibility complex and biological activities has raised the possibility that polymorphisms within this locus may contribute to the pathogenesis of wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases. For example, a bi-allelic single nucleotide substitution of G (TNFA1 allele) with A (TNFA2 allele) polymorphism at -308 nucleotides upstream from the transcription initiation site in the TNF-alpha promoter is associated with elevated TNF-alpha levels and disease susceptibilities. However, it is still unclear whether TNF-alpha -308 polymorphism plays a part in the disease process, in particular whether it could affect transcription factor binding and in turn influence TNF-alpha transcription and synthesis. Several studies have suggested that TNFA2 allele is significantly linked with the high TNF-alpha-producing autoimmune MHC haplotype HLA-A1, B8, DR3, with elevated serum TNF-alpha levels and a more severe outcome in diseases. This review discusses the genetics of the TNF-alpha -308 polymorphism in selected major diseases and evaluates its common role in health and disease. PMID:19708125

  1. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  2. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin. PMID:26306021

  3. Response of Iron Deficiency Anemia to Intravenous Iron Sucrose in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intravenous iron sucrose (IS) in iron deficient children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in remission. METHODS: Electronic medical records at a university based pediatric children's hospital were searched for patients in age range 0 to 18 years with diagnosis of IBD and treatment with IS over a 1-year period. Response to IS treatment was assessed by posttreatment changes in ferritin, hemoglobin (Hb), and mean corpuscular volume (MCV). Patients with recorded symptoms of active disease were excluded from analysis of treatment response. RESULTS: Twelve patients were identified by the search criteria, 10 with Crohn's disease (CD), 2 with ulcerative colitis (UC). Data represent 8 patients in remission, 7 with CD and 1 with UC, who received a total of 34 IS infusions. Iron sucrose was administered in cycles of 2 infusions, 2.5 to 3.5 mg/kg/dose (maximum 200 mg), 1 week apart. Mean ferritin increased from 21.4 ± 9.2 to 52.9 ± 10.1 ng/mL (p = 0.0005), Hb from 10.9 ± 0.4 to 11.3 ± 0.3 g/dL (p = 0.02), and MCV from 76.9 ± 2 to 79.4 ± 2 fl (p = 0.006). Iron sucrose treatment normalized ferritin in 6 of 7, Hb in 2 of 8, and MCV in 2 of 5 patients with low pretreatment levels. No adverse effects were recorded. CONCLUSIONS: Two IS infusions of 2.5 to 3.5 mg/kg/dose (maximum 200 mg), given 1 week apart normalized ferritin levels in most pediatric IBD patients in remission without adverse effects. Further studies are needed to determine optimal dosing schedules. PMID:27199624

  4. Mapping of the chromosome 1p36 region surrounding the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A locus

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, P.; Gere, S.; Wolpert, C.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Although CMT2 is clinically indistinguishable from CMT1, the two forms can be differentiated by pathological and neurophysiological methods. We have established one locus, CMT2A on chromosome 1p36, and have established genetic heterogeneity. This locus maps to the region of the deletions associated with neuroblastoma. We have now identified an additional 11 CMT2 families. Three families are linked to chromosome 1p36 while six families are excluded from this region. Another six families are currently under analysis and collection. To date the CMT2A families represent one third of those CMT2 families examined. We have established a microdissection library of the 1p36 region which is currently being characterized for microsatellite repeats and STSs using standard hybridization techniques and a modified degenerate primer method. In addition, new markers (D1S253, D1S450, D1S489, D1S503, GATA27E04, and GATA4H04) placed in this region are being mapped using critical recombinants in the CEPH reference pedigrees. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to confirm mapping. A YAC contig is being assembled from the CEPH megabase library using STSs to isolate key YACs which are extended by vectorette end clone and Alu-PCR. These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrates further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  5. The PARK8 Locus in Autosomal Dominant Parkinsonism: Confirmation of Linkage and Further Delineation of the Disease-Containing Interval

    PubMed Central

    Zimprich, Alexander; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Farrer, Matthew; Leitner, Petra; Sharma, Manu; Hulihan, Mary; Lockhart, Paul; Strongosky, Audrey; Kachergus, Jennifer; Calne, Donald B.; Stoessl, Jon; Uitti, Ryan J.; Pfeiffer, Ronald F.; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Homann, Nikolaus; Ott, Erwin; Wenzel, Karoline; Asmus, Friedrich; Hardy, John; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Gasser, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Recently, a new locus (PARK8) for autosomal dominant parkinsonism has been identified in one large Japanese family. Linkage has been shown to a 16-cM centromeric region of chromosome 12, between markers D12S1631 and D12S339. We tested 21 white families with Parkinson disease and an inheritance pattern compatible with autosomal dominant transmission for linkage in this region. Criteria for inclusion were at least three affected individuals in more than one generation. A total of 29 markers were used to saturate the candidate region. One hundred sixty-seven family members were tested (84 affected and 83 unaffected). Under the assumption of heterogeneity and through use of an affecteds-only model, a maximum multipoint LOD score of 2.01 was achieved in the total sample, with an estimated proportion of families with linkage of 0.32. This LOD score is significant for linkage in a replication study and corresponds to a P value of .0047. Two families (family A [German Canadian] and family D [from western Nebraska]) reached significant linkage on their own, with a combined maximum multipoint LOD score of 3.33, calculated with an affecteds-only model (family A: LOD score 1.67, P=.0028; family D: LOD score 1.67, P=.0028). When a penetrance-dependent model was calculated, the combined multipoint LOD score achieved was 3.92 (family A: LOD score 1.68, P=.0027; family D: LOD score 2.24, P=.0007). On the basis of the multipoint analysis for the combined families A and D, the 1-LOD support interval suggests that the most likely disease location is between a CA repeat polymorphism on genomic clone AC025253 (44.5 Mb) and marker D12S1701 (47.7 Mb). Our data provide evidence that the PARK8 locus is responsible for the disease in a subset of families of white ancestry with autosomal dominant parkinsonism, suggesting that it could be a more common locus. PMID:14691730

  6. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1983-1984)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1984-09-01

    The hypotranserrinemic-hemochromatosis mutation in mice discovered in our laboratory is an almost exact duplicate of human atransferrinemia. Just as in man, the condition is inherited as a recessive lethal. The disease appears to stem from a congenital deficiency in transferrin. The new mutation arose spontaneously in BALB/c mice and results in death before 12 days of age. It is characterized by stunted growth, low numbers of erythrocytes, hypochromia, and in the absence of jaundice. Treatments with Imferon or other iron preparations were uniformly unsuccessful, but the use of normal mouse serum proved successful as a therapeutic measure. We find that we are able to keep these afflicted mice alive for more than a year with small amounts of normal serum, and transferrin bands are missing on cellulose acetate electrophoresis of serum proteins from affected individuals receiving no treatment. Genetic tests indicated that the new mutation was not an allele of any of the other known iron deficiency anemias in the mouse: sex linked anemia (sla), microcytic anemia (mk), or flexed anemia (f) or any of the members of the hemolytic disease group (sph, sph/sup ha/, nb, or ja). Biochemical and genetic analyses carried out during the past year indicate that the new mutation, tentatively designated hpx is not likely to be a mutation at the transferrin (Trf) locus on Chromosome 9. We observed no unusual serum proteins on cellulose acetate electrophoresis, such as might be expected if the Trf gene had mutated. Moreover, radial immunodiffusion examination and Ouchterlony analysis did not show the presence of smaller molecules (or fragments) with transferrin antigenic specificities. Instead they showed a total loss in serum transferrin. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Kcne2 deletion causes early-onset nonalcoholic fatty liver disease via iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Min; Nguyen, Dara; Anand, Marie; Kant, Ritu; Köhncke, Clemens; Lisewski, Ulrike; Roepke, Torsten K.; Hu, Zhaoyang; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasing health problem worldwide, with genetic, epigenetic, and environmental components. Here, we describe the first example of NAFLD caused by genetic disruption of a mammalian potassium channel subunit. Mice with germline deletion of the KCNE2 potassium channel β subunit exhibited NAFLD as early as postnatal day 7. Using mouse genetics, histology, liver damage assays and transcriptomics we discovered that iron deficiency arising from KCNE2-dependent achlorhydria is a major factor in early-onset NAFLD in Kcne2─/─ mice, while two other KCNE2-dependent defects did not initiate NAFLD. The findings uncover a novel genetic basis for NAFLD and an unexpected potential factor in human KCNE2-associated cardiovascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26984260

  8. Kcne2 deletion causes early-onset nonalcoholic fatty liver disease via iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Min; Nguyen, Dara; Anand, Marie; Kant, Ritu; Köhncke, Clemens; Lisewski, Ulrike; Roepke, Torsten K; Hu, Zhaoyang; Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasing health problem worldwide, with genetic, epigenetic, and environmental components. Here, we describe the first example of NAFLD caused by genetic disruption of a mammalian potassium channel subunit. Mice with germline deletion of the KCNE2 potassium channel β subunit exhibited NAFLD as early as postnatal day 7. Using mouse genetics, histology, liver damage assays and transcriptomics we discovered that iron deficiency arising from KCNE2-dependent achlorhydria is a major factor in early-onset NAFLD in Kcne2(─/─) mice, while two other KCNE2-dependent defects did not initiate NAFLD. The findings uncover a novel genetic basis for NAFLD and an unexpected potential factor in human KCNE2-associated cardiovascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26984260

  9. Mining Disease-Resistance Genes in Roses: Functional and Molecular Characterization of the Rdr1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Terefe-Ayana, Diro; Yasmin, Aneela; Le, Thanh Loan; Kaufmann, Helgard; Biber, Anja; Kühr, Astrid; Linde, Marcus; Debener, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of roses with the leaf spot pathogen Diplocarpon rosae (the cause of black spot on roses) is an interesting pathosystem because it involves a long-lived woody perennial, with life history traits very different from most model plants, and a hemibiotrophic pathogen with moderate levels of gene flow. Here we present data on the molecular structure of the first monogenic dominant resistance gene from roses, Rdr1, directed against one isolate of D. rosae. Complete sequencing of the locus carrying the Rdr1 gene resulted in a sequence of 265,477 bp with a cluster of nine highly related TIR–NBS–LRR (TNL) candidate genes. After sequencing revealed candidate genes for Rdr1, we implemented a gene expression analysis and selected five genes out of the nine TNLs. We then silenced the whole TNL gene family using RNAi (Rdr1–RNAi) constructed from the most conserved sequence region and demonstrated a loss of resistance in the normally resistant genotype. To identify the functional TNL gene, we further screened the five TNL candidate genes with a transient leaf infiltration assay. The transient expression assay indicated a single TNL gene (muRdr1H), partially restoring resistance in the susceptible genotype. Rdr1 was found to localize within the muRdr1 gene family; the genes within this locus contain characteristic motifs of active TNL genes and belong to a young cluster of R genes. The transient leaf assay can be used to further analyze the rose black spot interaction and its evolution, extending the analyses to additional R genes and to additional pathogenic types of the pathogen. PMID:22639591

  10. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to aplastic anemia. Examples include Fanconi anemia , Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis (DIS-ker-ah-TO-sis) congenita, and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video ...

  11. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  12. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  13. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  14. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  15. Targeted sequencing of the Paget's disease associated 14q32 locus identifies several missense coding variants in RIN3 that predispose to Paget's disease of bone

    PubMed Central

    Vallet, Mahéva; Soares, Dinesh C.; Wani, Sachin; Sophocleous, Antonia; Warner, Jon; Salter, Donald M.; Ralston, Stuart H.; Albagha, Omar M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a common disorder with a strong genetic component characterized by increased but disorganized bone remodelling. Previous genome-wide association studies identified a locus on chromosome 14q32 tagged by rs10498635 which was significantly associated with susceptibility to PDB in several European populations. Here we conducted fine-mapping and targeted sequencing of the candidate locus to identify possible functional variants. Imputation in 741 PDB patients and 2699 controls confirmed that the association was confined to a 60 kb region in the RIN3 gene and conditional analysis adjusting for rs10498635 identified no new independent signals. Sequencing of the RIN3 gene identified a common missense variant (p.R279C) that was strongly associated with the disease (OR = 0.64; P = 1.4 × 10−9), and was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs10498635. A further 13 rare missense variants were identified, seven of which were novel and detected only in PDB cases. When combined, these rare variants were over-represented in cases compared with controls (OR = 3.72; P = 8.9 × 10−10). Most rare variants were located in a region that encodes a proline-rich, intrinsically disordered domain of the protein and many were predicted to be pathogenic. RIN3 was expressed in bone tissue and its expression level was ∼10-fold higher in osteoclasts compared with osteoblasts. We conclude that susceptibility to PDB at the 14q32 locus is mediated by a combination of common and rare coding variants in RIN3 and suggest that RIN3 may contribute to PDB susceptibility by affecting osteoclast function. PMID:25701875

  16. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time. PMID:19787825

  17. High-resolution genetic localization of a modifying locus affecting disease severity in the juvenile cystic kidneys (jck) mouse model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Beier, David R

    2016-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a locus on proximal Chr 4 modifies disease severity in the juvenile cystic kidney (jck) mouse, a model of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) that carries a mutation of the Nek8 serine-threonine kinase. In this study, we used QTL analysis of independently constructed B6.D2 congenic lines to confirm this and showed that this locus has a highly significant effect. We constructed sub-congenic lines to more specifically localize the modifier and have determined it resides in a 3.2 Mb interval containing 28 genes. These include Invs and Anks6, which are both excellent candidates for the modifier as mutations in these genes result in PKD and both genes are known to genetically and physically interact with Nek8. However, examination of strain-specific DNA sequence and kidney expression did not reveal clear differences that might implicate either gene as a modifier of PKD severity. The fact that our high-resolution analysis did not yield an unambiguous result highlights the challenge of establishing the causality of strain-specific variants as genetic modifiers, and suggests that alternative strategies be considered. PMID:27114383

  18. Unique β-Glucuronidase Locus in Gut Microbiomes of Crohn’s Disease Patients and Unaffected First-Degree Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Gloux, Karine; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease, an incurable chronic inflammatory bowel disease, has been attributed to both genetic predisposition and environmental factors. A dysbiosis of the gut microbiota, observed in numerous patients but also in at least one hundred unaffected first-degree relatives, was proposed to have a causal role. Gut microbiota β-D-glucuronidases (EC 3.2.1.33) hydrolyse β-D-glucuronate from glucuronidated compounds. They include a GUS group, that is homologous to the Escherichia coli GusA, and a BG group, that is homologous to metagenomically identified H11G11 BG and has unidentified natural substrates. H11G11 BG is part of the functional core of the human gut microbiota whereas GusA, known to regenerate various toxic products, is variably found in human subjects. We investigated potential risk markers for Crohn’s disease using DNA-sequence-based exploration of the β-D-glucuronidase loci (GUS or Firmicute H11G11-BG and the respective co-encoded glucuronide transporters). Crohn’s disease-related microbiomes revealed a higher frequency of a C7D2 glucuronide transporter (12/13) compared to unrelated healthy subjects (8/32). This transporter was in synteny with the potential harmful GUS β-D-glucuronidase as only observed in a Eubacterium eligens plasmid. A conserved NH2-terminal sequence in the transporter (FGDFGND motif) was found in 83% of the disease-related subjects and only in 12% of controls. We propose a microbiota-pathology hypothesis in which the presence of this unique β-glucuronidase locus may contribute to an increase risk for Crohn’s disease. PMID:26824357

  19. Albuminuria as a Risk Factor for Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Suk; Lee, Mi Jung; Park, Kyoung Sook; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Park, Sue Kyung; Lee, Joongyub; Hyun, Young Youl; Chung, Wookyung; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Ahn, Curie; Choi, Kyu Hun

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia is a common complication among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients with CKD independent of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We assessed the association of the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) and eGFR with anemia in CKD patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study using baseline data from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD). Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify the independent association of albuminuria with anemia. Furthermore, odds ratios for anemia were calculated by cross-categorization of ACR and eGFR. Results Among 1,456 patients, the mean age was 53.5 ± 12.4 years, and the mean eGFR and ACR were 51.9 ± 30.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and 853.2 ± 1,330.3 mg/g, respectively. Anemia was present in 644 patients (40.5%). Multivariate analysis showed that the odds ratio of anemia increased according to ACR levels, after adjusting for age, sex, eGFR, body mass index, pulse pressure, cause of CKD, use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, serum calcium and ferritin (ACR < 30 mg/g as a reference group; 30–299 mg/g, adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.88–2.33; ≥300 mg/g, adjusted OR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.12–3.10). In addition, graded associations were observed in cross-categorized groups of a higher ACR and eGFR compared to the reference group with an ACR <30 mg/g and eGFR ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that albuminuria was a significant risk factor for anemia in CKD patients independent of the eGFR. PMID:26430892

  20. A Genome Wide Association Study for Coronary Artery Disease Identifies a Novel Susceptibility Locus in the Major Histocompatibility Complex

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Robert W.; Wells, George A.; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Shah, Svati H.; Ferguson, Jane F.; Hall, Alistair S.; Anand, Sonia S.; Burnett, Mary S.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Dandona, Sonny; Chen, Li; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Loley, Christina; König, Inke R.; Kraus, William E.; Granger, Christopher B.; Engert, James C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Schreiber, Stefan; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Ellis, Stephen G.; Rader, Daniel J.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several novel loci that reproducibly associate with CAD and/or MI risk. However, known common CAD risk variants explain only 10% of the predicted genetic heritability of the disease, suggesting that important genetic signals remain to be discovered. Methods and Results We performed a discovery meta-analysis of 5 GWASs involving 13,949 subjects (7123 cases, 6826 controls) imputed at approximately 5 million SNPs using pilot 1000 Genomes based haplotypes. Promising loci were followed up in an additional 5 studies with 11,032 subjects (5211 cases, 5821 controls). A novel CAD locus on chromosome 6p21.3 in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) between HCG27 and HLA-C was identified and achieved genome wide significance in the combined analysis (rs3869109; pdiscovery=3.3×10−7, preplication=5.3×10−4 pcombined=1.12×10−9). A sub-analysis combining discovery GWASs showed an attenuation of significance when stringent corrections for European population structure were employed (p=4.1×10−10 versus 3.2×10−7) suggesting the observed signal is partly confounded due to population stratification. This gene dense region plays an important role in inflammation, immunity and self cell recognition. To determine whether the underlying association was driven by MHC class I alleles, we statistically imputed common HLA alleles into the discovery subjects; however, no single common HLA type contributed significantly or fully explained the observed association. Conclusion We have identified a novel locus in the MHC associated with CAD. MHC genes regulate inflammation and T cell responses that contribute importantly to the initiation and propagation of atherosclerosis. Further laboratory studies will be required to understand the biological basis of this association and identify the causative allele(s). PMID:22319020

  1. Functional genomics of the CDKN2A/B locus in cardiovascular and metabolic disease: what have we learned from GWASs?

    PubMed

    Hannou, Sarah Anissa; Wouters, Kristiaan; Paumelle, Réjane; Staels, Bart

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) provide an unprecedented opportunity to examine, on a large scale, the association of common genetic variants with complex diseases like type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), thus allowing the identification of new potential disease loci. Using this approach, numerous studies have associated SNPs on chromosome 9p21.3 situated near the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/B (CDKN2A/B) locus with the risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) and T2D. However, identifying the function of the nearby gene products (CDKN2A/B and ANRIL) in the pathophysiology of these conditions requires functional genomic studies. We review the current knowledge, from studies using human and mouse models, describing the function of CDKN2A/B gene products, which may mechanistically link the 9p21.3 risk locus with CVD and diabetes. PMID:25744911

  2. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... 2/1/2016 Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. ...

  3. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  4. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  5. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  6. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  7. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  8. Dysfunction of the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system and related circuitry in Parkinson's disease-related dementia.

    PubMed

    Del Tredici, Kelly; Braak, Heiko

    2013-07-01

    Although resting tremor, cogwheel rigidity, hypokinesia/bradykinesia and postural instability usually dominate the clinical picture of sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), both clinical and epidemiological data reveal that a wide variety of additional symptoms impair patients' quality of life considerably, parallel to the chronic progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder. Autopsy based retrospective studies have shown that α-synuclein immunoreactive Lewy pathology (LP) develops in the locus coeruleus (LC) of patients with neuropathologically confirmed sporadic PD, as well as in individuals with incidental (prodromal or premotor) Lewy body disease but not in age and gender matched controls. Using five case studies, this review discusses the possible role of LP (axonopathy, cellular dysfunction and nerve cell loss) in the LC, catecholaminergic tract and related circuitry in the development of PD-related dementia. The contribution of noradrenergic deficit to cognitive dysfunction in PD has been underappreciated. Noradrenergic therapeutic interventions might not only alleviate depressive symptoms and anxiety but also delay the onset of cognitive decline. PMID:23064099

  9. Correlates of Anemia in American Blacks and Whites

    PubMed Central

    Zakai, Neil A.; McClure, Leslie A.; Prineas, Ronald; Howard, George; McClellan, William; Holmes, Chris E.; Newsome, Britt B.; Warnock, David G.; Audhya, Paul

    2009-01-01

    For unclear reasons, anemia is more common in American blacks than whites. The authors evaluated anemia prevalence (using World Health Organization criteria) among 19,836 blacks and whites recruited in 2003–2007 for the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke Renal Ancillary study and characterized anemia by 3 anemia-associated conditions (chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and microcytosis). They used multivariable models to assess potential causes of race differences in anemia. Anemia was 3.3-fold more common in blacks than whites, with little attenuation after adjusting for demographic variables, socioeconomic factors, and comorbid conditions. Increasing age, residence in the US southeast, lower income, vascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and never smoking were associated with anemia. Age, diabetes, and vascular disease were stronger correlates of anemia among whites than blacks (P < 0.05). Among those with anemia, chronic kidney disease was less common among blacks than whites (22% vs. 34%), whereas inflammation (18% vs. 14%) and microcytosis (22% vs. 11%) were more common. In this large, geographically diverse cohort, anemia was 3-fold more common in blacks than whites with different characteristics and correlates. Race differences in anemia prevalence were not explained by the factors studied. Future research into the causes and consequences of anemia in different racial groups is needed. PMID:19066309

  10. A putative quantitative trait locus on chromosome 20 associated with bovine pathogenic disease incidence.

    PubMed

    Casas, E; Snowder, G D

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to detect QTL associated with the incidence of multiple pathogenic diseases in offspring from half-sib bovine families. Four F(1) sires were used to produce offspring: Brahman x Hereford (BH; n = 547), Piedmontese x Angus (PA; n = 209), Brahman x Angus (n = 176), and Belgian Blue x MARC III (n = 246). Treatment records for bovine respiratory disease, infectious keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye), and infectious pododermatitis (footrot) were available for all of the offspring from birth to slaughter. The incidences of these 3 microbial pathogenic diseases were combined into a single binary trait to represent an overall pathogenic disease incidence. Offspring diagnosed and treated for 1 or more of the previously mentioned pathogenic diseases were coded as a 1 for affected. Cattle with no treatment record were coded as 0 for healthy. A putative QTL for pathogenic disease incidence was detected in the family derived from the BH sire at the genome-wise suggestive level. This was supported by evidence, in the same chromosomal region, of a similar QTL in the family derived from the PA sire. The maximum F-statistic (F = 13.52; P = 0.0003) was located at cM 18. The support interval of the QTL spanned from cM 9 to 28. Further studies should explore this QTL by using other bovine populations to further confirm the QTL and refine the QTL support interval. Offspring inheriting the Hereford allele, in the family from the BH sire, and the Angus allele, in the family from the PA sire, were less susceptible to incidence of pathogenic diseases, when compared with those inheriting the Brahman allele and Piedmontese allele, from the BH and PA sires, respectively. PMID:18502878

  11. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  12. A putative quantitative trait locus on chromosome 20 associated with bovine pathogenic disease incidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to detect QTL associated with the incidence of multiple pathogenic diseases in offspring from half-sib bovine families. Four F1 sires were used to produce offspring: Brahman x Hereford (BH; n = 547), Piedmontese x Angus (PA; n = 209), Brahman x Angus (BA; n = 176), and Belgian Blu...

  13. Safety and Efficacy of PDpoetin for Management of Anemia in Patients with end Stage Renal Disease on Maintenance Hemodialysis: Results from a Phase IV Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Javidan, Abbas Norouzi; Shahbazian, Heshmatollah; Emami, Amirhossein; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Emami-Razavi, Hassan; Farhadkhani, Masoumeh; Ahmadzadeh, Ahmad; Gorjipour, Fazel

    2014-08-26

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is available for correcting anemia. PDpoetin, a new brand of rHuEPO, has been certified by Food and Drug Department of Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran for clinical use in patients with chronic kidney disease. We conducted this post-marketing survey to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of PDpoetin for management of anemia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Patients from 4 centers in Iran were enrolled for this multicenter, open-label, uncontrolled phase IV clinical trial. Changes in blood chemistry, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, renal function, and other characteristics of the patients were recorded for 4 months; 501 of the patients recruited, completed this study. Mean age of the patients was 50.9 (±16.2) years. 48.7% of patients were female. Mean of the hemoglobin value in all of the 4 centers was 9.29 (±1.43) g/dL at beginning of the study and reached 10.96 (±2.23) g/dL after 4 months and showed significant increase overall (P<0.001). PDpoetin dose was stable at 50-100 U/kg thrice weekly. Hemorheologic disturbancesand changes in blood electrolytes was not observed. No case of immunological reactions to PDpoetin was observed. Our study, therefore, showed that PDpoetin has significantly raised the level of hemoglobin in the hemodialysis patients (about 1.7±0.6 g/dL). Anemia were successfully corrected in 49% of patients under study. Use of this biosimilar was shown to be safe and effective for the maintenance of hemoglobin in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. PMID:25317316

  14. Safety and Efficacy of PDpoetin for Management of Anemia in Patients with end Stage Renal Disease on Maintenance Hemodialysis: Results from a Phase IV Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Javidan, Abbas Norouzi; Shahbazian, Heshmatollah; Emami, Amirhossein; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Emami-Razavi, Hassan; Farhadkhani, Masoumeh; Gorjipour, Fazel

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is available for correcting anemia. PDpoetin, a new brand of rHuEPO, has been certified by Food and Drug Department of Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran for clinical use in patients with chronic kidney disease. We conducted this post-marketing survey to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of PDpoetin for management of anemia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Patients from 4 centers in Iran were enrolled for this multicenter, open-label, uncontrolled phase IV clinical trial. Changes in blood chemistry, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, renal function, and other characteristics of the patients were recorded for 4 months; 501 of the patients recruited, completed this study. Mean age of the patients was 50.9 (±16.2) years. 48.7% of patients were female. Mean of the hemoglobin value in all of the 4 centers was 9.29 (±1.43) g/dL at beginning of the study and reached 10.96 (±2.23) g/dL after 4 months and showed significant increase overall (P<0.001). PDpoetin dose was stable at 50-100 U/kg thrice weekly. Hemorheologic disturbancesand changes in blood electrolytes was not observed. No case of immunological reactions to PDpoetin was observed. Our study, therefore, showed that PDpoetin has significantly raised the level of hemoglobin in the hemodialysis patients (about 1.7±0.6 g/dL). Anemia were successfully corrected in 49% of patients under study. Use of this biosimilar was shown to be safe and effective for the maintenance of hemoglobin in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. PMID:25317316

  15. Severe Aplastic Anemia Associated With Eosinophilic Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    de Masson, Adèle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Benhamou, Ygal; Moluçon-Chabrot, Cécile; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Laquerrière, Annie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Michonneau, David; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Rybojad, Michel; Bonnotte, Bernard; Jardin, Fabrice; Lévesque, Hervé; Bagot, Martine; Socié, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Diffuse eosinophilic fasciitis (Shulman disease) is a rare sclerodermiform syndrome that, in most cases, resolves spontaneously or after corticosteroid therapy. It has been associated with hematologic disorders, such as aplastic anemia. The clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia have been poorly described. We report the cases of 4 patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated severe aplastic anemia. For 3 of these patients, aplastic anemia was refractory to conventional immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. One of the patients received rituximab as a second-line therapy with significant efficacy for both the skin and hematologic symptoms. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe rituximab used to treat eosinophilic fasciitis with associated aplastic anemia. In a literature review, we identified 19 additional cases of eosinophilic fasciitis and aplastic anemia. Compared to patients with isolated eosinophilic fasciitis, patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia were more likely to be men (70%) and older (mean age, 56 yr; range, 18–71 yr). Corticosteroid-containing regimens improved skin symptoms in 5 (42%) of 12 cases but were ineffective in the treatment of associated aplastic anemia in all but 1 case. Aplastic anemia was profound in 13 cases (57%) and was the cause of death in 8 cases (35%). Only 5 patients (22%) achieved long-term remission (allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: n = 2; cyclosporine-containing regimen: n = 2; high-dose corticosteroid-based regimen: n = 1). PMID:23429351

  16. A Scan of Chromosome 10 Identifies a Novel Locus Showing Strong Association with Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grupe, Andrew; Li, Yonghong; Rowland, Charles; Nowotny, Petra; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Smemo, Scott; Kauwe, John S. K.; Maxwell, Taylor J.; Cherny, Sara; Doil, Lisa; Tacey, Kristina; van Luchene, Ryan; Myers, Amanda; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Kaleem, Mona; Hollingworth, Paul; Jehu, Luke; Foy, Catherine; Archer, Nicola; Hamilton, Gillian; Holmans, Peter; Morris, Chris M.; Catanese, Joseph; Sninsky, John; White, Thomas J.; Powell, John; Hardy, John; O’Donovan, Michael; Lovestone, Simon; Jones, Lesley; Morris, John C.; Thal, Leon; Owen, Michael; Williams, Julie; Goate, Alison

    2006-01-01

    Strong evidence of linkage to late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) has been observed on chromosome 10, which implicates a wide region and at least one disease-susceptibility locus. Although significant associations with several biological candidate genes on chromosome 10 have been reported, these findings have not been consistently replicated, and they remain controversial. We performed a chromosome 10–specific association study with 1,412 gene-based single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), to identify susceptibility genes for developing LOAD. The scan included SNPs in 677 of 1,270 known or predicted genes; each gene contained one or more markers, about half (48%) of which represented putative functional mutations. In general, the initial testing was performed in a white case-control sample from the St. Louis area, with 419 LOAD cases and 377 age-matched controls. Markers that showed significant association in the exploratory analysis were followed up in several other white case-control sample sets to confirm the initial association. Of the 1,397 markers tested in the exploratory sample, 69 reached significance (P<.05). Five of these markers replicated at P<.05 in the validation sample sets. One marker, rs498055, located in a gene homologous to RPS3A (LOC439999), was significantly associated with Alzheimer disease in four of six case-control series, with an allelic P value of .0001 for a meta-analysis of all six samples. One of the case-control samples with significant association to rs498055 was derived from the linkage sample (P=.0165). These results indicate that variants in the RPS3A homologue are associated with LOAD and implicate this gene, adjacent genes, or other functional variants (e.g., noncoding RNAs) in the pathogenesis of this disorder. PMID:16385451

  17. Gene-disease association with human IFNL locus polymorphisms extends beyond hepatitis C virus infections.

    PubMed

    Chinnaswamy, S

    2016-07-01

    Interferon (IFN) lambda (IFN-λ or type III IFN) gene polymorphisms were discovered in the year 2009 to have a strong association with spontaneous and treatment-induced clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in human hosts. This landmark discovery also brought renewed interest in type III IFN biology. After more than half a decade since this discovery, we now have reports that show that genetic association of IFNL gene polymorphisms in humans is not limited only to HCV infections but extends beyond, to include varied diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, allergy and several other viral diseases including that caused by the human immunodeficiency virus. Notably, all these conditions have strong involvement of host innate immune responses. After the discovery of a deletion polymorphism that leads to the expression of a functional IFN-λ4 as the prime 'functional' variant, the relevance of other polymorphisms regulating the expression of IFN-λ3 is in doubt. Herein, I seek to critically address these issues and review the current literature to provide a framework to help further understanding of IFN-λ biology. PMID:27278127

  18. Disease-Related Growth Factor and Embryonic Signaling Pathways Modulate an Enhancer of TCF21 Expression at the 6q23.2 Coronary Heart Disease Locus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Clint L.; Anderson, D. Ryan; Kundu, Ramendra K.; Raiesdana, Azad; Nürnberg, Sylvia T.; Diaz, Roxanne; Cheng, Karen; Leeper, Nicholas J.; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chang, I-Shou; Schadt, Eric E.; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality in both developed and developing countries worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have now identified 46 independent susceptibility loci for CHD, however, the biological and disease-relevant mechanisms for these associations remain elusive. The large-scale meta-analysis of GWAS recently identified in Caucasians a CHD-associated locus at chromosome 6q23.2, a region containing the transcription factor TCF21 gene. TCF21 (Capsulin/Pod1/Epicardin) is a member of the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor family, and regulates cell fate decisions and differentiation in the developing coronary vasculature. Herein, we characterize a cis-regulatory mechanism by which the lead polymorphism rs12190287 disrupts an atypical activator protein 1 (AP-1) element, as demonstrated by allele-specific transcriptional regulation, transcription factor binding, and chromatin organization, leading to altered TCF21 expression. Further, this element is shown to mediate signaling through platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFR-β) and Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) pathways. A second disease allele identified in East Asians also appears to disrupt an AP-1-like element. Thus, both disease-related growth factor and embryonic signaling pathways may regulate CHD risk through two independent alleles at TCF21. PMID:23874238

  19. Intravenous Versus Oral Iron for the Treatment of Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Bonovas, Stefanos; Fiorino, Gionata; Allocca, Mariangela; Lytras, Theodore; Tsantes, Argirios; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Danese, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is the most prevalent extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our aim was to evaluate the comparative efficacy and harm of intravenous (IV) versus oral iron supplementation for correcting anemia in adult IBD patients.We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to integrate evidence from randomized controlled trials having enrolled adults with IBD, and comparing IV versus oral iron (head-to-head) for correcting iron-deficiency anemia. Medline, Embase, Scopus, and the Web of Science database were searched through July 2015. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, the ClinicalTrials.gov, and international conference proceedings were also investigated. Two reviewers independently abstracted study data and outcomes, and rated each trial's risk-of-bias. Pooled odds ratio (OR) estimates with their 95% CIs were calculated using fixed- and random-effects models.Five eligible studies, including 694 IBD patients, were identified. In meta-analysis, IV iron demonstrated a higher efficacy in achieving a hemoglobin rise of ≥2.0 g/dL as compared to oral iron (OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.13, 2.18). Treatment discontinuation rates, due to adverse events or intolerance, were lower in the IV iron groups (OR: 0.27, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.59). Similarly, the occurrence of gastrointestinal adverse events was consistently lower in the IV iron groups. On the contrary, serious adverse events (SAEs) were more frequently reported among patients receiving IV iron preparations (OR: 4.57, 95% CI: 1.11, 18.8); however, the majority of the reported SAEs were judged as unrelated or unlikely to be related to the study medication. We found no evidence of publication bias, or between-study heterogeneity, across all analyses. Risk of bias was high across primary studies, because patients and personnel were not blinded to the intervention.IV iron appears to be more effective and better tolerated than oral

  20. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  1. Replication of GWAS Coding SNPs Implicates MMEL1 as a Potential Susceptibility Locus among Saudi Arabian Celiac Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Saadah, Omar I; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Salama, Mohammed A; Al-Harthi, Sameer E; Wang, Jun; Shawoosh, Harbi A; Alghamdi, Sharifa A; Bin-Taleb, Yagoub Y; Alhussaini, Bakr H; Elango, Ramu; Al-Aama, Jumana Y

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a gluten intolerance disorder, was implicated to have 57 genetic susceptibility loci for Europeans but not for culturally and geographically distinct ethnic populations like Saudi Arabian CD patients. Therefore, we genotyped Saudi CD patients and healthy controls for three polymorphisms, that is, Phe196Ser in IRAK1, Trp262Arg in SH2B3, and Met518Thr in MMEL1 genes. Single locus analysis identified that carriers of the 518 Thr/Thr (MMEL1) genotype conferred a 1.6-fold increased disease risk compared to the noncarriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.22-5.54; P < 0.01). This significance persisted even under allelic (OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.05-2.28; P = 0.02) and additive (OR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17-0.71; P = 0.03) genetic models. However, frequencies for Trp262Arg (SH2B3) and Phe196Ser (IRAK1) polymorphisms were not significantly different between patients and controls. The overall best MDR model included Met518Thr and Trp262Arg polymorphisms, with a maximal testing accuracy of 64.1% and a maximal cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10 (P = 0.0156). Allelic distribution of the 518 Thr/Thr polymorphism in MMEL1 primarily suggests its independent and synergistic contribution towards CD susceptibility among Saudi patients. Lack of significant association of IRAK and SH2B3 gene polymorphisms in Saudi patients but their association in European groups suggests the genetic heterogeneity of CD. PMID:26843707

  2. Replication of GWAS Coding SNPs Implicates MMEL1 as a Potential Susceptibility Locus among Saudi Arabian Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saadah, Omar I.; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Salama, Mohammed A.; Al-Harthi, Sameer E.; Wang, Jun; Shawoosh, Harbi A.; Alghamdi, Sharifa A.; Bin-Taleb, Yagoub Y.; Alhussaini, Bakr H.; Elango, Ramu; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a gluten intolerance disorder, was implicated to have 57 genetic susceptibility loci for Europeans but not for culturally and geographically distinct ethnic populations like Saudi Arabian CD patients. Therefore, we genotyped Saudi CD patients and healthy controls for three polymorphisms, that is, Phe196Ser in IRAK1, Trp262Arg in SH2B3, and Met518Thr in MMEL1 genes. Single locus analysis identified that carriers of the 518 Thr/Thr (MMEL1) genotype conferred a 1.6-fold increased disease risk compared to the noncarriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.22–5.54; P < 0.01). This significance persisted even under allelic (OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.05–2.28; P = 0.02) and additive (OR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17–0.71; P = 0.03) genetic models. However, frequencies for Trp262Arg (SH2B3) and Phe196Ser (IRAK1) polymorphisms were not significantly different between patients and controls. The overall best MDR model included Met518Thr and Trp262Arg polymorphisms, with a maximal testing accuracy of 64.1% and a maximal cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10 (P = 0.0156). Allelic distribution of the 518 Thr/Thr polymorphism in MMEL1 primarily suggests its independent and synergistic contribution towards CD susceptibility among Saudi patients. Lack of significant association of IRAK and SH2B3 gene polymorphisms in Saudi patients but their association in European groups suggests the genetic heterogeneity of CD. PMID:26843707

  3. An Autoinflammatory Disease Due to Homozygous Deletion of the IL1RN Locus

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sreelatha; Jia, Shuang; Geoffrey, Rhonda; Lorier, Rachel; Suchi, Mariko; Broeckel, Ulrich; Hessner, Martin J.; Verbsky, James

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY We describe a patient with an autoinflammatory disease in which the main clinical features are pustular rash, marked osteopenia, lytic bone lesions, respiratory insufficiency, and thrombosis. Genetic studies revealed a 175-kb homozygous deletion at chromosome 2q13, which encompasses several interleukin-1 family members, including the gene encoding the interleukin-1–receptor antagonist (IL1RN). Mononuclear cells, obtained from the patient and cultured, produced large amounts of inflammatory cytokines, with increasing amounts secreted after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. A similar increase was not observed in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells from a patient with neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disorder (NOMID). Treatment with anakinra completely resolved the symptoms and lesions. PMID:19494219

  4. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-11-26

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26582375

  5. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26637747

  6. Crohn's Disease Risk Alleles on the NOD2 Locus Have Been Maintained by Natural Selection on Standing Variation

    PubMed Central

    Nakagome, Shigeki; Mano, Shuhei; Kozlowski, Lukasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuaki; Kidd, Judith R.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kawamura, Shoji; Oota, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Risk alleles for complex diseases are widely spread throughout human populations. However, little is known about the geographic distribution and frequencies of risk alleles, which may contribute to differences in disease susceptibility and prevalence among populations. Here, we focus on Crohn's disease (CD) as a model for the evolutionary study of complex disease alleles. Recent genome-wide association studies and classical linkage analyses have identified more than 70 susceptible genomic regions for CD in Europeans, but only a few have been confirmed in non-European populations. Our analysis of eight European-specific susceptibility genes using HapMap data shows that at the NOD2 locus the CD-risk alleles are linked with a haplotype specific to CEU at a frequency that is significantly higher compared with the entire genome. We subsequently examined nine global populations and found that the CD-risk alleles spread through hitchhiking with a high-frequency haplotype (H1) exclusive to Europeans. To examine the neutrality of NOD2, we performed phylogenetic network analyses, coalescent simulation, protein structural prediction, characterization of mutation patterns, and estimations of population growth and time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA). We found that while H1 was significantly prevalent in European populations, the H1 TMRCA predated human migration out of Africa. H1 is likely to have undergone negative selection because 1) the root of H1 genealogy is defined by a preexisting amino acid substitution that causes serious conformational changes to the NOD2 protein, 2) the haplotype has almost become extinct in Africa, and 3) the haplotype has not been affected by the recent European expansion reflected in the other haplotypes. Nevertheless, H1 has survived in European populations, suggesting that the haplotype is advantageous to this group. We propose that several CD-risk alleles, which destabilize and disrupt the NOD2 protein, have been maintained by natural

  7. Alterations of the IKBKG locus and diseases: an update and a report of 13 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Francesca; Pescatore, Alessandra; Bal, Elodie; Ghoul, Aida; Paciolla, Mariateresa; Lioi, Maria Brigida; D'Urso, Michele; Rabia, Smail Hadj; Bodemer, Christine; Bonnefont, Jean Paul; Munnich, Arnold; Miano, Maria Giuseppina; Smahi, Asma; Ursini, Matilde Valeria

    2008-05-01

    Mutations in the inhibitor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells, kinase gamma (IKBKG), also called nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB) essential modulator (NEMO), gene are the most common single cause of incontinentia pigmenti (IP) in females and anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (EDA-ID) in males. The IKBKG gene, located in the Xq28 chromosomal region, encodes for the regulatory subunit of the inhibitor of kappaB (IkB) kinase (IKK) complex required for the activation of the NF-kB pathway. Therefore, the remarkably heterogeneous and often severe clinical presentation reported in IP is due to the pleiotropic role of this signaling transcription pathway. A recurrent exon 4_10 genomic rearrangement in the IKBKG gene accounts for 60 to 80% of IP-causing mutations. Besides the IKBKG rearrangement found in IP females (which is lethal in males), a total of 69 different small mutations (missense, frameshift, nonsense, and splice-site mutations) have been reported, including 13 novel ones in this work. The updated distribution of all the IP- and EDA-ID-causing mutations along the IKBKG gene highlights a secondary hotspot mutation in exon 10, which contains only 11% of the protein. Furthermore, familial inheritance analysis revealed an unexpectedly high incidence of sporadic cases (>65%). The sum of the observations can aid both in determining the molecular basis of IP and EDA-ID allelic diseases, and in genetic counseling in affected families. PMID:18350553

  8. Multi-locus genetic risk score predicts risk for Crohn’s disease in Slovenian population

    PubMed Central

    Zupančič, Katarina; Skok, Kristijan; Repnik, Katja; Weersma, Rinse K; Potočnik, Uroš; Skok, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop a risk model for Crohn’s disease (CD) based on homogeneous population. METHODS: In our study were included 160 CD patients and 209 healthy individuals from Slovenia. The association study was performed for 112 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We generated genetic risk scores (GRS) based on the number of risk alleles using weighted additive model. Discriminatory accuracy was measured by area under ROC curve (AUC). For risk evaluation, we divided individuals according to positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) of a test, with LR > 5 for high risk group and LR < 0.20 for low risk group. RESULTS: The highest accuracy, AUC of 0.78 was achieved with GRS combining 33 SNPs with optimal sensitivity and specificity of 75.0% and 72.7%, respectively. Individuals with the highest risk (GRS > 5.54) showed significantly increased odds of developing CD (OR = 26.65, 95%CI: 11.25-63.15) compared to the individuals with the lowest risk (GRS < 4.57) which is a considerably greater risk captured than in one SNP with the highest effect size (OR = 3.24). When more than 33 SNPs were included in GRS, discriminatory ability was not improved significantly; AUC of all 74 SNPs was 0.76. CONCLUSION: The authors proved the possibility of building accurate genetic risk score based on 33 risk variants on Slovenian CD patients which may serve as a screening tool in the targeted population. PMID:27076762

  9. Evidence for a NOD2-independent susceptibility locus for inflammatory bowel disease on chromosome 16p

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Jochen; Frenzel, Henning; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Croucher, Peter J. P.; Cuthbert, Andrew; Mascheretti, Silvia; Huse, Klaus; Platzer, Matthias; Bridger, Stephen; Meyer, Birgit; Nürnberg, Peter; Stokkers, Pieter; Krawczak, Michael; Mathew, Christopher G.; Curran, Mark; Schreiber, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Heritable predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been demonstrated by epidemiological and genetic analysis. Linkage of IBD to broad regions of chromosome 16 has been established by analysis of multiple populations. NOD2, located on proximal 16q, was recently identified as an IBD gene. As the linkage regions on chromosome 16 are large, we have investigated the possibility that NOD2 is not the only IBD gene located on this chromosome. A high-density experiment using 39 microsatellite markers was performed to identify additional regions of association, and to indicate areas of interest for further investigation. A triple-peaked configuration of the linkage curve with peak logarithm of odds (lod) scores of 2.7, 3.2, and 3.1 was observed on proximal 16p, proximal 16q, and central 16q, respectively. The cohort was stratified by coding individuals carrying the NOD2 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)8 and SNP13 “unknown.” Significance at the central peak, corresponding to the genomic location of NOD2, then decreased from 3.2 to 1.2. The maximal lod scores on the proximal p-arm (lod = 2.1) and central q-arm (lod = 2.6) changed only moderately. An exploratory association analysis (TRANSMIT) yielded a strong lead at D16S3068 (P = 0.00028). The region around this marker was further investigated by using anonymous SNPs. An associated haplotype containing three SNPs was identified (peak significance P = 0.00027, IBD phenotype). On stratification based on NOD2 genotype, this significance increased to P = 0.0001. These results confirm the importance of NOD2 and provide evidence for a second IBD gene located on chromosome 16p. PMID:11752413

  10. How Is Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells. Chelation (ke-LAY-shun) therapy for lead poisoning. Chelation therapy is used mainly in children. This ... iron-deficiency anemia are at increased risk of lead poisoning. Procedures If your anemia is severe, your doctor ...

  11. Anemia in the Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video) Meconium Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Arthur E. Kopelman, MD ... Prematurity (ROP) Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) Jaundice in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn Thyroid ...

  12. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  13. Congenital spherocytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... spheres, and premature breakdown of red blood cells ( hemolytic anemia ). ... Schwartz RS. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 163.

  14. Anemia in children with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Ariel; Malkiel, Sarah; Wexler, Isaiah D; Levy-Khademi, Floris; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Stepensky, Polina

    2011-01-01

    Background. Iron deficiency anemia impacts on cognitive development. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in children with Down syndrome and identify risk factors for anemia. Methods. We conducted a prolective cross-sectional study of children attending a multidisciplinary Down syndrome medical center. One hundred and forty nine children with Down syndrome aged 0-20 years were enrolled in the study. Information obtained included a medical history, physical and developmental examination, nutritional assessment, and the results of blood tests. Results. Of the patients studied, 8.1% were found to have anemia. Among the 38 children who had iron studies, 50.0% had iron deficiency. In a multivariate analysis, Arab ethnicity and low weight for age were significantly associated with anemia. Gender, height, the presence of an eating disorder, and congenital heart disease were not risk factors for anemia. Conclusions. Children with Down syndrome are at risk for anemia and iron deficiency similar to the general population. Children with Down syndrome should be monitored for anemia and iron deficiency so that prompt intervention can be initiated. PMID:21941570

  15. Genome-Wide Mapping of Susceptibility to Coronary Artery Disease Identifies a Novel Replicated Locus on Chromosome 17

    PubMed Central

    Peden, John F; Olsson, Per G; Clarke, Robert; Hellenius, Mai-Lis; Rust, Stephan; Lagercrantz, Jacob; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Schulte, Helmut; Carey, Alisoun; Olsson, Gunnar; Assmann, Gerd; Tognoni, Gianni; Collins, Rory; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh

    2006-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death world-wide, and most cases have a complex, multifactorial aetiology that includes a substantial heritable component. Identification of new genes involved in CAD may inform pathogenesis and provide new therapeutic targets. The PROCARDIS study recruited 2,658 affected sibling pairs (ASPs) with onset of CAD before age 66 y from four European countries to map susceptibility loci for CAD. ASPs were defined as having CAD phenotype if both had CAD, or myocardial infarction (MI) phenotype if both had a MI. In a first study, involving a genome-wide linkage screen, tentative loci were mapped to Chromosomes 3 and 11 with the CAD phenotype (1,464 ASPs), and to Chromosome 17 with the MI phenotype (739 ASPs). In a second study, these loci were examined with a dense panel of grid-tightening markers in an independent set of families (1,194 CAD and 344 MI ASPs). This replication study showed a significant result on Chromosome 17 (MI phenotype; p = 0.009 after adjustment for three independent replication tests). An exclusion analysis suggests that further genes of effect size λsib > 1.24 are unlikely to exist in these populations of European ancestry. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide linkage analysis to map, and replicate, a CAD locus. The region on Chromosome 17 provides a compelling target within which to identify novel genes underlying CAD. Understanding the genetic aetiology of CAD may lead to novel preventative and/or therapeutic strategies. PMID:16710446

  16. Genome-wide haplotype association study identifies the FRMD4A gene as a risk locus for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J-C; Grenier-Boley, B; Harold, D; Zelenika, D; Chouraki, V; Kamatani, Y; Sleegers, K; Ikram, M A; Hiltunen, M; Reitz, C; Mateo, I; Feulner, T; Bullido, M; Galimberti, D; Concari, L; Alvarez, V; Sims, R; Gerrish, A; Chapman, J; Deniz-Naranjo, C; Solfrizzi, V; Sorbi, S; Arosio, B; Spalletta, G; Siciliano, G; Epelbaum, J; Hannequin, D; Dartigues, J-F; Tzourio, C; Berr, C; Schrijvers, E M C; Rogers, R; Tosto, G; Pasquier, F; Bettens, K; Van Cauwenberghe, C; Fratiglioni, L; Graff, C; Delepine, M; Ferri, R; Reynolds, C A; Lannfelt, L; Ingelsson, M; Prince, J A; Chillotti, C; Pilotto, A; Seripa, D; Boland, A; Mancuso, M; Bossù, P; Annoni, G; Nacmias, B; Bosco, P; Panza, F; Sanchez-Garcia, F; Del Zompo, M; Coto, E; Owen, M; O'Donovan, M; Valdivieso, F; Caffara, P; Scarpini, E; Combarros, O; Buée, L; Campion, D; Soininen, H; Breteler, M; Riemenschneider, M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Alpérovitch, A; Lathrop, M; Trégouët, D-A; Williams, J; Amouyel, P

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have led to the discovery of nine new loci of genetic susceptibility in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the landscape of the AD genetic susceptibility is far away to be complete and in addition to single-SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) analyses as performed in conventional GWAS, complementary strategies need to be applied to overcome limitations inherent to this type of approaches. We performed a genome-wide haplotype association (GWHA) study in the EADI1 study (n=2025 AD cases and 5328 controls) by applying a sliding-windows approach. After exclusion of loci already known to be involved in AD (APOE, BIN1 and CR1), 91 regions with suggestive haplotype effects were identified. In a second step, we attempted to replicate the best suggestive haplotype associations in the GERAD1 consortium (2820 AD cases and 6356 controls) and observed that 9 of them showed nominal association. In a third step, we tested relevant haplotype associations in a combined analysis of five additional case–control studies (5093 AD cases and 4061 controls). We consistently replicated the association of a haplotype within FRMD4A on Chr.10p13 in all the data set analyzed (OR: 1.68; 95% CI: (1.43–1.96); P=1.1 × 10−10). We finally searched for association between SNPs within the FRMD4A locus and Aβ plasma concentrations in three independent non-demented populations (n=2579). We reported that polymorphisms were associated with plasma Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio (best signal, P=5.4 × 10−7). In conclusion, combining both GWHA study and a conservative three-stage replication approach, we characterised FRMD4A as a new genetic risk factor of AD. PMID:22430674

  17. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27542426

  18. [Clinical evaluation of anemia in the aged].

    PubMed

    Pentimone, F; Del Corso, L; Frustaci, G; Gnesi, A; Romanelli, A M; Sabbatini, A R

    1992-01-01

    Of 533 patients over 65 years old (153 males and 380 females), admitted to geriatric units for various medical diseases, 111 (20.8%) were anemic. Among males the prevalence of anemia was 30.1%, among females 17.1%. Three principal causes of anemia were revealed. The most frequent (42.3%) was microcytic, hypochromic anemia, with low levels of serum iron concentrations, related to gastrointestinal diseases (with chronic occult blood loss). 38.7% of anemic elderly people was affected by chronic diseases. In 19.0% a folate (16 case) and iron (5 cases) deficiency was revealed. These results suggest that anemia in the elderly is always pathological; hemoglobin values lower than 12 g/dl should be considered abnormal and investigated. PMID:1545920

  19. Anemia: Progress in molecular mechanisms and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to understanding frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that may stand to benefit from the new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease), rare genetic disorders of red blood cell production, and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new treatment approaches include drugs that target recently defined pathways in red blood cell production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin gene expression, as well as gene therapies using improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies. PMID:25742458

  20. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  1. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Masamitsu

    2008-03-01

    Diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) requires both serologic evidence of an autoantibody and hemolysis. Based on the characteristic temperature reactivity of the autoantibody to red cell membranes, AIHA is classified into warm AIHA or cold AIHA (cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria). Sensitized RBCs are destructed by intravascular and/or extravascular hemolysis. On the basis of etiology, AIHA are classified as idiopathic or secondary. The common cause of secondary AIHA is lymphoproliferative disorders, autoimmune diseases, and infections. The first line therapy of patients with warm AIHA is glucocorticoids and primary treatment for cold AIHA is avoiding cold exposure. The other standard treatments include splenectomy and immunosuppressive drugs. Recently, rituximab, a monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, has been used in refractory AIHA with excellent responses. PMID:18326320

  2. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  3. A case of asymptomatic pancytopenia with clinical features of hemolysis as a presentation of pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Kollipara, Venkateswara K; Brine, Patrick L; Gemmel, David; Ingnam, Sisham

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is an autoimmune disease with a variety of clinical presentations. We describe a case of pernicious anemia presenting with pancytopenia with hemolytic features. Further workup revealed very low vitamin B12 levels and elevated methylmalonic acid. It is important for a general internist to identify pernicious anemia as one of the cause of pancytopenia and hemolytic anemia to avoid extensive workup. Pernicious anemia can present strictly with hematological abnormalities without neurological problems or vice versa as in our case. PMID:27609735

  4. Erythropoietin Levels in Elderly Patients with Anemia of Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Martin, Alison; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Background In many elderly patients with anemia, a specific cause cannot be identified. This study investigates whether erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in these cases of “anemia of unknown etiology” and whether this trend persists after accounting for confounders. Methods This study includes all anemic patients over 60 years old who had erythropoietin measured between 2005 and 2013 at a single center. Three independent reviewers used defined criteria to assign each patient’s anemia to one of ten etiologies: chronic kidney disease, iron deficiency, chronic disease, confirmed myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), suspected MDS, vitamin B12 deficiency, folate deficiency, anemia of unknown etiology, other etiology, or multifactorial etiology. Iron deficiency anemia served as the comparison group in all analyses. We used linear regression to model the relationship between erythropoietin and the presence of each etiology, sequentially adding terms to the model to account for the hemoglobin concentration, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Results A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Linear regression analysis showed that erythropoietin levels in chronic kidney disease, anemia of chronic disease and anemia of unknown etiology were lower by 48%, 46% and 27%, respectively, compared to iron deficiency anemia even after adjusting for hemoglobin, eGFR and comorbidities. Conclusions We have shown that erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in anemia of unknown etiology, even after adjusting for confounders. This suggests that decreased erythropoietin production may play a key role in the pathogenesis of anemia of unknown etiology. PMID:27310832

  5. Malaria and anemia.

    PubMed

    Ekvall, Håkan

    2003-03-01

    Anemia due to infection is a major health problem in endemic areas for young children and pregnant women. The anemia is caused by excess removal of nonparasitized erythrocytes in addition to immune destruction of parasitized red cells, and impaired compensation for this loss by bone marrow dysfunction. The pathogenesis is complex, and a predominant mechanism has not been identified. Certain parasite and host characteristics may modify the anemia. Concomitant infections and nutritional deficiencies also contribute to anemia and may interact with the malarial infection. Few preventive strategies exist, and the management of severe malarial anemia with blood transfusion carries a risk of HIV transmission. The current increase in malaria-specific childhood mortality in sub-Saharan Africa attributed to drug-resistant infection is likely partly related to an increase in severe anemia. This review summarizes recent findings on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of malarial anemia. PMID:12579035

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Wallerstein, Ralph O.

    1987-01-01

    The laboratory evaluation of anemia begins with a complete blood count and reticulocyte count. The anemia is then categorized as microcytic, macrocytic or normocytic, with or without reticulocytosis. Examination of the peripheral smear and a small number of specific tests confirm the diagnosis. The serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level and hemoglobin electrophoresis generally separate the microcytic anemias. The erythrocyte size-distribution width may be particularly helpful in distinguishing iron deficiency from thalassemia minor. Significant changes have occurred in the laboratory evaluation of macrocytic anemia, and a new syndrome of nitrous oxide-induced megaloblastosis and neurologic dysfunction has been recognized. A suggested approach to the hemolytic anemias includes using the micro-Coombs' test and ektacytometry. Finally, a number of causes have been identified for normocytic anemia without reticulocytosis, including normocytic megaloblastic anemia and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:3577135

  7. Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. PMID:24859981

  8. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  9. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  10. Differential response of the central noradrenergic nervous system to the loss of locus coeruleus neurons in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Pamela J; White, Sylvia S; Franklin, Allyn; Greenup, J Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Raskind, Murray A; Szot, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is a significant loss of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) in addition to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). The goal of this study was to determine if the surviving LC noradrenergic neurons in PD demonstrate compensatory changes in response to the neuronal loss, as observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) mRNA expression in postmortem LC tissue of control and age-matched PD subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of noradrenergic neurons in the LC of PD subjects. TH mRNA expression/neuron did not differ between control and PD subjects, but DBH mRNA expression/neuron was significantly elevated in PD subjects compared to control. This increase in DBH mRNA expression in PD subjects is not a response to neuronal loss because the amount of DBH mRNA expression/neuron in AD subjects was not significantly different from control. Norepinephrine transporter (NET) binding site concentration in the LC of PD subjects was significantly reduced over the cell body region as well as the peri-LC dendritic zone. In PD subjects, the loss of dendrites from surviving noradrenergic neurons was also apparent with TH-immunoreactivity (IR). This loss of LC dendritic innervation in PD subjects as measured by TH-IR was not due to LC neuronal loss because TH-IR in AD subjects was robust, despite a similar loss of LC neurons. These data suggest that there is a differential response of the noradrenergic nervous system in PD compared to AD in response to the loss of LC neurons. PMID:21147074

  11. Differential response of the central noradrenergic nervous system to the loss of locus coeruleus neurons in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Pamela J; White, Sylvia S; Franklin, Allyn; Greenup, J Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Raskind, Murray A; Szot, Patricia

    2011-02-10

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is a significant loss of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) in addition to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). The goal of this study was to determine if the surviving LC noradrenergic neurons in PD demonstrate compensatory changes in response to the neuronal loss, as observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) mRNA expression in postmortem LC tissue of control and age-matched PD subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of noradrenergic neurons in the LC of PD subjects. TH mRNA expression/neuron did not differ between control and PD subjects, but DBH mRNA expression/neuron was significantly elevated in PD subjects compared to control. This increase in DBH mRNA expression in PD subjects is not a response to neuronal loss because the amount of DBH mRNA expression/neuron in AD subjects was not significantly different from control. Norepinephrine transporter (NET) binding site concentration in the LC of PD subjects was significantly reduced over the cell body region as well as the peri-LC dendritic zone. In PD subjects, the loss of dendrites from surviving noradrenergic neurons was also apparent with TH-immunoreactivity (IR). This loss of LC dendritic innervation in PD subjects as measured by TH-IR was not due to LC neuronal loss because TH-IR in AD subjects was robust, despite a similar loss of LC neurons. These data suggest that there is a differential response of the noradrenergic nervous system in PD compared to AD in response to the loss of LC neurons. PMID:21147074

  12. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  13. Ferric Maltol Is Effective in Correcting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results from a Phase-3 Clinical Trial Program

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Tariq; Tulassay, Zsolt; Baumgart, Daniel C.; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Büning, Carsten; Howaldt, Stefanie; Stallmach, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is frequently seen in inflammatory bowel disease. Traditionally, oral iron supplementation is linked to extensive gastrointestinal side effects and possible disease exacerbation. This multicenter phase-3 study tested the efficacy and safety of ferric maltol, a complex of ferric (Fe3+) iron with maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4-pyrone), as a novel oral iron therapy for IDA. Methods: Adult patients with quiescent or mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, mild-to-moderate IDA (9.5–12.0 g/dL and 9.5–13.0 g/dL in females and males, respectively), and documented failure on previous oral ferrous products received oral ferric maltol capsules (30 mg twice a day) or identical placebo for 12 weeks according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design. The primary efficacy endpoint was change in hemoglobin (Hb) from baseline to week 12. Safety and tolerability were assessed. Results: Of 329 patients screened, 128 received randomized therapy (64 ferric maltol-treated and 64 placebo-treated patients) and comprised the intent-to-treat efficacy analysis: 55 ferric maltol patients (86%) and 53 placebo patients (83%) completed the trial. Significant improvements in Hb were observed with ferric maltol versus placebo at weeks 4, 8, and 12: mean (SE) 1.04 (0.11) g/dL, 1.76 (0.15) g/dL, and 2.25 (0.19) g/dL, respectively (P < 0.0001 at all time-points; analysis of covariance). Hb was normalized in two-thirds of patients by week 12. The safety profile of ferric maltol was comparable with placebo, with no impact on inflammatory bowel disease severity. Conclusions: Ferric maltol provided rapid clinically meaningful improvements in Hb and showed a favorable safety profile, suggesting its possible use as an alternative to intravenous iron in IDA inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25545376

  14. Localization of the gene for thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome, on the long arm of chromosome 1, by homozygosity mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, E J; Mandel, H; Raz, T; Szargel, R; Yandava, C N; Stagg, A; Fauré, S; Barrett, T; Buist, N; Cohen, N

    1997-01-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia, also known as "TRMA" or "Rogers syndrome," is an early-onset autosomal recessive disorder defined by the occurrence of megaloblastic anemia, diabetes mellitus, and sensorineural deafness, responding in varying degrees to thiamine treatment. On the basis of a linkage analysis of affected families of Alaskan and of Italian origin, we found, using homozygosity mapping, that the TRMA-syndrome gene maps to a region on chromosome 1q23.2-23.3 (maximum LOD score of 3.7 for D1S1679). By use of additional consanguineous kindreds of Israeli-Arab origin, the putative disease-gene interval also has been confirmed and narrowed, suggesting genetic homogeneity. Linkage analysis generated the highest combined LOD-score value, 8.1 at a recombination fraction of 0, with marker D1S2799. Haplotype analysis and recombination events narrowed the TRMA locus to a 16-cM region between markers D1S194 and D1S2786. Several heterozygote parents had diabetes mellitus, deafness, or megaloblastic anemia, which raised the possibility that mutations at this locus predispose carriers in general to these manifestations. Characterization of the metabolic defect of TRMA may shed light on the role of thiamine deficiency in such common diseases. PMID:9399900

  15. Persistence of chicken anemia virus antigen and inclusions in spontaneous cases of Marek’s disease visceral lymphomas in broiler chickens at slaughterhouses

    PubMed Central

    AHMED, Mohamed Sabry; ONO, Hiroki; SASAKI, Jun; OCHIAI, Kenji; GORYO, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    The chicken anemia virus (CAV) and Marek’s disease virus (MDV) infect chickens worldwide; a single or dual infection by these viruses has a great impact on poultry production. In the present study, we examined the existence of CAV antigen and its inclusions in Marek’s disease (MD) lymphomas in chickens in the slaughterhouses of Iwate prefecture, Japan. Forty-nine spleens and 13 livers with different degrees of nodular lesions were histopathologically examined at our laboratory. Grossly, the tested organs showed various sizes and anatomical architectures. Based on the cellular morphology and the infiltrative nature of the neoplastic lymphocytes, MD was confirmed in 76% (37/49) of the spleens and 92% (12/13) of the livers. The lesions of MD, according to the pattern of lymphocytic accumulation in the affected organs, were divided into multifocal, coalesced and diffuse. CAV intranuclear inclusion bodies were detected within the small and the large bizarre lymphocytes of the MD lymphomas in 2 livers and 9 spleens, and the immunostaining test for CAV confirmed the persistence of CAV antigens and inclusions in the neoplastic cells. This study demonstrated the persistence of CAV infection within the neoplastic cells of naturally occurring MD lymphomas in chickens. PMID:26888585

  16. Persistence of chicken anemia virus antigen and inclusions in spontaneous cases of Marek's disease visceral lymphomas in broiler chickens at slaughterhouses.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed Sabry; Ono, Hiroki; Sasaki, Jun; Ochiai, Kenji; Goryo, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    The chicken anemia virus (CAV) and Marek's disease virus (MDV) infect chickens worldwide; a single or dual infection by these viruses has a great impact on poultry production. In the present study, we examined the existence of CAV antigen and its inclusions in Marek's disease (MD) lymphomas in chickens in the slaughterhouses of Iwate prefecture, Japan. Forty-nine spleens and 13 livers with different degrees of nodular lesions were histopathologically examined at our laboratory. Grossly, the tested organs showed various sizes and anatomical architectures. Based on the cellular morphology and the infiltrative nature of the neoplastic lymphocytes, MD was confirmed in 76% (37/49) of the spleens and 92% (12/13) of the livers. The lesions of MD, according to the pattern of lymphocytic accumulation in the affected organs, were divided into multifocal, coalesced and diffuse. CAV intranuclear inclusion bodies were detected within the small and the large bizarre lymphocytes of the MD lymphomas in 2 livers and 9 spleens, and the immunostaining test for CAV confirmed the persistence of CAV antigens and inclusions in the neoplastic cells. This study demonstrated the persistence of CAV infection within the neoplastic cells of naturally occurring MD lymphomas in chickens. PMID:26888585

  17. Worldwide patterns of haplotype diversity at 9p21.3, a locus associated with type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Silander, Kaisa; Tang, Hua; Myles, Sean; Jakkula, Eveliina; Timpson, Nicholas J; Cavalli-Sforza, Luigi; Peltonen, Leena

    2009-01-01

    A 100 kb region on 9p21.3 harbors two major disease susceptibility loci: one for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and one for coronary heart disease (CHD). The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with these two diseases in Europeans reside on two adjacent haplotype blocks with independent effects on disease. To help delimit the regions that likely harbor the disease-causing variants in populations of non-European origin, we studied the haplotype diversity and allelic history of the 9p21.3 region using 938 unrelated individuals from 51 populations (Human Genome Diversity Panel). We used SNP data from Illumina's 650Y SNP arrays supplemented with five additional SNPs within the region of interest. Haplotype frequencies were analyzed with the EM algorithm implemented in PLINK. For the T2D locus, the TT risk haplotype of SNPs rs10811661 and rs10757283 was present at similar frequencies in all global populations, while a shared 6-SNP haplotype that carries the protective C allele of rs10811661 was found at a frequency of 2.9% in Africans and 41.3% in East Asians and was associated with low haplotype diversity. For the CHD locus, all populations shared a core risk haplotype spanning >17.5 kb, which shows dramatic increase in frequency between African (11.5%) and Middle Eastern (63.7%) populations. Interestingly, two SNPs (rs2891168 and rs10757278) tagging this CHD risk haplotype are most strongly associated with CHD disease status according to independent clinical fine-mapping studies. The large variation in linkage disequilibrium patterns identified between the populations demonstrates the importance of allelic background data when selecting SNPs for replication in global populations. Intriguingly, the protective allele for T2D and the risk allele for CHD show an increase in frequency in non-Africans compared to Africans, implying different population histories for these two adjacent disease loci. PMID:19463184

  18. Colonic lymphangiomatosis associated with anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Woo Chul; Kim, Hye-Kang; Yoo, Jin Young; Lee, Jeong Rok; Lee, Kang-Moon; Paik, Chang Nyol; Jang, U-Im; Yang, Jin Mo

    2008-01-01

    Lymphangioma is an uncommon malformation of lymphatic system. Multiple colonic lymphangioma named as lymphangiomatosis is considered an extremely rare disease. Although lymphangioma is a benign tumor and most colonic lymphangiomas do not cause symptoms and do not require treatment, resection of lymphangioma is necessary in the presence of symptoms such as abdominal pain, bleeding, intussusceptions. We report a case of colonic lymphangiomatosis in a man who presented with abdominal discomfort and anemia, which was diagnosed and treated with endoscopic snare polypectomy. PMID:18837097

  19. George Minot and Pernicious Anemia.

    PubMed

    Dhungat, J V Pai

    2015-08-01

    George Minot (1885-1950) was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He was great grandson of James Jackson, co-founder of Massachusetts General Hospital in 1821. Graduating from Harvard College he enrolled at Harvard Medical School and obtained his MD in 1912. As a house pupil (intern) at the hospital he became interested in diseases of the blood and began taking meticulous histories of dietary habits of patients with anemia. PMID:27604448

  20. Refining the localization of the PKD2 locus on chromosome 4q by linkage analysis in Spanish families with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease type 2

    SciTech Connect

    San Millan, J.L.; Viribay, M.; Peral, B.; Moreno, F.; Martinez, I.; Weissenbach, J.

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. At least two distinct forms of ADPKD are now well defined. In {approximately}86% of affected European families, a gene defect localized to 16p13.3 was responsible for ADPKD, while a second locus has been recently localized to 4q13-q23 as candidate for the disease in the remaining families. We present confirmation of linkage to microsatellite markers on chromosome 4q in eight Spanish families with ADPKD, in which the disease was not linked to 16p13.3. By linkage analysis with marker D4S423, a maximum lod score of 9.03 at a recombination fraction of .00 was obtained. Multipoint linkage analysis, as well as a study of recombinant haplotypes, placed the PKD2 locus between D4S1542 and D4S1563, thereby defining a genetic interval of {approximately}1 cM. The refined map will serve as a genetic framework for additional genetic and physical mapping of the region and will improve the accuracy of presymptomatic diagnosis of PKD2. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Identification of Genetic Loci Affecting the Severity of Symptoms of Hirschsprung Disease in Rats Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Daisuke; Lei, Chuzhao; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is a congenital disease in neonates characterized by the absence of the enteric ganglia in a variable length of the distal colon. This disease results from multiple genetic interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate developing gut. We previously reported that three rat strains with different backgrounds (susceptible AGH-Ednrbsl/sl, resistant F344-Ednrbsl/sl, and LEH-Ednrbsl/sl) but the same null mutation of Ednrb show varying severity degrees of aganglionosis. This finding suggests that strain-specific genetic factors affect the severity of HSCR. Consistent with this finding, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the severity of HSCR on chromosome (Chr) 2 was identified using an F2 intercross between AGH and F344 strains. In the present study, we performed QTL analysis using an F2 intercross between the susceptible AGH and resistant LEH strains to identify the modifier/resistant loci for HSCR in Ednrb-deficient rats. A significant locus affecting the severity of HSCR was also detected within the Chr 2 region. These findings strongly suggest that a modifier gene of aganglionosis exists on Chr 2. In addition, two potentially causative SNPs (or mutations) were detected upstream of a known HSCR susceptibility gene, Gdnf. These SNPs were possibly responsible for the varied length of gut affected by aganglionosis. PMID:25790447

  2. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy. PMID:21644200

  3. Pathophysiology of anemia and erythrocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Vivien M; Rainey, Susan; Lappin, Terence R; Maxwell, A Peter

    2007-11-01

    An increasing understanding of the process of erythropoiesis raises some interesting questions about the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of anemia and erythrocytosis. The mechanisms underlying the development of many of the erythrocytoses, previously characterised as idiopathic, have been elucidated leading to an increased understanding of oxygen homeostasis. Characterisation of anemia and erythrocytosis in relation to serum erythropoietin levels can be a useful addition to clinical diagnostic criteria and provide a rationale for treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). Recombinant human erythropoietin as well as other ESAs are now widely used to treat anemias associated with a range of conditions, including chronic kidney disease, chronic inflammatory disorders and cancer. There is also heightened awareness of the potential abuse of ESAs to boost athletic performance in competitive sport. The discovery of erythropoietin receptors outside of the erythropoietic compartment may herald future applications for ESAs in the management of neurological and cardiac diseases. The current controversy concerning optimal hemoglobin levels in chronic kidney disease patients treated with ESAs and the potential negative clinical outcomes of ESA treatment in cancer reinforces the need for cautious evaluation of the pleiotropic effects of ESAs in non-erythroid tissues. PMID:17656101

  4. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  5. Iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of diagnostic testing and therapeutic recommendations for dogs and cats with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:22942439

  6. Evaluation of Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kujovich, Jody L

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common problem in primary care. Classification based on mean cell volume narrows the differential diagnosis and directs testing. A marked macrocytosis is characteristic of vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, certain medications, and primary bone marrow disorders. The three most common causes of microcytic anemia are iron deficiency, thalassemia trait, and anemia of inflammation. Additional laboratory testing is required for diagnosis. Determination of the rate of development of anemia and examination of a blood smear may provide diagnostic clues to guide more specialized testing. Diagnosis of iron, vitamin B12, or folate deficiency mandates determination of the underlying cause. PMID:27212091

  7. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated? Doctors treat pernicious anemia by replacing the missing vitamin B12 in the body. People who have pernicious anemia may need lifelong treatment. The goals of treating ...

  8. [Anemia and transfusion therapy: an update].

    PubMed

    Madrazo-González, Z; García-Barrasa, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, L; Rafecas-Renau, A; Alonso-Fernández, G

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most prevalent diseases in the general population and is a very frequently found condition in medical and surgical patients in all medical specialties. A good evaluation of its clinical impact and its therapeutic possibilities is essential. Allogenic blood transfusion is a useful procedure in anemia management, although it has important adverse effects. It is the responsibility of the clinician to know and to take into account all the available alternatives for the treatment of anemia. Blood transfusions, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, iron therapy (oral and endovenous) and other therapeutic alternatives must be rationally used, in accordance with the currently available clinical evidence. This review article summarizes some epidemiological characteristics of anemia, its clinical evaluation and the main therapeutic possibilities based on the present knowledge, placing special emphasis on the critically ill patient. PMID:20483506

  9. Alleviating anemia and thrombocytopenia in myelofibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco; Correa, Juan-Gonzalo; Hernandez-Boluda, Juan Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Anemia and thrombocytopenia are frequent clinical manifestations of myelofibrosis as well as important prognostic factors of the disease. Concerning the treatment of anemia, the first step should be the correction of reversible contributing factors, such as possible iron, folate and vitamin B12 deficiency. Then, treatment options include erythropoiesis stimulating agents, androgens, immunomodulating drugs, corticosteroids, and splenectomy. Anemia responses may also be observed in some patients treated with JAK inhibitors. However, most patients eventually fail to such therapies and become transfusion dependent. Some of the aforementioned therapies can also improve thrombocytopenia, but the responses are usually observed in patients with moderate platelet count decrease. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the only curative treatment of myelofibrosis, can be an alternative for selected patients with cytopenias who are refractory to conventional therapies. However, for the majority of patients, the management of anemia and severe thrombocytopenia remains an unmet need. PMID:26891375

  10. Renal anemia: from incurable to curable.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuki; Yanagita, Motoko

    2013-11-01

    Renal anemia has been recognized as a characteristic complication of chronic kidney disease. Although many factors are involved in renal anemia, the predominant cause of renal anemia is a relative deficiency in erythropoietin (EPO) production. To date, exogenous recombinant human (rh)EPO has been widely used as a powerful drug for the treatment of patients with renal anemia. Despite its clinical effectiveness, a potential risk for increased mortality has been suggested in patients who receive rhEPO, in addition to the economic burden of rhEPO administration. The induction of endogenous EPO is another therapeutic approach that might have advantages over rhEPO administration. However, the physiological and pathophysiological regulation of EPO are not fully understood, and this lack of understanding has hindered the development of an endogenous EPO inducer. In this review, we will discuss the current treatment for renal anemia and its drawbacks, provide an overview of EPO regulation in healthy and diseased conditions, and propose future directions for therapeutic trials that more directly target the underlying pathophysiology of renal anemia. PMID:23884144

  11. Specificity of antinuclear antibodies in scleroderma-like chronic graft-versus-host disease: clinical correlation and histocompatibility locus antigen association.

    PubMed

    Bell, S A; Faust, H; Mittermüller, J; Kolb, H J; Meurer, M

    1996-05-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantation presents, in a few cases, as mild to severe scleroderma-like changes. Patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease with and without sclerodermatous skin changes were analysed for antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) and antinucleolar autoantibodies (ANoA) and the results correlated with disease symptoms and histocompatibility locus antigen (HLA) pattern. Nineteen patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease and scleroderma-like skin changes, 18 with chronic graft-versus-host disease without scleroderma, and 17 controls on immunosuppressive treatment were screened for ANA and ANoA using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunodiffusion and immunoblot techniques. Four patients with severe scleroderma had antibodies to topoisomerase I, two had antibodies against PM-Scl, both characteristic serological findings in idiopathic systemic scleroderma. One patient had La/SSB antibodies and, in three cases, antibodies to the nucleolar antigen C23 (nucleolin) could be identified. A possible correlation between antinucleolin antibodies and disease activity was observed. HLA-A1, -B1, and -B2 were found significantly more often in patients with scleroderma-like symptoms in comparison to patients without scleroderma-like symptoms. Chronic graft-versus-host disease with scleroderma-like manifestations can be associated with the occurrence of ANA specific for idiopathic scleroderma. The development of scleroderma after bone marrow transplantation might have a HLA-linked genetic background. PMID:8736324

  12. Bed bugs reproductive life cycle in the clothes of a patient suffering from Alzheimer’s disease results in iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sabou, Marcela; Gallo Imperiale, Delphine; Andrès, Emmanuel; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Foeglé, Jacinthe; Lavigne, Thierry; Kaltenbach, Georges; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of an 82-year-old patient, hospitalized for malaise. Her clothes were infested by numerous insects and the entomological analysis identified them as being Cimex lectularius (bed bugs). The history of the patient highlighted severe cognitive impairment. The biological assessment initially showed a profound microcytic, aregenerative, iron deficiency anemia. A vitamin B12 deficiency due to pernicious anemia (positive intrinsic factor antibodies) was also highlighted, but this was not enough to explain the anemia without macrocytosis. Laboratory tests, endoscopy and a CT scan eliminated a tumor etiology responsible for occult bleeding. The patient had a mild itchy rash which was linked to the massive colonization by the bed bugs. The C. lectularius bite is most often considered benign because it is not a vector of infectious agents. Far from trivial, a massive human colonization by bed bugs may cause such a hematic depletion that severe microcytic anemia may result. PMID:23673315

  13. Association Study of rs1333040 and rs1004638 Polymorphisms in the 9p21 Locus with Coronary Artery Disease in Southwest of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Golabgir Khademi, Khadijeh; Foroughmand, Ali Mohammad; Galehdari, Hamid; Yazdankhah, Saied; Pourmahdi Borujeni, Mahdi; Shahbazi, Zahra; Dinarvand, Parvaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a multifactorial and heterogenic disease. Recently, genome-wide association studies have reported that rs1333040 (C/T) and rs1004638 (A/T) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 9p21 locus have very strong association with CAD. This study aimed to examine these associations in Southwest of Iran. Methods: Blood samples were collected from 200 CAD patients and 110 healthy individuals with no CAD. The association of two SNPs with CAD was evaluated by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: Chi-square test showed no association between rs1333040 SNP and CAD (X2: 4.66, df: 2, P=0.09). Also, there was no association between rs1004638 SNP and CAD (X2: 0.27, df: 2, P=0.88). Conclusion: No association was observed between rs1333040 and rs1004638 SNPs in the 9P21 region and CAD in Southwest of Iran. PMID:26597055

  14. Fine genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) by haplotype analysis and demonstration of allelic association with chromosome 16p microsatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, H.M.; McKay, T.R.; Thompson, A.D.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Richards, R.I.; Callen, D.F.; Stallings, R.L.; Doggett, N.A.; Attwood, J.

    1993-05-01

    Batten disease, juvenile onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in neurons and other cell types. The disease locus (CLN3) has previously been assigned to chromosome 16p. The genetic localization of CLN3 has been refined by analyzing 70 families using a high-resolution map of 15 marker loci encompassing the CLN3 region on 16p. Crossovers in three maternal meioses allowed localization of CLN3 to the interval between D16S297 and D16S57. Within that interval alleles at three highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci (D16S288, D16S298, D16S299) were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3. Analysis of haplotypes suggests that a majority of CLN3 chromosomes have arisen from a single founder mutation. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cells offer new approach to therapy in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia and option in prenatal diagnosis in genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lin; Chang, Judy C.; Lin, Chin; Sun, Xiaofang; Yu, Jingwei; Kan, Yuet Wai

    2009-01-01

    The innovation of reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells provides a possible new approach to treat β-thalassemia and other genetic diseases such as sickle cell anemia. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be made from these patients' somatic cells and the mutation in the β-globin gene corrected by gene targeting, and the cells differentiated into hematopoietic cells to be returned to the patient. In this study, we reprogrammed the skin fibroblasts of a patient with homozygous β0 thalassemia into iPS cells, and showed that the iPS cells could be differentiated into hematopoietic cells that synthesized hemoglobin. Prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion have been effective in decreasing the number of β-thalassemia births in some countries that have instituted carrier screening and genetic counseling. To make use of the cells from the amniotic fluid or chorionic villus sampling that are used for prenatal diagnosis, we also showed that these cells could be reprogrammed into iPS cells. This raises the possibility of providing a new option following prenatal diagnosis of a fetus affected by a severe illness. Currently, the parents would choose either to terminate the pregnancy or continue it and take care of the sick child after birth. The cells for prenatal diagnosis can be converted into iPS cells for treatment in the perinatal periods. Early treatment has the advantage of requiring much fewer cells than adult treatment, and can also prevent organ damage in those diseases in which damage can begin in utero or at an early age. PMID:19482945

  17. Heterozygous Loss-of-Function SEC61A1 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Tubulo-Interstitial and Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease with Anemia.

    PubMed

    Bolar, Nikhita Ajit; Golzio, Christelle; Živná, Martina; Hayot, Gaëlle; Van Hemelrijk, Christine; Schepers, Dorien; Vandeweyer, Geert; Hoischen, Alexander; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Raes, Ann; Matthys, Erve; Sys, Emiel; Azou, Myriam; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Praet, Marleen; Van Camp, Guy; McFadden, Kelsey; Pediaditakis, Igor; Přistoupilová, Anna; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Vyleťal, Petr; Hartmannová, Hana; Stránecký, Viktor; Hůlková, Helena; Barešová, Veronika; Jedličková, Ivana; Sovová, Jana; Hnízda, Aleš; Kidd, Kendrah; Bleyer, Anthony J; Spong, Richard S; Vande Walle, Johan; Mortier, Geert; Brunner, Han; Van Laer, Lut; Kmoch, Stanislav; Katsanis, Nicholas; Loeys, Bart L

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal-dominant tubulo-interstitial kidney disease (ADTKD) encompasses a group of disorders characterized by renal tubular and interstitial abnormalities, leading to slow progressive loss of kidney function requiring dialysis and kidney transplantation. Mutations in UMOD, MUC1, and REN are responsible for many, but not all, cases of ADTKD. We report on two families with ADTKD and congenital anemia accompanied by either intrauterine growth retardation or neutropenia. Ultrasound and kidney biopsy revealed small dysplastic kidneys with cysts and tubular atrophy with secondary glomerular sclerosis, respectively. Exclusion of known ADTKD genes coupled with linkage analysis, whole-exome sequencing, and targeted re-sequencing identified heterozygous missense variants in SEC61A1-c.553A>G (p.Thr185Ala) and c.200T>G (p.Val67Gly)-both affecting functionally important and conserved residues in SEC61. Both transiently expressed SEC6A1A variants are delocalized to the Golgi, a finding confirmed in a renal biopsy from an affected individual. Suppression or CRISPR-mediated deletions of sec61al2 in zebrafish embryos induced convolution defects of the pronephric tubules but not the pronephric ducts, consistent with the tubular atrophy observed in the affected individuals. Human mRNA encoding either of the two pathogenic alleles failed to rescue this phenotype as opposed to a complete rescue by human wild-type mRNA. Taken together, these findings provide a mechanism by which mutations in SEC61A1 lead to an autosomal-dominant syndromic form of progressive chronic kidney disease. We highlight protein translocation defects across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, the principal role of the SEC61 complex, as a contributory pathogenic mechanism for ADTKD. PMID:27392076

  18. Association Study between Coronary Artery Disease and rs1333049 and rs10757274 Polymorphisms at 9p21 Locus in South-West Iran

    PubMed Central

    Foroughmand, Ali Mohammad; Nikkhah, Emad; Galehdari, Hamid; Jadbabaee, Mohammad Hossin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a multi-factorial and heterogenic disease with atherosclerosis plaques formation in internal wall of coronary artery. Plaque formation results to limitation of the blood reaching to myocardium leading to appearance of some problems, such as ischemia, sudden thrombosis veins and myocardial infarction (MI). Several environmental and genetic factors are involved in prevalence and incident of CAD as follows: hypertension, high low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), age, diabetes mellitus, family history of early-onset heart disease and smoking. According to genome wide association studies (GWAS), five polymorphisms in the 9p21 locus seem to be associated with the CAD. We aimed to evaluate the remarkable association of two polymorphisms at 9p21 locus, rs1333049 and rs10757274, with CAD. Materials and Methods This experimental study was conducted in Golestan, Aria Hospitals and Genetics Lab of Shahid Chamran University in the city of Ahvaz, Iran, in 2010- 2011. The collected blood samples belonging to 170 CAD patients (case group) and 100 healthy individuals (control group) were analyzed by tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The results were analyzed using software package used for statistical analysis (SPSS; SPSS Inc., USA) version 16. A value of p<0.05 and an odd ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were considered significant. Results The frequencies of CC, CG and GG genotypes for rs1333049 polymorphism in patients were 18.2, 65.3 and 16.5%, while in controls, the related values were 25, 67 and 8%, respectively. GG genotypes of rs1333049 polymorphism in CAD patients were more than control cases (OR: 0.354, 95%CI: 0.138-0.912, p=0.032). The frequencies of AA, AG and GG genotypes for rs10757274 in CAD patients were 8.2, 58.3 and 33.5%, while in controls, the related values were 35, 63 and 2%, respectively. GG Genotype in rs10757274 polymorphism

  19. Hereditary orotic aciduria with epilepsy and without megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Karina; Lauffer, Heinz; Lauenstein, Peter; Hoffmann, Georg F; Seidlitz, Günter

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary orotic aciduria is a rare metabolic disease that results from a defect of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase (UMPS). In affected patients, main clinical symptoms are a markedly increased urinary excretion of orotic acid combined with megaloblastic anemia. This report describes a new case of UMPS deficiency without megaloblastic anemia but with epilepsy. PMID:25757096

  20. The effect of 9p21.3 coronary artery disease locus neighboring genes on atherosclerosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyong Brian; Deluna, Andres; Mungrue, Imran N.; Vu, Christine; Pouldar, Delila; Civelek, Mete; Orozco, Luz; Wu, Judy; Wang, Xuping; Charugundla, Sarada; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Rusek, Marta; Jakobowski, Hieronim; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The human 9p21.3 chromosome locus has been shown to be an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis in multiple large scale genome-wide association studies, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We set out to investigate the potential role of the 9p21.3 locus neighboring genes, including Mtap, the two isoforms of Cdkn2a, p16Ink4a and p19Arf, and Cdkn2b in atherosclerosis using knockout mice models. Methods and Results Gene targeted mice for neighboring genes, including Mtap, Cdkn2a, p19Arf, and Cdkn2b, were each bred to mice carrying the human APO*E3 Leiden transgene which sensitizes the mice for atherosclerotic lesions through elevated plasma cholesterol. We found that the mice heterozygous for Mtap developed larger lesion compared to wild-type mice (49623±21650 vs. 18899±9604 μm2/section (Mean±SD); p=0.01), with similar morphology as wild type mice. The Mtap heterozygous mice demonstrated changes in metabolic and methylation profiles and CD4+ cell counts. The Cdkn2a knockout mice had smaller lesions compared to wild-type and heterozygous mice and there were no significant differences in lesion size in p19Arf and Cdkn2b mutants as compared to wild type. We observed extensive, tissue-specific compensatory regulation of the Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b genes among the various knockout mice, making the effects on atherosclerosis difficult to interpret. Conclusions Mtap plays a protective role against atherosclerosis, whereas Cdkn2a appears to be modestly proatherogenic. However, no relation was found between the 9p21 genotype and the transcription of 9p21 neighboring genes in primary human aortic vascular cells in vitro. There is extensive compensatory regulation in the highly conserved 9p21 orthologous region in mice. PMID:22952318

  1. Anemia of Central Origin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kazusa; Young, Neal S

    2015-10-01

    Hypoproliferative anemia results from the inability of bone marrow to produce adequate numbers of red blood cells. The list of conditions that cause hypoproliferative anemia is long, starting from common etiologies as iron deficiency to rarer diagnoses of constitutional bone marrow failure syndromes. There is no perfect diagnostic algorithm, and clinical data may not always clearly distinguish "normal" from "abnormal", yet it is important for practicing clinicians to recognize each condition so that treatment can be initiated promptly. This review describes diagnostic approaches to hypoproliferative anemia, with particular emphasis on bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:26404444

  2. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history. PMID:26404440

  3. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. PMID:24412987

  4. Evaluation of the relationship between Chlamydia pecorum sequence types and disease using a species-specific multi-locus sequence typing scheme (MLST).

    PubMed

    Jelocnik, Martina; Walker, Evelyn; Pannekoek, Yvonne; Ellem, Judy; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydia pecorum is globally associated with several ovine diseases including keratoconjunctivitis and polyarthritis. The exact relationship between the variety of C. pecorum strains reported and the diseases described in sheep remains unclear, challenging efforts to accurately diagnose and manage infected flocks. In the present study, we applied C. pecorum multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to C. pecorum positive samples collected from sympatric flocks of Australian sheep presenting with conjunctivitis, conjunctivitis with polyarthritis, or polyarthritis only and with no clinical disease (NCD) in order to elucidate the exact relationships between the infecting strains and the range of diseases. Using Bayesian phylogenetic and cluster analyses on 62 C. pecorum positive ocular, vaginal and rectal swab samples from sheep presenting with a range of diseases and in a comparison to C. pecorum sequence types (STs) from other hosts, one ST (ST 23) was recognised as a globally distributed strain associated with ovine and bovine diseases such as polyarthritis and encephalomyelitis. A second ST (ST 69) presently only described in Australian animals, was detected in association with ovine as well as koala chlamydial infections. The majority of vaginal and rectal C. pecorum STs from animals with NCD and/or anatomical sites with no clinical signs of disease in diseased animals, clustered together in a separate group, by both analyses. Furthermore, 8/13 detected STs were novel. This study provides a platform for strain selection for further research into the pathogenic potential of C. pecorum in animals and highlights targets for potential strain-specific diagnostic test development. PMID:25223647

  5. Novel and dynamic evolution of equine infectious anemia virus genomic quasispecies associated with sequential disease cycles in an experimentally infected pony.

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, C; Issel, C J; Montelaro, R C

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the genetic evolution of three functionally distinct regions of the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) genome (env, rev, and long terminal repeat) during recurring febrile episodes in a pony experimentally infected with a well-characterized reference biological clone designated EIAV(PV). Viral populations present in the plasma of an EIAV(PV)-infected pony during sequential febrile episodes (18, 34, 80, 106, and 337 days postinfection) were amplified from viral RNA, analyzed, and compared to the inoculated strain. The comparison of the viral quasispecies showed that the inoculated EIAV(PV) quasispecies were all represented during the first febrile episode, but entirely replaced at the time of the second febrile episode, and that new predominant quasispecies were associated with each subsequent cycle of disease. One of the more surprising results was the in vivo generation of large deletion (up to 15 amino acids) in the principal neutralizing domain (PND) of gp90 during the third febrile episode. This deletion did not alter the competence for in vitro replication as shown by the analysis of a env chimeric clone with a partially deleted PND and did not altered the fitness of the virus in vivo, since this partially deleted envelope became the major population during the fourth febrile episode. Finally, we showed that the amino acid mutations were not randomly distributed but delineated eight variables regions, V1 to V8, with V3 containing the PND region. These studies provide the first detailed description of the evolution of EIAV genomic quasispecies during persistent infection and reveal new insights into the genetics and potential mechanisms of lentivirus genomic variation. PMID:9371627

  6. The location of a disease-associated polymorphism and genomic structure of the human 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus (SSA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsugu, H.; Horowitz, R.; Gibson, N.

    1994-12-01

    Sera from approximately 30% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contain high titers of autoantibodies that bind to the 52-kDa Ro/SSA protein. We previously detected polymorphisms in the 52-kDa Ro/SSA gene (SSA1) with restriction enzymes, one of which is strongly associated with the presence of SLE (P < 0.0005) in African Americans. A higher disease frequency and more severe forms of the disease are commonly noted among these female patients. To determine the location and nature of this polymorphism, we obtained two clones that span 8.5 kb of the 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus including its upstream regulatory region. Six exons were identified, and their nucleotide sequences plus adjacent noncoding regions were determined. No differences were found between these exons and the coding region of one of the reported cDNAs. The disease-associated polymorphic site suggested by a restriction enzyme map and confirmed by DNA amplification and nucleotide sequencing was present upstream of exon 1. This polymorphism may be a genetic marker for a disease-related variation in the coding region for the protein or in the upstream regulatory region of this gene. Although this RFLP is present in Japanese, it is not associated with lupus in this race. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. [Acquired aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hirohito

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA) is an autoimmune disease caused by T cells. An increase in the percentage of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein-deficient cells and the presence of HLA allele-lacking leukocytes due to 6pUPD provide indirect evidence that T cells contribute to the pathophysiology of AA. Recent studies have revealed the presence of somatic mutations in MDS and/or AML candidate genes in one third of AA patients. Current treatment topics include the efficacy of eltrombopag for AA found to be refractory to immunosuppressive therapy as well as for newly diagnosed AA when administered in combination with ATG and cyclosporine. Furthermore, improved outcomes of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors using reduced-intensity conditioning regimens have been obtained with eltrombopag. Fludarabine-based regimens are now the mainstream approach for preconditioning and have lowered the transplant-related mortality rate. However, new problems such as mixed chimerism and secondary graft failure have arisen. Attempts to prevent GVHD more efficiently by including ATG and alemtuzumab in the preconditioning regimen are being investigated. PMID:26935624

  8. Selection of peptides for serological detection of equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Santos, E M; Cardoso, R; Souza, G R L; Goulart, L R; Heinemann, M B; Leite, R C; Reis, J K P

    2012-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia caused by equine infectious anemia virus is an important disease due to its high severity and incidence in animals. We used a phage display library to isolate peptides that can be considered potential markers for equine infectious anemia diagnosis. We selected peptides using IgG purified from a pool comprised of 20 sera from animals naturally infected with equine infectious anemia virus. The diagnostic potential of these peptides was investigated by ELISA, Western blot and dot blot with purified IgG and serum samples. Based on the results, we chose a peptide mimetic for glycoprotein gp45 epitopes of equine infectious anemia virus, with potential for use as an antigen in indirect diagnostic assays. Synthesis of this peptide has possible applications for the development of new diagnostic tools for this disease. PMID:22653674

  9. Hookworm Anemia in a Peritoneal Dialysis Patient in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuquan; Xu, Ying; Xia, Min; Ying, Guanghui; Shou, Zhangfei

    2016-06-01

    Hookworm infections as well as other intestinal nematodiases are endemic in China. In this case, a 70-year-old male showed symptoms of chest tightness, shortness of breath, and both lower extremities edema. The diagnostic result was chronic renal insufficiency, chronic kidney disease (5th stage), and renal anemia at first. Then, he received treatment with traditional drugs. However, this treatment did not help to alleviate the symptoms of the patient significantly. The results of gastroendoscopy showed hookworms in the duodenum, also confirmed by pathology examination. Anemia was markedly ameliorated after eliminating the parasites. The results mentioned above suggested that ancylostomiasis was the leading causes of anemia in this patient, and the etiology of anemia in uremic patients should be systematically considered. Especially when anemia could not be cured by regular treatments, rare diseases should be investigated. PMID:27417086

  10. Hookworm Anemia in a Peritoneal Dialysis Patient in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fuquan; Xu, Ying; Xia, Min; Ying, Guanghui; Shou, Zhangfei

    2016-01-01

    Hookworm infections as well as other intestinal nematodiases are endemic in China. In this case, a 70-year-old male showed symptoms of chest tightness, shortness of breath, and both lower extremities edema. The diagnostic result was chronic renal insufficiency, chronic kidney disease (5th stage), and renal anemia at first. Then, he received treatment with traditional drugs. However, this treatment did not help to alleviate the symptoms of the patient significantly. The results of gastroendoscopy showed hookworms in the duodenum, also confirmed by pathology examination. Anemia was markedly ameliorated after eliminating the parasites. The results mentioned above suggested that ancylostomiasis was the leading causes of anemia in this patient, and the etiology of anemia in uremic patients should be systematically considered. Especially when anemia could not be cured by regular treatments, rare diseases should be investigated. PMID:27417086

  11. Your Guide to Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphoma, and multiple myeloma) l Toxins (e.g., pesticides) l Diamond-Blackfan anemia l Amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia l ... are stopped. n Environmental toxins. Substances such as pesticides, arsenic, and benzene can damage your bone marrow, ...

  12. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. About 1 out of every 500 African-American children is born with this form of anemia. Thalassemia , which usually affects people of Mediterranean, African, and Southeast Asian descent, is ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste ... Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow- ...

  14. A Randomized Study of Extended Dosing Regimens for Initiation of Epoetin Alfa Treatment for Anemia of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spinowitz, Bruce; Germain, Michael; Benz, Robert; Wolfson, Marsha; McGowan, Tracy; Tang, K. Linda; Kamin, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Although epoetin alfa is commonly initiated weekly (QW) in anemic chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, recent evidence indicates that it can be initiated every 2 wk (Q2W) and used in maintenance therapy every 4 wk (Q4W). This study examined the feasibility of initiating epoetin alfa Q4W in anemic CKD patients not receiving dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: This open-label study randomized subjects (1:2:2:2) to treatment with epoetin alfa 10,000 IU QW, 20,000 IU Q2W, 20,000 IU Q4W, or 40,000 IU Q4W for 16 wk. Subjects were ≥18 yr, had hemoglobin <11 g/dl, a glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 90 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and had not received erythropoietic therapy within 8 wk. The primary analysis was a noninferiority comparison of the 40,000 IU Q4W to the 20,000 IU Q2W group in the per-protocol population with respect to hemoglobin change from baseline to the end of study. Results: Of 262 subjects randomized, 229 comprised the per-protocol population. Mean hemoglobin change from baseline for the 40,000 IU Q4W group (1.24 g/dl) was not inferior to the 20,000 IU Q2W group (1.11 g/dl) with the lower limit of 95% CI, −0.21 g/dl. In the QW, 20,000 IU Q2W, 20,000 IU Q4W, and 40,000 IU Q4W groups, 90%, 87%, 75%, and 86% of subjects, respectively, achieved a hemoglobin increase ≥1 g/dl. Serious adverse events were similar across all groups. Conclusions: Epoetin alfa can be initiated Q4W in anemic CKD subjects. PMID:18400964

  15. Investigation of the Genetics of Hematologic Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes; Erythrocyte Disorder; Leukocyte Disorder; Hemostasis; Blood Coagulation Disorder; Sickle Cell Disease; Dyskeratosis Congenita; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Congenital Thrombocytopenia; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Fanconi Anemia

  16. NDR1, a locus of Arabidopsis thaliana that is required for disease resistance to both a bacterial and a fungal pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Century, K S; Holub, E B; Staskawicz, B J

    1995-01-01

    We have employed Arabidopsis thaliana as a model host plant to genetically dissect the molecular pathways leading to disease resistance. A. thaliana accession Col-0 is susceptible to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 but resistant in a race-specific manner to DC3000 carrying any one of the cloned avirulence genes avrB, avrRpm1, avrRpt2, and avrPph3. Fast-neutron-mutagenized Col-0 M2 seed was screened to identify mutants susceptible to DC3000(avrB). Disease assays and analysis of in planta bacterial growth identified one mutant, ndr1-1 (nonrace-specific disease resistance), that was susceptible to DC3000 expressing any one of the four avirulence genes tested. Interestingly, a hypersensitive-like response was still induced by several of the strains. The ndr1-1 mutation also rendered the plant susceptible to several avirulent isolates of the fungal pathogen Peronospora parasitica. Genetic analysis of ndr1-1 demonstrated that the mutation segregated as a single recessive locus, located on chromosome III. Characterization of the ndr1-1 mutation suggests that a common step exists in pathways of resistance to two unrelated pathogens. Images Fig. 1 PMID:11607554

  17. Fanconi Anemia Genes, of Menders and Sweepers.

    PubMed

    Campello, Silvia; Cecconi, Francesco

    2016-05-23

    Reporting recently in Cell, Sumpter et al. (2016) provide evidence that Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway genes, which are mutated in the homonymous disease and are tumor suppressors known as damaged nuclear DNA "menders," also act as intracellular sweepers in selective virophagy and mitophagy. PMID:27219059

  18. Meta-Analysis for Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Multiple Variants at the BIN1 Locus Associated with Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaolan; Pickering, Eve; Liu, Yingxue Cathy; Hall, Stephanie; Fournier, Helene; Katz, Elyse; Dechairo, Bryan; John, Sally; Van Eerdewegh, Paul; Soares, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Recent GWAS studies focused on uncovering novel genetic loci related to AD have revealed associations with variants near CLU, CR1, PICALM and BIN1. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide association study in an independent set of 1034 cases and 1186 controls using the Illumina genotyping platforms. By coupling our data with available GWAS datasets from the ADNI and GenADA, we replicated the original associations in both PICALM (rs3851179) and CR1 (rs3818361). The PICALM variant seems to be non-significant after we adjusted for APOE e4 status. We further tested our top markers in 751 independent cases and 751 matched controls. Besides the markers close to the APOE locus, a marker (rs12989701) upstream of BIN1 locus was replicated and the combined analysis reached genome-wide significance level (p = 5E-08). We combined our data with the published Harold et al. study and meta-analysis with all available 6521 cases and 10360 controls at the BIN1 locus revealed two significant variants (rs12989701, p = 1.32E-10 and rs744373, p = 3.16E-10) in limited linkage disequilibrium (r2 = 0.05) with each other. The independent contribution of both SNPs was supported by haplotype conditional analysis. We also conducted multivariate analysis in canonical pathways and identified a consistent signal in the downstream pathways targeted by Gleevec (P = 0.004 in Pfizer; P = 0.028 in ADNI and P = 0.04 in GenADA). We further tested variants in CLU, PICALM, BIN1 and CR1 for association with disease progression in 597 AD patients where longitudinal cognitive measures are sufficient. Both the PICALM and CLU variants showed nominal significant association with cognitive decline as measured by change in Clinical Dementia Rating-sum of boxes (CDR-SB) score from the baseline but did not pass multiple-test correction. Future experiments will help us better understand potential roles of these genetic loci in AD pathology. PMID:21390209

  19. Genetic modulation of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.H.

    1995-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia, a common disorder associated with reduced life span of the red blood cell and vasoocclusive events, is caused by a mutation in the {Beta}-hemoglobin gene. Yet, despite this genetic homogeneity, the phenotype of the disease is heterogeneous. This suggests the modulating influence of associated inherited traits. Some of these may influence the accumulation of fetal hemoglobin, a hemoglobin type that interferes with the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin. Another inherited trait determines the accumulation of {alpha}-globin chains. This review focuses on potential genetic regulators of the phenotype of sickle cell anemia. 125 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. The Invisible Malady: Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Savitt, Todd L.

    1981-01-01

    Though several articles have appeared on the history of sickle cell anemia in the United States, none has dealt with the dissemination of information from the scientific community to the public. It is an interesting commentary on our society that 60 years have passed before this important but racially oriented disease has reached the public forum. In this article, the author tries to describe the major events in the history of sickle cell anemia and to explain why it has not been publicized. PMID:7021863

  1. Aplastica Anemia And Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:21415960

  2. Anemia management after acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lelubre, Christophe; Bouzat, Pierre; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Taccone, Fabio Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is frequent among brain-injured patients, where it has been associated with an increased risk of poor outcome. The pathophysiology of anemia in this patient population remains multifactorial; moreover, whether anemia merely reflects a higher severity of the underlying disease or is a significant determinant of the neurological recovery of such patients remains unclear. Interestingly, the effects of red blood cell transfusions (RBCT) in moderately anemic patients remain controversial; although hemoglobin levels are increased, different studies observed only a modest and inconsistent improvement in cerebral oxygenation after RBCT and raised serious concerns about the risk of increased complications. Thus, considering this "blood transfusion anemia paradox", the optimal hemoglobin level to trigger RBCT in brain-injured patients has not been defined yet; also, there is insufficient evidence to provide strong recommendations regarding which hemoglobin level to target and which associated transfusion strategy (restrictive versus liberal) to select in this patient population. We summarize in this review article the more relevant studies evaluating the effects of anemia and RBCT in patients with an acute neurological condition; also, we propose some potential strategies to optimize transfusion management in such patients. PMID:27311626

  3. Genomic and Epigenetic Complexity of the FOXF1 Locus in 16q24.1: Implications for Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dharmadhikari, Avinash V.; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    The FOXF1 (Forkhead box F1) gene, located on chromosome 16q24.1 encodes a member of the FOX family of transcription factors characterized by a distinct forkhead DNA binding domain. FOXF1 plays an important role in epithelium-mesenchyme signaling, as a downstream target of Sonic hedgehog pathway. Heterozygous point mutations and genomic deletions involving FOXF1 have been reported in newborns with a lethal lung developmental disorder, Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignment of Pulmonary Veins (ACDMPV). In addition, genomic deletions upstream to FOXF1 identified in ACDMPV patients have revealed that FOXF1 expression is tightly regulated by distal tissue-specific enhancers. Interestingly, FOXF1 has been found to be incompletely paternally imprinted in human lungs; characterized genomic deletions arose de novo exclusively on maternal chromosome 16, with most of them being Alu-Alu mediated. Regulation of FOXF1 expression likely utilizes a combination of chromosomal looping, differential methylation of an upstream CpG island overlapping GLI transcription factor binding sites, and the function of lung-specific long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). FOXF1 knock-out mouse models demonstrated its critical role in mesoderm differentiation and in the development of pulmonary vasculature. Additionally, epigenetic inactivation of FOXF1 has been reported in breast and colorectal cancers, whereas overexpression of FOXF1 has been associated with a number of other human cancers, e.g. medulloblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. Constitutional duplications of FOXF1 have recently been reported in congenital intestinal malformations. Thus, understanding the genomic and epigenetic complexity at the FOXF1 locus will improve diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of ACDMPV and other human disorders associated with FOXF1 alterations. PMID:26085809

  4. Genetic and Informatic Analyses Implicate Kif12 as a Candidate Gene within the Mpkd2 Locus That Modulates Renal Cystic Disease Severity in the Cys1cpk Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mrug, Michal; Zhou, Juling; Yang, Chaozhe; Aronow, Bruce J.; Cui, Xiangqin; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Siegal, Gene P.; Yoder, Bradley K; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously mapped the interval on Chromosome 4 for a major polycystic kidney disease modifier (Mpkd) of the B6(Cg)-Cys1cpk/J mouse model of recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Informatic analyses predicted that this interval contains at least three individual renal cystic disease severity-modulating loci (Mpkd1-3). In the current study, we provide further validation of these predicted effects using a congenic mouse line carrying the entire CAST/EiJ (CAST)-derived Mpkd1-3 interval on the C57BL/6J background. We have also generated a derivative congenic line with a refined CAST-derived Mpkd1-2 interval and demonstrated its dominantly-acting disease-modulating effects (e.g., 4.2-fold increase in total cyst area; p<0.001). The relative strength of these effects allowed the use of recombinants from these crosses to fine map the Mpkd2 effects to a <14 Mbp interval that contains 92 RefSeq sequences. One of them corresponds to the previously described positional Mpkd2 candidate gene, Kif12. Among the positional Mpkd2 candidates, only expression of Kif12 correlates strongly with the expression pattern of Cys1 across multiple anatomical nephron structures and developmental time points. Also, we demonstrate that Kif12 encodes a primary cilium-associated protein. Together, these data provide genetic and informatic validation of the predicted renal cystic disease-modulating effects of Mpkd1-3 loci and implicate Kif12 as the candidate locus for Mpkd2. PMID:26295839

  5. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  6. How I Diagnose Non-thalassemic Microcytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mariasole; De Falco, Luigia; Iolascon, Achille

    2015-10-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most common form of anemia, characterized by reduced hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis associated with decreased red blood cell volume (MCV). It is a very heterogeneous group of diseases that may be either acquired or inherited. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from defects in globin (hemoglobinopathies or thalassemias) or heme synthesis or in iron availability, or acquisition by the erythroid precursors. Diagnosis of microcytic anaemia appears to be important in children/adolescents, especially to set, where possible, a treatment plan on the basis of the etiology and pathogenesis. After excluding the acquired causes of microcytic anemia that represent the most frequent etiology, according to the differential diagnosis, the analysis of genetic causes, mostly hereditary, must be considered. This review will consider acquired and hereditary microcytic anemias due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects and their diagnosis. PMID:26404439

  7. Use Massive Parallel Sequencing and Exome Capture Technology to Sequence the Exome of Fanconi Anemia Children and Their Patents

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-21

    Fanconi Anemia; Autosomal or Sex Linked Recessive Genetic Disease; Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis Failure, Multiple Congenital Abnormalities, and Susceptibility to Neoplastic Diseases.; Hematopoiesis Maintainance.

  8. Freezing of Gait in Parkinson's Disease Is Associated with Reduced 6-[18F]Fluoro-l-m-tyrosine Uptake in the Locus Coeruleus

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Sayaka Asari; Sato, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is a common disorder in Parkinson's disease (PD) and could be attributed to a reduction in brain noradrenaline. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity in the locus coeruleus (LC) and FOG in PD using high-resolution positron emission tomography with an AADC tracer, 6-[18F]fluoro-l-m-tyrosine (FMT). We assessed 40 patients with PD and 11 age-matched healthy individuals. PD was diagnosed based on the UK Brain Bank criteria by two movement disorder experts. FOG was directly observed by the clinician and assessed using a patient questionnaire. FMT uptake in the LC, caudate, and putamen was analyzed using PMOD software on coregistered magnetic resonance images. FOG was present in 30 patients. The severity of FOG correlated with the decrease of FMT uptake in the LC regardless of disease duration and the severity of other motor impairments, indicating dysfunction of the noradrenergic network in FOG. PMID:27006858

  9. Heterozygous deletions at the ZEB1 locus verify haploinsufficiency as the mechanism of disease for posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy type 3.

    PubMed

    Liskova, Petra; Evans, Cerys J; Davidson, Alice E; Zaliova, Marketa; Dudakova, Lubica; Trkova, Marie; Stranecky, Viktor; Carnt, Nicole; Plagnol, Vincent; Vincent, Andrea L; Tuft, Stephen J; Hardcastle, Alison J

    2016-07-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy (PPCD) lack a molecular diagnosis. We evaluated 14 unrelated probands who had a clinical diagnosis of PPCD who were previously determined to be negative for mutations in ZEB1 by direct sequencing. A combination of techniques was used including whole-exome sequencing (WES), single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array copy number variation (CNV) analysis, quantitative real-time PCR, and long-range PCR. Segregation of potentially pathogenic changes with disease was confirmed, where possible, in family members. A putative run of homozygosity on chromosome 10 was identified by WES in a three-generation PPCD family, suggestive of a heterozygous deletion. SNP array genotyping followed by long-range PCR and direct sequencing to define the breakpoints confirmed the presence of a large deletion that encompassed multiple genes, including ZEB1. Identification of a heterozygous deletion spanning ZEB1 prompted us to further investigate potential CNVs at this locus in the remaining probands, leading to detection of two additional heterozygous ZEB1 gene deletions. This study demonstrates that ZEB1 mutations account for a larger proportion of PPCD than previously estimated, and supports the hypothesis that haploinsufficiency of ZEB1 is the underlying molecular mechanism of disease for PPCD3. PMID:26508574

  10. How Is Hemolytic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines rituximab and cyclosporine. If you have severe sickle cell anemia , your doctor may recommend a medicine called hydroxyurea. ... hemoglobin that newborns have. In people who have sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin helps prevent red blood cells from ...

  11. Plasma proteome changes associated with refractory anemia and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Refractory anemia and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts are two myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) subgroups linked with anemia. MDS is a group of heterogeneous oncohematological bone marrow disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, blood cytopenias, and progression of the disease toward acute myeloid leukemia. The aim of this study was to search for plasma proteome changes in MDS patients with refractory anemia and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts. Results A total of 26 patient and healthy donor plasma samples were depleted of fourteen high-abundant plasma proteins, separated with 2D electrophoresis, and statistically processed with Progenesis SameSpots software. 55 significantly differing spots were observed and corresponded to 39 different proteins identified by nanoLC-MS/MS. Changes in the fragments of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 protein were observed. Using mass spectrometry-based relative label-free quantification of tryptic peptides, there were differences in alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein peptides, while no differences were observed between the control and patient sample groups for retinol-binding protein 4 peptides. Conclusions This study describes plasma proteome changes associated with MDS patients with refractory anemia and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts. Changes observed in the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 fragments were in agreement with our previous studies of other MDS subgroups: refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and refractory anemia with excess blasts subtype 1. Mass spectrometry-based relative quantification of retinol-binding protein 4 peptides has shown that there are differences in the modification of this protein between refractory anemia with excess blasts subtype 1 patients and MDS patients with refractory anemia and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts. Alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein seems to be a new potential MDS biomarker candidate. PMID

  12. Factors Associated with Anemia in the Institutionalized Elderly.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emanuelle Cruz da; Roriz, Anna Karla Carneiro; Eickemberg, Michaela; Mello, Adriana Lima; Côrtes, Elvira Barbosa Quadros; Feitosa, Caroline Alves; Medeiros, Jairza Maria Barreto; Ramos, Lílian Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    As a common problem in long-term care facilities (LTCFs), anemia affects 25-63% of the elderly. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of anemia and its associated factors in the institutionalized elderly. The cross-sectional study was carried out with three hundred thirteen individuals aged ≥ 60 years, of both genders, living in long-term care facilities for the elderly in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Poisson regression (PR) with robust variance estimates was used to assess the factors related to anemia. The prevalence of anemia was 38%. Mild anemia was predominant in both genders (male: 26.8%; female: 21.1%), as normocytic and normochromic anemia, with no anisocytosis (69.75%). Anemia was associated with thinness (PR: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.04-2.72) and with moderate (PR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.07-3.63) and total (PR: 2.61; 95% CI: 1.34-5.07) dependence in the final model. Severe dependence exhibited borderline significance (PR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.00-3.77). The prevalence of anemia was high in the institutionalized elderly in both genders, with characteristics suggesting chronic diseases as the causal factor, and the frequency of occurrence was higher in thinness elderly with moderate to total dependence. PMID:27607057

  13. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  14. Biomarkers for the differentiation of anemia and their clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Northrop-Clewes, Christine A; Thurnham, David I

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization defines anemia as the point at which the amount of hemoglobin in the circulation falls below World Health Organization cutoffs for specific age and sex groups. Anemia is a worldwide problem of complex etiology and is associated with many factors. The purpose of this review was to describe the biomarkers used to identify the nature of anemia in patients and in the community. The important biomarkers are the automated red cell counts, tests for nutritional deficiencies, hemoglobinopathies, and inflammation. Diseases are important potential initiators of anemia, but biomarkers of specific diseases are not included in this review, only the underlying feature common to all disease – namely, inflammation. PMID:23687454

  15. Conjugated Bilirubin Triggers Anemia by Inducing Erythrocyte Death

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca2+ influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Conclusion: Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. (Hepatology 2015;61:275–284) PMID:25065608

  16. Duodenal perforation: an unusual complication of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Acıpayam, Can; Aldıç, Güliz; Akçora, Bülent; Çelikkaya, Mehmet Emin; Aşkar, Hasan; Dorum, Bayram Ali

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal perforation in childhood is a rare condition with a high mortality rate if not treated surgically. Primary gastroduodenal perforation is frequently associated with peptic ulcer and exhibits a positive family history. Helicobacter pylorus is the most significant agent. Secondary gastroduodenal perforation may be a finding of specific diseases, such as Crohn disease, or more rarely may be associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia. A 14-year-old boy presented with abdominal and back pain. The patient was operated on for acute abdomen and diagnosed with duodenal perforation. Helicobacter pylorus was negative. There was no risk factor to account for duodenal perforation other than sickle cell anemia. Surgical intervention was successful and without significant sequelae. Duodenal perforation is a rare entity described in patients with sickle cell anemia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of duodenal perforation in a patient sickle cell anemia. PMID:25422692

  17. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated? Doctors decide how to treat Fanconi anemia (FA) based on a person's age and how ... Long-term treatments for FA can: Cure the anemia. Damaged bone marrow cells are replaced with healthy ...

  18. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed? People who have Fanconi anemia (FA) are born with the disorder. They may ... questions about: Any personal or family history of anemia Any surgeries you’ve had related to the ...

  19. Anemia in People with Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... My ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Anemia in People With Cancer What is anemia? When you don’t have enough healthy red ... the symptoms that bother people most. What causes anemia? There are many different reasons a person with ...

  20. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  1. Anemia and Oxygen Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Clinical assessment of tissue oxygenation is challenging. Anemia reflects a decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and its significance in the perioperative setting relates largely to the associated risk of insufficient oxygen delivery and cellular hypoxia. Until meaningful clinical measures of tissue oxygenation are available in veterinary practice, clinicians must rely on evaluation of a patient's hemodynamic and ventilatory performance, along with biochemical and hemogasometric measurements. Blood transfusion is used commonly for treatment of perioperative anemia, and may improve tissue oxygenation by normalizing the rheologic properties of blood and enhancing perfusion, independent of increases in oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:26033442

  2. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1980-1981)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1981-07-02

    The basic purpose of this study is the delineation and exploitation of inborn anemias of the laboratory mouse, carried out by utilization of genetically homogeneous stocks segregating only for anemia-producing genes; by physiological and histological descriptions of each condition at all stages in the life history; by determination of tissue sites of primary gene action through tissue culture studies, tissue transplantation and parabiosis experiments; by analysis of reactions of normal and anemic mice to a variety of stressful stimuli, including x-irradiation, hypoxia, and toxic chemicals, and by biochemical comparisons between tissues, especially erythrocytes and hemopoietic cells of normal vs each type of anemic mouse. At present 16 single-locus anemias are known in the mouse, plus one with multifactorial inheritance (the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB inbred mice). Of these, six are maintained only by the Jackson Laboratory, and two others have but one additional source. Effects of anemia-producing mutant alleles of these loci (an; f; ja; ha; Hba/sup th/; mk; nb; Sl and Sl/sup d/; sla; sph; and W, W/sup v/, W/sup J/ and 10 other putative W-alleles) are currently under investigation at the Jackson Laboratory. 15 refs.

  3. Extra-Axial Hematoma and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Induced Aplastic Anemia: The Role of Hematological Diseases in Subdural and Epidural Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Menger, Richard P.; Dossani, Rimal H.; Thakur, Jai Deep; Farokhi, Frank; Morrow, Kevin; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Objective and Importance. To illustrate the development of spontaneous subdural hematoma secondary to aplastic anemia resulting from the administration of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. This is the first report of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole potentiating coagulopathy leading to any form of intracranial hematoma. Clinical Presentation. A 62-year-old female developed a bone marrow biopsy confirmed diagnosis of aplastic anemia secondary to administration of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole following a canine bite. She then developed a course of waxing and waning mental status combined with headache and balance related falls. CT imaging of the head illustrated a 3.7 cm × 6.6 mm left frontal subdural hematoma combined with a 7.0 mm × 1.7 cm left temporal epidural hematoma. Conclusion. Aplastic anemia is a rare complication of the administration of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Thrombocytopenia, regardless of cause, is a risk factor for the development of spontaneous subdural hematoma. Given the lack of a significant traumatic mechanism, this subset of subdural hematoma is more suitable to conservative management. PMID:26199768

  4. Mathematical analysis of a multiple strain, multi-locus-allele system for antigenically variable infectious diseases revisited.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Alhaji

    2015-09-01

    Many important pathogens such as HIV/AIDS, influenza, malaria, dengue and meningitis generally exist in phenotypically distinct serotypes that compete for hosts. Models used to study these diseases appear as meta-population systems. Herein, we revisit one of the multiple strain models that have been used to investigate the dynamics of infectious diseases with co-circulating serotypes or strains, and provide analytical results underlying the numerical investigations. In particular, we establish the necessary conditions for the local asymptotic stability of the steady states and for the existence of oscillatory behaviors via Hopf bifurcation. In addition, we show that the existence of discrete antigenic forms among pathogens can either fully or partially self-organize, where (i) strains exhibit no strain structures and coexist or (ii) antigenic variants sort into non-overlapping or minimally overlapping clusters that either undergo the principle of competitive exclusion exhibiting discrete strain structures, or co-exist cyclically. PMID:26116427

  5. Association of the C2-CFB locus with non-infectious uveitis, specifically predisposed to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingming; Fan, Jiao-jie; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Yan; Teng, Yan; Liu, Ping

    2016-04-01

    Complement component 2 (C2) and factor B (CFB) are regulators of complement system and involved in the alternative pathway, which have been identified to be associated with multiple immune-related diseases. This study aimed to investigate the association of these genes with non-infectious intermediate and posterior uveitis. A total of 260 Chinese non-infectious uveitis patients were recruited, including 97 patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH), 70 patients with intermediate uveitis (IU) and 93 patients with Behçet's disease (BD). Two hundred and ninety-three normal control subjects were also recruited. Five SNPs across the C2/CFB region were selected and genotyped using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. Association analysis was adjusted for gender and stratified by different subtypes. The CFB SNP rs1048709 was significantly associated with non-infectious uveitis [P corr = 0.01, OR 1.49 (allele model) and P corr = 0.04, OR 1.58 (dominant model), respectively], and similar association was also detected between rs1048709 and female uveitis patients (P corr = 0.01, OR 1.70 and P corr = 0.049, OR 184, respectively). Moreover, subgroup analyses showed that CFB-rs1048709 was specifically associated with VKH, where significantly higher frequencies of A allele and AA homozygosity were observed in VKH patients compared with controls (P corr = 0.025 and P corr = 0.035, respectively), whereas none of these five SNPs was associated with IU or BD. In addition, a haplotype block across CFB (GTG) was significantly predisposed to uveitis with protective effect (OR 0.66, P corr = 0.048). Our results revealed a significant association of CFB with non-infectious uveitis, particularly predisposed to VKH disease. Genetic differences for uveitis could be gender-specific. PMID:26671509

  6. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  7. Genetic variation in lipoprotein (a) levels in families enriched for coronary artery disease is determined almost entirely by the apolipoprotein (a) gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    DeMeester, C.A.; Lusis, A.J.; Bu, X.; Gray, R.J.; Rotter, J.I.

    1995-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a) (Lp[a]) is a cholesterol-rich lipoprotein resembling LDL but also containing a large polypeptide designated apolipoprotein (a) (apo[a]). Its levels are highly variable among individuals and, in a number of studies, are strongly correlated with the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). In an effort to determine which genes control Lp(a) levels, we have studied 25 multiplex families (comprising 298 members) enriched for CAD. The apo(a) gene was genotyped among the families, using a highly informative pulse-field gel electrophoresis procedure. In addition, polymorphisms of the gene for the other major protein of Lp(a), apolipoprotein B (apoB), were examined. Quantitative sib-pair linkage analysis indicates that apo(a) is the major gene controlling Lp(a) levels in this CAD population (P = .001; 99 sib pairs), whereas the apoB gene demonstrated no significant quantitative linkage effect. We estimate that the apo(a) locus accounts for {le}98% of variance of Lp(a) serum levels. Approximately 43% of this variation is explained by size polymorphisms within the apo(a) gene. These results indicate that the apo(a) gene is the major determinant of Lp(a) serum levels not only in the general population but also in a high-risk CAD population. 59 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of your blood. The test checks your hemoglobin and hematocrit (hee-MAT-oh-crit) levels. Hemoglobin is the iron-rich protein in red blood ... up in your blood. A low level of hemoglobin or hematocrit is a sign of anemia. The ...

  9. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  10. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  11. Hepcidin and sports anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important mineral element used by the body in a variety of metabolic and physiologic processes. These processes are highly active when the body is undergoing physical exercises. Prevalence of exercise-induced iron deficiency anemia (also known as sports anemia) is notably high in athletic populations, particularly those with heavy training loads. The pathogenesis of sports anemia is closely related to disorders of iron metabolism, and a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of iron metabolism in the course of physical exercises could expand ways of treatment and prevention of sports anemia. In recent years, there have been remarkable research advances regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying changes of iron metabolism in response to physical exercises. This review has covered these advances, including effects of exercise on duodenum iron absorption, serum iron status, iron distribution in organs, erythropoiesis, and hepcidin’s function and its regulation. New methods for the treatment of exercise-induced iron deficiency are also discussed. PMID:24731443

  12. Clustering and age of onset in familial late onset Alzheimer`s disease are determined at the apoliopoprotein E locus

    SciTech Connect

    Houlden, H.; Rossor, M.

    1994-09-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype is of great importance in the etiology of Alzheimer`s disease (AD). Thus, inheritance of the ApoE4 allele predisposes to the occurrences of late onset disease and decreases the onset age in families with pathogenic mutations in the amyloid precursor protein gene. We analysed ApoE genotypes in 35 families multiply affected by AD and confirm that familial clustering in late onset AD is associated with the ApoE4 allele. This allele occurs in the great majority (82%) of late onset familial Alzheimer cases. Elderly unaffected sibs (80-90 years) have an allele frequency that is not significantly different to that of normal controls. Data presented from our family sets together previously published data is suggestive that the effect of a single ApoE4 allele is to increase the risk of developing AD by an amount equivalent to 5 years and that the effect of ApoE4 homozygosity is to increase the risk of developing AD by an amount equivalent to 10 years of age. Data shows significant difference between the frequency of the ApoE4 allele in the familial AD probands and controls and in both sets of unaffected sibs, p<0.01.

  13. Anemia in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kausman, Joshua Yehuda; Powell, Harley Robert; Jones, Colin Lindsay

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of anemia in stable pediatric renal transplant recipients and to examine the association of anemia with renal function, immunosuppressants, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and growth, as well as iron, vitamin B(12), and folate stores. This is a cross-sectional study of the 50 renal transplant recipients currently followed at our center. Patient data were collected regarding hematological parameters, growth, medications, renal function, underlying renal disease, delayed graft function, episodes of rejection, and iron or erythropoietin therapy post transplantation. The mean hemoglobin level (Hb) was 110 g/l and the overall prevalence of anemia was 60%, including 30% who were severely anemic (Hb<100 g/l). There was a high rate of iron deficiency (34%) and serum iron was the parameter of iron metabolism most closely associated with anemia. Hb in patients with low serum iron was 90.7 g/l versus 114.4 g/l in those with normal serum iron ( P<0.01). Both univariate and multiple linear regression determined tacrolimus dose and creatinine clearance to be significant factors associated with anemia. Tacrolimus dose correlated with a 10 g/l reduction in Hb for every increase of tacrolimus dose of 0.054 mg/kg per day ( P=0.001). The dose of mycophenolate was positively correlated with Hb, but this was likely to be confounded by our practice of dose reduction in the setting of anemia. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor use was not associated with anemia. Severely anemic patients tended to be shorter, with a mean Z-score for height of -1.8 compared with -0.9 for those with normal Hb ( P=0.02). Anemia is a significant and common problem in pediatric renal transplant patients. Deteriorating renal function is an important cause, but other factors like iron deficiency and immunosuppression are involved. Definition of iron deficiency is difficult and serum iron may be a valuable indicator. Medication doses

  14. Susceptibility locus for clinical and subclinical coronary artery disease at chromosome 9p21 in the multi-ethnic ADVANCE study.

    PubMed

    Assimes, Themistocles L; Knowles, Joshua W; Basu, Analabha; Iribarren, Carlos; Southwick, Audrey; Tang, Hua; Absher, Devin; Li, Jun; Fair, Joan M; Rubin, Geoffrey D; Sidney, Stephen; Fortmann, Stephen P; Go, Alan S; Hlatky, Mark A; Myers, Richard M; Risch, Neil; Quertermous, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    A susceptibility locus for coronary artery disease (CAD) at chromosome 9p21 has recently been reported, which may influence the age of onset of CAD. We sought to replicate these findings among white subjects and to examine whether these results are consistent with other racial/ethnic groups by genotyping three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the risk interval in the Atherosclerotic Disease, Vascular Function, and Genetic Epidemiology (ADVANCE) study. One or more of these SNPs was associated with clinical CAD in whites, U.S. Hispanics and U.S. East Asians. None of the SNPs were associated with CAD in African Americans although the power to detect an odds ratio (OR) in this group equivalent to that seen in whites was only 24-30%. ORs were higher in Hispanics and East Asians and lower in African Americans, but in all groups the 95% confidence intervals overlapped with ORs observed in whites. High-risk alleles were also associated with increased coronary artery calcification in controls and the magnitude of these associations by racial/ethnic group closely mirrored the magnitude observed for clinical CAD. Unexpectedly, we noted significant genotype frequency differences between male and female cases (P = 0.003-0.05). Consequently, men tended towards a recessive and women tended towards a dominant mode of inheritance. Finally, an effect of genotype on the age of onset of CAD was detected but only in men carrying two versus one or no copy of the high-risk allele and presenting with CAD at age >50 years. Further investigations in other populations are needed to confirm or refute our findings. PMID:18443000

  15. Potential contribution of the Alzheimer's disease risk locus BIN1 to episodic memory performance in cognitively normal Type 2 diabetes elderly.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Lior; Ravona-Springer, Ramit; Lubitz, Irit; Schmeidler, James; Cooper, Itzik; Sano, Mary; Silverman, Jeremy M; Heymann, Anthony; Beeri, Michal Schnaider

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, several promising susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) were discovered, by implementing genome-wide association studies (GWAS) approach. Recent GWAS meta-analysis has demonstrated the association of 19 loci (in addition to the APOE locus) with AD in the European ancestry population at genome-wide significance level. Since Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a substantial risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, the 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represent the 19 AD loci were studied for association with performance in episodic memory, a primary cognitive domain affected by AD, in a sample of 848 cognitively normal elderly Israeli Jewish T2D patients. We found a suggestive association of SNP rs6733839, located near the bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) gene, with this phenotype. Controlling for demographic (age, sex, education, disease duration and ancestry) covariates, carriers of two copies of the AD risk allele T (TT genotype) performed significantly worse (p=0.00576; p=0.00127 among Ashkenazi origin sub-sample) in episodic memory compared to carriers of the C allele (CT+CC genotypes). When including additional potential covariates (clinical and APOE genotype), results remained significant (p=0.00769; p=0.00148 among Ashkenazi). Interestingly, as validated in multiple large studies, BIN1 is one of the most established AD risk loci, with a high odds ratio. Although preliminary and require further replications, our findings support a contribution of BIN1 to individual differences in episodic memory performance among T2D patients. PMID:26947052

  16. The Role of Health Locus of Control in Predicting Depression Symptoms in a Sample of Iranian Older Adults with Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad-Abadi, Mohammad-Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the prediction of depression on a group of Iranian older adults based on components of health locus of control. Method: Sixty-six men and 42 women over the age of 55 were recruited from the retirement clubs in Shiraz, using convenience sampling. The participants completed the research questionnaires including the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC). Results: The findings on health locus of control revealed that the highest score was on internal locus of control followed by God, powerful others and chance. The mean score on depression was on a normal range. Multiple regression analysis showed that two independent variables including internal control (ß = −.32, p < 0.01) and God control (ß = −.20, = p < 0.03) significantly predicted depression. The other components of health locus of control such as chance and powerful others as well as age did not predict depression. Findings also revealed that the independents variables explained 26% of the total variance of depression (R2 = .26, p <0.001). Conclusion: his study provides more support for the application of theory of health locus of control on depression. PMID:27437004

  17. Nutritional anemia and its control.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Deeksha; Agarwal, Kailash Nath; Agarwal, Dev Kumari

    2002-07-01

    Available studies on prevalence of nutritional anemia in India show that 65% infant and toddlers, 60% 1-6 years of age, 88% adolescent girls (3.3% had hemoglobin < 7.0 g/dl; severe anemia) and 85% pregnant women (9.9% having severe anemia) were anemic. The prevalence of anemia was marginally higher in lactating women as compared to pregnancy. The commonest is iron deficiency anemia. National programmes to control and prevent anemia have not been successful. Experiences from other countries in controlling moderately-severe anemia guide to adopt long-term measures i.e. fortification of food items like milk, cereal, sugar, salt with iron. Use of iron utensils in boiling milk, cooking vegetables etc may contribute significant amount of dietary iron. Nutrition education to improve dietary intakes in family for receiving needed macro/micro nutrients as protein, iron and vitamins like folic acid, B12, A and C etc. for hemoglobin synthesis is important. As an immediate measure medicinal iron is necessary to control anemia. Addition of folate with iron controls anemia and is neuroprotective. Evidence in early childhood suggests vitamin B12 deficiency anemia; thus it may also be given along with iron and folate. PMID:12173702

  18. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: classification and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Sève, Pascal; Philippe, Pierre; Dufour, Jean-François; Broussolle, Christiane; Michel, Marc

    2008-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon cause of anemia. Classifications of AIHA include warm AIHA, cold AIHA (including mainly chronic cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), mixed-type AIHA and drug-induced AIHA. AIHA may also be further subdivided on the basis of etiology. Management of AIHA is based mainly on empirical data and on small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. The therapeutic options for treating AIHA are increasing with monoclonal antibodies and, potentially, complement inhibitory drugs. Based on data available in the literature and our experience, we propose algorithms for the treatment of warm AIHA and cold agglutinin disease in adults. Therapeutic trials are needed in order to better stratify treatment, taking into account the promising efficacy of rituximab. PMID:21082924

  19. A Founding Locus within the RET Proto-Oncogene May Account for a Large Proportion of Apparently Sporadic Hirschsprung Disease and a Subset of Cases of Sporadic Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Borrego, Salud; Wright, Fred A.; Fernández, Raquel M.; Williams, Nita; López-Alonso, Manuel; Davuluri, Ramana; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Eng, Charis

    2003-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a common congenital disorder characterized by aganglionosis of the gut. The seemingly unrelated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytoma, and hyperparathyroidism. Yet, germline mutations in the RET proto-oncogene are associated with both MEN 2 and HSCR. In the former, gain-of-function mutations in a limited set of codons is found, whereas, in the latter, loss-of-function mutations are found. However, germline RET mutation is associated with only 3% of a population-based series of isolated HSCR, and little is known about susceptibility to sporadic MTC. We have found previously that specific haplotypes comprising RET coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) comprising exon 2 SNP A45A were strongly associated with HSCR, whereas haplotypes associated with exon 14 SNP S836S were associated with MTC. In this study, we describe three novel intron 1 SNPs, and, together with the coding SNP haplotypes, the data suggest the presence of distinct ancestral haplotypes for HSCR and sporadic MTC in linkage disequilibrium with a putative founding susceptibility locus/loci. The data are consistent with the presence of a very ancient, low-penetrance founder locus ∼20–30 kb upstream of SNP A45A, but the failure of the SNPs to span the locus presents challenges in modeling mode of transmission or ancestry. We postulate that this founding locus is germane to both isolated HSCR and MTC but also that different mutations in this locus would predispose to one or the other. PMID:12474140

  20. Sideroblastic anemia in 7 dogs (1996-2002).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Douglas J

    2005-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is an anemic condition characterized by chronic hypochromic anemia and the presence of large iron deposits in erythroid cells. Seven dogs with sideroblastic anemia were evaluated retrospectively. Historical, clinical, and clinicopathologic findings were reviewed to determine whether the condition was idiopathic or associated with disease conditions or drug or toxin exposure. Associated diseases were identified in 6 affected dogs and included acute hepatitis, pancreatitis, acute hepatitis and pancreatitis, inflammatory disease, glomerulonephritis, and myelofibrosis. None of the dogs had a history of recent exposure to drugs or toxins. One dog had no evidence of associated disease. Regardless of the associated disease condition, sideroblastic anemia was characterized by moderate to severe nonregenerative and frequently hypochromic anemia with prominent dysplastic features in bone marrow that were most prominent in the erythroid series. Survival varied from days to years. Identification of large numbers of siderocytes or sideroblasts in blood or bone marrow is inconsistent with a diagnosis of iron deficiency and should prompt a search for inflammatory disease conditions, including hepatitis, pancreatitis, and glomerulonephritis. PMID:15954546

  1. Genetic dissection of the pre-eclampsia susceptibility locus on chromosome 2q22 reveals shared novel risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew P; Brennecke, Shaun P; East, Christine E; Dyer, Thomas D; Roten, Linda T; Proffitt, J Michael; Melton, Phillip E; Fenstad, Mona H; Aalto-Viljakainen, Tia; Mäkikallio, Kaarin; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele; Austgulen, Rigmor; Blangero, John; Moses, Eric K

    2013-07-01

    Pre-eclampsia is an idiopathic pregnancy disorder promoting morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. Delivery of the fetus is the only means to resolve severe symptoms. Women with pre-eclamptic pregnancies demonstrate increased risk for later life cardiovascular disease (CVD) and good evidence suggests these two syndromes share several risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms. To elucidate the genetic architecture of pre-eclampsia we have dissected our chromosome 2q22 susceptibility locus in an extended Australian and New Zealand familial cohort. Positional candidate genes were prioritized for exon-centric sequencing using bioinformatics, SNPing, transcriptional profiling and QTL-walking. In total, we interrogated 1598 variants from 52 genes. Four independent SNP associations satisfied our gene-centric multiple testing correction criteria: a missense LCT SNP (rs2322659, P = 0.0027), a synonymous LRP1B SNP (rs35821928, P = 0.0001), an UTR-3 RND3 SNP (rs115015150, P = 0.0024) and a missense GCA SNP (rs17783344, P = 0.0020). We replicated the LCT SNP association (P = 0.02) and observed a borderline association for the GCA SNP (P = 0.07) in an independent Australian case-control population. The LRP1B and RND3 SNP associations were not replicated in this same Australian singleton cohort. Moreover, these four SNP associations could not be replicated in two additional case-control populations from Norway and Finland. These four SNPs, however, exhibit pleiotropic effects with several quantitative CVD-related traits. Our results underscore the genetic complexity of pre-eclampsia and present novel empirical evidence of possible shared genetic mechanisms underlying both pre-eclampsia and other CVD-related risk factors. PMID:23420841

  2. Compensatory changes in the noradrenergic nervous system in the locus ceruleus and hippocampus of postmortem subjects with Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; White, Sylvia S; Greenup, J Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Peskind, Elaine R; Raskind, Murray A

    2006-01-11

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is a significant loss of locus ceruleus (LC) noradrenergic neurons. However, functional and anatomical evidence indicates that the remaining noradrenergic neurons may be compensating for the loss. Because the noradrenergic system plays an important role in learning and memory, it is important to determine whether compensation occurs in noradrenergic neurons in the LC and hippocampus of subjects with AD or a related dementing disorder, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). We observed profound neuronal loss in the LC in AD and DLB subjects with three major changes in the noradrenergic system consistent with compensation: (1) an increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression in the remaining neurons; (2) sprouting of dendrites into peri-LC dendritic zone, as determined by alpha2-adrenoreceptors (ARs) and norepinephrine transporter binding sites; and (3) sprouting of axonal projections to the hippocampus as determined by alpha2-ARs. In AD and DLB subjects, the postsynaptic alpha1-ARs were normal to elevated. Expression of alpha1A- and alpha2A-AR mRNA in the hippocampus of AD and DLB subjects were not altered, but expression of alpha1D- and alpha2C-AR mRNA was significantly reduced in the hippocampus of AD and DLB subjects. Therefore, in AD and DLB subjects, there is compensation occurring in the remaining noradrenergic neurons, but there does appear to be a loss of specific AR in the hippocampus. Because changes in these noradrenergic markers in AD versus DLB subjects were similar (except neuronal loss and the increase in TH mRNA were somewhat greater in DLB subjects), the presence of Lewy bodies in addition to plaques and tangles in DLB subjects does not appear to further affect the noradrenergic compensatory changes. PMID:16407544

  3. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed. PMID:26404446

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  5. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone marrow . The ...

  7. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  8. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re ... and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many ...

  9. Characterization of anemia induced by avian osteopetrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R W; Smith, R E

    1978-01-01

    Chickens infected intravenously at 8 days after hatching with an avian osteopetrosis virus developed a severe, progressive anemia in the absence of osteopetrosis. The anemia was characterized as a pancytopenia, in which erythrocytes, granulocytes, and thrombocytes decreased concomitantly. Serum bilirubin levels were normal, whereas erythrocytes from infected chickens demonstrated a slightly elevated osmotic fragility. A negative Coombs test indicated that there was no evidence for erythrocyte-bound antibody. Erythrocytes from infected animals had slightly decreased 51Cr-labeled erythrocyte survival time when compared with normal. Examination of marrow histological preparations, together with ferrokinetic studies with 59Fe, indicated that marrow failure occurred during the acute phase of the anemia. Circulating virus was present during the development and acute phases of the anemia, but disappeared during the recovery phase of the disease. Neutralizing antibody appeared after the disappearance of circulating virus. It is concluded that virus infection induced both marrow failure (aplastic crisis) and decreased erythrocyte survival. Images PMID:215554

  10. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody. PMID:18173205

  11. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  12. [Transitory acute atrioventricular block in an African patient: consider sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Gacon, P-H; Jourdain, P; Funck, F; Amara, W

    2012-11-01

    This case report shows a rare cardiac complication of sickle cell anemia in a young African patient which was an acute paroxysmal atrio-ventricular block. Acute paroxysmal atrioventricular block is a rare complication of polymerization of hemoglobin S during sickle cell disease. Hence, sickle cell anemia should be considered as a cause of auriculoventricular block in black African patients. Cardiac complications of sickle cell anemia are presented in this article. PMID:22980397

  13. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  14. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  15. Iron Deficiency and Other Types of Anemia in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mary

    2016-02-15

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below the mean for age, is prevalent in infants and children worldwide. The evaluation of a child with anemia should begin with a thorough history and risk assessment. Characterizing the anemia as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic based on the mean corpuscular volume will aid in the workup and management. Microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency is the most common type of anemia in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend routine screening for anemia at 12 months of age; the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits vs. harms of screening. Iron deficiency anemia, which can be associated with cognitive issues, is prevented and treated with iron supplements or increased intake of dietary iron. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to recommend screening or treating pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia to improve maternal or neonatal outcomes. Delayed cord clamping can improve iron status in infancy, especially for at-risk populations, such as those who are preterm or small for gestational age. Normocytic anemia may be caused by congenital membranopathies, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, metabolic defects, and immune-mediated destruction. An initial reticulocyte count is needed to determine bone marrow function. Macrocytic anemia, which is uncommon in children, warrants subsequent evaluation for vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, hypothyroidism, hepatic disease, and bone marrow disorders. PMID:26926814

  16. Genetic variation of single nucleotide polymorphisms identified at the mating type locus correlates with form-specific disease phenotype in the barley net blotch fungus Pyrenophora teres

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mating-type (MAT) locus-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to be sufficient for conventional PCR-based differentiation of Pyrenophora teres f. teres (Ptt) and P. teres f. maculata (Ptm), the cause of the net and spot form, respectively, of barley net blotch (Lu et al. 20...

  17. Anemia in Intensive Cardiac Care Unit patients - An underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Idzkowska, Ewelina; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2015-09-01

    The heterogeneous group of patients admitted to Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) as well as nonspecific complaints associated with anemia might be the reason for underdiagnosing or minimization of this problem. Because of this heterogeneity, there are no clear guidelines to follow. It is known that anemia is impairing the outcome. Thus, it is crucial to keep alert in the diagnosis and treatment of anemia, especially in critically ill cardiac patients. The greatest groups of patients admitted to ICCU are those with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), severe arrhythmias as well as individuals after cardiac operations. However, patients suffering other critical cardiac illnesses quite often become anemic during hospitalization in ICCU. It is because anemia is typed in the clinical features of heavy diseases or may be the consequence of treatment. The current review focuses on the incidence, complex etiology and predictive role of anemia in a diverse group of ICCU patients. It discusses clinical aspects of anemia treatment in particular groups of critically ill cardiac patients because proper treatment increases chances for recovery and improves the outcome in this severe group of patients. PMID:26149915

  18. Anemia in the elderly: a public health crisis in hematology.

    PubMed

    Guralnik, Jack M; Ershler, William B; Schrier, Stanley L; Picozzi, Vincent J

    2005-01-01

    Over 3 million people in the United States aged 65 years and older are anemic. This condition is associated with significant functional impairment and, perhaps, increased mortality. In March 2004, the American Society of Hematology (in conjunction with the National Institute of Aging) convened a "blue ribbon" panel of twenty physicians who are experts on various aspects of this topic. This paper highlights important consensus concepts resulting from that meeting. In particular, four areas of thought are shared. First, the epidemiology of anemia in the elderly is reviewed, including its definition, its expression in different racial groups, and its wide-ranging manifestations. Second, the pathophysiology of anemia in the elderly is reviewed as pertains to three general etiological categories (nutritional, chronic diseases, and so-called "unexplained" anemias). Particular emphasis is given to pathophysiologic mechanisms of anemia that are potentially unique to this age group. Third, a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of anemia for this patient population for the practicing hematologist is provided. Finally, the public health implications of anemia in the elderly for key stakeholder constituencies will be discussed in the oral presentation. PMID:16304431

  19. Erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors associated with hereditary anemia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    Most heritable anemias are caused by mutations in genes encoding globins, red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins, or enzymes in the glycolytic and hexose monophosphate shunt pathways. A less common class of genetic anemia is caused by mutations that alter the functions of erythroid transcription factors (TFs). Many TF mutations associated with heritable anemia cause truncations or amino acid substitutions, resulting in the production of functionally altered proteins. Characterization of these mutant proteins has provided insights into mechanisms of gene expression, hematopoietic development, and human disease. Mutations within promoter or enhancer regions that disrupt TF binding to essential erythroid genes also cause anemia and heritable variations in RBC traits, such as fetal hemoglobin content. Defining the latter may have important clinical implications for de-repressing fetal hemoglobin synthesis to treat sickle cell anemia and β thalassemia. Functionally important alterations in genes encoding TFs or their cognate cis elements are likely to occur more frequently than currently appreciated, a hypothesis that will soon be tested through ongoing genome-wide association studies and the rapidly expanding use of global genome sequencing for human diagnostics. Findings obtained through such studies of RBCs and associated diseases are likely generalizable to many human diseases and quantitative traits. PMID:24652993

  20. A Case of Fetal Intestinal Volvulus Without Malrotation Causing Severe Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Tachibana, Daisuke; Kitada, Kohei; Kurihara, Yasushi; Terada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Masayasu; Sakae, Yukari; Morotomi, Yoshiki; Nomura, Shiho; Saito, Mika

    2015-01-01

    Fetal intestinal volvulus without malrotation is a rare, life-threatening disease. Left untreated, hemorrhage from necrotic bowel tissue will lead to severe fetal anemia and even intrauterine death. We encountered a case of fetal intestinal volvulus causing severe anemia, which was diagnosed postnatally and successfully treated with surgical intervention. PMID:25628516

  1. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  2. Anemia - B12 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... vitamin B12. They include: Chronic alcoholism Crohn disease, celiac disease, infection with the fish tapeworm, or other ... may no longer be needed after Crohn disease, celiac disease, or alcoholism is properly treated. Your doctor ...

  3. Anemia of renal failure. Use of erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Humphries, J E

    1992-05-01

    Chronic renal failure is almost invariably accompanied by symptomatic anemia. It has been demonstrated that the primary cause of this anemia is inadequate production of erythropoietin by the diseased kidneys. The isolation of erythropoietin, followed by the cloning and expression of the human erythropoietin gene, made possible clinical trials of rHuEPO in uremic patients. rHuEPO produced dramatic increases in the hematocrit in almost all patients treated and also ameliorated many symptoms, such as lethargy, dizziness, and poor appetite, that had long been attributed to the effect of uremic toxins. Adverse effects of treatment with rHuEPO noted in the early clinical trials included hypertension, seizures, arteriovenous fistula or shunt thrombosis, and hyperkalemia. Further study of rHuEPO has shown that many of these side effects may be no more frequent in patients receiving rHuEPO than in other uremic patients not receiving rHuEPO. Reduction of the rHuEPO dosage and subcutaneous administration produce less rapid increases in the hematocrit and may lessen the incidence and severity of these side effects. rHuEPO therapy places great demands on both the body's iron stores and the capacity to rapidly transfer iron from storage sites to the erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, almost all patients treated with rHuEPO become iron deficient and require oral or parenteral iron replacement. Response to rHuEPO in uremic patients is diminished if the anemia is complicated by iron deficiency, inflammatory disorders, aluminum overload, or deficiency of folate or vitamin B12. rHuEPO therapy is safe and effective in the treatment of the anemia of chronic renal failure. The use of rHuEPO leads to enhanced quality of life and eliminates the need for red cell transfusions. In addition to hemodialysis patients, predialysis patients and those on CAPD benefit from and are candidates for rHuEPO therapy. PMID:1578966

  4. Linkage analyses in british pedigrees suggest a single locus for Darier disease and narrow the location to the interval between D12S105 and D12S129

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.A.; Bryce, S.D.; Bashir, R.

    1994-11-15

    Darier disease is a dominantly inherited skin disorder in which there appears to be abnormal adhesion between keratinocytes. The authors and others have shown that the disease in some British pedigrees is closely linked to markers mapping to 12q23-q24.1. In the present study they have defined crossovers that enable narrowing the location of the disease gene to the interval between the D12S105 and the D12S129 markers. This interval may be expected to be on the order of about 4 cM on the basis of linkage data obtained using the primary CEPH reference families. The data provide further evidence for locus homogeneity: each of four large British pedigrees, two of which have previously been subjected to preliminary characterization, shows statistically significant evidence for linkage to markers mapping to 12q23-q24.1. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Infections and inequalities: anemia in AIDS, the disadvantages of poverty

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Lucia; Seley, Celeste; Martorano, Julieta; Garcia-Moreno, Isabella; Troncoso, Alcides

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study anemia in AIDS patients and its relation with socioeconomic, employment status and educational levels. Methods A total number of 442 patients who visited the Infectious Diseases University Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina were included in the study. Patients were dividied into two groups, i.e. one with anemia and the other without anemia. Anemia epidemiology and its relationship with educational level, housing, job situation, monthly income, total daily caloric intake and weekly intake of meat were evaluated. Results Anemia was found in 228 patients (54%). Comparing patients with or without anemia, a statistically significant difference was found (P<0.000 1) in those whose highest educational level reached was primary school, who lived in a precarious home, who had no stable job or were unable to work, whose income was less than 30 dollars per month, whose meat consumption was less than twice a week or received less than 8 000 calories per day. Conclusions The high prevalence of anemia found in poor patients with AIDS suggests that poverty increases the risk to suffer from this hematological complication. The relationship between economic development policies and AIDS is complex. Our results seem to point to the fact that AIDS epidemic may affect economic development and in turn be affected by it. If we consider that AIDS affects the economically active adult population, despite recent medical progress it usually brings about fatal consequences, especially within the poorest sectors of society where the disease reduces the average life expectancy, increases health care demand and tends to exacerbate poverty and iniquity. PMID:23569955

  6. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease that primarily affects the black population. This anemia is due to a homozygous state of the abnormal hemoglobin S. An alteration occurs on the DNA molecule involving the substitution of the amino acid valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position on the beta polypeptide chain. This biochemical variation on the DNA molecule creates a physiological change that causes sickle-shaped red blood cells to be produced. The sickle-shaped cells are the result of the hemoglobin S being deoxygenated. This case report presents a case of 16-year-old female with sickle cell disease and its dental management. How to cite this article: Acharya S. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):141-144. PMID:26379384

  8. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease that primarily affects the black population. This anemia is due to a homozygous state of the abnormal hemoglobin S. An alteration occurs on the DNA molecule involving the substitution of the amino acid valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position on the beta polypeptide chain. This biochemical variation on the DNA molecule creates a physiological change that causes sickle-shaped red blood cells to be produced. The sickle-shaped cells are the result of the hemoglobin S being deoxygenated. This case report presents a case of 16-year-old female with sickle cell disease and its dental management. How to cite this article: Acharya S. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):141-144. PMID:26379384

  9. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dacie, J V

    1975-10-01

    Warm-type autoantibodies of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are usually IgG but may be IgM or IgA. They are usual Rh specific. Cold-type antibodies are IgM or IgG (Donath-Landsteiner [DL] antibody). IgM antibodies are usually anit-l (occasionally anti-i) and DL antibodies anti-P. The warm IgG antibodies do not fix complement (C); they cause red blood cell (RBC) destruction predominantly in the spleen as the result of interaction between fixing; they cause RBC destruction either by intravascular lysis (complement sequence completed) or by interaction between C3-coated RBCs and phagocytes in liver and spleen. Gentic factors, immunoglobulin deficiency, somatic mutation, viral infections and drugs, and failure of T-lymphocyte function, all probably play a part in breaking immunological tolerance and the development of AIHA. PMID:1164110

  10. Therapy for aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    DeZern, Amy E; Guinan, Eva C

    2011-01-01

    A 24-year-old man from Ecuador presents to your clinic with dyspnea on exertion, bruising, and petechiae. He is noted to be pancytopenic with ANC 430, hemoglobin 7.4 g/dL (reticulocyte count 0.9%), and platelets 18 000. His BM biopsy is hypocellular for age. Ultimately, he is diagnosed with severe aplastic anemia. He is the only child of 2 South American parents without any matches in the unrelated donor registry, including cord blood. He is red cell- and platelet transfusion-dependent. He has been recommended therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine but declined it. He seeks recommendations about new alternatives to this regimen to improve his chance of response. PMID:22160016

  11. Ret-Y a measure of reticulocyte size: a sensitive indicator of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Kickler, T S; Borowitz, M J; Thompson, R E; Charintranont, N; Law, R

    2004-12-01

    In this study the size of reticulocytes was measured, reticulocyte-Y (Ret-Y), to distinguish iron deficiency anemia from the anemia of chronic disease using a Sysmex XE2100 cell counter. We evaluated this parameter prospectively in 100 patients seen for the evaluation of anemia. A clinical diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia or anemia of chronic disease was made on the basis of a complete blood count, examination of the peripheral smear, and serum ferritin along with a history and physical examination. We analyzed the sensitivity and specificity of the Ret-Y in relationship to the clinical diagnosis. We also measured serum transferrin receptor levels to use as the gold standard laboratory test for iron deficiency against which we compared the Ret-Y. In 40 normal individuals with normal serum ferritin and transferrin receptor levels the mean Ret-Y was 1874 +/- 178 (1 SD). The mean Ret-Y in the anemia of chronic disease group (n=62) was 1722 +/- 162, not significantly different from normal. The mean Ret-Y value among iron-deficient patients (n=38), was 1407 +/- 136 (P <0.01 vs. the anemia of chronic disease group's Ret-Y value). Receiver operator curves showed that Ret-Y correlated closely to the serum transferrin receptor and was superior to the mean corpuscular volume, and ferritin level, in differentiating the type of anemia. The Ret-Y parameter has the highest overall sensitivity and specificity of the panel of tests routinely used in differentiating iron deficiency anemia from anemia of chronic disease. PMID:15596002

  12. nm1054: a spontaneous, recessive, hypochromic, microcytic anemia mutation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Ohgami, Robert S; Campagna, Dean R; Antiochos, Brendan; Wood, Emily B; Sharp, John J; Barker, Jane E; Fleming, Mark D

    2005-11-15

    Hypochromic, microcytic anemias are typically the result of inadequate hemoglobin production because of globin defects or iron deficiency. Here, we describe the phenotypic characteristics and pathogenesis of a new recessive, hypochromic, microcytic anemia mouse mutant, nm1054. Although the mutation nm1054 is pleiotropic, also resulting in sparse hair, male infertility, failure to thrive, and hydrocephaly, the anemia is the focus of this study. Hematologic analysis reveals a moderately severe, congenital, hypochromic, microcytic anemia, with an elevated red cell zinc protoporphyrin, consistent with functional erythroid iron deficiency. However, serum and tissue iron analyses show that nm1054 animals are not systemically iron deficient. From hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and iron uptake studies in nm1054 reticulocytes, we provide evidence that the nm1054 anemia is due to an intrinsic hematopoietic defect resulting in inefficient transferrin-dependent iron uptake by erythroid precursors. Linkage studies demonstrate that nm1054 maps to a genetic locus not previously implicated in microcytic anemia or iron phenotypes. PMID:15994289

  13. Prevalence and incidence of anemia in the German Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Lewin; Dürig, Jan; Broecker-Preuss, Martina; Dührsen, Ulrich; Bokhof, Beate; Erbel, Raimund; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-06-01

    This study aims to determine prevalence and incidence of anemia in the general population in Germany and evaluate a potential role of serum-free light chains (FLC) as biomarker in anemia. The population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study comprises 4,814 men and women aged 45-75 years. Hemoglobin <13 g/dl in men and <12 g/dl in women defined anemia. Laboratory data was used to classify cases into renal, iron deficiency (IDA), vitamin B12/folic acid deficiency, anemia of chronic disease (ACD), and unexplained anemia (UA). Follow-up data was available from annual questionnaires, death certificates, and 5-year follow-up visit (5-year FU). Anemia cases (152) were identified (prevalence 3.2 %, 95 % CI 2.7-3.7). In participants aged 65 or older, prevalence was 4.3 % (95 % CI 2.9-6.0) in both men and women. Main anemia subtypes were: IDA 19 %, ACD 25 %, and UA 44 %. Incidence increased with age and was 12.8/1,000 person-years and 10.9/1,000 person-years in men and women aged 65 or older, respectively. UA was characterized by elevated FLC. Participants with elevated FLC and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) had an increased risk of anemia at 5-year FU. FLC-alone or in combination with hsCRP-may serve as biomarker indicating an increased risk of developing anemia. PMID:23430088

  14. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... need for blood transfusions. Medicines To Suppress the Immune System Research suggests that aplastic anemia may sometimes occur because the body's immune system attacks its own cells by mistake. For this ...

  15. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... I told my doctor that I was very tired. My doctor did blood tests to check for ... or faint ● ● Short of breath ● ● Very weak and tired ● ● Your heart beating very fast What is anemia? ...

  16. Iron, anemia and hepcidin in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Spottiswoode, Natasha; Duffy, Patrick E.; Drakesmith, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Malaria and iron have a complex but important relationship. Plasmodium proliferation requires iron, both during the clinically silent liver stage of growth and in the disease-associated phase of erythrocyte infection. Precisely how the protozoan acquires its iron from its mammalian host remains unclear, but iron chelators can inhibit pathogen growth in vitro and in animal models. In humans, iron deficiency appears to protect against severe malaria, while iron supplementation increases risks of infection and disease. Malaria itself causes profound disturbances in physiological iron distribution and utilization, through mechanisms that include hemolysis, release of heme, dyserythropoiesis, anemia, deposition of iron in macrophages, and inhibition of dietary iron absorption. These effects have significant consequences. Malarial anemia is a major global health problem, especially in children, that remains incompletely understood and is not straightforward to treat. Furthermore, the changes in iron metabolism during a malaria infection may modulate susceptibility to co-infections. The release of heme and accumulation of iron in granulocytes may explain increased vulnerability to non-typhoidal Salmonella during malaria. The redistribution of iron away from hepatocytes and into macrophages may confer host resistance to superinfection, whereby blood-stage parasitemia prevents the development of a second liver-stage Plasmodium infection in the same organism. Key to understanding the pathophysiology of iron metabolism in malaria is the activity of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin is upregulated during blood-stage parasitemia and likely mediates much of the iron redistribution that accompanies disease. Understanding the regulation and role of hepcidin may offer new opportunities to combat malaria and formulate better approaches to treat anemia in the developing world. PMID:24910614

  17. Cold agglutinin-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Randen, Ulla; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2015-06-01

    Cold antibody types account for about 25% of autoimmune hemolytic anemias. Primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is characterized by a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) complicates specific infections and malignancies. Hemolysis in CAD and CAS is mediated by the classical complement pathway and is predominantly extravascular. Not all patients require treatment. Successful CAD therapy targets the pathogenic B-cell clone. Complement modulation seems promising in both CAD and CAS. Further development and documentation are necessary before clinical use. We review options for possible complement-directed therapy. PMID:26043385

  18. Aplastic Anemia in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E.; Guinan, Eva C.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent and young adult patient presentations of aplastic anemia require a particular perspective on both diagnosis and treatment. This unique age group necessitates a thorough diagnostic evaluation to ensure the etiology, acquired or inherited, is sufficiently determined. The treatment options include human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic cell transplantation or immunosuppressive therapy, and both require attention to the specific medical and social needs of these adolescents and young adults. Longitudinal surveillance throughout life for the development of late complications of the disease and treatment is mandatory. PMID:25228559

  19. Impairment of Bone Health in Pediatric Patients with Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schündeln, Michael M.; Goretzki, Sarah C.; Hauffa, Pia K.; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Grasemann, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. Study Design To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P = 0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P = 0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025) influence of LDH (partial r2 = 0.29), diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2 = 0.05) and age (partial r2 = 0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Conclusion Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment. PMID:25299063

  20. Effects of Iron Supplementation With and Without Docosahexaenoic Acid on the Cardiovascular Disease Risk Based on Paraoxonase-1, hs-CRP, and ApoB/ApoA-I Ratio in Women with Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Shidfar, Farzad; Amani, Samira; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Shekarriz, Ramin; Hosseini, Sharieh; Shidfar, Shahrzad; Eshraghian, Mohammadreza; Mousavi, Seyedeh Neda

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that tissue deposition of iron following prolonged high dose of oral supplementation for treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) leads to body iron overload and oxidative stress, which starts the process of atherosclerosis. This study aimed to determine the effect of iron supplementation in combination with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the cardiovascular disease risk based on paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and ApoB/ApoA-I ratio in women with IDA. In this randomized controlled trial, 76 women with IDA, aged 15-45 years, were included. The patients were randomly assigned to receive 500 mg of DHA supplement or placebo with an iron tablet, once daily for 12 weeks. The participants were assessed by measurement of the serum iron, ferritin, PON-1, hs-CRP levels, and the ApoB/ApoA-I ratio at the beginning and end of study. Serum hs-CRP decreased in the DHA-supplemented group (p = 0.036), and ApoA-I decreased in the placebo group (p = 0.013). No significant difference was detected for the serum PON-1 concentration and the ApoB/ApoA-I ratio in two groups. Iron supplementation combined with DHA may have favorable effects on serum hs-CRP in women with IDA. PMID:26077874

  1. An unusual presentation of listeriosis: anemia and cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Teo, Hooi Khee; Yap, Jonathan; Fong, Yuke Tien

    2014-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen causing food-borne disease. It usually affects the young as well as immunocompromised individuals and is associated with high mortality rates. Cutaneous manifestations have rarely been described. We describe an interesting case of a traveller from the tropics presenting with cutaneous listeriosis and anemia. PMID:24968680

  2. [The importance of genetic counseling at sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Cínthia Tavares Leal; Coelho, Gabriela Ortega

    2010-06-01

    The genetic counseling has the purpose of guiding people through a conscientious and balanced decision making process regarding procreation, helping them to understand how the hereditary succession can contribute for the occurrence or risk of recurrence of genetic illnesses, as it is the case of the sickle cell anemia. This type of anemia is the most prevalence hereditary illness in Brazil and has clinical complications that can harm the development, the quality of life and lead to death. The present article has the objective to clarify the importance of the genetic counseling for the anemia carriers or falciform trace, aiming at to point out the main characteristics of this illness, its complications and how the diagnosis is made. The study was based on the bibliographical method, looking for studies that deal with this type of anemia and genetic counseling, relating them with guidelines and data from the Health Ministry. Based on the found data, we infer the importance of genetic counseling for the individuals who present the heterozygote form of sickle cell anemia - the falcemic trace - and highlight the need to implement precocious diagnostics programs and genetic and social/psychological orientation for those with the disease or falciform trace. PMID:20640335

  3. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  4. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia? The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue ( ... mild symptoms or none at all. Complications of Anemia Some people who have anemia may have arrhythmias ( ...

  5. Chronic Anemia and the Role of the Infusion Therapy Nurse.

    PubMed

    Betcher, Jeffrey; Van Ryan, Velvet; Mikhael, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chronic anemia develops over a course of weeks to months and is usually mild to moderate in nature. It is important to understand the etiology of the reduced number of circulating red blood cells to treat the anemia appropriately. Diagnosis is dependent on patient history and laboratory findings, such as complete blood counts, iron studies, a peripheral smear, and occasionally, a bone marrow biopsy. Treatment modalities frequently administered by infusion therapy nurses include treatment of the underlying chronic disease, replacement of deficiencies (iron, vitamin B12, folate, or erythropoietin), or transfusion of red blood cells. Infusion therapy nurses play a vital role in the assessment and delivery of medication therapy to patients with chronic anemia. PMID:26339940

  6. [Cardiopulmonary complications in sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Jiménez, Sara; Lopera-Valle, Johan; Yabur-Espítia, Mirna

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, considered the most prevalent genetic disease among African Americans, is a disease with autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, characterized by the production of hemoglobin S. This abnormal protein polymerizes and facilitates the formation of fibrillar aggregates that alters the erythrocyte morphology. The stiffness of the red blood cells hinders the adequate transit across microcirculation, leading to hemolysis and increased blood viscosity, which ease thrombogenesis and vascular occlusion, resulting in tissue ischemia and microinfarcts. This disease has a high rate of morbidity and mortality, especially in the first three years of life, when a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential. Cardiovascular complications such as heart failure and pulmonary hypertension may develop independently, and each one contributes to increased mortality, being the combination of both risk factors, an important aggravating factor for prognosis and a determinant indicator of mortality. PMID:24215682

  7. Selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B12 displays recessive Mendelian inheritance: Assignment of a locus to chromosome 10 by linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Aminoff, M.; Tahvanainen, E.; Chapelle, A. de la

    1995-10-01

    Juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B12 has been considered a distinct condition displaying autosomal recessive inheritance. It appears to have a worldwide distribution, and comparatively high incidences were reported 30 years ago in Finland and Norway. More recently, the Mendelian inheritance of the condition has been questioned because almost no new cases have occurred in these populations. Here we report linkage studies assigning a recessive-gene locus for the disease to chromosome 10 in previously diagnosed multiplex families from Finland and Norway, proving the Mendelian mode of inheritance. The locus is tentatively assigned to the 6-cM interval between markers D10S548 and D10S466, with a multipoint maximum lod score (Z{sub max}) of 5.36 near marker D10S1477. By haplotype analysis, the healthy sibs in these families did not appear to constitute any examples of nonpenetrance. We hypothesize that the paucity of new cases in these populations is due either to a dietary effect on the gene penetrance that has changed with time, or to a drop in the birth rate in subpopulations showing enrichment of the mutation, or to both of these causes. 38 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Disruption of the Hbs1l-Myb locus causes hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mikiko; Yamazaki, Hiromi; Mukai, Harumi Y; Motohashi, Hozumi; Shi, Lihong; Tanabe, Osamu; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-04-01

    The human β-globin locus is comprised of embryonic, fetal, and adult globin genes, each of which is expressed at distinct stages of pre- and postnatal development. Functional defects in globin proteins or expression results in mild to severe anemia, such as in sickle-cell disease or β-thalassemia, but the clinical symptoms of both disorders are ameliorated by persistent expression of the fetal globin genes. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified the intergenic region between the HBS1L and MYB loci as a candidate modifier of fetal hemoglobin expression in adults. However, it remains to be clarified whether the enhancer activity within the HBS1L-MYB regulatory domain contributes to the production of fetal hemoglobin in adults. Here we report a new mouse model of hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) in which a transgene was randomly inserted into the orthologous murine Hbs1l-Myb locus. This mutant mouse exhibited typically elevated expression of embryonic globins and hematopoietic parameters similar to those observed in human HPFH. These results support the contention that mutation of the HBS1L-MYB genomic domain is responsible for elevated expression of the fetal globin genes, and this model serves as an important means for the analysis of networks that regulate fetal globin gene expression. PMID:23428869

  9. The IGF2 Locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone regulating various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 is vital to embryo development. The IGF2 locus covers approximately 150-kb genomic region on human chromosome 11, containing two imprinted genes, IGF2 and H19, sha...

  10. What Is Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the News December 3, 2015 Link between congenital heart disease and neurodevelopment issues in children found Scientists have ... set of gene mutations in the development of congenital heart disease and simultaneously discovered a link between them and ...

  11. Hepatic bilirubin UDP-glucuronyltransferase in patients with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Maddrey, W C; Cukier, J O; Maglalang, A C; Boitnott, J K; Odell, G B

    1978-02-01

    In sickle cell anemia the shortened survival of red blood cells presents the liver with an augmented load of bilirubin for hepatic clearance. To determine the effects of this excessive bilirubin load on the microsomal conjugating enzyme, hepatic bilirubin UDP-glucuronyltransferase, levels of this enzyme were measured in liver biopsies from patients with sickle cell anemia and several comparison groups. UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity in 14 patients with sickle cell anemia was 2-fold greater (P less than 0.005) than in 14 nonjaundiced comparison patients without liver disease. The elevated UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity in sickle cell anemia was similar to that found in 10 patients who chronically ingested drugs (barbiturates or estrogens) known to increase UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity. These observations suggest enhanced conjugation of bilirubin in patients with sickle cell anemia may result from substrate (bilirubin) induction of UDP-glycuronyltransferase. PMID:413760

  12. Non-Myeloablative Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation With Matched Unrelated Donors for Treatment of Hematologic Malignancies, Renal Cell Carcinoma, and Aplastic Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-11-07

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myelodysplasia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Follicular Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma; NHL; Myeloproliferative Diseases; Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Aplastic Anemia

  13. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  14. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning . Symptoms Mild anemia may have no symptoms. As ... Saunders; 2011:chap 449. Read More Anemia Hemoglobin Lead poisoning Update Date 2/25/2014 Updated by: Sameer ...

  15. Anemia Boosts Stroke Death Risk, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160476.html Anemia Boosts Stroke Death Risk, Study Finds Blood condition ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older stroke victims suffering from anemia -- a lack of red blood cells -- may have ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CDA congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  17. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic - caused by chemicals or toxins ... Possible substances that can cause hemolytic anemia include: Anti-malaria drugs (quinine compounds) Arsenic Dapsone Intravenous water infusion (not half-normal saline or normal saline) Metals (chromium/chromates, ...

  18. Anemia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Anemia URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/anemia.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  19. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell disease? Sickle cell disease, also called sickle cell anemia, is a hereditary condition (which means it runs ... or blocks blood and oxygen reaching nearby tissues. Sickle cell disease ... the whites of the eyes) Anemia (the decreased ability of the blood to carry ...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxian; Li, Chenglong; Li, Qiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is the result of altered genetic make up due to hereditary encounter and its form as homozygous sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe. The disease is characterized by chronic anemia, recurrent pain crises and vascular occlusion. Neurologically, there is a high incidence of stroke in childhood, as well as cognitive dysfunction. Newborn screening programmes and preventative treatments have allowed a much longer lifespan. However, recently, neurological research has shifted to characterizing more subtle aspects of brain development and functioning that may be critically important to the individual's quality of life. The present review article examines the neurological and neurocognitive complications of sickle cell disease, and discusses the importance of magnetic resonance imaging scans in the management of the disease. PMID:27446243

  1. Prevalence and Predictors of Anemia in a Population-Based Study of Octogenarians and Centenarians in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Haslam, Alyson; Johnson, Mary Ann; Davey, Adam; Poon, Leonard W.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anemia has been associated with increased physical and financial costs and occurs more frequently in older individuals. Therefore, the primary objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence and possible predictors of anemia in the very old. Methods. Hemoglobin was used to identify those with anemia in a group of centenarians and near centenarians (98+, n = 185) and octogenarians (n = 69), who were recruited as part of the population-based multidisciplinary Georgia Centenarian Study. Blood markers, including ferritin, vitamin B12, red blood cell folate, methylmalonic acid, creatinine, and C-reactive protein, demographic variables, and medication and/or supplement usage were used to determine possible predictors of anemia. Results. The prevalence of anemia was 26.2% in octogenarians and 52.1% in centenarians. Low serum albumin (<3.6 g/dL) and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (<45 mL/min/m2) were predictors of anemia in centenarians. Conclusions. Anemia is a major health issue, particularly as people age. Because of the high prevalence of anemia in older individuals, awareness of the predictors associated with anemia becomes increasingly important so as to reduce the negative consequences associated with it and allow for the identification of steps that can be taken to correct anemia, including managing chronic disease. PMID:21896502

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Rasmussen, Morten; Nathan, Torben

    2015-04-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women < 40 years of age. Small intestine investigation (capsule endoscopy, CT, or MRI enterography) is not recommended routinely after negative bidirectional endoscopy but should be conducted if there are red flags indicating malignant or inflammatory small bowel disease (e.g., involuntary weight loss, abdominal pain or increased CRP). Targeted treatment of any cause of anemia with iron deficiency found on diagnostic assessment should be initiated. In addition, iron supplementation should be administered, with the goal of normalizing hemoglobin levels and replenishing iron stores. Oral treatment with a 100-200 mg daily dose of elemental iron is recommended (lower dose if side effects), but 3-6 months of oral iron therapy is often required to achieve therapeutic goals. Intravenous iron therapy is used if oral treatment lacks efficacy or causes side effects or in the presence of intestinal malabsorption or prolonged inflammation. Three algorithms are given for the following conditions: a) the paraclinical diagnosis of anemia with iron deficiency; b) the diagnostic work-up for unexplained anemia with

  3. [Algorithm for treating preoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Hemoglobin optimization and treatment of preoperative anemia in surgery with a moderate to high risk of surgical bleeding reduces the rate of transfusions and improves hemoglobin levels at discharge and can also improve postoperative outcomes. To this end, we need to schedule preoperative visits sufficiently in advance to treat the anemia. The treatment algorithm we propose comes with a simple checklist to determine whether we should refer the patient to a specialist or if we can treat the patient during the same visit. With the blood count test and additional tests for iron metabolism, inflammation parameter and glomerular filtration rate, we can decide whether to start the treatment with intravenous iron alone or erythropoietin with or without iron. With significant anemia, a visit after 15 days might be necessary to observe the response and supplement the treatment if required. The hemoglobin objective will depend on the type of surgery and the patient's characteristics. PMID:26320341

  4. [Anemia treatment in peritoneal dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Janković, Nikola; Janković, Mateja

    2009-09-01

    Anemia is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and patients receiving renal replacement therapy. In this paper we will outline the prevention and treatment of anemia in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). PD patients are less anemic and more sensitive to erythropoesis-stimulating agent (ESA) than their hemodialysis (HD) counterparts and, in general, dosages required for achieving similar hemoglobin levels to those achieved in HD patients are remarkably less. Before starting with ESA treatment we have to evaluate the degree of anemia and excluded other causes which are not connected with CKD and method of treatment. Patient's compliance is crucial for a successful therapy and it can be improved by decreasing frequency of administration of ESA. Since ESAare expensive, "cost-effectivnes" studies represent an important factor in choosing a distinct drug. Subcutaneous administration provides better long-term utilization of ESA in comparison to intravenous administration and is therefore preferred in PD patients. Intraperitoneal administration is not recommended due to poor bioavailability. In some patients we can observe the reduced response to ESA therapy. The definition of reduced response is generally regarded as a failure to achieve target hemoglobin concentration of >11 g/dL. Identification of underlying cause is not always easy but every attempt should be made to investigate every patient with resistance to therapy because some causes are easily corrected. Since 2005 particular ESA drugs have been approved by Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and registered for use in Croatia. For PD patients the ESAcan be prescribed by general practitioner. The list of available drugs is available in the official government newspaper Nardone novine No.27, March 2nd, 2009. PMID:20232548

  5. Depressive disorders co-existing with Addison–Biermer anemia – case report

    PubMed Central

    Just, Mark Jean; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia is a disease that can co-exist with depression, other mental disorders, or somatic diseases. Anemia can imitate symptoms of depression, while depression symptoms can mask concurring symptoms of anemia. Case presentation I am presenting a case of a 48-year-old woman with Addison–Biermer anemia, with co-existing mood disorders. The clinical analysis of the presented patient’s history indicates diagnostic problems and a need for a detailed analysis of drug-related complications that occurred during previous treatment, eg, in the form of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Conclusion The presented case report contains valuable guidelines that can be of assistance in diagnostics and treatment of patients treated for mental disorders, who are also diagnosed with somatic diseases. PMID:25995639

  6. (Inborn anemias of mice): Terminal progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations located at 11 different chromosomal locations in the mouse all affecting hemopoiesis have been studied. These include: Hertwig's anemia (an), W-anemias (W, W/sup v/, W/sup 17J/ to W/sup 41J/), Steel anemias (Sl, Sl/sup d/, etc.), Normoblastic anemia (nb), Jaundiced (ja), Spherocytic anemias (sph, sph/sup ha/), sph/sup 2J/, sph/sup 2BC/, Flexed-tail anemia (f), Microcytic anemia (mk), Sex-linked anemia (Sla), Alpha thallasemia (Hba/sup th/), and a hypochromic anemia associated with low transferrin levels (hpx). Our findings indicate that the erythroid defect in W-anemias stem from an intrinsic defect in the erythroid progenitor cells, and that all other erythroid hemostatic mechanisms are fully functional. Hertwig's anemia (an) is affected in a similar fashion. However, in the case of Steel anemias, the erythroid progenitors are repressed, but when transplanted to appropriate recipients were found to be fully functional. 70 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Thymoma with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kensuke; Inomata, Minehiko; Shiraishi, Shiori; Hayashi, Ryuji; Tobe, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old Japanese male was referred to our hospital with abnormal chest X-ray results and severe Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. He was diagnosed with a stage IV, WHO type A thymoma and was treated with oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) and subsequent chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, the patient underwent surgical resection of the thymoma. Hemolysis rapidly disappeared and did not return after the discontinuation of oral corticosteroids. Corticosteroid therapy may be preferable to chemotherapy or thymoma surgical resection in the management of autoimmune hemolytic anemia with thymoma. PMID:25722666

  8. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Manchandani, Raj Pal; Oneal, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare. PMID:27559485

  9. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchandani, Raj Pal; Oneal, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare. PMID:27559485

  10. BMT Abatacept for Non-Malignant Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Hurler Syndrome; Fanconi Anemia; Glanzmann Thrombasthenia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Dyskeratosis-congenita; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia; Thalassemia Major; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Sickle Cell Disease

  11. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Total Bilirubin and Cholelithiasis Risk in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Milton, Jacqueline N.; Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia; Hartley, Stephen W.; Bhatnagar, Pallav; Arking, Dan E.; Dworkis, Daniel A.; Casella, James F.; Barron-Casella, Emily; Bean, Christopher J.; Hooper, W. Craig; DeBaun, Michael R.; Garrett, Melanie E.; Soldano, Karen; Telen, Marilyn J.; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Gladwin, Mark T.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Steinberg, Martin H.; Klings, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Serum bilirubin levels have been associated with polymorphisms in the UGT1A1 promoter in normal populations and in patients with hemolytic anemias, including sickle cell anemia. When hemolysis occurs circulating heme increases, leading to elevated bilirubin levels and an increased incidence of cholelithiasis. We performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bilirubin levels and cholelithiasis risk in a discovery cohort of 1,117 sickle cell anemia patients. We found 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with total bilirubin levels at the genome-wide significance level (p value <5×10−8). SNPs in UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A6, UGT1A8 and UGT1A10, different isoforms within the UGT1A locus, were identified (most significant rs887829, p = 9.08×10−25). All of these associations were validated in 4 independent sets of sickle cell anemia patients. We tested the association of the 15 SNPs with cholelithiasis in the discovery cohort and found a significant association (most significant p value 1.15×10−4). These results confirm that the UGT1A region is the major regulator of bilirubin metabolism in African Americans with sickle cell anemia, similar to what is observed in other ethnicities. PMID:22558097

  12. Solenostemon monostachyus, Ipomoea involucrata and Carica papaya seed oil versus Glutathione, or Vernonia amygdalina: Methanolic extracts of novel plants for the management of sickle cell anemia disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disease caused by an individual inheriting an allele for sickle cell hemoglobin from both parents and is associated with unusually large numbers of immature blood cells, containing many long, thin, crescent-shaped erythrocytes. It is a disease prevalent throughout many populations. The use of medicinal plants and nutrition in managing SCD is gaining increasing attention. Methods The antisickling effects of Solenostemon monostachyus (SolMon), Carica papaya seed oil (Cari-oil) and Ipomoea involucrata (Ipocrata) in male (HbSSM) and female (HbSSF) human sickle cell blood was examined in vitro and compared with controls, or cells treated with glutathione or an antisickling plant (Vernonia amygdalina; VerMyg). Results Levels of sickle blood cells were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in all the plant-extract treated SCD patients’ blood compared with that of untreated SCD patients. RBCs in SolMon, Ipocrata, and Cari-oil treated samples were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with VerMyg-treated samples. The Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in all plant extract-treated HbSSM samples compared with controls. Hemoglobin concentration was significantly increased (P < 0.05) by SolMon treatment in HbSSF compared with VerMyg. Sickle cell polymerization inhibition exhibited by SolMon was significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with that of VerMyg in HbSSF blood. Sickle cell polymerization inhibition in SolMon and Ipocrata were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with VerMyg in HbSSM blood. All plant extracts significantly reduced (P < 0.05) lactate dehydrogenase activity in both HbSSM and HbSSF-treated blood. Catalase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in HbSSF blood treated with Ipocrata compared with glutathione. Cari-oil treated HbSSM and HbSSF blood had significantly increased (P < 0.05) peroxidase activity compared with controls. Conclusions Methanolic extracts from S

  13. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tienari, P.J. Univ. of Helsinki ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. ); Palo, J. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-01-15

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  14. Is there any relation between Duration of breastfeeding and anemia?

    PubMed Central

    Dalili, H; Baghersalimi, A; Dalili, S; Pakdaman, F; Hassanzadeh Rad, A; Abbasi Kakroodi, M; Rezvany, SM; Koohmanaei, Sh

    2015-01-01

    Background In the early months of life, Breastfeeding increases chance of survival, reduces recovery time after disease and mortality due to infections such as diarrhea and acute respiratory infections. However, infants who are exclusively breast-fed for more than 6 months in developing countries may be at increased risk of anemia. Therefore, the aim of study was to assess the relation between duration of breastfeeding and anemia. Materials and Methods In this analytical cross-sectional study, 400 neonates registered in primary health care system since birth time. Complete blood count and serum ferritin were obtained. Data were analyzed by chi- square test and regression analysis. P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant and 95% confidence interval was noted. Results Results of this study showed that 199 infants were anemic (Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration <11 mg/dl). Ten percent of anemic patients reported Ferritin< 12ng/dl and %25 of anemic children had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In Binominal logistic regression, merely kind of delivery and duration of breastfeeding were effective factors. Binominal logistic regression also showed that natural vaginal delivery and exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months had a significant influence on anemia. Exclusive breast feeding for 6 months or more increased the likelihood of anemia. In addition, 4 months exclusive breastfeeding decreased 0.686 fold the likelihood of anemia. Conclusion According to the results, it seems that revision of health program recommendations for iron supplementation can be constructive. National planning to promote the level of knowledge regarding natural vaginal delivery and appropriate period for clamping can be recommended. PMID:26985355

  15. Perinatal outcome in sickle cell anemia: a prospective study from India.

    PubMed

    Daigavane, Mayoor M; Jena, Rabindra K; Kar, Tushar J

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, the homozygous genotype of sickle cell disease is one of the most common heritable diseases in the world. The Arab-Asian haplotype present in India is one of the least severe of all haplotypes. Many sickle cell anemia patients are now leading a symptom-free productive life due to hydroxyurea (HU) and better supportive care. Although pregnancy in sickle cell anemia patients is considered a high-risk category, it perinatal outcome is least studied, particularly among carriers of the Arab-Asian haplotype. Thus, the present prospective, randomized study was performed to assess the perinatal outcome in sickle cell anemia. Neonatal outcome such as low birth weight, perinatal mortality rate, special care newborn unit (SCNU) admission, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and pre term births were significantly higher in sickle cell anemia mothers. Maternal outcome such as severe anemia, preeclampsia, vasoocclusive crisis (VOC), pulmonary complications, jaundice and blood transfusion requirements were significantly higher in sickle cell anemia mothers, which were successfully managed. Cesarian section rate was not significantly different from normal controls. Successful pregnancies were achieved in 84.44% of cases. However, we strongly recommend that pregnancies in these patients should be managed in an institutional setup. PMID:23952263

  16. Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone: 202–776–0544 Fax: 202–776–0545 Internet: www.hematology.org Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation ... Fax: 301–279–7205 Email: help@aamds.org Internet: www.aamds.org Iron Disorders Institute P.O. ...

  17. A 17-month-old patient with severe anemia and respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Ahmad A; Parekh, Hetu; Bahna, Sami L

    2015-01-01

    Anemia can be caused by, or be associated with, many clinical conditions, including pulmonary diseases, some of which are rare and can be misdiagnosed. Nontraumatic pulmonary bleeding may be caused by a variety of conditions and results in anemia and pulmonary hemosiderosis, even when it is subtle. The differential diagnosis in such cases is extensive. We present the case of a diagnostic dilemma in a 17-month-old child hospitalized for severe anemia and respiratory distress in which the diagnosis was settled through an allergy/immunology consultation. PMID:26534758

  18. [Anemia as a surgical risk factor].

    PubMed

    Moral García, Victoria; Ángeles Gil de Bernabé Sala, M; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Pericas, Bartolomé Cantallops; Nebot, Alexia Galindo

    2013-07-01

    Perioperative anemia is common in patients undergoing surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased quality of life. The main causes of anemia in the perioperative context are iron deficiency and chronic inflammation. Anemia can be aggravated by blood loss during surgery, and is most commonly treated with allogeneic transfusion. Moreover, blood transfusions are not without risks, once again increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Given these concerns, we propose to review the pathophysiology of anemia in the surgical environment, as well as its treatment through the consumption of iron-rich foods and by oral or intravenous iron therapy (iron sucrose and iron carboxymaltose). In chronic inflammatory anemia, we use erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (erythropoietin alpha) and, in cases of mixed anemia, the combination of both treatments. The objective is always to reduce the need for perioperative transfusions and speed the recovery from postoperative anemia, as well as decrease the patient morbidity and mortality rate. PMID:24314568

  19. Randomized placebo-controlled dose-ranging and pharmacodynamics study of roxadustat (FG-4592) to treat anemia in nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD) patients

    PubMed Central

    Besarab, Anatole; Provenzano, Robert; Hertel, Joachim; Zabaneh, Raja; Klaus, Stephen J.; Lee, Tyson; Leong, Robert; Hemmerich, Stefan; Yu, Kin-Hung Peony; Neff, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Roxadustat (FG-4592) is an oral hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor that stimulates erythropoiesis. This Phase 2a study tested efficacy (Hb response) and safety of roxadustat in anemic nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD) subjects. Methods NDD-CKD subjects with hemoglobin (Hb) ≤11.0 g/dL were sequentially enrolled into four dose cohorts and randomized to roxadustat or placebo two times weekly (BIW) or three times weekly (TIW) for 4 weeks, in an approximate roxadustat:placebo ratio of 3:1. Efficacy was assessed by (i) mean Hb change (ΔHb) from baseline (BL) and (ii) proportion of Hb responders (ΔHb ≥ 1.0 g/dL). Pharmacodynamic evaluation was performed in a subset of subjects. Safety was evaluated by adverse event frequency/severity. Results Of 116 subjects receiving treatment, 104 completed 4 weeks of dosing and 96 were evaluable for efficacy. BL characteristics for roxadustat and placebo groups were comparable. In roxadustat-treated subjects, Hb levels increased from BL in a dose-related manner in the 0.7, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg groups. Maximum ΔHb within the first 6 weeks was significantly higher in the 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg groups than in the placebo subjects. Hb responder rates were dose dependent and ranged from 30% in the 0.7 mg/kg BIW group to 100% in the 2.0 mg/kg BIW and TIW groups versus 13% in placebo. Conclusions Roxadustat transiently and moderately increased endogenous erythropoietin and reduced hepcidin. Adverse events were similar in the roxadustat and placebo groups. Roxadustat produced dose-dependent increases in blood Hb among anemic NDD-CKD patients in a placebo-controlled trial. Clinical Trials Registration Clintrials.gov #NCT00761657. PMID:26238121

  20. The diagnosis of microcytic anemia by a rule-based expert system using VP-Expert.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, M L; McKinney, T

    1989-09-01

    We describe our experience in creating a rule-based expert system for the interpretation of microcytic anemia using the expert system development tool, VP-Expert, running on an IBM personal computer. VP-Expert processes data (complete blood cell count results, age, and sex) according to a set of user-written logic rules (our program) to reach conclusions as to the following causes of microcytic anemia: alpha- and beta-thalassemia trait, iron deficiency, and anemia of chronic disease. Our expert system was tested using previously interpreted complete blood cell count data. In most instances, there was good agreement between the expert system and its pathologist-author, but many discrepancies were found in the interpretation of anemia of chronic disease. We conclude that VP-Expert has a useful level of power and flexibility, yet is simple enough that individuals with modest programming experience can create their own expert systems. Limitations of such expert systems are discussed. PMID:2774865

  1. Hyper-variation of Tandem Repeats at the PD0218 (pspB) locus of Xylella fastidiosa Almond Leaf Scorch and Grape Pierce’s Disease Strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram negative plant pathogenic bacterium that causes almond leaf scorch disease (ALSD) and grape Pierce’s disease (PD) in California. A-genotype strains cause ALSD only. G-genotype strains cause both PD and ALSD. Little is known about how X. fastidiosa interacts with the envi...

  2. Targeted disruption of the murine Facc gene: Towards the establishment of a mouse model for Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Auerbach, W.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital malformations and predisposition to malignancies. The gene responsible for the defect in FA group C has been cloned and designated the Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group C gene (FACC). A murine cDNA for this gene (Facc) was also cloned. Here we report our progress in the establishment of a mouse model for FA. The mouse Facc cDNA was used as probe to screen a genomic library of mouse strain 129. More than twenty positive clones were isolated. Three of them were mapped and found to be overlapping clones, encompassing the genomic region from exon 8 to the end of the 3{prime} UTR of the mouse cDNA. A targeting vector was constructed using the most 5{prime} mouse genomic sequence available. The end result of the homologous recombination is that exon 8 is deleted and the neo gene is inserted. The last exon, exon 14, is essential for the complementing function of the FACC gene product; the disruption in the middle of the murine Facc gene should render this locus biologically inactive. This targeting vector was linearized and electroporated into R1 embryonic stem (ES) cells which were derived from the 129 mouse. Of 102 clones screened, 19 positive cell lines were identified. Four targeted cell lines have been used to produce chimeric mice. 129-derived ES cells were aggregated ex vivo into the morulas derived from CD1 mice and then implanted into foster mothers. 22 chimeras have been obtained. Moderately and strongly chimeric mice have been bred to test for germline transmission. Progeny with the expected coat color derived from 2 chimeras are currently being examined to confirm transmission of the targeted allele.

  3. Detecting purely epistatic multi-locus interactions by an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wongseree, Waranyu; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Piroonratana, Theera; Sinsomros, Saravudh; Limwongse, Chanin; Chaiyaratana, Nachol

    2009-01-01

    Background Purely epistatic multi-locus interactions cannot generally be detected via single-locus analysis in case-control studies of complex diseases. Recently, many two-locus and multi-locus analysis techniques have been shown to be promising for the epistasis detection. However, exhaustive multi-locus analysis requires prohibitively large computational efforts when problems involve large-scale or genome-wide data. Furthermore, there is no explicit proof that a combination of multiple two-locus analyses can lead to the correct identification of multi-locus interactions. Results The proposed 2LOmb algorithm performs an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses. The algorithm consists of four main steps: two-locus analysis, a permutation test, global p-value determination and a progressive search for the best ensemble. 2LOmb is benchmarked against an exhaustive two-locus analysis technique, a set association approach, a correlation-based feature selection (CFS) technique and a tuned ReliefF (TuRF) technique. The simulation results indicate that 2LOmb produces a low false-positive error. Moreover, 2LOmb has the best performance in terms of an ability to identify all causative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a low number of output SNPs in purely epistatic two-, three- and four-locus interaction problems. The interaction models constructed from the 2LOmb outputs via a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method are also included for the confirmation of epistasis detection. 2LOmb is subsequently applied to a type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) data set, which is obtained as a part of the UK genome-wide genetic epidemiology study by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). After primarily screening for SNPs that locate within or near 372 candidate genes and exhibit no marginal single-locus effects, the T2D data set is reduced to 7,065 SNPs from 370 genes. The 2LOmb search in the reduced T2D data reveals that four intronic SNPs

  4. Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse Healthy School Lunch Planner How Can I ...

  5. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1982-1983)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1983-09-09

    The nature of the defects that shorten the effective lifespan of red blood cells in the circulation and which gave rise to anemia, jaundice and to spleen, liver and heart enlargement are studied because they so closely parallel inherited hemolytic anemias in man. In mice, ''hemolytic disease'' initiated by the ja, sph, sph/sup ha/, or the nb genes has been traced to abnormalities in the protein components of their red cell membranes. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of detergent solubilized membranes reveal that in the different genetic types one or more of the major high molecular weight proteins called spectrins is decreased or totally missing. It is one thing to observe a correlation between missing or defective components in selected analytical procedures, and another to establish a causal relationship between the two. To investigate the possible interrelationships, we examined the associations between spectrin or ankyrin content, the severity of the resulting anemia, red cell osmotic fragilities, and the capacity of cells from each genotype to be deformed in a continuous osmotic gradient at constant sheer stress. Our findings indicate that sensitivity to osmotic stress, cell rigidity (inadequate deformability), deficiency of spectrin or ankyrin, and the severity of the anemia, are statistically highly correlated. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  7. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  8. A 4.5-megabase yeast artificial chromosome contig from human chromosome 13q14.3 ordering 9 polymorphic microsatellites (22 sequence-tagged sites) tightly linked to the Wilson disease locus.

    PubMed Central

    White, A; Tomfohrde, J; Stewart, E; Barnes, R; Le Paslier, D; Weissenbach, J; Cavalli-Sforza, L; Farrer, L; Bowcock, A

    1993-01-01

    We have previously performed a genetic analysis of multiply affected families to map a locus responsible for Wilson disease (WND) to a 0.3-centimorgan (cM) region within chromosome 13q14.3, between D13S31 and D13S59. Here we describe the construction of a contig of approximately 4.5 Mb, which spans this region and extends from D13S25 to D13S59. This contig consists of 28 genomic yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones. Five critical crossover events have been defined in this interval in two unaffected (Centre d'Etudes du Polymorphisme Humain) and three WND families. The combination of sequence tagged site content mapping of YACs with both polymorphic and nonpolymorphic markers and recombination breakpoint mapping resulted in the following order of polymorphic markers: centromere-RB1-D13S25-AFM205vh2-D13S31-D13S22 7-D13S228-AFM238vc3-D13S133- AFM084xc5-D13S137-D13S169, D13S155-D13S59-telomere. The recombination/physical distance ratio varies from approximately 3000 kb per cM in the region between D13S31 and D13S25 to 6000 kb per cM in the region between D13S31 and D13S59. Three WND families exhibiting recombination between the disease locus and D13S31 or D13S59 were genotyped for additional markers in this region and further refined the location of the WND gene to between D13S155 and D13S133. Nine of the markers in this region of < 1 cM are polymorphic microsatellites (seven have observed heterozygosities of 70% or above) that will be extremely useful in prenatal and preclinical diagnosis of this disease. This physical map is an essential step in the isolation of the WND gene and is a framework for the identification of candidate genes. PMID:8234264

  9. Incidence and risk factors of aplastic anemia in Latin American countries: the LATIN case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Maluf, Eliane; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; Júnior, Álvaro Avezum; Eluf-Neto, José; Falcão, Roberto Passetto; Lorand-Metze, Irene G.; Goldenberg, Daniel; Santana, Cézar Leite; de Oliveira Werneck Rodrigues, Daniela; da Motta Passos, Leny Nascimento; Rosenfeld, Luis Gastão Mange; Pitta, Marimilia; Loggetto, Sandra; Feitosa Ribeiro, Andreza A.; Velloso, Elvira Deolinda; Kondo, Andrea Tiemi; de Miranda Coelho, Erika Oliveira; Pintão, Maria Carolina Tostes; de Souza, Hélio Moraes; Borbolla, José Rafael; Pasquini, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Background Associations between aplastic anemia and numerous drugs, pesticides and chemicals have been reported. However, at least 50% of the etiology of aplastic anemia remains unexplained. Design and Methods This was a case-control, multicenter, multinational study, designed to identify risk factors for agranulocytosis and aplastic anemia. The cases were patients with diagnosis of aplastic anemia confirmed through biopsy or bone marrow aspiration, selected through an active search of clinical laboratories, hematology clinics and medical records. The controls did not have either aplastic anemia or chronic diseases. A total of 224 patients with aplastic anemia were included in the study, each case was paired with four controls, according to sex, age group, and hospital where the case was first seen. Information was collected on demographic data, medical history, laboratory tests, medications, and other potential risk factors prior to diagnosis. Results The incidence of aplastic anemia was 1.6 cases per million per year. Higher rates of benzene exposure (≥30 exposures per year) were associated with a greater risk of aplastic anemia (odds ratio, OR: 4.2; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.82–9.82). Individuals exposed to chloramphenicol in the previous year had an adjusted OR for aplastic anemia of 8.7 (CI: 0.87–87.93) and those exposed to azithromycin had an adjusted OR of 11.02 (CI 1.14–108.02). Conclusions The incidence of aplastic anemia in Latin America countries is low. Although the research study centers had a high coverage of health services, the underreporting of cases of aplastic anemia in selected regions can be discussed. Frequent exposure to benzene-based products increases the risk for aplastic anemia. Few associations with specific drugs were found, and it is likely that some of these were due to chance alone. PMID:19734415

  10. Epidemiology of Anemia in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kushang V.

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is a common, multifactorial condition among older adults. The World Health Organization (WHO) definition of anemia (hemoglobin concentration <12 g/dL in women and <13 g/dL in men) is most often used in epidemiologic studies of older adults. More than 10% of community-dwelling adults age 65 years and older has WHO-defined anemia. After age 50 years, prevalence of anemia increases with advancing age and exceeds 20% in those 85 years and older. In nursing homes, anemia is present in 48–63% of residents. Incidence of anemia in older adults is not well characterized. Among older adults with anemia, approximately one-third have evidence of iron, folate, and/or vitamin B12 deficiency, another third have renal insufficiency and/or chronic inflammation, and the remaining third have anemia that is unexplained. Several studies demonstrate that anemia is associated with poorer survival in older adults. This review details the distribution and consequences of anemia in older adults and identifies future epidemiologic research needs. PMID:18809090

  11. Assessing Chaos in Sickle Cell Anemia Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Wesley; Le Floch, Francois

    2006-11-01

    Recent developments in sickle cell research and blood flow modeling allow for new interpretations of the sickle cell crises. With an appropriate set of theoretical and empirical equations describing the dynamics of the red cells in their environment, and the response of the capillaries to major changes in the rheology, a complete mathematical system has been derived. This system of equations is believed to be of major importance to provide new and significant insight into the causes of the disease and related crises. With simulations, it has been proven that the system transition from a periodic solution to a chaotic one, which illustrates the onset of crises from a regular blood flow synchronized with the heart beat. Moreover, the analysis of the effects of various physiological parameters exposes the potential to control chaotic solutions, which, in turn, could lead to the creation of new and more effective treatments for sickle cell anemia. .

  12. Pernicious anemia. From past to present.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Santiago, E; Ferre Aracil, C; García García de Paredes, A; Moreira Vicente, V F

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is currently the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in Western countries. The histological lesion upon which this condition is based is autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis. The destruction of parietal cells causes a deficiency in intrinsic factor, an essential protein for vitamin B12 absorption in the terminal ileum. Advances in the last two decades have reopened the debate on a disease that seemed to have been forgotten due to its apparent simplicity. The new role of H. pylori, the value of parietal cell antibodies and intrinsic factor antibodies, the true usefulness of serum vitamin B12 levels, the risk of adenocarcinoma and gastric carcinoids and oral vitamin B12 treatment are just some of the current issues analyzed in depth in this review. PMID:25680481

  13. Current management of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    McGann, Patrick T; Nero, Alecia C; Ware, Russell E

    2013-08-01

    Proper management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins with establishing the correct diagnosis early in life, ideally during the newborn period. The identification of affected infants by neonatal screening programs allows early initiation of prophylactic penicillin and pneumococcal immunizations, which help prevent overwhelming sepsis. Ongoing education of families promotes the early recognition of disease-released complications, which allows prompt and appropriate medical evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Periodic evaluation by trained specialists helps provide comprehensive care, including transcranial Doppler examinations to identify children at risk for primary stroke, plus assessments for other parenchymal organ damage as patients become teens and adults. Treatment approaches that previously highlighted acute vaso-occlusive events are now evolving to the concept of preventive therapy. Liberalized use of blood transfusions and early consideration of hydroxyurea treatment represent a new treatment paradigm for SCA management. PMID:23709685

  14. Current Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T.; Nero, Alecia C.; Ware, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins with establishing the correct diagnosis early in life, ideally during the newborn period. The identification of affected infants by neonatal screening programs allows early initiation of prophylactic penicillin and pneumococcal immunizations, which help prevent overwhelming sepsis. Ongoing education of families promotes the early recognition of disease-released complications, which allows prompt and appropriate medical evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Periodic evaluation by trained specialists helps provide comprehensive care, including transcranial Doppler examinations to identify children at risk for primary stroke, plus assessments for other parenchymal organ damage as patients become teens and adults. Treatment approaches that previously highlighted acute vaso-occlusive events are now evolving to the concept of preventive therapy. Liberalized use of blood transfusions and early consideration of hydroxyurea treatment represent a new treatment paradigm for SCA management. PMID:23709685

  15. Prevalence of Iron deficiency anemia in children with liver cirrhosis: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zareifar, Soheila; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Rahanjam, Najmeh; Farahmand Far, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among the many complications reported for cirrhosis, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has attracted much attention. This type of anemia, in contrast to other types of anemia, is easy to treat prophylactically, but if left untreated can lead to a poor quality of life. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemoglobin and serum iron levels among patients with liver cirrhosis for the early diagnosis of IDA and to avoid unnecessary testing and iron supplementation. Subjects and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 88 children diagnosed with cirrhosis were included, and the values of hemoglobin, serum iron levels and relationship between serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), prothrombine time (PT), international normalization ratio (INR), total and direct bilirubin and hepatic enzymes were estimated using paired t test, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Forty-six (52.3%) of 88 children were girls and 42 (47.7%) were boys. Forty-eight (54.5%) patients had anemia and 8 (9%) had iron deficiency anemia (5 boys, 5.6%, and 3 girls, 3.4%). No relationships were observed between iron deficiency anemia and the patient’s age or gender, whereas there was a relationship between iron deficiency and severity and duration of the disease, although the correlation was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The high frequency of iron deficiency anemia in children with cirrhosis (9%) suggests that timely screening should be used for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26261697

  16. Determinants of Anemia and Hemoglobin Concentration in Haitian School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Lora L; Delnatus, Jacques R; Odom, Audrey R; Eaton, Jacob C; Griggs, Jennifer J; Brown, Sarah; Wolff, Patricia B

    2015-11-01

    Anemia diminishes oxygen transport in the body, resulting in potentially irreversible growth and developmental consequences for children. Limited evidence for determinants of anemia exists for school-aged children. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial in Haiti from 2012 to 2013 to test the efficacy of a fortified school snack. Children (N = 1,047) aged 3-13 years were followed longitudinally at three time points for hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, anthropometry, and bioelectrical impedance measures. Dietary intakes, infectious disease morbidities, and socioeconomic and demographic factors were collected at baseline and endline. Longitudinal regression modeling with generalized least squares and logit models with random effects identified anemia risk factors beyond the intervention effect. At baseline, 70.6% of children were anemic and 2.6% were severely anemic. Stunting increased the odds of developing anemia (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-2.08) and severe anemia (adjusted OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.30-4.71). Parent-reported vitamin A supplementation and deworming were positively associated with Hb concentrations, whereas fever and poultry ownership showed a negative relationship with Hb concentration and increased odds of severe anemia, respectively. Further research should explore the full spectrum of anemia etiologies in school children, including genetic causes. PMID:26350448

  17. In situ localization of the genetic locus encoding the lysosomal acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (LIPA) deficient in wolman disease to chromosome 10q23. 2-q23. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Rao, N.; Byrum, R.S.; Rothschild, C.B.; Bowden, D.W.; Hayworth, R.; Pettenati, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Human acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (EC 3.1.1.13) is a 46-kDa glycoprotein required for the lysosomal hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides that cells acquire through the receptor-mediated endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins. This activity is essential in the provision of free cholesterol for cell metabolism as well as for the feedback signal that modulates endogenous cellular cholesterol production. The extremely low level of lysosomal acid lipase in patients afflicted with the hereditary, allelic lysosomal storage disorders Woman disease (WD) and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) (MIM Number 278000 (6)) is associated with the massive intralysosomal lipid storage and derangements in the regulation of cellular cholesterol production (10). Both WD and CESD cells lack a specific acid lipase isoenzyme and it is thought that the different mutations associated with WD and CESD are in the structural gene for this isoenzyme, LIPA. Analysis of the activity of the acid lipase isoenzyme in cell extracts from human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids (4, 11) demonstrated the concordant segregation of the gene locus for lysosomal acid lipase with the glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase-1 (GOT1) enzyme marker for human chromosome 10 which was subsequently localized to 10q24.1 q25.1 (8). 11 refs., 1 figs.

  18. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin <12.0 g/dl and ferritin level <12 ng/ml were interviewed about their habits of eating ice or other non-food substances. Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors. PMID:24850454

  19. [Anemia in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Grau-Amorós, J; Formiga, F; Urrutia, A

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most common comorbidities in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure admitted to the Internal Medicine Ward. However, although there is evidence supporting its treatment to improve the functional capacity of the patients and to reduce the new admissions rate, the clinical practice guidelines do not provide any directives regarding its approach. This is an ideal clinical problem for the internist due to its multifactorial origin and the comprehensive point of view needed to approach the group of syndromes that occur in these patients (anemia, heart failure, geriatric syndromes, diabetes, etc.) The choice of treatment strategy, if such treatment is decided, should always begin after correcting the congestive signs in the outpatient with optimal treatment of heart failure. PMID:21620391

  20. Allele-specific chromatin remodeling in the ZPBP2/GSDMB/ORMDL3 locus associated with the risk of asthma and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Verlaan, Dominique J; Berlivet, Soizik; Hunninghake, Gary M; Madore, Anne-Marie; Larivière, Mathieu; Moussette, Sanny; Grundberg, Elin; Kwan, Tony; Ouimet, Manon; Ge, Bing; Hoberman, Rose; Swiatek, Marcin; Dias, Joana; Lam, Kevin C L; Koka, Vonda; Harmsen, Eef; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Avila, Lydiana; Celedón, Juan C; Weiss, Scott T; Dewar, Ken; Sinnett, Daniel; Laprise, Catherine; Raby, Benjamin A; Pastinen, Tomi; Naumova, Anna K

    2009-09-01

    Common SNPs in the chromosome 17q12-q21 region alter the risk for asthma, type 1 diabetes, primary biliary cirrhosis, and Crohn disease. Previous reports by us and others have linked the disease-associated genetic variants with changes in expression of GSDMB and ORMDL3 transcripts in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). The variants also alter regulation of other transcripts, and this domain-wide cis-regulatory effect suggests a mechanism involving long-range chromatin interactions. Here, we further dissect the disease-linked haplotype and identify putative causal DNA variants via a combination of genetic and functional analyses. First, high-throughput resequencing of the region and genotyping of potential candidate variants were performed. Next, additional mapping of allelic expression differences in Yoruba HapMap LCLs allowed us to fine-map the basis of the cis-regulatory differences to a handful of candidate functional variants. Functional assays identified allele-specific differences in nucleosome distribution, an allele-specific association with the insulator protein CTCF, as well as a weak promoter activity for rs12936231. Overall, this study shows a common disease allele linked to changes in CTCF binding and nucleosome occupancy leading to altered domain-wide cis-regulation. Finally, a strong association between asthma and cis-regulatory haplotypes was observed in three independent family-based cohorts (p = 1.78 x 10(-8)). This study demonstrates the requirement of multiple parallel allele-specific tools for the investigation of noncoding disease variants and functional fine-mapping of human disease-associated haplotypes. PMID:19732864

  1. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  2. Positive predictive value of diagnosis coding for hemolytic anemias in the Danish National Patient Register

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Dennis Lund; Overgaard, Ulrik Malthe; Pedersen, Lars; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The nationwide public health registers in Denmark provide a unique opportunity for evaluation of disease-associated morbidity if the positive predictive values (PPVs) of the primary diagnosis are known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive values of hemolytic anemias registered in the Danish National Patient Register. Patients and methods All patients with a first-ever diagnosis of hemolytic anemia from either specialist outpatient clinic contact or inpatient admission at Odense University Hospital from January 1994 through December 2011 were considered for inclusion. Patients with mechanical reason for hemolysis such as an artificial heart valve, and patients with vitamin-B12 or folic acid deficiency were excluded. Results We identified 412 eligible patients: 249 with a congenital hemolytic anemia diagnosis and 163 with acquired hemolytic anemia diagnosis. In all, hemolysis was confirmed in 359 patients, yielding an overall PPV of 87.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 83.5%–90.2%). A diagnosis could be established in 392 patients of whom 355 patients had a hemolytic diagnosis. Diagnosis was confirmed in 197 of the 249 patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, yielding a PPV of 79.1% (95% CI: 73.5%–84.0%). Diagnosis of acquired hemolytic anemia could be confirmed in 136 of the 163 patients, resulting in a PPV of 83.4% (95% CI: 76.8%–88.8%). For hemoglobinopathy PPV was 84.1% (95% CI: 77.4%–89.4%), for hereditary spherocytosis PPV was 80.6% (95% CI: 69.5%–88.9%), and for autoimmune hemolytic anemia PPV was 78.4% (95% CI: 70.4%–85.0%). Conclusion The PPV of hemolytic anemias was moderately high. The PPVs were comparable in the three main categories of overall hemolysis, and congenital and acquired hemolytic anemia. PMID:27445504

  3. Cost-effectiveness of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator in anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Background Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are the mainstay of anemia therapy. Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) is a highly effective, long-acting ESA developed for once-monthly dosing. A multitude of clinical studies has evaluated the safety and efficiency of this treatment option for patients with renal anemia. In times of permanent financial pressure on health care systems, the cost-effectiveness of CERA should be of particular importance for payers and clinicians. Objective To critically analyze, from the nephrologists’ point of view, the published literature focusing on the cost-effectiveness of CERA for anemia treatment. Methods The detailed literature search covered electronic databases including MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase, as well as international conference abstract databases. Results Peer-reviewed literature analyzing the definite cost-effectiveness of CERA is scarce, and most of the available data originate from conference abstracts. Identified data are restricted to the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease. Although the majority of studies suggest a considerable cost advantage for CERA, the published literature cannot easily be compared. While time and motion studies clearly indicate that a switch to CERA could minimize health care staff time in dialysis units, the results of studies comparing direct costs are more ambivalent, potentially reflecting the differences between health care systems and variability between centers. Conclusion Analyzed data are predominantly insufficient; they miss clear evidence and have to thus be interpreted with great caution. In this day and age of financial restraints, results from well-designed, head-to-head studies with clearly defined endpoints have to prove whether CERA therapy can achieve cost savings without compromising anemia management. PMID:25050070

  4. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lab for analysis. The CBC includes a measurement of a person’s hematocrit, the percentage of the ... hematocrit and hemoglobin, the CBC includes two other measurements to show whether a person has enough iron: ...

  5. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone: 202–776–0544 Fax: 202–776–0545 Internet: www. hematology. org Iron Disorders Institute P.O. ... or 864–292–1175 Email: cgarrison@ irondisorders. org Internet: www. irondisorders. org or www. hemachromatosis. org National ...

  6. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney transplant or blood-filtering treatments called dialysis. People with kidney failure can also develop iron ... to blood loss during hemodialysis, a type of dialysis that uses a special filter called a dialyzer ...

  7. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure. PMID:24216080

  8. Descriptive epidemiology of marine anemia in seapen-reared salmon in southern British Columbia.

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, C; Ribble, C S; Kent, M L

    1996-01-01

    Marine anemia, also known as plasmacytoid leukemia, is a recently described disease of farmed Pacific salmon in British Columbia. Most of what is known about the disease has been generated through laboratory studies or field investigations of severely affected farms. The goals of this study were to determine the range of the spatial and temporal distribution of naturally occurring marine anemia, identify potential risk factors, and provide an initial description of the impact of the disease on commercial salmon farms in British Columbia. Data were obtained from mail surveys, farm visits, and reviews of clinical and laboratory records. An attempt was made to evaluate negative, as well as mildly, moderately, and severely affected sites. The results showed marine anemia to be widely distributed throughout the major salmon farming regions in British Columbia. The disease was most commonly diagnosed in August and September, when water temperatures were at their seasonal peaks. A wide variety of lineage's and fish sources were associated with the disease. The average mortality rate attributed to marine anemia was 6% (range 2.5% to 11%). The peak occurrence of the disease was associated with a peak in the occurrence of other infectious and inflammatory diseases. The broad demographic distribution of marine anemia, coupled with its endemic nature, indicated that the disease is unlikely to be due to the recent introduction of a new pathogen and that causal factors are widespread in southern British Columbia. It is concluded that the significance of diagnosing marine anemia is not that it is predictive of an impending epidemic of mortality, but that it is an indicator of the general pattern of disease on a farm. PMID:8809395

  9. Anemia in the frail, elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Röhrig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and frailty are two common findings in geriatric patients and have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in this patient group. Recent studies have contributed to the growing evidence of a possible association with the age-related chronic inflammatory status known as “inflammaging”. These findings do not only give a better insight into the pathogenesis of anemia in frailty, but also offer new treatment options. The present article focuses on this assumed association between anemia, frailty, and inflammaging and summarizes current management options for anemia in frail patients. PMID:27051279

  10. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  11. Do You Know about Sickle Cell Anemia? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lunch Recipes Do You Know About Sickle Cell Anemia? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do You Know About Sickle ... stay in the hospital. What Causes Sickle Cell Anemia? Sickle cell anemia is an inherited (say: in- ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that prevents developing red ...

  13. Advanced Renal Failure in Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia: Clinical Course and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Iluminado A.; Hosten, Adrian O.; Dillard, Martin G.; Castro, Oswaldo L.

    1982-01-01

    Advanced renal failure occurred in nine adult sickle cell disease patients. There were six men and three women with a mean age of 38.6 years. Eight patients had homozygous SS disease, one had sickle cell thalassemia. Three patients had acute renal failure from which they partially recovered. Six developed endstage kidney disease requiring dialysis. Two of these received a kidney transplant, and there was one death in the immediate postoperative period. Angina pectoris, hyperkalemia, and severe anemia complicated chronic dialysis, suggesting that early transplantation should be considered for sickle cell anemia patients with renal failure. PMID:6757451

  14. Differential expression of Marek's disease virus (MDV) late proteins during in vitro and in situ replication: role for pUL47 in regulation of the MDV UL46-UL49 gene locus.

    PubMed

    Jarosinski, Keith W; Vautherot, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a lymphotropic alphaherpesvirus that replicates in a highly cell-associated manner in vitro. Production of infectious cell-free virus only occurs in feather follicle epithelial (FFE) cells of infected chicken skins. Previously, we described differential expression for a core alphaherpesvirus protein, pUL47 that was found to be abundantly expressed in FFE cells of infected chickens, while barely detectable during in vitro propagation. Here, we further examined the dynamics of expression of four tegument proteins within the UL46-49 locus during in vitro and in situ replication. All four proteins examined were expressed abundantly in situ, whereas both pUL47 and pUL48 expression were barely detectable in vitro. Replacement of the putative UL47 and UL48 promoters with the minimal cytomegalovirus promoter enhanced mRNA and protein expression in vitro. Interestingly, enhanced expression of pUL47 resulted in increased UL46, UL48, and UL49 transcripts that resulted in increased pUL46 and pUL48 expression. PMID:26117307

  15. Phytomedicines and nutraceuticals: alternative therapeutics for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the "SS" individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β -globin subunit results in replacement of β 6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

  16. Current concepts in the pathophysiology and treatment of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Young, Neal S.; Calado, Rodrigo T.; Scheinberg, Phillip

    2006-01-01

    Aplastic anemia, an unusual hematologic disease, is the paradigm of the human bone marrow failure syndromes. Almost universally fatal just a few decades ago, aplastic anemia can now be cured or ameliorated by stem-cell transplantation or immunosuppressive drug therapy. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, with activated type 1 cytotoxic T cells implicated. The molecular basis of the aberrant immune response and deficiencies in hematopoietic cells is now being defined genetically; examples are telomere repair gene mutations in the target cells and dysregulated T-cell activation pathways. Immunosuppression with antithymocyte globulins and cyclosporine is effective at restoring blood-cell production in the majority of patients, but relapse and especially evolution of clonal hematologic diseases remain problematic. Allogeneic stem-cell transplant from histocompatible sibling donors is curative in the great majority of young patients with severe aplastic anemia; the major challenges are extending the benefits of transplantation to patients who are older or who lack family donors. Recent results with alternative sources of stem cells and a variety of conditioning regimens to achieve their engraftment have been promising, with survival in small pediatric case series rivaling conventional transplantation results. PMID:16778145

  17. Phytomedicines and Nutraceuticals: Alternative Therapeutics for Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the “SS” individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β-globin subunit results in replacement of β6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

  18. [Results of treatment for severe acquired aplastic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Ochocka, M; Karwacki, M; Matysiak, M; Armata, J; Dłuzniewska, A; Bogusławska-Jaworska, J; Pejcz, J; Kowalczyk, J; Skomra, S; Radwańska, U

    1995-03-01

    The authors evaluated results of treatment of 106 children with acquired aplastic anemia. The patients were divided into 3 groups depending on the severity of their disease. Thirty-nine patients were classified as very severe, 30 as severe and 37 as non-severe according to the modified Camitta criteria. Among them, 47 children were treated with oxymetholone and prednisolone. In this group 32 died. Antilymphocyte globulin (ALG) was given to 48 patients and 20 received cyclosporin A (CsA). The results obtained by these two methods are nearly the same and 5 year survival was 61% and 59% respectively. Bone marrow was transplanted in only one child, who is still in complete remission. Statistical analysis showed a steady increase in incidence of aplastic anemia in the years 1987-1989, which might coincide with the Czarnobyl explosion. However, further research is required to prove this point. PMID:8657487

  19. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xiangyuan; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ye, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  20. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Ng, Fu Liang; Chan, Kenneth; Pu, Xiangyuan; Poston, Robin N; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Wu, Jingchun; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T; Caulfield, Mark J; Ye, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  1. The 4p16.3 Parkinson Disease Risk Locus Is Associated with GAK Expression and Genes Involved with the Synaptic Vesicle Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Michael W.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Labadorf, Adam; Dumitriu, Alexandra; Hadzi, Tiffany C.; Beach, Thomas G.; Myers, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified the GAK/DGKQ/IDUA region on 4p16.3 among the top three risk loci for Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the specific gene and risk mechanism are unclear. Here, we report transcripts containing the 3’ clathrin-binding domain of GAK identified by RNA deep-sequencing in post-mortem human brain tissue as having increased expression in PD. Furthermore, carriers of 4p16.3 PD GWAS risk SNPs show decreased expression of one of these transcripts, GAK25 (Gencode Transcript 009), which correlates with the expression of genes functioning in the synaptic vesicle membrane. Together, these findings provide strong evidence for GAK clathrin-binding- and J-domain transcripts’ influence on PD pathogenicity, and for a role for GAK in regulating synaptic function in PD. PMID:27508417

  2. [Abdominal pain, constipation and anemia].

    PubMed

    Barresi, Fabio; Kunz Caflish, Isabel; Bayly-Schinzel, Leena; Dressel, Holger

    2016-03-30

    We present the case of a 42-year old man who went to the emergency department because of spasmodic abdominal pain. The abdomen was soft. A gastroscopy and a colonoscopy were without pathological findings. The laboratory analyses indicated anemia. The differential blood count showed basophilic granules in the red blood cells. The blood lead level was elevated. A lead poisoning was diagnosed. The cause was the oral intake of an ayurvedic medication which the patient had received in Bangladesh to treat his vitiligo. PMID:27005735

  3. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  4. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  5. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  6. Clinical case of the month. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis presenting as a rare cause of iron deficiency anemia in a toddler--a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Shah, Kinjal; Maddox, Kevin; Velayuthan, Sujithra; Scott, L Keith

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common cause of anemia in all age groups. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is an extremely rare etiology of iron deficiency anemia seen predominantly in the pediatric population. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is characterized by the triad of symptoms consisting of iron deficiency anemia, diffuse pulmonary infiltrates, and hemoptysis. The clinical presentation is extremely variable, and all three symptoms may not always be seen. Due to the rarity of the disease and the variability in clinical presentation, diagnosis is usually delayed. Early diagnosis and treatment with corticosteroids prevents further episodes of recurrent alveolar hemorrhage and improves the clinical outcome. Hence, a high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis of this condition in young patients presenting with severe iron deficiency anemia and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. We report a toddler with idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis whose initial clinical presentation was severe iron deficiency anemia. PMID:23362597

  7. Genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) to the interval D16S288-D16S383 by analysis of haplotypes and allelic association

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, H.M.; O`Rawe, A.M.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1994-07-15

    CLN3, the gene for juvenile-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) or Batten disease, has been localized by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 16p between loci D16S297 and D16S57. The authors have now further refined the localization of CLN3 by haplotype analysis using two new microsatellite markers from loci D16S383 and SPN in the D16S297-D16S57 interval on a larger collaborative family resource consisting of 142 JNCL pedigrees. Crossover events in 3 maternal meioses define new flanking markers for CLN3 and localize the gene to the interval at 16p12.1-11.2 between D16S288 and D16S383, which corresponds to a genetic distance of 2.1 cM. Within this interval 4 microsatellite loci are in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3, and extended haplotype analysis of the associated alleles indicates that CLN3 is in closest proximity to loci D16S299 and D16S298. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Unrelated Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation(HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    Sickle Cell Disease; Thalassemia; Anemia; Granuloma; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chediak Higashi Syndrome; Osteopetrosis; Neutropenia; Thrombocytopenia; Hurler Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease; Fucosidosis

  9. Investigation of the Etiology of Anemia in Thromboangiitis Obliterans.

    PubMed

    Akbarin, Mohammad Mehdi; Ravari, Hassan; Rajabnejad, Ataollah; Valizadeh, Narges; Fazeli, Bahare

    2016-09-01

    During a review of patients admitted with thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), there was evidence of normochromic normocytic anemia and abrupt changes in hemoglobin (Hgb) levels in patients with several hospital admissions. Therefore, the evidence of hemolytic anemia was evaluated based on 37 banked plasma samples taken from Caucasian male TAO patients during disease exacerbation between 2012 and 2014. The patients' hospital records, including clinical manifestations and complete blood count, were evaluated. The following tests were performed on all samples: indirect antiglobulin test (IAT), C-reactive protein (CRP), high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), haptoglobin, indirect bilirubin, d-aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and d-alanine aminotransferase (ALT). The mean age of the patients was 40 ± 7 years. Two patients underwent below-knee amputation. The mean hospital-documented Hgb of the patients was 12.9 ± 2.6 g/dL. CRP and IAT were positive in 75.6 and 70.2% of the samples, respectively. The tests and corresponding results were as follows: hsCRP, 14.07 ± 2.37 µg/mL; LDH, 2,552 ± 315 u/L; haptoglobin, 2.27 ± 1.1 g/L; indirect bilirubin, 0.09 ± 0.04 mg/dL; AST, 67 ± 7 u/L; and ALT, 26 ± 3 u/L. There was a significant inverse correlation between hsCRP and hospital-documented Hgb level (p = 0.03). Anemia with the positive IAT in most of the samples, high LDH and AST, and normal ALT are suggestive of hemolytic anemia. Normal indirect bilirubin is consistent with intravascular hemolysis. The positive CRP and elevated haptoglobin levels could be due to systemic inflammation in TAO. However, it is not known if an autoantigen or an infectious antigen is responsible for TAO systemic inflammation and induction hemolytic anemia. As such, the underlying mechanism of anemia in TAO could be part of the footprint of its main etiology. PMID:27574381

  10. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in critically ill cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anemia and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion occur frequently in hospitalized patients with cardiac disease. In this narrative review, we report the epidemiology of anemia and RBC transfusion in hospitalized adults and children (excluding premature neonates) with cardiac disease, and on the outcome of anemic and transfused cardiac patients. Both anemia and RBC transfusion are common in cardiac patients, and both are associated with mortality. RBC transfusion is the only way to rapidly treat severe anemia, but is not completely safe. In addition to hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, the determinant(s) that should drive a practitioner to prescribe a RBC transfusion to cardiac patients are currently unclear. In stable acyanotic cardiac patients, Hb level above 70 g/L in children and above 70 to 80 g/L in adults appears safe. In cyanotic children, Hb level above 90 g/L appears safe. The appropriate threshold Hb level for unstable cardiac patients and for children younger than 28 days is unknown. The optimal transfusion strategy in cardiac patients is not well characterized. The threshold at which the risk of anemia outweighs the risk of transfusion is not known. More studies are needed to determine when RBC transfusion is indicated in hospitalized patients with cardiac disease. PMID:25024880

  11. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... vitamin C pills or eating foods high in vitamin C, such as citrus fruits or juice, at the same time you eat ... vitamins contain at least this amount.) Foods with vitamin C—such as strawberries and citrus fruits—help your body absorb iron. Eat these foods ...

  12. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... body needs extra folate. Folate is a B vitamin found in foods such as leafy green vegetables, fruits, and dried beans and peas. Folic acid is ... iron, like orange juice, strawberries, broccoli, or other fruits and vegetables with vitamin C. Don't drink coffee or tea with ...

  13. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips Getting More Help Related Topics Kidney Problems Nutrition ... when you have low numbers of red blood cells. These cells carry oxygen to your body’s organs and tissues. This can happen due to ...

  14. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and webinars ASH Image Bank Educational Web-based library of hematologic imagery In This Section: Resources for Clinicians Resources for Trainees Resources for Educators Resources for Patients Resources for Industry Professionals View all Guidelines & Quality Care Resources to ...

  15. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis: alveoli are an answer to anemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S; Tullu, M S; Vaideeswar, P; Lahiri, K R

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare disorder (triad of iron-deficiency anemia, hemoptysis, and alveolar infiltrates). A 3-year-old male presented with mild fever, breathlessness, dry cough, and bluish nail discoloration for 8 days. He had required five blood transfusions in the past 1 year (last transfusion was given 4 months ago). He had a respiratory rate of 58/min with respiratory distress, cyanosis, and grade III clubbing. Respiratory system examination was normal. Several previous reports of hemoglobin were as low as 3.6 g/dl with hypochromic and microcytic anemia. There were transient increases in the hemoglobin and normalization of red cell morphology with blood transfusions. Serum iron, G6PD enzyme assay, hemoglobin electrophoresis, the sickling test, Coomb's test, stool and urine analysis, and a Meckel's scan were normal. HIV antibody and dsDNA were negative. The chest radiograph revealed symmetrical patchy infiltrates sparing lung apices (confirmed on high-resolution computed tomography). Lung biopsy diagnosed pulmonary hemosiderosis (interstitial lung disease with hemosiderin-laden macrophages scattered in the alveoli and areas of fibrosis in the alveolar septa). The patient showed marked clinical improvement in 10 days of therapy with prednisolone. IPH should be listed in the differential diagnosis of a child presenting with unexplained hypochromic, microcytic anemia and respiratory symptoms. PMID:21206122

  16. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... vitamin B12. They include: Chronic alcoholism Crohn disease, celiac disease, infection with the fish tapeworm, or other problems ... may no longer be needed after Crohn disease, celiac disease, or alcohol use is properly treated. Your provider ...

  17. Anemia among Muslim Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in Southern Israel.

    PubMed

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni; Biderman, Aya

    2015-11-01

    There are inequalities in health indicators among different ethnic groups living in the same region and receiving the same medical services. Anemia is a global problem. Although the prevalence of anemia is not high in Israel, differences among ethnic groups have not been studied. Our objective was to assess anemia among Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in southern Israel. A retrospective observational study was conducted based on data from computerized medical records. Seven thousand eight hundred seventy-one women in the study clinics underwent complete blood counts and had blood hemoglobin levels of 11 g/dl or below. The Jewish patients were older (31.7 vs. 29.7 years, P < 0.001), practiced birth control more (24.2 vs. 9.9 %, P < 0.001), and adhered to it more (81.1 vs. 61.9 %, P < 0.001). Bedouin women had more children (3.7 vs. 1.9, P < 0.001), and more Bedouin women were pregnant during the study period (49.3 vs. 35.0 %, P < 0.001). The most prevalent types of anemia were iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease. Two types of anemia were proportionally higher among Jewish women, anemia of chronic disease (18.1 vs. 9.7 %, P < 0.001) and folic acid deficiency (3.3 vs. 2.2 %, P > 0.001). The adherence rates for treatment were very low. Three factors associated with severe anemia (hemoglobin below 8 g/dl) were being Bedouin (odds ratio (OR) = 1.295, P < 0.001), use of birth control (OR = 0.419, P < 0.001), and pregnancy (OR = 0.447, P < 0.001). Being a Bedouin woman is a risk factor for severe anemia, and adherence to treatment for anemia is very low in both groups. These findings should be addressed in a national program to reduce health inequalities. PMID:26211919

  18. Anemia in the Neonate: The Differential Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nassin, Michele L; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; de Jong, Jill L O

    2015-07-01

    Anemia is a common problem in the neonatal period. Presenting symptoms may suggest numerous possible diagnoses ranging from anemia seen as a normal part of development to anemia due to critical pathology. An illustrative case is presented to highlight the appropriate evaluation of the neonate with significant anemia. Several important features of the evaluation of neonatal anemia are highlighted. The constellation of signs and symptoms that occur in conjunction with the anemia are critical for the evaluation. The evaluation should be performed in a step-wise process that starts by eliminating common causes of anemia. Manual review of the peripheral blood smear with a hematologist can be helpful. PMID:26171704

  19. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  20. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  1. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Packman, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  2. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  3. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  4. Imaging Manifestations of Neurologic Complications in Anemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ritesh; Sabat, Shyam; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    The hallmark signs and symptoms of anemia are directly related to a decrease in oxygen delivery to vital tissues and organs and include pallor, fatigue, lightheadedness, and shortness of breath. Neurologic complications are often nonspecific and can include poor concentration, irritability, faintness, tinnitus, and headache. If undiagnosed or untreated, anemia can progress to cognitive dysfunction, psychosis, encephalopathy, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and more focal syndromes, such as stroke, seizures, chorea, and transverse myelitis. Imaging can play an important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of these neurologic and systemic complications associated with anemia, and hence, better outcome. PMID:27443995

  5. Molecular and clinical aspects of iron homeostasis: From anemia to hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Weiss, Günter

    2006-08-01

    The discovery in recent years of a plethora of new genes whose products are implicated in iron homeostasis has led to rapid expansion of our knowledge in the field of iron metabolism and its underlying complex regulation in both health and disease. Abnormalities of iron metabolism are among the most common disorders encountered in practical medicine and may have significant negative impact on physical condition and life expectancy. Basic insights into the principles of iron homeostasis and the pathophysiological and clinical consequences of iron overload, iron deficiency and misdistribution are thus of crucial importance in modern medicine. This review summarizes our current understanding of human iron metabolism and focuses on the clinically relevant features of hereditary and secondary hemochromatosis, iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease and anemia of critical illness. The interconnections between iron metabolism and immunity are also addressed, in as much as they may affect the risk and course of infections and malignancies. PMID:16957974

  6. Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis Presenting as Anemia, Failure to Thrive, and Jaundice in a Toddler.

    PubMed

    Chen, Carol C; McManemy, Julie K; Vece, Timothy J; Cruz, Andrea T

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare disease characterized by the triad of hemoptysis, pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiograph, and anemia. Its diagnosis should be considered in any child presenting with moderate to severe anemia and failure to thrive of unclear etiology. Consideration of the differential diagnosis in such a child should include the review of both extravascular and intravascular causes of hemolysis. Systemic treatment of IPH with glucocorticoids has been shown to decrease morbidity, mortality, and disease progression to pulmonary fibrosis. Thus, diagnostic delays can impact prognosis. Here, we present a case of a 15-month-old boy with IPH who presented with anemia, jaundice, and failure to thrive, as well as a history of hemoptysis that was not initially elicited. PMID:26414632

  7. [A simple algorithm for anemia].

    PubMed

    Egyed, Miklós

    2014-03-01

    The author presents a novel algorithm for anaemia based on the erythrocyte haemoglobin content. The scheme is based on the aberrations of erythropoiesis and not on the pathophysiology of anaemia. The hemoglobin content of one erytrocyte is between 28-35 picogram. Any disturbance in hemoglobin synthesis can lead to a lower than 28 picogram hemoglobin content of the erythrocyte which will lead to hypochromic anaemia. In contrary, disturbances of nucleic acid metabolism will result in a hemoglobin content greater than 36 picogram, and this will result in hyperchromic anaemia. Normochromic anemia, characterised by hemoglobin content of erythrocytes between 28 and 35 picogram, is the result of alteration in the proliferation of erythropoeisis. Based on these three categories of anaemia, a unique system can be constructed, which can be used as a model for basic laboratory investigations and work-up of anaemic patients. PMID:24583558

  8. Impacts of anemia on 3-year ischemic events in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: a propensity-matched study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Miaohan; Li, Jing; Wang, Heyang; Qi, Jing; Wang, Geng; Xu, Kai; Liu, Haiwei; Zhao, Xin; Jing, Quanmin; Han, Yaling

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia correlates with worse outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), improved anemia can improve the outcomes in patients who underwent PCI. But the influence of anemia on long-term ischemic events after PCI remains unknown. Methods We analyzed 8,825 consecutive patients who underwent PCI at General Hospital of Shenyang Military Region and identified 581 patients with anemia. Patients (anemia vs. no anemia) were compared using a propensity score analysis to best match between groups. The main outcome of this study is 3-year ischemic events after PCI, the secondary outcome of this study is 3-year mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) after PCI. Results Compared with nonanemic patients, anemic patients were often female (38.90% vs. 14.51%) and elder patients (66.44% vs. 34.95%). Anemic patients have lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and creatinine clearance (Ccr) and were more likely to have history of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, hypertension, peripheral vascular diseases (PVD) (P<0.05). However, the prevalences of diabetes and hyperlipidemia were lower in anemic patients (P<0.01). Anemia was an independent predictor for 3-year ischemic events [hazard ratio (HR): 2.20, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.61-3.00, P<0.01], 3-year mortality (HR: 3.58, 95% CI: 1.75-7.32, P<0.01) and 3-year MACE (HR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.64-2.79, P<0.01) after PCI in post-match samples. The incidence of 3-year ischemic events was 41.0% and 19.3% in anemic and nonanemic patients, respectively. Conclusions Anemia is an independent predictor for 3-year ischemic events, 3-year mortality and 3-year MACE in patients who underwent PCI. Further studies need to explore the impact of the pathogenesis and progress, prevention and therapy of anemia on the outcome of patients undergoing PCI. PMID:26716033

  9. [Prevention of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in tropical areas].

    PubMed

    Dillon, J C

    2000-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most widespread nutritional disease in the World. It is prevalent in tropical areas especially in pregnant women and children. The main cause in these areas is consumption of foods containing inhibitors of iron absorption resulting in insufficient bioavailability. In advanced stages of iron deficiency, low hemoglobin levels lead to anemia. Functional consequences of anemia depend on age including mental and physical retardation in children and work disability in adults. Although other disorders including parasitic, infectious, genetic, and nutritional diseases may be involved in anemia in tropical areas, iron deficiency is always a factor because of nutritional conditions. The WHO has proposed laboratory criteria for use in establishing the incidence of iron deficiency and related anemia in a given population. Based on several surveys, four preventive strategies have been developed, i.e., dietary diversification, iron supplementation, general public health measures, and food fortification. Each of these strategies has advantages and disadvantages. The prevailing consensus is that coordinated use of these approaches holds forth the only hope of impacting the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in tropical regions. PMID:10989795

  10. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency - children ... able to absorb iron well, even though the child is eating enough iron Slow blood loss over ... bleeding in the digestive tract Iron deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning .

  11. Erythroblast apoptosis and microenvironmental iron restriction trigger anemia in the VK*MYC model of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bordini, Jessica; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Fermo, Isabella; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P Leif; Camaschella, Clara; Campanella, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant disorder characterized by bone marrow proliferation of plasma cells and by overproduction of monoclonal immunoglobulin detectable in the sera (M-spike). Anemia is a common complication of multiple myeloma, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. We aimed to identify the different determinants of anemia using the Vk*MYC mouse, which spontaneously develops an indolent bone marrow localized disease with aging. Affected Vk*MYC mice develop a mild normochromic normocytic anemia. We excluded the possibility that anemia results from defective erythropoietin production, inflammation or increased hepcidin expression. Mature erythroid precursors are reduced in Vk*MYC bone marrow compared with wild-type. Malignant plasma cells express the apoptogenic receptor Fas ligand and, accordingly, active caspase 8 is detected in maturing erythroblasts. Systemic iron homeostasis is not compromised in Vk*MYC animals, but high expression of the iron importer CD71 by bone marrow plasma cells and iron accumulation in bone marrow macrophages suggest that iron competition takes place in the local multiple myeloma microenvironment, which might contribute to anemia. In conclusion, the mild anemia of the Vk*MYC model is mainly related to the local effect of the bone marrow malignant clone in the absence of an overt inflammatory status. We suggest that this reproduces the initial events triggering anemia in patients. PMID:25715406

  12. Renal cell carcinoma and autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Lands, R; Foust, J

    1996-04-01

    A previously healthy man who became bedridden because of malaise, fatigue, and weakness was found to have an autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). In the course of his evaluation for the AIHA, he was found, coincidentally, to have a renal cell carcinoma. The AIHA was marginally responsive to therapy with corticosteroids, but it resolved promptly after excision of the cancer. This case represents probably a rarely observed association between a nonhematologic malignancy and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:8614893

  13. Cerebral Microcirculation during Experimental Normovolaemic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bellapart, Judith; Cuthbertson, Kylie; Dunster, Kimble; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G.; Raffel, O. Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Barnett, Adrian; Paratz, Jenifer; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is accepted among critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anemia. Experimental studies suggest that anemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise, when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion among critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure, and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anemia does not result in short-term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain. PMID:26869986

  14. Diamond Blackfan Anemia: Diagnosis, Treatment and Molecular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Jeffrey M.; Ellis, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by erythroid failure, congenital anomalies and a predisposition to cancer. Faulty ribosome biogenesis, resulting in pro-apoptotic erythropoiesis leading to erythroid failure, is hypothesized to be the underlying defect. The genes identified to date that are mutated in DBA all encode ribosomal proteins associated with either the small (RPS) or large (RPL) subunit and in these cases haploinsufficiency gives rise to the disease. Extraordinarily robust laboratory and clinical investigations have recently led to demonstrable improvements in clinical care for patients with DBA. PMID:19327583

  15. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  16. Family structure and child anemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Kammi K

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data from the nationally-representative Mexico Family Life Survey, this study assesses the association between family structure and iron-deficient anemia among children ages 3-12 in Mexico. The longitudinal models (n = 4649), which control for baseline anemia status and allow for consideration of family structure transitions, suggest that children living in stable-cohabiting and single-mother families and those who have recently experienced a parental union dissolution have higher odds of anemia than those in stable-married, father-present family structures. Interaction effects indicate that unmarried family contexts have stronger associations with anemia in older children (over age five); and, that the negative effects of parental union dissolution are exacerbated in poorer households. Resident maternal grandparents have a significant beneficial effect on child anemia independent of parental family structure. These results highlight the importance of family structure for child micronutrient deficiencies and suggest that understanding social processes within households may be critical to preventing child anemia in Mexico. PMID:23294876

  17. A Retrospective Study of Equine Infectious Anemia Based on the Canadian Control Program

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Benoit

    1985-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia in Canada was reviewed for the period January 1976 to December 1981. The human and ecological factors prevailing in Canada are deemed instrumental with respect to the evolution of the disease. The natural spread of the disease on a large scale has not been influenced by the Federal program. Reactors with signs of the disease are important for it's propagation. The author underlines the necessity of cooperation with private practising veterinarians to control it. PMID:17422597

  18. Mutated Fanconi anemia pathway in non-Fanconi anemia cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yihang; Lee, Yuan-Hao; Panneerselvam, Jayabal; Zhang, Jun; Loo, Lenora W. M.; Fei, Peiwen

    2015-01-01

    An extremely high cancer incidence and the hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents associated with Fanconi Anemia (FA) have marked it to be a unique genetic model system to study human cancer etiology and treatment, which has emerged an intense area of investigation in cancer research. However, there is limited information about the relationship between the mutated FA pathway and the cancer development or/and treatment in patients without FA. Here we analyzed the mutation rates of the seventeen FA genes in 68 DNA sequence datasets. We found that the FA pathway is frequently mutated across a variety of human cancers, with a rate mostly in the range of 15 to 35 % in human lung, brain, bladder, ovarian, breast cancers, or others. Furthermore, we found a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) between the mutated FA pathway and the development of human bladder cancer that we only further analyzed. Together, our study demonstrates a previously unknown fact that the mutated FA pathway frequently occurs during the development of non-FA human cancers, holding profound implications directly in advancing our understanding of human tumorigenesis as well as tumor sensitivity/resistance to crosslinking drug-relevant chemotherapy. PMID:26015400

  19. Anemia analyzer: algorithm and reflex testing in clinical practice leading to efficiency and cost savings.

    PubMed

    Haq, Samir M

    2009-01-01

    Anemia is a common disease affecting about 3.5 million people in the United States. In present day clinical practice, a clinician makes a diagnosis of anemia based on low hemoglobin levels discovered during a complete blood count (CBC) test. If the etiology of the anemia is not readily apparent, the clinician orders additional testing to discover the cause of the anemia. Which tests are ordered, in what order these tests are run, and how the information gathered from the tests is used is based primarily on the individual physician's knowledge and expertise. Using this system to determine the cause of anemia is not only labor and resource intensive but it carries a potential for morbidity and an occasional mortality. Utilizing previously published data, we created an algorithmic approach to analyze the cause of anemia in the majority of cases. The algorithm accepts as input three parameters from a CBC test: (1) mean corpuscular volume, (2) red cell distribution width, and (3) reticulocyte count. With these three parameters, the algorithm generates a probable etiology of the anemia. Additionally, the algorithm will automatically order reflex tests needed to confirm the diagnosis. These reflex tests can be modified depending on the policies of the institution using the algorithm, as different institutions may order different tests based on availability and costs. This is a simple algorithm that could be integrated into the CBC test output. When a low hemoglobin level is found, the algorithm suggests the probable etiology and orders reflex tests if they are desired. Such an approach would not only provide cost efficiency and time savings but would also elevate the level of every clinician ordering a CBC to that of an expert hematologist. PMID:19380908

  20. Overview of the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) Project.

    PubMed

    Suchdev, Parminder S; Namaste, Sorrel M L; Aaron, Grant J; Raiten, Daniel J; Brown, Kenneth H; Flores-Ayala, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Anemia remains a widespread public health problem. Although iron deficiency is considered the leading cause of anemia globally, the cause of anemia varies considerably by country. To achieve global targets to reduce anemia, reliable estimates of the contribution of nutritional and non-nutritional causes of anemia are needed to guide interventions. Inflammation is known to affect many biomarkers used to assess micronutrient status and can thus lead to incorrect diagnosis of individuals and to overestimation or underestimation of the prevalence of deficiency in a population. Reliable assessment of iron status is particularly needed in settings with high infectious disease burden, given the call to screen for iron deficiency to mitigate potential adverse effects of iron supplementation. To address these information gaps, in 2012 the CDC, National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, and Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition formed a collaborative research group called Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutrition Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA). Data from nationally and regionally representative nutrition surveys conducted in the past 10 y that included preschool children and/or women of childbearing age were pooled. Of 25 data sets considered for inclusion, 17 were included, representing ∼30,000 preschool children, 26,000 women of reproductive age, and 21,000 school-aged children from all 6 WHO geographic regions. This article provides an overview of the BRINDA project and describes key research questions and programmatic and research implications. Findings from this project will inform global guidelines on the assessment of anemia and micronutrient status and will guide the development of a research agenda for future longitudinal studies. PMID:26980818