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Sample records for aneurisma cerebral posterior

  1. Bilateral posterior cerebral artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Davinia; Murphy, Sinead M; Hennessey, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with short-term memory impairment and a homonymous left inferior quadrantanopia secondary to simultaneous bilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territory infarction. As in more than a quarter of cases of PCA infarction, no aetiological cause was identified. Unlike the transient nature of symptoms in some cases following unilateral infarction, his deficits persisted on 2-month follow-up. PMID:22798298

  2. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2016-08-01

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit. PMID:26122324

  3. [Ischemic insult in the anterior and posterior cerebral circulation].

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dzevdet; Ibrahimagić, Omer; Dostović, Zikrija

    2003-01-01

    In the everyday practice among clinical and etiological classifications for ischemic stroke, the terms strokes in the anterior and posterior cerebral circulation are also in use. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of ischemic strokes in the anterior and posterior circulation, their age and sex distribution, risk factors and hospital mortality. In the study it was analyzed 1772 patients with acute ischemic stroke hospitalized at the Department of Neurology Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, between January 1st 1996 and December 31st 2000. The mean age was 65.5 years (+9.9), 942 (55%) were females. Ischemic strokes for all patients were confirmed with computed tomography, while other data were collected from the standard patients' history charts. Anterior circulation stroke (ACS) had 1408 patients (81.8%), the rest of 314 (18.2%) had posterior circulation stroke (PCS). In the both types females were slightly overrepresented: 784 (56%) in ACS, and 158 (50.5%) in PCS. Moreover, females were significantly older than males: 67 (+9.8) versus 64 (+10) years in ACS (p < 0.001), 67.5 (+10.3) versus 63.5 (+9.2) in PCS (p < 0.001). Hypertension was the major risk factor occurring in 67% patients with ACS and 71 with PCS; heart diseases 54% in the both types, and diabetes in 23% patients with ACS and 20% with PCS. The cortical ischemic lesion was verified in 46% patients with ACS, 41% with PCS; subcortical in 12.5% and 14.5%; and lacunar in 41.5% and 44.5%, respectively. Hospital mortality was 30% (430 patients) for ACS, and 32% (101 patients) for PCS. Hospital mortality was considerably higher among females: 33% versus 28% for ACS (p = 0.03), 38% versus 27% for PCS (p = 0.03). On the basis of our study we can conclude that ischemic strokes in the anterior cerebral circulation are 4/5 of all ischemic strokes at the Department of Neurology Tuzla. Both, anterior and posterior circulation strokes are more frequent in females, witches were in average older than males

  4. Posterior cerebral artery stroke presenting as alexia without agraphia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhawna; Handa, Rahul; Prakash, Swayam; Nagpal, Kadam; Bhana, Indu; Gupta, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Sunil; Sisodiya, Mahendra Singh

    2014-12-01

    Alexia without agraphia (pure alexia) was the first of the disconnection syndromes to be described by Dejerine who reported a patient of alexia without agraphia secondary to an embolic occipital lobe infarct. We herein report a 55-year-old man who presented with alexia without agraphia with magnetic resonance imaging suggestive of left posterior cerebral artery infarct involving left occipital lobe and splenium of corpus callosum. Alexia without agraphia is a relatively uncommon clinical condition, which should always be thought in a patient presenting with difficulty in reading with normal visual acuity. Ophthalmologists should also be aware of this disconnection syndrome as many patients initially take their advice due to predominant visual complaints. Early diagnosis and treatment of this condition help in ensuring the patient and attendants about nonprogressive nature of the disease and may prevent further episodes of stroke. PMID:24935413

  5. Subdural hematoma caused by rupture of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhou; Tan, Qiang; Li, Lin; Chen, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm is rare and is usually associated with delayed diagnosis and treatment. We present a patient of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm presenting as subacute SDH. The incidence, mechanisms and treatment of this condition are discussed. PMID:27094528

  6. Failure of the Pipeline Embolization Device in Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms Associated with a Fetal Posterior Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Zanaty, Mario; Chalouhi, Nohra; Starke, Robert M.; Jabbour, Pascal; Ryken, Katherine O.; Bulsara, Ketan R.; Hasan, David

    2016-01-01

    The pipeline embolization device has emerged as an important endovascular option. This is in part due to safety, efficacy, and possibly the ability to shorten the operative time considerably. With this new technology, some limitations are emerging as experience accumulates. We report three cases of posterior communicating (PCOM) artery aneurysms associated with fetal posterior cerebral artery where pipeline embolization was unsuccessful in obliterating the aneurysms. PCOM artery aneurysms associated with a fetal PCA should be managed either by microsurgical clipping or coiling when feasible. PMID:27069709

  7. Aneurysms of the P2P Segment of Posterior Cerebral Artery: Case Report and Surgical Steps.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Paulo; Gatto, Luana; Neves, Maick; Martins, Carlos; Nakasone, Fabio; Isolan, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The posterior cerebral artery (PCA) is divided into 4 segments: precommunicating segment (P1), postcommunicating segment (P2), quadrigeminal segment (P3), and calcarine segment (P4). Small aneurysms are more prevalent than large aneurysms in patients with ruptured aneurysms. P2 and P3 aneurysms are usually managed by the subtemporal approach. This is a case report of rupture saccular aneurysm of posterior cerebral artery on P2P segment. The authors show the surgical steps of these rare aneurysms with an illustrative case. PMID:25548571

  8. Aneurysms of the P2P Segment of Posterior Cerebral Artery: Case Report and Surgical Steps

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Neves, Maick; Martins, Carlos; Nakasone, Fabio; Isolan, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The posterior cerebral artery (PCA) is divided into 4 segments: precommunicating segment (P1), postcommunicating segment (P2), quadrigeminal segment (P3), and calcarine segment (P4). Small aneurysms are more prevalent than large aneurysms in patients with ruptured aneurysms. P2 and P3 aneurysms are usually managed by the subtemporal approach. This is a case report of rupture saccular aneurysm of posterior cerebral artery on P2P segment. The authors show the surgical steps of these rare aneurysms with an illustrative case. PMID:25548571

  9. Executive dysfunction associated with stroke in the posterior cerebral artery territory.

    PubMed

    Park, Key-Chung; Yoon, Sung-Sang; Rhee, Hak-Young

    2011-02-01

    Cognitive decline following posterior cerebral artery infarction (PCAI) is associated with lesions in the occipital lobe that extend into the parahippocampus or the splenium. We investigated patterns of neuropsychological deficits, including those causing executive dysfunction, associated with isolated lesions of the occipital lobe and with extensive lesions of the occipital lobe that extended into the splenium or the posterior ventral temporal lobes including the parahippocampus and fusiform gyrus. Eleven patients with unilateral PCAI involving the cerebral cortex and one patient with an occipital hemorrhage were selected for inclusion in this study. The mean age of the patients was 68.50 ± 7.94 years and their mean level of education was 8.58 ± 4.12 years. Four patients had isolated occipital lobe lesions and eight had lesions in either the splenium or the posterior ventral temporal lobe in addition to the occipital lobe. Whereas three of four patients with isolated occipital lobe lesions had left-sided lesions, only three of the eight patients with extended occipital lesions had left-sided lesions. The patients underwent a standardized battery of neuropsychological tests. The patients with occipital injuries in addition to splenial or posterior ventral temporal lobe injuries demonstrated performance decline across diverse cognitive domains, including memory (eight of eight), visuospatial function (eight of eight), executive function (seven of eight), language-related function (four of eight) and attention (one of eight). In contrast, memory impairment (three of four patients) was the only area in which patients with isolated occipital lobe lesions demonstrated decline in performance. Our findings suggest that strokes in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery are frequently associated with executive dysfunction. Injuries involving the splenium or posterior ventral temporal lobe in addition to the occipital lobe lead to more diverse neuropsychological

  10. Complete Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Caused by Direct Compression of the Posterior Cerebral Artery.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Shin Kyoung; Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Na, Sang-Jun

    2015-07-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy frequently occurs because of external compression by an internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm and diabetes mellitus. In addition, pontine infarction, cavernous sinus tumors, demyelinating disease, and autoimmune disorder are well-known causes of oculomotor nerve palsy. However, cases of complete oculomotor nerve palsy by neurovascular conflicts presented with a sudden onset of clinical symptoms are extremely rare. We experienced a rare case of complete oculomotor nerve palsy because of direct vascular compression of the oculomotor nerve by the posterior cerebral artery. PMID:25939862

  11. Computational Image Analysis Reveals Intrinsic Multigenerational Differences between Anterior and Posterior Cerebral Cortex Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Winter, Mark R; Liu, Mo; Monteleone, David; Melunis, Justin; Hershberg, Uri; Goderie, Susan K; Temple, Sally; Cohen, Andrew R

    2015-10-13

    Time-lapse microscopy can capture patterns of development through multiple divisions for an entire clone of proliferating cells. Images are taken every few minutes over many days, generating data too vast to process completely by hand. Computational analysis of this data can benefit from occasional human guidance. Here we combine improved automated algorithms with minimized human validation to produce fully corrected segmentation, tracking, and lineaging results with dramatic reduction in effort. A web-based viewer provides access to data and results. The improved approach allows efficient analysis of large numbers of clones. Using this method, we studied populations of progenitor cells derived from the anterior and posterior embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, each growing in a standardized culture environment. Progenitors from the anterior cortex were smaller, less motile, and produced smaller clones compared to those from the posterior cortex, demonstrating cell-intrinsic differences that may contribute to the areal organization of the cerebral cortex. PMID:26344906

  12. Computational Image Analysis Reveals Intrinsic Multigenerational Differences between Anterior and Posterior Cerebral Cortex Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Mark R.; Liu, Mo; Monteleone, David; Melunis, Justin; Hershberg, Uri; Goderie, Susan K.; Temple, Sally; Cohen, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Time-lapse microscopy can capture patterns of development through multiple divisions for an entire clone of proliferating cells. Images are taken every few minutes over many days, generating data too vast to process completely by hand. Computational analysis of this data can benefit from occasional human guidance. Here we combine improved automated algorithms with minimized human validation to produce fully corrected segmentation, tracking, and lineaging results with dramatic reduction in effort. A web-based viewer provides access to data and results. The improved approach allows efficient analysis of large numbers of clones. Using this method, we studied populations of progenitor cells derived from the anterior and posterior embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, each growing in a standardized culture environment. Progenitors from the anterior cortex were smaller, less motile, and produced smaller clones compared to those from the posterior cortex, demonstrating cell-intrinsic differences that may contribute to the areal organization of the cerebral cortex. PMID:26344906

  13. Unusual vascular events in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Fisher, C M

    1986-02-01

    There is an unusual type of vascular episode in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery which remains relatively unknown. Ten cases are presented in which a posterior cerebral artery deficit developed suddenly in dramatic fashion with headache, visual symptoms, sensory and motor deficits and signs of third nerve involvement. Nine of the patients were female and one was male. Seven were under the age of 33. In all instances there was a permanent neurologic sequela, usually a hemianopia. A similar case was described in 1901. The nature of the underlying process remains obscure, but the evidence favors accompanied migraine in which a particularly severe attack results in permanent damage. The term "catastrophic migraine" is suggested. PMID:3955450

  14. [Elective cerebral arteriovenous malformation treatment with onyx after coil embolization of ruptured, flow-realeted aneurysm of the posterior circulation].

    PubMed

    Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rać, Monika; Sagan, Leszek; Kojder, Ireneusz

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous posterior circulation malformation was planned to embolize by onyx injection after acute coil embolization of ruptured flow-realeted aneurysm of posterior cerebral artery. Control angiography revealed completely embolized malformation with normal vessel patency at the end of procedure. There were no adverse events related to this procedure and no neurologic deficit at the discharge. PMID:23276020

  15. Progressive Deconstruction of a Distal Posterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysm Using Competitive Flow Diversion.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew K; Tan, Lee A; Lopes, Demetrius K; Moftakhar, Roham

    2016-03-01

    Progressive deconstruction is an endovascular technique for aneurysm treatment that utilizes flow diverting stents to promote progressive thrombosis by diverting blood flow away from the aneurysm's parent vessel. While the aneurysm thromboses, collateral blood vessels develop over time to avoid infarction that can often accompany acute parent vessel occlusion. We report a 37-year-old woman with a left distal posterior cerebral artery aneurysm that was successfully treated with this strategy. The concept and rationale of progressive deconstruction are discussed in detail. PMID:26958413

  16. Endovascular parent artery occlusion of proximal posterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Hidenori; Tanoue, Shunsuke; Teranishi, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Senshu; Magami, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Munetaka; Arai, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    We report two cases of proximal posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms treated with endovascular parent artery occlusion (PAO) with coils. In both cases, selective injection from the 4 F distal access catheter clearly showed the perforating arteries arising from the PCA. Case No 1, a 49-year-old woman, was successfully treated with preservation of a paramedian artery. Case No 2, a 54-year-old woman, was treated in the same manner. The patient underwent extensive thalamic infarction after the procedure because of paramedian artery occlusion. Endovascular PAO with coils is feasible for proximal PCA aneurysms; however, preservation of perforating arteries arising from the PCA is mandatory. PMID:25969452

  17. Increased Arterial Diameters in the Posterior Cerebral Circulation in Men with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A.; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males – females; normal – impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p<0.01) and posterior cerebral artery diameter (p<0.05) compared to male controls. This was independent of disease severity as measured by renal function and did not lead to changes in arterial blood flow properties. A basilar artery diameter of >3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, p<0.001), but not from stroke patients. Enlarged arterial diameters of the posterior circulation are present only in men with Fabry disease independent of disease severity. PMID:24475221

  18. Crankshaft effect after posterior spinal fusion and unit rod instrumentation in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Smucker, J D; Miller, F

    2001-01-01

    Radiographs and charts were reviewed for all children with cerebral palsy who underwent posterior-only spinal fusion with the unit rod for neuromuscular scoliosis by the senior author from 1989 through 1996. Fifty patients were found to have an open triradiate cartilage at the time of fusion. A single observer obtained measurements of the preoperative, postoperative, and most recent spine films using the standard Cobb angle. Amount of change was calculated over the respective periods. Forty-three patients had at least 2 years of clinical follow-up. Twenty-nine patients had more than 2 years of both radiographic (mean, 4.6 years) and clinical follow-up (mean, 4.8 years) with a closed triradiate cartilage on their most recent films. In this group, the mean absolute curve change over the length of radiographic follow-up was 0.6 degrees (range, -9-14). None of the 43 patients with at least 2 years of clinical follow-up (mean, 4.5 years) had any radiographic change that was clinically significant on chart review. Therefore posterior spinal fusion alone with unit rod instrumentation is adequate treatment to control crankshaft deformity in skeletally immature children with neuromuscular scoliosis due to cerebral palsy. PMID:11176363

  19. Superficial temporal artery to proximal posterior cerebral artery bypass through the anterior temporal approach

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Noda, Kosumo; Oda, Junpei; Miyata, Shiro; Ota, Nakao; Yoshikane, Tsutomu; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Background: The superficial temporal artery (STA) to proximal posterior cerebral artery (PCA) (P2 segment) bypass is one of the most difficult procedures to perform because the proximal PCA is located deep and high within the ambient cistern. STA to proximal PCA bypass is usually performed through a subtemporal approach or posterior transpetrosal approach, and rarely through a transsylvian approach. The aim of this study was to describe the operative technique of STA to proximal PCA bypass through a modified transsylvian approach (anterior temporal approach). Methods: STA to proximal PCA bypass was performed through an anterior temporal approach in three patients with intracranial aneurysm. We describe the details of the surgical technique. Results: The STA was successfully anastomosed to the proximal PCA in all cases. One patient suffered hemiparesis and aphasia due to infarction in the anterior thalamoperforating artery territory. Conclusions: STA to proximal PCA bypass can be performed through an anterior temporal approach in selected patients. We recommend that every precaution, including complete hemostasis, placement of cellulose sponges beneath the recipient artery to elevate the site of the anastomosis, and placement of a continuous drainage tube at the bottom of the operative field to avoid blood contamination during the anastomosis, should be taken to shorten the temporary occlusion time. PMID:26097774

  20. [Recurrent posterior reversible encephalopathy due to vasospasm and cerebral hypoperfusionin in acute leukemia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hiraide, Takuya; Matsubayashi, Tomoko; Ishigaki, Hidetoshi; Asahina, Miki; Sakaguchi, Kimiyoshi; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2015-11-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with recurrent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). She was diagnosed with B-precursor acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and was administered remission-induction chemotherapy. On day 28 of the induction therapy, she experienced seizure and prolonged unconsciousness. Blood pressure was slightly elevated. MRI revealed cortical cytotoxic edema in the right temporal and occipital lobes. In the right occipital white matter the lesion with vasogenic edema also existed. Three days later, MRI showed vasogenic edema in subcortical white matter of the right temporal right occipital and bilateral occipital lobes. The lesions had receded with time. Since the seizure occurred, the chemotherapy had been discontinued. The episodes of seizure and prolonged consciousness recurred 22 days later. MRI revealed vasogenic edema in the right occipital lobe, and MR angiography demonstrated vessel irregularity and reduced branch visualization in the middle and posterior cerebral arteries. Arterial spin-labeling (ASL) showed hypoperfusion in both occipital lobes. It suggests that vasoconstriction and hypoperfusion could lead to recurrent PRES in this case. It is possible that ASL might be more sensitive than MRI in detecting the lesions of PRES. It should be noted that PRES might recur in leukemia. PMID:26717647

  1. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Mimicking a Left Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, Santo; Kumar, Jai Dev; Libman, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    Certain Acute Clinical presentations are highly suggestive of stroke caused by specific mechanisms. One example of this would be the sudden onset of aphasia without hemiparesis often reflecting cerebral embolism, frequently from a cardiac source. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) describes a usually reversible neurologic syndrome with a variety of presenting symptoms from headache, altered mental status, seizures, vomiting, diminished spontaneity and speech, abnormalities of visual perception and visual loss. We report a patient presenting with elevated blood pressure, CT characteristics of PRES but a highly circumscribed neurologic syndrome (Wernicke's Aphasia without hemiparesis) suggestive of a cardioembolic stroke affecting the left MCA territory. That is, PRES mimicked a focal stroke syndrome. The importance of recognizing this possibility is that his deficits resolved with blood pressure control, while other treatments, such as intensifying his anticoagulation would have been inappropriate. In addition, allowing his blood pressure to remain elevated as is often done in the setting of an acute stroke might have perpetuated the underlying pathophysiology of PRES leading to a worse clinical outcome. For this reason PRES needs to be recognized quickly and treated appropriately. PMID:22371821

  2. [A case of posterior cerebral artery territory infarction with micropsia as the chief complaint].

    PubMed

    Touge, T; Takeuchi, H; Yamada, A; Miki, H; Nishioka, M

    1990-08-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted to the hospital complaining that all objects in his vision suddenly appeared small. Examination on admission revealed amnesia of recent events, recognition memory deficits, emotional disturbance, right upper quadrantanopsia and micropsia. The patient was diagnosed as posterior cerebral artery territory infarction based on brain CT scan and MRI findings which showed an ischemic lesion involving the left occipital lobe and hippocampus. We regarded the quadrantanopsia to have originated in the occipital lobe lesion and memory and emotional disturbances to have originated in the hippocampal lesion. After admission, micropsia and disturbances of memory and emotion improved within a month, but the quadrantanopsia did not recover. A comparison of the 25th and 2nd day brain CT scans indicated that the low density of the ischemic lesion near the hippocampus had become less clear and smaller. These findings suggest that the pathogenesis of micropsia in this case was a visual perceptional abnormality due to edematous change in the structures near the hippocampus. Cases of occipital artery territory infarction with micropsia, disturbances of memory and emotion, and quadrantanopsia appear to be rare, but micropsia may be overlooked since it is often masked by disturbance of memory or emotion. PMID:2253428

  3. Endovascular Therapeutic Occlusion of the Posterior Cerebral Artery: An Option for Ruptured Giant Aneurysm in a Child.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Zeferino; Matos, Luiz Afonso Dias; Dos Santos, Marcio Luis Tostes; Cardoso-Demartini, Adriane de Andre

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population is low, and surgical clipping remains a good long-term treatment option. However, posterior circulation aneurysms are even more complex to manage in children than in adults. We report a case of a giant aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery in a 10-year-old boy presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Endovascular treatment with platinum coils was performed with total occlusion of the aneurysm and the affected arterial segment without complications. The patient achieved good recovery, and a late control angiogram confirmed exclusion of the aneurysm. Occurrence of special features of cerebral aneurysm in children, in comparison to adults, is also described. Parent artery sacrifice is an effective therapeutic option, but long-term follow-up is necessary to avoid recurrence and rebleeding. PMID:26974558

  4. The influence of the non-Newtonian properties of blood on blood-hammer through the posterior cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Tazraei, Pedram; Riasi, Alireza; Takabi, Behrouz

    2015-06-01

    This work investigates a two dimensional numerical analysis of blood hammer through the posterior cerebral artery. The non-Newtonian and usual Newtonian blood models are compared in the case of blood hammer through the posterior cerebral artery to quantify the differences between the models. In this way, a validated CFD simulation is used to study non-Newtonian shear-thinning effects of blood. The governing equations for the modeling of two-dimensional transient flow are solved using a combination of characteristics and central finite difference methods, respectively for the hyperbolic and parabolic parts. Herein, the non-Newtonian viscosity characteristic of blood is incorporated by using the Carreau model. To convert the nonlinear terms available in the characteristics equation into the linear ones, the Newton-Kantorovich method is implemented. The verification and validation of the numerical results are carried out in detail. Hemodynamic characteristics of blood hammer through the posterior cerebral artery are derived with both the Newtonian and non-Newtonian models, and the results are meticulously compared and discussed. The results show that when blood hammer occurs, the non-Newtonian properties greatly influence the velocity and shear stress profiles. At the early stages of blood hammer, there is a 64% difference between magnitudes of wall shear stress in these two models, and the magnitude of the wall shear stress for the shear-thinning blood flow is lower than the Newtonian one. PMID:25865933

  5. Combined Anterior and Posterior Lumbar Rhizotomy for Treatment of Mixed Dystonia and Spasticity in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nada, Mohamed; Mahran, Mahmoud A.; Aboud, Ahmed; Mahran, Moustafa G.; Nasef, Marwa A.A.; Gaber, Mohamed; Sabry, Tamer; Ibrahim, Mohamed H.; Taha, Mohamed H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) can present with severe secondary dystonia with or without associated spasticity of their extremities. OBJECTIVE: To assess the outcomes of combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomy for the treatment of mixed hypertonia in the lower extremities of children with CP. METHODS: Fifty children with CP were subjected to combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomies in a prospective study. Clinical outcome measurements were recorded preoperatively and were evaluated at 2, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The operative techniques were performed by laminotomy from L1-S1, and intraoperative monitoring was used in all cases. All patients underwent intensive postoperative physiotherapy programs. RESULTS: Changes in muscle tone, joint range of motion, and dystonia were significant (P = .000) at postoperative assessment visits. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated the potential of combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomies to improve activities of daily living in children with CP and with mixed spasticity and dystonia. ABBREVIATIONS: BAD, Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale CAPR, combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomy CP, cerebral palsy ITB, intrathecal baclofen MAS, modified Ashworth Scale ROM, range of motion SDR, selective dorsal rhizotomy PMID:27244465

  6. Visual Agnosia and Posterior Cerebral Artery Infarcts: An Anatomical-Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Martinaud, Olivier; Pouliquen, Dorothée; Gérardin, Emmanuel; Loubeyre, Maud; Hirsbein, David; Hannequin, Didier; Cohen, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate systematically the cognitive deficits following posterior cerebral artery (PCA) strokes, especially agnosic visual disorders, and to study anatomical-clinical correlations. Methods and Findings We investigated 31 patients at the chronic stage (mean duration of 29.1 months post infarct) with standardized cognitive tests. New experimental tests were used to assess visual impairments for words, faces, houses, and objects. Forty-one healthy subjects participated as controls. Brain lesions were normalized, combined, and related to occipitotemporal areas responsive to specific visual categories, including words (VWFA), faces (FFA and OFA), houses (PPA) and common objects (LOC). Lesions were located in the left hemisphere in 15 patients, in the right in 13, and bilaterally in 3. Visual field defects were found in 23 patients. Twenty patients had a visual disorder in at least one of the experimental tests (9 with faces, 10 with houses, 7 with phones, 3 with words). Six patients had a deficit just for a single category of stimulus. The regions of maximum overlap of brain lesions associated with a deficit for a given category of stimuli were contiguous to the peaks of the corresponding functional areas as identified in normal subjects. However, the strength of anatomical-clinical correlations was greater for words than for faces or houses, probably due to the stronger lateralization of the VWFA, as compared to the FFA or the PPA. Conclusions Agnosic visual disorders following PCA infarcts are more frequent than previously reported. Dedicated batteries of tests, such as those developed here, are required to identify such deficits, which may escape clinical notice. The spatial relationships of lesions and of regions activated in normal subjects predict the nature of the deficits, although individual variability and bilaterally represented systems may blur those correlations. PMID:22276198

  7. Posterior cerebral artery--variation in the origin and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Dodevski, Ace; Tosovska Lazarova, Dobrila; Mitreska, Nadica; Aliji, Vjolca; Stojovska Jovanovska, Elizabeta

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of new techniques in diagnostic and interventional radiology and progress in micro-neurosurgery, accurate knowledge of the brain blood vessels is essential in daily clinical work. The aim of this study was to describe the different types of PCA origin, their diameter, and to emphasize their clinical significance. In this study we examined radiographs of 53 patients who had CT angiography undertaken for a variety of clinical reasons, performed as a part of their medical treatment at the University Radiology Clinic in Skopje, R. Macedonia. This study included 24 females and 29 males, ranging in age from 32 to 73 years; mean age 55.3±11.5 years. The results showed that the diameter of the posterior cerebral artery was 1.74±0.317 mm on the right side and 1.98±0.408 mm on the left side. The adult configuration was present in 37 (69.81%); foetal configuration was present in 12 (22.64%) and transitional configuration was present in 4 (7.54%) of the patients. We found two patients with bilateral foetal type and ten with unilateral foetal type (six on the right side and four on the left side). Despite the limitations of the study, we found that the foetal variant was presented in 22.64% of patients. Thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the intracranial vessels is important to clinicians as well as basic scientists who deal with problems related to intracranial vasculature on a daily basis. PMID:24798602

  8. Influence of Vascular Variant of the Posterior Cerebral Artery (PCA) on Cerebral Blood Flow, Vascular Response to CO2 and Static Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Emmert, Kirsten; Zöller, Daniela; Preti, Maria Giulia; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Haller, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The fetal origin of the posterior cerebral artery (fPCA) is a frequent vascular variant in 11–29% of the population. For the fPCA, blood flow in the PCA originates from the anterior instead of the posterior circulation. We tested whether this blood supply variant impacts the cerebral blood flow assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL), cerebrovascular reserve as well as resting-state static functional connectivity (sFC) in the sense of a systematic confound. Methods The study included 385 healthy, elderly subjects (mean age: 74.18 years [range: 68.9–90.4]; 243 female). Participants were classified into normal vascular supply (n = 296, 76.88%), right fetal origin (n = 23, 5.97%), left fetal origin (n = 16, 4.16%), bilateral fetal origin (n = 4, 1.04%), and intermediate (n = 46, 11.95%, excluded from further analysis) groups. ASL-derived relative cerebral blood flow (relCBF) maps and cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) maps derived from a CO2 challenge with blocks of 7% CO2 were compared. Additionally, sFC between 90 regions of interest (ROIs) was compared between the groups. Results CVR was significantly reduced in subjects with ipsilateral fPCA, most prominently in the temporal lobe. ASL yielded a non-significant trend towards reduced relCBF in bilateral posterior watershed areas. In contrast, conventional atlas-based sFC did not differ between groups. Conclusions In conclusion, fPCA presence may bias the assessment of cerebrovascular reserve by reducing the response to CO2. In contrast, its effect on ASL-assessed baseline perfusion was marginal. Moreover, fPCA presence did not systematically impact resting-state sFC. Taken together, this data implies that perfusion variables should take into account the vascularization patterns. PMID:27532633

  9. Anatomical features of the vertebral artery for transbrachial direct cannulation of a guiding catheter to perform coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Yuichi; Tanno, Yuhei; Kasakura, Shigen; Aoyagi, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Background Transbrachial approach is an alternative technique for coil embolization of posterior circulation aneurysms. The purpose of our study was to investigate the anatomical features of the vertebral artery (VA) for transbrachial direct VA cannulation of a guiding catheter (GC) to perform coil embolization of posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods Included in retrospective analysis were patients who underwent transbrachial coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation by direct VA cannulation of a GC from 2007 to 2013. Investigated were patient characteristics, preoperative sizes of aneurysms, aneurysms location, the angle formed by the target VA and the subclavian artery (AVS), and the VA diameter at the level of the fourth cervical vertebral body (VAD) in the side of the transbrachial access route. Results Thirty-one patients with 32 aneurysms met our criteria. The locations of aneurysms were the VA (n = 16), basilar artery (BA) tip (n = 10), BA trunk (n = 3), BA superior cerebellar artery (n = 1), BA anterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1), and VA posterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1). The right brachial artery was punctured in 27 cases with 28 aneurysms as transbrachial direct cannulation of a GC, and left was in 4 cases with 4 aneurysms. The average AVS, ranging from 45° to 95°, was 77°, and the average VAD, ranging from 3.18 to 4.45 mm, was 3.97 mm. Conclusion For transbrachial direct cannulation of a GC, it seems required that the AVS is about 45° or more and the VAD is about 3.18 mm or more. PMID:25964434

  10. Good outcome after posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) despite elevated cerebral lactate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kondziella, Daniel; Danielsen, Else R; Thomsen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) may cause irreversible brain damage. The diagnosis is confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where vasogenic edema may be seen especially in the posterior parts of the brain. MR spectroscopy (MRS) may be included to help predict the outcome by measuring selected metabolites for instance lactate. Usually lactate is immeasurable in brain tissue, but elevates in cases of hypoxia, and it has been associated with poor outcome. We report a case of a patient with eclampsia and PRES, who had elevated lactate initially, but complete remission clinically and on MRI. PMID:26331088

  11. Endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery aneurysms and vascular insufficiency of fetal-type circulation after parent artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hideaki; Kato, Noriyuki; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Hosoo, Hisayuki; Yamazaki, Tomosato; Yasuda, Susumu; Matsumura, Akira

    2016-10-01

    We present a retrospective analysis of endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms and discuss the susceptibility of a fetal-type PCA to vascular insufficiency after parent artery occlusion. Among 1207 aneurysms treated with endovascular therapy between March 1997 and March 2013 in our institution, 10 patients (0.8%) presented PCA aneurysms. The principal strategy was to employ selective coil embolization for the aneurysm. However, in certain cases of fusiform or dissecting aneurysms, we performed parent artery occlusion with coils. Clinical and radiological data were collected from hospital charts and evaluated retrospectively. The mean age was 52.7±15.6years (range, 12-65years). Five patients (50%) were admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage, and one patient presented with slowly developing paralysis. The remaining four patients were diagnosed incidentally. Five patients underwent selective coil embolization, and five patients underwent parent artery occlusion. All endovascular therapies were successfully performed. However, two patients in the parent artery occlusion group suffered cerebral infarction, and both patients exhibited a fetal-type PCA. The remaining three patients in the parent artery occlusion group exhibited an adult-type PCA and did not suffer a cerebral infarction. Endovascular treatment with either selective coil embolization or parent artery occlusion is safe and effective as the long as the anatomical type of the PCA is considered. Patients with a fetal-type PCA may develop vascular insufficiency upon parent artery occlusion. Neurosurgeons should attempt to preserve the parent artery using a flow-diverting stent or stent-assisted technique for a fetal-type PCA aneurysm. PMID:27523585

  12. Aging is associated with changes to the biomechanical properties of the posterior cerebral artery and parenchymal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Otero, Janice M; Garver, Hannah; Fink, Gregory D; Jackson, William F; Dorrance, Anne M

    2016-02-01

    Artery remodeling, described as a change in artery structure, may be responsible for the increased risk of cardiovascular disease with aging. Although the risk for stroke is known to increase with age, relatively young animals have been used in most stroke studies. Therefore, more information is needed on how aging alters the biomechanical properties of cerebral arteries. Posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) and parenchymal arterioles (PAs) are important in controlling brain perfusion. We hypothesized that aged (22-24 mo old) C57bl/6 mice would have stiffer PCAs and PAs than young (3-5 mo old) mice. The biomechanical properties of the PCAs and PAs were assessed by pressure myography. Data are presented as means ± SE of young vs. old. In the PCA, older mice had increased outer (155.6 ± 3.2 vs. 169.9 ± 3.2 μm) and lumen (116.4 ± 3.6 vs. 137.1 ± 4.7 μm) diameters. Wall stress (375.6 ± 35.4 vs. 504.7 ± 60.0 dyn/cm(2)) and artery stiffness (β-coefficient: 5.2 ± 0.3 vs. 7.6 ± 0.9) were also increased. However, wall strain (0.8 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1) was reduced with age. In the PAs from old mice, wall thickness (3.9 ± 0.3 vs. 5.1 ± 0.2 μm) and area (591.1 ± 95.4 vs. 852.8 ± 100 μm(2)) were increased while stress (758.1 ± 100.0 vs. 587.2 ± 35.1 dyn/cm(2)) was reduced. Aging also increased mean arterial and pulse pressures. We conclude that age-associated remodeling occurs in large cerebral arteries and arterioles and may increase the risk of cerebrovascular disease. PMID:26637558

  13. Evolution of Giant P2-Posterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysm over 16 Years: Saccular to Serpentine. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S

    2009-12-14

    Giant intracranial aneurysms account for only about 5% of all intracranial aneurysms. Giant intradural aneurysms are associated with severe natural history, yet remain potentially curable. These aneurysms cause symptoms due to their mass effect, and only 14-35% of cases present with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). The present case report is an imaging evolution of a giant posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm in a patient who was lost on follow-up from 1992 to 2008 giving insight into the natural history and morphologic evolution of giant serpentine aneurysms. Attempted surgery 16 years previously for a saccular PCA aneurysm produced encephalomalacia and created a more spacious perianeurysmal environment, preventing any mass effect on vital structures in its vicinity. This allowed the patient to have a long symptom-free period and also allowed the aneurysm to follow a morphologic evolution over a long period without causing symptoms which would have called for intervention. This unusual development gave a unique opportunity to study the evolution of a gaint serpentine aneurysm from a saccular aneurysm and also the clinical and morphologic changes in an aneurysm if it can be prevented from producing mass effect. The Coanda effect, or boundary wall effect, has been considered responsible for the development of the serpentine channel in the original globular aneurysm . However many Authors conclude that giant serpentine aneurysms are not derived from saccular aneurysms. PMID:24209407

  14. [Anesthetic Management Using Frontal Nerve, Greater Occipital Nerve, and Superficial Cervical Plexus Block for Posterior Cervical Spinal Fusion in a Patient with Athetoid Cerebral Palsy].

    PubMed

    Matsunami, Sayuri; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Fujitate, Yasutaka; Soen, Masako; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-05-01

    Here, we report successful anesthetic management of posterior cervical spinal fusion utilizing block of the frontal nerve, the greater occipital nerve, and the superficial cervical plexus in a patient with athetoid cerebral palsy. A 69-year-old woman (height 157 cm; weight 33 kg) with athetoid cerebral palsy was scheduled to undergo posterior cervical spinal fusion for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. After induction of general anesthesia, we performed tracheal intubation using the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope with a thin Intlock. After tracheal intubation, we used ropivacaine for the frontal nerve, greater occipital nerve, and superficial cervical plexus block. Anesthetic maintenance was performed with total intravenous anesthesia utilizing propofol and remifentanil. Continuous administration of dexmedetomidine was started during operation. Following surgery, smooth spontaneous ventilation was observed following uneventful extubation. No significant pain and no athetoid movement were observed under continuous administration of dexmedetomidine. PMID:26422967

  15. Cerebral Blood Flow in Posterior Cortical Nodes of the Default Mode Network Decreases with Task Engagement but Remains Higher than in Most Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Chanraud, Sandra; Pitel, Anne-Lise; Müller-Oehring, Eva; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Alsop, David C.; Rohlfing, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies provide converging evidence for existence of intrinsic brain networks activated during resting states and deactivated with selective cognitive demands. Whether task-related deactivation of the default mode network signifies depressed activity relative to the remaining brain or simply lower activity relative to its resting state remains controversial. We employed 3D arterial spin labeling imaging to examine regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) during rest, a spatial working memory task, and a second rest. Change in regional CBF from rest to task showed significant normalized and absolute CBF reductions in posterior cingulate, posterior-inferior precuneus, and medial frontal lobes . A Statistical Parametric Mapping connectivity analysis, with an a priori seed in the posterior cingulate cortex, produced deactivation connectivity patterns consistent with the classic “default mode network” and activation connectivity anatomically consistent with engagement in visuospatial tasks. The large task-related CBF decrease in posterior-inferior precuneus relative to its anterior and middle portions adds evidence for the precuneus' heterogeneity. The posterior cingulate and posterior-inferior precuneus were also regions of the highest CBF at rest and during task performance. The difference in regional CBF between intrinsic (resting) and evoked (task) activity levels may represent functional readiness or reserve vulnerable to diminution by conditions affecting perfusion. PMID:20484322

  16. A comparison of the effects of solid, articulated, and posterior leaf-spring ankle-foot orthoses and shoes alone on gait and energy expenditure in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Smiley, Sara J; Jacobsen, F Stig; Mielke, Cary; Johnston, Robert; Park, Carol; Ovaska, Gary J

    2002-04-01

    Fourteen children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy were evaluated wearing threedifferent ankle-foot orthoses and shoes alone. The ankle-foot orthoses included solid, articulated ankle, and posterior leaf-spring types. Evaluation measures included computerized gait analysis, Energy Efficiency Index data, and individual preference. Highly significant kinematic differences were found at the ankle with shoes alone approaching normative data and braces showing abnormal dorsiflexion. No significant differences, were found in velocity, cadence, stride length, or in the Energy Efficiency Index. Eight children preferred articulated braces, six chose posterior leaf-spring, and none chose the solid brace. PMID:12002212

  17. A Cadaveric Study of Bilateral Configuration of Posterior Bifurcation of Posterior Communicating Artery in Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Anubha; Mandal, Shyamash

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various studies have been done regarding variations of circle of Willis, but few literatures are available about the detail configurations on Indian population. Posterior communicating artery is the main collateral channel between the vertebrobasilar and carotid system. It may act as a main source of blood flow via posterior cerebral artery if fetal configuration is present. Aim of the study is to see the bilateral configurations to compare the blood supply of both cerebral hemispheres via posterior cerebral artery in human cadavers. Materials and Methods: Fifty six formalin fixed brains were used for study. The specimens were classified into 3 types and 21 subtypes according to the configuration of the vessel of both hemispheres. As hemodynamic balance is dependent on the calibre of the vessel, the diameter of the arteries were also taken into consideration. Pearson’s correlation had been done. Result: In present study type I is 57.2%, type II is 37.5% and type III is 5.4%. Incidence of unilateral fetal type posterior cerebral artery is in high percentage (33.9%). Greatest diameter of posterior communicating artery is 3.8mm on right and 3.6mm on left side. Significant correlations also have been found between arterial segments of different types. Conclusion: It is expected that the study will help to enrich the knowledge about the arterial predominance of origin of posterior cerebral artery of both cerebral hemispheres in normal or variant cases and its effect on perfusion images. PMID:25954608

  18. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Schmutzhard, E

    2016-06-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome refers to a neurological disorder characterized by headache, disorders of consciousness, visual disturbances, epileptic seizures, and subcortical vasogenic edema. About two thirds of patients develop neurological symptoms, which are associated with blood pressure fluctuations. One hypothesis is that hypertensive episodes cause autoregulatory failure, and values above the upper limit of cerebral autoregulation result in a breakthrough followed by hyperperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In another hypothesis, endothelial dysfunction triggered by numerous factors including preeclampsia, immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutics, sepsis, or autoimmune disorders is thought to be the key pathomechanism. Endo- or exogenic toxic agents including pharmacological substances, cytokines, or bacterial toxins are supposed to trigger endothelial activation and dysfunction resulting in the release of vasoconstrictors, pro-inflammatory mediators, and vascular leakage. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical and neuroimaging findings that frequently show a bilateral, symmetric, and parietooccipital pattern. However, the diagnosis can often only be confirmed during the course of disease after excluding important differential diagnoses. Currently, there is no specific treatment available. Lowering of arterial blood pressure and eliminating the underlying cause usually leads to an improvement of clinical and neuroradiological findings. Admission to a critical care unit is required in about 40 % of patients due to complicating conditions including status epilepticus, cerebral vasoconstriction, ischemia, or intracerebral hemorrhage. Prognosis is favorable; in the majority of patients neurological deficits and imaging findings resolve completely. PMID:27272329

  19. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  20. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  1. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  2. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... movement problems a child has. What is spastic CP? Spastic means tight or stiff muscles, or muscles ...

  3. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  4. Cerebral palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that can involve brain and nervous system functions, such as movement, ... and thinking. There are several different types of cerebral palsy, including spastic, dyskinetic, ataxic, hypotonic, and mixed.

  5. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Palsy Information Page Clinical Trials Trial of Erythropoietin Neuroprotection ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Palsy? The term cerebral palsy refers to a group ...

  6. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  7. [Posterior capsule opacification].

    PubMed

    Milazzo, S; Grenot, M; Benzerroug, M

    2014-12-01

    Posterior capsule opacification (PCO) is the most common complication after cataract surgery, with an incidence of 30%. It tends to be considered a normal event in the natural history of cataract surgery. Better understanding of its pathophysiology and advancement of intraocular lens material and design along with the improvement of phacoemulsification technique have contributed to decrease the incidence of PCO. Although treatment by Nd: YAG laser posterior capsulotomy is quick and non-invasive, the opening of the posterior capsule may be associated with numerous complications. Prevention remains the best measure for controlling this pathology. PMID:25455552

  8. Posterior fossa tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the posterior fossa, it can block the flow of spinal fluid and cause increased pressure on the brain and ... the cancer early. A total blockage in the flow of spinal fluid can be life threatening. If tumors are found ...

  9. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  10. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases. PMID:16224109

  11. Bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Matthias; Vogel, Tobias; Weise, Kuno; Muratore, Tim; Trobisch, Per

    2010-07-01

    Posterior sternoclavicular dislocations are a rare injury, representing <5% of all sternoclavicular dislocations and 1 in 1600 shoulder girdle injuries. Proper imaging with computed tomography and prompt diagnosis are essential steps in preventing potentially lethal complications observed in approximately 3% of all posterior sternoclavicular dislocations. Surgical treatment is necessary if closed reduction fails. With the medial clavicular epiphysis being the last to close (between ages 22 and 25), children and adolescents typically present with epiphyseal fractures rather than joint dislocations. If closed reduction fails, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) should be considered in fractures, whereas complex reconstructions with tendon graft procedures have been recommended for joint dislocations. This article presents a case of a traumatic bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation due to an epiphyseal fracture in a 15-year-old boy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation. Attempted closed reduction failed with redislocation after 2 days. The patient subsequently required ORIF. This article describes our technique with anterior retraction of the medial clavicle, closure of the posterior periosteum, and ORIF using nonabsorbable sutures. Postoperative shoulder mobilization was started on day 1. At final follow-up, the patient was completely asymptomatic. PMID:20608625

  12. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wimalasundera, Neil; Stevenson, Valerie L

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral palsy has always been known as a disorder of movement and posture resulting from a non-progressive injury to the developing brain; however, more recent definitions allow clinicians to appreciate more than just the movement disorder. Accurate classification of cerebral palsy into distribution, motor type and functional level has advanced research. It also facilitates appropriate targeting of interventions to functional level and more accurate prognosis prediction. The prevalence of cerebral palsy remains fairly static at 2-3 per 1000 live births but there have been some changes in trends for specific causal groups. Interventions for cerebral palsy have historically been medical and physically focused, often with limited evidence to support their efficacy. The use of more appropriate outcome measures encompassing quality of life and participation is helping to deliver treatments which are more meaningful for people with cerebral palsy and their carers. PMID:26837375

  13. Tibialis Posterior Tendon Entrapment Within Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fragment.

    PubMed

    Fantry, Amanda; Lareau, Craig; Vopat, Bryan; Blankenhorn, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures continues to be controversial, with respect to both need for fixation and fixation methods. Fixation methods include an open posterior approach to the ankle as well as percutaneous reduction and fixation with or without arthroscopy for visualization of the articular surface. Plain radiographs are unreliable in identifying fracture pattern and intraoperative reduction, making arthroscopy a valuable adjunct to posterior malleolus fracture management. In this article, we report a case of tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus fracture, as identified by arthroscopy and managed with open reduction. Tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus has not been previously reported. Ankle arthroscopy for posterior malleolus fractures provides an opportunity to identify soft-tissue or tendinous entrapment, articular surface reduction, and articular cartilage injuries unlikely to be identified with fluoroscopy alone and should be considered in reduction and fixation of posterior malleolus fractures. PMID:26991573

  14. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  15. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a ... ability to move and maintain balance and posture. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood. ...

  16. Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral arteriosclerosis is the result of thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries in the ... cause an ischemic stroke. When the thickening and hardening is uneven, arterial walls can develop bulges (called ...

  17. Cerebral angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral angiography is done in the hospital or radiology center. You lie on an x-ray table. ... be done in preparation for medical treatment (interventional radiology procedures) by way of certain blood vessels. What ...

  18. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  19. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  20. Blood flow distribution in cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Zarrinkoob, Laleh; Ambarki, Khalid; Wåhlin, Anders; Birgander, Richard; Eklund, Anders; Malm, Jan

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution phase–contrast magnetic resonance imaging can now assess flow in proximal and distal cerebral arteries. The aim of this study was to describe how total cerebral blood flow (tCBF) is distributed into the vascular tree with regard to age, sex and anatomic variations. Forty-nine healthy young (mean 25 years) and 45 elderly (mean 71 years) individuals were included. Blood flow rate (BFR) in 21 intra- and extracerebral arteries was measured. Total cerebral blood flow was defined as BFR in the internal carotid plus vertebral arteries and mean cerebral perfusion as tCBF/brain volume. Carotid/vertebral distribution was 72%/28% and was not related to age, sex, or brain volume. Total cerebral blood flow (717±123 mL/min) was distributed to each side as follows: middle cerebral artery (MCA), 21% distal MCA, 6% anterior cerebral artery (ACA), 12%, distal ACA, 4% ophthalmic artery, 2% posterior cerebral artery (PCA), 8% and 20% to basilar artery. Deviating distributions were observed in subjects with ‘fetal' PCA. Blood flow rate in cerebral arteries decreased with increasing age (P<0.05) but not in extracerebral arteries. Mean cerebral perfusion was higher in women (women: 61±8; men: 55±6 mL/min/100 mL, P<0.001). The study describes a new method to outline the flow profile of the cerebral vascular tree, including reference values, and should be used for grading the collateral flow system. PMID:25564234

  1. [Posterior cortical atrophy with progressive visual agnosia].

    PubMed

    Zarranz, J J; Lasa, A; Fernández, M; Lezcano, E; Pérez Bas, M; Varona, L; Ruiz, J; Beristain, X

    1995-03-01

    Interest in progressive focal cerebral syndromes associated with classical degenerative diseases has increased in recent years. Descriptions of posterior cortical atrophy with progressive visual agnosia are relatively rare. We present 5 patients (2 women) ranging in age between 57 and 72 years old. In all cases symptoms began and progressed with no known etiology. All cases were sporadic. The main clinical signs are difficulty in recognizing objects, colors, persons or places; topographical disorientation and visual memory alterations; alexia, simultagnosia, loss of ocular fixing and optic ataxia. Some patients presented other disturbances of praxis or memory and 2 progressed to global dementia. Language function was preserved and behavioral disturbances did not develop. The amplitude of the P100 visual evoked potential was low but latency was normal in 4 patients and prolonged in 1. Brain images showed atrophy and hypoperfusion in the parieto-occipital area. The neuropathology status of these patients is unknown. PMID:7756009

  2. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  3. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  4. Posterior Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  5. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  6. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  7. A rare combination of atypical cerebral vascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Koleilat, Issam; Eidt, John

    2015-10-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with neurologic deficits consistent with a cerebrovascular accident. Her workup demonstrated the simultaneous occurrence of three uncommon cerebrovascular congenital anomalies in a single patient: (1) persistent trigeminal artery, (2) persistent fetal origin of the posterior cerebral artery and (3) bilateral occurrence of the vertebral arteries terminating in the posterior inferior cerebellar arteries. These persistent fetal cerebrovascular anatomic variants are reviewed and the clinical relevance discussed. PMID:25414171

  8. Gossypiboma mimicking posterior urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Kumar, Prem; Sinha, Sanjay Kumar; Sinha, Neelam; Hasan, Zaheer; Thakur, Vinit Kumar; Anand, Utpal; Priyadarshi, Rajiv Nayan; Mandal, Manish

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Foreign bodies in the urogenital tract are not uncommon. Hairpins, glass rods, umbilical tapes, ball point pen are described in lower urogenital tract. Retained gauze piece (gossypiboma) in posterior urethra may cause diagnostic dilemma. Symptoms and investigations may mimic stricture of posterior urethra. PRESENTATION OF CASE Two cases of retained gauze pieces in the urethra are described here. The micturating cystourethrogram was suggestive of posterior urethral stricture. DISCUSSION Two cases described here had retained gauze piece as a cause of filling defect and abnormal appearance in the micturating cystourethrogram. Gossypiboma may be a possibility where posterior urethral stricture are seen after previous surgery in paediatric age group. CONCLUSION In the setting of previous urogenital surgery gossypiboma should be kept in the differential diagnosis where posterior urethral stricture are seen in the paediatric age group. PMID:23500749

  9. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information About ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  10. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  11. Noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation in newborns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Wynne, Karon E.; Petrov, Yuriy; Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Richardson, C. Joan; Prough, Donald S.

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral ischemia after birth and during labor is a major cause of death and severe complications such as cerebral palsy. In the USA alone, cerebral palsy results in permanent disability of 10,000 newborns per year and approximately 500,000 of the total population. Currently, no technology is capable of direct monitoring of cerebral oxygenation in newborns. This study proposes the use of an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive cerebral ischemia monitoring by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. We developed and built a multi-wavelength, near-infrared optoacoustic system suitable for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral ischemia in newborns with normal weight (NBW), low birth-weight (LBW, 1500 - 2499 g) and very low birth-weight (VLBW, < 1500 g). The system was capable of detecting SSS signals through the open anterior and posterior fontanelles as well as through the skull. We tested the system in NBW, LBW, and VLBW newborns (weight range: from 675 g to 3,000 g) admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. We performed single and continuous measurements of the SSS blood oxygenation. The data acquisition, processing and analysis software developed by our group provided real-time, absolute SSS blood oxygenation measurements. The SSS blood oxygenation ranged from 60% to 80%. Optoacoustic monitoring of the SSS blood oxygenation provides valuable information because adequate cerebral oxygenation would suggest that no therapy was necessary; conversely, evidence of cerebral ischemia would prompt therapy to increase cerebral blood flow.

  12. Posterior Circulation Stroke After Bronchial Artery Embolization. A Rare but Serious Complication

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, Alicia; Tejero, Carlos; Fredes, Arturo; Cebrian, Luis; Guelbenzu, Santiago; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-06-15

    Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is the treatment of choice for massive hemoptysis with rare complications that generally are mild and transient. There are few references in the medical literature with acute cerebral embolization as a complication of BAE. We report a case of intracranial posterior territory infarctions as a complication BAE in a patient with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis.

  13. Treadmill Training in a Child with Cerebral Palsy: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Julie P.; Arnold, Sandra H.; McEwen, Irene R.; James, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    This case report describes the use of treadmill training without body weight support to improve walking speed in a child with diplegic cerebral palsy. The child was a six-year-old girl with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. She walked short distances independently using a posterior support walker but was unable to keep up with her peers walking…

  14. Parainfluenza virus infection associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical and radiological entity. The most accepted theory of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a loss of autoregulation in cerebral blood flow with a subsequent increase in vascular permeability and leakage of blood plasma and erythrocytes, producing vasogenic edema. In infection-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, a clinical pattern consistent with systemic inflammatory response syndrome develops. Parainfluenza virus has not been reported in the medical literature to be associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Case presentation We report herein the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian woman with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with parainfluenza virus infection who presented with generalized headache, blurring of vision, new-onset seizure and flu-like symptoms. Conclusion Infection-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome as well as hypertension-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome favor the contribution of endothelial dysfunction to the pathophysiology of this clinicoradiological syndrome. In view of the reversible nature of this clinical entity, it is important that all physicians are well aware of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in patients presenting with headache and seizure activity. A detailed clinical assessment leading to the recognition of precipitant factors in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is paramount. PMID:22448715

  15. Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after ‘Ecstasy’ abuse

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2014-01-01

    Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or ‘Ecstasy’ has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting ‘Ecstasy’. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2 mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. ‘Ecstasy’ can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision. PMID:24994748

  16. Endovascular coil embolization of unruptured posterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Binning, Mandy; Hakma, Zakaria; Veznedaroglu, Erol

    2014-07-01

    The patient is a 60-year-old woman who presented to her primary care physician with new onset of headache. She was neurologically intact without cranial nerve deficit. An outpatient CT angiogram (CTA) revealed no subarachnoid hemorrhage, but showed a right-sided posterior communicating artery aneurysm measuring 11 mm by 10 mm. Digitally subtracted cerebral angiography confirmed these measurements and showed that the aneurysm was amenable to endovascular coil embolization. The patient underwent aneurysm coiling without complication and was discharged to home on postoperative Day 1. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/MjOc3Zpv2K8 . PMID:24983726

  17. Cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  18. [Cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The term cerebral palsy (CP), is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the non-evolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations. PMID:18422084

  19. Cerebral blood flow asymmetries in headache-free migraineurs

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Welch, K.M.; Ewing, J.R.; Joseph, R.; D'Andrea, G.

    1987-11-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) asymmetries were studied in controls and patients with common and classic/complicated migraine using /sup 133/Xe inhalation with 8 homologously situated external collimators over each cerebral hemisphere. Migraine patients as a group more frequently had posterior rCBF asymmetries than controls (p less than 0.03). Although there were no differences in the number of anterior rCBF asymmetries, migraine patients had 2 or more asymmetric probe pairs more often than controls (p less than 0.02). The posterior rCBF asymmetries, consistent with the site of activation of many migraine attacks, may be related to more labile control of the cerebral circulation.

  20. Isolated Posterior Fossa Involvement in Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yukie; Tha, Khin Khin; Iguchi, Akihiro; Cho, Yuko; Yoshida, Atsushi; Fujima, Noriyuki; Tsukahara, Akiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Terae, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by reversible vasogenic edema affecting the subcortical white matter of bilateral occipital and parietal lobes. We describe a case of isolated posterior fossa involvement of PRES which occurred during remission induction chemotherapy for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Both the brainstem and cerebellum were extensively involved, but the supratentorial structures were completely spared. The follow-up magnetic resonance images revealed reversibility of most lesions. The knowledge of atypical radiological features of PRES is essential for prompt diagnosis. PMID:24199811

  1. Posterior polar cataract: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kalantan, Hatem

    2011-01-01

    Posterior polar cataract is a rare form of congenital cataract. It is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, yet it can be sporadic. Five genes have been attributed to the formation of this disease. It is highly associated with complications during surgery, such as posterior capsule rupture and nucleus drop. The reason for this high complication rate is the strong adherence of the opacity to the weak posterior capsule. Different surgical strategies were described for the handling of this challenging entity, most of which emphasized the need for gentle maneuvering in dealing with these cases. It has a unique clinical appearance that should not be missed in order to anticipate, avoid, and minimize the impact of the complications associated with it. PMID:23960967

  2. Rethinking "posterior" tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Currently, many clinicians who help with breastfeeding problems are diagnosing "posterior" tongue-tie in infants and performing or referring for frenotomy. In this "Speaking Out" article, I argue that the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie has successfully raised awareness of the importance of impaired tongue function in breastfeeding difficulty. However, the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie also applies a reductionist, medicalized theoretical frame to the complex problem of impaired tongue function, risking unintended outcomes. Impaired tongue function arises out of multiple interacting and co-evolving factors, including the interplay between social behaviors concerning breastfeeding and mother-infant biology. Consideration of theoretical frames is vital if we are to build an evidence base through efficient use of the scarce resources available for clinical breastfeeding research and minimize unintended outcomes. PMID:24143939

  3. Application of sonography for evaluation of posterior circulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Alpaidze, M; Janelidze, M

    2014-03-01

    Posterior circulation disorders (PCD) include a) vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI), which has a wide clinical manifestation such as vestibulocerebellar syndrome, cephalalgia, cochlear syndrome, vegetovascular dystonia, visual disturbances, "syndrome of vertebral artery compression" etc, b) vertebrobasilar TIA and c) stroke. All of them are caused by blood flow disturbances in vertebral (VA), basilar (BAS) and posterior cerebral arteries (PCA). Aim - evaluation of role of extracranial duplex-sonography (EDS), transcranial color-coded duplex-sonography (TCCD) and rotational functional tests (RFT) in PCD. 88 patients (age range 18-62y) with PCD and 20 healthy controls with relevant age range were examined using EDS, TCCD and RFT with measurement of vertebral arteries (VA) diameter, mean flow velocities (MFV) and pulsatility index (PI) in VA, basilar artery (BAS) and posterior cerebral arteries (PCA). For statistical analysis SPSS software (Version 11.5) was used. In 48 (54,5%) patients revealed unilateral narrowing (less than 2.5 mm in diameter) and deformation of vertebral artery associated with osteochondrosis or primary hypoplasia. In 11 (12,5%) patients revealed bilateral narrowing (less than 2.8 mm in diameter) and deformation of vertebral arteries. Ultrasound investigation showed a decrease of MFV (23 ± 1.4 cm/sec) in the intracranial length of vertebral artery and an increase of PI (3,2 ±0,3 p=0,002) in the extracranial segments (V1- V3). In 52 cases (59%) revealed decrease of MFV in BAS by 32.6 ± 4.7% and in 41 cases (46.5%) decrease of MFV in both PCA by 24.8 ± 5.2% (P<0.002). In 21 cases (23.8%) revealed concurrent development of vertebrogenic reflex vasoconstriction. In 18 patients (20.4%) exposed only deformation of vertebral arteries with local increase of MFV and normal values in intracranial segments. Rotational tests were positive in 42 (47.7%) patients and manifested high correlation with clinical data. EDS and TCCD are important tools for

  4. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) Text Size ... the arch, and an inward rolling of the ankle. As the condition progresses, the symptoms will change. ...

  5. Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171056

  6. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not associated with mutations in aquaporin-4.

    PubMed

    Matiello, Marcelo; Muralidharan, Rajanandini; Sun, David; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Weinshenker, Brian G

    2015-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by acute reversible subcortical vasogenic edema that is typically bilateral and self-limiting. It preferentially affects posterior regions of the brain. Clinical manifestations include encephalopathy, seizures, headache, and cortical blindness. PRES may be precipitated by hypertensive crises such as eclampsia and by immunosuppressive agents. The pathophysiology of PRES is incompletely understood. Disordered cerebral autoregulation leading to protein and fluid extravasation is thought to be important.(1) Other theories implicate endothelial dysfunction or vasospasm.(2). PMID:27066556

  7. Blood transfusion in sickle cell disease leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES).

    PubMed

    Raj, Shashi; Killinger, James; Overby, Philip

    2013-10-01

    Children with sickle cell disease have a very high risk of lifelong neurologic morbidity and mortality. Cerebrovascular accidents are a known complication in children with sickle cell disease. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a constellation of acute neurologic findings increasingly recognized in pediatric critical care population with evidence of vasogenic edema on brain imaging possibly due to cerebral vascular endothelial cell dysfunction. This report, for the first time, describes a young adult with sickle cell disease who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following blood transfusion. PMID:22899796

  8. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of UCP blog for the latest updates. United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  9. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a neurological condition in which proteins called amyloid build up on the walls of the arteries ... The cause of cerebral amyloid angiopathy is unknown. Sometimes, it ... Persons with this condition have deposits of amyloid protein ...

  10. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Additional Content Medical News Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations By James E. Wilberger, MD, Derrick A. Dupre, ... a direct, strong blow to the head. Cerebral lacerations are tears in brain tissue, caused by a ...

  11. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  12. Differential Impact of Posterior Lesions in the Left and Right Hemisphere on Visual Category Learning and Generalization to Contrast Reversal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langguth, Berthold; Juttner, Martin; Landis, Theodor; Regard, Marianne; Rentschler, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    Hemispheric differences in the learning and generalization of pattern categories were explored in two experiments involving sixteen patients with unilateral posterior, cerebral lesions in the left (LH) or right (RH) hemisphere. In each experiment participants were first trained to criterion in a supervised learning paradigm to categorize a set of…

  13. The role of cerebral oxygenation and regional cerebral blood flow on tolerance to central hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Kay, Victoria L; Rickards, Caroline A

    2016-02-15

    Tolerance to central hypovolemia is highly variable, and accumulating evidence suggests that protection of anterior cerebral blood flow (CBF) is not an underlying mechanism. We hypothesized that individuals with high tolerance to central hypovolemia would exhibit protection of cerebral oxygenation (ScO2), and prolonged preservation of CBF in the posterior vs. anterior cerebral circulation. Eighteen subjects (7 male/11 female) completed a presyncope-limited lower body negative pressure (LBNP) protocol (3 mmHg/min onset rate). ScO2 (via near-infrared spectroscopy), middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv), posterior cerebral artery velocity (PCAv) (both via transcranial Doppler ultrasound), and arterial pressure (via finger photoplethysmography) were measured continuously. Subjects who completed ≥70 mmHg LBNP were classified as high tolerant (HT; n = 7) and low tolerant (LT; n = 11) if they completed ≤60 mmHg LBNP. The minimum difference in LBNP tolerance between groups was 193 s (LT = 1,243 ± 185 s vs. HT = 1,996 ± 212 s; P < 0.001; Cohen's d = 3.8). Despite similar reductions in mean MCAv in both groups, ScO2 decreased in LT subjects from -15 mmHg LBNP (P = 0.002; Cohen's d=1.8), but was maintained at baseline values until -75 mmHg LBNP in HT subjects (P < 0.001; Cohen's d = 2.2); ScO2 was lower at -30 and -45 mmHg LBNP in LT subjects (P ≤ 0.02; Cohen's d ≥ 1.1). Similarly, mean PCAv decreased below baseline from -30 mmHg LBNP in LT subjects (P = 0.004; Cohen's d = 1.0), but remained unchanged from baseline in HT subjects until -75 mmHg (P = 0.006; Cohen's d = 2.0); PCAv was lower at -30 and -45 mmHg LBNP in LT subjects (P ≤ 0.01; Cohen's d ≥ 0.94). Individuals with higher tolerance to central hypovolemia exhibit prolonged preservation of CBF in the posterior cerebral circulation and sustained cerebral tissue oxygenation, both associated with a delay in the onset of presyncope. PMID:26676249

  14. A case of cerebral embolism due to cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebral microaneurysms detected on first MRI scans.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Saji, Naoki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-03-01

    A 64-year-old man developed right arm weakness and dysarthria, and was admitted to our hospital. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a high intensity area in the frontal lobe. T2*-weighted images showed multiple spotty low intensity lesions in bilateral cerebral hemispheres, mimicking cerebral microbleeds. Cerebral angiography showed multiple aneurysms in the anterior, middle, posterior cerebral arteries and cerebellar arteries. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a floating structure in the left atrial chamber, indicating cardiac myxoma. We diagnosed cardioembolic ischemic stroke due to left atrial myxoma. Cardiac surgery for excision of a left atrial myxoma was performed on the 3rd hospital day. Multiple aneurysms should be taken into account for differential diagnosis in patients with cardiac myxoma and with atypical spotty low intensity on T2*-weighted images. PMID:26797485

  15. Scheie syndrome diagnosed after cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Daiki; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Kono, Syoichiro; Sakai, Yasuko; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko; Furujyo, Mahoko; Abe, Koji

    2012-05-01

    We report a 41-year-old woman with Scheie syndrome diagnosed after cerebral infarction. She presented with acute onset dysarthria and right upper limb weakness. The neurologic findings revealed dysarthria, right central facial paralysis, mild right hemiparesis, and mild sensory impairment in the right arm and leg. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed subtle high signal lesions in the left corona radiata and posterior limb of the internal capsule. The diagnosis was made by a coarse facial appearance, claw hands, pigmentary degeneration of the bilateral retinas, and a deficiency of the enzymatic activity of lysosomal α-L-iduronidase. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) followed by enzyme replacement therapy. The prognosis of this disease would improve with enzyme replacement therapy. It is necessary to be aware of cerebral infarction in patients with Scheie syndrome. PMID:21167740

  16. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow in human cerebral ischemic infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, G.L.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Jones, T.

    1982-09-01

    Fifteen patients with acute cerebral hemispheric infarcts have been studied with positron emission tomography and the /sup 15/O steady-state inhalation technique. Thirteen follow-up studies were also performed. The values of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO/sub 2/), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction ration (OER) have been calculated for the infarcted regions, their borders, the symmetrical regions in contralateral cerebral hemispheres, and the cerebellar hemispheres. This study demonstrates that in the completed stroke there are thresholds for regional CMRO/sub 2/ and regional CBF below which the general clinical outcome of the patients is usually poor. The ischaemic lesions invariably produce an uncoupling between the greatly decreased metabolic demand and the less affected blood supply, with very frequent instances of relative hyperperfusion. Remote effects of the hemispheric infarcts have been demonstrated, such as crossed cerebellar diaschisis and contralateral transhemispheric depression. The level of consciousness correlates with oxygen uptake and blood flow both in the posterior fossa and in the contralateral cerebral hemispheres. The follow-up studies of individual patients underline the high variability of metabolism-to-flow balance during the acute phase of the illness, and stress the need for more studies focused on repeated assessments of homogeneous patient populations.

  17. Posterior cruciate ligament of the knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a powerful ligament extending from the top-rear surface of the tibia to the bottom-front surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from posterior instability.

  18. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy in a venomous snake (Bothrops asper) bite victim.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Miguel E; Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2012-03-01

    An 18-year-old man developed posterior reversible leukoencephalopaty after being bitten by a venomous snake (Bothrops asper). It is possible that this previously unrecognized neurological complication of snake bite envenoming occurred as the result of endothelial dysfunction induced by the venom of the offending snake. This pathogenetic mechanism has also been implicated as the cause of cerebral infarctions in snake bite victims. Alternatively, the leukoencephalopathy might have been a complication of antivenom therapy. PMID:22403325

  19. Spinal hemianesthesia: Unilateral and posterior

    PubMed Central

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The injection of a non-isobaric local anesthetic should induce a unilateral spinal anesthesia in patients in a lateral decubitus position. The posterior spinal hemianesthesia only be obtained with hypobaric solutions injected in the jackknife position. The most important factors to be considered when performing a spinal hemianesthesia are: type and gauge of the needle, density of the local anesthetic relative to the CSF, position of the patient, speed of administration of the solution, time of stay in position, and dose/concentration/volume of the anesthetic solution. The distance between the spinal roots on the right-left sides and anterior-posterior is, approximately, 10-15 mm. This distance allows performing unilateral spinal anesthesia or posterior spinal anesthesia. The great advantage of obtaining spinal hemianesthesia is the reduction of cardiovascular changes. Likewise, both the dorsal and unilateral sensory block predominates in relation to the motor block. Because of the numerous advantages of producing spinal hemianesthesia, anesthesiologists should apply this technique more often. This review considers the factors which are relevant, plausible and proven to obtain spinal hemianesthesia. PMID:25886320

  20. Measuring cerebral hemodynamic changes during action observation with functional transcranial doppler

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Sik; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of action observation training (AOT) on cerebral hemodynamic changes including cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and cerebral blood flow volume (CBFvol) in healthy subjects. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy subjects participated in this study. [Methods] All subjects were educated regarding AOT, and systolic peak velocity (Vs) as well as mean flow velocity (Vm) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA), and posterior cerebral artery (PCA) were evaluated using functional transcranial doppler with a 2-MHz probe, before and after performing AOT. [Results] Healthy subjects showed significant differences in Vs and Vm in the MCA, ACA, and PCA after AOT compared with those before AOT. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that AOT has a positive effect in terms of an increase in CBFV and CBFvol in healthy subjects, since the brain requires more blood to meet the metabolic demand during AOT. PMID:26157224

  1. [Visual disturbances following right cerebral lesion: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Yasui, N; Suzuki, A; Kobayashi, T

    1984-07-01

    A 49-year-old right handed male, who showed three types of visual disturbance, e. g. hemianopsia, obscuration phenomena and unilateral visuospatial agnosia at different times, was reported. At first, he had hemiparesis, hemisensory disturbance and homonymous hemianopsia on the left side because of multiple stenoses of posterior branches of the right middle cerebral artery. His motor and visual field disturbances improved for several days after onset, but there appeared transient obscuration phenomena on the left visual field. CT scan revealed an abnormal low density area in the right temporo-parietal region. At about 4.5 years after the first attack, he again had hemiparesis and homonymous hemianopsia on the left side. Cerebral angiography showed an occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. Since his paresis was progressive, STA-MCA anastomoses was performed. Hemiparesis was improved, but homonymous hemianopsia remained. Moreover, at about one year after the second attack, left visuospatial agnosia participated in his hemianopsia. Cerebral angiography showed an additional occlusion in the crural segment of the right posterior cerebral artery. CT scan showed a lesion in the right basal ganglia and temporo-parietal lobe. In most cases, unilateral visuospatial agnosia occurs with hemianopsia. But, in this case, these symptoms occurred at different times. This may indicate the differentiation between unilateral visuospatial agnosia and hemianopsia. PMID:6487433

  2. Effect of certain cerebral hemispheric diseases on dreaming.

    PubMed

    Epstein, A W

    1979-02-01

    Dreaming may be altered by cerebral hemispheric disease. A woman who sustained a probable left posterior cerebral artery thrombosis, with right homonymous hemianopsia and alexia, had virtual cessation of dreaming for at least 9 months. Four individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy experienced recurrent painful (frightening) dreams, which in two patients showed features identical to seizures. Sleep recordings showed abnormalities in all four, including rhythmic temporal epileptiform activity during REM sleep. Lesions in parieto-occipital loci may interfere with production of the visual imagery required for dreaming (negative symptom in the Jacksonian sense) while epileptic activity in temporal loci may produce painful repetitive dream imagery (positive symptom). PMID:217457

  3. Impact of COPD exacerbation on cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Sema; Kaya, Ihsan; Cece, Hasan; Gencer, Mehmet; Ziylan, Zeki; Yalcin, Funda; Turksoy, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation on cerebral blood flow (CBF). In 21 COPD patients - in both exacerbation and stable phases -Doppler ultrasonographies of internal carotid artery (ICA) and vertebral artery (VA) were performed. There were significant differences in total, anterior and posterior CBF, ICA and VA flow volumes in exacerbated COPD compared to stable COPD. Total CBF was correlated with cross-sectional areas of left and right ICA, whereas independent predictor of total CBF was cross-sectional area of right ICA. Increased CBF might indicate cerebral autoregulation-mediated vasodilatation to overcome COPD exacerbation induced hypoxia. PMID:22542376

  4. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as the initial presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuji; Takeda, Hidetaka; Furuya, Daisuke; Nagoya, Harumitsu; Deguchi, Ichiro; Fukuoka, Takuya; Tanahashi, Norio

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is very rare. We present a woman with thrombosis of the superior sagittal, straight, transverse and sigmoid sinuses who presented with SAH in the right temporal sulcus and bilateral cerebellar sulci. Brain perfusion CT demonstrated a delay of the mean transit time and high cerebral blood volume around the right posterior temporal lobe and cerebellum. These findings were compatible with venous congestion and they suggest the possibility that extension of the dural sinus thrombosis into the superficial veins caused localized venous hypertension with dilatation of the thin, fragile-walled cortical veins which eventually ruptured into the subarachnoid space. PMID:20190485

  5. [Etiology of cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Jaisle, F

    1996-01-01

    The "perinatal asphyxia" is regarded to be one of the causes of cerebral palsy, though in the very most of the children with cerebral palsy there is found no hypoxia during labour. It should be mentioned, that the definition of "perinatal" and "asphyxia" neither are unic nor concret. And also there is no correlation between nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns and acidosis in fetal blood with the incidence of cerebral palsy. Numerous studies in pregnant animals failed in proving an acute intrapartal hypoxia to be the origin of the cerebral palsy. Myers (1975) describes four patterns of anatomic brain damage after different injuries. Only his so called oligo-acidotic hypoxia, which is protracted and lasts over a longer time is leading to brain injury, which can be regarded in analogy to the injury of children with cerebral palsy. Summarising the update publications about the causes of cerebral palsy and the studies in pregnant animals there is no evidence that hypoxia during labour may be the cause of cerebral palsy. There is a great probability of a pre(and post-)natal origin of brain injury (for instance a periventricular leucomalacia found after birth) which leads to cerebral palsy. Short after labour signs of a so called "asphyxia" may occur in addition to this preexisting injury and misrepresent the cause of cerebral palsy. Finally the prepartal injury may cause both: Cerebral palsy and hypoxia. PMID:9035826

  6. Infundibular dilatation of the posterior communicating artery in a defined population.

    PubMed

    Vlajković, Slobodan; Vasović, Ljiljana; Trandafilović, Milena; Jovanović, Ivan; Ugrenović, Slađana; Dorđević, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Unusual widening of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA) at its beginning from the cerebral portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) was described as its infundibular dilatation (ID). A possibility of ID rupture or progression to aneurysm was the reason for an investigation of its frequency and morphologic features in specimens of the Serbian population. Cerebral arteries on the brain base of 267 adult cadavers of both genders and varying age and causes of death were dissected. The images of the PCoA in 190 fetuses were also reviewed. ID of the PCoA was defined as a funnel shaped beginning of different width from ICA, wherein PCoA continues from ID apex to the posterior cerebral artery. There were no cases of ID in fetuses. ID and aneurysms of the PCoA were found in 6/267 or 2.2% and 3/267 or 1.12% of adults, respectively. Unilaterally, they existed on the left side and, frequently, in male cases aging 70 years and older, that had died without cerebral cause. Bilaterally, ID was found in 2/6 cases. There was only one case of ID and aneurysm of the PCoA, but from the ID. We are of the opinion that ID of the PCoA only develops postnatally and probably is due to the influence of hemodynamic factors or hypertension. PMID:25458180

  7. Changes in oxytocin and vasopressin content in posterior pituitary and hypothalamus following pantethine treatment.

    PubMed

    Ong, G L; Miaskowski, C; Haldar, J

    1990-01-01

    Pantethine, a cysteamine precursor, depletes somatostatin in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus and prolactin in the anterior pituitary and hypothalamus. This study investigated the effect of pantethine on oxytocin and arginine vasopressin content in the posterior pituitary and hypothalamus. Male Long-Evans rats were injected intraperitoneally with escalating doses of pantethine (i.e., 146.7 mg, 293.4 mg and 586.6 mg/100 gm body weight). Hormone content was determined by radioimmunoassay. Three hours after pantethine treatment, the oxytocin content in the posterior pituitary and the hypothalamus was markedly reduced with all doses of the drug. Vasopressin content in the posterior pituitary and hypothalamus was decreased but to a lesser extent than oxytocin and only with the highest dose of pantethine. Pantethine may act to reduce oxytocin and vasopressin content through intracellular conversion to cysteamine. The exact mechanism of action of pantethine on oxytocin and vasopressin remains to be elucidated. PMID:2402177

  8. Tibialis posterior in health and disease: a review of structure and function with specific reference to electromyographic studies

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Ruth; Murley, George S; Woodburn, James; Turner, Deborah E

    2009-01-01

    Tibialis posterior has a vital role during gait as the primary dynamic stabiliser of the medial longitudinal arch; however, the muscle and tendon are prone to dysfunction with several conditions. We present an overview of tibialis posterior muscle and tendon anatomy with images from cadaveric work on fresh frozen limbs and a review of current evidence that define normal and abnormal tibialis posterior muscle activation during gait. A video is available that demonstrates ultrasound guided intra-muscular insertion techniques for tibialis posterior electromyography. Current electromyography literature indicates tibialis posterior intensity and timing during walking is variable in healthy adults and has a disease-specific activation profile among different pathologies. Flat-arched foot posture and tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction are associated with greater tibialis posterior muscle activity during stance phase, compared to normal or healthy participants, respectively. Cerebral palsy is associated with four potentially abnormal profiles during the entire gait cycle; however it is unclear how these profiles are defined as these studies lack control groups that characterise electromyographic activity from developmentally normal children. Intervention studies show antipronation taping to significantly decrease tibialis posterior muscle activation during walking compared to barefoot, although this research is based on only four participants. However, other interventions such as foot orthoses and footwear do not appear to systematically effect muscle activation during walking or running, respectively. This review highlights deficits in current evidence and provides suggestions for the future research agenda. PMID:19691828

  9. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  10. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  11. Posterior ankyloglossia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chu, Michael W; Bloom, David C

    2009-06-01

    Ankyloglossia, or tongue-tie, refers to an abnormally short lingual frenulum. Ankyloglossia is a recognized but poorly defined condition and has been reported to cause feeding difficulties, dysarthria, dyspnea, and social or mechanical problems. In infants, the most concerning symptoms are feeding difficulties and inability to breastfeed. While a recent trend toward breastfeeding has brought frenulectomy back into favor, the literature regarding treatment remains inconclusive. We report a case of posterior ankyloglossia with anterior mucosal hooding and a simple, safe, and effective way to treat it to improve breastfeeding. PMID:19303646

  12. Mapping the Structural Core of Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hagmann, Patric; Cammoun, Leila; Gigandet, Xavier; Meuli, Reto; Honey, Christopher J; Wedeen, Van J; Sporns, Olaf

    2008-01-01

    Structurally segregated and functionally specialized regions of the human cerebral cortex are interconnected by a dense network of cortico-cortical axonal pathways. By using diffusion spectrum imaging, we noninvasively mapped these pathways within and across cortical hemispheres in individual human participants. An analysis of the resulting large-scale structural brain networks reveals a structural core within posterior medial and parietal cerebral cortex, as well as several distinct temporal and frontal modules. Brain regions within the structural core share high degree, strength, and betweenness centrality, and they constitute connector hubs that link all major structural modules. The structural core contains brain regions that form the posterior components of the human default network. Looking both within and outside of core regions, we observed a substantial correspondence between structural connectivity and resting-state functional connectivity measured in the same participants. The spatial and topological centrality of the core within cortex suggests an important role in functional integration. PMID:18597554

  13. Hemiparesis post cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Taiaa, Oumkaltoum; Amil, Touriya; Darbi, Abdelatif

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is one of the most serious complications in the Plasmodium falciparum infection. In endemic areas, the cerebral malaria interested mainly children. The occurrence in adults is very rare and most interested adult traveling in tropical zones. This case report describes a motor deficit post cerebral malaria in a young adult traveling in malaria endemic area. This complication has been reported especially in children and seems very rare in adults. PMID:25995798

  14. Mechanisms of recovery from aphasia: evidence from serial xenon 133 cerebral blood flow studies

    SciTech Connect

    Knopman, D.S.; Rubens, A.B.; Selnes, O.A.; Klassen, A.C.; Meyer, M.W.

    1984-06-01

    In 21 patients who suffered aphasia resulting from left hemisphere ischemic infarction, the xenon 133 inhalation cerebral blood flow technique was used to measure cerebral blood flow within 3 months and 5 to 12 months after stroke. In addition to baseline measurements, cerebral blood flow measurements were also carried out while the patients were performing purposeful listening. In patients with incomplete recovery of comprehension and left posterior temporal-inferior parietal lesions, greater cerebral blood flow occurred with listening in the right inferior frontal region in the late studies than in the early studies. In patients with nearly complete recovery of comprehension and without left posterior temporal-inferior parietal lesions, early listening studies showed diffuse right hemisphere increases in cerebral blood flow. Later listening studies in this latter patient group showed greater cerebral blood flow in the left posterior temporal-inferior parietal region. The study provides evidence for participation of the right hemisphere in language comprehension in recovering aphasics, and for later return of function in left hemisphere regions that may have been functionally impaired early during recovery.

  15. Impaired fasting glucose is associated with increased regional cerebral amyloid.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jill K; Vidoni, Eric D; Wilkins, Heather M; Archer, Ashley E; Burns, Nicole C; Karcher, Rainer T; Graves, Rasinio S; Swerdlow, Russell H; Thyfault, John P; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    The Alzheimer's disease risk gene apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 (APOE ε4) is associated with increased cerebral amyloid. Although impaired glucose metabolism is linked to Alzheimer's disease risk, the relationship between impaired glycemia and cerebral amyloid is unclear. To investigate the independent effects of APOE ε4 and impaired glycemia on cerebral amyloid, we stratified nondemented subjects (n = 73) into 4 groups: normal glucose, APOE ε4 noncarrier (control [CNT]; n = 31), normal glucose, APOE ε4 carrier (E4 only; n = 14) impaired glycemia, APOE ε4 noncarrier (IG only; n = 18), and impaired glycemia, APOE ε4 carrier (IG+E4; n = 10). Cerebral amyloid differed both globally (p = 0.023) and regionally; precuneus (p = 0.007), posterior cingulate (PCC; p = 0.020), superior parietal cortex (SPC; p = 0.029), anterior cingulate (p = 0.027), and frontal cortex (p = 0.018). Post hoc analyses revealed that E4 only subjects had increased cerebral amyloid versus CNT globally and regionally in the precuneus, PCC, SPC, anterior cingulate, and frontal cortex. In IG only subjects, increased cerebral amyloid compared with CNT was restricted to precuneus, PCC, and SPC. IG+E4 subjects exhibited higher cerebral amyloid only in the precuneus relative to CNT. These results indicate that impaired glycemia and APOE ε4 genotype are independent risk factors for regional cerebral amyloid deposition. However, APOE ε4 and impaired glycemia did not have an additive effect on cerebral amyloid. PMID:27318141

  16. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  17. Huge interparietal posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Manuel Filipe Dias; de Santa Barbara, Rita de Cassia

    2015-01-01

    Congenital encephalocele is a neural tube defect characterized by a sac-like protrusion of the brain, meninges, and other intracranial structures through the skull, which is caused by an embryonic development abnormality. The most common location is at the occipital bone, and its incidence varies according to different world regions. We report a case of an 1-month and 7-day-old male child with a huge interparietal-posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele, a rare occurrence. Physical examination and volumetric computed tomography were diagnostic. The encephalocele was surgically resected. Intradural and extradural approaches were performed; the bone defect was not primarily closed. Two days after surgery, the patient developed hydrocephaly requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The surgical treatment of the meningohydroencephalocele of the interparietal-posterior fontanel may be accompanied by technical challenges and followed by complications due to the presence of large blood vessels under the overlying skin. In these cases, huge sacs herniate through large bone defects including meninges, brain, and blood vessels. The latter present communication with the superior sagittal sinus and ventricular system. A favorable surgical outcome generally follows an accurate strategy taking into account individual features of the lesion. PMID:26484324

  18. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  19. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: another manifestation of CNS SLE?

    PubMed

    Ishimori, M L; Pressman, B D; Wallace, D J; Weisman, M H

    2007-01-01

    A variety of neuropsychiatric findings may complicate systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. We describe the clinical and radiographic features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and distinguish PRES from other conditions seen in SLE. Patient charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of four patients with SLE on immunosuppressive therapy with acute or subacute neurologic changes initially suggesting cerebritis or stroke were reviewed. The English language literature was reviewed using the Medline databases from 1996-2006 for other reports of PRES with SLE. Literature review yielded 26 other SLE cases reported with PRES. SLE patients with PRES were more commonly on immunosuppressive drugs, had episodes of relative hypertension, and had renal involvement. Characteristic findings are seen on MRI, which differentiate PRES from other CNS complications of SLE. Clinical and radiographic resolution of abnormalities within 1-4 weeks is typically seen. PRES has been increasingly recognized. Reversible changes are found on brain MRI accompanied by sometimes dramatic signs and symptoms. The therapeutic implications for separating PRES from stroke or cerebritis are important. We propose that PRES should be considered in the differential diagnosis in SLE patients with new-onset neurologic signs and symptoms. PMID:17664235

  20. Multiple supratentorial intraparenchymal hemorrhage after posterior fossa surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, Lucas Alverne Freitas; Dourado, Jules Carlos; Almeida, João Paulo; Costa, Bruno Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background: The intraparenchymal supratentorial hemorrhages after interventions of the posterior fossa is a very rare complication, with very little literature and its precise incidence is unknown (range of 0.4–1.6%). It possesses potentially an etiology diverse from that associated with other postoperative bleeding. Case Description: A white, 23-year-old female, with no history of coagulation disorders or other diseases, was referred to our hospital with a large ependymoma, which extended from the floor of the fourth ventricle, emerged from the foramen of Magendie and descended to the C2 level. The patient was submitted to surgical treatment and during resection of the lesion, when near the vagal trigone, the patient presented great pressure lability. In the immediate postoperative period, the patient did not have a level of consciousness sufficient to tolerate extubation. Brain computed tomography (CT) was carried out, which showed multiple supratentorial hemorrhages. On the ninth day of the postoperative period, there was a sudden neurological worsening and anisocoria. A new brain CT was carried out [Figure 4], which demonstrated a diffuse cerebral edema. In spite of the introduction of clinical measures for the control of diffuse cerebral edema, the patient evolved to brain death. Conclusions: The principal measures in the management of these cases include early diagnosis, detection of possible coagulation disorders, continual monitoring, and maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion. Surgical treatment is recommended in cases of the presence of mass effect or diffuse edema not yielding to clinical treatment. High rates of mortality and morbidity are observed. PMID:25883853

  1. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  2. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Trent J; Lubowitz, James H

    2013-01-01

    Autogenous hamstring harvesting for knee ligament reconstruction is a well-established standard. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest is a simple, efficient, reproducible technique for harvest of the semitendinosus or gracilis tendon or both medial hamstring tendons. A 2- to 3-cm longitudinal incision from the popliteal crease proximally, in line with the semitendinosus tendon, is sufficient. The deep fascia is bluntly penetrated, and the tendon or tendons are identified. Adhesions are dissected. Then, an open tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons proximally; a closed, sharp tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons from the pes. Layered, absorbable skin closure is performed, and the skin is covered with a skin sealant, bolster dressing, and plastic adhesive bandage for 2 weeks. PMID:24266003

  3. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: rare or underrecognized in children?

    PubMed

    Probert, Rebecca; Saunders, Dawn E; Ganesan, Vijeya

    2013-04-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinicoradiological diagnosis comprising 'thunderclap' headaches and reversible segmental vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries, occasionally complicated by ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. We report a case of RCVS in a 13-year-old male with severe thunderclap headaches and no focal neurological signs. Brain imaging showed multiple posterior circulation infarcts; cerebral computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and catheter angiography showed multifocal irregularity and narrowing, but in different arterial segments. Laboratory studies did not support a diagnosis of vasculitis. Symptoms resolved over 3 weeks; magnetic resonance angiography 3 months later was normal and remained so after 2 years. We highlight the typical clinical features of RCVS in this case and suggest that the diagnosis should be considered in children with thunderclap headaches or stroke syndromes where headache is a prominent feature, especially if cerebrovascular imaging studies appear to be evolving or discrepant. PMID:23066702

  4. Primary Burkitt lymphoma in the posterior mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Zied; Charfi, Slim; Hentati, Abdessalem; Ayadi, Ines; Abid, Hanene; Frikha, Imed

    2015-11-01

    A 13-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital with complaints of posterior chest pain and dyspnea. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the chest revealed a mass in the posterior mediastinum, extending from T8 to T11 with intraspinal involvement. A percutaneous core needle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma. He was treated according to the Lymphoma Malignancy B protocol 2001 arm C3, but he presented with liver and brain relapses and died 7.5 months after admission. Although lymphoma is rarely localized in the posterior mediastinum, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of posterior mediastinal masses in children. PMID:26038605

  5. The Comparison of Malocclusion Prevalence Between Children with Cerebral Palsy and Healthy Children.

    PubMed

    Bakarcić, Danko; Lajnert, Vlatka; Maricić, Barbara Mady; Jokić, Nataga Ivancić; Vrancić, Zlatka Roksandić; Grzić, Renata; Prpić, Igor

    2015-09-01

    This study sets out to examine the prevalence of malocclusion and habits in a group of children with cerebral palsy and to compare it with a control group of healthy children. The presence of an anterior open bite was statistically significantly higher in the cerebral palsied group. The presence of aposterior crossbite was not significantly different between the examined groups, as was the case for a lingual crossbite. The occurrence of visceral swallowing, incompetent lips and oral respiration was significantly higher in the cerebral palsied group. The current study cannot satisfactorily sustain the issue of a higher prevalence of posterior and lingual crossbite in children with cerebral palsy because of no significant differences between groups, but it certainly can for an anterior openbite. The present study also adds to the evidence that there is an increased prevalence of oral breathing, visceral swallowing and lip incompetence in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:26898063

  6. Acute intermittent porphyria leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES): a rare cause of abdominal pain and seizures.

    PubMed

    Dagens, Andrew; Gilhooley, Michael James

    2016-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited deficiency in the haem biosynthesis pathway. AIP is rare, affecting around 1 in 75 000 people. Acute attacks are characterised by abdominal pain associated with autonomic, neurological and psychiatric symptoms. AIP is rarely associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). PRES is a clinicoradiological condition caused by the failure of the posterior circulation to autoregulate, resulting in cerebral oedema, headaches, nausea and seizures. This association is important because drugs used in the management of seizures may worsen an attack of AIP. This article describes a case of AIP and PRES in a young woman. PMID:27277587

  7. Pseudoaneurysm of the Posterior Tibial Artery After Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Elabdi, Monsef; Roukhsi, Redouane; Tijani, Youssef; Chtata, Hassan; Jaafar, Abdeloihab

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery is an uncommon condition that, left untreated, can lead to hemorrhage, thrombosis, or emboli. We present the case of a 54-year-old male who developed pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery 4 months after undergoing tibialis posterior tendon transfer for management of peroneal nerve palsy, which had developed as a complication of hip arthroplasty. PMID:26972754

  8. Posterior Cervical Foraminotomy: Indications, Technique, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dodwad, Shah-Jahan M; Dodwad, Shah-Nawaz M; Prasarn, Mark L; Savage, Jason W; Patel, Alpesh A; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-06-01

    Cervical radiculopathy presents with upper extremity pain, decreased sensation, and decreased strength caused by irritation of specific nerve root(s). After failure of conservative management, surgical options include anterior cervical decompression and fusion, disk arthroplasty, and posterior cervical foraminotomy. In this review, we discuss indications, techniques, and outcomes of posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy. PMID:27187617

  9. Consistently inconsistent, the posterior vaginal wall.

    PubMed

    Hale, Douglass S; Fenner, Dee

    2016-03-01

    Posterior vaginal wall prolapse is one of the most common prolapses encountered by gynecological surgeons. What appears to be a straightforward condition to diagnose and treat surgically for physicians has proven to be frustratingly unpredictable with regard to symptom relief for patients. Functional disorders such as dyssynergic defecation and constipation are often attributed to posterior vaginal wall prolapse. Little scientific evidence supports this assumption, emphasizing that structure and function are not synonymous when treating posterior vaginal wall prolapse. Rectoceles, enteroceles, sigmoidoceles, peritoneoceles, rectal and intraanal intussusception, rectal prolapse, and descending perineal syndrome are all conditions that have an impact on the posterior vaginal wall. All too often these different anatomic conditions are treated with the same surgical approach, addressing a posterior vaginal wall bulge with a traditional posterior colporrhaphy. Studies that examine the correlation between stage of posterior wall prolapse and patient symptoms have failed to reliably do so. Surgical outcomes measured by prolapse staging appear successful, yet patient expectations are often not met. As increasing attention is being placed on patient satisfaction outcomes concerning surgical treatments, this fact will need to be addressed. Surgeons will have to clearly communicate what can and what cannot be expected with surgical repair of posterior vaginal wall prolapse. PMID:26348375

  10. Posterior structural brain volumes differ in maltreated youth with and without chronic posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    De Bellis, Michael D; Hooper, Stephen R; Chen, Steven D; Provenzale, James M; Boyd, Brian D; Glessner, Christopher E; MacFall, James R; Payne, Martha E; Rybczynski, Robert; Woolley, Donald P

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging studies of maltreated children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suggest that maltreatment-related PTSD is associated with adverse brain development. Maltreated youth resilient to chronic PTSD were not previously investigated and may elucidate neuromechanisms of the stress diathesis that leads to resilience to chronic PTSD. In this cross-sectional study, anatomical volumetric and corpus callosum diffusion tensor imaging measures were examined using magnetic resonance imaging in maltreated youth with chronic PTSD (N = 38), without PTSD (N = 35), and nonmaltreated participants (n = 59). Groups were sociodemographically similar. Participants underwent assessments for strict inclusion/exclusion criteria and psychopathology. Maltreated youth with PTSD were psychobiologically different from maltreated youth without PTSD and nonmaltreated controls. Maltreated youth with PTSD had smaller posterior cerebral and cerebellar gray matter volumes than did maltreated youth without PTSD and nonmaltreated participants. Cerebral and cerebellar gray matter volumes inversely correlated with PTSD symptoms. Posterior corpus callosum microstructure in pediatric maltreatment-related PTSD differed compared to maltreated youth without PTSD and controls. The group differences remained significant when controlling for psychopathology, numbers of Axis I disorders, and trauma load. Alterations of these posterior brain structures may result from a shared trauma-related mechanism or an inherent vulnerability that mediates the pathway from chronic PTSD to comorbidity. PMID:26535944

  11. Thrombolysis in anterior versus posterior circulation strokes: timing of recanalization, ischemic tolerance, and other differences.

    PubMed

    Pagola, Jorge; Ribo, Marc; Alvarez-Sabin, José; Rubiera, Marta; Santamarina, Estevo; Maisterra, Olga; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Ortega, Gemma; Quintana, Manuel; Molina, Carlos A

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested a greater ischemic tolerance in posterior circulation as compared to anterior cerebral circulation. We aimed to investigate whether a differential response exists between anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Two hundred and four middle cerebral artery (MCA) patients and 28 basilar artery occlusion (BAO) patients treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator were included. Transcranial Doppler assessed recanalization at different time points. Patients were divided in three groups: total time of ischemia (TTI)<6, 6-24, or>24 hours. We calculated the percentage of recovery (admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS]- discharge NIHSS/admission NIHSS)×100. Mean time to treatment was longer in BAO patients (P=.031). Early recanalization was more frequent among MCA occlusions (41% vs 29%; P=.039); the rate of persisting occlusion at 24 hours was similar (P=.933). Clinical recovery according to TTI was similar in each group: <6 hours: BAO 84%/MCA 69%; 6-24 hours: BAO 63%/MCA 61%; >24 hours: BAO -44%/MCA 11% (P=.23). For each hour of ischemia MCA patients worsened 1.78% (P=.035) and BAO 1.76% (P=.421). MCA occlusions compared to BAO were independently associated with hemorrhagic transformation (OR: 8.2; P=.043). Our data do not support the theory of increased ischemic tolerance in posterior circulation. Despite longer time-to-treatment, BAO were more resistant to hemorrhagic transformations. PMID:20040010

  12. A 3D numerical study of the collateral capacity of the circle of Willis with anatomical variation in the posterior circulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The Circle of Willis (CoW) is the most important collateral pathway of the cerebral artery. The present study aims to investigate the collateral capacity of CoW with anatomical variation when unilateral internalcarotid artery (ICA) is occluded. Methods Basing on MRI data, we have reconstructed eight 3D models with variations in the posterior circulation of the CoW and set four different degrees of stenosis in the right ICA, namely 24%, 43%, 64% and 79%, respectively. Finally, a total of 40 models are performed with computational fluid dynamics simulations. All of the simulations share the same boundary condition with static pressure and the volume flow rate (VFR) are obtained to evaluate their collateral capacity. Results As for the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), the transitional-type model possesses the best collateral capacity. But for the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), unilateral stenosis of ICA has the weakest influence on the unilateral posterior communicating artery (PCoA) absent model. We also find that the full fetal-type posterior circle of Willis is an utmost dangerous variation which must be paid more attention. Conclusion The results demonstrate that different models have different collateral capacities in coping stenosis of unilateral ICA and these differences can be reflected by different outlets. The study could be used as a reference for neurosurgeon in choosing the best treatment strategy. PMID:25603312

  13. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... al. Course of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation. Neurology. 2007;68:1411-1416. PMID: 17452586 www.ncbi. ...

  14. Rehabilitation in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most frequent physical disability of childhood onset. Over the past four decades, prevalence has remained remarkably constant at 2 to 3 per 1,000 live births in industrialized countries. In this article I concentrate on the rehabilitation and outcome of patients with cerebral palsy. The epidemiologic, pathogenetic, and diagnostic aspects are highlighted briefly as they pertain to the planning and implementation of the rehabilitation process. PMID:1866952

  15. Congenital basis of posterior fossa anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Cotes, Claudia; Bonfante, Eliana; Lazor, Jillian; Jadhav, Siddharth; Caldas, Maria; Swischuk, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    The classification of posterior fossa congenital anomalies has been a controversial topic. Advances in genetics and imaging have allowed a better understanding of the embryologic development of these abnormalities. A new classification schema correlates the embryologic, morphologic, and genetic bases of these anomalies in order to better distinguish and describe them. Although they provide a better understanding of the clinical aspects and genetics of these disorders, it is crucial for the radiologist to be able to diagnose the congenital posterior fossa anomalies based on their morphology, since neuroimaging is usually the initial step when these disorders are suspected. We divide the most common posterior fossa congenital anomalies into two groups: 1) hindbrain malformations, including diseases with cerebellar or vermian agenesis, aplasia or hypoplasia and cystic posterior fossa anomalies; and 2) cranial vault malformations. In addition, we will review the embryologic development of the posterior fossa and, from the perspective of embryonic development, will describe the imaging appearance of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. Knowledge of the developmental bases of these malformations facilitates detection of the morphological changes identified on imaging, allowing accurate differentiation and diagnosis of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. PMID:26246090

  16. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  17. Sickle cell disease and posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Cole, Catherine; Herkes, Geoffrey K; Barnett, Yael; Lin, Jamie; Needham, Merrilee

    2014-08-01

    Sickle cell disease can present with neurological manifestations. One such presentation is with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy also known as reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy. The condition is classically described as reversible over time; it commonly presents with oedematous changes involving the white matter of the occipital and parietal regions. Only a few patients with the association between sickle cell disease and posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy have been described in the adult literature. We present two patients from our institutions to emphasise the association between the two conditions and summarise the published cases in the literature. PMID:24656986

  18. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanba, Takamasa; Kashimura, Hiroshi; Saura, Hiroaki; Takeda, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Although posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, to our knowledge, rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm following PRES has not been reported. We describe a patient with atypical PRES involving the brainstem, thalamus, and periventricular white matter without cortical or subcortical edema of the parietooccipital lobe on magnetic resonance imaging, with rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm. Preexisting extremely high blood pressure may trigger atypical PRES, and failure to lower blood pressure may lead to a concomitant aneurysm rupture. In the future treatment of hypertensive urgency with a recurrence of symptoms and mean arterial blood pressure >150 mmHg, it is advisable to immediately hospitalize the patient for aggressive blood pressure management, especially if PRES is suspected based on clinical and radiological features. PMID:27365964

  19. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome with Bilateral Independent Epileptic Foci Precipitated By Guillain-Barrè Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Rosario; Saddi, Maria Valeria; Mela, Alessandro; Ticca, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 56-year-old woman who developed status epilepticus (SE) related to independent occipital foci as clinical manifestation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in the background of Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS). SE resulted from a series of focal seizures clinically characterized by left- and rightward deviations of the head and consequent oculoclonic movements. Electroencephalography recorded independent seizure activity in both occipital regions with alternate involvement of the two cerebral hemispheres. The epileptic foci corresponded topographically to parenchymal abnormalities of PRES in the occipital lobes. The manifestation of bilateral, independent occipital seizures with alternate deviations of the head and oculoclonic movements, previously not reported in patients with PRES, highlights the acute epileptogenicity of the cerebral lesions in this syndrome. Despite the variable clinical expression of seizures due to occipital damage in PRES, the development of independent seizure activity in both occipital lobes might represent a distinctive epileptic phenomenon of this encephalopathy. PMID:27403359

  20. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome with Bilateral Independent Epileptic Foci Precipitated By Guillain-Barrè Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Rosario; Saddi, Maria Valeria; Mela, Alessandro; Ticca, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 56-year-old woman who developed status epilepticus (SE) related to independent occipital foci as clinical manifestation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in the background of Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS). SE resulted from a series of focal seizures clinically characterized by left- and rightward deviations of the head and consequent oculoclonic movements. Electroencephalography recorded independent seizure activity in both occipital regions with alternate involvement of the two cerebral hemispheres. The epileptic foci corresponded topographically to parenchymal abnormalities of PRES in the occipital lobes. The manifestation of bilateral, independent occipital seizures with alternate deviations of the head and oculoclonic movements, previously not reported in patients with PRES, highlights the acute epileptogenicity of the cerebral lesions in this syndrome. Despite the variable clinical expression of seizures due to occipital damage in PRES, the development of independent seizure activity in both occipital lobes might represent a distinctive epileptic phenomenon of this encephalopathy. PMID:27403359

  1. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nanba, Takamasa; Kashimura, Hiroshi; Saura, Hiroaki; Takeda, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Although posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, to our knowledge, rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm following PRES has not been reported. We describe a patient with atypical PRES involving the brainstem, thalamus, and periventricular white matter without cortical or subcortical edema of the parietooccipital lobe on magnetic resonance imaging, with rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm. Preexisting extremely high blood pressure may trigger atypical PRES, and failure to lower blood pressure may lead to a concomitant aneurysm rupture. In the future treatment of hypertensive urgency with a recurrence of symptoms and mean arterial blood pressure >150 mmHg, it is advisable to immediately hospitalize the patient for aggressive blood pressure management, especially if PRES is suspected based on clinical and radiological features. PMID:27365964

  2. Recurarization in a successfully managed case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) for emergency caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Suchita; Tavri, Snehlata; Mohite, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome of headache, visual changes, altered mental status and seizures with radiologic findings of posterior cerebral white matter edema. It is seen in hypertensive encephalopathy, renal failure, and autoimmune disorders or in patients on immunosuppressants. We report a case of 24-year-old primigravida who presented at term with sudden onset hypertension, neurological deficits, and an episode of the visual blackout. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features suggestive of PRES. She was posted for emergency lower segment cesarean section. General anesthesia was administered and blood pressure managed with antihypertensives. Postoperatively, she developed acute respiratory depression after prophylactic administration of injection magnesium sulfate. This case highlights that good clinical acumen along with early neuroimaging helps in prompt diagnosis, treatment and prevention of long-term neurological sequelae in PRES and the anesthetic implications of administering magnesium sulfate in the immediate post neuromuscular block reversal phase. PMID:27212776

  3. An evaluation of the posterior leaf spring orthosis using joint kinematics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ounpuu, S; Bell, K J; Davis, R B; DeLuca, P A

    1996-01-01

    The primary function of the posterior leaf spring orthosis (PLS) is to prevent excessive equinus or drop foot in swing. The name of the orthosis, posterior leaf "spring," suggests that it also mechanically augments push-off in stance. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the PLS on ankle function by using computerized gait-analysis techniques. Multiple barefoot versus brace walks were compared in 31 children with cerebral palsy. Results indicate that the PLS reduces excessive equinus in swing and is sufficiently flexible to allow ankle dorsiflexion in midstance. In terminal stance, the peak power-generating capabilities of the ankle were reduced when the child was wearing the PLS. Energy results indicate that more mechanical energy was absorbed during midstance and less produced during terminal stance with the PLS. Therefore, the PLS improved ankle function but did not augment ankle function through storage and return of mechanical, or spring, energy. PMID:8728642

  4. Thrombectomy in posterior circulation stroke through persistent primitive trigeminal artery: A case report.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Mjhl; Lycklama À Nijeholt, G J; Dinkelaar, W; de Rooij, Tpw; van Es, Acgm; van der Kallen, B F; Emmer, B J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of intra-arterial treatment (IAT) of acute posterior circulation occlusion in a patient with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA). The patient presented with an acute left sided hemiparesis and loss of consciousness (Glasgow coma score of 5). Computed tomography angiography showed an acute occlusion of the right internal carotid artery (ICA), the PPTA, distal basilar artery (BA), right posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and right superior cerebellar artery (SCA). Stent-retriever assisted thrombectomy was not considered possible through the hypoplastic proximal BA. After passage of the proximal ICA occlusion, the right PCA and SCA were recanalized through the PPTA, with a single thrombectomy procedure. Ten days after intervention patient was discharged scoring optimal EMV with only a mild facial and left hand paresis remaining. PPTA is a persistent embryological carotid-basilar connection. Knowledge of existing (embryonic) variants in neurovascular anatomy is essential when planning and performing acute neurointerventional procedures. PMID:26464287

  5. Recurarization in a successfully managed case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) for emergency caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Suchita; Tavri, Snehlata; Mohite, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome of headache, visual changes, altered mental status and seizures with radiologic findings of posterior cerebral white matter edema. It is seen in hypertensive encephalopathy, renal failure, and autoimmune disorders or in patients on immunosuppressants. We report a case of 24-year-old primigravida who presented at term with sudden onset hypertension, neurological deficits, and an episode of the visual blackout. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features suggestive of PRES. She was posted for emergency lower segment cesarean section. General anesthesia was administered and blood pressure managed with antihypertensives. Postoperatively, she developed acute respiratory depression after prophylactic administration of injection magnesium sulfate. This case highlights that good clinical acumen along with early neuroimaging helps in prompt diagnosis, treatment and prevention of long-term neurological sequelae in PRES and the anesthetic implications of administering magnesium sulfate in the immediate post neuromuscular block reversal phase. PMID:27212776

  6. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in childhood: report of nine cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gümüş, Hakan; Per, Hüseyin; Kumandaş, Sefer; Yikilmaz, Ali

    2010-04-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is recently described disorder with typical radiological findings in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemisphere and cerebellum. Its clinical symptoms include headache, decreased alertness, mental abnormalities, such as confusion, diminished spontaneity of speech, and changed behavior ranging from drowsiness to stupor, seizures, vomiting and abnormalities of visual perception like cortical blindness. RPLS is caused by various heterogeneous factors, the commonest being hypertension, followed by non-hypertensive causes such as eclampsia, renal diseases and immunosuppressive therapy. We presented nine patients with RPLS who had primary diagnoses such as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, idiopathic hypertension, the performing of intravenous immunoglobulin for infection with crescentic glomerulonephritis, erythrocyte transfusion for severe iron deficiency, L: -asparaginase treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and performing of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for ulcerative colitis due to neutropenia. Early recognition of RPLS as complication during different diseases and therapy in childhood may facilitate precise diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:19809787

  7. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with Henoch-Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Incedayi, Mehmet; Mutlu, Hakan; Meral, Cihan

    2013-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis that affects the gastrointestinal and central nervous systems and the kidneys. The disease primarily affects children, but may occur in elderly children with allergic purpura and also in adults. Central nervous system involvement may be the first sign; however, it is rarely encountered. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical syndrome of encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbance and seizures. Its radiological signs can be observed in grey and white matter at the posterior region of the cerebral hemispheres. HSP should be considered in children with PRES in the presence of rash, joint and gastrointestinal symptoms. We reported a 5-year-old patient who developed acute renal failure and PRES by reason of HSP. PMID:23946524

  8. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Lumboperitoneal Shunt for Fulminant Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Chandra, Ronil V; Gutman, Matthew; Ligtermoet, Matthew; Seneviratne, Udaya; Kempster, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with severe visual loss from fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Her lumbar puncture opening pressure was 97 cm H2O. Soon after lumboperitoneal shunt surgery, she had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated frontal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and neuroimaging findings consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). We hypothesize that an abrupt drop in intracranial pressure after lumboperitoneal shunting led to maladjustment of cerebral vascular autoregulation, which caused SAH and PRES. PMID:26919070

  9. Coiling occlusion of the vertebral artery for a patient with recurrent posterior circulation TIAs.

    PubMed

    Chembala, J; Jadun, C; Natarajan, I; Roffe, C

    2013-02-01

    Recurrent posterior circulation infarcts frequently involve multiple vascular territories, suggesting an embolic source. We describe a patient with left vertebral artery occlusion who had recurrent transient ischaemic attacks due to cerebral embolization originating from the occluded vertebral artery in spite of optimal anticoagulant and antithrombotic treatment. This was successfully managed by coiling occlusion of the vertebral artery with no recurrence of symptoms over one year of follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of coiling occlusion in the treatment of recurrent vertebral artery embolization. PMID:23859172

  10. Subarachnoid hemorrhage then thrombosis of posterior inferior cerebellar artery dissection: is early surgical exploration warranted?

    PubMed

    Alexiades, Nikita G; Ellis, Jason A; Meyers, Philip M; Connolly, E Sander

    2016-06-01

    The natural history of spontaneous cerebral artery dissection and thrombosis remains uncertain. Concurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage further complicates the therapeutic approach. Thus the best strategy for managing patients with acute vessel thrombosis in the setting of subarachnoid hemorrhage is unclear. Here we present a case of spontaneous posterior inferior cerebellar artery dissection presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage and acute thrombosis. Although the patient was initially managed conservatively, angiographic follow-up demonstrated recanalization of the diseased vessel, necessitating definitive treatment. Thus we propose that angiographic follow-up is necessary in the management of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage in association with apparent vessel thrombosis. PMID:25987592

  11. Localization of cerebral activity during simple singing.

    PubMed

    Perry, D W; Zatorre, R J; Petrides, M; Alivisatos, B; Meyer, E; Evans, A C

    1999-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured with PET during rudimentary singing of a single pitch and vowel, contrasted to passive listening to complex tones. CBF increases in cortical areas related to motor control were seen in the supplementary motor area, anterior cingulate cortex, precentral gyri, anterior insula (and the adjacent inner face of the precentral operculum) and cerebellum, replicating most previously seen during speech. Increases in auditory cortex were seen within right Heschl's gyrus, and in the posterior superior temporal plane (and the immediately overlying parietal cortex). Since cortex near right Heschl's has been linked to complex pitch perception, its asymmetric activation here may be related to analyzing the fundamental frequency of one's own voice for feedback-guided modulation. PMID:10599861

  12. Localization of cerebral activity during simple singing.

    PubMed

    Perry, D W; Zatorre, R J; Petrides, M; Alivisatos, B; Meyer, E; Evans, A C

    1999-12-16

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured with PET during rudimentary singing of a single pitch and vowel, contrasted to passive listening to complex tones. CBF increases in cortical areas related to motor control were seen in the supplementary motor area, anterior cingulate cortex, precentral gyri, anterior insula (and the adjacent inner face of the precentral operculum) and cerebellum, replicating most previously seen during speech. Increases in auditory cortex were seen within right Heschl's gyrus, and in the posterior superior temporal plane (and the immediately overlying parietal cortex). Since cortex near right Heschl's has been linked to complex pitch perception, its asymmetric activation here may be related to analyzing the fundamental frequency of one's own voice for feedback-guided modulation. PMID:10716244

  13. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in ALL.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-07-01

    Investigators from Soochow University, Suzhou, China, studied the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) observed in 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after induction chemotherapy. PMID:26933594

  14. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is located inside your knee joint and connects the bones of your upper and ... such as a knee dislocation , you will need knee surgery to repair the joint. For milder injuries, you may not need surgery. ...

  15. Cryptorchidism in boys with posterior urethral valves.

    PubMed

    Krueger, R P; Hardy, B E; Churchill, B M

    1980-07-01

    A review of 207 male children with poterior urethral valves revealed an over-all incidence of cryptorchidism of 12 per cent. This association of cryptorchidism in boys with posterior urethral valves has not been described previously. PMID:6106069

  16. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  17. Study on the correlation of vertebral artery dominance, basilar artery curvature and posterior circulation infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Ya-Fang; Dong, Xiao-Feng; Feng, Hong-Xuan; Zhao, He-Qing; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-09-01

    Vertebral artery dominance (VAD), which is a common congenital variation of vertebral artery, may be associated with an increased risk of cerebral posterior circulation infarction (PCI). The aims of this study were to investigate the correlation of VAD with incidence and laterality of PCI, and oblige the correlation of VAD and basilar artery (BA) curvature. Incidence of separate territory infarction in posterior circulation and incidence of BA curvature were compared between 78 VAD patients and 68 controls. VA dominance, laterality of BA curvature and separate territory infarction, and their directional relationships were observed in VAD group. The incidence of BA curvature in VAD group was significantly higher than that in controls (P = 0.000). 89.7 % (35/39) of patients had an opposite directional relationship between dominant VA and BA curvature. The total incidence of PCI in VAD group was significantly higher than that in controls (P = 0.001). The incidences of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and BA territory infarction were both significantly higher than those in controls [11.5 % (9/78) vs. 1.5 % (1/68), P = 0.016; 20.5 % (16/78) vs. 7.4 % (5/68), P = 0.024]. No differences were found in superior cerebellar artery and posterior cerebral artery territory infarction between two groups. 77.8 % (7/9) of PICA infarction were on the opposite side of dominant VA. 75.0 % (12/16) of BA infarction were on the side of dominant VA. The incidence of PCI in BA curvature patients was significantly higher than that in BA straight patients. The incidence of BA curvature is higher in VAD patients, and BA usually bends to the opposite side of dominant VA. The incidence of PCI is higher in VAD patients, especially in PICA infarction and BA infarction patients. PMID:26615535

  18. Cerebral cortex structure in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Nopoulos, Peggy C; Aylward, Elizabeth H; Ross, Christopher A; Johnson, Hans J; Magnotta, Vincent A; Juhl, Andrew R; Pierson, Ronald K; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R; Paulsen, Jane S

    2010-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is "spared," despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as "Far from onset," "Midway to onset," "Near onset," and "already diagnosed." MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  19. Cerebral Cortex Structure in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nopoulos, Peggy C.; Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Ross, Christopher A.; Johnson, Hans J.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Juhl, Andrew R.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is “spared,” despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as “Far from onset,” “Midway to onset,” “Near onset,” and “already diagnosed.” MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  20. Abnormal cerebral vasodilation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: use of serial 133Xe cerebral blood flow measurement plus acetazolamide to assess cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Tran Dinh, Y R; Lot, G; Benrabah, R; Baroudy, O; Cophignon, J; Seylaz, J

    1993-10-01

    A patient with cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was investigated by serial measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using the xenon-133 emission tomography method. The CBF was measured before and after acetazolamide injection. On Day 2 after SAH, there was early local hyperperfusion in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory, ipsilateral to the left posterior communicating artery aneurysm. The regional CBF of this arterial territory decreased slightly after acetazolamide injection, probably because of vasoplegia and the "steal" phenomenon, and thus surgery was delayed. A right hemiplegia with aphasia and disturbed consciousness occurred 4 days later (on Day 6 after SAH) due to arterial vasospasm, despite treatment with a calcium-channel blocker. The initial hyperemia of the left MCA territory was followed by ischemia. The vasodilation induced by acetazolamide administration was significantly subnormal until Day 13, at which time CBF and vasoreactivity amplitude returned to normal and the patient's clinical condition improved. Surgery on Day 14 and outcome were without complication. It is concluded that serial CBF measurements plus acetazolamide injection are useful for monitoring the development of cerebral vasospasm to determine the most appropriate time for aneurysm surgery. PMID:8410215

  1. Vasospasm in Cerebral Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2014-01-01

    All forms of cerebral inflammation as found in bacterial meningitis, cerebral malaria, brain injury, and subarachnoid haemorrhage have been associated with vasospasm of cerebral arteries and arterioles. Vasospasm has been associated with permanent neurological deficits and death in subarachnoid haemorrhage and bacterial meningitis. Increased levels of interleukin-1 may be involved in vasospasm through calcium dependent and independent activation of the myosin light chain kinase and release of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1. Another key factor in the pathogenesis of cerebral arterial vasospasm may be the reduced bioavailability of the vasodilator nitric oxide. Therapeutic trials in vasospasm related to inflammation in subarachnoid haemorrhage in humans showed a reduction of vasospasm through calcium antagonists, endothelin receptor antagonists, statins, and plasminogen activators. Combination of therapeutic modalities addressing calcium dependent and independent vasospasm, the underlying inflammation, and depletion of nitric oxide simultaneously merit further study in all conditions with cerebral inflammation in double blind randomised placebo controlled trials. Auxiliary treatment with these agents may be able to reduce ischemic brain injury associated with neurological deficits and increased mortality. PMID:25610703

  2. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  3. Oval capsulorhexis for phacoemulsification in posterior polar cataract with preexisting posterior capsule rupture.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kiranjit; Mittal, Vikas; Kaur, Harmit

    2011-07-01

    We describe use of an oval capsulorhexis rather than the conventional circular capsulorhexis for phacoemulsification in posterior polar cataract with preexisting posterior capsule rupture. An oval capsulorhexis minimizes the turbulence in the capsular bag by increasing the area available for efflux of fluid. It also enables end-to-end nuclear sculpting, removal of the nuclear fragment from the bag, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and vitrectomy without stretching the capsular bag. The smaller axis of the oval capsulorhexis facilitates optic capture of a sulcus-fixated IOL. The oval capsulorhexis can be used safely for phacoemulsification of all grades of nuclear sclerosis in posterior polar cataract with preexisting posterior capsule rupture. PMID:21700098

  4. Characterization of Posterior Glenoid Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Yanke, Adam Blair; Frank, Rachel M.; Shin, Jason J.; Van Thiel, Geoffrey S.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Cole, Brian J.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Provencher, Matthew T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to characterize the morphology and location of posterior glenoid bone loss in pat ients with posterior instability instability utilizing computed tomography (CT). Methods: Clinical data was selected for patients with posterior shoulder instability that had undergone posterior stabilization (open or arthroscopic) or posterior osseous augmentation (distal tibia or iliac crest). Three fellowship-trained surgeons from two institutions contributed patients. Pre-operative CT data was collected for all patients. The axial cuts were segmented and reformatted in three-dimensions for glenoid analysis using Osirix. From this three-dimensional model, the following was calculated: percent bone loss (Nobuhara), total arc of the defect (degrees), and a clock-face description (start point, stop point, and average or direction). Pearson correlation coefficients were performed using significance of p<0.05. Results: Fifty shoulders from 50 patients were reviewed. Fourteen patients (average age 30 years; 93% male) had evidence of posterior glenoid bone loss and were included for evaluation. Defects on average involved 13.7±8.6% of the glenoid (range, 2-35%). The average start time (assuming all right shoulders) on the clock face was 10 o’clock ± 40 minutes and stopped at 6:30 ± 25 minutes. The average direction of the defect pointed toward 8:15 ± 25 minutes. The percent bone loss correlated with the total arc of the defect (Pearson: 0.93, p<0.05, R2: 0.86) and the direction of the bone loss (Pearson: 0.64, p<0.05, R2: 0.40). The direction of bone loss significantly moved more posterosuperior the larger the defect became (Pearson: 0.63, p<0.05, R2: 0.40). Conclusion: Posterior bone loss associated with posterior glenohumeral instability is typically directed posteriorly at 8:15 on the clock. As defect get bigger, this direction moves more posterosuperior. This information will help guide clinicians in understanding the typical location of

  5. Neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Namura, Shobu; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Liu, Jialing; Yenari, Midori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, a focal or global insufficiency of blood flow to the brain, can arise through multiple mechanisms, including thrombosis and arterial hemorrhage. Ischemia is a major driver of stroke, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the general etiology of cerebral ischemia and stroke has been known for some time, the conditions have only recently been considered treatable. This report describes current research in this field seeking to fully understand the pathomechanisms underlying stroke; to characterize the brain’s intrinsic injury, survival, and repair mechanisms; to identify putative drug targets as well as cell-based therapies; and to optimize the delivery of therapeutic agents to the damaged cerebral tissue. PMID:23488559

  6. Cerebral aneurysms following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, P.J.; Sung, J.H.

    1989-04-01

    Three patients, two males and one female aged 21, 14, and 31 years, respectively, developed cerebral saccular aneurysms several years after undergoing radiotherapy for cerebellar medulloblastoma at 2, 5, and 14 years of age, respectively. Following surgery, all three received combined cobalt-60 irradiation and intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) therapy, and died from rupture of the aneurysm 19, 9, and 17 years after the radiotherapy, respectively. Autopsy examination revealed no recurrence of the medulloblastoma, but widespread radiation-induced vasculopathy was found at the base of the brain and in the spinal cord, and saccular aneurysms arose from the posterior cerebral arteries at the basal cistern or choroidal fissure. The aneurysms differed from the ordinary saccular aneurysms of congenital type in their location and histological features. Their locations corresponded to the areas where intrathecally administered colloidal /sup 198/Au is likely to pool, and they originated directly from a segment of the artery rather than from a branching site as in congenital saccular aneurysms. It is, therefore, concluded that the aneurysms in these three patients were most likely radiation-induced.

  7. THE DIAGNOSTIC AND MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES FOR POSTERIOR REVERSIBLE LEUCOENCEPHALOPATHY SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Çoban, Eda Kiliç; Gez, Sedat; Kara, Batuhan; Soysal, Aysun

    2015-11-30

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by epileptic seizures, headaches, altered mental status and focal neurological signs. Hypertension is the second most common condition associated with PRES. The 50-year-old-male patient with, right-sided hemiparesis and speech disturbances admitted to our clinic. His blood pressure at the emergency service was 220/140 mmHg. A left putaminal hematoma was seen in his CT and MRI. In his brain MRI, FLAIR and T2 -weighted sequences showed bilateral symmetric diffuse hyperintensities in the brain stem, basal ganglia, and occipital, parietal, frontal, and temporal lobes. After the intense antihypertensive drug treatment, his blood pressure came to normal limits within a week. During his hospitalisation he had a recurrent speech disturbance lasting an hour. His electroencephalography was normal. In his repeated diffusion weighted MRI, an acute lacunary infarct was seen on right centrum semiovale. Two months later, the control MRI showed only the previous lacuner infarcts and the chronic putaminal hematoma. We presented a case developping either a cerebral hemorrhage or a lacunar infarction due to PRES. The main reason of the following complications of the disease was delayed diagnosis. Uncontrolled hypertension was guilted for the events. PMID:26821517

  8. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in leukemic children: a sensitive issue.

    PubMed

    Kridis, Wala Ben; Mdhaffer, Moez; Hentati, Yosr; Kammoun, Fatma; Milad, Abir; Haddar, Sondes; Mahfoudh, Khaireddine Ben; Triki, Chahinez; Elloumi, Moez

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an acute central nervous system disorder characterized by reversible brain vasogenic edema. We report here a new case of a nine-year-old boy with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) who developed PRES secondary to induction chemotherapy including dexamethasone (dexamethasone®), vincristine (oncovin(®)), daunorubicin (adriblastine(®)) and intrathecal injection. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed high signal intensity on T2 at cortical and sub cortical region of parieto-frontal and parieto-occipital lobes. The patient was put under sodium valproate (depakine(®)) and we decided to continue dexamethasone (dexamethasone(®)) and daunorubicin (adriblastine(®)) injection. The MRI, after four weeks, was normal. So, we resumed vincristine (oncovin(®)) and we started L-asparaginase injections. Then, the outcome was favorable. The treatment of PRES is based on the withdrawal of the triggering factor to avoid the risk of irreversible lesions. But, due to the severity of leukemia the discontinuation of chemotherapy is difficult because of the risk of disease progression. PMID:24919742

  9. Posterior Predictive Bayesian Phylogenetic Model Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Paul O.; Xie, Wangang; Chen, Ming-Hui; Fan, Yu; Kuo, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    We present two distinctly different posterior predictive approaches to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection and illustrate these methods using examples from green algal protein-coding cpDNA sequences and flowering plant rDNA sequences. The Gelfand–Ghosh (GG) approach allows dissection of an overall measure of model fit into components due to posterior predictive variance (GGp) and goodness-of-fit (GGg), which distinguishes this method from the posterior predictive P-value approach. The conditional predictive ordinate (CPO) method provides a site-specific measure of model fit useful for exploratory analyses and can be combined over sites yielding the log pseudomarginal likelihood (LPML) which is useful as an overall measure of model fit. CPO provides a useful cross-validation approach that is computationally efficient, requiring only a sample from the posterior distribution (no additional simulation is required). Both GG and CPO add new perspectives to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection based on the predictive abilities of models and complement the perspective provided by the marginal likelihood (including Bayes Factor comparisons) based solely on the fit of competing models to observed data. [Bayesian; conditional predictive ordinate; CPO; L-measure; LPML; model selection; phylogenetics; posterior predictive.] PMID:24193892

  10. Cerebral arteriopathy associated with Arg179His ACTA2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Amans, Matthew R; Stout, Charles; Fox, Christine; Narvid, Jared; Hetts, Steven W; Cooke, Daniel L; Higashida, Randall T; Dowd, Christopher F; McSwain, Hugh; Halbach, Van V

    2013-01-01

    ACTA2 mutations have recently been shown to cause a multisystem smooth muscle dysfunction syndrome that may result in pediatric stroke. We report a case of ACTA2 mutation in a 3-year-old girl presenting with acute ischemic stroke and provide high resolution imaging of the cerebral arteries demonstrating novel findings of multiple tiny aneurysms (particularly in the posterior circulation), as well as the more characteristic imaging phenotype of straightened and narrowed proximal intracranial vessels, dilated cervical vessels and occlusion of the M1 MCA segment without lenticulostriate collateral formation. This newly identified disease should be added to the differential diagnosis of pediatric stroke and cerebral vasculopathy. Neuroradiologists, interventionalists, surgeons and neurologists should become familiar with this rare disease and its clinical sequelae. PMID:24293535

  11. Cerebral arteriopathy associated with Arg179His ACTA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Amans, Matthew R; Stout, Charles; Fox, Christine; Narvid, Jared; Hetts, Steven W; Cooke, Daniel L; Higashida, Randall T; Dowd, Christopher F; McSwain, Hugh; Halbach, Van V

    2013-01-01

    ACTA2 mutations have recently been shown to cause a multisystem smooth muscle dysfunction syndrome that may result in pediatric stroke. We report a case of ACTA2 mutation in a 3-year-old girl presenting with acute ischemic stroke and provide high resolution imaging of the cerebral arteries demonstrating novel findings of multiple tiny aneurysms (particularly in the posterior circulation), as well as the more characteristic imaging phenotype of straightened and narrowed proximal intracranial vessels, dilated cervical vessels and occlusion of the M1 MCA segment without lenticulostriate collateral formation. This newly identified disease should be added to the differential diagnosis of pediatric stroke and cerebral vasculopathy. Neuroradiologists, interventionalists, surgeons and neurologists should become familiar with this rare disease and its clinical sequelae. PMID:24293535

  12. Cerebral arteriopathy associated with Arg179His ACTA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Amans, Matthew R; Stout, Charles; Fox, Christine; Narvid, Jared; Hetts, Steven W; Cooke, Daniel L; Higashida, Randall T; Dowd, Christopher F; McSwain, Hugh; Halbach, Van V

    2014-11-01

    ACTA2 mutations have recently been shown to cause a multisystem smooth muscle dysfunction syndrome that may result in pediatric stroke. We report a case of ACTA2 mutation in a 3-year-old girl presenting with acute ischemic stroke and provide high resolution imaging of the cerebral arteries demonstrating novel findings of multiple tiny aneurysms (particularly in the posterior circulation), as well as the more characteristic imaging phenotype of straightened and narrowed proximal intracranial vessels, dilated cervical vessels and occlusion of the M1 MCA segment without lenticulostriate collateral formation. This newly identified disease should be added to the differential diagnosis of pediatric stroke and cerebral vasculopathy. Neuroradiologists, interventionalists, surgeons and neurologists should become familiar with this rare disease and its clinical sequelae. PMID:24353327

  13. Cerebral lateralization and color perception: a transcranial Doppler study.

    PubMed

    Njemanze, P C; Gomez, C R; Horenstein, S

    1992-03-01

    Eight normal subjects were examined in dark, light and color conditions. Mean cerebral blood flow velocity (MBFV) were recorded almost simultaneously from their posterior cerebral arteries (PCA) using transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound. The side-to-side difference was significant during the dark (p = 0.0159) and color stimulation (p = 0.0001) but not in light condition. This side-to-side difference in MBFV was used to characterize lateralization of color perception. This showed that the right PCA was always greater than the left during the presentation of color stimuli. Primary psychological colors (blue, yellow, red and green) induced greater lateralization as compared with color resulting from a mixed blue-green wavelength. This suggests that the right visual cortex is selectively sensitive to wavelengths. PMID:1572174

  14. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  15. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  16. Vertebral artery hypoplasia, posterior circulation infarction and relative hypoperfusion detected by perfusion magnetic resonance imaging semiquantitatively.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dao Pei; Ma, Qian Kun; Zhang, Jie Wen; Zhang, Shu Ling; Lu, Gui Feng; Yin, Suo

    2016-09-15

    Vertebral artery hypoplasia (VAH) has been considered a risk factor of posterior circulation infarction (PCI), especially in the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). But whether VAH is an independent risk factor for PCI remains uncertain and how VAH participates in the evolvement of PCI is still not clear either. Therefore, this study aims to examine whether VAH is an independent risk factor for PCI and evaluate the effect of VAH on the cerebral perfusion in the territory of the PICA detected by perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) semiquantitatively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that VAH, hypertension and smoking were more frequent in patients with PCI than in patients without PCI. Perfusion MRI analysis found that there were remarkable differences in the frequency of the relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) value ≤0.85 and the relative time to peak (rTTP) values between VAH patients without PCI and non-VAH patients without PCI. Our results indicated that VAH may be an independent risk factor for PCI, especially in the presence of hypertension and smoking and that a relative hypoperfusion associates with VAH that may contribute to the evolvement of the infarction in the PICA territory. PMID:27538599

  17. Posterior osseous bridging of C1.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Serkan; Yigitkanli, Kazim; Comert, Ayhan; Acar, Halil I; Seckin, Hakan; Er, Uygur; Belen, Deniz; Tekdemir, Ibrahim; Elhan, Alaittin

    2008-06-01

    The sulcus of the vertebral artery is located behind the lateral mass of the atlas and in some cases is converted into a foramen by anomalous ossification known as the posterior ponticulus (osseous bridge). This study involved anatomical observations of 158 isolated anatomical specimens of dry C1 vertebrae. The incidence and types of posterior osseous bridging were identified for the 158 dry samples of atlas vertebrae. In nine (5.6%) dry C1 vertebrae, partial osseous bridging was detected (bilaterally in eight vertebrae and unilaterally on the left in one). Complete osseous bridging (arcuate foramen) was observed in six (3.8%) dry C1 vertebrae (bilaterally in one vertebra, unilaterally on the left in three, and on the right in two). Awareness of the types of posterior osseous bridging of C1 in craniocervical junction surgery is essential, and may be helpful in surgical interventions in this region. PMID:18378457

  18. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Curtis R; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J; Stabley, John N; McCullough, Danielle J; Davis, Robert T; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M; Delp, Michael D

    2013-06-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight. PMID:23457215

  19. Posterior predictive checking of multiple imputation models.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cattram D; Lee, Katherine J; Carlin, John B

    2015-07-01

    Multiple imputation is gaining popularity as a strategy for handling missing data, but there is a scarcity of tools for checking imputation models, a critical step in model fitting. Posterior predictive checking (PPC) has been recommended as an imputation diagnostic. PPC involves simulating "replicated" data from the posterior predictive distribution of the model under scrutiny. Model fit is assessed by examining whether the analysis from the observed data appears typical of results obtained from the replicates produced by the model. A proposed diagnostic measure is the posterior predictive "p-value", an extreme value of which (i.e., a value close to 0 or 1) suggests a misfit between the model and the data. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the posterior predictive p-value as an imputation diagnostic. Using simulation methods, we deliberately misspecified imputation models to determine whether posterior predictive p-values were effective in identifying these problems. When estimating the regression parameter of interest, we found that more extreme p-values were associated with poorer imputation model performance, although the results highlighted that traditional thresholds for classical p-values do not apply in this context. A shortcoming of the PPC method was its reduced ability to detect misspecified models with increasing amounts of missing data. Despite the limitations of posterior predictive p-values, they appear to have a valuable place in the imputer's toolkit. In addition to automated checking using p-values, we recommend imputers perform graphical checks and examine other summaries of the test quantity distribution. PMID:25939490

  20. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  1. Imaging the posterior mediastinum: a multimodality approach

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Mariaelena; Heidinger, Benedikt H.; Franquet, Elisa; Eisenberg, Ronald L.; Bankier, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The posterior mediastinum contains several structures that can produce a wide variety of pathologic conditions. Descending thoracic aorta, esophagus, azygos and hemiazygos veins, thoracic duct, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, and nerves are all located in this anatomical region and can produce diverse abnormalities. Although chest radiography may detect many of these pathologic conditions, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are the imaging modalities of choice for further defining the relationship of posterior mediastinal lesions to neighboring structures and showing specific imaging features that narrow the differential diagnosis. This review emphasizes modality-related answers to morphologic questions, which provide precise diagnostic information. PMID:25993732

  2. Imaging the posterior mediastinum: a multimodality approach.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Mariaelena; Heidinger, Benedikt H; Franquet, Elisa; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Bankier, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    The posterior mediastinum contains several structures that can produce a wide variety of pathologic conditions. Descending thoracic aorta, esophagus, azygos and hemiazygos veins, thoracic duct, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, and nerves are all located in this anatomical region and can produce diverse abnormalities. Although chest radiography may detect many of these pathologic conditions, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are the imaging modalities of choice for further defining the relationship of posterior mediastinal lesions to neighboring structures and showing specific imaging features that narrow the differential diagnosis. This review emphasizes modality-related answers to morphologic questions, which provide precise diagnostic information. PMID:25993732

  3. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes. PMID:27599438

  4. Noninvasive measurement of cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral phronetal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengli; Zhang, Aiyu; Xu, Min; Jin, Taiyi

    1998-08-01

    Using the Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), the noninvasive measurement of cerebral oxygen concentration can be achieved in vivo based on the Lambert-Beer Law. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of studying higher brain functions through combining cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral function measurement. Event-related experiments are introduced to measure the cerebral phronetal function. Time domain curves show sight differences among these experiment results. However, with the aid of DFT, experiment data of all five human volunteers show the frequency near 20 Hz or 40 Hz is evoked depending on the difficulty of the mental tasks. The results demonstrate the feasibility of cerebral functions study by means of cerebral oxygen saturation measurement analyzed in the frequency domain.

  5. [Therapy of posterior and posterolateral knee instability].

    PubMed

    Jakob, R P; Rüegsegger, M

    1993-11-01

    The natural course after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear is a slow process of degeneration starting in the medial compartment. Functional disability is mainly present in those instabilities that are combined with posterolateral insufficiency. The surgical treatment at present mainly addresses these combined types of posterior-posterolateral instability. It is generally agreed that suture of the torn PCL alone is insufficient and augmentation with autologous structures, such as the patellar ligament, are mandatory. Synthetic augmentation to facilitate after treatment is another adjunct. Because of the difficulty of precise tibial tunnel placement a two-stage procedure is advocated, an anterior approach with the patient supine being used for femoral graft placement. If a posterior approach with the patient prone is used, a straight posterior incision is made between the two heads of the gastrocnemius and the neuromuscular bundle. With this approach the tibial bone block is placed in a trough. The accuracy of graft placement and the immediate functional aftertreatment facilitated by the use of osseous fixation of a synthetic augmentation device at both ends have made better results of surgical reconstruction of the PCL possible. PMID:8309701

  6. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  7. Posterior instability caused by batter's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kang, Richard W; Mahony, Gregory T; Harris, Thomas C; Dines, Joshua S

    2013-10-01

    In summary, batter’s shoulder is a rare and only recently recognized entity. This condition is posterior shoulder instability caused by a missed attempt at hitting a pitch, especially with an outside pitch. The lack of counterforce from hitting a ball produces increased forces imparted on the posterior capsulolabral complex of the lead shoulder during batting. If the player fails conservative management, she or he can undergo an arthroscopic posterior labral repair instead of debridement. After treatment, the player can expect to return to play after approximately 6 to 7 months. Initial results from a small, retrospective series demonstrate greater than 90% excellent results. These findings are similar to current literature for arthroscopic treatment of posterior instability, which reports success rates that range from 75% to 91%. Longer-term follow-up will be needed to determine the natural history and prognosis or batter’s shoulder. Based on initial results, the authors predict good to excellent results for most players with batter’s shoulder who undergo proper treatment. Additionally, with the exception of switch hitters, the nonthrowing arm is affected. This can also improve the athlete’s return to play. PMID:24079435

  8. Posterior Probabilities for a Consensus Ordering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fligner, Michael A.; Verducci, Joseph S.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of consensus ordering is defined, and formulas for exact and approximate posterior probabilities for consensus ordering are developed under the assumption of a generalized Mallows' model with a diffuse conjugate prior. These methods are applied to a data set concerning 98 college students. (SLD)

  9. Genetics of Cerebral Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Travis R.; Zuckerman, Scott L.; Mocco, J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) is a major source of morbidity and mortality in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). It is thought that an inflammatory cascade initiated by extravasated blood products precipitates CV, disrupting vascular smooth muscle cell function of major cerebral arteries, leading to vasoconstriction. Mechanisms of CV and modes of therapy are an active area of research. Understanding the genetic basis of CV holds promise for the recognition and treatment for this devastating neurovascular event. In our review, we summarize the most recent research involving key areas within the genetics and vasospasm discussion: (1) Prognostic role of genetics—risk stratification based on gene sequencing, biomarkers, and polymorphisms; (2) Signaling pathways—pinpointing key inflammatory molecules responsible for downstream cellular signaling and altering these mediators to provide therapeutic benefit; and (3) Gene therapy and gene delivery—using viral vectors or novel protein delivery methods to overexpress protective genes in the vasospasm cascade. PMID:23691311

  10. Phenylpropanolamine and cerebral hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, J.R.; LeBlanc, H.J.

    1985-05-01

    Computerized tomography, carotid angiograms, and arteriography were used to diagnose several cases of cerebral hemorrhage following the use of phenylpropanolamine. The angiographic picture in one of the three cases was similar to that previously described in association with amphetamine abuse and pseudoephedrine overdose, both substances being chemically and pharmacologically similar to phenylpropanolamine. The study suggests that the arterial change responsible for symptoms may be due to spasm rather than arteriopathy. 14 references, 5 figures.

  11. Cerebral dysgenesis. An overview.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, G B; Sheth, R D; Bodensteiner, J B

    1994-11-01

    A significant portion of patients with neurodevelopmental abnormalities (mental retardation, learning disabilities, and so forth) have no definable cause for these problems. Mounting evidence suggests a substantial number of these idiopathic conditions have subtle abnormalities of brain development (cerebral dysgenesis) as the inherent pathophysiologic event. In this article the authors summarize normal and abnormal brain development, the diagnostic approach to idiopathic neurodevelopmental anomalies, and the new molecular genetic insights into the underlying causes of brain malformations. PMID:7845342

  12. What provides cerebral reserve?

    PubMed

    Staff, Roger T; Murray, Alison D; Deary, Ian J; Whalley, Lawrence J

    2004-05-01

    The cerebral reserve hypothesis is a heuristic concept used to explain apparent protection from the onset of cerebral disease and/or cognitive decline in old age. A significant obstacle when investigating the reserve hypothesis is the absence of baseline data with which to compare current cognitive status. We tested the influence of three hypothesized proxies of reserve (education, head size and occupational attainment [OCC]) in 92 volunteers born in 1921, whose cognitive function was measured at age 11 and 79 years, and who underwent brain MRI. The association between each proxy and old age cognitive function was tested, adjusting for variance contributed by childhood mental ability and detrimental age-related pathological changes measured using MRI. The results showed that education and OCC, but not total intracranial volume (TICV), contribute to cerebral reserve and help retain cognitive function in old age. Education was found to contribute between 5 and 6% of the variance found in old age memory function but was found to have no significant association with reasoning abilities. OCC was found to contribute around 5% of the variance found in old age memory function and between 6 and 8% of the variance found in old age reasoning abilities. We conclude that the intellectual challenges experienced during life, such as education and occupation, accumulate reserve and allow cognitive function to be maintained in old age. PMID:15047587

  13. [Insomnia and cerebral hypoperfusion].

    PubMed

    Káposzta, Zoltán; Rácz, Klára

    2007-11-18

    Insomnia is defined as difficulty with the initiation, maintenance, duration, or quality of sleep that results in the impairment of daytime functioning, despite adequate opportunity and circumstances for sleep. In most countries approximately every third inhabitant has insomnia. Insomnia can be classified as primary and secondary. The pathogenesis of primary insomnia is unknown, but available evidence suggests a state of hyperarousal. Insomnia secondary to other causes is more common than primary insomnia. Cerebral hypoperfusion can be the cause of insomnia in some cases. In such patients the cerebral blood flow should be improved using parenteral vascular therapy. If insomnia persists despite treatment, then therapy for primary insomnia should be instituted using benzodiazepine-receptor agonists such as Zolpidem, Zopiclone, or Zaleplon. In those cases Midazolam cannot be used for the treatment of insomnia due to its marked negative effect on cerebral blood flow. In Hungary there is a need to organize multidisciplinary Insomnia Clinics because insomnia is more than a disease, it is a public health problem in this century. PMID:17988972

  14. Cerebral oxygenation and hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Anthony R.; Morrison, Shawnda A.; Ainslie, Philip N.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is associated with marked reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Increased distribution of cardiac output to the periphery, increases in alveolar ventilation and resultant hypocapnia each contribute to the fall in CBF during passive hyperthermia; however, their relative contribution remains a point of contention, and probably depends on the experimental condition (e.g., posture and degree of hyperthermia). The hyperthermia-induced hyperventilatory response reduces arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2) causing cerebral vasoconstriction and subsequent reductions in flow. During supine passive hyperthermia, the majority of recent data indicate that reductions in PaCO2 may be the primary, if not sole, culprit for reduced CBF. On the other hand, during more dynamic conditions (e.g., hemorrhage or orthostatic challenges), an inability to appropriately decrease peripheral vascular conductance presents a condition whereby adequate cerebral perfusion pressure may be compromised secondary to reductions in systemic blood pressure. Although studies have reported maintenance of pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy) during exercise and severe heat stress, the influence of cutaneous blood flow is known to contaminate this measure. This review discusses the governing mechanisms associated with changes in CBF and oxygenation during moderate to severe (i.e., 1.0°C to 2.0°C increase in body core temperature) levels of hyperthermia. Future research directions are provided. PMID:24624095

  15. An Unusual Cause of Posterior Elbow Impingement: Detachment of a Hypertrophied Posterior Fat Pad.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Daisuke; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sugiura, Kosuke; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Suzue, Naoto; Goto, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Wada, Keizo; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 47-year-old woman who developed posterior impingement of the elbow due to detachment of a hypertrophied posterior fat pad. She reported acute left elbow pain after leaning back onto a hard object with her hand and subsequently experienced a "catching" sensation. Comparison with the magnetic resonance images of a normal elbow revealed a hypertrophied posterior fat pad interposed between the olecranon and olecranon fossa in both elbows, with the fat pad in the left elbow located more inferiorly than that in the right elbow. Elbow arthroscopy showed the olecranon fossa covered by the fat pad, a portion of which was detached from the rest of the pad. Debridement of the detached portion was performed until no impingement was evident. Postoperatively, full extension of the elbow did not elicit pain. Clinicians should include this pathology among the differential diagnoses for posterior elbow pain. PMID:26613057

  16. Posterior cruciate-retaining versus posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bercik, Michael J; Joshi, Ashish; Parvizi, Javad

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare outcomes of posterior cruciate-retaining and posterior stabilized prostheses. A computerized literature search was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials comparing the clinical outcomes of cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized designs. The table of contents of four major Orthopaedic journals and the references section of two arthroplasty text books were reviewed to identify other relevant studies. Ultimately, 1114 patients (1265 knees) were compared. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in flexion and range of motion in favor of posterior-stabilized knees, but no difference in complication rates. The clinical importance of this remains unknown. The decision to use one design versus the other should rest with the surgeon's preference and comfort with a particular design. PMID:23433255

  17. An Unusual Cause of Posterior Elbow Impingement: Detachment of a Hypertrophied Posterior Fat Pad

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Daisuke; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sugiura, Kosuke; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Suzue, Naoto; Goto, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Wada, Keizo; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 47-year-old woman who developed posterior impingement of the elbow due to detachment of a hypertrophied posterior fat pad. She reported acute left elbow pain after leaning back onto a hard object with her hand and subsequently experienced a “catching” sensation. Comparison with the magnetic resonance images of a normal elbow revealed a hypertrophied posterior fat pad interposed between the olecranon and olecranon fossa in both elbows, with the fat pad in the left elbow located more inferiorly than that in the right elbow. Elbow arthroscopy showed the olecranon fossa covered by the fat pad, a portion of which was detached from the rest of the pad. Debridement of the detached portion was performed until no impingement was evident. Postoperatively, full extension of the elbow did not elicit pain. Clinicians should include this pathology among the differential diagnoses for posterior elbow pain. PMID:26613057

  18. Supratentorial Neurometabolic Alterations in Pediatric Survivors of Posterior Fossa Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rueckriegel, Stefan M.; Driever, Pablo Hernaiz; Bruhn, Harald

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Therapy and tumor-related effects such as hypoperfusion, internal hydrocephalus, chemotherapy, and irradiation lead to significant motor and cognitive sequelae in pediatric posterior fossa tumor survivors. A distinct proportion of those factors related to the resulting late effects is hitherto poorly understood. This study aimed at separating the effects of neurotoxic factors on central nervous system metabolism by using H-1 MR spectroscopy to quantify cerebral metabolite concentrations in these patients in comparison to those in age-matched healthy peers. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with World Health Organization (WHO) I pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) treated by resection only, 24 patients with WHO IV medulloblastoma (MB), who additionally received chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation, and 43 healthy peers were investigated using single-volume H-1 MR spectroscopy of parietal white matter and gray matter. Results: Concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) were significantly decreased in white matter (p < 0.0001) and gray matter (p < 0.0001) of MB patients and in gray matter (p = 0.005) of PA patients, compared to healthy peers. Decreased creatine concentrations in parietal gray matter correlated significantly with older age at diagnosis in both patient groups (MB patients, p = 0.009, r = 0.52; PA patients, p = 0.006, r = 0.7). Longer time periods since diagnosis were associated with lower NAA levels in white matter of PA patients (p = 0.008, r = 0.66). Conclusions: Differently decreased NAA concentrations were observed in both PA and MB groups of posterior fossa tumor patients. We conclude that this reflects a disturbance of the neurometabolic steady state of normal-appearing brain tissue due to the tumor itself and to the impact of surgery in both patient groups. Further incremental decreases of metabolite concentrations in MB patients may point to additional harm caused by irradiation and chemotherapy. The stronger decrease of NAA in MB

  19. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Curtis R.; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J.; Stabley, John N.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Davis, Robert T.; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight.—Taylor, C. R., Hanna, M., Behnke, B. J., Stabley, J. N., McCullough, D. J., Davis III, R. T., Ghosh, P., Papadopoulos, A., Muller-Delp, J. M., Delp, M. D. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated

  20. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  1. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  2. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  3. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region

    PubMed Central

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A βcatenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (βcatenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis. PMID:26556349

  4. Arthroscopic approach to the posterior compartment of the knee using a posterior transseptal portal

    PubMed Central

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Masaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery of the posterior compartment of the knee is difficult when only two anterior portals are used for access because of the inaccessibility of the back of the knee. Since its introduction, the posterior transseptal portal has been widely employed to access lesions in the posterior compartment. However, special care should be taken to avoid neurovascular injuries around the posteromedial, posterolateral, and transseptal portals. Most importantly, popliteal vessel injury should be avoided when creating and using the transseptal portal during surgery. Purpose of the present study is to describe how to avoid the neurovascular injuries during establishing the posterior three portals and to introduce our safer technique to create the transseptal portal. To date, we have performed arthroscopic surgeries via the transseptal portal in the posterior compartments of 161 knees and have not encountered nerve or vascular injury. In our procedure, the posterior septum is perforated with a 1.5-3.0-mm Kirschner wire that is protected by a sheath inserted from the posterolateral portal and monitored from the posteromedial portal to avoid popliteal vessel injury. PMID:26301179

  5. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region.

    PubMed

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A βcatenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (βcatenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis. PMID:26556349

  6. [Simultanagnosia and scene agnosia induced by right posterior cerebral artery infarction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Muramatsu, Tomoko; Sato, Mamiko; Hayashi, Hiromi; Miura, Toyoaki

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for rehabilitation of topographical disorientation. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed infarction in the right medial side of the occipital lobe. On neuropsychological testing, he scored low for the visual information-processing task; however, his overall cognitive function was retained. He could identify parts of the picture while describing the context picture of the Visual Perception Test for Agnosia but could not explain the contents of the entire picture, representing so-called simultanagnosia. Further, he could morphologically perceive both familiar and new scenes, but could not identify them, representing so-called scene agnosia. We report this case because simultanagnosia associated with a right occipital lobe lesion is rare. PMID:26369377

  7. Vagal and sympathetic nerve activities influenced by posterior cerebral circulation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Kubo, T; Matsunaga, T

    1993-01-01

    Vagal and sympathetic nervous activities in the rabbit were recorded while vertebral blood flow was partially blocked by the injection of adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP; platelet aggregator). When a small dose of ADP (0.2 mg/kg) was administered into a unilateral vertebral artery, sympathetic nerve (SN) activity increased, and its magnitude was inversely correlated with the extent of the decrease in blood pressure (BP). A larger dose (2 mg/kg) of ADP suppressed SN activity on the injected side, whereas the change was small on the non-injected side. Vagal nerve (VN) activity showed a monophasic excitatory response on both sides, although the change was larger on the injected than on the non-injected side. As a result, asymmetry in autonomic nerve activity was more distinct in SN than in VN. The present study demonstrated that asymmetry of autonomic nervous function can result from changes in blood flow in the cerebellum and brainstem. PMID:8256597

  8. Posterior fossa lesions associated with neuropsychiatric symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Pollak, L; Klein, C; Rabey, J M; Schiffer, J

    1996-11-01

    We reviewed 7 cases with posterior fossa structural abnormalities (3 tumors, 2 megacisterna magna and 2 Dandy-Walker syndrome) presenting with neuropsychiatric symptomatology. Derangement in the balance of dopamine, serotonin and noradrenergic networks has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, affective and even personality disorders. Disruption of the cerebellar output to mesial dopaminergic areas, locus coeruleus and raphe nuclei, or deafferentation of the thalamolimbic circuits by a cerebellar lesion may lead to behavioral changes. Seven patients (pts) (comprising 4 men and 3 women with mean age 22 years) were diagnosed as suffering from psychosis (2 pts), major depression (1 pt), personality disorders (2 pts) and somatoform disorders (2 pts) (DSM-IV criteria). Brain CT scan (7 pts) and MRI (4 pts) revealed tumors of the posterior fossa (2 pts), megacisterna magna (2 pts) and Dandy-Walker variant (2 pts). In one patient a IVth ventricle tumor was removed in childhood. PMID:9003973

  9. Fractures of posterior teeth in adults.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Maxwell, E H; Braly, B V

    1986-02-01

    Examined in this study were 191 patients with 206 complete or incomplete fractures of posterior teeth. The patients ranged in age from 14 to 76 years, with 66.5% younger than 40 years. The number of fractures occurring in each arch was almost equal. The mandibular first molar was the most frequently fractured posterior tooth. The lingual cusps of mandibular molars fractured more often than did the buccal cusps of mandibular molars by a ratio of 2 to 1. In maxillary molars, buccal and lingual cusps fractured with almost equal frequency, but, in maxillary premolars, the lingual cusps fractured slightly more often than buccal cusps. Data gathered on the widths of the isthmuses of restorations in 109 teeth showed that fewer fractures occurred in teeth with more conservative restorations, with widths of isthmuses a quarter of the inter-cusp distance, and intact marginal ridges. PMID:3456380

  10. Primary brain tumors and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Cachia, David; Olar, Adriana; Armstrong, Terri S.; Gilbert, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurotoxic encephalopathic state associated with reversible cerebral vasogenic edema. It is an increasingly recognized occurrence in the oncology population. However, it is very uncommon in patients with primary brain tumors (PBTs). The aim of this study was to analyze the clinicoradiological features and report the clinical outcomes of PRES in PBT patients. Methods We identified 4 cases with PBT who developed PRES at MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) between 2012 and 2014. Clinical and radiological data were abstracted from their records. In addition, we also solicited 8 cases from the literature. Results The median age at PRES onset was 19 years, male-to-female ratio was 1:1, and the syndrome occurred in patients with ependymoma (n = 4), glioblastoma (n = 3), diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG; n = 3), juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (n = 1), and atypical meningioma (n = 1). Two glioblastomas and 2 DIPG cases received bevacizumab and vandetanib before the onset of symptoms, respectively. The most common clinical presentation was seizures (n = 7). Three MDACC patients recovered completely in 3–4 weeks after the onset of symptoms. One patient died due to active cancer and several comorbidities including PRES. Conclusions Hypertension seems to be the most important coexisting risk factor for development of PRES; however, the potential effects of chemotherapeutic agents in the pathogenesis of PRES should also be examined. The clinicoradiological course of PRES in PBT patients did not vary from the classical descriptions of PRES found in other causes. PRES must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in patients with PBTs presenting with seizures or acute encephalopathy. PMID:26034631

  11. Morphological and Hemodynamic Analysis of Mirror Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xi; Wu, Yongfa; Jiang, Che; Wang, Shengzhang; Huang, Qinghai; Liu, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hemodynamic factors are commonly believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis, progression, and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. In this study, we aimed to identify significant hemodynamic and morphological parameters that discriminate intracranial aneurysm rupture status using 3-dimensional-angiography and computational fluid dynamics technology. Materials and Methods 3D-DSA was performed in 8 patients with mirror posterior communicating artery aneurysms (Pcom-MANs). Each pair was divided into ruptured and unruptured groups. Five morphological and three hemodynamic parameters were evaluated for significance with respect to rupture. Results The normalized mean wall shear stress (WSS) of the aneurysm sac in the ruptured group was significantly lower than that in the unruptured group (0.52±0.20 versus 0.81±0.21, P = .012). The percentage of the low WSS area in the ruptured group was higher than that in the unruptured group (4.11±4.66% versus 0.02±0.06%, P = .018). The AR was 1.04±0.21 in the ruptured group, which was significantly higher than 0.70±0.17 in the unruptured group (P = .012). By contrast, parameters that had no significant differences between the two groups were OSI (P = .674), aneurysm size (P = .327), size ratio (P = .779), vessel angle (P = 1.000) and aneurysm inclination angle (P = 1.000). Conclusions Pcom-MANs may be a useful disease model to investigate possible causes of aneurysm rupture. The ruptured aneurysms manifested lower WSS, higher percentage of low WSS area, and higher AR, compared with the unruptured one. And hemodynamics is as important as morphology in discriminating aneurysm rupture status. PMID:23383184

  12. Ciprofloxacin-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Al Bu Ali, Waleed Hammad

    2013-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-neuroradiological syndrome characterised by numerous symptoms and of no specific aetiology. Headache, confusion, seizures, cortical visual disturbances or blindness are the key symptoms. As this syndrome is reversible and readily treated by interrupting or discontinuing the aetiology, it should sharply be acknowledged. Ciprofloxacin was associated with PRES in an adolescent male treated from chest infection. It was managed in a hospital intensive care unit and was observed until disappearance. PMID:23585504

  13. The mechanism of continence after posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, Herman S.; Angermeier, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    The standard of care after a pelvic fracture urethral injury is a repair via a one-stage anastomotic posterior urethroplasty using a step-wise perineal approach. The initial injury, immediate postoperative management, and surgical repair can all affect urinary continence in these patients. Proximal continence mechanisms, particularly the bladder neck, are particularly important in maintaining urinary continence in these patients. Patients with bladder neck dysfunction should be counselled about the greater risk of urinary incontinence. PMID:26019981

  14. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  15. Influence of COMT Genotype on Antero-posterior Cortical Functional Connectivity Underlying Interference Resolution.

    PubMed

    Jaspar, Mathieu; Manard, Marine; Dideberg, Vinciane; Bours, Vincent; Maquet, Pierre; Collette, Fabienne

    2016-02-01

    Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val(158)Met) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of executive functioning and its neural correlates. However, this attention has generally centered on the prefrontal cortices because of the well-known direct impact of COMT enzyme on these cerebral regions. In this study, we were interested in the modulating effect of COMT genotype on anterior and posterior brain areas underlying interference resolution during a Stroop task. More specifically, we were interested in the functional connectivity between the right inferior frontal operculum (IFop), an area frequently associated with inhibitory efficiency, and posterior brain regions involved in reading/naming processes (the 2 main non-executive determinants of the Stroop effect). The Stroop task was administered during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning to 3 groups of 15 young adults divided according to their COMT Val(158)Met genotype [Val/Val (VV), Val/Met (VM), and Met/Met (MM)]. Results indicate greater activity in the right IFop and the left middle temporal gyrus in homozygous VV individuals than in Met allele carriers. In addition, the VV group exhibited stronger positive functional connectivity between these 2 brain regions and stronger negative connectivity between the right IFop and left lingual gyrus. These results confirm the impact of COMT genotype on frontal functions. They also strongly suggest that differences in frontal activity influence posterior brain regions related to a non-executive component of the task. Particularly, changes in functional connectivity between anterior and posterior brain areas might correspond to compensatory processes for performing the task efficiently when the available dopamine level is low. PMID:25205659

  16. The diagnostic dilemma of the posterior mediastinal thymus: CT manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.D.; Weber, T.R.; Sequeira, F.W.; Vane, D.W.; King, H.

    1983-03-01

    Extension of the normal thymus into the posterior mediastinum is rare. The CT appearance of this anomaly in an infant is presented. A mass of soft-tissue density extended from the anterior mediastinum to the posterior chest wall. The absence of any tissue-cleavage plane in the lesion and a smooth continuous lateral margin are signs of posterior extension of the thymus, and they help to distinguish this from a normal anterior thymus being present with a posterior tumor.

  17. Indocyanine green angiography in posterior uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh V; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Gunasekaran, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Literature review for indocyanine green angiography and evaluate the role of indocyanine green angiogram (ICGA) in patients with posterior uveitis seen at a tertiary referral eye care centre. Detailed review of the literature on ICGA was performed. Retrospective review of medical records of patients with posterior uveitis and dual fundus and ICGA was done after institutional board approval. Eighteen patients (26 eyes) had serpiginous choroiditis out of which 12 patients had active choroiditis and six patients had healed choroiditis, six patients (12 eyes) had ampiginous choroiditis, six patients (12 eyes) had acute multifocal posterior placoid pigment epitheliopathy, eight patients (10 eyes) had multifocal choroiditis, four patients (eight eyes) had presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome, four patients (eight eyes) had presumed tuberculous choroiditis, two patients (four eyes) had multiple evanescent white dot syndrome and two patients (four eyes) had Vogt Koyanagi Harada (VKH) syndrome. The most characteristic feature noted on ICGA was the presence of different patterns of hypofluorescent dark spots, which were present at different stages of the angiogram. ICGA provides the clinician with a powerful adjunctive tool in choroidal inflammatory disorders. It is not meant to replace already proven modalities such as the fluorescein angiography, but it can provide additional information that is useful in establishing a more definitive diagnosis in inflammatory chorioretinal diseases associated with multiple spots. It still needs to be determined if ICGA can prove to be a follow up parameter to evaluate disease progression. PMID:23685486

  18. Electrocardiographic diagnosis of remote posterior wall myocardial infarction using unipolar posterior lead V9

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, M.W.; Imburgia, M.; King, T.R.; Fischer, K.C.; Kovach, K.L. )

    1989-09-01

    The accuracy of four electrocardiographic criteria for diagnosing remote posterior myocardial infarction was assessed prospectively in 369 patients undergoing exercise treadmill testing with thallium scintigraphy. Criteria included the following: (1) R-wave width greater than or equal to 0.04 s and R-wave greater than or equal to S-wave in V1; (2) R-wave greater than or equal to S-wave in V2; (3) T-wave voltage in V2 minus V6 greater than or equal to 0.38 mV (T-wave index); (4) Q-wave greater than or equal to 0.04 s in left paraspinal lead V9. Twenty-seven patients (7.3 percent) met thallium criteria for posterior myocardial infarction, defined as a persistent perfusion defect in the posterobase of the left ventricle. Sensitivities for the four criteria ranged from 4 to 56 percent, and specificities ranged from 64 to 99 percent. Posterior paraspinal lead V9 provided the best overall predictive accuracy (94 percent), positive predictive value (58 percent), and ability to differentiate patients with and without posterior myocardial infarction of any single criterion (p less than .0001). Combining the T-wave index with lead V9 further enhanced the diagnostic yield: the sensitivity for detecting posterior infarction by at least one of these criteria was 78 percent, and when both criteria were positive, specificity was 98.5 percent. It is concluded that a single, unipolar posterior lead in the V9 position is superior to standard 12-lead electrocardiographic criteria in diagnosing remote posterior myocardial infarction, and that combining V9 with the T-wave index maximizes the diagnostic yield.

  19. A Pilot Study on Clinical and Neuroimaging Characteristics of Chinese Posterior Cortical Atrophy: Comparison with Typical Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhihong; Cai, Li; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Shuling; Han, Tong; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Yuying; Wang, Xinping; Gao, Shuo; Ji, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a clinicoradiologic neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by predominant impairment of higher visual functions. Neuroimaging and neuropathological studies show that PCA is probably an atypical presentation of Alzheimer’s disease. However, in China PCA has rarely been studied and remains largely unknown. Our study therefore aimed to analyze the clinical manifestations and patterns of cerebral atrophy, amyloid beta deposition and regional glucose metabolism in Chinese PCA patients, comparing them directly with those of typical Alzheimer’s disease (TAD). Seven PCA patients, 6 TAD patients and 5 controls underwent neuropsychological assessment, MRI scan, 11C-PIB PET scan and 18F-FDG PET scan. Cerebral atrophy including ventricular enlargement, posterior atrophy and medial temporal lobe atrophy were evaluated with MRI. The uptake of 11C-PIB was quantified at the voxel level using the standardized uptake value ratio. Comparisons of regional cerebral glucose metabolism were calculated with statistical parametric mapping. PCA patients showed significant impairment on visuospatial function in neuropsychological assessment. And PCA patients showed more severe posterior atrophy and less severe left medial temporal lobe atrophy compared with TAD patients. The data from 11C-PIB PET scanning showed that amyloid beta deposition in PCA was comparable to TAD. Moreover, in PCA the results from 18F-FDG PET scanning revealed significant hypometabolism in the temporoparietooccipital region and identified specific hypometabolism in the right occipital lobe, compared with TAD. Our study thus provides a preliminary view of PCA in Chinese patients. A further study with a larger number of subjects would be recommended to confirm these findings. PMID:26267071

  20. Oligodendrogenesis after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruilan; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle of adult rodent brain generate oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) that disperse throughout the corpus callosum and striatum where some of OPCs differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Studies in animal models of stroke demonstrate that cerebral ischemia induces oligodendrogenesis during brain repair processes. This article will review evidence of stroke-induced proliferation and differentiation of OPCs that are either resident in white matter or are derived from SVZ neural progenitor cells and of therapies that amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis in ischemic brain. PMID:24194700

  1. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  2. Athetoid cerebral palsy with cysts in the putamen after hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, M A; Pennock, J M; Murdoch-Eaton, D M; Cowan, F M; Dubowitz, L M

    1992-01-01

    Three cases of athetoid cerebral palsy after hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) are reported. All three neonates had haemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia and thalami on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prior cranial ultrasound had detected the lesions in only two cases. In all three children athetoid movements began within the first year of life. Follow up MRI scans showed bilateral symmetrical cystic lesions in the posterior putamen. Although haemorrhagic lesions within the basal ganglia are a common MRI finding in neonates with HIE, few of these babies develop athetoid cerebral palsy. We believe this to be the first report of discrete cystic lesions found in the basal ganglia of children with athetoid cerebral palsy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1519987

  3. Stroke-like Phenomena Revealing Multifocal Cerebral Vasculitis in Pediatric Lyme Neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Mary; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Fluss, Joel

    2015-08-01

    Stroke-like presentation in Lyme neuroborreliosis is rare in the pediatric age group. We report a previously healthy 12-year-old boy who presented with acute left hemiparesis and meningeal signs. Neuroimaging failed to reveal any cerebral infarction but demonstrated a multifocal cerebral vasculitis involving small, medium and large-sized vessels affecting both the anterior and posterior circulation. Concentric contrast enhancement of the basilar artery was also observed. Further investigations and laboratory findings were consistent with Lyme neuroborreliosis. A rapidly favorable clinical outcome was obtained with appropriate antibiotic treatment along with antiaggregants and steroids. Lyme neuroborreliosis should be considered in the diagnostic differential, not only in adults but also among children, especially in the context of an unexplained cerebral vasculitis. PMID:25316727

  4. Initial experience of coiling cerebral aneurysms using the new Comaneci device.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Aimee Louise Deborah; Chandran, Arun; Puthuran, Mani; Goddard, Tony; Nahser, Hans; Patankar, Tufail

    2016-08-01

    We present our initial patient experience with an innovative temporary bridging device, the Comaneci (Rapid Medical, Israel), to assist in the coiling of cerebral aneurysms. The Comaneci device confers the same benefits as balloon remodeling but without the risks of parent artery occlusion. This alleviates time pressure on the clinician, and could reduce the risk of parent artery thrombosis. Three patients were treated with the Comaneci device. Two patients had acute ruptured posterior communicating aneurysms and one patient was treated electively for a carotico-ophthalmic aneurysm. Excellent occlusion of all three aneurysms was obtained. One patient developed a distal middle cerebral artery clot, that was treated with intravenous aspirin, with minor neurological consequences. These early results show that the Comaneci device can be used to achieve good cerebral aneurysm occlusion. Vessel patency is maintained throughout the procedure with potential advantages over conventional balloon assisted coiling. PMID:26138730

  5. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. PMID:16391455

  6. Cerebral pathology post heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Peteghem, S Van; Pauw, M De

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral pathology is frequently encountered post heart transplantation with a cumulative incidence of about 80% after 15 years. A broad spectrum of disease entities is reported, from minor abnormalities to life-threatening diseases. Although cerebral infections and malignancies are rare in this patient population, they have a high mortality rate. Since 1991, 171 orthotopic heart transplantations were performed at the Ghent University Hospital with a 10-year survival rate of 75%. Severe cerebral complications occurred in 10 patients, with epilepsy in 2 patients, cerebrovascular accidents in 4 patients, cerebral infections in 3 patients and a cerebral malignancy in 1 patient, resulting in a fatal outcome in 7 patients. We present four of these cases. PMID:25292206

  7. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: an under-recognized clinical emergency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2010-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by recurrent thunderclap headaches and reversible cerebral vasoconstrictions. RCVS is more common than previously thought and should be differentiated from aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage. RCVS can be spontaneous or evoked by pregnancy or exposure to vasoactive substances. Patients tend to be middle-aged women but pediatric patients have been seen. Up to 80% of sufferers have identifiable triggers. Thunderclap headaches tend to recur daily and last for a period of around 2 weeks, while the vasoconstrictions may last for months. About one-third of patients have blood pressure surges accompanying headache attacks. The potential complications of RCVS include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, ischemic strokes over watershed zones, cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance images including angiography and venography and lumbar punctures are the studies of choice, whereas catheter angiography should not be implemented routinely. Patients with a mean flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery greater than 120 cm/s shown by transcranial color-coded sonography have a greater risk of ischemic complications than those without. The pathophysiology of RCVS remains unknown; sympathetic hyperactivity may play a role. Open-label trials showed calcium channel blockers, such as nimodipine may be an effective treatment in prevention of thunderclap headache attacks. In severe cases, intra-arterial therapy may be considered. Most patients with RCVS recover without sequelae; however, relapse has been reported in a small proportion of patients. PMID:21179608

  8. [Unilateral Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunt for Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Takayuki; Sato, Daisuke; Endo, Shin; Kato, Syunichi

    2016-06-01

    The patient, a 79-year-old man, experienced a Hunt & Kosnik grade IV subarachnoid hemorrhage, presenting with sudden-onset coma and severe left hemiplegia. We performed cranial clipping surgery for a ruptured aneurysm on the right middle cerebral artery the same day. Post-operative recovery proceeded smoothly, with gradual improvements in disturbed consciousness and left hemiplegia. Three weeks post-operation, CT revealed low-density areas in the right frontal and temporal lobe, believed to be due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as hydrocephaly. We then performed a lumbo-peritoneal (L-P) shunt for the hydrocephaly. Two months later, the patient experienced shunt occlusion, and we performed a ventriculo-peritoneal (V-P) shunt revision (pressure: 6 cm H(2)O). Headaches, severe decline in cognitive function, and worsened left hemiplegia were observed seven weeks post-shunt revision. Cranial CT revealed widespread low-density areas in right posterior cerebral white matter. We suspected unilateral posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) after performing cranial MRI and cerebral angiography. Increasing the set pressure of the shunt improved the symptoms and radiographic findings. PRES is typically bilateral, and unilateral incidents are rare. This is the first report of unilateral PRES secondary to shunt operation. Its unilaterality appears to have been caused by unilateral brain damage or adhesions to the brain surface from the subarachnoid cerebral hemorrhage. Overdrainage post-shunt can also induce PRES. Diagnosis of PRES is more difficult in unilateral cases;practitioners must keep PRES in mind as a rare complication post-shunt operation. PMID:27270150

  9. Cerebral cartography and connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. PMID:25823870

  10. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  11. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-10-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  12. [Noradrenaline and cerebral aging].

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M; Albarede, J L; Lubin, S; Meyrignac, C

    1991-01-01

    The central functions of norepinephrine (NE) are a recent discovery: regulation of alertness and of the wakefulness-sleep cycle, maintenance of attention, memory and learning, cerebral plasticity and neuro-protection. The anatomical, histological, biochemical and physiological properties of the central noradrenergic system: extreme capacity for ramification and arborization; slow conduction, non-myelinized axons with extrasynaptic varicosities producing and releasing NE; frequency of co-transmission phenomena, and; neuromodulation with fiber effect responsible for improvement in the signal over background noise ratio and selection of significant stimuli form a true interface between the outside world and the central nervous system, notably for the neocortex in the context of the cognitive treatment of information. This central noradrenergic system is involved in the neurophysiology and the clinical features of cerebral aging (ideation-motor and cognitive function slowing down, loss of behavioral adjustment), neuro-degenerative disorders (SDAT, Parkinson's disease), certain aspects of depression and less obvious conditions (head injuries, sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents, sub-cortical dementia). The recent development of medications improving alertness (adrafinil, modafinil) with a pure central action and specifically noradrenergic, may contribute to an improvement in these multifactorial disorders. PMID:1864252

  13. Cerebral blood flow velocity in two patients with neonatal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, S; Seki, K; Yokota, S

    2001-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery of two patients who exhibited unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction during the neonatal period. Doppler studies demonstrated increases in cerebral blood flow velocity but decreases in the resistance index on the affected side of the middle cerebral artery in the neonate who developed hemiplegia with cystic encephalomalacia, although the neonate with normal neurologic outcome exhibited symmetric cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance index. The asymmetry in cerebral blood flow velocity measurements of both middle cerebral arteries may be useful to evaluate the severity of brain damage and predict the neurodevelopmental prognosis of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction. PMID:11377112

  14. Anterior and posterior fixation for delayed treatment of posterior atlantoaxial dislocation without fracture.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai Ming; Malhotra, Karan; Butler, Joseph S; Wu, Shi Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Posterior atlantoaxial dislocation (PAAD) without fracture of the odontoid process is a rare injury. Authors have variously reported closed or open reduction, followed by either anterior or posterior fixation, but there is no consensus on best treatment. We present a particularly unstable case of PAAD. Open reduction through a retropharyngeal approach with odontoidectomy was required for reduction. Anterior fixation with transarticular lag screws was required prior to posterior fixation with pedicle screws. Despite non-compliance with postoperative immobilisation, imaging at 20-month follow-up confirmed solid fusion. The patient is pain-free with a good range of movement of the neck and has returned to a manual job. Our case had a greater degree of instability than was previously reported, which necessitated 360° fixation. This is the first reported case of this treatment strategy, which provided a very stable fixation allowing fusion despite early movement and without causing undue stiffness. PMID:26516249

  15. Ventricular Volume Load Reveals the Mechanoelastic Impact of Communicating Hydrocephalus on Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Haubrich, Christina; Czosnyka, Marek; Diehl, Rolf; Smielewski, Peter; Czosnyka, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the progression of communicating hydrocephalus is associated with diminished cerebral perfusion and microangiopathy. If communicating hydrocephalus similarly alters the cerebrospinal fluid circulation and cerebral blood flow, both may be related to intracranial mechanoelastic properties as, for instance, the volume pressure compliance. Twenty-three shunted patients with communicating hydrocephalus underwent intraventricular constant-flow infusion with Hartmann's solution. The monitoring included transcranial Doppler (TCD) flow velocities (FV) in the middle (MCA) and posterior cerebral arteries (PCA), intracranial pressure (ICP), and systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). The analysis covered cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), the index of pressure-volume compensatory reserve (RAP), and phase shift angles between Mayer waves (3 to 9 cpm) in ABP and MCA-FV or PCA-FV. Due to intraventricular infusion, the pressure-volume reserve was exhausted (RAP) 0.84+/-0.1 and ICP was increased from baseline 11.5+/-5.6 to plateau levels of 20.7+/-6.4 mmHg. The ratio dRAP/dICP distinguished patients with large 0.1+/-0.01, medium 0.05+/-0.02, and small 0.02+/-0.01 intracranial volume compliances. Both M wave phase shift angles (r = 0.64; p<0.01) and CPP (r = 0.36; p<0.05) displayed a gradual decline with decreasing dRAP/dICP gradients. This study showed that in communicating hydrocephalus, CPP and dynamic cerebral autoregulation in particular, depend on the volume-pressure compliance. The results suggested that the alteration of mechanoelastic characteristics contributes to a reduced cerebral perfusion and a loss of autonomy of cerebral blood flow regulation. Results warrant a prospective TCD follow-up to verify whether the alteration of dynamic cerebral autoregulation may indicate a progression of communicating hydrocephalus. PMID:27415784

  16. Ventricular Volume Load Reveals the Mechanoelastic Impact of Communicating Hydrocephalus on Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Haubrich, Christina; Czosnyka, Marek; Diehl, Rolf; Smielewski, Peter; Czosnyka, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the progression of communicating hydrocephalus is associated with diminished cerebral perfusion and microangiopathy. If communicating hydrocephalus similarly alters the cerebrospinal fluid circulation and cerebral blood flow, both may be related to intracranial mechanoelastic properties as, for instance, the volume pressure compliance. Twenty-three shunted patients with communicating hydrocephalus underwent intraventricular constant-flow infusion with Hartmann’s solution. The monitoring included transcranial Doppler (TCD) flow velocities (FV) in the middle (MCA) and posterior cerebral arteries (PCA), intracranial pressure (ICP), and systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). The analysis covered cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), the index of pressure-volume compensatory reserve (RAP), and phase shift angles between Mayer waves (3 to 9 cpm) in ABP and MCA-FV or PCA-FV. Due to intraventricular infusion, the pressure-volume reserve was exhausted (RAP) 0.84+/-0.1 and ICP was increased from baseline 11.5+/-5.6 to plateau levels of 20.7+/-6.4 mmHg. The ratio dRAP/dICP distinguished patients with large 0.1+/-0.01, medium 0.05+/-0.02, and small 0.02+/-0.01 intracranial volume compliances. Both M wave phase shift angles (r = 0.64; p<0.01) and CPP (r = 0.36; p<0.05) displayed a gradual decline with decreasing dRAP/dICP gradients. This study showed that in communicating hydrocephalus, CPP and dynamic cerebral autoregulation in particular, depend on the volume-pressure compliance. The results suggested that the alteration of mechanoelastic characteristics contributes to a reduced cerebral perfusion and a loss of autonomy of cerebral blood flow regulation. Results warrant a prospective TCD follow-up to verify whether the alteration of dynamic cerebral autoregulation may indicate a progression of communicating hydrocephalus. PMID:27415784

  17. Usefulness of three posterior chest leads for the detection of posterior wall acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Aqel, Raed A; Hage, Fadi G; Ellipeddi, Pavani; Blackmon, Linda; McElderry, Hugh T; Kay, G Neal; Plumb, Vance; Iskandrian, Ami E

    2009-01-15

    A significant proportion of patients with myocardial infarction are missed upon initial presentation to the emergency department. The 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) has a low sensitivity for the detection of acute myocardial infarction, especially if the culprit lesion is in the left circumflex artery (LCA). This study was designed to evaluate the benefit of adding 3 posterior chest leads on top of the 12-lead ECG to detect ischemia resulting from LC disease, using a model of temporary balloon occlusion to produce ischemia. We studied 53 consecutive patients who underwent clinically indicated coronary interventions. At the time of coronary angiography, the balloon was inflated to produce complete occlusion of the proximal LCA. We recorded and analyzed the changes noted on the 15-lead ECG, which included 3 posterior leads in addition to the standard 12 leads. In response to acute occlusion of the LCA, the posterior chest leads showed more ST elevation than the other leads, and more patients had ST elevation in the posterior leads than in any other lead. The 15-lead ECG was able to detect>or=0.5 mm (74% vs 38%, p<0.0001) and >or=1 mm (62% vs 34%, p<0.0001) ST elevation in any 2 contiguous leads more frequently than the 12-lead ECG. In conclusion, the 15-lead ECG identified more patients with posterior myocardial wall ischemia because of temporary balloon occlusion of the LC than the 12-lead ECG. This information may enhance the detection of posterior MI in the emergency department and potentially facilitate early institution of reperfusion therapy. PMID:19121429

  18. Surgical options for posterior tibial plateau fracture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongwei; Wu, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate surgical methods and clinical effectiveness of posteromedial and posterolateral approaches for the posterior tibial plateau fracture. Method: 21 cases who received surgery through posterior approaches for the treatment of posterior tibial plateau fractures (PTPFs) were included. Results: 21 cases were subject to follow-up for 12-24 months (an average of 16.2 months). No cases developed incision inflammation, neurovascular injury, internal fixation loosening and breakage. All fractures were healed. No cases developed knee varus and valgus deformity and fracture dislocation. After surgery, Rasmussen score for knee joint functions was 13-30 points (a mean of 24.2). The results were excellent in 12 cases, good in 7 cases and fair in 2 cases. The percentage of excellent and good results was 90.5%. Rasmussen radiology score was 10-18 points (a mean of 15.6 points). The results were excellent in 13 cases, good in 7 cases and fair in 1 cases. The percentage of excellent and good results was 95.2%. 1 case had significant limited range of knee flexion and extension, which was improved after phase II release under arthroscopy combined with function exercise. 2 cases developed traumatic arthritis, which was relieved after intra-articular injection with sodium hyaluronate and oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Conclusion: The posteromedial and posterolateral approaches for PTPF is good for reduction and fixation of PTPF. The approaches have benefits such as clear exposure, convenient placement of internal fixation, less trauma and good clinical outcome. PMID:26885086

  19. Delayed recurrent stroke in a young patient with acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy.

    PubMed

    Matamala, José Manuel; Feuerhake, Walter; Verdugo, Renato

    2013-11-01

    Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) is a chorioretinal disease that causes acute binocular visual disturbance with characteristic funduscopic lesions at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium. APMPPE has been associated with multiple neurologic complications, including cerebrovascular diseases. We report a 15-year-old patient who had bilateral APMPPE, which was successfully treated with corticosteroids. One year later he presented with transient dysarthria and right hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral ischemic lesions in both lenticular nuclei and corona radiata. Brain MRI performed 3 months later revealed a new asymptomatic ischemic lesion. Cerebral angiography showed diffuse multifocal segmental vessel narrowing. The cerebrospinal fluid showed mononuclear pleocytosis in keeping with vasculitis. We started corticosteroid treatment, which lasted 10 months. Currently, after 2 years of clinical and neuroradiologic follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and shows no worsening of the cerebrovascular lesions. PMID:23186913

  20. Distinct Roles of the Prefrontal and Posterior Parietal Cortices in Response Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Qi, Xue-Lian; Constantinidis, Christos

    2016-03-29

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex have been implicated in the planning of movements and inhibition of inappropriate responses, though their precise roles in these functions are not known. To address this question, we trained monkeys to perform memory-guided saccade and anti-saccade tasks and compared neural responses in the same animals. A population of neurons with no motor responses was also activated by a stimulus appearing out of the receptive field and could therefore mediate vector inversion. These neurons were found almost exclusively in the prefrontal cortex. Prefrontal cortical activity better predicted the level of performance in the task. Representation of the saccade goal also peaked in the prefrontal cortex at a time that was predictive of reaction time. These results suggest that the prefrontal cortex is the primary site of vector inversion in the cerebral cortex and explain the importance of this area in response inhibition. PMID:26997283

  1. Distinct Roles of the Prefrontal and Posterior Parietal Cortices in Response Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Qi, Xue-Lian; Constantinidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The dorsolateral prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex have been implicated in planning of movements and inhibition of inappropriate responses, though their precise roles in these functions are not known. To address this question we trained monkeys to perform memory guided saccade and anti-saccade tasks and compared neural responses in the same animals. A population of neurons with no motor responses was also activated by a stimulus appearing out of the receptive field and could therefore mediate vector inversion. These neurons were found almost exclusively in the prefrontal cortex. Prefrontal cortical activity better predicted the level of performance in the task. Representation of the saccade goal also peaked in the prefrontal cortex at a time that was predictive of reaction time. These results suggest that prefrontal cortex is the primary site of vector inversion in the cerebral cortex and explain the importance of this area in response inhibition. PMID:26997283

  2. Spontaneous healing and complete disappearance of a ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Su, Tsung-Ming; Cheng, Ching-Hsiao; Chen, Wu-Fu; Hsu, Shih-Wei

    2014-05-01

    A 7-month-old baby presented with a 4-day history of drowsiness and vomiting after a falling accident. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, and variable stages of subdural hematoma in bilateral occipital and left temporal subdural spaces. A partially thrombosed aneurysm was noted in the right craniocervical junction. Ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral retinal petechial hemorrhages. Conventional cerebral angiography revealed a dissecting aneurysm in the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Endovascular embolization was suggested, but the family refused. After conservative treatment, follow-up MRI revealed that the PICA aneurysm had remodeled and ultimately disappeared completely at the 10th month. This case illustrates the relatively plastic nature of intracranial aneurysms in pediatric patients. More studies are necessary to clarify the natural history of spontaneously thrombosed aneurysms to assist in their overall management. PMID:24580645

  3. Complications when augmenting the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, Paul; Melnick, Philip R; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary posterior edentulous region presents a challenge when planning for restoring missing teeth with a dental implant. The available bone in such cases is often not dense and not adequate for the placement of a properly sized implant because of maxillary sinus pneumatization and alveolar bone loss. Maxillary sinus lift is a predictable procedure to provide adequate bone height for the purpose of implant placement. However, complications are encountered during or after the execution of the sinus lift procedure. In this article, the prevention and management of maxillary sinus complications are discussed. PMID:25434561

  4. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to posterior fossa tumor.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Mamta; Agrawal, Vikrant; Agrawal, Rajiv; Pramod, D S R

    2010-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is by no means an uncommon entity presenting as typical or atypical pain syndrome with a standard treatment protocol consisting of medical and surgical therapies. The diagnosis of TN is mainly dependent on the characteristics of symptoms conveyed by the patient and the clinical presentation. Careful history taking, proper interpretation of the signs and symptoms and cranial nerve assessment are necessary for proper diagnosis. Here, we report a case of TN, treated for dental problems and then for neuralgia with only short-term relief. Subsequently, the patient underwent neuroimaging and was found to be having an uncommon space-occupying lesion in the posterior cranial fossa. PMID:22442556

  5. Gait stability in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as children with CP. In doing so, we tested the FPE’s sensitivity to the assumptions needed to calculate this measure, as well as the ability of the FPE to detect differences in stability between children with CP and TD children, and differences in walking speed. Participants were asked to walk at two different speeds, while gait kinematics were recorded. From these data, the FPE, as well as the error that violations of assumptions of the FPE could have caused were calculated. The results showed that children with CP walked with marked instabilities in anterior-posterior and mediolateral directions. Furthermore, errors caused by violations of assumptions in calculation of FPE were only small (~1.5 cm), while effects of walking speed (~20 cm per m/s increase in walking speed) and group (~5cm) were much larger. These results suggest that the FPE may be used to quantify gait stability in TD children and children with CP. PMID:23500163

  6. Cerebral venous angiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.; Gilmor, R.L.; Richmond, B.

    1984-04-01

    Several unusual cases of cerebral venous angiomas as well as some characteristic cases are reported. The characteristic angiographic feature is that of a collection of dilated medullary veins draining into a single large draining vein, which appears first in the early venous phase and persists into the late venous phase of the arteriogram. Computed tomography (CT) was abnormal in 12/13 cases. The draining vein was the most common abnormality identified on CT. Coronal and sagittal reconstruction may be helpful in demonstrating the draining vein. A case of large twin venous angiomas, a case of hemorrhage from a venous angioma, and a case of a venous angioma with an incidentally associated glioblastoma are presented.

  7. Hydatidosis of the liver and posterior mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Quail, Jacob F; Gramins, Daniel L; Dutton, William D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cystic echinococcus (CE) is an endemic zoonosis secondary to infection by the larval form of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. An intermediate host, humans enter the organism’s life cycle by exposure to infected canid feces. The liver is the most common location of CE while mediastinal hydatid cysts are rarely reported. Presentation of case We report a case of synchronous CE of the liver and posterior mediastinum treated sequentially using chemotherapy, percutaneous aspiration with injection of a scolicidal agent and re-aspiration (PAIR) and then staged minimally-invasive surgeries. Discussion Synchronous CE involving the liver and posterior mediastinum is rare. The treatment of hydatid liver and mediastinal disease is multimodal including chemotherapy, percutaneous and laparoscopic or open surgical interventions. One option for controlled puncture of hepatic and mediastinal CE includes PAIR followed by surgery. Conclusion The sequential use of chemotherapy and PAIR followed by surgery provides another treatment strategy for management of CE. We believe this strategy may be used safely in locations without endemic CE, including most regions of the United States. PMID:25562598

  8. Traumatic posterior dislocation of hip in children.

    PubMed

    Kutty, S; Thornes, B; Curtin, W A; Gilmore, M F

    2001-02-01

    Traumatic posterior dislocation of the hip joint in children is an uncommon injury. It constitutes a true orthopedic emergency. It makes up over 80% of pediatric hip dislocations. In children, it can occur as a result of minimal trauma, which is attributed to a soft pliable acetabulum and ligamentous laxity. In skeletally mature adolescents, a greater force is required to dislocate the hip joint. Delay in reduction is associated with long-term complications such as avascular necrosis and degenerative arthritis. Avascular necrosis is related to the duration of dislocation. A poorer prognosis is associated with delay in reduction beyond 6 hours, advanced skeletal maturity, or multiple traumas. Prompt reduction minimizes complications. We report two cases of traumatic posterior dislocation of hip in children aged 3 and 14 years. Both were reduced within 6 hours of dislocation, and review at 6 months revealed normal examination and no evidence of any post-traumatic changes. Post-reduction treatment remains without a consensus. This review highlights the clinical presentation, management, and time-sensitive complications of the injury. PMID:11265904

  9. The posterior calf fascial free flap.

    PubMed

    Walton, R L; Matory, W E; Petry, J J

    1985-12-01

    Six posterior calf fascial free flaps were employed to reconstruct defects of the upper and lower extremities. One flap failed due to a constricting dressing. Two flaps sustained partial loss secondary to bleeding and hematoma formation. One flap dehisced at the distal suture line due to mobility of an underlying fracture. All surviving flaps eventually healed and resulted in stable, thin coverage. Donor-site morbidity has been minimal. Shortcomings of this flap model have been defined in the peculiarities of its thinness, diffuse vascular oozing, the extent of the vascular territory, and in postoperative monitoring. These problems are analyzed and recommendations for their resolution are presented. Fascia represents a unique tissue which offers an exciting new dimension in the reconstruction of certain defects--particularly those in which thinness is a desirable option. In the posterior calf model, the inclusion of fat represents an alternative modification that allows the surgeon to tailor the design to a variety of problems where fascia alone is too thin and a cutaneous flap is too thick. This concept may find its greatest application in wounds involving the hand or foot. We believe that this and other fascial flap prototypes may offer an ideal solution for reconstruction of major wounds of the extremities. PMID:3906718

  10. Mycophenolate-Induced Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Bhavik; Khajuria, Mansi; Agrawal, Yashwant

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman presented with diffuse anasarca and shortness of breath. Workup revealed a creatinine of 3.3 and a glomerular filtration rate of 17. The patient was also found to be pancytopenic with evidence of hemolytic anemia. A renal biopsy showed evidence of stage IV lupus nephritis with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Her lupus was further classified as ANA negative and anti-dsDNA positive. Mycophenolate and triweekly hemodialysis were started along with a steroid burst of methylprednisolone 1 g for 3 days followed by prednisone 60 mg daily. Four days after discharge, the patient represented with a witnessed 3-minute seizure involving bowel incontinence, altered mental status, and tongue biting. She was given 2 mg intravenous lorazepam and loaded with 1000 mg levetiracetam for seizure prophylaxis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head revealed bilateral posterior hemispheric subcortical edema, and the diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was made. Mycophenolate was immediately discontinued and replaced with cyclophosphamide. Strict blood pressure control below 140/90 mm Hg was maintained initially with intravenous nicardipine drip and then transitioned to oral nifedipine, clonidine, losartan, and minoxidil. A repeat head magnetic resonance imaging 8 days later showed resolved subcortical edema consistent with the patient's improved mental status. No permanent neurologic sequelae were recorded as a result of this hospital episode. PMID:25933141

  11. Management of an Uncomplicated Posterior Elbow Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Blackard, Douglas; Sampson, Jo-Ann

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To present a case of an uncomplicated posterior elbow dislocation in a US World Cup athlete and discuss her rehabilitation. Background: Traditional protocol for management of this injury has been splint immobilization for several weeks, but research suggests a shortened duration of immobilization and early active motion. Differential Diagnosis: Elbow dislocation with possible fracture. Treatment: The dislocation was reduced and a compression bandage and sling were applied. The sports medicine staff and athlete determined that rehabilitation would involve limited immobilization with a posterior splint. Also, active range-of- motion exercises were to be incorporated early in the range-of- motion program to decrease pain at the articulation. Uniqueness: The athlete was not immobilized and her aggressive five-phase rehabilitation program progressed according to decrease in inflammation and increase in range of motion and strength. Conclusions: Shortened immobilization and return to World Championship competition 6 weeks postinjury had no longterm adverse effects on the athlete. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4.Fig. 5. PMID:16558436

  12. Prehension Movements in a Patient (AC) with Posterior Parietal Cortex Damage and Posterior Callosal Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frak, Victor; Paulignan, Yves; Jeannerod, Marc; Michel, Francois; Cohen, Henri

    2006-01-01

    Prehension movements of the right hand were recorded in a right-handed man (AC), with an injury to the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and with a section of the left half of the splenium. The kinematic analysis of AC's grasping movements in direct and perturbed conditions was compared to that of five control subjects. A novel effect in…

  13. Structural network alterations and neurological dysfunction in cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Reijmer, Yael D; Fotiadis, Panagiotis; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Salat, David H; Schultz, Aaron; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Ayres, Alison M; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Rosas, Diana; Schwab, Kristin; Leemans, Alexander; Biessels, Geert-Jan; Rosand, Jonathan; Johnson, Keith A; Viswanathan, Anand; Gurol, M Edip; Greenberg, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a common form of small-vessel disease and an important risk factor for cognitive impairment. The mechanisms linking small-vessel disease to cognitive impairment are not well understood. We hypothesized that in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy, multiple small spatially distributed lesions affect cognition through disruption of brain connectivity. We therefore compared the structural brain network in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy to healthy control subjects and examined the relationship between markers of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related brain injury, network efficiency, and potential clinical consequences. Structural brain networks were reconstructed from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in 38 non-demented patients with probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy (69 ± 10 years) and 29 similar aged control participants. The efficiency of the brain network was characterized using graph theory and brain amyloid deposition was quantified by Pittsburgh compound B retention on positron emission tomography imaging. Global efficiency of the brain network was reduced in patients compared to controls (0.187 ± 0.018 and 0.201 ± 0.015, respectively, P < 0.001). Network disturbances were most pronounced in the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes. Among patients, lower global network efficiency was related to higher cortical amyloid load (r = -0.52; P = 0.004), and to magnetic resonance imaging markers of small-vessel disease including increased white matter hyperintensity volume (P < 0.001), lower total brain volume (P = 0.02), and number of microbleeds (trend P = 0.06). Lower global network efficiency was also related to worse performance on tests of processing speed (r = 0.58, P < 0.001), executive functioning (r = 0.54, P = 0.001), gait velocity (r = 0.41, P = 0.02), but not memory. Correlations with cognition were independent of age, sex, education level, and other magnetic resonance imaging

  14. Cerebral Laterality and Verbal Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jay L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Research suggests that we process information by way of two distinct and functionally separate coding systems. Their location, somewhat dependent on cerebral laterality, varies in right- and left-handed persons. Tests this dual coding model. (Editor/RK)

  15. Cognitive Deficits and Cerebral Asymmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Dirk J.

    1982-01-01

    Research concerning cerebral asymmetry and its effect on scholastic achievement, reading disabilities, learning disabilities, and linguistic competence is reviewed in an exploration of brain hemisphere-specific etiologies of dyslexia. (CJ)

  16. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Henoch-Schonlein Purpura and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fidan, Kibriya; Kandur, Yasar; Ucar, Murat; Gucuyener, Kivilcim; Soylemezoglu, Oguz

    2016-07-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological syndrome, composed of symptoms such as headache, seizures, visual disturbances, lethargy, confusion, stupor, focal neurologic findings and radiological findings of bilateral gray and white matter abnormalities suggestive of edema in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemispheres. PRES is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if it is not expeditiously recognized. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) represents the most sensitive imaging technique for recognizing PRES. PRES has been seen in various clinical settings including renal disorders such as acute glomerulonephritis, lupus nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and drug usage such as calcineurin inhibitors. We aimed to present two study cases for such clinical setting. In this report, we present two patients with PRES in whom the primary diagnosis was hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP). Both of them were treated with anticonvulsant and proper antihypertensive drugs. A repeated MRI scan of the head, an ophthalmologic assessment, and a follow-up electroencephalogram produced normal results with no sequelae. Early recognition of PRES as a complication during different diseases and therapies in childhood may facilitate the appropriate treatment, so that intensive treatment should be performed as soon as possible to avoid neurological sequelae. PMID:27298664

  17. Effect of posterior decompression extent on biomechanical parameters of the spinal cord in cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Khuyagbaatar, Batbayar; Kim, Kyungsoo; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is a common cause of the cervical myelopathy due to compression of the spinal cord. Patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament usually require the decompression surgery, and there is a need to better understand the optimal surgical extent with which sufficient decompression without excessive posterior shifting can be achieved. However, few quantitative studies have clarified this optimal extent for decompression of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. We used finite element modeling of the cervical spine and spinal cord to investigate the effect of posterior decompression extent for continuous-type cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament on changes in stress, strain, and posterior shifting that occur with three different surgical methods (laminectomy, laminoplasty, and hemilaminectomy). As posterior decompression extended, stress and strain in the spinal cord decreased and posterior shifting of the cord increased. The location of the decompression extent also influenced shifting. Laminectomy and laminoplasty were very similar in terms of decompression results, and both were superior to hemilaminectomy in all parameters tested. Decompression to the extents of C3-C6 and C3-C7 of laminectomy and laminoplasty could be considered sufficient with respect to decompression itself. Our findings provide fundamental information regarding the treatment of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and can be applied to patient-specific surgical planning. PMID:26951839

  18. Evaluation of posterior fossa lesions by computer assisted tomography (CAT).

    PubMed

    Lott, T; El Gammal, T; Volcan, I

    1977-07-01

    Valuable neuroradiologic information can be obtained with routine examination of the posterior fossa by computer assisted tomography (CAT). The diagnosis can be difficult in the posterior fossa due to the relatively small size of the compartment and its proximities to large bony masses and air in the mastoid cells. However, many lesions can be accurately diagnosed when close attention is given to anatomic detail and the frequent use of contrast enhancement. We introduced a new CAT classification of posterior fossa neoplasms. PMID:877637

  19. Posterior Cruciate Ligament: Focus on Conflicting Issues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Seuk

    2013-01-01

    There is little consensus on how to optimally reconstruct the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the natural history of injured PCL is also unclear. The graft material (autograft vs. allograft), the type of tibial fixation (tibial inlay vs. transtibial tunnel), the femoral tunnel position within the femoral footprint (isometric, central, or eccentric), and the number of bundles in the reconstruction (1 bundle vs. 2 bundles) are among the many decisions that a surgeon must make in a PCL reconstruction. In addition, there is a paucity of information on rehabilitation after reconstruction of the PCL and posterolateral structures. This article focused on the conflicting issues regarding the PCL, and the scientific rationales behind some critical points are discussed. PMID:24340144

  20. The neuropsychiatric profile of posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Isella, Valeria; Villa, Giulia; Mapelli, Cristina; Ferri, Francesca; Appollonio, Ildebrando Marco; Ferrarese, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed scores obtained at the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) by 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) and contrasted it with 20 patients having Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients with hallucinations and delusions were not included due to the high probability of a diagnosis of Lewy body disease. Prevalence of behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD) was 95% in the PCA group, the most frequent being apathy and anxiety. Cluster analysis on NPI subscales highlighted a behavioral subsyndrome characterized by agitated temper and irritability. Depression, anxiety, and apathy did not cluster with any other BPSD nor with each other. The PCA group showed a significantly higher proportion of anxious patients and worse anxiety score than patients with AD. No correlation was found between NPI data and demographic, clinical, or neuropsychological features nor were there significant differences for the same variables between anxious and nonanxious cases with PCA. In agreement with anecdotal reports, anxiety seems particularly relevant in PCA. PMID:25330926

  1. Arthroscopic Reverse Remplissage for Posterior Instability.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Chad D; Hanzlik, Shane R; Pearson, Sara E; Caldwell, Paul E

    2016-02-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation is an unusual injury often associated with electrical shock or seizure. As with anterior instability, patients frequently present with an impaction injury to the anterior aspect of the humeral head known as a "reverse Hill-Sachs lesion." The treatment of this bony defect is controversial, and multiple surgical procedures to fill the defect in an effort to decrease recurrence have been described. Most of the reports have focused on an open approach using variations of lesser tuberosity and subscapularis transfers, bone allograft, and even arthroplasty to assist with persistent instability. We advocate an arthroscopic technique that involves a suture anchor-based distal tenodesis of the subscapularis tendon or a reverse remplissage procedure. PMID:27073776

  2. Iodine-125 radiation of posterior uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S.

    1987-12-01

    Twenty-eight cases of posterior choroidal melanoma were treated with iodine-125 in gold eye plaques. Eleven cases were located within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve (group A), nine were within 3.0 mm of the fovea (group B), and eight were within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve and fovea (group C). The mean follow-up of group A was 46.3 months; group B, 25.5 months; and group C, 42.7 months. Complications included macular edema, cataract and tumor growth. Visual acuity remained within two lines of that tested preoperatively for 4 of 11 patients in group A, 4 of 9 in group B, and 5 of 8 in group C. These results with iodine-125 suggest it as an appropriate treatment for patients with choroidal melanoma located near optic nerve and/or macula.

  3. Rapid Maxillary Expansion without Posterior Anchorage.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Adauê; Amaral, Cássia

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate an alternative form of maxillary expansion anchored with mini-implants. A patient 12 years, class III in permanent canine teeth, with multiple agenesis of upper posterior teeth was treated with the aid of four mini-implants in the palate and Haas modified type appliance. During the period of expansion, an interincisal diastema was observed as the first clinical sign of disjunction of the sutures. After correction of cross bite, the expansion of the palate was confirmed by upper occlusal radiographs. Thus, the evaluations showed that the technique was effective and that new scientific studies should be conducted to further develop this subject. Keywords: Appliances; Biomechanics; Implants; Malocclusions PMID:27319047

  4. Ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumour of the posterior tongue.

    PubMed

    Cardin, Marie-Josée; Fiset, Pierre Olivier; Zeitouni, Anthony G; Caglar, Derin

    2014-01-01

    Ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumor (ECMT) is a rare benign neoplasm arising in the tongue. With only 45 cases reported in the literature, there are several unique features defining this lesion. Firstly, almost all patients present with an asymptomatic slow growing mass on the anterior dorsum of the tongue. At the microscopic level, it is recognizable as a well-circumscribed unencapsulated proliferation of uniform round to fusiform cells embedded in a chondromyxoid matrix. Lastly, the immunohistochemistry profile is characterised by positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein and frequent positivity for S-100 and cytokeratins. We report a case of a mass located on the posterior dorsum of the tongue and meeting the aforementioned morphological and immunohistochemical criteria of ECMT. PMID:24288100

  5. Tibial Tuberosity-Posterior Cruciate Ligament Distance.

    PubMed

    Daynes, Jake; Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Farr, Jack

    2016-08-01

    When trochlear dysplasia is present, it is difficult to measure the tibial tuberosity to trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance. A new measurement to assess tuberosity position was recently described by Seitlinger et al, which avoids the difficulty of identifying the TG as it references the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). To evaluate the reproducibility of the Seitlinger et al findings, 42 knees in 41 patients with a documented history of recurrent patellar instability and 84 knees in patients with no history of patellar instability or patellofemoral symptoms were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. The TT-PCL distance was increased in the instability group (mean, 21.6 mm) compared with the control group (mean, 19.0 mm). The TT-PCL distance is an independent risk factor for patients with recurrent patellar instability. Its role in surgical planning remains to be determined. PMID:26509659

  6. Arthroscopic Reverse Remplissage for Posterior Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Chad D.; Hanzlik, Shane R.; Pearson, Sara E.; Caldwell, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation is an unusual injury often associated with electrical shock or seizure. As with anterior instability, patients frequently present with an impaction injury to the anterior aspect of the humeral head known as a “reverse Hill-Sachs lesion.” The treatment of this bony defect is controversial, and multiple surgical procedures to fill the defect in an effort to decrease recurrence have been described. Most of the reports have focused on an open approach using variations of lesser tuberosity and subscapularis transfers, bone allograft, and even arthroplasty to assist with persistent instability. We advocate an arthroscopic technique that involves a suture anchor–based distal tenodesis of the subscapularis tendon or a reverse remplissage procedure. PMID:27073776

  7. Is Posterior Leaflet Extension and Associated Commissurotomy

    PubMed Central

    Omeroglu, Suat Nail; Kirali, Kaan; Mansuroglu, Denyan; Goksedef, Deniz; Balkanay, Mehmet; Ipek, Gokhan; Isik, Omer; Yakut, Cevat

    2004-01-01

    In this prospective study, the long-term effect of posterior leaflet extension with glutaraldehyde-preserved autologous pericardium and associated mitral valve commissurotomy was investigated in patients with mixed mitral valve disease of rheumatic origin. Mitral commissurotomy and posterior leaflet extension using a pericardial patch were performed in 25 patients from 1 January 1994 through 31 December 1995 for mixed mitral valve disease. Preoperatively, no patient had chordal rupture or papillary muscle dysfunction. Four patients had left atrial thrombosis. The mean age was 35.7 ± 15.4 years. Associated procedures were tricuspid annuloplasty in 4 patients, aortic annuloplasty in 3, aortic and tricuspid annuloplasty in 1, and aortic homograft replacement in 1. There were no early deaths. One patient died 2 years after surgery due to noncardiac causes. Mitral valve area increased from 1.53 ± 0.63 cm2 to 2 ± 0.33 cm2 (P = 0.09), and left atrial diameter decreased from 5.8 ± 1 cm to 4.86 ± 1.27 cm (P = 0.07) after 6.1 ± 0.7 years (range, 5.5 to 7.1 years). Mitral insufficiency was reduced significantly, from grade 2.65 ± 0.9 to grade 1.2 ± 0.9 (P = 0.007). Functional capacity improved in all patients (New York Heart Association functional class, 3 ± 0.58 preoperatively vs 1.44 ± 0.82 postoperatively; P = 0.001). Three patients required reoperation and valve replacement. This type of reconstruction may be a good alternative for patients who are not able to use anticoagulant therapy. Long-term results of this technique are acceptable; however, the risk of reoperation is an important disadvantage in these young patients. PMID:15562843

  8. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ≈4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter∗∗ procedure probably provides the most successful results. PMID:26019982

  9. Diagnostics for insufficiencies of posterior calculations in Bayesian signal inference.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Sebastian; Oppermann, Niels; Ensslin, Torsten A

    2013-11-01

    We present an error-diagnostic validation method for posterior distributions in Bayesian signal inference, an advancement of a previous work. It transfers deviations from the correct posterior into characteristic deviations from a uniform distribution of a quantity constructed for this purpose. We show that this method is able to reveal and discriminate several kinds of numerical and approximation errors, as well as their impact on the posterior distribution. For this we present four typical analytical examples of posteriors with incorrect variance, skewness, position of the maximum, or normalization. We show further how this test can be applied to multidimensional signals. PMID:24329375

  10. Simultaneous correction of functional posterior cross bite and midline shift

    PubMed Central

    Arvinth, R.; Rana, Shailendra Singh; Duggal, Ritu; Kharbanda, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent cause of functional posterior crossbite is the reduction in width of the maxillary dental arch. This posterior crossbite is associated with anterior crowding which is presented as an infrapositioned canine or a palatally positioned lateral incisor on one side; this leads to an upper midline shift toward the crowded side. The present case report shows the management of posterior crossbite with functional shift and upper midline shift simultaneously without adverse side effects. In this case, rapid maxillary expansion along with fixed appliance is used to correct posterior crossbite with the upper dental midline shift using reciprocal action of elastic transseptal fibers.

  11. [Surgical treatment of atlanto-axial dislocation in a patient of athetoid cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Hojo, M; Nakahara, I; Tanaka, M; Oda, Y; Kikuchi, H

    1994-09-01

    The authors report a case of successful surgical treatment of atlanto-axial dislocation (AAD) secondary to athetoid cerebral palsy. A 61-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital in July 1993 complaining of progressive weakness in the right upper extremity and gait disturbance. She had been suffering from athetoid movements of her face, neck and arms due to cerebral palsy. Neurological examinations on admission revealed down-beat nystagmus on downward gazing, motor weakness of extremities, pallhypesthesia, hyperreflexia exaggerated in the right side and bilateral positive pathological reflexes. Lateral tomogram of the upper cervical spine demonstrated instability of the atlanto-axial joint, increased atlanto-dental interval (ADI) by 5.5 mm (in flexion), and narrowed canal at C1 level. Myelogram showed narrowed dural sac and angulation of the spinal cord at C1 level. A halo vest was applied two days before operation for reduction of the atlanto-axial junction and external fixation. She underwent posterior internal fixation using a Hartshill Ransford Loop combined with posterior decompression. This loop was secured to the occiput, C1, C2 and C3 by sublaminar wiring, and foramen magnum decompression and laminectomy of C1 were performed. Postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative plain X-ray film, tomogram and computed tomography demonstrated good fixation (ADI was 2.5 mm) and excellent stability. There has been no problem during 6 months since the operation. It is known that involuntary movements in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy sometimes cause cervical spondylosis (especially at C3/4 and C4/5 level). Recently, AAD due to athetoid cerebral palsy has been reported. Almost every case of AAD secondary to athetoid cerebral palsy is combined with incompetence of the odontoid process.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8090275

  12. Positron emission tomography in the newborn: extensive impairment of regional cerebral blood flow with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, J.J.; Herscovitch, P.; Perlman, J.M.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) now provides the capability of measuring regional cerebral blood flow with high resolution and little risk. In this study, we utilized PET in six premature infants (920 to 1,200 g) with major intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement to measure regional cerebral blood flow during the acute period (5 to 17 days of age). Cerebral blood flow was determined after intravenous injection of H/sub 2/O, labeled with the positron-emitting isotope, /sup 15/O. Findings were similar and dramatic in all six infants. In the area of hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement, little or no cerebral blood flow was detected. However, in addition, surprisingly, a marked two- to fourfold reduction in cerebral blood flow was observed throughout the affected hemisphere, well posterior and lateral to the intracerebral hematoma, including cerebral white matter and, to a lesser extent, frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex. In the one infant studied a second time, ie, at 3 months of age, the extent and severity of the decreased cerebral blood flows in the affected hemisphere were similar to those observed on the study during the neonatal period. At the three autopsies, the affected left hemisphere showed extensive infarction, corroborating the PET scans. These observations, the first demonstration of the use of PET in the determination of regional cerebral blood flow in the newborn, show marked impairments in regional cerebral blood flow in the hemisphere containing an apparently restricted intracerebral hematoma, indicating that the hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement is only a component of a much larger lesion, ischemic in basic nature, ie, an infarction. This large ischemic lesion explains the poor neurologic outcome in infants with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement.

  13. [Plasma osmolarity and cerebral volume].

    PubMed

    Boulard, G

    2001-02-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, the osmolarity of extracellular fluids (ECFs) and natremia are controlled by two regulatory mechanisms modulating the water balance and sodium outflow from information collected by the osmoreceptors and baroreceptors, respectively. As well, under normal physiological conditions, water and electrolytes of brain ECFs are secreted by the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Furthermore, isotonicity is present on both sides of the blood-brain barrier. In the event of systemic osmolarity disorders, water transport subject to osmosis laws occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier. In the case of plasmatic hyperosmolarity cerebral dehydration is observed, while cerebral edema occurs in the contrary case. However, plasmatic osmolarity disorders have less effect on the cerebral volume when their introduction is slow. Experimentation in acute conditions shows that measured variations of the cerebral water content are lower than calculated variations, thus suggesting the existence of an adaptive mechanism, that is, the cerebral osmoregulation which limits the variation of the volume of brain cells by modulating their osmoactive molecule content. These osmoactive molecules are, on the one hand, the electrolytes, which are early and rapidly mobilized, and, on the other hand, the organic osmoles (amino acids, etc.), whose secretion is slower and delayed. This phenomenon should be taken into account in the treatment of osmolarity disorders. Thus, the related-risk of treatment for natremia disorders is therapeutic reversal of the osmotic gradient at the level of the blood-brain barrier. This reversal, which corresponds to a second osmotic stress, requires the implementation of a new procedure of cerebral osmoregulation in the opposite direction of the preceding one. As successive osmotic stresses decrease the effectiveness of brain osmoregulation, the risk for cerebral dehydration and pontine myelinolysis increases when the treatment

  14. Deep Posterior Compartment Strength and Foot Kinematics in Subjects With Stage II Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Christopher; Flemister, Adolph S.; Houck, Jeff R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tibialis posterior muscle weakness has been documented in subjects with Stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) but the effect of weakness on foot structure remains unclear. The association between strength and flatfoot kinematics may guide treatment such as the use of strengthening programs targeting the tibialis posterior muscle. Materials and Methods Thirty Stage II PTTD subjects (age; 58.1 ± 10.5 years, BMI 30.6 ± 5.4) and 15 matched controls (age; 56.5 ± 7.7 years, BMI 30.6 ± 3.6) volunteered for this study. Deep Posterior Compartment strength was measured from both legs of each subject and the strength ratio was used to compare each subject’s involved side to their uninvolved side. A 20% deficit was defined, a priori, to define two groups of subjects with PTTD. The strength ratio for each group averaged; 1.06 ± 0.1 (range 0.87 to 1.36) for controls, 1.06 ± 0.1 (range, 0.89 to 1.25), for the PTTD strong group, and 0.64 ± 0.2 (range 0.42 to 0.76) for the PTTD weak group. Across four phases of stance, kinematic measures of flatfoot were compared between the three groups using a two-way mixed effect ANOVA model repeated for each kinematic variable. Results Subjects with PTTD regardless of group demonstrated significantly greater hindfoot eversion compared to controls. Subjects with PTTD who were weak demonstrated greater hindfoot eversion compared to subjects with PTTD who were strong. For forefoot abduction and MLA angles the differences between groups depended on the phase of stance with significant differences between each group observed at the pre-swing phase of stance. Conclusion Strength was associated with the degree of flatfoot deformity observed during walking, however, flatfoot deformity may also occur without strength deficits. PMID:20371019

  15. Costello syndrome: Analysis of the posterior cranial fossa in children with posterior fossa crowding

    PubMed Central

    D’Apolito, Gabriella; Panfili, Marco; Zampino, Giuseppe; Tartaglione, Tommaso; Colosimo, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess changes in the posterior cranial fossa (PCF) to shed light on the mechanism of cerebellar herniation in children with Costello syndrome (CS) and posterior fossa crowding. We performed a morphovolumetric PCF analysis on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in seven children with CS (mean age 31 ± 16 months) comparing the MRI scans with those of seven age-matched healthy subjects. PCF volume (PCFV), PCF brain volume (PCFBV) and cerebellar volume (CeV) were assessed on axial T2-weighted MRI. Morphometric parameters (diameters of the foramen magnum, tentorial angle, basiocciput, supraocciput, basisphenoid and exocciput lengths) were measured on sagittal T1-weighted MRI. The volume of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces was calculated as PCFV minus PCFBV. Five out of seven CS children showed tonsillar herniation in the upper cervical canal; no child had hydrocephalus but three out of seven children showed ventriculomegaly. In addition, the PCFV/PCFBV ratio, PCFV, CSF spaces volume, basiocciput, basisphenoid and exocciput lengths and latero-lateral and antero-posterior diameters of the foramen magnum were significantly reduced, whereas no significant changes were found in supraocciput length, PCFBV, CeV or hindbrain volume The volumetric reduction of the PCF due to bony posterior fossa hypoplasia is a predisposing factor for developing cerebellar tonsillar herniation through the foramen magnum in children with CS. The altered anatomy of the foramen magnum and upward expansion of the PCF secondary to an increased tentorial slope serves to explain the possible mechanism of cerebellar herniation in patients with CS. PMID:26246091

  16. Arterial Spin Labeling of Cerebral Perfusion Territories Using a Separate Labeling Coil

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Fernando F.; Tannús, Alberto; Talagala, S. Lalith; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To obtain cerebral perfusion territories of the left, the right and the posterior circulation in humans with high SNR and robust delineation. Materials and Methods CASL was implemented using a dedicated RF coil, positioned over the neck, to label the major cerebral feeding arteries in humans. Selective labeling was achieved by flow-driven adiabatic fast passage and by tilting the longitudinal labeling gradient about the Y-axis by θ=±60°. Results Mean CBF values in gray and white matter were 74±13 ml·100g−1·min−1 and 14±13 ml·100g−1·min−1, respectively (N=14). There were no signal differences between left and right hemispheres when θ=0° (P>0.19), indicating efficient labeling of both hemispheres. When θ=+60°, the signal in GM on the left hemisphere, 0.07±0.06%, was 92% lower than on the right hemisphere, 0.85±0.30% (P<10−9), while for θ=−60°, the signal in the right hemisphere, 0.16±0.13%, was 82% lower than on the contralateral side, 0.89±0.22% (P<10−10). Similar attenuations were obtained in white matter. Conclusions Clear delineation of the left and right cerebral perfusion territories was obtained, allowing discrimination of the anterior and posterior circulation in each hemisphere. PMID:18425844

  17. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  18. Cerebral oximetry and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Skhirtladze-Dworschak, Keso; Dworschak, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral oximetry is a Food and Drug Administration-approved technology that allows monitoring of brain oxygen saturation in accessible superficial brain cortex regions, which are amongst the most vulnerable in regard to ischemic or hypoxic injury. Since most oxygen in the area of interest is located in the venous compartment, the determined regional brain oxygen saturation approximately reflects the local balance between oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption. Major systemic alterations in blood oxygen content and oxygen delivery will be accompanied by corresponding changes in regional brain saturation. This systematic review, which is based on a Medline search, focuses on the characteristic changes in regional cerebral oxygen saturation that occur, when global oxygen supply to the brain ceases. It further highlights the potential application of cerebral oximetry in the management of cardiac arrest victims, the predictability of clinical outcome after global cerebral ischemia, and it also indicates possible potentials for the management of cerebral reperfusion after having instituted return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23782549

  19. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  20. Cerebral palsy and aging

    PubMed Central

    Haak, Peterson; Lenski, Madeleine; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Li, Min; Paneth, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common major disabling motor disorder of childhood, is frequently thought of as a condition that affects only children. Deaths in children with CP, never common, have in recent years become very rare, unless the child is very severely and multiply disabled. Thus, virtually all children assigned the diagnosis of CP will survive into adulthood. Attention to the adult with CP has been sparse, and the evolution of the motor disorder as the individual moves through adolescence, young adulthood, middle age, and old age is not well understood. Nor do we know what happens to other functional domains, such as communication and eating behavior, in adults with CP. Although the brain injury that initially causes CP by definition does not progressively worsen through the lifetime, the effects of CP manifest differently throughout the life span. The aging process must inevitably interact with the motor disorder, but we lack systematic, large-scale follow-up studies of children with CP into adulthood and through adulthood with thorough assessments performed over time. In this paper we summarize what is known of the epidemiology of CP throughout the life span, beginning with mortality and life expectancy, then survey what is known of functioning, ability, and quality of life of adults with CP. We conclude by describing a framework for future research on CP and aging that is built around the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and suggest specific tools and approaches for conducting that research in a sound manner. PMID:19740206

  1. Isolated posterior capsular rupture following blunt head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O; Hamam, Rola N; Maalouf, Fadi C

    2014-01-01

    Closed-globe traumatic cataract is not uncommon in males in the pediatric age group. However, there is a relative paucity of literature on isolated posterior lens capsule rupture associated with closed-globe traumatic cataract. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with white cataract 1 day after blunt trauma to the forehead associated with posterior capsular rupture that was detected by B-scan ultrasonography preoperatively. No stigmata of trauma outside the posterior capsule could be detected by slit-lamp exam, funduscopy, and optical coherence tomography. Phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens implant was performed 24 hours after trauma, with the patient achieving 6/6 visual acuity 1 week and 6 months after surgery. Our case is unique, being the youngest (amblyogenic age) to be reported, with prompt surgical intervention, and with no signs of trauma outside the posterior capsule. PMID:25506201

  2. Emerging Techniques for Posterior Fixation of the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kushagra; Boniello, Anthony; Rihn, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Pedicle screw fixation is the preferred method of posterior fusion in lumbar spinal surgery. The technique provides three-column support of the vertebrae, contributing to the biomechanical strength of the construct. However, open pedicle screw fixation often necessitates wide posterior exposure and dissection with soft-tissue disruption of the facet joint. Alternative posterior fixation techniques have been developed to reduce surgical time, soft-tissue dissection, disruption of the adjacent facet joint capsule, neurologic risk, and implant cost. Results of these techniques are comparable to those of standard pedicle screw fixation systems. Certain patients, especially those at a lower risk of nonunion or those who require posterior fixation only as an adjunct to anterior column support, may benefit from the shorter surgical time and limited posterior exposure of the alternative techniques. However, the decreased rigidity of these alternative constructs can result in excessive motion, which can lead to nonunion and early hardware failure. PMID:27077477

  3. Role of posterior hypothalamus in hypobaric hypoxia induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Choudhary, R C; Reddy, M K; Ray, A; Ravi, K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of posterior hypothalamus and central neurotransmitters in the pulmonary edema due to hypobaric hypoxia, rats were placed in a high altitude simulation chamber (barometric pressure-294.4 mmHg) for 24 h. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increases in mean arterial blood pressure, renal sympathetic nerve activity, right ventricular systolic pressure, lung wet to dry weight ratio and Evans blue dye leakage. There was a significant attenuation in these responses to hypobaric hypoxia (a) after lesioning posterior hypothalamus and (b) after chronic infusion of GABAA receptor agonist muscimol into posterior hypothalamus. No such attenuation was evident with the chronic infusion of the nitric oxide donor SNAP into the posterior hypothalamus. It is concluded that in hypobaric hypoxia, there is over-activity of posterior hypothalamic neurons probably due to a local decrease in GABA-ergic inhibition which increases the sympathetic drive causing pulmonary hypertension and edema. PMID:25448396

  4. Cerebritis: an unusual complication of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Mainak; Simes, David C; Prabha, Ramesh D

    2009-01-01

    Cerebritis is part of a continuum of brain infection and is difficult to diagnose. Cerebritis caused by Klebsiella in immunocompetent adults without predisposing factors such as neurosurgery or penetrating brain injury has not been reported before. We report a case of Klebsiella cerebritis in an adult patient with a proven extracranial focus of infection. We suggest considering cerebritis as a differential diagnosis for altered level of consciousness in patients of severe sepsis, even if an extracranial source of infection is proven. PMID:19881180

  5. Cerebritis: An unusual complication of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Mainak; Simes1, David C.; Prabha1, Ramesh D.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebritis is part of a continuum of brain infection and is difficult to diagnose. Cerebritis caused by Klebsiella in immunocompetent adults without predisposing factors such as neurosurgery or penetrating brain injury has not been reported before. We report a case of Klebsiella cerebritis in an adult patient with a proven extracranial focus of infection. We suggest considering cerebritis as a differential diagnosis for altered level of consciousness in patients of severe sepsis, even if an extracranial source of infection is proven. PMID:19881180

  6. Multiple infected cerebral hydatid cysts.

    PubMed

    Gana, R; Skhissi, M; Maaqili, R; Bellakhdar, F

    2008-05-01

    We report an unusual patient with multiple infected cerebral hydatid cysts. A 20-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of headache and progressive left-sided hempiparesis. A cerebral CT scan showed a large and heterogeneous parieto-occipital lesion. During surgery an infected hydatid cyst was discovered with multiple daughter vesicles. Post-operatively the patient was treated with albendazol, cefotaxime and metronidazole. The clinical course was good with total recovery of the hemiparesis. A follow-up CT scan showed persistence of some small deep-seated cysts. Multiple infected cerebral hydatid cyst is uncommon and can be confused with other cystic brain lesions. The aim of surgery is to remove the cyst unruptured and this should be followed by antihelminthic and antibiotic treatment in order to avoid recurrences. PMID:18342511

  7. Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum and cerebral anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Schrander-Stumpel, C T; de Die-Smulders, C E; Hennekam, R C; Fryns, J P; Bouckaert, P X; Brouwer, O F; da Costa, J J; Lommen, E J; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P D

    1992-01-01

    We report on three Dutch children with a clinical diagnosis of oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS) and hydrocephalus. The clinical features are compared to 15 published cases of OAVS and hydrocephalus. Several other cerebral abnormalities were present in the whole group. About half of the cases had cleft lip/palate, anophthalmia/microphthalmia, or a cardiac defect. Mental retardation was found in five of the surviving 11 patients and early death occurred in one-third. We compared the cases with OAVS and hydrocephalus with published reports of OAVS and other cerebral anomalies and found no significant clinical differences. However, the clinical characteristics were clearly more severely expressed than generally found in patients with OAVS. Children with OAVS and more severe clinical features, especially anophthalmia/microphthalmia and cleft lip/palate, seem to be at an increased risk for cerebral malformations and for mental retardation. Images PMID:1583660

  8. Posterior Probability Matching and Human Perceptual Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Richard F.; Patel, Khushbu; Yee, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Probability matching is a classic theory of decision making that was first developed in models of cognition. Posterior probability matching, a variant in which observers match their response probabilities to the posterior probability of each response being correct, is being used increasingly often in models of perception. However, little is known about whether posterior probability matching is consistent with the vast literature on vision and hearing that has developed within signal detection theory. Here we test posterior probability matching models using two tools from detection theory. First, we examine the models’ performance in a two-pass experiment, where each block of trials is presented twice, and we measure the proportion of times that the model gives the same response twice to repeated stimuli. We show that at low performance levels, posterior probability matching models give highly inconsistent responses across repeated presentations of identical trials. We find that practised human observers are more consistent across repeated trials than these models predict, and we find some evidence that less practised observers more consistent as well. Second, we compare the performance of posterior probability matching models on a discrimination task to the performance of a theoretical ideal observer that achieves the best possible performance. We find that posterior probability matching is very inefficient at low-to-moderate performance levels, and that human observers can be more efficient than is ever possible according to posterior probability matching models. These findings support classic signal detection models, and rule out a broad class of posterior probability matching models for expert performance on perceptual tasks that range in complexity from contrast discrimination to symmetry detection. However, our findings leave open the possibility that inexperienced observers may show posterior probability matching behaviour, and our methods provide new tools

  9. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Leff, Alexander P.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Methods: Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Results: Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%–270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. PMID:26138948

  10. Decoding Trajectories from Posterior Parietal Cortex Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Mulliken, Grant H.; Musallam, Sam; Andersen, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    High-level cognitive signals in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) have previously been used to decode the intended endpoint of a reach, providing the first evidence that PPC can be used for direct control of a neural prosthesis (Musallam et al., 2004). Here we expand on this work by showing that PPC neural activity can be harnessed to estimate not only the endpoint but also to continuously control the trajectory of an end effector. Specifically, we trained two monkeys to use a joystick to guide a cursor on a computer screen to peripheral target locations while maintaining central ocular fixation. We found that we could accurately reconstruct the trajectory of the cursor using a relatively small ensemble of simultaneously recorded PPC neurons. Using a goal-based Kalman filter that incorporates target information into the state-space, we showed that the decoded estimate of cursor position could be significantly improved. Finally, we tested whether we could decode trajectories during closed-loop brain control sessions, in which the real-time position of the cursor was determined solely by a monkey’s neural activity in PPC. The monkey learned to perform brain control trajectories at 80% success rate(for 8 targets) after just 4–5 sessions. This improvement in behavioral performance was accompanied by a corresponding enhancement in neural tuning properties (i.e., increased tuning depth and coverage of encoding parameter space) as well as an increase in off-line decoding performance of the PPC ensemble. PMID:19036985

  11. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Complicating Traumatic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sigurtà, Anna; Terzi, Valeria; Regna-Gladin, Caroline; Fumagalli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We are reporting a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) developed in an unusual clinical scenario without the presence of the most described symptoms. PRES is a neurological and radiological syndrome described in many different clinical conditions. In children it has been mostly reported in association with hematological and renal disorders. Our patient was a 15 years old boy, admitted to our intensive care unit for pancreatitis after blunt abdominal trauma. During the stay in the intensive care unit, he underwent multiple abdominal surgical interventions for pancreatitis complications. He had a difficult management of analgesia and sedation, being often agitated with high arterial pressure, and he developed a bacterial peritonitis. After 29 days his neurological conditions abruptly worsened with neuroimaging findings consistent with PRES. His clinical conditions progressively improved after sedation and arterial pressure control. He was discharged at home with complete resolution of the neurological and imaging signs 2 months later. The pathophysiology of PRES is controversial and involves disordered autoregulation ascribable to hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. In this case both hypertension and endothelial activation, triggered by sepsis and pancreatitis, could represent the culprits of PRES onset. Even if there is no specific treatment for this condition, a diagnosis is mandatory to start antihypertensive and supportive treatment. We are therefore suggesting to consider PRES in the differential diagnosis of a neurological deterioration preceded by hypertension and/or septic state, even without other “typical” clinical features. PMID:27258506

  12. Automatic quantification of posterior capsule opacification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Sarah A.; Uyyanonvara, Bunyarit; Boyce, James F.; Sanguinetti, Giorgia; Hollick, Emma J.; Meacock, William R.; Spalton, David J.; Paplinski, Andrew P.

    2000-06-01

    After Cataract surgery where a plastic implant lens is implanted into the eye to replace the natural lens, many patients suffer from cell growth across a membrane situated at the back of the lens which degrades their vision. The cell growth is known as Posterior Capsule Opacification (or PCO). It is important to be able to quantify PCO so that the effect of different implant lens types and surgical techniques may be evaluated. Initial results obtained using a neural network to detect PCO from implant lenses are compared to an established but less automated method of detection, which segments the images using texture segmentation in conjunction with co- occurrence matrices. Tests show that the established method performs well in clinical validation and repeatability trials. The requirement to use a neural network to analyze the implant lens images evolved from the analysis of over 1000 images using the established co-occurrence matrix segmentation method. The work shows that a method based on neural networks is a promising tool to automate the procedure of calculating PCO.

  13. The posterior glottis: structural and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kotby, M N; Kamal, E; El-Makhzangy, A; Nabil Khattab, A; Milad, P

    2012-11-01

    Despite the presence of a number of good publications during the past two decades, the posterior glottis (PG) is still not clearly appreciated in clinical laryngological practice. This study focuses on searching the literature to find out the present day awareness of the PG, as well as highlighting some of its clinical features. The investigation proceeds with two main sections: (1) critical analysis of the literature on the PG during the last 50 years (2) describing the clinical appearance and behavior of the PG in 100 normal subjects. Results of section 1 illustrate the limited awareness in the literature of the existence of PG as a distinct part of the human larynx. Results of section 2 illustrate some misconcepts related to the PG as inter-arytenoid pachydermia, change of voice with lesions in the PG. Discussion elaborates on the significance of the findings and attempts to clarify certain misconcepts about the PG, its structure, function, and clinical features. In the light of the data collected from the literature regarding the dimensions of the PG, a set of recommendations were proposed regarding the optimal sizes of the endotracheal tubes in both sexes. PMID:22614807

  14. Changes in Cerebral Cortex of Children Treated for Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Arthur K. . E-mail: aliu1@partners.org; Marcus, Karen J.; Fischl, Bruce; Grant, P. Ellen; Young Poussaint, Tina; Rivkin, Michael J.; Davis, Peter; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: Children with medulloblastoma undergo surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. After treatment, these children have numerous structural abnormalities. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, we measured the thickness of the cerebral cortex in a group of medulloblastoma patients and a group of normally developing children. Methods and Materials: We obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans and measured the cortical thickness in 9 children after treatment of medulloblastoma. The measurements from these children were compared with the measurements from age- and gender-matched normally developing children previously scanned. For additional comparison, the pattern of thickness change was compared with the cortical thickness maps from a larger group of 65 normally developing children. Results: In the left hemisphere, relatively thinner cortex was found in the perirolandic region and the parieto-occipital lobe. In the right hemisphere, relatively thinner cortex was found in the parietal lobe, posterior superior temporal gyrus, and lateral temporal lobe. These regions of cortical thinning overlapped with the regions of cortex that undergo normal age-related thinning. Conclusion: The spatial distribution of cortical thinning suggested that the areas of cortex that are undergoing development are more sensitive to the effects of treatment of medulloblastoma. Such quantitative methods may improve our understanding of the biologic effects that treatment has on the cerebral development and their neuropsychological implications.

  15. Altered Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Whiplash Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Vállez García, David; Doorduin, Janine; Willemsen, Antoon T M; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Otte, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing evidence of central hyperexcitability in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (cWAD). However, little is known about how an apparently simple cervical spine injury can induce changes in cerebral processes. The present study was designed (1) to validate previous results showing alterations of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in cWAD, (2) to test if central hyperexcitability reflects changes in rCBF upon non-painful stimulation of the neck, and (3) to verify our hypothesis that the missing link in understanding the underlying pathophysiology could be the close interaction between the neck and midbrain structures. For this purpose, alterations of rCBF were explored in a case-control study using H2(15)O positron emission tomography, where each group was exposed to four different conditions, including rest and different levels of non-painful electrical stimulation of the neck. rCBF was found to be elevated in patients with cWAD in the posterior cingulate and precuneus, and decreased in the superior temporal, parahippocampal, and inferior frontal gyri, the thalamus and the insular cortex when compared with rCBF in healthy controls. No differences in rCBF were observed between different levels of electrical stimulation. The alterations in regions directly involved with pain perception and interoceptive processing indicate that cWAD symptoms might be the consequence of a mismatch during the integration of information in brain regions involved in pain processing. PMID:27444853

  16. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Fardin; Didgar, Farshid; Talaie-Zanjani, Afsoon; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient's history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control. PMID:24250168

  17. Cerebral oscillatory activity during simulated driving using MEG

    PubMed Central

    Sakihara, Kotoe; Hirata, Masayuki; Ebe, Kazutoshi; Kimura, Kenji; Yi Ryu, Seong; Kono, Yoshiyuki; Muto, Nozomi; Yoshioka, Masako; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Yorifuji, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to examine cerebral oscillatory differences associated with psychological processes during simulated car driving. We recorded neuromagnetic signals in 14 healthy volunteers using magnetoencephalography (MEG) during simulated driving. MEG data were analyzed using synthetic aperture magnetometry to detect the spatial distribution of cerebral oscillations. Group effects between subjects were analyzed statistically using a non-parametric permutation test. Oscillatory differences were calculated by comparison between “passive viewing” and “active driving.” “Passive viewing” was the baseline, and oscillatory differences during “active driving” showed an increase or decrease in comparison with a baseline. Power increase in the theta band was detected in the superior frontal gyrus (SFG) during active driving. Power decreases in the alpha, beta, and low gamma bands were detected in the right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), left postcentral gyrus (PoCG), middle temporal gyrus (MTG), and posterior cingulate gyrus (PCiG) during active driving. Power increase in the theta band in the SFG may play a role in attention. Power decrease in the right IPL may reflect selectively divided attention and visuospatial processing, whereas that in the left PoCG reflects sensorimotor activation related to driving manipulation. Power decreases in the MTG and PCiG may be associated with object recognition. PMID:25566017

  18. Regional cerebral blood flow in childhood headache

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, E.S.; Stump, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 16 cranial regions in 23 children and adolescents with frequent headaches using the non-invasive Xenon-133 inhalation technique. Blood flow response to 5% carbon dioxide (CO2) was also determined in 21 patients, while response to 50% oxygen was measured in the two patients with hemoglobinopathy. Included were 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of migraine, 4 with musculoskeletal headaches, and 3 with features of both types. Also studied were 2 patients with primary thrombocythemia, 2 patients with hemoglobinopathy and headaches, 1 patient with polycythemia, and 1 with headaches following trauma. With two exceptions, rCBF determinations were done during an asymptomatic period. Baseline rCBF values tended to be higher in these young patients than in young adults done in our laboratory. Localized reduction in the expected blood flow surge after CO2 inhalation, most often noted posteriorly, was seen in 8 of the 13 vascular headaches, but in none of the musculoskeletal headache group. Both patients with primary thrombocythemia had normal baseline flow values and altered responsiveness to CO2 similar to that seen in migraineurs; thus, the frequently reported headache and transient neurologic signs with primary thrombocythemia are probably not due to microvascular obstruction as previously suggested. These data support the concept of pediatric migraine as a disorder of vasomotor function and also add to our knowledge of normal rCBF values in younger patients. Demonstration of altered vasomotor reactivity to CO2 could prove helpful in children whose headache is atypical.

  19. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, K.; Damasio, H.; Graff-Radford, N.; Eslinger, P.; Kirchner, P.

    1985-05-01

    In 37 patients (ages 58-81) with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied utilizing a dedicated SPECT system (Tomomatic-64) that produces rCBF images from 4-minute clearance of Xenon-133 in the brain. The authors have modified the device to acquire 5 continuous tomographic slices simultaneously. A consistent pattern of diminished blood flow was seen in 33 patients in the posterior-temporal and lower-parietal brain regions. Computer programs were developed to quantitate the size of the affected brain tissue in the posterolateral brain areas (confined to the posterior 40% and the lateral 25% of the major and minor brain axes respectively). They have previously reported normal rCBF in 25 volunteers to be greater than 45 ml/min/100g with less than 10% regional variation. Hence, an area was considered abnormal if rCBF measured less than 40 ml/min/100g or was less than 70% of the mean rCBF value in the anterior temporal-frontal regions.

  20. Behaviour Problems Amongst Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswin, Maureen

    Based on 6 years of work with cerebral palsied children, the thesis considers types and causes of cerebral palsy, the life pattern of the child with cerebral palsy from early years to adolescence, and the effect of the handicapped child on his parents and family. Literature on behavior disorders is reviewed, and kinds of behavior problems are…

  1. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  2. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  3. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  4. Inflammation, Cerebral Vasospasm, and Evolving Theories of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Kevin R.; Zuckerman, Scott L.; Mocco, J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CVS) is a potentially lethal complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Recently, the symptomatic presentation of CVS has been termed delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), occurring as early as 3-4 days after the sentinel bleed. For the past 5-6 decades, scientific research has promulgated the theory that cerebral vasospasm plays a primary role in the pathology of DCI and subsequently delayed ischemic neurological decline (DIND). Approximately 70% of patients develop CVS after aSAH with 50% long-term morbidity rates. The exact etiology of CVS is unknown; however, a well-described theory involves an antecedent inflammatory cascade with alterations of intracellular calcium dynamics and nitric oxide fluxes, though the intricacies of this inflammatory theory are currently unknown. Consequently, there have been few advances in the clinical treatment of this patient cohort, and morbidity remains high. Identification of intermediaries in the inflammatory cascade can provide insight into newer clinical interventions in the prevention and management of cerebral vasospasm and will hopefully prevent neurological decline. In this review, we discuss current theories implicating the inflammatory cascade in the development of CVS and potential treatment targets. PMID:24058736

  5. Radiosurgery for cerebral cavernomas.

    PubMed

    Nagy, G; Kemeny, A A

    2015-09-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of cerebral cavernomas (CCMs) remains controversial. However, during the last decade the increasing knowledge on natural history and numerous publications from SRS centers using modern treatment protocols has been changing the initial resistance of the neurosurgical community. Unfortunately, the quality of publications on CCM SRS remains heterogeneous. Controversies arise from the lack of control groups, the different definition of hemorrhage, heterogeneous patient populations, and poor definition of treatment protocols. The key for proper interpretation of results is the understanding of the natural history of CCMs, which is varied both according to anatomical location and the presence or absence of previous hemorrhage. Hemispheric lesions appear to be more benign with lower annual bleed rate and risk of persisting disability, whereas those found in the thalamus, basal ganglia and brainstem typically have higher rebleed risk resulting in higher cumulative morbidity following subsequent hemorrhages. However, we are still unable at presentation to predict the future behavior of an individual lesion. In the present paper we critically review and analyze the modern SRS literature on CCMs. The expanding number of available data with current treatment protocols strongly supports the initial intuition that SRS is an effective treatment alternative for deep-seated CCMs with multiple hemorrhages reducing pretreatment annual rebleed rates from 32% pre-treatment to 1.5% within 2 years after treatment (N.=197). Moreover, it appears to stabilize lesions with no more than one bleed, and it is also effective for CCMs causing therapy resistant epilepsy especially if applied within 3 years after presentation. In modern SRS series the rate of persisting adverse radiation effects is low, resulting only in mild morbidity even in deep-seated lesions (4.16%, N.=376), and morbidity caused by post-treatment hemorrhages is also

  6. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Retention versus Posterior Stabilization for Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Bian, Yanyan; Feng, Bin; Weng, Xisheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although being debated for many years, the superiority of posterior cruciate-retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA remains controversial. We compare the knee scores, post-operative knee range of motion (ROM), radiological outcomes about knee kinematic and complications between CR TKA and PS TKA. Methods Literature published up to August 2015 was searched in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases, and meta-analysis was performed using the software, Review Manager version 5.3. Results Totally 14 random control trials (RCTs) on this topic were included for the analysis, which showed that PS and CR TKA had no significant difference in Knee Society knee Score (KSS), pain score (KSPS), Hospital for Special Surgery score (HSS), kinematic characteristics including postoperative component alignment, tibial posterior slope and joint line, and complication rate. However, PS TKA is superior to CR TKA regarding post-operative knee range of motion (ROM) [Random Effect model (RE), Mean Difference (MD) = -7.07, 95% Confidential Interval (CI) -10.50 to -3.65, p<0.0001], improvement of ROM (Fixed Effect model (FE), MD = -5.66, 95% CI -10.79 to -0.53, p = 0.03) and femoral-tibial angle [FE, MD = 0.85, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.25, p<0.0001]. Conclusions There are no clinically relevant differences between CR and PS TKA in terms of clinical, functional, radiological outcome, and complications, while PS TKA is superior to CR TKA in respects of ROM, while whether this superiority matters or not in clinical practice still needs further investigation and longer follow-up. PMID:26824368

  7. Arthroscopic Repair of Posterior Meniscal Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Lauren; Moulton, Samuel G.; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare subjective clinical outcomes in patients requiring arthroscopic transtibial pullout repair for posterior meniscus root tears of the medial and lateral menisci. We hypothesized that improvement in function and activity level would be similar among patients undergoing lateral and medial meniscal root repairs. Methods: This study was IRB approved. All patients who underwent posterior meniscal root repair by a single orthopaedic surgeon were included in this study. Detailed operative data were documented at surgery. Patients completed a subjective questionnaire, including Lysholm score, Tegner activity scale, WOMAC, SF-12 and patient satisfaction with outcome, which were collected preoperatively and at a minimum of two years postoperatively. Failure was defined as any patient who underwent revision meniscal root repair or partial meniscectomy following the index surgery. Results: There were 50 patients (16 females, 34 males) with a mean age of 37.8 years (range, 16.6-65.7) and a mean BMI of 27.3 (range, 20.5-49.2) included in this study. Fifteen patients underwent lateral meniscus root repair and 35 patients underwent medial meniscus root repair. Three patients who underwent lateral meniscus root repair required revision meniscus root repair surgery, while no patients who underwent medial meniscus root repair required revision surgery (p=0.26). There was a significant difference in preoperative and postoperative Lysholm score (53 vs. 78) (p<0.001), Tegner activity scale (2.0 vs. 4.0) (p=0.03), SF-12 physical component subscale (38 vs. 50) (p=0.001) and WOMAC (36 vs. 8) (p<0.001) for the total population. Median patient satisfaction with outcome was 9 (range, 1-10). There was no significant difference in mean age between lateral and medial root repair groups (32 vs. 40) (p=0.12) or gender (p=0.19). There was no significant difference in gender between lateral and medial root repair groups (p=0.95). There was a

  8. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Chang, Ji-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity has been considered a risk factor causing late failure of reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, although it is unknown whether that is the case for reconstructed posterior cruciate ligaments. We hypothesized patients with generalized joint laxity, compared with those without laxity, would have similar postoperative knee stability, range of motion, and functional scores after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Beighton and Horan criteria were used to determine generalized joint laxity. We enrolled 24 patients with generalized joint laxity (Group L) and 29 patients without any positive findings of joint laxity (Group N) matched by gender and age. The average side-by-side differences of posterior tibial translation were 4.72 mm in Group L and 3.63 mm in Group N. We observed no differences in posterior tibial translation with differing graft materials or combined procedures. In Group L the International Knee Documentation Committee score was normal in 12.5% and nearly normal in 45.8% whereas in Group N, 24.1% were normal and 55.2% nearly normal. Patients with generalized joint laxity showed more posterior laxity than patients without joint laxity. Generalized joint laxity therefore appears to be a risk factor associated with posterior laxity after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Level of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18843524

  9. Cerebral Arterial Time Constant Recorded from the MCA and PICA in Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Czosnyka, Marek; Poplawska, Karolina; Reinhard, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral arterial time constant (τ) estimates how quickly the cerebral arterial bed distal to the point of insonation is filled with arterial blood following a cardiac contraction. It is not known how τ behaves in different vascular territories in the brain. We therefore investigated the differences in τ of two cerebral arteries: the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and the middle cerebral artery (MCA).Transcranial Doppler cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the PICA and left MCA along with Finapres arterial blood pressure (ABP) were simultaneously recorded in 35 young healthy volunteers. τ was estimated using mathematical transformations of pulse waveforms of ABP and the CBFV of the MCA and the PICA. Since τ is independent from the vessel radius, its comparison in different cerebral arteries was feasible. Mean ABP was 76.1 ± 9.6 mmHg. The CBFV of the MCA was higher than that of the PICA (59.7 ± 7.7 vs. 41.0 ± 4.5 cm/s; p < 0.000001). τ of the PICA was shorter than that of the MCA (0.15 ± 0.03 vs. 0.18 ± 0.03 s; p < 0.000001). The MCA-supplied vascular bed has a longer distal average length, measured from the place of insonation up to the small arterioles, than the PICA-supplied vascular bed. Therefore, a longer time is needed to fill it with arterial blood volume. This study thus confirms the physiological validity of the τ concept. PMID:27165908

  10. The language profile of Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J.; Lehmann, Manja; Warren, Jason D.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA) is typically considered to be a visual syndrome, primarily characterised by progressive impairment of visuoperceptual and visuospatial skills. However patients commonly describe early difficulties with word retrieval. This paper details the first systematic analysis of linguistic function in PCA. Characterising and quantifying the aphasia associated with PCA is important for clarifying diagnostic and selection criteria for clinical and research studies. Methods Fifteen patients with PCA, 7 patients with logopenic/phonological aphasia (LPA) and 18 age-matched healthy participants completed a detailed battery of linguistic tests evaluating auditory input processing, repetition and working memory, lexical and grammatical comprehension, single word retrieval and fluency, and spontaneous speech. Results Relative to healthy controls, PCA patients exhibited language impairments across all the domains examined, but with anomia, reduced phonemic fluency and slowed speech rate the most prominent deficits. PCA performance most closely resembled that of LPA patients on tests of auditory input processing, repetition and digit span, but was relatively stronger on tasks of comprehension and spontaneous speech. Conclusions The study demonstrates that in addition to the well-reported degradation of vision, literacy and numeracy, PCA is characterised by a progressive oral language dysfunction with prominent word retrieval difficulties. Overlap in the linguistic profiles of PCA and LPA, which are both most commonly caused by Alzheimer’s disease, further emphasises the notion of a phenotypic continuum between typical and atypical manifestations of the disease. Clarifying the boundaries between AD phenotypes has important implications for diagnosis, clinical trial recruitment and investigations into biological factors driving phenotypic heterogeneity in AD. Rehabilitation strategies to ameliorate the phonological deficit in PCA are required

  11. Aspheric versus Spherical Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Jafarinasab, Mohammad-Reza; Feizi, Sepehr; Baghi, Ahmad-Reza; Ziaie, Hossein; Yaseri, Mehdi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare spherical aberration and contrast sensitivity function following implantation of four different foldable posterior chamber intraocular lenses (IOLs), namely Sensar, Akreos AO, Tecnis, and AcrySof IQ. Methods In this randomized clinical trial, 68 eyes of 68 patients with senile cataracts underwent phacoemulsification and IOL implantation with Sensar (n=17), Akreos AO (n=17), Tecnis (n=17), or AcrySof IQ (n=17). Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) and best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), spherical aberration and contrast sensitivity function (CSF) were compared among the study groups, 3 months after surgery. Results There was no significant difference between the study groups in terms of age (P = 0.21). Mean postoperative BSCVA with Sensar, Akreos AO, Tecnis, and AcrySof IQ was 0.15±0.10, 0.12±0.9, 0.08±0.08, and 0.08±0.07 logMAR, respectively (P=0.08). Spherical aberration measured over a 4 mm pupil was significantly higher with Sensar and Akreos AO than the two other IOLs. The difference between Tecnis and AcrySof IQ was significantly in favor of the former IOL. Over a 6 mm pupil, spherical aberrations were comparable with Sensar and Akreos AO, furthermore spherical aberration was also comparable among eyes implanted with Akreos AO, AcrySof IQ, and Tecnis. Sensar yielded significantly inferior results as compared to Acrysof IQ and Tecnis. CSF with Sensar was inferior to the three aspheric IOLs at the majority of spatial frequencies. Tecnis yielded significantly better mesopic CSF at 1.5 and 3 cycles per degree spatial frequencies. Conclusion Tecnis and AcrySof IQ provided significantly better visual function as compared to Sensar and Akreos AO, especially with smaller pupil size. However, this difference diminished with increasing pupil size. PMID:22737364

  12. Cerebral ischemia during surgery: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-Bin; Meng, Lingzhong; Gelb, Adrian W; Lee, Roger; Huang, Wen-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral ischemia is the pathophysiological condition in which the oxygenated cerebral blood flow is less than what is needed to meet cerebral metabolic demand. It is one of the most debilitating complications in the perioperative period and has serious clinical sequelae. The monitoring and prevention of intraoperative cerebral ischemia are crucial because an anesthetized patient in the operating room cannot be neurologically assessed. In this paper, we provide an overview of the definition, etiology, risk factors, and prevention of cerebral ischemia during surgery.

  13. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  14. Patterns of cerebral glucose utilization in depression, multiple infarct dementia, and Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.; Metter, E.J.; Riege, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Patterns of local cerebral glucose utilization were determined in moderately to severely disabled patients with depression (n=7), multiple infarct dementia (n=6), and Alzheimer's disease (n=6), and in normal controls (n=6), using positron emission tomography with the /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose method. Average global metabolic rate was decreased 30% in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but overlap among the other groups reduced the discriminant value of this measure. In depressed patients, the cerebral metabolic pattern was normal, except for evidence of hypometabolic zone in the posterior-inferior frontal cortex which was of marginal statistical significance. In multiple infarct dementia, focal metabolic defects were scattered throughout the brain and exceeded the extent of infarction. In Alzheimer's disease, metabolism was markedly reduced in cortex, especially parietal cortex, but relatively preserved in caudate, thalamus, anterior cingulate gyrus, pre and post central gyrus, and calcarine occipital cortex, a pattern duplicating the degree and location of pathological and neurochemical alterations characteristic of this disorder.

  15. Technical Note on Modified Posterior Approach to the Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Krishna Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The posterior approach is the most commonly and relatively easy to be used to expose the hip joint. Posterior approaches allow excellent visualization of the entire acetabulum and the upper femoral shaft, and thus they are popular for revision joint replacement surgery particularly in cases where only the femoral component needs to be replaced. There may be a higher dislocation rate with minimal movement as compared to anterior approaches if the posterior approach is used in fractured neck of femur surgery in demented or elderly bedridden patients who often lie crouched in bed with their hips in a flexed and adducted position. The expected purpose of this modification of the Posterior Approach to the Hip Joint is to overcome the fear of dislocation and hence combine the advantages of the Posterior route with greater stability. Technique: The author’s original paper written 30 years ago (Iyer, 1981) presented an original technique devised to confer greater stability to the hip joint posteriorly to minimize the greater incidence of dislocation which has been reported extensively in literature. The technique involves an osteotomy of the posterior overhanging part of the greater trochanter to include the insertions of the short lateral rotators along with the posterior third of the gluteus medius, which can then be turned back in one piece like the page of a book to include the capsule of the hip joint. This gives wide exposure of the posterior lip of the acetabulum and is relatively bloodless in its exposure. This approach is very useful in the elderly particularly demented patients requiring a hemiarthroplasty and also in primary and revision total hip replacement. This approach has been tested in cadavers to conclude the greater stability given as compared to the routine resuture or reattachment of the short lateral rotators. Conclusion: The modified technique provides for greater stability as compared to the Southern Approach. PMID:27299026

  16. [Cerebral ischemia in young adults].

    PubMed

    Berlit, P; Endemann, B; Vetter, P

    1991-08-01

    An overview is given over etiology and prognosis of cerebral ischemias until the age of 40. In a time period of 19 years, 168 patients were diagnosed with cerebral ischemia until the age of 40 (91 females, 77 males). The most frequent etiology is premature atherosclerosis in patients with vascular risk factors (up to 50%). Cardiogenic embolism is responsible for 1 to 34% of the cases: cardiac valve diseases and endocarditis being the most frequent sources. In 2 to 19% a vasculitis is diagnosed. While infectious arteritis is especially frequent in countries of the third world, immunovasculitides are common in Europe and the USA. Noninflammatory vasculopathies include spontaneous or traumatic dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia and vascular malformations. A migrainous stroke is especially frequent in female smokers with intake of oral contraceptives. During pregnancy both sinus thrombosis and arterial ischemia occur. Hematologic causes for ischemia are polycythemia, thrombocytosis and genetic diseases (sickle cell anemia, AT3-deficiency). Cerebral ischemia may occur in connection with the ingestion of ergot-derivates. The prognosis of cerebral ischemia in young adults is better than in older stroke-patients. PMID:1937340

  17. Innervation of the cerebral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Duckles, S P

    1983-01-01

    With the development of specific antibodies to vasoactive peptides and application of immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay methods, knowledge of vascular innervation has grown rapidly. In the cerebral circulation, four possible neurotransmitters are present: norepinephrine, acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and substance P. There is a dense adrenergic innervation of cerebral arteries, but contractile responses to nerve stimulation or circulating catecholamines are relatively small both in vitro and in vivo. Recent studies using radioligand binding techniques indicate a lack of specific 3H-prazosin binding in cerebral arteries, in contrast to other vascular beds. Thus a lack of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in cerebral arteries may account for weak responsiveness to sympathetic stimulation. Both VIP and acetylcholine may be vasodilator neurotransmitters, but blockade of cholinergic responses does not alter neurogenic vasodilation. The lack of specific VIP antagonists hampers efforts to explore this system more fully. Substance P-containing nerves are affected by capsaicin, supporting the hypothesis that these are primary sensory afferents, perhaps mediating pain. Future work in this area may focus on defining the pathways of these nerves and exploring the role of co-transmitters and possible interactions between nerves. With this basic information, experiments can be designed to elucidate more clearly the functional roles these nerves play. PMID:6210001

  18. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  19. Investigating cerebral oedema using poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Vardakis, John C; Chou, Dean; Tully, Brett J; Hung, Chang C; Lee, Tsong H; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral oedema can be classified as the tangible swelling produced by expansion of the interstitial fluid volume. Hydrocephalus can be succinctly described as the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain which ultimately leads to oedema within specific sites of parenchymal tissue. Using hydrocephalus as a test bed, one is able to account for the necessary mechanisms involved in the interaction between oedema formation and cerebral fluid production, transport and drainage. The current state of knowledge about integrative cerebral dynamics and transport phenomena indicates that poroelastic theory may provide a suitable framework to better understand various diseases. In this work, Multiple-Network Poroelastic Theory (MPET) is used to develop a novel spatio-temporal model of fluid regulation and tissue displacement within the various scales of the cerebral environment. The model is applied through two formats, a one-dimensional finite difference - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework, as well as a two-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) formulation. These are used to investigate the role of endoscopic fourth ventriculostomy in alleviating oedema formation due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction (1D coupled model) in addition to observing the capability of the FEM template in capturing important characteristics allied to oedema formation, like for instance in the periventricular region (2D model). PMID:26749338

  20. Substantial Reduction of Parenchymal Cerebral Blood Flow in Mice with Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yorito; Enmi, Jun-Ichiro; Iguchi, Satoshi; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Iida, Hidehiro; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) mouse model, which replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and white matter ischemic lesions, is considered to model some aspects of vascular cognitive impairment. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the brain surface post-BCAS have been demonstrated by laser speckle flowmetry, but CBF levels in the brain parenchyma remain unknown. Adult C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to BCAS using external microcoils. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was conducted to visualize the intracranial main arteries while arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to measure cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF levels before and after BCAS. Brain MRA showed anterior circulation flow was substantially decreased until 14 days post-BCAS, which gradually but incompletely recovered over the following 14 days, with probable growth of collaterals from the posterior cerebral artery. ASL showed that cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF remained decreased at approximately 50% of the baseline level during 1 and 14 days post-BCAS, recovering to approximately 70% at day 28. CBF levels in the parenchyma were lower than the cortical superficial region in the BCAS model and remained decreased without recovery during the first 2 weeks post-BCAS. These results suggest that the BCAS model reliably replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:27535801

  1. Successful treatment of cerebral large vessel vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus with intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Kato, R; Sumitomo, S; Kawahata, K; Fujio, K; Yamamoto, K

    2015-07-01

    A 39-year-old woman with a six-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was admitted because of a prolonged high fever, discoid rash, and multiple lymphadenopathies. She also developed pericarditis, and was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by prednisolone 50 mg daily and cyclosporine 100 mg daily. Meanwhile, she had a progressive headache, and a brain MRI revealed right pons infarction, although she did not have any abnormal neurological findings. An MRA revealed obvious irregular narrowing in the basilar, right vertebral and right posterior cerebral artery. There was no evidence of antiphospholipid syndrome. We concluded that the cause of the asymptomatic brain infarction was cerebral large vessel vasculitis associated with neuropsychiatric SLE. Intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy was started, and two months later, we confirmed that the irregular arterial narrowing had markedly ameliorated.Cerebral large vessel vasculitis in neuropsychiatric SLE is very rare, and a marked amelioration has not been reported to date. Here, we present a rare case of cerebral large vessel vasculitis treated successfully with a clear visual presentation. PMID:25661835

  2. Ischemic Cardiomyopathy and Cerebral Infarction in a Young Patient Associated with Khat Chewing

    PubMed Central

    Meulman, T. J.; Bakker, J.; van den Bos, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Khat is a stimulating agent used by many people in the Horn of Africa and the Arabian peninsula. Khat chewing is a known cardiovascular risk factor and is thought to cause vasoconstriction, systemic hypertension, and thrombogenicity. A 33-year-old Somalian man initially presented with loss of neurological function of the left arm, hazy vision, and headache. He smokes tobacco and chews two bundles of khat a week for more than 10 years. His ECG on admission showed a Q wave in V1 and V2 and 2 mm ST-elevations in V1, V2, and V3 and a terminal negative T wave in I, aVL, V2, V3, and V4, consistent with a recent, evolving anterior infarction. A noncontrast enhanced CT of the brain showed ischemia in the right middle cerebral artery vascular territory. An MRI showed recent ischemia in the vascular territory of the posterior division of the right middle cerebral artery. Coronary angiography showed a 70% stenosis with haziness of the proximal left anterior descending artery. Diagnostic tests and imaging are consistent with recent myocardial infarction in the LAD vascular territory because of coronary spasm and cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery vascular territory probably related to khat chewing. PMID:25815235

  3. A simple technique for morphological measurement of cerebral arterial circle variations using public domain software (Osiris).

    PubMed

    Ansari, Saeed; Dadmehr, Majid; Eftekhar, Behzad; McConnell, Douglas J; Ganji, Sarah; Azari, Hassan; Kamali-Ardakani, Shahab; Hoh, Brian L; Mocco, J

    2011-12-01

    This article describes a straightforward method to measure the dimensions and identify morphological variations in the cerebral arterial circle using the general-purpose software program Osiris. This user-friendly and portable program displays, manipulates, and analyzes medical digital images, and it has the capability to determine morphometric properties of selected blood vessels (or other anatomical structures) in humans and animals. To ascertain morphometric variations in the cerebral arterial circle, 132 brains of recently deceased fetuses, infants, and adults were dissected. The dissection procedure was first digitized, and then the dimensions were measured with Osiris software. Measurements of each vessel's length and external diameters were used to identify and classify morphological variations in the cerebral arterial circle. The most commonly observed anatomical variations were uni- and bilateral hypoplasia of the posterior communicating artery. This study demonstrates that public domain software can be used to measure and classify cerebral arterial circle vessels. This method could be extended to examine other anatomical regions or to study other animals. Additionally, knowledge of variations within the circle could be applied clinically to enhance diagnostic and treatment specificity. PMID:22254161

  4. Arterial Spin Labeling Measurements of Cerebral Perfusion Territories in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Renata F.; Paiva, Fernando F.; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Henning, Erica C.; Nascimento, George C.; Tannús, Alberto; De Araújo, Dráulio B.; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Collateral circulation, defined as the supplementary vascular network that maintains cerebral blood flow (CBF) when the main vessels fail, constitutes one important defense mechanism of the brain against ischemic stroke. In the present study, continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) was used to quantify CBF and obtain perfusion territory maps of the major cerebral arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and their normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) controls. Results show that both WKY and SHR have complementary, yet significantly asymmetric perfusion territories. Right or left dominances were observed in territories of the anterior (ACA), middle and posterior cerebral arteries, and the thalamic artery. Magnetic resonance angiography showed that some of the asymmetries were correlated with variations of the ACA. The leptomeningeal circulation perfusing the outer layers of the cortex was observed as well. Significant and permanent changes in perfusion territories were obtained after temporary occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery in both SHR and WKY, regardless of their particular dominance. However, animals with right dominance presented a larger volume change of the left perfusion territory (23 ± 9%) than animals with left dominance (7 ± 5%, P < 0.002). The data suggest that animals with contralesional dominance primarily safeguard local CBF values with small changes in contralesional perfusion territory, while animals with ipsilesional dominance show a reversal of dominance and a substantial increase in contralesional perfusion territory. These findings show the usefulness of CASL to probe the collateral circulation. PMID:24323754

  5. Substantial Reduction of Parenchymal Cerebral Blood Flow in Mice with Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Yorito; Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Iguchi, Satoshi; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Iida, Hidehiro; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) mouse model, which replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and white matter ischemic lesions, is considered to model some aspects of vascular cognitive impairment. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the brain surface post-BCAS have been demonstrated by laser speckle flowmetry, but CBF levels in the brain parenchyma remain unknown. Adult C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to BCAS using external microcoils. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was conducted to visualize the intracranial main arteries while arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to measure cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF levels before and after BCAS. Brain MRA showed anterior circulation flow was substantially decreased until 14 days post-BCAS, which gradually but incompletely recovered over the following 14 days, with probable growth of collaterals from the posterior cerebral artery. ASL showed that cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF remained decreased at approximately 50% of the baseline level during 1 and 14 days post-BCAS, recovering to approximately 70% at day 28. CBF levels in the parenchyma were lower than the cortical superficial region in the BCAS model and remained decreased without recovery during the first 2 weeks post-BCAS. These results suggest that the BCAS model reliably replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:27535801

  6. Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Tonsils and Posterior Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, D. M.; Lee, D. M.; Snow, A. F.; Fairley, C. K.; Peel, J.; Bradshaw, C. S.; Hocking, J. S.; Lahra, M. M.; Chen, M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the factors influencing gonorrhea detection at the pharynx. One hundred men infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae were swabbed from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx. N. gonorrhoeae was reisolated from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx in 62% and 52%, respectively (P = 0.041). Culture positivity was greater with higher gonococcal DNA loads at the tonsils (P = 0.001) and oropharynx (P < 0.001). N. gonorrhoeae can be cultured from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx with greater isolation rates where gonococcal loads are higher. PMID:26292303

  7. Anatomic Double-Bundle Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Nitri, Marco; Civitarese, David; Dean, Chase S; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is known to be the main posterior stabilizer of the knee. Anatomic single-bundle PCL reconstruction, focusing on reconstruction of the larger anterolateral bundle, is the most commonly performed procedure. Because of the residual posterior and rotational tibial instability after the single-bundle procedure and the inability to restore the normal knee kinematics, an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction has been proposed in an effort to re-create the native PCL footprint more closely and to restore normal knee kinematics. We detail our technique for an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction using Achilles and anterior tibialis tendon allografts. PMID:27284530

  8. The Simultaneous Modeling Technique: closing gaps in posteriors.

    PubMed

    Scolavino, Salvatore; Paolone, Gaetano; Orsini, Giovanna; Devoto, Walter; Putignano, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Direct posterior restorations represent a widespread procedure in daily practice. Occlusal layering is often considered a complex task, generally not predictable and often requiring several occlusal adjustments. Moreover, direct posterior restorations are time consuming, as many small increments must be applied and cured individually to control shrinkage stress. Several authors have proposed different material layering techniques for posteriors. The authors of this article propose a simplified approach, which primarily aims to help the clinician perform quick, simple, predictable, and natural-looking occlusal modeling, reducing the need for occlusal adjustments. PMID:26835524

  9. Posterior Wall Blowout in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Justin J.; Dean, Chase S.; Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J.; Cram, Tyler R.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Violation of the posterior femoral cortex, commonly referred to as posterior wall blowout, can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and lead to loss of graft fixation or early graft failure. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and adherence to proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and alternative fixation techniques is imperative to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This article highlights anatomic considerations for femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction and techniques for avoidance and salvage of a posterior wall blowout. PMID:27335885

  10. Cerebral arachnoid cysts in children

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, M. J. G.

    1971-01-01

    The case histories of 14 children are described in which hydrocephalus was found on investigation to be associated with a cyst of the posterior fossa or subarachnoid cisterns. The neuroradiological and histological findings are described. The cysts are considered to be developmental in origin. Their recognition and management are discussed. Images PMID:5315217

  11. Posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko; Fujiyoshi, Takayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the clinical results of posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF) for thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). A total of 24 patients underwent PDF, and their surgical outcomes were evaluated by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores (0-11 points) and by recovery rates calculated at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery and at a mean final follow-up of 4 years and 5 months. The mean JOA score before surgery was 3.7 points. Although transient paralysis occurred immediately after surgery in one patient (3.8%), all patients showed neurological recovery at the final follow-up with a mean JOA score of 8.0 points and a mean recovery rate of 58.1%. The mean recovery rate at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery was 36.7, 48.8, 54.0 and 56.8%, respectively. The median time point that the JOA score reached its peak value was 9 months after surgery. No patient chose additional anterior decompression surgery via thoracotomy. The present findings demonstrate that despite persistent anterior impingement of the spinal cord by residual OPLL, PDF can result in considerable neurological recovery with a low risk of postoperative paralysis. Since neurological recovery progresses slowly after PDF, we suggest that additional anterior decompression surgery is not desirable during the early stage of recovery. PMID:20049486

  12. Cardiovascular responses to water immersion in humans: impact on cerebral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Angela L.; Pugh, Christopher J. A.; Ainslie, Philip; Naylor, Louise H.; Green, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic increases in cerebrovascular perfusion and shear stress may have beneficial impacts on endothelial function that improve brain health. We hypothesized that water immersion to the level of the right atrium in humans would increase cerebral perfusion. We continuously measured, in 9 young (means ± SD, 24.6 ± 2.0 yr) healthy men, systemic hemodynamic variables along with blood flows in the common carotid and middle and posterior cerebral arteries during controlled filling and emptying of a water tank to the level of the right atrium. Mean arterial pressure (80 ± 9 vs. 91 ± 12 mmHg, P < 0.05), cardiac output (4.8 ± 0.7 vs. 5.1 ± 0.6 l/min, P < 0.05) and end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2, 39.5 ± 2.0 vs. 44.4 ± 3.5 mmHg, P < 0.05) increased with water immersion, along with middle (59 ± 6 vs. 64 ± 6 cm/s, P < 0.05) and posterior cerebral artery blood flow velocities (41 ± 9 vs. 44 ± 10 cm/s, P < 0.05). These changes were reversed when the tank was emptied. Water immersion is associated with hemodynamic and PetCO2 changes, which increase cerebral blood velocities in humans. This study provides an evidence base for future studies to examine the potential additive effect of exercise in water on improving cerebrovascular health. PMID:24553298

  13. An in vitro assessment of the cerebral hemodynamics through three patient specific circle of Willis geometries.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Paul; Delassus, Patrick; McCarthy, Peter; Sultan, Sheriff; Hynes, Niamh; Morris, Liam

    2014-01-01

    The Circle of Willis (CoW) is a complex pentagonal network comprised of fourteen cerebral vessels located at the base of the brain. The collateral flow feature within the circle of Willis allows the ability to maintain cerebral perfusion of the brain. Unfortunately, this collateral flow feature can create undesirable flow impact locations due to anatomical variations within the CoW. The interaction between hemodynamic forces and the arterial wall are believed to be involved in the formation of cerebral aneurysms, especially at irregular geometries such as tortuous segments, bends, and bifurcations. The highest propensity of aneurysm formation is known to form at the anterior communicating artery (AcoA) and at the junctions of the internal carotid and posterior communicating arteries (PcoAs). Controversy still remains as to the existence of blood flow paths through the communicating arteries for a normal CoW. This paper experimentally describes the hemodynamic conditions through three thin walled patient specific models of a complete CoW based on medical images. These models were manufactured by a horizontal dip spin coating method and positioned within a custom made cerebral testing system that simulated symmetrical physiological afferent flow conditions through the internal carotid and vertebral arteries. The dip spin coating procedure produced excellent dimensional accuracy. There was an average of less than 4% variation in diameters and wall thicknesses throughout all manufactured CoW models. Our cerebral test facility demonstrated excellent cycle to cycle repeatability, with variations of less than 2% and 1% for the time and cycle averaged flow rates, respectively. The peak systolic flow rates had less than a 4% variation. Our flow visualizations showed four independent flow sources originating from all four inlet arteries impacting at and crossing the AcoA with bidirectional cross flows. The flow paths entering the left and right vertebral arteries dissipated

  14. Magnetic source imaging in posterior cortex epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Badier, Jean-Michel; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Chauvel, Patrick; Bénar, Christian-George; Gavaret, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cortex epilepsies (PCE) are characterized by less satisfying postoperative results than temporal lobe epilepsies and are thus challenging for non-invasive presurgical investigations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of magnetic source imaging (MSI) in PCE, validating the results by the SEEG (stereoelectroencephalography) definition of irritative and epileptogenic zones (IZ and EZ). Fourteen PCE surgery candidates were investigated using MSI and SEEG. LCMV (Linearly Constrained Minimum Variance) and MUSIC algorithms were used. IZ was quantified using a semi-automatic detection of interictal spikes. EZ was quantified using the epileptogenicity index (EI) method that accounts for both the propensity of a brain area to generate rapid discharges and the time for this area to get involved in the seizure. EI values range from 0 (no epileptogenicity) to 1 (maximal epileptogenicity). Levels of concordance between MSI and IZ, MSI and EZ were determined as follows: A = localized on MSI and SEEG for the site of value 1 (IZ and EZ quantification), B = localized on MSI and SEEG for a part of the IZ or a structure involved in the EZ (without the maximal value 1), C = localized on MSI and not SEEG, D = localized on SEEG and not MSI, E = localized on MSI and SEEG, discordant for site. Five PCE cases were characterized by focal IZ, nine by distributed IZ between several distant brain areas. MSI allowed to determinate IZ in 4/5 focal IZ cases. In case of distributed IZ, levels of concordance were A (2 cases), B (4 cases) and D (3 cases). In most distributed cases, MSI allowed to localize only a part of the IZ. Medial temporal involvement in the IZ was frequent (9/12 cases) and not evidenced by MSI. The brain area that demonstrated the maximal value of EI was shown by MSI in four out of five (80 %) focal IZ cases, in two out of nine (22 %) distributed cases. MSI results depend on IZ characteristics. A distributed IZ organization

  15. Effect of Posterior Tibial Slope on Flexion and Anterior-Posterior Tibial Translation in Posterior Cruciate-Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Andrew W; Wood, Addison R; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Sanchez, Hugo B; Wagner, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    Reduced posterior tibial slope (PTS) and posterior tibiofemoral translation (PTFT) in posterior cruciate-retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may result in suboptimal flexion. We evaluated the relationship between PTS, PTFT, and total knee flexion after PCR TKA in a cadaveric model. We performed a balanced PCR TKA using 9 transfemoral cadaver specimens and changed postoperative PTS in 1° increments. We measured maximal flexion and relative PTFT at maximal flexion. We determined significant changes in flexion and PTFT as a function of PTS. Findings showed an average increase in flexion of 2.3° and average PTFT increase of 1mm per degree of PTS increase when increasing PTS from 1° to 4° (P<.05). Small initial increases in PTS appear to significantly increase knee flexion and PTFT. PMID:26476469

  16. Posterior Urethral Valve: An Unusual Cause of Primary Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Agbugui, Jude Orumuah; Omokhudu, Oisamoren

    2015-01-01

    Background Posterior urethral valve presenting in adulthood is uncommon. This can be an unusual cause of primary male infertility as a result of abnormalities in sexual function. Case Presentation This report describes a 40 year old man who presented to us on account of inability to impregnate his wife after 2 years of marriage. History revealed poor stream of urine since childhood and passage of scanty ejaculate during intercourse. A micturating cystourethrogram revealed dilated posterior urethra in keeping with posterior urethral valves. Endoscopic valve ablation was done with subsequent improvement in ejaculate volume and urine stream. His spouse achieved pregnancy thereafter. Conclusion In this report, it was found that adult posterior urethral valve though uncommon may be a cause of male infertility. Restoration of fertility potential can be achieved following valve ablation. PMID:25927029

  17. Free posterior tibial flap reconstruction for hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this article was to determine outcomes in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx (SCCHP) in whom the free posterior tibial flap was used for primary reconstruction of hypopharynx defects after cancer resection. Subjects and methods Between August 2009 and February 2012, 10 patients with SCCHP underwent posterior tibial flap reconstruction for hypopharynx defects. The corresponding clinical data were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Results Despite the multistep and time-consuming procedure, the posterior tibial flap survival rate was 100%. Operation-induced complications did not occur in four patients. Six patients developed postoperative hypoproteinemia, four patients developed postoperative pulmonary infections, and four patients developed pharyngeal fistula. The pharyngeal and laryngeal functions of all patients were preserved. Conclusion Our experience demonstrates that the posterior tibial flap is a safe and reliable choice for the reconstruction of hypopharynx defects. PMID:24884631

  18. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome accompanying eclampsia: correct diagnosis using preoperative MRI.

    PubMed

    Ekawa, Yuka; Shiota, Mitsuru; Tobiume, Takako; Shimaoka, Masao; Tsuritani, Mitsuhiro; Kotani, Yasushi; Mizuno, Yoshiaki; Hoshiai, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is characterized by clinical symptoms such as seizures, visual disturbance, and altered mental status. It also presents abnormal findings on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicating cerebral edema in the white matter of the occipital, temporal, and parietal lobes. Both the clinical symptoms and abnormal imaging findings can be reversed by controlling blood pressure or treating the underlying condition including infection. This report describes a patient with RPLS that occurred secondary to eclampsia. A 26-year-old female, gravida 0 para 0, developed weakness and pain in her upper and lower extremities and gait disturbance during the 34th week of pregnancy, and severe pregnancy-induced hypertension near the end of the 37th week. On the first day of the 38th week, she developed constricted visual fields and complained of visual illusions. MRI revealed a high-signal-intensity area in the right occipital lobe. Immediately after MRI, the patient had a 10-sec tonic convulsion. Diagnosed with eclampsia, she underwent emergency cesarean section. MRI on the 2nd postoperative day showed that the high-signal-intensity area was slightly improved. Her visual illusions were diminished by the 4th postoperative day, and almost all subjective symptoms disappeared by the 7th postoperative day. The patient was discharged at 12th postoperative day. We recommend MRI not only for symptomatic patients with suspected RPLS, but also for asymptomatic patients with severe pregnancy-induced hypertension. If findings such as cerebral edema are observed on MRI, immediate delivery should be considered before eclamptic seizures or exacerbation of neurological symptoms. PMID:22186037

  19. Abnormalities of fixation, saccade and pursuit in posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, Timothy J; Kaski, Diego; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Ryan, Natalie S; Schott, Jonathan M; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-01

    The clinico-neuroradiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy is the cardinal 'visual dementia' and most common atypical Alzheimer's disease phenotype, offering insights into mechanisms underlying clinical heterogeneity, pathological propagation and basic visual phenomena (e.g. visual crowding). Given the extensive attention paid to patients' (higher order) perceptual function, it is surprising that there have been no systematic analyses of basic oculomotor function in this population. Here 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 17 patients with typical Alzheimer's disease and 22 healthy controls completed tests of fixation, saccade (including fixation/target gap and overlap conditions) and smooth pursuit eye movements using an infrared pupil-tracking system. Participants underwent detailed neuropsychological and neurological examinations, with a proportion also undertaking brain imaging and analysis of molecular pathology. In contrast to informal clinical evaluations of oculomotor dysfunction frequency (previous studies: 38%, current clinical examination: 33%), detailed eyetracking investigations revealed eye movement abnormalities in 80% of patients with posterior cortical atrophy (compared to 17% typical Alzheimer's disease, 5% controls). The greatest differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer's disease were seen in saccadic performance. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy made significantly shorter saccades especially for distant targets. They also exhibited a significant exacerbation of the normal gap/overlap effect, consistent with 'sticky fixation'. Time to reach saccadic targets was significantly associated with parietal and occipital cortical thickness measures. On fixation stability tasks, patients with typical Alzheimer's disease showed more square wave jerks whose frequency was associated with lower cerebellar grey matter volume, while patients with posterior cortical atrophy showed large saccadic intrusions

  20. Abnormalities of fixation, saccade and pursuit in posterior cortical atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kaski, Diego; Yong, Keir X. X.; Paterson, Ross W.; Slattery, Catherine F.; Ryan, Natalie S.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    The clinico-neuroradiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy is the cardinal ‘visual dementia’ and most common atypical Alzheimer’s disease phenotype, offering insights into mechanisms underlying clinical heterogeneity, pathological propagation and basic visual phenomena (e.g. visual crowding). Given the extensive attention paid to patients’ (higher order) perceptual function, it is surprising that there have been no systematic analyses of basic oculomotor function in this population. Here 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 17 patients with typical Alzheimer’s disease and 22 healthy controls completed tests of fixation, saccade (including fixation/target gap and overlap conditions) and smooth pursuit eye movements using an infrared pupil-tracking system. Participants underwent detailed neuropsychological and neurological examinations, with a proportion also undertaking brain imaging and analysis of molecular pathology. In contrast to informal clinical evaluations of oculomotor dysfunction frequency (previous studies: 38%, current clinical examination: 33%), detailed eyetracking investigations revealed eye movement abnormalities in 80% of patients with posterior cortical atrophy (compared to 17% typical Alzheimer’s disease, 5% controls). The greatest differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer’s disease were seen in saccadic performance. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy made significantly shorter saccades especially for distant targets. They also exhibited a significant exacerbation of the normal gap/overlap effect, consistent with ‘sticky fixation’. Time to reach saccadic targets was significantly associated with parietal and occipital cortical thickness measures. On fixation stability tasks, patients with typical Alzheimer’s disease showed more square wave jerks whose frequency was associated with lower cerebellar grey matter volume, while patients with posterior cortical atrophy showed large

  1. Neurosurgical Management of Childhood Spasticity: Functional Posterior Rhizotomy and Intrathecal Baclofen Infusion Therapy

    PubMed Central

    MOROTA, Nobuhito; IHARA, Satoshi; OGIWARA, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    A paradigm shift is currently ongoing in the treatment of spasticity in childhood in Japan. Functional posterior rhizotomy (FPR), which was first introduced to Japan in 1996, is best indicated for children with spastic cerebral palsy, regardless of the clinical severity of spasticity. Surgery is generally carried out in the cauda equina, where the posterior root is separated from the anterior one, and neurophysiological procedures are used to judge which nerve root/rootlet should be cut. The outcome of FPR is favorable for reducing spasticity in the long-term follow-up. Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) treatment for childhood spasticity was approved in 2007 in Japan and the number of children undergoing ITB pump implantation has been gradually increasing. ITB treatment is best indicated for children with severe spasticity, especially those with dystonia, regardless of the pathological background. Since it is a surgery performed to implant foreign bodies, special attention should be paid to avoid perioperative complications such as CSF leakage, meningitis, and mechanical failure. Severely disabled children with spasticity would benefit most from ITB treatment. We would especially like to emphasize the importance of a strategic approach to the treatment of childhood spasticity. The first step is to reduce spasticity by FPR, ITB, and botulinum toxin injection. The second step is to aim for functional improvement after controlling spasticity. Traditional orthopedic surgery and neuro-rehabilitation form the second step of treatment. The combination of these treatments that allows them to complement each other is the key to a successful treatment of childhood spasticity. PMID:26227057

  2. A rare case of traumatic posterior phacocele with retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Sindal, Manavi D; Mourya, Deepesh

    2016-01-01

    Dislocation of crystalline lens into the anterior subconjunctival or subtenon's space is a rare but known complication of blunt trauma. Dislocation into the posterior subtenon's space is even rarer and can be associated with a complication such as occult scleral tear and retinal detachment. We report a case of traumatic posterior subtenon's dislocation of crystalline lens after blunt trauma and its successful surgical management. PMID:26953031

  3. Posterior partially edentulous jaws, planning a rehabilitation with dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Douglas R; Silva, Emily V F; Pellizzer, Eduardo P; Filho, Osvaldo Magro; Goiato, Marcelo C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To discuss important characteristics of the use of dental implants in posterior quadrants and the rehabilitation planning. METHODS: An electronic search of English articles was conducted on MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1990 up to the period of March 2014. The key terms were dental implants and posterior jaws, dental implants/treatment planning and posterior maxilla, and dental implants/treatment planning and posterior mandible. No exclusion criteria were used for the initial search. Clinical trials, randomized and non randomized studies, classical and comparative studies, multicenter studies, in vitro and in vivo studies, case reports, longitudinal studies and reviews of the literature were included in this review. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-two articles met the inclusion criteria of treatment planning of dental implants in posterior jaw and were read in their entirety. The selected articles were categorized with respect to their context on space for restoration, anatomic considerations (bone quantity and density), radiographic techniques, implant selection (number, position, diameter and surface), tilted and pterygoid implants, short implants, occlusal considerations, and success rates of implants placed in the posterior region. The results derived from the review process were described under several different topic headings to give readers a clear overview of the literature. In general, it was observed that the use of dental implants in posterior region requires a careful treatment plan. It is important that the practitioner has knowledge about the theme to evaluate the treatment parameters. CONCLUSION: The use of implants to restore the posterior arch presents many challenges and requires a detailed treatment planning. PMID:25610852

  4. Cementoblastoma of posterior maxilla involving the maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Dadhich, Anuj S.; Nilesh, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cementoblastoma is a rare neoplasm, representing <1% of all odontogenic tumors. It usually occurs in the posterior mandible and is associated with roots of a mandibular first molar or second premolar. This paper presents a rare case of cementoblastoma in the maxillary posterior region involving the maxillary sinus, in a young female patient. The clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed along with a review of previously reported cases in the literature. PMID:26389052

  5. Erupted complex odontoma of the posterior maxilla: A rarity

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonika; Arul, A. Sri Kennath J.; Arul, A. Sri Sennath J.; Chitra, S.

    2015-01-01

    Complex odontomas, hamartomas of aborted tooth development, mainly occur in posterior part of the mandible and rarely erupt into the oral cavity. The spontaneous eruption may be associated with pain, inflammation of adjacent soft tissues or recurrent infection. The present case of complex odontoma is of particular interest due to its apparent eruption in the maxillary posterior segment, its association with agenesis of the second molar and impacted third molar; with the lesion being completely asymptomatic. PMID:26604611

  6. Erupted complex odontoma of the posterior maxilla: A rarity.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sonika; Arul, A Sri Kennath J; Arul, A Sri Sennath J; Chitra, S

    2015-08-01

    Complex odontomas, hamartomas of aborted tooth development, mainly occur in posterior part of the mandible and rarely erupt into the oral cavity. The spontaneous eruption may be associated with pain, inflammation of adjacent soft tissues or recurrent infection. The present case of complex odontoma is of particular interest due to its apparent eruption in the maxillary posterior segment, its association with agenesis of the second molar and impacted third molar; with the lesion being completely asymptomatic. PMID:26604611

  7. Isolated posterior high ankle sprain: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Botchu, Rajesh; Allen, Patricia; Rennie, Winston J

    2013-12-01

    High ankle sprains are difficult to diagnose and account for 10% of all ankle sprains. A high index of suspicion is essential for diagnosis. High ankle sprains are managed symptomatically, with prolonged rehabilitation. The posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament is the strongest syndesmotic ligament; isolated injury of it is rare. We present 3 cases of isolated posterior high ankle sprain and discuss the relevant anatomy, mechanism of injury, and management. PMID:24366808

  8. Sevoflurane and nitrous oxide increase regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in a drug-specific manner in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kolbitsch, C; Lorenz, I H; Hörmann, C; Kremser, C; Schocke, M; Felber, S; Moser, P L; Hinteregger, M; Pfeiffer, K P; Benzer, A

    2001-12-01

    Anesthesia for diagnostic procedures, e.g., MRI measurements, has increasingly used sevoflurane and nitrous oxide in recent years. Sevoflurane and nitrous oxide are known cerebrovasodilatators, however, which potentially interferes with MRI examination of cerebral hemodynamics. To compare the effects of relevant equianesthetic concentrations (0.4 MAC) of both drugs on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) we used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion measurement, which has the advantage of providing regional anatomic resolution. Sevoflurane increased rCBF more than did nitrous oxide in all regions except in parietal and frontal gray matter. Nitrous oxide, by contrast, increased rCBV in most of the gray matter regions more than did sevoflurane. In summary we show that, in contrast to nitrous oxide, sevoflurane supratentorially reversed the anterior-posterior gradient in rCBF and typically redistributed rCBF to infratentorial gray matter. In contrast, nitrous oxide increased rCBV more than did sevoflurane. Both inhalational anesthetics had a drug-specific influence on cerebral hemodynamics, which is of importance when interpreting MRI studies of cerebral hemodynamics in anesthetized patients. PMID:11804751

  9. Computational modelling of mobile bearing TKA anterior-posterior dislocation.

    PubMed

    Müller, J H; Zakaria, T; van der Merwe, W; D'Angelo, F

    2016-01-01

    Anterior-posterior stability in an unconstrained mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and one with rotational constraints is compared in a computational model based on an ASTM test. Both TKA designs dislocate at loads greater than reported maximum in vivo forces. The posterior drawer forces (mean: 3027 N vs. 1817 N) needed to induce subluxation increase with a greater anterior jump distance (12 mm vs. 7 mm; refers to the vertical height of the anterior or posterior border of the tibial insert's articulating surface). The posterior jump distance for both tested TKA differed by 1.5 mm and had minimal effect on the magnitude of the anterior drawer forces at dislocation in mid-flexion (unconstrained vs. constrained: 445 N vs. 412 N). The unconstrained insert dislocated by means of spin-out whereas in the constrained TKA the femur dislocated from the bearing during posterior drawer and the bearing from the baseplate during anterior drawer. MCL function is an important consideration during ligament balancing since a ± 10% variation in MCL tension affects dislocation forces by ± 20%. The simulation platform provided the means to investigate TKA designs in terms of anterior-posterior stability as a function of knee flexion, collateral ligament function and mechanical morphology. PMID:26047039

  10. Optimizing tooth form with direct posterior composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ramya; Srinivasan, Raghu

    2011-10-01

    Advances in material sciences and technology have provided today's clinicians the strategies to transform the mechanistic approach of operative dentistry into a biologic philosophy. In the last three decades, composite resins have gone from being just an esthetically pleasing way of restoring Class III and Class IV cavities to become the universal material for both anterior and posterior situations as they closely mimic the natural esthetics while restoring the form of the human dentition. In order to enhance their success, clinicians have to rethink their protocol instead of applying the same restorative concepts and principles practiced with metallic restorations. Paralleling the evolution of posterior composite resin materials, cavity designs, restorative techniques and armamentarium have also developed rapidly to successfully employ composite resins in Class II situations. Most of the earlier problems with posterior composites such as poor wear resistance, polymerization shrinkage, postoperative sensitivity, predictable bonding to dentin, etc., have been overcome to a major extent. However, the clinically relevant aspect of achieving tight contacts in Class II situations has challenged clinicians the most. This paper reviews the evolution of techniques and recent developments in achieving predictable contacts with posterior composites. A Medline search was performed for articles on "direct posterior composite contacts." The keywords used were "contacts and contours of posterior composites." The reference list of each article was manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:22144797

  11. Cerebral autoregulation with changes in arterial and cerebral venous pressure

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, R.W.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of cerebral venous pressure (Pcv) elevation on cerebral autoregulation has been incompletely studied. The authors compared the effect of decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by elevated Pcv and decreased arterial pressure (Pa) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a canine modified bypass model. CPP of 80, 70, 60, 50, 40 and 30 mmHg were produced by decreasing Pa with intracranial pressure (ICP) and Pcv maintained at 0 mmHg (group 1, n = 5), or by elevating Pcv as Pa was maintained at 80 mmHg (group 2, n = 5. CBF was measured using radiolabeled microspheres, and CMRO/sub 2/ = CBF times arterial-sagittal sinus O/sub 2/ content difference. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) = CPP/CBF. In group 1 CBF (ml/100 gm/min) was unchanged from control (36 +/- 4) as CPP was decreased from 80 to 40 mmHg. As CPP was decreased to 30 mmHg, CBF decreased to 28 +/- 1. CVR (mmHg/ml/min/100 gm) was 2.3 +/- 0.3 and progressively decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 at CPP of 30 mmHg. In group 2 CBF was 34 +/- 3 and was unchanged as CPP decreased to 50 mmHg. At CPP of 40 and 30 mmHg CBF decreased to 25 +/- 3 and 22 +/- 2 respectively. Control CRV was 2.4 +/- 0.2 and progressively decreased to 1.4 +/- 0.1 as CPP decreased to 30 mmHg. CMRO/sub 2/ was unchanged from control in both groups. Thus, CBF is maintained to low CPP regardless of whether vascular transmural pressure was decreased (decrease Pa) or increased (increased Pcv) demonstrating that the myogenic mechanism of autoregulation may be unimportant in normoxic dogs.

  12. What's new in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    JONES, M H

    1953-11-01

    Among new researches bearing on cerebral palsy are the growth of brain cells in tissue cultures for experimentation; the use of polysaccharides to prevent the formation of a glial barrier to nerve growth after injury; observation of changes in reactions of neurons at various stages of development; the finding of hypernatremia and hyperchloremia in lesions of the frontal lobe and the thalamus; stimulation of cerebral blood flow by injection of sodium bicarbonate and retardation with ammonium chloride; and studies of serial sections of brains of palsied children who died. Study of development in the early months of life has made possible the detection of significant abnormalities in behavior early in life. Loss of hearing may be tested in very young children by measuring minute variations in electrical resistance of the skin upon auditory stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Conditions which have been described as having been confused with cerebral palsy are dislocation of a cervical vertebra, hereditary spastic paraplegia, transverse myelopathy, injury to the spinal cord or cauda equina by anomalous growths of the spine, and also encephalitis and meningitis. Sedation has proved a valuable adjunct to electroencephalographic study of cerebral palsy. Better criteria for abnormality in the young child should be determined and the application of them more clearly standardized. Simple exercises are useful for early training of palsied children to stimulate development. "Crossed laterality"-the dominant eye being contralateral to the preferred hand-has been counteracted by special training with great success in eliminating emotional and behavior problems and accelerating development.Recent studies indicate that only 50 per cent of cerebral palsy patients have normal or better intelligence. Subluxation of the hip joint, a common deformity associated with cerebral palsy, can sometimes be corrected by operation if detected at an early stage. Radical ablation of

  13. CEREBRAL PALSY. PRENTICE-HALL FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHANCE, BURTON, JR.; MCDONALD, EUGENE T.

    THIS INTRODUCTORY TEXT ON CEREBRAL PALSY IS DIVIDED INTO TWO SECTIONS. THE FIRST SECTION OF THE BOOK CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT UNDERSTANDING THE MEANING OF CEREBRAL PALSY, PROGRAMS FOR THOSE WITH CEREBRAL PALSY, THE NEUROLOGICAL BASES, ETIOLOGY, AND DIAGNOSIS, AND THE CLASSIFICATION OF CEREBRAL PALSY. PROBLEMS OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH CEREBRAL PALSY…

  14. The influence of posterior parietal cortex on extrastriate visual activity: A concurrent TMS and fast optical imaging study.

    PubMed

    Parks, Nathan A; Mazzi, Chiara; Tapia, Evelina; Savazzi, Silvia; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Beck, Diane M

    2015-11-01

    The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is a critical node in attentional and saccadic eye movement networks of the cerebral cortex, exerting top-down control over activity in visual cortex. Here, we sought to further elucidate the properties of PPC feedback by providing a time-resolved map of functional connectivity between parietal and occipital cortex using single-pulse TMS to stimulate the left PPC while concurrently recording fast optical imaging data from bilateral occipital cortex. Magnetic stimulation of the PPC induced transient ipsilateral occipital activations (BA 18) 24-48ms post-TMS. Concurrent TMS and fast optical imaging results demonstrate a clear influence of PPC stimulation on activity within human extrastriate visual cortex and further extend this time- and space-resolved method for examining functional connectivity. PMID:26449990

  15. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and cerebrovascular constriction syndrome in the differential diagnosis of post-partum headaches].

    PubMed

    Ruiz López, N; Cano Hernández, B; Balbás Álvarez, S

    2016-02-01

    Postpartum headache can be due to many causes. In a patient with previous epidural analgesia, the headache can be attributed to post-dural puncture headache, even if the symptoms are not typical of this clinical entity. We report a case of a post-partum with accidental dural tap during the insertion of an epidural catheter for labour analgesia, and who referred to headaches in the third post-partum day. Initially, a post-dural puncture headache was suspected, but the subsequent onset of seizures and visual impairment meant that the diagnosis had to be reconsidered. In this case report, the clinical and pathophysiological features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, as well as the differential diagnosis of post-partum headaches are described. PMID:26056067

  16. [Cerebral syndromes in premature children].

    PubMed

    Edel'shteĭn, E A; Bandarenko, E S

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral disturbances observed in premature infants are analyzed. These disturbances are a consequence of developmental slowdown and are associated with the pathological immaturity of the brain structures. On condition an active pathogenetic therapy is given these disturbances may gradually regress. On the basis of long-term observations of 600 prematurely born infants the authors describe the following clinical syndromes: muscular hypotonicity lasting up to 4-5 months and followed with a rise of the tone; the syndrome of "paretic hands" observed during the first two months of life; a hypertensive-hydrocephalic syndrome combined with a rise of the neuro-reflectory excitability; the syndrome of psychomotor development retardation followed at an age of over 1.5 to 2 years by complete recovery or minimal cerebral insufficiency with belated development of motor speech and neurosis-like reactions. PMID:6880498

  17. Imaging of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bonneville, F

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a potentially life-threatening emergency. The wide ranging of clinical symptoms makes the use of imaging in "slices" even more important for diagnosis. Both CT and MRI are used to diagnose the occlusion of a venous sinus, but MRI is superior to CT for detecting a clot in the cortical or deep veins. CT can show the hyperintense clot spontaneously and CT angiography the intraluminal defect. MRI also detects this thrombus, whose signal varies over time: in the acute phase, it is hypointense in T2*, whilst T1 and T2 can appear falsely reassuring; in the subacute phase, it is hyperintense on all sequences (T1, T2, FLAIR, T2*, diffusion). MRI easily shows the ischemic damage, even hemorrhagic, in the cerebral parenchyma in cases of CVT. Finally, imaging may reveal pathology at the origin of the CVT, such as a fracture of the skull, infection, tumor, dural fistula, or intracranial hypotension. PMID:25465119

  18. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  19. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25698610

  20. [Pathogenesis of infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Semenova, K A

    1980-01-01

    Some causes of the pathological activity of postural reflexes and other motor disturbances underlying the clinical picture of infantile cerebral paralysis are considered. It is shown that disturbed metabolism of corticosteroids observed in that disease, as well as impaired functional activity of T lymphocytes promote the development of both inflammatory and neuroimmune processes in the brain, mainly in large hemispheres--and this may be one of the causes of the pathological postural activity. PMID:6969015

  1. Incidental Cerebral Microbleeds and Cerebral Blood Flow in Elderly Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Nicholas M.; Kim, Albert E.; Gurol, M. Edip; Lopez, Oscar L.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Price, Julie C.; Mathis, Chester A.; James, Jeffrey A.; Snitz, Beth E.; Cohen, Ann D.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Minhas, Davneet; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Tamburo, Erica L.; Klunk, William E.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are collections of blood breakdown products that are a common incidental finding in magnetic resonance imaging of elderly individuals. Cerebral microbleeds are associated with cognitive deficits, but the mechanism is unclear. Studies show that individuals with CMBs related to symptomatic cerebral amyloid angiopathy have abnormal vascular reactivity and cerebral blood flow (CBF), but, to our knowledge, abnormalities in cerebral blood flow have not been reported for healthy individuals with incidental CMBs. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association of incidental CMBs with resting-state CBF, cerebral metabolism, cerebrovascular disease, β-amyloid (Aβ), and cognition. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A cross-sectional study of 55 cognitively normal individuals with a mean (SD) age of 86.8 (2.7) years was conducted from May 1, 2010, to May 1, 2013, in an academic medical center in Pittsburgh; data analysis was performed between June 10, 2013, and April 9, 2015. INTERVENTIONS 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging was performed with susceptibility-weighted imaging or gradient-recalled echo to assess CMBs, arterial spin labeling for CBF, and T1- and T2-weighted imaging for atrophy, white matter hyperintensities, and infarcts. Positron emission tomography was conducted with fluorodeoxyglucose to measure cerebral metabolism and Pittsburgh compound B for fibrillar Aβ. Neuropsychological evaluation, including the Clinical Dementia Rating scale, was performed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Magnetic resonance images were rated for the presence and location of CMBs. Lobar CMBs were subclassified as cortical or subcortical. Measurements of CBF, metabolism, and Aβ were compared with the presence and number of CMBs with voxelwise and region-of-interest analyses. RESULTS The presence of cortical CMBs was associated with significantly reduced CBF in multiple regions on voxelwise and region-of-interest analyses (percentage difference in global CBF,

  2. Infarction of the unilateral posterior horn and lateral column of the spinal cord with sparing of posterior columns: demonstration by MRI.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneki, M; Inoue, K; Shimizu, T; Mannen, T

    1994-01-01

    Infarction of the spinal cord, particularly in the distribution of the posterior spinal arteries, is rare. Twenty seven cases of posterior spinal artery syndrome have been reported. In all cases, the posterior columns were affected, and in all but two, the lesions were bilateral. Here a 49-year-old woman is reported, who was affected with lumbar cord infarction in the distribution of the posterior spinal arteries, diagnosed by MRI and clinical presentation. This case is of special interest because of sparing of the posterior columns and the unilateral nature of the lesion, even though the infarction occurred in the distribution of the posterior spinal arteries. Images PMID:8201340

  3. Photoacoustic imaging of cerebral hypoperfusion during acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B. Z.; Yang, J. G.; Wu, D.; Zeng, D. W.; Yi, Y.; Yang, N.; Jiang, H. B.

    2015-01-01

    Using acupuncture to treat cerebral hypoperfusion is a hot topic. However, there is a lack of effective tools to clarify the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on cerebral hypoperfusion. Here, we show in a mouse model of cerebral hypoperfusion that photoacoustic tomography (PAT) can noninvasively image cerebral vasculature and track total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration changes in cerebral hypoperfusion with acupuncture stimulation on the YangLingQuan (GB34) point. We measured the changes of HbT concentration and found that the HbT concentration in hypoperfusion regions was clearly lower than that in the control regions when the acupuncture was absent; however, it was significantly increased when the acupuncture was implemented on the GB34 point. We also observed the increase of vessel size and the generation of new vessels in cerebral hypoperfusion during acupuncture. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) was employed to validate some of the PAT findings. PMID:26417495

  4. Cerebral ischaemia: A neuroradiological study

    SciTech Connect

    Bories, J.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief clinical and pathophysiological approach, the papers presented in this book are devoted to CT and angiography. Concerning CT, a particular study has been made of cerebral arterial territories on cuts parallel to the orbito-meatal line: these are very important in making the differential diagnosis from some tumors. Also concerning CT, a paper has been devoted to cerebral ''lacunae.'' The term ''lacuna'' as far as CT imaging is concerned, should be reserved only for those hypodense areas corresponding to small cavities containing fluid, which are sequelae of infarcts in the territory of penetrating arteries. Before this sequellar state come all the evolutive states of a small deep infarct. The angiographic study specifies the indications of angiography in the study of cerebral ischemia, and the techniques to be used. It shows the main etiologic aspects. Because of the important place of vascular surgery today, it seemed necessary to show also the main post operative angiographic aspects. After CT and angiography, some pages are reserved to more modern techniques. Finally, some pages are devoted to certain particular associations and etiologies: childhood, cardiopathies, migraine, oral contraception and end with venous infarction.

  5. Bone age in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Palmieri, Maurício D'arc; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the chronological age and bone age among cerebral palsy patients in the outpatient clinic and its correlation with the type of neurological involvement, gender and functional status. Methods 401 patients with spastic cerebral palsy, and ages ranging from three months to 20 years old, submitted to radiological examination for bone age and analyzed by two independent observers according Greulich & Pyle. Results In the topographic distribution, there was a significant delay (p<0.005) in tetraparetic (17.7 months), hemiparetic (10.1 months), and diparetic patients (7.9 months). In the hemiparetic group, the mean bone age in the affected side was 96.88 months and the uncompromised side was 101.13 months (p<0.005). Regarding functional status, the ambulatory group showed a delay of 18.73 months in bone age (p<0.005). Comparing bone age between genders, it was observed a greater delay in males (13.59 months) than in females (9.63 months), but not statistically significant (p = 0.54). Conclusion There is a delay in bone age compared to chronological age influenced by the topography of spasticity, functional level and gender in patients with cerebral palsy. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453693

  6. Interoceptive awareness changes the posterior insula functional connectivity profile.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Esther; Mueller, Karsten; Lohmann, Gabriele; Schuetz-Bosbach, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Interoceptive awareness describes the ability to consciously perceive inner bodily signals, such as one's own heartbeat. The right anterior insula is assumed to mediate this ability. The role of the posterior insula, particularly posterior-to-anterior insula signal flows is less clear in this respect. We scanned 27 healthy people with either high or low interoceptive awareness using 3T fMRI, while they either monitored their own heartbeats, or external tones, respectively. We used a combination of network centrality and bivariate connectivity analyses to characterize changes in cortical signal flows between the posterior insula and the anterior insula during interoceptive awareness or exteroceptive awareness, respectively. We show that heartbeat monitoring was accompanied by reduced network centrality of the right posterior insula, and decreased functional connectivity strengths between the right posterior insula and the right mid and anterior insula. In addition, decreased signal flows between the right posterior insula and the bilateral anterior cingulate cortices, and the bilateral orbitofrontal cortices were observed during interoceptive awareness. Functional connectivity changes were only shown by people with high interoceptive awareness, and occurred specifically within the low-frequency range (i.e., <0.1 Hz). Both groups did not differ in their functional connectivity profiles during rest. Our results show for the first time that interoceptive awareness changes intra-insula signal flows in the low-frequency range. We speculate that the selective inhibition of slow signal progression along the posterior-to-anterior insula pathway during interoceptive awareness allows the salient and noiseless detection of one's own heartbeat. PMID:25613901

  7. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  8. Acid-sensing ion channel 1 and nitric oxide synthase are in adjacent layers in the wall of rat and human cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Hsien; Jin, Jingwen; Nashelsky, Marcus B.; Talman, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular acidification activates a family of proteins known as acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). One ASIC subtype, ASIC type 1 (ASIC1), may play an important role in synaptic plasticity, memory, fear conditioning and ischemic brain injury. ASIC1 is found primarily in neurons, but one report showed its expression in isolated mouse cerebrovascular cells. In this study, we sought to determine if ASIC1 is present in intact rat and human major cerebral arteries. A potential physiological significance of such a finding is suggested by studies showing that nitric oxide (NO), which acts as a powerful vasodilator, may modulate proton-gated currents in cultured cells expressing ASIC1s. Because both constitutive NO synthesizing enzymes, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS), are expressed in cerebral arteries we also studied the anatomical relationship between ASIC1 and nNOS or eNOS in both rat and human cerebral arteries. Western blot analysis demonstrated ASIC1 in cerebral arteries from both species. Immunofluorescent histochemistry and confocal microscopy also showed that ASIC1-immunoreactivity (IR), colocalized with the smooth muscle marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), was present in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), middle cerebral artery (MCA), posterior cerebral artery (PCA) and basilar artery (BA) of rat and human. Expression of ASIC1 in cerebral arteries is consistent with a role for ASIC1 in modulating cerebrovascular tone both in rat and human. Potential interactions between smooth muscle ASIC1 and nNOS or eNOS were supported by the presence of nNOS-IR in the neighboring adventitial layer and the presence of nNOS-IR and eNOS-IR in the adjacent endothelial layer of the cerebral arteries. PMID:25462386

  9. Parasympathetic tonic dilatory influences on cerebral vessels.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Nicholas C; Dragon, Deidre Nitschke; Talman, William T

    2009-05-11

    Parasympathetic nerves from the pterygopalatine ganglia may participate in development of cluster headaches, in vascular responses to hypertension and in modulation of damage due to stroke. Stimulation of the nerves elicits cerebral vasodilatation, but it is not known if the nerves tonically influence cerebrovascular tone. We hypothesized that parasympathetics provide a tonic vasodilator influence and tested that hypothesis by measuring cerebral blood flow in anesthetized rats before and after removal of a pterygopalatine ganglion. Ganglion removal led to reduced cerebral blood flow without changing blood pressure. Thus, parasympathetic nerves provide tonic vasodilatory input to cerebral blood vessels. PMID:19195933

  10. Effects of nicotine on regional cerebral glucose metabolism in awake resting tobacco smokers.

    PubMed

    Domino, E F; Minoshima, S; Guthrie, S K; Ohl, L; Ni, L; Koeppe, R A; Cross, D J; Zubieta, J

    2000-01-01

    Eleven healthy tobacco smoking adult male volunteers of mixed race were tobacco abstinent overnight for this study. In each subject, positron emission tomographic images of regional cerebral metabolism of glucose with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose were obtained in two conditions in the morning on different days: about 3min after approximately 1-2mg of nasal nicotine spray and after an equivalent volume of an active placebo spray of oleoresin of pepper in a random counterbalanced design. A Siemens/CTI 931/08-12 scanner with the capability of 15 horizontal brain slices was used. The images were further converted into a standard uniform brain format in which the mean data of all 11 subjects were obtained. Images were analysed in stereotactic coordinates using pixel-wise t statistics and a smoothed Gaussian model. Peak plasma nicotine levels varied three-fold and the areas under the curve(0-30min) varied seven-fold among the individual subjects. Nicotine caused a small overall reduction in global cerebral metabolism of glucose but, when the data were normalized, several brain regions showed relative increases in activity. Cerebral structures specifically activated by nicotine (nicotine minus pepper, Z score >4.0) included: left inferior frontal gyrus, left posterior cingulate gyrus and right thalamus. The visual cortex, including the right and left cuneus and left lateral occipito-temporal gyrus fusiformis, also showed an increase in regional cerebral metabolism of glucose with Z scores >3. 6. Structures with a decrease in regional cerebral metabolism of glucose (pepper minus nicotine) were the left insula and right inferior occipital gyrus, with Z scores >3.5. Especially important is the fact that the thalamus is activated by nicotine. This is consistent with the high density of nicotinic cholinoceptors in that brain region. However, not all brain regions affected by nicotine are known to have many nicotinic cholinoceptors. The results are discussed in relation to the

  11. Alteration of the Intra- and Cross- Hemisphere Posterior Default Mode Network in Frontal Lobe Glioma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haosu; Shi, Yonghong; Yao, Chengjun; Tang, Weijun; Yao, Demin; Zhang, Chenxi; Wang, Manning; Wu, Jinsong; Song, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Patients with frontal lobe gliomas often experience neurocognitive dysfunctions before surgery, which affects the default mode network (DMN) to different degrees. This study quantitatively analyzed this effect from the perspective of cerebral hemispheric functional connectivity (FC). We collected resting-state fMRI data from 20 frontal lobe glioma patients before treatment and 20 healthy controls. All of the patients and controls were right-handed. After pre-processing the images, FC maps were built from the seed defined in the left or right posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to the target regions determined in the left or right temporal-parietal junction (TPJ), respectively. The intra- and cross-group statistical calculations of FC strength were compared. The conclusions were as follows: (1) the intra-hemisphere FC strength values between the PCC and TPJ on the left and right were decreased in patients compared with controls; and (2) the correlation coefficients between the FC pairs in the patients were increased compared with the corresponding controls. When all of the patients were grouped by their tumor’s hemispheric location, (3) the FC of the subgroups showed that the dominant hemisphere was vulnerable to glioma, and (4) the FC in the dominant hemisphere showed a significant correlation with WHO grade. PMID:27248706

  12. Posterior Cingulate Lactate as a Metabolic Biomarker in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Kurt E.; Richards, Todd L.; Logsdon, Rebecca G.; McGough, Ellen L.; Minoshima, Satoshi; Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Kleinhans, Natalia M.; Grabowski, Thomas J.; McCurry, Susan M.; Teri, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction represents a central factor within the pathogenesis of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) spectrum. We hypothesized that in vivo measurements of lactate (lac), a by-product of glycolysis, would correlate with functional impairment and measures of brain health in a cohort of 15 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) individuals. Lac was quantified from the precuneus/posterior cingulate (PPC) using 2-dimensional J-resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Additionally, standard behavioral and imaging markers of aMCI disease progression were acquired. PPC lac was negatively correlated with performance on the Wechsler logical memory tests and on the minimental state examination even after accounting for gray matter, cerebral spinal fluid volume, and age. No such relationships were observed between lac and performance on nonmemory tests. Significant negative relationships were also noted between PPC lac and hippocampal volume and PPC functional connectivity. Together, these results reveal that aMCI individuals with a greater disease progression have increased concentrations of PPC lac. Because lac is upregulated as a compensatory response to mitochondrial impairment, we propose that J-resolved MRS of lac is a noninvasive, surrogate biomarker of impaired metabolic function and would provide a useful means of tracking mitochondrial function during therapeutic trials targeting brain metabolism. PMID:26417597

  13. Injuries to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Bergfeld, J; Järvinen, M; Johnson, R J; Pope, M; Renström, P; Yasuda, K

    1991-08-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the strongest ligament about the knee and is approximately twice as strong as the anterior cruciate ligament. Its main function is to prevent the posterior dislocation of the tibia in relation to the femur, providing 95% of the strength to resist the tibial posterior displacement. Along with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) the PCL controls the passive 'screw home' mechanism of the knee in terminal knee extension. It also provides mechanical support for the collateral ligaments during valgus or varus stress of the knee. PCL ruptures are uncommon apparently due to its strong fibre structure. The most frequent injury mechanism in isolated PCL tears is a direct blow on the anterior tibia with the knee flexed thus driving the tibia posteriorly. Automobile accidents (in which the knee hits the dashboard) and soccer injuries (in which an athlete receives a blow to the anterior surface of the tibia during knee flexion) characteristically produce this type of injury. In other PCL injury mechanisms (hyperextension, hyperflexion or rotational injuries with associated valgum/varum stress), other knee structures are also often damaged. The most characteristic diagnostic finding in a knee with a PCL rupture is the 'posterior sag sign' meaning the apparent disappearance of the tibial tubercle in lateral inspection when the knee is flexed 90 degrees. This is due to gravity-assisted posterior displacement of the tibia in relation to the femur. A positive posterior drawer test performed at 90 degrees of flexion and a knee hyperextension sign are sensitive but nonspecific tests. False negative findings are frequent, especially in acute cases. If necessary, the clinical diagnosis of the PCL tear can be verified by magnetic resonance imaging, examination under anaesthesia, arthroscopy, or a combination of these modalities. If a PCL avulsion fragment has been dislocated, surgical treatment is recommended. In isolated, complete midsubstance

  14. Association of Dysphagia With Supratentorial Lesions in Patients With Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the supratentorial area associated with poststroke dysphagia, we assessed the diffusion tensor images (DTI) in subacute stroke patients with supratentorial lesions. Methods We included 31 patients with a first episode of infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory. Each subject underwent brain DTI as well as a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and patients divided were into the dysphagia and non-dysphagia groups. Clinical dysphagia scale (CDS) scores were compared between the two groups. The corticospinal tract volume (TV), fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated for 11 regions of interest in the supratentorial area—primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, supplementary motor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, parieto-occipital cortex, insular cortex, posterior limb of the internal capsule, thalamus, and basal ganglia (putamen and caudate nucleus). DTI parameters were compared between the two groups. Results Among the 31 subjects, 17 were diagnosed with dysphagia by VFSS. Mean TVs were similar across the two groups. Significant inter-group differences were observed in two DTI values: the FA value in the contra-lesional primary motor cortex and the ADC value in the bilateral posterior limbs of the internal capsule (all p<0.05). Conclusion The FA value in the primary motor cortex on the contra-lesional side and the ADC value in the bilateral PLIC can be associated with dysphagia in middle cerebral artery stroke. PMID:27606270

  15. Effects of Treatment for Tobacco Dependence on Resting Cerebral Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Matthew R; Mandelkern, Mark A; Shoptaw, Stephen; Shulenberger, Stephanie; Baker, Stephanie K; Abrams, Anna L; Xia, Catherine; London, Edythe D; Brody, Arthur L

    2010-01-01

    While bupropion HCl and practical group counseling (PGC) are commonly used treatments for tobacco dependence, the effects of these treatments on brain function are not well established. For this study, 54 tobacco-dependent cigarette smokers underwent resting 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose–positron emission tomography (FDG–PET) scanning before and after 8 weeks of treatment with bupropion HCl, PGC, or pill placebo. Using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 2), changes in cerebral glucose metabolism from before to after treatment were compared between treatment groups and correlations were determined between amount of daily cigarette usage and cerebral glucose metabolism. Compared with placebo, the two active treatments (bupropion HCl and PGC) had reductions in glucose metabolism in the posterior cingulate gyrus. Further analysis suggested that PGC had a greater effect than bupropion HCl on glucose metabolism in this region. We also found positive correlations between daily cigarette use and glucose metabolism in the left occipital gyrus and parietal–temporal junction. There were no significant negative correlations between daily cigarette use and glucose metabolism. Our findings suggest that bupropion HCl and PGC reduce neural activity much as the performance of a goal-oriented task does in the default mode network of the brain, including the posterior cingulate gyrus. Thus, this study supports the theory that active treatments for tobacco dependence move the brain into a more goal-oriented state. PMID:19865076

  16. A Simple Approach to Specimen Retrieval via Posterior Colpotomy Incision

    PubMed Central

    Menderes, Gulden; Tower, Amanda M.; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior colpotomy incision for specimen retrieval is infrequently used in gynecologic laparoscopic surgery unless a concomitant hysterectomy is performed. We aim to describe a simple and unique technique for creating the colpotomy incision and to describe intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. Methods: Fifty patients underwent adnexal specimen retrieval through a posterior colpotomy incision. After devascularization and detachment of the adnexal specimen, the posterior cul-de-sac was visualized. The colpotomy incision was created by introducing a 12- or 15-mm laparoscopic trocar through the vagina into the posterior vaginal fornix under direct visualization. Specimens were placed into laparoscopic bags and removed through the vagina. The colpotomy incision was closed vaginally. Charts were reviewed for intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. Results: Twenty-nine women underwent adnexal surgery for an adnexal mass, 14 women underwent surgery for pelvic pain, and 7 women underwent adnexal surgery for primary prevention of malignancy. The specimens removed ranged in size from 2 to 16 cm (mean 5.7). The mean time patients were under anesthesia was 103 minutes (SD 57.3). There were no operative complications related to the colpotomy incision and no cases of postoperative vaginal cellulitis or pelvic infection were reported. Only 1 woman with a prior vaginal delivery reported dyspareunia postoperatively. Conclusion: This simple technique for posterior colpotomy incision can easily be added to the gynecologic surgeon's armamentarium and can be safely used for most women. PMID:25901107

  17. Instrumented Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Adult Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ching-Hsiao; Wang, Chen-Ti

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear whether using artificial cages increases fusion rates compared with use of bone chips alone in posterior lumbar interbody fusion for patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. We hypothesized artificial cages for posterior lumbar interbody fusion would provide better clinical and radiographic outcomes than bone chips alone. We assumed solid fusion would provide good clinical outcomes. We clinically and radiographically followed 34 patients with spondylolisthesis having posterior lumbar interbody fusion with mixed autogenous and allogeneic bone chips alone and 42 patients having posterior lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of artificial cages packed with morselized bone graft. Patients with the artificial cage had better functional improvement in the Oswestry disability index than those with bone chips alone, whereas pain score, patient satisfaction, and fusion rate were similar in the two groups. Postoperative disc height ratio, slip ratio, and segmental lordosis all decreased at final followup in the patients with bone chips alone but remained unchanged in the artificial cage group. The functional outcome correlated with radiographic fusion status. We conclude artificial cages provide better functional outcomes and radiographic improvement than bone chips alone in posterior lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar spondylolisthesis, although both techniques achieved comparable fusion rates. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18846411

  18. Fetoscopic transuterine release of posterior urethral valves: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Matthew S; Harrison, Michael R; Ball, Robert; Lee, Hanmin

    2008-01-01

    Fetal urinary tract obstruction with oligohydramnios produces pulmonary hypoplasia and renal dysplasia. Decompression of the obstructed urinary tract may restore amniotic fluid and allow lung growth, but transabdominal catheter shunt decompression is often inadequate and does not allow for cycling of the bladder, while open procedures cause significant maternal morbidity. Disruption of the anatomic obstruction, usually posterior urethral valves in a male fetus, would be ideal but has proven technically difficult. Here we describe a new technique of percutaneous fetal cystoscopy and disruption of posterior urethral valves, and the case report of our first application of this technique. We pre-sent a case of a 17-week male fetus with posterior urethral valves which underwent fetal cystoscopy for mechanical disruption of posterior urethral valves. This minimally invasive approach to disruption of posterior urethral valves in a fetus is a novel method for decompressing the urinary tract. The technique offers a minimal degree of maternal morbidity and, if instituted early enough, can restore amniotic fluid volume, avert fatal pulmonary hypoplasia and may preserve renal function. PMID:18033963

  19. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  20. Thinking in spatial terms: decoupling spatial representation from sensorimotor control in monkey posterior parietal areas 7a and LIP

    PubMed Central

    Chafee, Matthew V.; Crowe, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Perhaps the simplest and most complete description of the cerebral cortex is that it is a sensorimotor controller whose primary purpose is to represent stimuli and movements, and adaptively control the mapping between them. However, in order to think, the cerebral cortex has to generate patterns of neuronal activity that encode abstract, generalized information independently of ongoing sensorimotor events. A critical question confronting cognitive systems neuroscience at present therefore is how neural signals encoding abstract information emerge within the sensorimotor control networks of the brain. In this review, we approach that question in the context of the neural representation of space in posterior parietal cortex of non-human primates. We describe evidence indicating that parietal cortex generates a hierarchy of spatial representations with three basic levels: including (1) sensorimotor signals that are tightly coupled to stimuli or movements, (2) sensorimotor signals modified in strength or timing to mediate cognition (examples include attention, working memory, and decision-processing), as well as (3) signals that encode frankly abstract spatial information (such as spatial relationships or categories) generalizing across a wide diversity of specific stimulus conditions. Here we summarize the evidence for this hierarchy, and consider data showing that signals at higher levels derive from signals at lower levels. That in turn could help characterize neural mechanisms that derive a capacity for abstraction from sensorimotor experience. PMID:23355813

  1. EEG of Chronic Marijuana Users during Abstinence: Relationship to Years of Marijuana Use, Cerebral Blood Flow and Thyroid Function

    PubMed Central

    Herning, Ronald I.; Better, Warren; Cadet, Jean L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Marijuana abuse is associated with neurological changes including increases in frontal EEG alpha during abstinence. Research is needed to assess to what extent these EEG patterns are indicative of cerebral perfusion deficits. Methods We recorded the resting eyes closed EEG of 75 abstinent marijuana users and 33 control subjects. Fifty-six marijuana users used marijuana for less than eight years and 19 used for eight years or more. The EEG evaluation occurred within 72 hours of admission to an inpatient unit. Fifty-nine marijuana users remained abstinent for a month and were tested twice. Supplemental psychological and physiological data were also collected. Results Log alpha2 and beta2 power at posterior sites were significantly lower for the marijuana abusers that used eight years or more than the other marijuana abusers and the control subjects. These EEG changes continued for the month of abstinence. The marijuana users who used marijuana for more than eight years, also, had lower heart rates and thyroid function (T4) compared to the other marijuana users and the control subjects. Conclusions Chronic marijuana use was also associated with reduced EEG power in alpha and beta bands at posterior sites. These reductions in EEG power appear to be related to cerebral perfusion deficits and/or thyroid function in marijuana abusers. Significance Our results suggest EEG, cerebral blood flow velocity, cardiovascular and thyroid function alterations in marijuana abuser with an extended period of use. These alterations reflect under arousal in these systems. PMID:18065267

  2. Children with New Onset Epilepsy Exhibit Diffusion Abnormalities in Cerebral White Matter in the Absence of Volumetric Differences

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Elizabeth; Pulsipher, Dalin; Dabbs, Kevin; Myers y Gutierrez, Adan; Sheth, Raj; Jones, Jana; Seidenberg, Michael; Meyerand, Elizabeth; Hermann, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The purpose of this investigation was to examine the diffusion properties of cerebral white matter in children with recent onset epilepsy (n=19) compared to healthy controls (n=11). Subjects underwent DTI with quantification of mean diffusion (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (Dax) and radial diffusivity (Drad) for regions of interest including anterior and posterior corpus callosum, fornix, cingulum, and internal and external capsules. Quantitative volumetrics were also performed for the corpus callosum and its subregions (anterior, midbody and posterior) and total lobar white and gray matter for the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes. The results demonstrated no group differences in total lobar gray or white matter volumes or volume of the corpus callosum and its subregions, but did show reduced FA and increased Drad in the posterior corpus callosum and cingulum. These results provide the earliest indication of microstructural abnormality in cerebral white matter among children with idiopathic epilepsies. This abnormality occurs in the context of normal volumetrics and suggests disruption in myelination processes. PMID:20044239

  3. Quantification of Posterior Globe Flattening: Methodology Development and Validationc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkins, S. B.; Garcia, K. M.; Sargsyan, A. E.; Hamilton, D. R.; Berggren, M. D.; Antonsen, E.; Ebert, D.

    2011-01-01

    Microgravity exposure affects visual acuity in a subset of astronauts, and mechanisms may include structural changes in the posterior globe and orbit. Particularly, posterior globe flattening has been implicated in several astronauts. This phenomenon is known to affect some terrestrial patient populations, and has been shown to be associated with intracranial hypertension. It is commonly assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), or B-mode ultrasound (US), without consistent objective criteria. NASA uses a semi-quantitative scale of 0-3 as part of eye/orbit MRI and US analysis for occupational monitoring purposes. The goal of this study was to initiate development of an objective quantification methodology for posterior globe flattening.

  4. Regression of posterior uveal melanomas following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cruess, A.F.; Augsburger, J.J.; Shields, J.A.; Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Day, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    A method has been devised for evaluating the rate and extent of regression of the first 100 consecutive patients with a posterior uveal melanoma that had been managed by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy at Wills Eye Hospital. It was found that the average posterior uveal melanoma in the series did not regress rapidly to a flat, depigmented scar but shrank slowly and persisted as a residual mass approximately 50% of the thickness of the original tumor at 54 months following Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. The authors also found that the rate and extent of regression of the tumors in patients who subsequently developed metastatic melanoma were not appreciably different from the rate and extent of regression of the tumors in patients who remained well systemically. These observations indicate that the rate and extent of regression of posterior uveal melanomas following Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy are poor indicators of the prognosis of the affected patients for subsequent development of clinical metastatic disease.

  5. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L.; Krych, Aaron J.; Dahm, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy. PMID:26870644

  6. [Research advances of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Qin, Jiong

    2016-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-neuroradiological entity affecting the posterior brain, i.e. occipital and parietal lobes. The syndrome are characterized by headaches, altered mental status, seizures, and visual disturbances. Although the pathogenesis remains unclear, endothelial dysfunction may be a key factor. The basic disease may play a crucial role in the incidence of PRES. In most cases, PRES resolves spontaneously and patients show both clinical and radiological improvements. In severe forms, PRES might cause substantial morbidity with sequel and even mortality, as a result of acute hemorrhage or massive posterior fossa edema causing obstructive hydrocephalus or brainstem compression. Early identification, active and appropriate treatment is very important. PMID:27530801

  7. Quantification of Posterior Globe Flattening: Methodology Development and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkins, Sarah B.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Berggren, Michael D.; Ebert, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity exposure affects visual acuity in a subset of astronauts and mechanisms may include structural changes in the posterior globe and orbit. Particularly, posterior globe flattening has been implicated in the eyes of several astronauts. This phenomenon is known to affect some terrestrial patient populations and has been shown to be associated with intracranial hypertension. It is commonly assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) or B-mode Ultrasound (US), without consistent objective criteria. NASA uses a semiquantitative scale of 0-3 as part of eye/orbit MRI and US analysis for occupational monitoring purposes. The goal of this study was ot initiate development of an objective quantification methodology to monitor small changes in posterior globe flattening.

  8. Endothelin: A novel peptide in the posterior pituitary system

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizawa, Toshihiro; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Shinmi, Osamu; Kimura, Sadao; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Masaki, Tomoh; Uchiyama, Yasuo ); Giaid, A.; Gibson, S.J.; Polak, J.M. )

    1990-01-26

    Endothelin (ET), originally characterized as a 21-residue vasoconstrictor peptide from endothelial cells, is present in the porcine spinal cord and may act as a neuropeptide. Endothelin-like immunoreactivity has now been demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclear neurons and their terminals in the posterior pituitary of the pig and the rat. The presence of ET in the porcine hypothalamus was confirmed by reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay. Moreover, in situ hybridization demonstrated ET messenger RNA in porcine paraventricular nuclear neurons. Endothelin-like immunoreactive products in the posterior pituitary of the rat were depleted by water deprivation, suggesting a release of ET under physiological conditions. These findings indicate that ET is synthesized in the posterior pituitary system and may be involved in neurosecretory functions.

  9. Ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament in a child.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Shamsi Abdul; Sujir, Premjit; Naik, Monappa A; Rao, Sharath K

    2012-04-01

    Ganglion cysts are more commonly associated with the anterior cruciate ligament than the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A literature review showed that all reported cases of ganglion cysts to date involved adults. We report a rare case of ganglion cyst in the PCL of a four-year-old boy, and discuss its aetiology, clinical presentation, imaging features and management. Ganglion cysts of the PCL may be confused with meniscal cysts arising from tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hence, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus has to be carefully evaluated to rule out a tear. MR imaging is the method of choice to confirm diagnosis, and arthroscopic resection is a safe treatment modality even in children. PMID:22511069

  10. Rotational stability of a posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Amador, D D

    1989-05-01

    The effect of the posterior stabilizing mechanism on rotational stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was investigated in six cadaver knees using a special knee-testing device. The device evaluated varus-valgus, rotational, and anteroposterior (AP) stability in the normal knee compared to a posterior stabilized TKA with either a rotationally constrained or an unconstrained articular surface. None of the stability parameters was significantly different from normal in either configuration of the tibial surface, but the constrained surface did decrease rotational deflection compared to the rotationally unconstrained surfaces. These findings show that rotational constraint in a posterior stabilized TKA is not necessary to achieve rotational stability as long as varus-valgus stability is achieved by appropriately tensioning the collateral ligaments. PMID:2706852

  11. Posterior Cingulate Glucose Metabolism, Hippocampal Glucose Metabolism, and Hippocampal Volume in Cognitively Normal, Late-Middle-Aged Persons at 3 Levels of Genetic Risk for Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Protas, Hillary D.; Chen, Kewei; Langbaum, Jessica B. S.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Alexander, Gene E.; Lee, Wendy; Bandy, Daniel; de Leon, Mony J.; Mosconi, Lisa; Buckley, Shannon; Truran-Sacrey, Diana; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.; Caselli, Richard J.; Reiman, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize and compare measurements of the posterior cingulate glucose metabolism, the hippocampal glucose metabolism, and hippocampal volume so as to distinguish cognitively normal, late-middle-aged persons with 2, 1, or 0 copies of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele, reflecting 3 levels of risk for late-onset Alzheimer disease. Design Cross-sectional comparison of measurements of cerebral glucose metabolism using 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography and measurements of brain volume using magnetic resonance imaging in cognitively normal ε4 homozygotes, ε4 heterozygotes, and noncarriers. Setting Academic medical center. Participants A total of 31 ε4 homozygotes, 42 ε4 heterozygotes, and 76 noncarriers, 49 to 67 years old, matched for sex, age, and educational level. Main Outcome Measures The measurements of posterior cingulate and hippocampal glucose metabolism were characterized using automated region-of-interest algorithms and normalized for whole-brain measurements. The hippocampal volume measurements were characterized using a semiautomated algorithm and normalized for total intracranial volume. Results Although there were no significant differences among the 3 groups of participants in their clinical ratings, neuropsychological test scores, hippocampal volumes (P=.60), or hippocampal glucose metabolism measurements (P = .12), there were significant group differences in their posterior cingulate glucose metabolism measurements (P=.001). The APOE ε4 gene dose was significantly associated with posterior cingulate glucose metabolism (r=0.29, P=.0003), and this association was significantly greater than those with hippocampal volume or hippocampal glucose metabolism (P<.05, determined by use of pairwise Fisher z tests). Conclusions Although our findings may depend in part on the analysis algorithms used, they suggest that a reduction in posterior cingulate glucose metabolism precedes a reduction in hippocampal volume or

  12. Correlation between cerebral reorganization and motor recovery after subcortical infarcts.

    PubMed

    Loubinoux, Isabelle; Carel, Christophe; Pariente, Jérémie; Dechaumont, Sophie; Albucher, Jean-François; Marque, Philippe; Manelfe, Claude; Chollet, François

    2003-12-01

    Our objective was to investigate correlations between clinical motor scores and cerebral sensorimotor activation to demonstrate that this reorganization is the neural substratum of motor recovery. Correlation analyses identified reorganization processes shared by all patients. Nine patients with first-time corticospinal tract lacuna were clinically evaluated using the NIH stroke scale, the motricity index, and the Barthel index. Patients were strictly selected for pure motor deficits. They underwent a first fMRI session (E1) 11 days after stroke, and then a second (E2) 4 weeks later. The task used was a calibrated repetitive passive flexion/extension of the paretic wrist. The control task was rest. Six healthy subjects followed the same protocol. Patients were also clinically evaluated 4 and 12 months after stroke. All patients improved significantly between E1 and E2. For E1 and E2, the ipsilesional primary sensorimotor and premotor cortex, supplementary motor area (SMA), and bilateral Broadmann area (BA) 40 were activated. Activation intensity was greater at the second examination except in the ipsilesional superior BA 40. Magnitude of activation was lower than that of controls except for well-recovered patients. E1 clinical hand motor score and E1 cerebral activation correlated in the SMA proper and inferior ipsilesional BA 40. Thus, we demonstrated early functionality of the sensorimotor system. The whole sensorimotor network activation correlated with motor status at E2, indicating a recovery of its function when activated. Moreover, the activation pattern in the acute phase (E1) had a predictive value: early recruitment and high activation of the SMA and inferior BA 40 were correlated with a faster or better motor recovery. On the contrary, activation of the contralesional hemisphere (prefrontal cortex and BA 39-40) and of the posterior cingulate/precuneus (BA 7-31) predicted a slower recovery. PMID:14683720

  13. Risk of rupture of unruptured cerebral aneurysms in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Date, Isao; Tokunaga, Koji; Tominari, Shinjiro; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Murayama, Yuichi; Ishibashi, Toshihiro; Takao, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Toshikazu; Nakayama, Takeo; Morita, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for rupture of unruptured cerebral aneurysms (UCAs) in elderly Japanese patients aged 70 years or older. Methods: The participants included all patients 70 years of age or older in 3 prospective studies in Japan (the Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Study of Japan [UCAS Japan], UCAS II, and the prospective study at the Jikei University School of Medicine). A total of 1,896 patients aged 70 years or older with 2,227 UCAs were investigated. The median and mean follow-up periods were 990 and 802.7 days, respectively. Results: The mean aneurysm size was 6.2 ± 3.9 mm. Sixty-eight patients (3.6%) experienced subarachnoid hemorrhage during the follow-up period. Multivariable analysis per patient revealed that in patients aged 80 years or older (hazard ratio [HR], 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–3.49, p = 0.012), aneurysms 7 mm or larger (HR, 3.08; 95% CI, 1.35–7.03, p = 0.007 for 7–9 mm; HR, 7.82; 95% CI, 3.60–16.98, p < 0.001 for 10–24 mm; and HR, 43.31; 95% CI, 12.55–149.42, p < 0.001 for ≥25 mm) and internal carotid–posterior communicating artery aneurysms (HR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.23–4.88, p = 0.011) were independent predictors for UCA rupture in elderly patients. Conclusions: In our pooled analysis of prospective cohorts in Japan, patient age and aneurysm size and location were significant risk factors for UCA rupture in elderly patients. PMID:26511450

  14. Genome-wide analyses of human perisylvian cerebral cortical patterning

    PubMed Central

    Abrahams, B. S.; Tentler, D.; Perederiy, J. V.; Oldham, M. C.; Coppola, G.; Geschwind, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the well established role of the frontal and posterior perisylvian cortices in many facets of human-cognitive specializations, including language, little is known about the developmental patterning of these regions in the human brain. We performed a genome-wide analysis of human cerebral patterning during midgestation, a critical epoch in cortical regionalization. A total of 345 genes were identified as differentially expressed between superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the remaining cerebral cortex. Gene ontology categories representing transcription factors were enriched in STG, whereas cell-adhesion and extracellular matrix molecules were enriched in the other cortical regions. Quantitative RT-PCR or in situ hybridization was performed to validate differential expression in a subset of 32 genes, most of which were confirmed. LIM domain-binding 1 (LDB1), which we show to be enriched in the STG, is a recently identified interactor of LIM domain only 4 (LMO4), a gene known to be involved in the asymmetric pattering of the perisylvian region in the developing human brain. Protocadherin 17 (PCDH17), a neuronal cell adhesion molecule, was highly enriched in focal regions of the human prefrontal cortex. Contactin associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2), in which mutations are known to cause autism, epilepsy, and language delay, showed a remarkable pattern of anterior-enriched cortical expression in human that was not observed in mouse or rat. These data highlight the importance of expression analysis of human brain and the utility of cross-species comparisons of gene expression. Genes identified here provide a foundation for understanding molecular aspects of human-cognitive specializations and the disorders that disrupt them. PMID:17978184

  15. The posterior bone block procedure in posterior shoulder instability: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Meuffels, D E; Schuit, H; van Biezen, F C; Reijman, M; Verhaar, J A N

    2010-05-01

    We present the long-term outcome, at a median of 18 years (12.8 to 23.5) of open posterior bone block stabilisation for recurrent posterior instability of the shoulder in a heterogenous group of 11 patients previously reported on in 2001 at a median follow-up of six years. We found that five (45%) would not have chosen the operation again, and that four (36%) had further posterior dislocation. Clinical outcome was significantly worse after 18 years than after six years of follow-up (median Rowe score of 60 versus 90 (p = 0.027)). The median Western Ontario Shoulder Index was 60% (37% to 100%) at 18 years' follow-up, which is a moderate score. At the time of surgery four (36%) had glenohumeral radiological osteoarthritis, which was present in all after 18 years. This study showed poor long-term results of the posterior bone block procedure for posterior instability and a high rate of glenohumeral osteoarthritis although three patients with post-traumatic instability were pleased with the result of their operations. PMID:20436001

  16. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after neurosurgery: A literature review].

    PubMed

    Durán Paz, S; Moreno Casanova, I; Benatar-Haserfaty, J

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical-radiological characterized by decreased level of consciousness, seizures, and visual disturbances, as well as radiologically ras brain edema, predominantly in parieto-occipital white matter regions. There are many situations that can trigger the disorder, including the administration of immunosuppressants, chemotherapy agents, hypertensive disorders, and sepsis. The case is described of a patient diagnosed with stage IV prostate adenocarcinoma, receiving chemotherapy, andundergoing a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after surgery for resection of brain metastasis. PMID:25866131

  17. Bilambdoid and posterior sagittal synostosis: the Mercedes Benz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moore, M H; Abbott, A H; Netherway, D J; Menard, R; Hanieh, A

    1998-09-01

    A consistent pattern of craniosynostosis in the sagittal and bilateral lambdoid sutures is described in three patients. The external cranial ridging associated with fusion of these sutures produces a characteristic triradiate, or "Mercedes Benz," appearance to the posterior skull. Locally marked growth restriction is evident in the posterior fossa with compensatory secondary expansion of the anterior fossa manifesting a degree of frontal bossing which mimics bicoronal synostosis. Although this appearance could lead to inadvertent surgery in the frontal region, attention to the occipital region with wide early suture excision and vault shaping is indicated. PMID:9780908

  18. Surgical treatment of posterior nutcracker syndrome presented with hyperaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Deser, Serkan Burc; Onem, Kadir; Demirag, Mustafa Kemal; Buyukalpelli, Recep

    2016-05-01

    Posterior nutcracker syndrome is caused by the compression of left renal vein between the abdominal aorta and the vertebral body. Most seen symptoms are haematuria, left flank pain, abdominal pain and varicocele. The nutcracker syndrome may lead to left renal vein thrombosis due to blood congestion within compression of the vessel. Both endovascular and open surgical interventions can relieve symptoms; however, traditional surgical repair is still considered as the gold standard. Here, we present the surgical treatment of a 36-year old female with complaints of hypertension, hyperaldosteronism and diagnosed with posterior nutcracker syndrome. PMID:26892192

  19. Superior labrum anterior to posterior tears in throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Lintner, David M

    2013-01-01

    Superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears and partial undersurface tears of the rotator cuff are common in experienced throwers, may be adaptive, and are only occasionally symptomatic. Pain in the shoulder of a throwing athlete with an MRI-documented SLAP tear or partial undersurface tear of the rotator cuff can be managed nonsurgically, with attention to posterior capsular contracture, scapular dyskinesia, and rotator cuff strength. The results of the surgical repair of SLAP lesions in the throwing athlete, with or without rotator cuff repair, are inferior to those of nonsurgical treatment. The cause of pain in the throwing athlete must be accurately diagnosed without reliance on MRI findings. PMID:23395053

  20. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  1. Variations in Writing Posture and Cerebral Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Jerre; Reid, Marylou

    1976-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between hand writing posture and cerebral dominance of 48 left handed writers and 25 right handed writers. Determined that cerebral dominance is related to handedness and to whether or not the writing hand posture is normal or inverted. (SL)

  2. Restenosis After Balloon Angioplasty for Cerebral Vasospasm

    SciTech Connect

    Sedat, J. Chau, Y.; Popolo, M.; Gindre, S.; Rami, L.; Orban, J. C.

    2009-03-15

    Transluminal balloon dilatation for symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage is effective, and clinical studies have shown that it achieves long-lasting dilatation of spastic cerebral arteries. Delayed arterial renarrowing has not been reported. Here we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented asymptomatic and permanent restenosis after angioplasty for cerebral vasospasm.

  3. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  4. Basal ganglia germinoma with progressive cerebral hemiatrophy.

    PubMed

    Liu, E; Robertson, R L; du Plessis, A; Pomeroy, S L

    1999-04-01

    The authors describe a 7-year-old Chinese-American female with a germinoma of the basal ganglia who presented with progressive hemiparesis and cerebral hemiatrophy. The additional finding of markedly elevated antiphospholipid antibodies suggests the possibility of an autoimmune pathogenesis for the progressive cerebral atrophy, as well as the later development of cognitive decline, tics, and obsessive-compulsive behaviors. PMID:10328283

  5. New Hope for Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obringer, S. John

    This paper explains the use of a unique experimental therapy for students with a type of cerebral palsy specifically called Botox. Botulinum Toxin Type A has been tried on a sizable number of students with cerebral palsy in clinical settings to reduce spastic and dystonic movements. By injecting Botox into overly tight heel cords, a normal or near…

  6. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... R, Awad IA, Ginsberg MH. Cerebral cavernous malformations proteins inhibit Rho kinase to stabilize vascular integrity. J Exp Med. 2010 Apr 12;207(4):881-96. doi: 10.1084/jem.20091258. Epub 2010 Mar 22. Citation on ... CCM1 and CCM2 protein interactions in cell signaling: implications for cerebral cavernous ...

  7. UNDERSTANDING CEREBRAL PALSY, A HANDBOOK FOR PARENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HATTON, DANIEL A.

    THIS MANUAL, WRITTEN BY A PSYCHOLOGIST, PROVIDES BASIC INFORMATION ABOUT THE NATURE OF CEREBRAL PALSY AND DISCUSSES FEELINGS AND REACTIONS OF PARENTS OF CEREBRAL PALSIED CHILDREN. INFORMATION ABOUT THE BRAIN AND BRAIN DAMAGE IN RELATION TO MOTOR AND EMOTIONAL FUNCTION, PERCEPTION AND INTELLIGENCE IS PRESENTED. PART TWO GIVES INSIGHT INTO PROBLEMS…

  8. Rhinomaxillary mucormycosis with cerebral extension

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shikha; Palaskar, Sangeeta; Shetty, Vishwa Parkash; Bhushan, Anju

    2009-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic infection caused by fungus belonging to the order Mucorales. A case of a controlled diabetic male with rhino maxillary mucormycosis, with cerebral extension, is described. The patient presented with hemifacial swelling, a nasal twang in his voice, fever, ocular signs, gross tissue destruction, and was sluggish. Early recognition of mucormycosis is necessary to limit the spread of infection, which can lead to high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, health practitioners should be familiar with the signs and symptoms of the disease. PMID:21886991

  9. Apraxia in deep cerebral lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, E; Coletti, A; Orlando, G; Tredici, G

    1983-01-01

    In a series of 50 patients with cerebrovascular lesions (demonstrated with CT scan), seven patients had lesions located in the basal ganglia and/or thalamus. All these seven patients were apractic. Ideomotor apraxia was present in all patients; five also had constructional apraxia, and one had bucco-facial apraxia. None of the patients had utilisation apraxia. These observations indicated that apraxia is not only a "high cerebral (cortical) function", but may depend also on the integrity of subcortical circuits and structures. PMID:6619888

  10. Phase dynamics in cerebral autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Latka, Miroslaw; Turalska, Malgorzata; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Kolodziej, Waldemar; Latka, Dariusz; West, Bruce J

    2005-11-01

    Complex continuous wavelet transforms are used to study the dynamics of instantaneous phase difference delta phi between the fluctuations of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in a middle cerebral artery. For healthy individuals, this phase difference changes slowly over time and has an almost uniform distribution for the very low-frequency (0.02-0.07 Hz) part of the spectrum. We quantify phase dynamics with the help of the synchronization index gamma = (sin delta phi)2 + (cos delta phi)2 that may vary between 0 (uniform distribution of phase differences, so the time series are statistically independent of one another) and 1 (phase locking of ABP and CBFV, so the former drives the latter). For healthy individuals, the group-averaged index gamma has two distinct peaks, one at 0.11 Hz [gamma = 0.59 +/- 0.09] and another at 0.33 Hz (gamma = 0.55 +/- 0.17). In the very low-frequency range (0.02-0.07 Hz), phase difference variability is an inherent property of an intact autoregulation system. Consequently, the average value of the synchronization parameter in this part of the spectrum is equal to 0.13 +/- 0.03. The phase difference variability sheds new light on the nature of cerebral hemodynamics, which so far has been predominantly characterized with the help of the high-pass filter model. In this intrinsically stationary approach, based on the transfer function formalism, the efficient autoregulation is associated with the positive phase shift between oscillations of CBFV and ABP. However, the method is applicable only in the part of the spectrum (0.1-0.3 Hz) where the coherence of these signals is high. We point out that synchrony analysis through the use of wavelet transforms is more general and allows us to study nonstationary aspects of cerebral hemodynamics in the very low-frequency range where the physiological significance of autoregulation is most strongly pronounced. PMID:16024579

  11. A study on cerebral hemodynamic analysis of moyamoya disease by using perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the clinical applications of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). Twenty-two patients with moyamoya disease (9 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 9.3 years (range: 4-22 years) were enrolled in this study. Perfusion MRI was performed by scanning the patients7.5 cm upward from the base of the cerebellum before their being process for post-treatment. The scan led to the acquisition of the following four map images: the cerebral blood volume (CBV), the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the mean transit time (MTT) for the contrast medium, and the time to peak (TTP) for the contrast medium. The lesions were assessed using the CBV, the CBF, the MTT and the TTP maps of perfusion MRI; the MTT and the TTP were measured in the lesion areas, as well as in the normal and the symmetric areas. Perfusion defects were recognizable in all four perfusion MRI maps, and the MTT and the TTP showed a conspicuous delay in the parts where perfusion defects were recognized. The MTT and the TTP images of perfusion MRI reflected a significant correlation between the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), as well as the development of collateral vessels. The four perfusion MRI maps could be used to predict the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior circulation, as well as the development of the collateral vessels, which enabled a hemodynamic evaluation of the parts with perfusion defects. Overall, perfusion MRI is useful for the diagnosis and the treatment of moyamoya disease and can be applied to clinical practice.

  12. An aneurysm at the site of the fenestration of the middle cerebral artery in a patient with multiple aneurysms: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Guive; Bakhtevari, Mehrdad Hosseinzadeh; Sabouri, Sofia; Rezaei, Omidvar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Middle cerebral artery (MCA) fenestration is a very rare anatomical variant of the MCA, incidentally found during magnetic resonance or computed tomography angiography. It has an incidence of 0.6%. Unlike fenestration of the posterior cerebral arterial circulation, fenestration of the anterior cerebral arterial circulation has not been well described. Methods: We present the rare case of a patient who was admitted for a ruptured aneurysm of the MCA arising at the site of the fenestration of the MCA and also an unruptured fusiform aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery and a distal anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. Results: The patient underwent craniotomy with microsurgical aneurysm clipping and the previously undiagnosed ruptured aneurysm, at the site of the fenestration of the MCA, arose immediately. Postoperatively, the patient awoke without a deficit. After treatment of postoperative bacterial meningitis, he was discharged on the 26th postoperative day in good condition without any neurologic deficit. Six months after the first surgery, he was operated for the distal azygos ACA aneurysm. Conclusion: Anomalies of the intracranial vasculature are common, and we describe a rare case of left MCA fenestration with an associated ruptured aneurysm at the site of the fenestration. In the literature, cases of fenestration of the MCA are sporadically reported and are only incidental findings. PMID:26539312

  13. Posterior Trans-Dural Repair of Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Herniation after Resection of Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic spinal cord herniation is a rare complication following spinal surgery. We introduce a posterior trans-dural repair technique used in a case of thoracic spinal cord herniation through a ventral dural defect following resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the cervicothoracic spine. A 51-year-old female was suffering from paraplegia after laminectomy alone for cervicothoracic OPLL. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a severely compressed spinal cord with pseudomeningocele identified postoperatively. Cerebrospinal fluid leak and iatrogenic spinal cord herniation persisted despite several operations with duroplasty and sealing agent. Finally, the problems were treated by repair of the ventral dural defect with posterior trans-dural duroplasty. Several months after surgery, the patient could walk independently. This surgical technique can be applied to treat ventral dural defect and spinal cord herniation. PMID:27114779

  14. Postoperative paralysis following posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko; Mannoji, Chikato; Fujiyoshi, Takayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). His spinal cord was severely impinged anteriorly by a beak-type OPLL and posteriorly by ossification of the ligamentum flavum at T4/5. He underwent surgical posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF). Immediately after surgery, he developed a Brown-Séquard-type paralysis, which spontaneously resolved without requiring the addition of OPLL extirpation. This example highlights that the risk of postoperative neurological deterioration cannot be eliminated even when PDF is selected as the surgical procedure for thoracic OPLL, especially in instances in which the spinal cord is severely compressed. PMID:21030260

  15. Regional differences in the cerebral blood flow velocity response to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Feddersen, Berend; Neupane, Pritam; Thanbichler, Florian; Hadolt, Irmgard; Sattelmeyer, Vera; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Waanders, Robb; Noachtar, Soheyl; Ausserer, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) may appear above 2,500 m altitude, if the time allowed for acclimatization is insufficient. As the mechanisms underlying brain adaptation to the hypobaric hypoxic environment are not fully understood, a prospective study was performed investigating neurophysiological changes by means of near infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalograpy (EEG), and transcranial doppler sonography at 100, 3,440 and 5,050 m above sea level in the Khumbu Himal, Nepal. Fourteen of the 26 mountaineers reaching 5,050 m altitude developed symptoms of AMS between 3,440 and 5,050 m altitude (Lake-Louise Score ⩾3). Their EEG frontal beta activity and occipital alpha activity increased between 100 and 3,440 m altitude, i.e., before symptoms appeared. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) increased in all mountaineers between 100 and 3,440 m altitude. During further ascent to 5,050 altitude, mountaineers with AMS developed a further increase in CBFV in the MCA, whereas in all mountaineers CBFV decreased continuously with increasing altitude in the posterior cerebral arteries. These results indicate that hypobaric hypoxia causes different regional changes in CBFV despite similar electrophysiological changes. PMID:26082017

  16. Cerebral Arterial Variations Associated with Moyamoya Disease Diagnosed by MR Angiography.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2014-12-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare progressive cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease associated with different variations of the cerebral arteries. We evaluated the types and prevalence of such variations among patients with moyamoya disease. In our institution during the past seven years, we diagnosed 72 patients (24 male, 48 female; aged 6 to 75 years, mean, 42 years) with moyamoya disease by magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using either a 3-Tesla or one of two 1.5-T imagers and a standard time-of-flight technique without contrast media. An experienced neuroradiologist retrospectively reviewed the images. There were 15 cerebral arterial variations in 13 of 72 patients with moyamoya disease (18.1%), including four basilar artery fenestrations, three ophthalmic arteries arising from the middle meningeal artery, two intracranial vertebral artery fenestrations, two persistent first cervical intersegmental arteries, two persistent trigeminal arteries, one extracranial origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and one persistent stapedial artery. Although our number of patients was small, moyamoya disease was frequently associated with variations of the cerebral arteries, especially fenestrations in the vertebrobasilar system and persistent trigeminal artery. PMID:25489893

  17. Transneuronal Degeneration of Thalamic Nuclei following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jen; Cherng, Juin-Hong; Wang, Ding-Han; Yu, Shu-Ping; Liou, Nien-Hsien; Hsu, Ming-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Postinfarction transneuronal degeneration refers to secondary neuronal death that occurs within a few days to weeks following the disruption of input or output to synapsed neurons sustaining ischemic insults. The thalamus receives its blood supply from the posterior circulation; however, infarctions of the middle cerebral arterial may cause secondary transneuronal degeneration in the thalamus. In this study, we presented the areas of ischemia and associated transneuronal degeneration following MCAo in a rat model. Materials and Methods. Eighteen 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive middle cerebral artery occlusion surgery for 1, 7, and 14 days. Cerebral atrophy was assessed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium hydrochloride staining. Postural reflex and open field tests were performed prior to animal sacrifice to assess the effects of occlusion on behavior. Results. Myelin loss was observed at the lesion site following ischemia. Gliosis was also observed in thalamic regions 14 days following occlusion. Differential degrees of increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression were observed at each stage of infarction. Increases in myelin basic protein levels were also observed in the 14-day group. Conclusion. The present rat model of ischemia provides evidence of transneuronal degeneration within the first 14 days of occlusion. The observed changes in protein expression may be associated with self-repair mechanisms in the damaged brain. PMID:27597962

  18. Cognitive decline and brain volume loss are signatures of cerebral Aβ deposition identified with PIB

    PubMed Central

    Storandt, Martha; Mintun, Mark A.; Head, Denise; Morris, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) levels in cerebral cortex with structural brain integrity and cognitive performance in older people with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) of 0 (cognitively normal). Methods The relations between mean cortical [11C] PIB binding potential values, proportional to the density of fibrillar Aβ binding sites in the brain, concurrent regional brain volumes as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, and both concurrent and longitudinal (up to 19 years) cognitive performance in multiple domains were examined in 135 CDR 0 individuals aged 65 to 88 years. Results Elevated cerebral Aβ levels, in some cases comparable to that seen in individuals with Alzheimer's disease, were observed in 29 CDR 0 individuals. Significantly smaller regional volumes in the hippocampus, temporal neocortex, anterior cingulate, and posterior cingulate were observed in these CDR 0 individuals with elevated Aβ levels. Concurrent cognitive performance was unrelated to Aβ levels but was related to regional brain volumes with the exception of caudate. Longitudinal cognitive decline was associated with elevated Aβ levels and decreased hippocampal volume. Decline was not limited to episodic memory but included working memory and visuospatial abilities as well. Interpretation [11C] PIB, an in vivo measure of cerebral amyloidosis, is associated with regionally specific brain atrophy cross-sectionally and a pattern of longitudinal cognitive decline in multiple cognitive domains that occurs prior to the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer' disease. These findings contribute to the understanding of the cognitive and structural consequences of Aβ levels in CDR 0 older adults. PMID:20008651

  19. Transneuronal Degeneration of Thalamic Nuclei following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Postinfarction transneuronal degeneration refers to secondary neuronal death that occurs within a few days to weeks following the disruption of input or output to synapsed neurons sustaining ischemic insults. The thalamus receives its blood supply from the posterior circulation; however, infarctions of the middle cerebral arterial may cause secondary transneuronal degeneration in the thalamus. In this study, we presented the areas of ischemia and associated transneuronal degeneration following MCAo in a rat model. Materials and Methods. Eighteen 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive middle cerebral artery occlusion surgery for 1, 7, and 14 days. Cerebral atrophy was assessed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium hydrochloride staining. Postural reflex and open field tests were performed prior to animal sacrifice to assess the effects of occlusion on behavior. Results. Myelin loss was observed at the lesion site following ischemia. Gliosis was also observed in thalamic regions 14 days following occlusion. Differential degrees of increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression were observed at each stage of infarction. Increases in myelin basic protein levels were also observed in the 14-day group. Conclusion. The present rat model of ischemia provides evidence of transneuronal degeneration within the first 14 days of occlusion. The observed changes in protein expression may be associated with self-repair mechanisms in the damaged brain. PMID:27597962

  20. Selective accumulation of aluminum in cerebral arteries in Alzheimer's disease (AD).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Zhao, Yuhai; Hill, James M; Culicchia, Frank; Kruck, Theodore P A; Percy, Maire E; Pogue, Aileen I; Walton, J R; Lukiw, Walter J

    2013-09-01

    Once biologically available aluminum bypasses gastrointestinal and blood-brain barriers, this environmentally-abundant neurotoxin has an exceedingly high affinity for the large pyramidal neurons of the human brain hippocampus. This same anatomical region of the brain is also targeted by the earliest evidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. The mechanism for the selective targeting and transport of aluminum into the hippocampus of the human brain is not well understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of a pathological aluminum entry system into the brain, this study examined the aluminum content of 8 arteries that supply blood to the hippocampus, including the aorta and several cerebral arteries. In contrast to age-matched controls, in AD patients we found a gradient of increasing aluminum concentration from the aorta to the posterior cerebral artery that supplies blood to the hippocampus. Primary cultures of human brain endothelial cells were found to have an extremely high affinity for aluminum when compared to other types of brain cells. Together, these results suggest for the first time that endothelial cells that line the cerebral vasculature may have biochemical attributes conducive to binding and targeting aluminum to selective anatomical regions of the brain, such as the hippocampus, with potential downstream pro-inflammatory and pathogenic consequences. PMID:23764827

  1. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  2. Cerebral Activity Changes in Different Traditional Chinese Medicine Patterns of Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Peihai; Pan, Junjie; Li, Zhengjie; Liu, Jixin; Li, Guangsen; Qin, Wei; You, Yaodong; Yu, Xujun; Sun, Jinbo; Dong, Minghao; Gong, Qiyong; Guo, Jun; Chang, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pattern differentiation is the foundation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED). This study aims to investigate the differences in cerebral activity in ED patients with different TCM patterns. Methods. 27 psychogenic ED patients and 27 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled in this study. Each participant underwent an fMRI scan in resting state. The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) was used to detect the brain activity changes in ED patients with different patterns. Results. Compared to HS, ED patients showed an increased cerebral activity in bilateral cerebellum, insula, globus pallidus, parahippocampal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and middle cingulate cortex (MCC). Compared to the patients with liver-qi stagnation and spleen deficiency pattern (LSSDP), the patients with kidney-yang deficiency pattern (KDP) showed an increased activity in bilateral brainstem, cerebellum, hippocampus, and the right insula, thalamus, MCC, and a decreased activity in bilateral putamen, medial frontal gyrus, temporal pole, and the right caudate nucleus, OFC, anterior cingulate cortex, and posterior cingulate cortex (P < 0.005). Conclusions. The ED patients with different TCM patterns showed different brain activities. The differences in cerebral activity between LSSDP and KDP were mainly in the emotion-related regions, including prefrontal cortex and cingulated cortex. PMID:26180534

  3. Clinical and Radiological Results of Microsurgical Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Decompression without Posterior Instrumentation for Lateral Recess Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Şişman, Lokman; Türkmen, Faik; Efe, Duran; Pekince, Oğuzhan; Göncü, Recep Gani; Sever, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A single-center, retrospective patient review of clinical and radiological outcomes of microsurgical posterior lumbar interbody fusion and decompression, without posterior instrumentation, for the treatment of lateral recess stenosis. Purpose This study documented the clinical and radiological results of microsurgical posterior lumbar interbody fusion and decompression of the lateral recess using interbody cages without posterior instrumentation for the treatment of lateral recess stenosis. Overview of Literature Although microsurgery has some advantages, various complications have been reported following microsurgical decompression, including cage migration, pseudoarthrosis, neurologic deficits, and persistent pain. Methods A total of 34 patients (13 men, 21 women), with a mean age of 56.65±9.1 years (range, 40-77 years) confirmed spinal stability, and preoperative radiological findings of lateral recess stenosis, were included in the study. Interbody polyetheretherketone cages and auto grafts were used in all patients. Posterior instrumentation was not used because of limited resection of the posterior lumbar structures. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging were assessed and compared to images taken at the final follow-up. Functional recovery was also evaluated according to the Macnab criteria at the final follow-up. Results The average follow-up time was 35.05±8.65 months (range, 24-46 months). The clinical results, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, and duration of hospital stay were similar to previously published results; the fusion rate (85.2%) was decreased and the migration rate (5.8%) was increased, compared with prior reports. Conclusions Although microsurgery has some advantages, migration and pseudoarthrosis remain challenges to achieving adequate lumbar interbody fusion. PMID:26435789

  4. A Functional Perspective on the Embryology and Anatomy of the Cerebral Blood Supply.

    PubMed

    Menshawi, Khaled; Mohr, Jay P; Gutierrez, Jose

    2015-05-01

    The anatomy of the arterial system supplying blood to the brain can influence the development of arterial disease such as aneurysms, dolichoectasia and atherosclerosis. As the arteries supplying blood to the brain develop during embryogenesis, variation in their anatomy may occur and this variation may influence the development of arterial disease. Angiogenesis, which occurs mainly by sprouting of parent arteries, is the first stage at which variations can occur. At day 24 of embryological life, the internal carotid artery is the first artery to form and it provides all the blood required by the primitive brain. As the occipital region, brain stem and cerebellum enlarge; the internal carotid supply becomes insufficient, triggering the development of the posterior circulation. At this stage, the posterior circulation consists of a primitive mesh of arterial networks that originate from projection of penetrators from the distal carotid artery and more proximally from carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses. These anastomoses regress when the basilar artery and the vertebral arteries become independent from the internal carotid artery, but their persistence is not uncommon in adults (e.g., persistent trigeminal artery). Other common remnants of embryological development include fenestration or duplication (most commonly of the basilar artery), hypoplasia (typically of the posterior communicating artery) or agenesis (typically of the anterior communicating artery). Learning more about the hemodynamic consequence that these variants may have on the brain territories they supply may help understand better the underlying physiopathology of cerebral arterial remodeling and stroke in patients with these variants. PMID:26060802

  5. A Functional Perspective on the Embryology and Anatomy of the Cerebral Blood Supply

    PubMed Central

    Menshawi, Khaled; Mohr, Jay P

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the arterial system supplying blood to the brain can influence the development of arterial disease such as aneurysms, dolichoectasia and atherosclerosis. As the arteries supplying blood to the brain develop during embryogenesis, variation in their anatomy may occur and this variation may influence the development of arterial disease. Angiogenesis, which occurs mainly by sprouting of parent arteries, is the first stage at which variations can occur. At day 24 of embryological life, the internal carotid artery is the first artery to form and it provides all the blood required by the primitive brain. As the occipital region, brain stem and cerebellum enlarge; the internal carotid supply becomes insufficient, triggering the development of the posterior circulation. At this stage, the posterior circulation consists of a primitive mesh of arterial networks that originate from projection of penetrators from the distal carotid artery and more proximally from carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses. These anastomoses regress when the basilar artery and the vertebral arteries become independent from the internal carotid artery, but their persistence is not uncommon in adults (e.g., persistent trigeminal artery). Other common remnants of embryological development include fenestration or duplication (most commonly of the basilar artery), hypoplasia (typically of the posterior communicating artery) or agenesis (typically of the anterior communicating artery). Learning more about the hemodynamic consequence that these variants may have on the brain territories they supply may help understand better the underlying physiopathology of cerebral arterial remodeling and stroke in patients with these variants. PMID:26060802

  6. Cerebral Metabolic Differences Associated with Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengtao; Wu, Ping; Guo, Sisi; Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Yixuan; Wang, Ying; Ding, Zhengtong; Wu, Jianjun; Zuo, Chuantao; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize cerebral glucose metabolism associated with different cognitive states in Parkinson’s disease (PD) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Methods Three groups of patients were recruited in this study including PD patients with dementia (PDD; n = 10), with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI; n = 20), and with no cognitive impairment (PD-NC; n = 30). The groups were matched for age, sex, education, disease duration, motor disability, levodopa equivalent dose and Geriatric Depression Rating Scale (GDS) score. All subjects underwent a FDG-PET study. Maps of regional metabolism in the three groups were compared using statistical parametric mapping (SPM5). Results PD-MCI patients exhibited limited areas of hypometabolism in the frontal, temporal and parahippocampal gyrus compared with the PD-NC patients (p < 0.01). PDD patients had bilateral areas of hypometabolism in the frontal and posterior parietal-occipital lobes compared with PD-MCI patients (p < 0.01), and exhibited greater metabolic reductions in comparison with PD-NC patients (p < 0.01). Conclusions Compared with PD-NC patients, hypometabolism was much higher in the PDD patients than in PD-MCI patients, mainly in the posterior cortical areas. The result might suggest an association between posterior cortical hypometabolism and more severe cognitive impairment. PD-MCI might be important for early targeted therapeutic intervention and disease modification. PMID:27064684

  7. Chronic whiplash symptoms are related to altered regional cerebral blood flow in the resting state.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Appel, Lieuwe; Söderlund, Anne; Frans, Orjan; Engler, Henry; Furmark, Tomas; Gordh, Torsten; Långström, Bengt; Fredrikson, Mats

    2009-01-01

    The neural pathogenic mechanisms involved in mediating chronic pain and whiplash associated disorders (WAD) after rear impact car collisions are largely unknown. This study's first objective was to compare resting state regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) by means of positron emission tomography with (15)O labelled water in 21 WAD patients with 18 healthy, pain-free controls. A second objective was to investigate the relations between brain areas with altered rCBF to pain experience, somatic symptoms, posttraumatic stress symptoms and personality traits in the patient group. Patients had heightened resting rCBF bilaterally in the posterior parahippocampal and the posterior cingulate gyri, in the right thalamus and the right medial prefrontal gyrus as well as lowered tempero-occipital blood flow compared with healthy controls. The altered rCBF in the patient group was correlated to neck disability ratings. We thus suggest an involvement of the posterior cingulate, parahippocampal and medial prefrontal gyri in WAD and speculate that alterations in the resting state are linked to an increased self-relevant evaluation of pain and stress. PMID:18486506

  8. Chronic ketosis and cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    DeVivo, D C; Leckie, M P; Ferrendelli, J S; McDougal, D B

    1978-04-01

    The effects of chronic ketosis on cerebral metabolism were determined in adult rats maintained on a high-fat diet for approximately three weeks and compared to a control group of animals. The fat-fed rats had statistically significantly lower blood glucose concentrations and higher blood beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate concentrations; higher brain concentrations of bound glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate, lactate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, alanine, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP); lower brain concentrations of fructose 1,6-diphosphate, aspartate, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), creatine, cyclic nucleotides, succinyl coenzyme A (CoA), acid-insoluble CoA, and total CoA; and similar brain concentrations of glucose, malate, calculated oxaloacetate, glutamate, glutamine, adenosine monophosphate, phosphocreatine, reduced CoA, acetyl CoA, sodium, potassium, chloride, and water content. The metabolite data in the chronically ketotic rats demonstrate an increase in the cerebral energy reserve and energy charge. These data also suggest negative modification of the enzymes phosphofructokinase, pyruvic dehydrogenase, and alpha-ketoglutaric dehydrogenase; positive modification of glycogen synthase; and possible augmentation of the hexose transport system. There was no demonstrable difference in brain pH, water content, or electrolytes in the two groups of animals. We speculate that the increased brain ATP/ADP ratio is central to most, if not all, the observed metabolic perturbations and may account for the increased neuronal stability that accompanies chronic ketosis. PMID:666275

  9. Cerebral lateralization in simultaneous interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, F; Gran, L; Basso, G; Bava, A

    1990-07-01

    Cerebral asymmetries for L1 (Italian), L2 (English), and L3 (French, German, Spanish, or Russian) were studied, by using a verbal-manual interference paradigm, in a group of Italian right-handed polyglot female students at the Scuola Superiore di Lingue Moderne per Interpreti e Traduttori (SSLM-School for Interpreters and Translators) of the University of Trieste and in a control group of right-handed monolingual female students at the Medical School of the University of Trieste. In an automatic speech production task no significant cerebral lateralization was found for the mother tongue (L1) either in the interpreting students or in the control group; the interpreting students were not significantly lateralized for the third language (L3), while weak left hemispheric lateralization was shown for L2. A significantly higher degree of verbal-manual interference was found for L1 than for L2 and L3. A significantly higher disruption rate occurred in the meaning-based mode of simultaneous interpretation (from L2 into L1 and vice versa) than in the word-for-word mode (from L2 into L1 and vice versa). No significant overall or hemispheric differences were found during simultaneous interpretation from L1 into L2 or from L2 into L1. PMID:2207622

  10. The transcriptome of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    VanGilder, Reyna L.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Barr, Taura L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular causality and response to stroke is complex. Yet, much of the literature examining the molecular response to stroke has focused on targeted pathways that have been well-characterized. Consequently, our understanding of stroke pathophysiology has made little progress by way of clinical therapeutics since tissue plasminogen activator was approved for treatment nearly a decade ago. The lack of clinical translation is in part due to neuron-focused studies, preclinical models of cerebral ischemia and the paradoxical nature of neuro-inflammation. With the evolution of the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable criteria streamlining research efforts and broad availability of genomic technologies, the ability to decipher the molecular fingerprint of ischemic stroke is on the horizon. This review highlights preclinical microarray findings of the ischemic brain, discusses the transcriptome of cerebral preconditioning and emphasizes the importance of further characterizing the role of the neurovascular unit and peripheral white blood cells in mediating stroke damage and repair within the penumbra. PMID:22381515

  11. Cerebral Syndromes of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shavelle, Henry S.

    1969-01-01

    Three labile diabetic patients had recurring episodes of altered sensorium. Each had severe cerebrovascular disease with superimposed metabolic derangements, including ketoacidosis, hyperglycemia without ketosis, mild uremia, and possibly cerebral edema. Two of the patients were examined postmortem. Severe leptomeningeal scarring, basal ganglial calcification and destruction of small intracerebral vessels without evidence of large vessel atherosclerosis were found unexpectedly in one patient, a rare occurrence in this country although recently reported from Europe. The other patient had large vessel atherosclerosis only. The clinical expression of the vascular disease was modified by concurrent abnormalities and reflected the sum total of the complexities which coexisted. The pathophysiology of the unconscious state necessarily depends on the inciting factors. Ketoacidotic coma is associated with depressed cerebral oxygen consumption. Spinal fluid pH is usually maintained during ketosis but is sometimes lowered inadvertently during bicarbonate therapy, with resultant coma. Other variables influencing the clinical expression, with or without ketosis, would include, among others, blood viscosity alterations, rapid decrements in blood sugar, and existing degrees of lactic acidosis. The increasing life-span of the juvenile diabetics, favorably influenced by improved management and recently by hemodialysis, may uncover vascular complications heretofore rarely seen and create additional diagnostic and therapeutic enigmas. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:5798497

  12. [Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Milojević, T M; Baljozović, B V; Rakić, M Lj; Nestorović, B D; Dostanić, M M; Milaković, B D; Kojić, Z Z; Repac, N R; Cvrkota, I S

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm causes permanent neurolological deficit or death occurance in 13% of clinical cases. Peak frequency is from 8-10th day after SAH. The purpose of this study is factor analysis that may have influence on vasospasm development , as well as predictor determination. The study is prospective and analysis 192 patients treated in Institute of Neurosurgery, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade. The majority of patients were admitted in hospital in first four days after SAH, and 184 had GCS over 7. Univariate methods of factor analysis were used, and for significance of predictors influence testing multivariante regression analysis was used. Vasospasm occurred in 22,40% of all cases. No relationships have been found between sex, age, previous hypertension, timing of surgery, appearance of hydrocephalus and intracerebral hematoma, hypertermia or mean arterial blood pressure, with occurrence of cerebral vasospasm. Factors with significantly associated with the occurance of vasospasm were: hearth disease, hypernatriemia, Hct, clinical grade on admission as well as preoperative clinical grade and Fisher CT scan grade. In the first four days after SAH, Fisher scan grade, preoperative clinical grade and Hct, appeared as predictors. After four days, clinical grade on admission and hypernatiemia, showed as poredictors. PMID:18792575

  13. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  14. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Madsen, Mette; Uldall, Peter

    2009-08-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs. The population analysed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analysed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about 860,000 euro for men and about 800,000 euro for women. The largest component was social care costs, particularly during childhood. A sensitivity analysis found that alterations in social care costs had a small effect, whereas lowering the discount rate from 5 to 3 per cent markedly increased total lifetime costs. Discounting decreases the value of costs in the future compared with the present. The high social care costs and productivity costs associated with CP point to a potential gain from labour market interventions that benefit individuals with CP. PMID:19416329

  15. [Negative symptoms and cerebral imaging].

    PubMed

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    A number of neuroanatomical and neurofonctional abnormalities have been evidenced by cerebral imaging studies in patients suffering from schizophrenia. Nevertheless, those specifically associated with the negative symptoms of this disease are still insufficiently known. This work is a review of selected studies that have assessed the brain correlates of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Approaches using structural imaging have highlighted reduction of gray matter density or cortical thickness associated with negative symptoms, which is rather sparsely distributed within the frontal and temporal regions, localized nevertheless more particularly in the frontal medial and orbitofrontal areas, as well as the amygdalo-hippocampic complex. These deficits are concurrent with a loss of integrity of the principal paths of white matter tracts between frontal and limbic regions. On the other hand, neurofonctional abnormalities associated with negative symptoms involve especially the frontal areas and limbic striatum. A disturbed functioning within the fronto-striatal loops, related to a striatal dopaminergic deficit, may represent a potential explanatory hypothesis of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as suggested by studies using Positron Emission Tomography on this topic or neuroimaging studies on the effects of antipsychotics. A better identification of the cerebral abnormalities associated with the negative dimension of schizophrenia, with regard to the lateralization of these abnormalities or to their changes during the course of the disease, could offer new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of this dimension which, until now, remains few responsive to conventional pharmacological treatments. PMID:26776387

  16. Suture Bridge Fixation Technique for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Avulsion Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Lee, Gyu Sang; Choy, Won Sik

    2015-01-01

    We presented a surgical technique including a suture bridge technique with relatively small incision for the reduction and fixation of posterior ligament avulsion fractures. A suture anchor was used to hold the avulsed fragment and a knotless anchor was used to continuously compress the bony fragment into the fracture site, thereby maintaining reduction during healing. PMID:26640635

  17. FEMORAL INSERTION OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: AN ANATOMICAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; Neto, Leopoldo Viana Batista; Goarayeb, Dedley Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify objective parameters to guide correct location of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in the femur. Methods: The PCLs of 20 human cadavers were resected. The following portions were measured: distance from the most distal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior edge of the cartilage (AB); distance from the most proximal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior cartilage (AC); distance between the two parts of the ligament close to the roof (BC); distance from the distal edge in its posterior portion, to the more posterior joint edge (DE); distance from the distal edge of the ligament in its posterior portion, to the intercondylar roof (DF); and finally, the format of the ligament insertion and area of coverage on the femoral condyle. Results: The PCL has the shape of a quarter ellipse, with an average area of 153.5mm2. The mean distances found were: AB of 2.1mm, AC of 10.7mm, BC of 8.6mm DE of 12.4mm and DF of 16.8mm. Conclusions: The edge close to the roof of the anterolateral bundle is closer to the joint cartilage (2.1mm) than the posteromedial bundle is, which is 12.4mm from the edge proximal to the cartilage. These references should assist in better and more accurate positioning of femoral tunnels in PCL reconstruction. PMID:27027059

  18. Atrial natriuretic factor-like activity in rat posterior pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Gutkowska, J.; Debinski, W.; Racz, K.; Thibault, G.; Garcia, R.; Kuchel, O.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M.

    1986-03-05

    The presence of a biologically active peptide: Atrial Natriuretic Factor (ANF) has been demonstrated in rat and human circulation and ANF is considered now as a new hormone. ANF may be involved in body fluid regulation. A very sensitive radioimmunoassay for rat ANF allowed the authors to search for immunoreactive ANF (IR-ANF) in rat posterior pituitary. Serial dilutions of homogenates of rat posterior pituitary showed a good parallelism with a reference curve in a radioimmunoassay system. The IR-ANF was extracted from rat posterior pituitary homogenates by activated Vycor glass beads. The lyophilized extract was purified by HPLC on C/sub 18/ ..mu.. Bondapak column. The HPLC yielded two IR-ANF peaks. Both isolated ANF-like material showed biological activity. The IR-ANF eluted with 33% acetonitrile, inhibited ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion with a similar potency as synthetic (Arg 101 - Tyr 126) ANF (0.7 x 10/sup -10/M). A much less potent ANF-like material was found in the second peak eluted with 36% acetonitrile. They conclude that ANF-like material is present in rat posterior pituitary and this suggest a possible role in ANF on AVP secretion directly in situ.

  19. Posterior Cortical Atrophy Presenting with Superior Arcuate Field Defect

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Sue Ling; Bukowska, Danuta M.; Ford, Stephen; Chen, Fred K.

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old female with reading difficulty presented with progressive arcuate field defect despite low intraocular pressure. Over a 5-year period, the field defect evolved into an incongruous homonymous hemianopia and the repeated neuroimaging revealed progressive posterior cortical atrophy. Further neuropsychiatric assessment demonstrated symptoms and signs consistent with Benson's syndrome. PMID:26417467

  20. Covering Your Posterior: Teaching Signaling Games Using Classroom Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turocy, Theodore L.

    2009-01-01

    The author describes a protocol for classroom experiments for courses that introduce undergraduates to signaling games. Signaling games are conceptually difficult because, when analyzing the game, students are not naturally inclined to think in probabilistic, Bayesian terms. The experimental design explicitly presents the posterior frequencies of…

  1. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer for Posterior Tibial Tendon Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Cobb procedure is useful for addressing stage 2 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and is often accompanied by a medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy and/or lateral column lengthening. The Cobb procedure can also be combined with selected medial column arthrodesis and realignment osteotomies along with equinus correction when indicated. PMID:26590721

  2. Learning about Posterior Probability: Do Diagrams and Elaborative Interrogation Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Virginia; Alibali, Martha W.; Nathan, Mitchell J.

    2016-01-01

    To learn from a text, students must make meaningful connections among related ideas in that text. This study examined the effectiveness of two methods of improving connections--elaborative interrogation and diagrams--in written lessons about posterior probability. Undergraduate students (N = 198) read a lesson in one of three questioning…

  3. Surface characteristics of posterior composites after polishing and toothbrushing.

    PubMed

    van Dijken, J W; Ruyter, I E

    1987-10-01

    The surface characteristics of eight posterior and two anterior composite resins were studied by SEM and profilometric tracings. The materials included both chemically cured and light-cured resin systems. Two posterior materials were microfilled composites; the others were conventional or hybrid types. The anterior composites were of conventional and hybrid types. At various steps in the procedures the following polishing/brushing treatments were evaluated: 1) dry polishing with Sof-lex discs followed by brushing with toothpaste; and 2) wet polishing with diamond pastes of increasing fineness, followed by brushing with toothpaste. The base line before the polishing/brushing procedures was obtained by wet polishing on silicon-carbide paper (4000 grit). All materials could be polished to a comparable smoothness by the Sof-lex discs, but this polishing procedure was associated with the development of an amorphous surface layer. Polishing with diamond pastes gave various results, with a 20-fold difference in surface roughness values from the smoothest to the roughest material. Toothbrushing after polishing with the Sof-lex system increased the surface roughness for all materials, but to various degrees. The two microfilled and four of the conventional posterior composites showed comparable surface roughness values, whereas two remaining posterior and the two anterior materials showed two to three times higher surface roughness values after toothbrushing. PMID:3478939

  4. Bilateral posterior shoulder dislocation after electrical shock: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ketenci, Ismail Emre; Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Ulusoy, Ayhan; Yanik, Hakan Serhat; Mutlu, Serhat; Durakbasa, Mehmet Oguz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Posterior dislocation of the shoulder is a rare and commonly missed injury. Unilateral dislocations occur mostly due to trauma. Bilateral posterior shoulder dislocations are even more rare and result mainly from epileptic seizures. Electrical injury is a rare cause of posterior shoulder dislocation. Injury mechanism in electrical injury is similar to epileptic seizures, where the shoulder is forced to internal rotation, flexion and adduction. Presentation of case This report presents a case of bilateral posterior shoulder dislocation after electrical shock. We were able to find a few individual case reports describing this condition. The case was acute and humeral head impression defects were minor. Our treatment in this case consisted of closed reduction under general anesthesia and applying of orthoses which kept the shoulders in abduction and external rotation. A rehabilitation program was begun after 3 weeks of immobilization. After 6 months of injury the patient has returned to work. 20 months postoperatively, at final follow-up, he was painless and capable of performing all of his daily activities. Discussion The amount of bilateral shoulder dislocations after electrical injury is not reported but is known to be very rare. The aim of this case presentation is to report an example for this rare entity, highlight the difficulties in diagnosis and review the treatment options. Conclusion Physical examination and radiographic evaluation are important for quick and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26904192

  5. Predictor variables for forward scapular posture including posterior shoulder tightness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cynn, Heon-seock; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Kwon, Oh-yun; Yoon, Tae-Lim

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to determine the relationships between the degree of forward scapular posture and the pectoralis minor index, the strength of the serratus anterior, the thoracic spine angle, and posterior shoulder tightness, and (2) to identify predictors of forward scapular posture, including posterior shoulder tightness. The study recruited eighteen subjects with forward scapular posture and objectively measured the acromion distance, the pectoralis minor index, and the strength of the serratus anterior muscle of each participant. The amount of glenohumeral horizontal adduction and internal rotation were evaluated to measure posterior shoulder tightness. There were high intra-rater reliabilities in all measurements. The measurement results showed a statistically strong negative correlation between the degree of forward scapular posture and the pectoralis minor index. They also revealed a moderate positive correlation between the degree of forward scapular posture and the thoracic spine angle and a moderate negative relationship between the degree of forward scapular posture and the amount of the glenohumeral horizontal adduction. A multiple regression analysis indicated that a total multiple regression model explained 93% of the amount of forward scapular posture. All predictor variables, including posterior shoulder tightness, should be considered while assessing, managing, and preventing forward scapular posture. PMID:25892380

  6. Acute Ischemic Stroke Involving Both Anterior and Posterior Circulation Treated by Endovascular Revascularization for Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion via Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Atsushi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute ischemic stroke involving both the anterior and posterior circulation associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA), treated by endovascular revascularization for acute basilar artery (BA) occlusion via the PPTA. An otherwise healthy 67-year-old man experienced sudden loss of consciousness and quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extensive acute infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, and magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and BA. Because the volume of infarction in the territory of the right MCA was extensive, we judged the use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator to be contraindicated. Cerebral angiography revealed hypoplasia of both vertebral arteries and the presence of a PPTA from the right internal carotid artery. A microcatheter was introduced into the BA via the PPTA and revascularization was successfully performed using a Merci Retriever with adjuvant low-dose intraarterial urokinase. After treatment, his consciousness level and right motor weakness improved. Although persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses such as a PPTA are relatively rare vascular anomalies, if the persistent primitive artery is present, it can be an access route for mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27446523

  7. Acute Ischemic Stroke Involving Both Anterior and Posterior Circulation Treated by Endovascular Revascularization for Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion via Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery.

    PubMed

    Imahori, Taichiro; Fujita, Atsushi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of acute ischemic stroke involving both the anterior and posterior circulation associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA), treated by endovascular revascularization for acute basilar artery (BA) occlusion via the PPTA. An otherwise healthy 67-year-old man experienced sudden loss of consciousness and quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extensive acute infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, and magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and BA. Because the volume of infarction in the territory of the right MCA was extensive, we judged the use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator to be contraindicated. Cerebral angiography revealed hypoplasia of both vertebral arteries and the presence of a PPTA from the right internal carotid artery. A microcatheter was introduced into the BA via the PPTA and revascularization was successfully performed using a Merci Retriever with adjuvant low-dose intraarterial urokinase. After treatment, his consciousness level and right motor weakness improved. Although persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses such as a PPTA are relatively rare vascular anomalies, if the persistent primitive artery is present, it can be an access route for mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27446523

  8. Computed tomography of cerebral infarction along the distribution of the basal perforating arteries. Part II. Thalamic arterial group

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Goto, K.; Fukasawa, H.; Kawata, Y.; Uemura, K.; Yaguchi, K.

    1985-04-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) manifestations of cerebral infarction along the distribution of the basal perforating arteries were reviewed and correlated with cerebral angiography. Infarcts in the territories of perforators were demonstrated individually based on knowledge of their three-dimensional distribution as shown by microangiography of cadavers. In Part II of the study, the posterior areas supplied by the thalamic arteries were examined. Infarcts in the area supplied by the thalamotuberal arteries involved the anterior pole of the thalamus; those in the area of the thalamoperforate arteries involved the medial portion of the thalamus, along the lateral wall of the third ventricle; those in the area of the thalamogeniculate arteries involved the posterolateral portion of the thalamus; and those in the area of the choroidal arteries of the lateral ventricle involved the most posterolateral and dorsolateral portions of the thalamus. Clinical and neuroradiological correlations are discussed.

  9. Posterior approaches for symptomatic metastatic spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Molina, Camilo; Goodwin, C Rory; Abu-Bonsrah, Nancy; Elder, Benjamin D; De la Garza Ramos, Rafael; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-08-01

    Surgical interventions for spinal metastasis are commonly performed for mechanical stabilization, pain relief, preservation of neurological function, and local tumor reduction. Although multiple surgical approaches can be used for the treatment of metastatic spinal lesions, posterior approaches are commonly performed. In this study, the role of posterior surgical procedures in the treatment of spinal metastases was reviewed, including posterior laminectomy with and without instrumentation for stabilization, transpedicular corpectomy, and costotransversectomy. A review of the literature from 1980 to 2015 was performed using Medline, as was a review of the bibliographies of articles meeting preset inclusion criteria, to identify studies on the role of these posterior approaches among adults with spinal metastasis. Thirty-four articles were ultimately analyzed, including 1 randomized controlled trial, 6 prospective cohort studies, and 27 retrospective case reports and/or series. Some of the reviewed articles had Level II evidence indicating that laminectomy with stabilization can be recommended for improvement in neurological outcome and reduction of pain in selected patients. However, the use of laminectomy alone should be carefully considered. Additionally, transpedicular corpectomy and costotransversectomy can be recommended with the expectation of improving neurological outcomes and reducing pain in properly selected patients with spinal metastases. With improvements in the treatment paradigms for patients with spinal metastasis, as well as survival, surgical therapy will continue to play an important role in the management of spinal metastasis. While this review presents a window into determining the utility of posterior approaches, future prospective studies will provide essential data to better define the roles of the various options now available to surgeons in treating spinal metastases. PMID:27476835

  10. Posterior Ankle Structure Injury During Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Reb, Christopher W; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Total ankle replacement studies have focused on reporting complications that are directly observed clinically or radiographically, including wound problems, technical errors, implant loosening, subsidence, infection, bone fractures, and heterotopic ossification. However, patients can still experience unresolved pain even when these problems have been ruled out. We initiated a study to more clearly define the relative risk of injury to the anatomic structures in the posterior ankle during total ankle replacement using a third-generation implant system. Ten fresh-frozen adult cadaveric below-the-knee specimens were positioned in the intraoperative positioning frame of an approved total ankle replacement system and adjusted to achieve proper foot alignment using fluoroscopic imaging. The relationship between the tibial cutting guide pins and the posterior neurovascular and tendon structures was measured using digital calipers. High rates of posterior structural injury were found. Nearly all proximal-medial pins encountered a posteromedial neurovascular structure, most commonly the tibial nerve. The distal-medial pins mainly encountered posteromedial tendinous structures, in particular, the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The proximal lateral pins were highly likely to encounter the Achilles tendon and the sural nerve. Our results support our hypothesis that the tibial neurovascular structures are at the greatest risk when preparing for and completing the bony resection, particularly with the medial and proximal cuts. Posterior ankle soft tissue structure injuries can occur during implantation but currently with unknown frequency and undetermined significance. Further study of posterior structural injuries could result in a more informed approach to post-total ankle replacement complications and management. PMID:27291681

  11. Morphofunctional Compensation of Masseter Muscles in Unilateral Posterior Crossbite Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cutroneo, G.; Vermiglio, G.; Centofanti, A.; Rizzo, G.; Runci, M.; Favaloro, A.; Piancino, M.G.; Bracco, P.; Ramieri, G.; Bianchi, F.; Speciale, F.; Arco, A.; Trimarchi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral posterior crossbite is a widespread, asymmetric malocclusion characterized by an inverse relationship of the upper and lower buccal dental cusps, in the molar and premolar regions, on one side only of the dental arch. Patients with unilateral posterior crossbite exhibit an altered chewing cycles and the crossbite side masseter results to be less active with respect to the contralateral one. Few studies about morphological features of masticatory muscle in malocclusion disorders exist and most of these have been performed on animal models. The aim of the present study was to evaluate morphological and protein expression characteristics of masseter muscles in patients affected by unilateral posterior crossbite, by histological and immunofluorescence techniques. We have used antibody against PAX-7, marker of satellite cells, and against α-, β-, γ-, δ-, ε- and ζ-sarcoglycans which are transmembrane glycoproteins involved in sarcolemma stabilization. By statistical analysis we have evaluated differences in amount of myonucley between contralateral and ipsilateral side. Results have shown: i) altered fibers morphology and atrophy of ipsilateral muscle if compared to the contralateral one; ii) higher number of myonuclei and PAX-7 positive cells in contralateral side than ipsilateral one; iii) higher pattern of fluorescence for all tested sarcoglycans in contralateral side than ipsilateral one. Results show that in unilateral posterior crossbite hypertrophic response of contralateral masseter and atrophic events in ipsilateral masseter take place; by that, in unilateral posterior crossbite malocclusion masticatory muscles modify their morphology depending on the function. That could be relevant in understanding and healing of malocclusion disorders; in fact, the altered balance about structure and function between ipsilateral and contralateral muscles could, long-term, lead and/ or worsen skeletal asymmetries. PMID:27349311

  12. Medical restraints to anterior-posterior motion of the knee.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, D; Levy, I M; Sheskier, S; Torzilli, P A; Warren, R F

    1984-07-01

    We investigated the motion of cadaver knees before and after section of the medial structures and anterior cruciate ligament. The knees were tested using a 5-degrees-of-freedom in vitro knee-testing apparatus that measured anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and axial displacement as well as internal-external and valgus-varus rotation. The flexion angle could be varied but was fixed for each individual test. A 125-newton anterior-posterior force was applied perpendicular to the tibial shaft and the resulting motion of the knee was measured. In five knees the anterior cruciate ligament was cut first, followed by progressive cuts of the structures on the medial side (superficial medial collateral ligament, deep medial ligament, oblique fibers of the superficial medial ligament, and the posteromedial part of the capsule). Conversely, in five knees the medial structures were progressively cut first, followed by section of the anterior cruciate ligament. Tests were performed after each cut. With an intact anterior cruciate ligament, progressive cutting of the medial side had no effect on anterior and posterior displacements. When section of the medial structures followed cutting of the anterior cruciate ligament, anterior displacement exceeded that seen after isolated section of the anterior cruciate ligament. The anterior and posterior load-tests were repeated with the tibia fixed in 5 degrees of internal and 5 degrees of external rotation. Fixed external rotation had no effect on anterior and posterior displacements. Fixed internal rotation significantly decreased anterior displacement only when both the anterior cruciate ligament and the medial structures were cut.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6736094

  13. Axial Spondylectomy and Circumferential Reconstruction via a Posterior Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jandial, Rahul; Kelly, Brandon; Bucklen, Brandon; Khalil, Saif; Chen, Mike Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal metastases of the second cervical vertebra are a subset of tumors that is particularly difficult to address surgically. Previously described techniques require highly morbid circumferential dissection posterior to the pharynx for resection and reconstruction. Objective To perform a biomechanical analysis of instrumented reconstruction configurations used after axial spondylectomy and demonstrate safe use of a novel construct in a patient case report. Methods Several different published and novel reconstruction configurations were inserted into 7 occipitocervical spines that underwent axial spondylectomy. A biomechanical analysis of the constructs’ stiffness in flexion and extension, lateral bending, and rotation was performed. A patient then underwent a posterior-only approach for axial spondylectomy and circumferential reconstruction. Results Biomechanical analysis of different constructs demonstrated that anterior column reconstruction with bilateral cages spanning C1 lateral mass to C3 facet in combination with occipitocervical instrumentation was superior in flexion-extension and equivalent in lateral bending and rotation to currently used constructs. In the patient in which this construct was placed via a posterior-only approach for axial spondylectomy and instrumentation, the patient remained at neurological baseline and demonstrated no recurrence of local disease or failure of instrumentation to date. Conclusion When comparing C1 lateral mass to C3 facet bilateral cage plus occipitocervical instrumentation to existing anterior and posterior constructs, this novel reconstruction is biomechanically equivalent if not superior in performance. In a patient, the posterior-only approach for C2 spondylectomy with the novel reconstruction was safe, durable, and avoided the morbidity of the anterior approach. PMID:23149951

  14. Prevalence of sinus augmentation associated with maxillary posterior implants.

    PubMed

    Seong, Wook-Jin; Barczak, Michael; Jung, Jae; Basu, Saonli; Olin, Paul S; Conrad, Heather J

    2013-12-01

    Pneumatization of the maxillary sinus limits the quantity of alveolar bone available for implant placement and may result in a lack of primary stability and difficulty in achieving osseointegration. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze a group of patients who had implants placed in the posterior maxilla, calculate the prevalence of sinus augmentation, and identify factors related to sinus augmentation. With institutional review board approval, dental records from a population of patients who had implants placed in the maxillary posterior region between January 2000 and December 2004 were used to create a database. Independent variables were classified as continuous (age of the patient at stage 1 implant surgery [S1], time between extraction and S1, time between extraction and sinus augmentation, and time between sinus augmentation and S1) and categorical (gender, implant failure, American Society of Anesthesiologists system classification, smoking, osteoporosis, residual crestal bone height, implant position, implant proximity, prostheses type, and implant diameter and length). The dependent variable was the incidence of a sinus augmentation procedure. Simple logistic regression was used to assess the influence of each factor on the presence of sinus augmentation (P < .05). The final database included 502 maxillary posterior implants with an overall survival rate of 93.2% over a mean follow-up period of 35.7 months. Of 502 implants, 272 (54.2%) were associated with a sinus augmentation procedure. Among variables, residual crestal bone height (P < .001), implant position (P < .001), implant proximity (P < .001), prosthesis type (P < .001), implant failure (P < .01), and implant diameter (P < .01), were statistically associated with sinus augmentation. Within the limitations of this retrospective study, the results suggest that more than half (54.2%) of the maxillary posterior implants were involved with a sinus augmentation procedure. The

  15. Caring for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormans, John P., Ed.; Pellegrino, Louis, Ed.

    Twenty-one papers on caring for children with cerebral palsy are organized into four sections, including: (1) cerebral palsy and the interdisciplinary team approach; (2) management of impairments related to cerebral palsy; (3) preventing disability by optimizing function of the child with cerebral palsy; and (4) preventing handicap by creating…

  16. Cerebral tissue oxygenation impairment during experimental cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Martins, Yuri C; Ong, Peng Kai; Zanini, Graziela M; Frangos, John A; Carvalho, Leonardo JM

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia and hypoxia have been implicated in cerebral malaria (CM) pathogenesis, although direct measurements of hypoxia have not been conducted. C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) develop a neurological syndrome known as experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), whereas BALB/c mice are resistant to ECM. In this study, intravital microscopy methods were used to quantify hemodynamic changes, vascular/tissue oxygen (O2) tension (PO2), and perivascular pH in vivo in ECM and non-ECM models, employing a closed cranial window model. ECM mice on day 6 of infection showed marked decreases in pial blood flow, vascular (arteriolar, venular), and perivascular PO2, perivascular pH, and systemic hemoglobin levels. Changes were more dramatic in mice with late-stage ECM compared with mice with early-stage ECM. These changes led to drastic decreases in O2 delivery to the brain tissue. In addition, ECM animals required a greater PO2 gradient to extract the same amount of O2 compared with non-infected animals, as the pial tissues extract O2 from the steepest portion of the blood O2 equilibrium curve. ECM animals also showed increased leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venules, and the intensity of adhesion was inversely correlated with blood flow and O2 extraction. PbA-infected BALB/c mice displayed no neurological signs on day 6 and while they did show changes similar to those observed in C57BL/6 mice (decreased pial blood flow, vascular/tissue PO2, perivascular pH, hemoglobin levels), non-ECM animals preserved superior perfusion and oxygenation compared with ECM animals at similar anemia and parasitemia levels, resulting in better O2 delivery and O2 extraction by the brain tissue. In conclusion, direct quantitative assessment of pial hemodynamics and oxygenation in vivo revealed that ECM is associated with severe progressive brain tissue hypoxia and acidosis. PMID:24128424

  17. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Without Typical Thunderclap Headache.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Ducros, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by severe headache and diffuse segmental intracranial arterial constriction that resolve within three months. Stroke, which is the major complication of RCVS, can result in persistent neurological disability, and rarely causes death. Diagnosis of RCVS early in the clinical course might improve outcomes. Although recurrent thunderclap headache is the clinical hallmark of RCVS, the absence of such a pattern should not lead to discard the diagnosis. Our literature review shows that RCVS can also manifest as an unspecific headache, such as a single severe headache episode, a mild or a progressive headache. Moreover, a subset of patients with severe RCVS presents without any headache, but frequently with seizures, focal neurological deficits, confusion or coma, in the setting of stroke or posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. These patients may be aphasic or in comatose state, explaining their inability to give their own medical history. They may have forgotten the headache they had a few days before more dramatic symptoms, or may have a variant of the classical RCVS. By consequence, an RCVS should be suspected in patients with any unusual headache, whether thunderclap or not, and in patients with cryptogenic stroke or convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage, whether the patient also has headache or not. Diagnosis in such cases relies on the demonstration of reversible multifocal intracranial arterial stenosis and the exclusion of other causes. PMID:27016378

  18. Anatomic variations of anterior cerebral artery cortical branches.

    PubMed

    Stefani, M A; Schneider, F L; Marrone, A C; Severino, A G; Jackowski, A P; Wallace, M C

    2000-01-01

    The anterior cerebral artery (ACA) is a major vessel responsible for the blood supply to the interhemispheric region. The ACA segment after the anterior communicating artery (AComA) origin is called the distal ACA and has central and cortical branches. The cortical branches are distributed in the different regions of the orbital and medial part of the brain. The objects of this study are the anatomical variations found in the distal ACA. In 76 hemispheres the ACA distal branches were injected with latex and dissected under microscope magnification. Vessel diameters and distances between vessel origins and anterior communicating artery were recorded and analyzed. Microsurgical dissection was carried out to demonstrate anatomic variations of these vessels. Average diameter of ACA at origin was 2.61 +/- 0.34 mm and average diameter of cortical branches diameter ranged from 0.79 +/- 0.27 mm to 1.84 +/- 0.3 mm. Distances between vessel origin and AComA ranged from 7.68 +/- 3.91 mm (orbitofrontal) to 112.6 +/- 11.63 mm (inferior internal parietal). This study found anatomical variations: a single (azygos) ACA was present in one case and three in three cases. Crossing branches of the distal ACA to the contralateral hemisphere were present in 26% of the cases. In some cases a single ACA may supply the posterior hemispheric region through crossing branches. This calls attention to potential bilateral brain infarcts due to a single unilateral ACA occlusion. PMID:10873213

  19. A life-threatening brainstem compression by cerebral Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Karakoç, Zehra Cagla; Kasimcan, Mustafa Omür; Pipia, Anna Paola; Tore, Gessica; Alberti, Alberto; Varcasia, Antonio; Sav, Aydin; Oruçkaptan, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus. It is of worldwide importance, and is widespread in the Mediterranean region and Middle East. This tapeworm shows great intraspecific variation in relation to host specificity, epidemiology and morphology. This variability led in previous years to the identification of ten (G1-G10) different genotypes of the parasite. Cerebral localization of E. granulosus is not common: it especially affects children and is more frequently located in the supratentorial region. It can be life-threatening due to its localization in eloquent areas especially in the posterior fossa. Despite the benign nature of hydatid cyst, invasion of critical areas may cause significant mortality and morbidity in some patients. Urgent surgical decompression and adjuvant medical treatment must be employed as soon as possible in these patients. We present a clinical case of life-threatening brainstem compression in a child due to a rare form of CE which was confirmed with biomolecular techniques. She presented with respiratory distress and progressive quadriparesis. All cysts were removed by microsurgical technique and albendazole was given postoperatively for one year with regular follow-ups. PMID:27031900

  20. Inadvertent Trypan Blue Staining of Posterior Capsule during Cataract Surgery Associated with "Argentinian Flag" Event.

    PubMed

    Prinzi, Robert A; Alapati, Neeti M; Gappy, Shawn S; Dilly, Jason S

    2016-01-01

    Trypan blue is common in visualizing the anterior capsule during cataract surgery. Inadvertent staining of the posterior capsule during phacoemulsification is a rare complication and there are few reports in the literature. The proposed mechanism of posterior capsule staining in previous reports includes a compromised zonular apparatus or iris retractors facilitating the posterior flow of trypan blue. We report the first case of trypan blue staining of the posterior capsule associated with the "Argentinian flag" sign. In our case, the "Argentinian flag" allowed the trypan blue to seep between the posterior capsule and the lens, staining the anterior surface of the posterior capsule. PMID:27022495

  1. Cerebral Hypoperfusion Precedes Nausea During Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Schlegel, Todd T.; Black, F. Owen; Wood, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Nausea and motion sickness are important operational concerns for aviators and astronauts. Understanding underlying mechanisms associated with motion sickness may lead to new treatments. The goal of this work was to determine if cerebral blood flow changes precede the development of nausea in motion sick susceptible subjects. Cerebral flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres) and end-tidal CO2 were measured while subjects were rotated on a centrifuge (250 degrees/sec). Following 5 min of rotation, subjects were translated 0.504 m off-center, creating a +lGx centripetal acceleration in the nasal-occipital plane. Ten subjects completed the protocol without symptoms while 5 developed nausea (4 while 6ff-center and 1 while rotating on-center). Prior to nausea, subjects had significant increases in blood pressure (+13plus or minus 3 mmHg, P less than 0.05) and cerebrovascular resistance (+46 plus or minus 17%, P less than 0.05) and decreases in cerebral flow velocity both in the second (-13 plus or minus 4%) and last minute (-22 plus or minus 5%) before symptoms (P less than 0.05). In comparison, controls demonstrated no change in blood pressure or cerebrovascular resistance in the last minute of off-center rotation and only a 7 plus or minus 2% decrease in cerebral flow velocity. All subjects had significant hypocapnia (-3.8 plus or minus 0.4 mmHg, P less than 0.05), however this hypocapnia could not fully explain the cerebral hypoperfusion associated with the development of nausea. These data indicate that reductions in cerebral blood flow precede the development of nausea. Further work is necessary to determine what role cerebral hypoperfusion plays in motion sickness and whether cerebral hypoperfusion can be used to predict the development of nausea in susceptible individuals.

  2. Cerebral Lactate Metabolism After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Patet, Camille; Suys, Tamarah; Carteron, Laurent; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral energy dysfunction has emerged as an important determinant of prognosis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A number of studies using cerebral microdialysis, positron emission tomography, and jugular bulb oximetry to explore cerebral metabolism in patients with TBI have demonstrated a critical decrease in the availability of the main energy substrate of brain cells (i.e., glucose). Energy dysfunction induces adaptations of cerebral metabolism that include the utilization of alternative energy resources that the brain constitutively has, such as lactate. Two decades of experimental and human investigations have convincingly shown that lactate stands as a major actor of cerebral metabolism. Glutamate-induced activation of glycolysis stimulates lactate production from glucose in astrocytes, with subsequent lactate transfer to neurons (astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle). Lactate is not only used as an extra energy substrate but also acts as a signaling molecule and regulator of systemic and brain glucose use in the cerebral circulation. In animal models of brain injury (e.g., TBI, stroke), supplementation with exogenous lactate exerts significant neuroprotection. Here, we summarize the main clinical studies showing the pivotal role of lactate and cerebral lactate metabolism after TBI. We also review pilot interventional studies that examined exogenous lactate supplementation in patients with TBI and found hypertonic lactate infusions had several beneficial properties on the injured brain, including decrease of brain edema, improvement of neuroenergetics via a "cerebral glucose-sparing effect," and increase of cerebral blood flow. Hypertonic lactate represents a promising area of therapeutic investigation; however, larger studies are needed to further examine mechanisms of action and impact on outcome. PMID:26898683

  3. Cerebral blood flow in the newborn infant.

    PubMed Central

    Pryds, O.; Edwards, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of CBF have provided some insight into cerebrovascular physiology and pharmacology. However, the precise relation between CBF and cerebral damage remains elusive, and there is no definition of a threshold CBF below which ischaemic brain damage always occurs. Measurement of CBF thus does not currently provide a secure guide in the clinical management of sick infants. Further work, particularly using techniques like magnetic resonance imaging and NIRS, which provide data in addition to CBF measurements, may yet disclose strategies which manipulate CBF to reduce cerebral ischaemia. While cerebral injury remains a substantial problem in neonatal intensive care, such research is urgently needed. Images Figure 3 PMID:8653440

  4. The evolution of cerebral revascularization surgery.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Melanie G; Lee, Marco; Guzman, Raphael; Steinberg, Gary K

    2009-05-01

    Among the relatively few surgeons to be awarded the Nobel Prize was Alexis Carrel, a French surgeon and pioneer in revascularization surgery at the turn of the 20th century. The authors trace the humble beginnings of cerebral revascularization surgery through to the major developments that helped shape the modern practice of cerebral bypass surgery. They discuss the cornerstone studies in the development of this technique, including the Extracranial/Intracranial Bypass Study initiated in 1977. Recent innovations, including modern techniques to monitor cerebral blood flow, microanastomosis techniques, and ongoing trials that play an important role in the evolution of this field are also evaluated. PMID:19408995

  5. Cerebral Palsy Gait, Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    TUGUI, Raluca Dana; ANTONESCU, Dinu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy refers to a lesion on an immature brain, that determines permanent neurological disorders. Knowing the exact cause of the disease does not alter the treatment management. The etiology is 2-2.5/1000 births and the rate is constant in the last 40-50 years because advances in medical technologies have permitted the survival of smaller and premature new born children. Gait analysis has four directions: kinematics (represents body movements analysis without calculating the forces), kinetics (represents body moments and forces), energy consumption (measured by oximetry), and neuromuscular activity (measured by EMG). Gait analysis can observe specific deviations in a patient, allowing us to be more accurate in motor diagnoses and treatment solutions: surgery intervention, botulinum toxin injection, use of orthosis, physical kinetic therapy, oral medications, baclofen pump. PMID:24790675

  6. Malignant cerebral swelling following cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Honeybul, S; Damodaran, O; Lind, C R P; Lee, G

    2016-07-01

    Over the past few years there have been a number of case reports and small cohort studies that have described so called "malignant" cerebral swelling following an uneventful cranioplasty procedure. The pathophysiology remains to be established however it has been suggested that it may be related to a combination of failure of autoregulation and the use of closed vacuum suction drainage. The current study presents three further patients who had had a decompressive hemicraniectomy for ischaemic stroke. If decompressive craniectomy is utilised in the management of neurological emergencies, close attention and wider reporting of this type of complication is required not only to focus attention on possible management strategies, but also to determine which patients are at most risk of this devastating complication. PMID:27189792

  7. Cerebral astroblastoma: A radiopathological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepak Kumar; Singh, Neha; Singh, Ragini; Husain, Nuzhat

    2014-01-01

    Astroblastoma is a rare glial neoplasm whose histogenesis has been clarified recently. It primarily occurs in children and young adults. We are reporting a case of 12-year-old girl child who presented with features of raised intracranial tension and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large well-circumscribed, cystic lesion without perifocal edema, and enhancing mural nodule in right parietal region. A radiological differential diagnosis of pilocytic astrocytoma and cerebral astroblastoma was made. A complete excision was done and histologically the lesion turned out to be an astroblastoma. We review the histology, immunohistochemistry, and imaging features of astroblastoma and survey the current literature, treatment strategies, and prognostic aspects for the management of this rare neoplasm. PMID:24891904

  8. Rodent models of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.D.; Busto, R. )

    1989-12-01

    The use of physiologically regulated, reproducible animal models is crucial to the study of ischemic brain injury--both the mechanisms governing its occurrence and potential therapeutic strategies. Several laboratory rodent species (notably rats and gerbils), which are readily available at relatively low cost, are highly suitable for the investigation of cerebral ischemia and have been widely employed for this purpose. We critically examine and summarize several rodent models of transient global ischemia, resulting in selective neuronal injury within vulnerable brain regions, and focal ischemia, typically giving rise to localized brain infarction. We explore the utility of individual models and emphasize the necessity for meticulous experimental control of those variables that modulate the severity of ischemic brain injury.169 references.

  9. Posterior shoulder pain and anterior instability: a preliminary clinical study.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Alessandro; Conti, Marco; Borroni, Mario; Massazza, Giuseppe; Vinci, Enzo; Franceschi, Giorgio; Garofalo, Raffaele

    2008-02-01

    Different clinical tests have been suggested in the literature as significant indicators of anterior shoulder instability. Sometimes patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability may show some muscular guarding thus making the evaluation of specific clinical tests very difficult. These patients may also report a medical history with posterior shoulder pain that can be also elicited during some clinical manoeuvres. From September 2005 to September 2006 we prospectively studied patients who underwent an arthroscopic anterior capsuloplasty. Shoulder clinical examination was performed including anterior shoulder instability tests (drawer, apprehension and relocation tests). Furthermore the exam was focused on the presence of scapular dyskinesia and posterior shoulder pain. The patients were also evaluated with ASES, Rowe, SST (Simple Shoulder Test), Constant and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) scoring system preoperatively and at the latest follow-up time. In the period of this study we observed 16 patients treated for anterior gleno-humeral arthroscopic stabilisation, who preoperatively complained also of a posterior scapular pain. The pain was referred at the level of lower trapezium and upper rhomboids tendon insertion on the medial border of the scapula. It was also reproducible upon local palpation by the examiner. Four of these patients also referred pain in the region of the insertion of the infraspinatus and teres minor. After arthroscopic stabilisation the shoulder was immobilised in a sling with the arm in the neutral rotation for a period of 4 weeks. A single physician supervised shoulder rehabilitation. After a mean time of 6.8 months of follow-up, all the shoulder scores were significantly improved and, moreover, at the same time the patients referred the disappearance of the posterior pain. Posterior scapular shoulder pain seems to be another complaint and sign that can be found in patients affected by anterior shoulder instability

  10. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Emerging Concepts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) involves cerebrovascular amyloid deposition and is classified into several types according to the amyloid protein involved. Of these, sporadic amyloid β-protein (Aβ)-type CAA is most commonly found in older individuals and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebrovascular Aβ deposits accompany functional and pathological changes in cerebral blood vessels (CAA-associated vasculopathies). CAA-associated vasculopathies lead to development of hemorrhagic lesions [lobar intracerebral macrohemorrhage, cortical microhemorrhage, and cortical superficial siderosis (cSS)/focal convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)], ischemic lesions (cortical infarction and ischemic changes of the white matter), and encephalopathies that include subacute leukoencephalopathy caused by CAA-associated inflammation/angiitis. Thus, CAA is related to dementia, stroke, and encephalopathies. Recent advances in diagnostic procedures, particularly neuroimaging, have enabled us to establish a clinical diagnosis of CAA without brain biopsies. Sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods, such as gradient-echo T2* imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging, are useful for detecting cortical microhemorrhages and cSS. Amyloid imaging with amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, such as Pittsburgh Compound B, can detect CAA, although they cannot discriminate vascular from parenchymal amyloid deposits. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid markers may be useful, including levels of Aβ40 for CAA and anti-Aβ antibody for CAA-related inflammation. Moreover, cSS is closely associated with transient focal neurological episodes (TFNE). CAA-related inflammation/angiitis shares pathophysiology with amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) induced by Aβ immunotherapies in AD patients. This article reviews CAA and CAA-related disorders with respect to their epidemiology, pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features, biomarkers, diagnosis

  11. Progressive intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion in a fatal case of cerebral aspergilloma

    PubMed Central

    Toksvang, Linea Natalie; Plovsing, Ronni R; Berg, Ronan M G

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report a case of cerebral aspergilloma in a 25-year-old immunoincompetent man admitted to a general intensive care unit. Monitoring of intracranial pressure was instigated and revealed hour-long epochs of severe intracranial hypertension, despite a normal opening pressure, with decreases in cerebral perfusion pressure. We documented that this was associated with cerebral hypoperfusion by transcranial Doppler ultrasound. The present case illustrates that severe intracranial hypertension may evolve despite a normal opening pressure; it furthermore shows that continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure may be used to predict changes in cerebral haemodynamics in critically ill patients with neuroinfection. PMID:24907204

  12. Posterior Fixation Techniques in the Subaxial Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Makanji, Heeren; Cha, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the historical context, indications, techniques, and complications of four posterior fixation techniques to stabilize the subaxial cervical spine. Specifically, posterior wiring, laminar screw fixation, lateral mass fixation, and pedicle screw fixation are among the common methods of operative fixation of the subaxial cervical spine. While wiring and laminar screw fixation are now rarely used, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation are technically challenging and present the risk of significant complications if performed incorrectly. With a sound understanding of anatomy and rigorous preoperative evaluation of bony structures, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation provide a safe and reliable method for subaxial cervical spine fixation. PMID:26594602

  13. A case of hypospadias, anterior and posterior urethral valves.

    PubMed

    Carvell, James; Mulik, Roopa

    2013-01-01

    This report outlines the case of a 3-year-old boy whose initial presentation was that of asymptomatic hypertension (lowest recording 148/90), found at preoperative check prior to stage 2-correction surgery for distal hypospadias. Upon diagnosis of true hypertension, an ultrasound of the child's renal tract showed evidence of marked hydronephrosis and calyceal dilatation. On the background of deteriorating renal function (Urea 25.5 and Creatinine 188), a Micturating Cystourethrogram was performed, demonstrating posterior urethral dilatation. With difficulties controlling blood pressure, the child was transferred to Urology care, where resection of a posterior urethral valve (PUV) was undertaken. Despite this, renal function deteriorated further and re-cystoscopy identified an anterior urethral valve (AUV), which was also resected. Renal function, although improved, remains poor and blood pressure is controlled with two anti-hypertensives. To the publisher's knowledge, the association between hypospadias, PUVs and AUVs is as yet undocumented. PMID:24964414

  14. Evaluation of arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, José Carlos; Maia, Lucas Russo; Fonseca, Juliano Rocha; Zabeu, José Luís Amim; Garcia, Jesely Pereira Myrrha

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide data for the analysis of arthroscopy as a method of surgical treatment for shoulder and discuss its actual indications and preliminary results. METHODS: We evaluated 15 patients submitted to reverse Bankart arthroscopic surgery. We used the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score to measure the results before surgery and 12 months thereafter. RESULTS: The average UCLA score changed from 26.67±0.25 (SD 0.97) before surgery to 34.20±0.53 (SD 2.04) after surgery. The effectiveness of surgery was 93%. In five cases loose bodies were found. A patient undergoing remplissage was evaluated separately. The data did not change after 24 months post-surgery. CONCLUSION: The arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability and posterior dislocation of the shoulder has been proved feasible and results in our series followed the same trends as in the literature. Level of Evidence III, Transversal Retrospective Study. PMID:26207089

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with neurological sequelae - a case report.

    PubMed

    Nesteruk, Marta; Kurdyła, Anna; Nesteruk, Tomasz; Dorobek, Małgorzata

    2016-04-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a set of neurological symptoms including impaired consciousness, cognitive disorders, seizures, blurred vision, dizziness and headache. The symptoms are closely related to the location of pathological changes in the brain; bilateral occipitto-parietal region is most often affected. Both focal neurological symptoms and encephalopathy are usually transient. We present the case of 64-year-old woman with PRES. She suffered from many internal diseases and was admitted to the hospital due to impaired consciousness, speech disorders, balance disorders. Significant neurological deterioration was observed within several days from the onset. Differential diagnosis included stroke and viral neuroinfection (cytosis 23 cells /ul, protein level of 93 mg/dl); magnetic resonance examination revealed lesions typical for posterior reversible encephalopathy.After 6 weeks of hospitalization patient condition improved, but did not restore to the premorbid state. The patient was discharged with generalized cognitive impairment. PMID:27137827

  16. Delayed supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage following posterior fossa surgery

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, Pravin; Malik, Vinod; Kovai, Priyamvadha; Aggarwal, Ashish; Khandelwal, Niranjan K.

    2016-01-01

    Delayed supratentorial intracerebral hematoma after posterior fossa surgery is uncommon. Only few cases have been reported in the past. The cause has been attributed to sitting position leading to changes in intracranial arterial and venous pressures. We report two cases of delayed intracerebral hematoma following posterior fossa surgery, none of which were operated in sitting position. MR venogram done in one patient showed venous sinus thrombosis. Intracererbal hematoma following infratentorial surgery is uncommon and is possibly due to venous sinus thrombosis leading to venous hypertension. Control of bleeding from venous sinuses due to avulsion of emissary veins during craniotomy/craniectomy possibly induces sinus thrombosis that may propagate antegrade or retrograde, leading to venous hypertension and parenchymal bleed. PMID:27366274

  17. Ogilvie's syndrome following posterior spinal instrumentation in thoraco lumbar trauma

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, R.; Kuzhimattam, Mathew John; Kumar, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To report unique cases of Ogilvie's syndrome (acute intestinal pseudo-obstruction) following posterior spinal instrumentation in thoraco lumbar trauma. Materials and Methods: A single centre retrospective study. We reviewed the surgical data of 420 patients who underwent thoracolumbar spinal surgery over a period of four years. Two patients who developed post operative Ogilvie's syndromes were identified. Results: The clinical presentation and blood investigations ruled out any infectious pathology. Computed tomography scans ruled out the mechanical obstruction. All patients improved with conservative management. Conclusion: Ogilvie's syndrome should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with postoperative significant abdominal distension who had undergone posterior instrumentation for spinal trauma. Early recognition and appropriate conservative treatment would be necessary to prevent complications such as bowel ischemia and perforation. PMID:26692695

  18. SHOULDER POSTERIOR INTERNAL IMPINGEMENT IN THE OVERHEAD ATHLETE

    PubMed Central

    Grant‐Nierman, Meggan; Lucas, Brennen

    2013-01-01

    Posterior internal impingement (PII) of the glenohumeral joint is a common cause of shoulder complex pain in the overhead athlete. This impingement is very different from standard outlet impingement seen in shoulder patients. Internal impingement is characterized by posterior shoulder pain when the athlete places the humerus in extreme external rotation and abduction as in the cocking phase of pitching or throwing. Impingement in this position occurs between the supraspinatus and or infraspinatus and the glenoid rim. Understanding regarding this pathology continues to evolve. Definitive understanding of precipitating factors, causes, presentation and methods of treatment have yet to be determined. A high index of suspicion should be used when attempting to make this diagnosis. This current concepts review presents the current thinking regarding pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of this condition. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:23593557

  19. A case of giant nodular posterior scleritis mimicking choroidal malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Andrea T; Luk, Fiona O; Chan, Carmen K

    2015-01-01

    To report a case of giant nodular posterior scleritis mimicking a choroidal tumor. A 42-year-old lady with systemic hypertension presented with a 1-week history of unilateral visual loss, pain and redness in her left eye. Examination showed sectoral anterior episcleritis in her left eye as well as a dome-shaped choroidal mass at the inferior-temporal periphery, associated with retinal hemorrhages and subretinal fluid. Systemic evaluation and imaging of the choroidal mass were performed and could not rule out amelanotic choroidal melanoma. At the same time, she was prescribed a 2-week course of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) for her sectoral anterior episcleritis. The choroidal mass was found to have resolved completely right before her scheduled fine needle biospy. Diagnosis of nodular posterior scleritis and a trial of oral NSAID can be considered in patients presenting with a choroidal mass before any invasive procedure. PMID:26862098

  20. Ear projection and the posterior auricular muscle insertion.

    PubMed

    Guyuron, B; DeLuca, L

    1997-08-01

    Prominent ears is a common congenital anomaly affecting approximately 5 percent of the general population. The etiology has been attributed to three basic deformities in the ear structure: valgus of the concha with a cranioauricular angle greater than 40 degrees, underfolding of the anthelix, and rarely, hypertrophy of the concha. It is believed that by virtue of its insertion onto the ponticulus, the cranial surface of the concha, the posterior auricular muscle may function to pull the auricle back toward the head. A proximally (anteromedially) displaced insertion site would decrease the length of the effective momentum of the muscle, leading to protrusion of the auricle. This study was conducted to determine if indeed a relationship between the posterior muscle insertion site and ear projection could be established clinically by measuring these parameters intraoperatively in patients presenting for otoplasty and in patients without prominent ears who required conchal cartilage grafts for other procedures. PMID:9252616

  1. Delayed diagnosed posterior interosseous nerve palsy due to intramuscular myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Kursumovic, A; Mattiassich, G; Rath, S

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of posterior interosseous nerve palsy after bowel surgery associated with intramuscular myxoma of the supinator muscle. The initial symptoms of swelling of the forearm made it difficult to distinguish the condition from extravasations after intravenous cannulation. The diagnosis was finally established with nerve conduction studies and MRI 3 months after symptom onset. The patient underwent surgery for removal of the tumour and decompression of the posterior interosseous nerve. The histological examination identified the tumour as intramuscular myxoma and the patient made a full recovery with no recurrence of the lesion until present. Every swelling on the forearm causing neurological disorders is tumour suspected and should be examined clinically as well as electrophysically and radiographically. Early surgery and nerve decompression should follow immediately after the diagnosis. In case of intramuscular myxoma, good recovery of function after surgery with low recurrence risk may be expected. PMID:23576649

  2. Severe complication of posterior nasal packing: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, José Antônio; Cintra, Pedro Paulo Vivacqua da Cunha; Sônego, Thiago Branco; Leal, Carolina de Farias Aires; Artico, Marina Spadari; Soares, Josemar dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Severe Epistaxis is common in patients with head trauma, especially when associated with multiple fractures of the face and skull base. Several methods of controlling bleeding that can be imposed. The anterior nasal tapenade associated with posterior Foley catheter is one of the most widespread, and the universal availability of necessary materials or their apparent ease of execution. Methods: Case report on control of severe epistaxis after severe TBI, with posterior nasal packing by Foley catheter and control tomography showing multiple fractures of the skull base and penetration of the probe into the brain parenchyma. Conclusion: This is a rare but possible complication in the treatment of severe nose bleeds associated with fracture of the skull base. This brief report highlights risks related to the method and suggests some care to prevent complications related through a brief literature review. PMID:25991984

  3. Cerebral blood flow: Physiologic and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 46 chapters divided among nine sections. The section titles are: Historical Perspectives; Cerebrovascular Anatomy; Cerebrovascular Physiology; Methods of Clinical Measurement; Experimental Methods; Imaging of Cerebral Circulation; Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology; Cerebrovascular Pharmacology; and Surgical and Interventional Augmentation.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... recurrent seizures (epilepsy). People with the Flemish and Italian types of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy are prone ... amyloid angiopathy . APP gene mutations cause the Dutch, Italian, Arctic, Iowa, Flemish, and Piedmont types of this ...

  5. Transcranial cerebral oximetry in random normal subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Mukesh; Stark, Jennifer; Dujovny, Manuel; Alp, M. Serdar; Widman, Ronald; Ausman, James I.

    1997-08-01

    Near infrared optical spectroscopy is becoming a useful method for monitoring regional cerebral oxygenation status. The method is simple, reliable and noninvasive and the information which it provides is clinically significant in managing a growing number of neurological ailments. Use of this technique has been described previously by numerous authors. In the present study, regional cerebral oxygen saturation was measured at rest in 94 subjects randomly elected from a diverse population of individuals. This sample consisted of 38 males and 65 females, with the age ranging from 18 - 70. There were 68 light-skinned individuals and 35 with darker skin comprising various ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Mean regional cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation was recorded as 67.14 plus or minus 8.84%. The association of the mean regional cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation in various group of individuals in relationship of their age, race, sex and skin color is examined.

  6. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis in Neonates and Children.

    PubMed

    Chung, Melissa G

    2016-03-01

    Investigators from Erasmus University Hospital in Belgium and Gustave-Dron Hospital and Roger-Salengro Hospital in France studied the clinical and neuroradiologic characteristics of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) in neonates and children. PMID:27396366

  7. Cerebral aneurysms: Formation, progression and developmental chronology

    PubMed Central

    Etminan, Nima; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dreier, Rita; Bruckner, Peter; Torner, James C.; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel; Macdonald, R. Loch

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UAIs) in the general population is up to 3%. Existing epidemiological data suggests that only a small fraction of UIAs progress towards rupture over the lifetime of an individual, but the surrogates for subsequent rupture and the natural history of UIAs are discussed very controversially at present. In case of rupture of an UIA, the case-fatality is up to 50%, which therefore continues to stimulate interest in the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysm formation and progression. Actual data on the chronological development of cerebral aneurysm has been especially difficult to obtain and, until recently, the existing knowledge in this respect is mainly derived from animal or mathematical models or short-term observational studies. Here, we highlight the current data on cerebral aneurysm formation and progression as well as a novel approach to investigate the developmental chronology of cerebral aneurysms. PMID:24323717

  8. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Ali; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-09-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by recurrent thunderclap headache, with or without neurologic symptoms, and reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. RCVS affects patients in various racial and ethnic groups and in all age groups, although most commonly in the fourth decade of life. Many conditions and exposures have been linked to RCVS, including vasoactive drugs and the peripartum period. Disturbance of the cerebral vascular tone is thought to contribute to the disease's pathophysiology. RCVS generally follows a monophasic course. Associated strokes and cerebral hemorrhages are not uncommon. In this review we will attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of RCVS, with emphasis on the controversies in the field and the newest findings in the reported literature. PMID:25138149

  9. Cerebral intraventricular echinococcosis in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sharad; Pandey, Deepa; Shende, Neeraj; Sahu, Anurag; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Echinococcosis in humans occurs as a result of infection by the larval stages of taeniid cestodes of the genus echinococcus. Intracranial hydatid cysts usually develop at an intraparenchymal site. Hydatid cyst within the cerebral ventricle is quite unusual. Methods: We reviewed the literature on adult intraventricular hydatid cyst and found case reports mainly in children with an only handful of cases in adults. We reported a rare case of cerebral intraventricular (left lateral ventricle) hydatid cyst in a 21-year-old adult female. Results: Although cerebral hydatid cysts are most commonly seen in children and young adults cerebral intraventricular hydatid cyst are comparatively rarer in adults. Conclusion: The possibility of infection with Echinococcus granulosus should be included in the differential diagnosis of raised intracranial hypertension in patients from endemic areas. PMID:26392915

  10. Intrinsic connections and architectonics of posterior parietal cortex in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, D.N.; Seltzer, B.

    1982-01-10

    By means of autoradiographic and ablation-degeneration techniques, the intrinsic cortical connections of the posterior parietal cortex in the rhesus monkey were traced and correlated with a reappraisal of cerebral architectonics. Two major rostral-to-caudal connectional sequences exist. One begins in the dorsal postcentral gyrus (area 2) and proceeds, through architectonic divisions of the superior parietal lobule (areas PE and PEc), to a cortical region on the medial surface of the parietal lobe (area PGm). This area has architectonic features similar to those of the caudal inferior parietal lobule (area PG). The second sequence begins in the ventral post/central gyrus (area 2) and passes through the rostral inferior parietal lobule (areas PG and PFG) to reach the caudal inferior parietal lobule (area PG). Both the superior parietal lobule and the rostral inferior parietal lobule also send projections to various other zones located in the parietal opercular region, the intraparietal sulcus, and the caudalmost portion of the cingulate sulcus. Areas PGm and PG, on the other hand, project to each other, to the cingulate region, to the caudalmost portion of the superior temporal gyrus, and to the upper bank of the superior temporal sulcus. Finally, a reciprocal sequence of connections, directed from caudal to rostral, links together many of the above-mentioned parietal zones. With regard to the laminar pattern of termination, the rostral-to-caudal connections are primarily distributed in the form of cortical ''columns'' while the caudal-to-rostral connections are found mainly over the first cortical cell layer.

  11. Transient presyncope secondary to posterior descending artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Andrew D; Al-Khatib, Jamal T; Michael, Jennifer; Nguyen, Vien X

    2011-01-01

    We describe the case of a 64-year-old male initially presenting with presyncope and bradycardia, without any anginal symptoms or objective evidence of myocardial ischemia. A stress test induced no physical symptoms but revealed a left bundle branch block with multiple preventricular contractions on electrocardiogram. Subsequent catheterization revealed severe obstructive disease throughout the coronary arteries. He was treated percutaneously on two separate heart catheterizations. The presyncope and bradycardia resolved after reperfusion of the posterior descending artery. PMID:24826229

  12. Anterior mitral annulus caseoma: as benign as posterior counterparts?

    PubMed

    Mazzucco, Alessandro; Abbasciano, Riccardo; Onorati, Francesco; Brognoli, Gabriele; Fanti, Diego; Gottin, Leonardo; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Mitral annular caseoma is a common incidental finding involving the posterior annulus. It has an innocent nature, with the exception of its endocarditic degeneration and/or a stenotic functional effect when exophytic. We report an exceptionally rare isolated anterior mitral annular caseoma involving also the anterior mitral leaflet and affecting its physiologic systolic movement, thus resulting in a restricting anterior leaflet motion responsible for mitral insufficiency. The case was successfully treated by complex mitral valve repair. PMID:26522681

  13. Hyperintense Acute Reperfusion Marker on FLAIR in Posterior Circulation Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Holger; Böhme, Johannes; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Groden, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of blood brain barrier injury in posterior circulation infarction as demonstrated by the hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) on fluid attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR). Methods From a MRI report database we identified patients with posterior circulation infarction who underwent MRI, including perfusion-weighted images (PWI), within 12 hours after onset and follow-up MRI within 24 hours and analyzed diffusion-weighted images (DWI), PWI, FLAIR, and MR angiography (MRA). On FLAIR images, the presence of HARM was noted by using pre-specified criteria (focal enhancement in the subarachnoid space and/or the ventricles). Results Overall 16 patients (median age of patients 68.5 (IQR 55.5–82.75) years) with posterior circulation infarction were included. Of these, 13 (81.3%) demonstrated PCA occlusion, and 3 (18.7%) patients BA occlusion on MRA. Initial DWI demonstrated ischemic lesions in the thalamus (68.8%), splenium (18.8%), hippocampus (75%), occipital lobe (81.3%), mesencephalon (18.8%), pons (18.8%), and cerebellum (50%). On follow-up MRA recanalization was noted in 10 (62.5%) patients. On follow-up FLAIR images, HARM was observed in 8 (50%) patients. In all of these, HARM was detected remote from the acute ischemic lesion. HARM was more frequently observed in patients with vessel recanalization (p = 0.04), minor infarction growth (p = 0.01), and smaller ischemic lesions on follow-up DWI (p = 0.05). Conclusions HARM is a frequent finding in posterior circulation infarction and associated with vessel recanalization, minor infarction growth as well as smaller infarction volumes in the course. Neuroradiologists should be cognizant of the fact that HARM may be present on short interval follow-up FLAIR images in patients with acute ischemic infarction who initially underwent MRI and received intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents. PMID:27326459

  14. Superior Labral Anterior Posterior Lesions of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Malal, Joby Jacob George; Khan, Yousaf; Farrar, Graville; Waseem, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesion is of fairly recent description and its understanding is rapidly evolving. Its incidence and need for surgical treatment has increased exponentially in line with the increase in shoulder arthroscopies. It is of particular importance in the elite over head athlete and the young. A range of arthroscopic techniques and devices have been described with good functional results. The ability to return to pre injury level of sports remains a concern. PMID:24082975

  15. Posterior dislocation of the hip while playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Tennent, T D; Chambler, A F; Rossouw, D J

    1998-12-01

    Injuries in basketball are usually to the ankles and knees. Dislocation of the hip is usually associated with severe trauma--for example, road traffic accidents. A case is reported here in which a 22 year old club basketball player slipped on landing from a jump shot, forcing him into a side splits position from which he sustained a posterior dislocation of the hip resulting in a sciatic nerve palsy. PMID:9865411

  16. Posterior elbow release and humeral osteotomy for patients with arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-05-01

    Children with arthrogryposis often lack the ability to feed themselves, largely due to limited shoulder external rotation and elbow flexion. Patients who can achieve passive elbow flexion through a surgical release but who cannot externally rotate their shoulders are still unable to reach their mouths with their hands. Combining a posterior elbow capsular release with a simultaneous humeral osteotomy in these patients places the forearm and hand in a much better position for function with minimal additional surgical exposure. PMID:22483178

  17. Wearable wireless cerebral oximeter (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral oximeters measure continuous cerebral oxygen saturation using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology noninvasively. It has been involved into operating room setting to monitor oxygenation within patient's brain when surgeons are concerned that a patient's levels might drop. Recently, cerebral oxygen saturation has also been related with chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency (CCVI). Patients with CCVI would be benefited if there would be a wearable system to measure their cerebral oxygen saturation in need. However, there has yet to be a wearable wireless cerebral oximeter to measure the saturation in 24 hours. So we proposed to develop the wearable wireless cerebral oximeter. The mechanism of the system follows the NIRS technology. Emitted light at wavelengths of 740nm and 860nm are sent from the light source penetrating the skull and cerebrum, and the light detector(s) receives the light not absorbed during the light pathway through the skull and cerebrum. The amount of oxygen absorbed within the brain is the difference between the amount of light sent out and received by the probe, which can be used to calculate the percentage of oxygen saturation. In the system, it has one source and four detectors. The source, located in the middle of forehead, can emit two near infrared light, 740nm and 860nm. Two detectors are arranged in one side in 2 centimeters and 3 centimeters from the source. Their measurements are used to calculate the saturation in the cerebral cortex. The system has included the rechargeable lithium battery and Bluetooth smart wireless micro-computer unit.

  18. Cerebral Microcirculation during Experimental Normovolaemic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bellapart, Judith; Cuthbertson, Kylie; Dunster, Kimble; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G.; Raffel, O. Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Barnett, Adrian; Paratz, Jenifer; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is accepted among critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anemia. Experimental studies suggest that anemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise, when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion among critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure, and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anemia does not result in short-term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain. PMID:26869986

  19. Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Pediatric Posterior Fossa Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, Chris; Gray, Jonathan; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) to noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. Methods and Materials: Nine pediatric patients with posterior fossa tumors, mean age 9 years (range, 6-15 years), treated using IMRT were chosen for this comparative planning study because of their tumor location. Each patient's treatment was replanned to receive 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) using five different methods: eight-field noncoplanar IMRT, single coplanar IMAT, double coplanar IMAT, single noncoplanar IMAT, and double noncoplanar IMAT. For each method, the dose to 95% of the PTV was held constant, and the doses to surrounding critical structures were minimized. The different plans were compared based on conformity, total linear accelerator dose monitor units, and dose to surrounding normal tissues, including the entire body, whole brain, temporal lobes, brainstem, and cochleae. Results: The doses to the target and critical structures for the various IMAT methods were not statistically different in comparison with the noncoplanar IMRT plan, with the following exceptions: the cochlear doses were higher and whole brain dose was lower for coplanar IMAT plans; the cochleae and temporal lobe doses were lower and conformity increased for noncoplanar IMAT plans. The advantage of the noncoplanar IMAT plan was enhanced by doubling the treatment arc. Conclusion: Noncoplanar IMAT results in superior treatment plans when compared to noncoplanar IMRT for the treatment of posterior fossa tumors. IMAT should be considered alongside IMRT when treatment of this site is indicated.

  20. Consolidation of Complex Events via Reinstatement in Posterior Cingulate Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bird, Chris M; Keidel, James L; Ing, Leslie P; Horner, Aidan J; Burgess, Neil

    2015-10-28

    It is well-established that active rehearsal increases the efficacy of memory consolidation. It is also known that complex events are interpreted with reference to prior knowledge. However, comparatively little attention has been given to the neural underpinnings of these effects. In healthy adults humans, we investigated the impact of effortful, active rehearsal on memory for events by showing people several short video clips and then asking them to recall these clips, either aloud (Experiment 1) or silently while in an MRI scanner (Experiment 2). In both experiments, actively rehearsed clips were remembered in far greater detail than unrehearsed clips when tested a week later. In Experiment 1, highly similar descriptions of events were produced across retrieval trials, suggesting a degree of semanticization of the memories had taken place. In Experiment 2, spatial patterns of BOLD signal in medial temporal and posterior midline regions were correlated when encoding and rehearsing the same video. Moreover, the strength of this correlation in the posterior cingulate predicted the amount of information subsequently recalled. This is likely to reflect a strengthening of the representation of the video's content. We argue that these representations combine both new episodic information and stored semantic knowledge (or "schemas"). We therefore suggest that posterior midline structures aid consolidation by reinstating and strengthening the associations between episodic details and more generic schematic information. This leads to the creation of coherent memory representations of lifelike, complex events that are resistant to forgetting, but somewhat inflexible and semantic-like in nature. PMID:26511235