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Sample records for angiotensin ii activates

  1. Angiotensin II and angiotensin II receptor blocker modulate the arrhythmogenic activity of pulmonary veins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tai, Ching-Tai; Yeh, Hung-I; Lin, Cheng-I; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2005-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (AIIRBs) have been shown to prevent atrial fibrillation. The pulmonary veins (PVs) are the most important focus for the generation of atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether angiotensin II or AIIRB may change the arrhythmogenic activity of the PVs. Conventional microelectrodes and whole-cell patch clamps were used to investigate the action potentials (APs) and ionic currents in isolated rabbit PV tissue and single cardiomyocytes before and after administering angiotensin II or losartan (AIIRB). In the tissue preparations, angiotensin II induced delayed after-depolarizations (1, 10, and 100 nM) and accelerated the automatic rhythm (10 and 100 nM). Angiotensin II (100 nM) prolonged the AP duration and increased the contractile force (10 and 100 nM). Losartan (1 and 10 μM) inhibited the automatic rhythm. Losartan (10 μM) prolonged the AP duration and reduced the contractile force (1 and 10 μM). Angiotensin II reduced the transient outward potassium current (Ito) but increased the L-type calcium, delayed rectifier potassium (IK), transient inward (Iti), pacemaker, and Na+–Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) currents in the PV cardiomyocytes. Losartan decreased the Ito, IK, Iti, and NCX currents. In conclusion, angiotensin II and AIIRB modulate the PV electrical activity, which may play a role in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. PMID:16273119

  2. N- and C-terminal structure-activity study of angiotensin II on the angiotensin AT2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bouley, R; Pérodin, J; Plante, H; Rihakova, L; Bernier, S G; Maletínská, L; Guillemette, G; Escher, E

    1998-02-19

    The predominant angiotensin II receptor expressed in the human myometrium is the angiotensin AT2 receptor. This preparation was used for a structure-activity relationship study on angiotensin II analogues modified in positions 1 and 8. The angiotensin AT2 receptor present on human myometrium membranes displayed a high affinity (pKd = 9.18) and was relatively abundant (53-253 fmol/mg of protein). The pharmacological profile was typical of an angiotensin AT2 receptor with the following order of affinities: (angiotensin III > or = angiotensin II > angiotensin I > PD123319 > angiotensin-(1-7) > angiotensin-(1-6) approximately angiotensin IV > Losartan). Modifications of the N-terminal side chain and of the primary amine of angiotensin II were evaluated. Neutralisation of the methylcarboxylate (Asp) to a methylcarboxamide (Asn) or to a hydroxymethyl (Ser) or substitution for a methylsulfonate group (cysteic acid) improved the affinity. Extension from methylcarboxylate (Asp) to ethylcarboxylate (Glu) did not affect the affinity. Introduction of larger side chains such as the bulky p-benzoylphenylalanine (p-Bpa) or the positively charged Lys did not substantially affect the affinity. Complete removal of the side chain (angiotensin III), however, resulted in a significant affinity increase. Removal or acetylation of the primary amine of angiotensin II did not noticeably influence the affinity. Progressive alkylation of the primary amine significantly increased the affinity, betain structures being the most potent. It appears that quite important differences exist between the angiotensin AT1 and AT2 receptors concerning their pharmacological profile towards analogues of angiotensin II modified in position 1. On position 8 of angiotensin II, a structure-activity relationship on the angiotensin AT2 receptor was quite similar to that observed with angiotensin AT1 receptor. Bulky, hydrophobic aromatic residues displayed affinities similar to or even better than [Sarcosine1

  3. Platelet activation during angiotensin II infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P T; Schwieler, J H; Wallén, N H

    2000-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of an intravenous infusion of angiotensin II (10 ng/kg per min) on platelet function and coagulation in vivo in 18 healthy males. The infusion increased mean arterial pressure by 23+/-2 mm Hg. Plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels, reflecting platelet secretion, increased by 66+/-24% during the infusion, as did also platelet surface expression of P-selectin as measured by flow cytometry. Platelet fibrinogen binding increased, whereas platelet aggregability, assessed by ex vivo filtragometry, was unaltered. Angiotensin II caused mild activation of the coagulation cascade with increases in plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex and prothrombin fragment F1 + 2. In conclusion, angiotensin II has mild platelet-activating effects in vivo and also enhances coagulation. Markers of platelet secretion are significantly increased, whereas markers of platelet aggregability are less affected. The clinical relevance of these findings remains to be clarified. PMID:10691100

  4. Angiotensin II activates different calcium signaling pathways in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Dolgacheva, Lyudmila P; Turovskaya, Maria V; Dynnik, Vladimir V; Zinchenko, Valery P; Goncharov, Nikolay V; Davletov, Bazbek; Turovsky, Egor A

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is an important mammalian neurohormone involved in reninangiotensin system. Ang II is produced both constitutively and locally by RAS systems, including white fat adipocytes. The influence of Ang II on adipocytes is complex, affecting different systems of signal transduction from early Са(2+) responses to cell proliferation and differentiation, triglyceride accumulation, expression of adipokine-encoding genes and adipokine secretion. It is known that white fat adipocytes express all RAS components and Ang II receptors (АТ1 and АТ2). The current work was carried out with the primary white adipocytes culture, and Са(2+) signaling pathways activated by Ang II were investigated using fluorescent microscopy. Са(2+)-oscillations and transient responses of differentiated adipocytes to Ang II were registered in cells with both small and multiple lipid inclusions. Using inhibitory analysis and selective antagonists, we now show that Ang II initiates periodic Са(2+)-oscillations and transient responses by activating АТ1 and АТ2 receptors and involving branched signaling cascades: 1) Ang II → Gq → PLC → IP3 → IP3Rs → Ca(2+) 2) Gβγ → PI3Kγ → PKB 3) PKB → eNOS → NO → PKG 4) CD38 → cADPR → RyRs → Ca(2+) In these cascades, AT1 receptors play the leading role. The results of the present work open a perspective of using Ang II for correction of signal resistance of adipocytes often observed during obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26850364

  5. Activation of Central PPAR-γ Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg/min) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and angiotensin II type-1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  6. Activation of central PPAR-γ attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that the activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg per minute) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  7. The Role of Angiotensin II and Cyclic AMP in Alveolar Active Sodium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ismael-Badarneh, Reem; Guetta, Julia; Klorin, Geula; Berger, Gidon; Abu-saleh, Niroz; Abassi, Zaid; Azzam, Zaher S.

    2015-01-01

    Active alveolar fluid clearance is important in keeping airspaces free of edema. Angiotensin II plays a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, heart failure and others. However, little is known about its contribution to alveolar fluid clearance. Angiotensin II effects are mediated by two specific receptors; AT1 and AT2. The localization of these two receptors in the lung, specifically in alveolar epithelial cells type II, was recently reported. We hypothesize that Angiotensin II may have a role in the regulation of alveolar fluid clearance. We investigated the effect of Angiotensin II on alveolar fluid clearance in rats using the isolated perfused lung model and isolated rat alveolar epithelial cells. The rate of alveolar fluid clearance in control rats was 8.6% ± 0.1 clearance of the initial volume and decreased by 22.5%, 28.6%, 41.6%, 48.7% and 39% in rats treated with 10-10 M, 10-9 M, 10-8 M, 10-7 M or 10-6 M of Ang II respectively (P < 0.003). The inhibitory effect of Angiotensin II was restored in losartan, an AT1 specific antagonist, pretreated rats, indicating an AT1 mediated effect of Ang II on alveolar fluid clearance. The expression of Na,K-ATPase proteins and cAMP levels in alveolar epithelial cells were down-regulated following the administration of Angiotensin II; suggesting that cAMP may be involved in AngII-induced reduced Na,K-ATPase expression, though the contribution of additional factors could not be excluded. We herein suggest a novel mechanism of clinical relevance by which angiotensin adversely impairs the ability of the lungs to clear edema. PMID:26230832

  8. Improving vagal activity ameliorates cardiac fibrosis induced by angiotensin II: in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Jun; Huang, Ning; Lu, Yi; Zhao, Mei; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Yang, Yang; Yang, Yong-hua; Zang, Wei-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is characterized by overactivity of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and withdrawal of vagal activity. We hypothesized that improving vagal activity could attenuate cardiac fibrosis induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) in vivo and in vitro. Rats were subjected to abdominal aorta constriction (AAC) with or without pyridostigmine (PYR) (31 mg/kg/d). After 8 weeks, PYR significantly decreased Ang II level, AT1 protein expression, and collagen deposition in cardiac tissue and improved heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac function, which were abolished by atropine. In vitro, treatment of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) with Ang II (10−7 M) increased cell proliferation, migration, transformation, and secretory properties, which were significantly diminished by acetylcholine (ACh, 10−6 M). Subsequently, Ang II significantly increased collagen type I expression as well as metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression and activity. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression and Smad3 phosphorylation presented a similar trend. Notably, the knockdown of the acetylcholine M2 receptor by siRNA could abolish ACh anti-fibrotic action. These data implicated cholinesterase inhibitor can increase vagal activity and reduce local Ang II level, and ACh inhibit Ang II pro-fibrotic effects. Our findings suggested that the parasympathetic nervous system can serve as a promising target for cardiac remodeling treatment. PMID:26596640

  9. Ethanol alters angiotensin II stimulated mitogen activated protein kinase in hepatocytes: agonist selectivity and ethanol metabolic independence.

    PubMed

    Weng, Y; Shukla, S D

    2000-06-23

    Angiotensin II activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (p42 and p44) in rat hepatocytes exposed to ethanol and the relevance of ethanol metabolism on this activation was investigated. Hepatocytes, isolated from rat liver, were treated with or without ethanol for 24 h. Angiotensin II, vasopressin, insulin, serum and epinephrine significantly increased hepatocyte MAPK activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) had little effect on MAPK activation. Interestingly, among the above agonists, which activated hepatocyte MAPK, ethanol exposure potentiated only angiotensin II and epinephrine-stimulated MAPK. Thus, potentiation of MAPK by ethanol exhibited agonist selectivity. In contrast to several other cells, there was prevalence of p42 over p44 MAPK band in hepatocytes. Angiotensin II treatment caused a rapid activation (peak 5 min) of MAPK followed by a decrease to basal levels in 30 min. Exposure with 100 mM ethanol potentiated the angiotensin II stimulated MAPK activity. This potentiation was partially blocked by pertussis toxin suggesting it to be a G-protein-dependent event. Treatment of the hepatocytes with pyrazole (an inhibitor of ethanol metabolism) or acetaldehyde (an ethanol metabolite) had no effect on potentiation. Thus, ethanol potentiation of hepatocyte MAPK is agonist-selective and independent of ethanol metabolism. PMID:10862821

  10. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  11. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase α1 in angiotensin-II-induced renal Tgfß-activated kinase 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Mia, Sobuj; Castor, Tatsiana; Musculus, Katharina; Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Lang, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin-II is a key factor in renal fibrosis. Obstructive nephropathy induces an isoform shift from catalytic Ampkα2 towards Ampkα1 which contributes to signaling involved in renal tissue injury. The present study explored whether the Ampkα1 isoform contributes to the renal effects of angiotensin-II. To this end, angiotensin-II was infused by subcutaneous implantation of osmotic minipumps in gene-targeted mice lacking functional Ampkα1 (Ampkα1(-/-)) and corresponding wild-type mice (Ampkα1(+/+)). Western blotting and qRT-PCR were employed to determine protein abundance and mRNA levels, respectively, in renal tissue. In Ampkα1(+/+) mice, angiotensin-II increased renal Ampkα1 protein expression without significantly modifying renal Ampkα2 protein expression. The renal phosphorylated Ampkα (Thr(172)) protein abundance was not affected by angiotensin-II in neither genotypes, but was significantly lower in Ampkα1(-/-) mice than Ampkα1(+/+) mice. Angiotensin-II increased the phosphorylation of Tak1 (Ser(412)) in renal tissue of Ampkα1(+/+) mice, an effect virtually absent in the Ampkα1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, angiotensin-II treatment significantly increased renal protein and mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (αSma) as well as Tak1-target gene expression: Cox2, Il6 and Pai1 in Ampkα1(+/+) mice, all effects significantly less pronounced in Ampkα1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, angiotensin-II up-regulates the Ampkα1 isoform in renal tissue. Ampkα1 participates in renal Tak1 activation and Tak1-dependent signaling induced by angiotensin-II. PMID:27230958

  12. Angiotensin II Stimulation of DPP4 Activity Regulates Megalin in the Proximal Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Aroor, Annayya; Zuberek, Marcin; Duta, Cornel; Meuth, Alex; Sowers, James R.; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Nistala, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Proteinuria is a marker of incipient kidney injury in many disorders, including obesity. Previously, we demonstrated that megalin, a receptor endocytotic protein in the proximal tubule, is downregulated in obese mice, which was prevented by inhibition of dipeptidyl protease 4 (DPP4). Obesity is thought to be associated with upregulation of intra-renal angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling via the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT1R) and Ang II suppresses megalin expression in proximal tubule cells in vitro. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II will suppress megalin protein via activation of DPP4. We used Ang II (200 ng/kg/min) infusion in mice and Ang II (10−8 M) treatment of T35OK-AT1R proximal tubule cells to test our hypothesis. Ang II-infused mouse kidneys displayed increases in DPP4 activity and decreases in megalin. In proximal tubule cells, Ang II stimulated DPP4 activity concurrent with suppression of megalin. MK0626, a DPP4 inhibitor, partially restored megalin expression similar to U0126, a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor and AG1478, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor. Similarly, Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation was suppressed with MK0626 and Ang II-induced DPP4 activity was suppressed by U0126. Therefore, our study reveals a cross talk between AT1R signaling and DPP4 activation in the regulation of megalin and underscores the significance of targeting DPP4 in the prevention of obesity related kidney injury progression. PMID:27213360

  13. Angiotensin II Stimulation of DPP4 Activity Regulates Megalin in the Proximal Tubules.

    PubMed

    Aroor, Annayya; Zuberek, Marcin; Duta, Cornel; Meuth, Alex; Sowers, James R; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Nistala, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Proteinuria is a marker of incipient kidney injury in many disorders, including obesity. Previously, we demonstrated that megalin, a receptor endocytotic protein in the proximal tubule, is downregulated in obese mice, which was prevented by inhibition of dipeptidyl protease 4 (DPP4). Obesity is thought to be associated with upregulation of intra-renal angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling via the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT₁R) and Ang II suppresses megalin expression in proximal tubule cells in vitro. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II will suppress megalin protein via activation of DPP4. We used Ang II (200 ng/kg/min) infusion in mice and Ang II (10(-8) M) treatment of T35OK-AT₁R proximal tubule cells to test our hypothesis. Ang II-infused mouse kidneys displayed increases in DPP4 activity and decreases in megalin. In proximal tubule cells, Ang II stimulated DPP4 activity concurrent with suppression of megalin. MK0626, a DPP4 inhibitor, partially restored megalin expression similar to U0126, a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor and AG1478, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor. Similarly, Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation was suppressed with MK0626 and Ang II-induced DPP4 activity was suppressed by U0126. Therefore, our study reveals a cross talk between AT₁R signaling and DPP4 activation in the regulation of megalin and underscores the significance of targeting DPP4 in the prevention of obesity related kidney injury progression. PMID:27213360

  14. NADPH Oxidases and Angiotensin II Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Abel Martin; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade many studies have demonstrated the importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by NADPH oxidases in angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling, as well as a role for ROS in the development of different diseases in which Ang II is a central component. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of activation of NADPH oxidases by Ang II and describe the molecular targets of ROS in Ang II signaling in the vasculature, kidney and brain. We also discuss the effects of genetic manipulation of NADPH oxidase function on the physiology and pathophysiology of the renin angiotensin system. PMID:19059306

  15. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor constitutive activation: from molecular mechanisms to pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Petrel, Christophe; Clauser, Eric

    2009-04-29

    Mutations activating the angiotensin II AT(1) receptor are important to identify and characterize because they give access to the activation mechanisms of this G protein coupled receptor and help to characterize the signaling pathways and the potential pathophysiology of this receptor. The different constitutively activated mutations of the AT(1) receptor are mostly localized in transmembrane domains (TM) and their characterization demonstrated that release of intramolecular constraints and movements among these TM are a necessary step for receptor activation. These mutations constitutively activate Gq linked signaling pathways, receptor internalization and maybe the G protein-independent signaling pathways. Expression of such mutations in mice is linked to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, but such natural mutations have not been identified in human pathology. PMID:19061936

  16. Effect of angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II on the proliferation and activation of human endometrial stromal cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Tieying; Shang, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Chunfang; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Guiying

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) or angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] has effect on the proliferation and activation of a variety of cells, however, the exact mechanisms that the role of Ang II or Ang-(1-7) in human endometrial stromal cell (ESCs) remains elusive. Here we demonstrated that Ang II could promote proliferation and activation of ESCs, up-regulated the expression of a-SMA, TGF-β1 and IGF-I, increased the secretion of extracellular matrix [Type I collagen (Col I) and fibronectin (FN)] of ESCs; Ang-(1-7) could inhibit Ang II induced the proliferation and activation of ESCs, down-regulated the expression of a-SMA, TGF-β1 and IGF-I, decreased the secretion of extracellular matrix (Col I and FN) of ESCs. These findings suggest that Ang-(1-7) can inhibits Ang II induced the proliferation of ESCs, Ang-(1-7) can inhibits the Ang II induced activation of ESCs and decreases secretion of Col I and FN by suppressing TGF-β1 and IGF-I expression. PMID:26464636

  17. Nitric oxide mediates the inhibitory action of platelet-activating factor on angiotensin II-induced renal vasoconstriction, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Handa, R K; Strandhoy, J W

    1996-06-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the mechanism(s) involved in the inhibitory effect of platelet-activating factor on renal vascular reactivity, in vivo. Bolus injections of vasoconstrictor agonists were administered into the renal circulation of pentobarbital anesthetized male Wistar rats at a dose to cause a transient 45 to 50% decrease in renal blood flow. Intrarenal infusion of platelet-activating factor (PAF) at 2.5 ng/min/kg attenuated the vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin II by 66%, a significantly smaller reduction of 35% for norepinephrine-mediated vasoconstriction, 22% for vasopressin-mediated vasoconstriction and no alteration of KCl-mediated vasoconstriction. The preferential inhibitory effect of platelet-activating factor on angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction was mimicked by the intrarenal infusion of either 0.2 to 5 micrograms/min/kg methacholine (endothelium-dependent vasodilator) or 2 micrograms/min/kg sodium nitroprusside (nitric oxide donor). After inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, intrarenal infusion of PAF or methacholine reduced angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction significantly less than that observed in the absence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. Therefore, this study provides evidence that the shared ability of platelet-activating factor and methacholine to selectively reduce angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction involves endothelium-derived nitric oxide. PMID:8667214

  18. Effects of β(3)-adrenoceptor activation on expression of pancreatic adrenoceptors and angiotensin II receptors in ApoE(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun-Ying; Li, Yan-Fang; Jiang, Zhi-Li; Guo, Yan-Qing

    2015-10-01

    Hyperlipidemia can be harmful to the pancreas and β3-adrenoceptor agonist can improve lipid metabolism disorder. We aimed to study the effects of β3-adrenoceptor activation on glucose, insulin and the expression of pancreatic adrenoceptors and angiotensin II receptors. Ten C57BL/6J mice at the age of 10 weeks served as normal control, and forty age-matched apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice were randomly divided into hyperlipidaemia model group, low-dose and high-dose β3-adrenoceptor agonist group and β3-adrenoceptor antagonist group. After 26 weeks of high-fat diet, treatments were given for 12 weeks. Serum glucose and insulin levels in 48 weeks old mice were measured using an automatic biochemical detector. Quantitative rt-PCR and Western blot were used to analyze the mRNA and protein expression of α1A-, α2A-, β2-, β3-adrenoceptors and angiotensin II type 1 and type 2 receptors in pancreas. We found that β3-adrenoceptor agonist could decrease serum glucose and insulin levels in aged ApoE(-/-) mice (P<0.01) and down-regulate the expression of α1A-adrenoceptor and angiotensin II type 1 receptor which were significantly increased in model mice (P<0.05, P<0.01). Compared with the model mice, α2A-, β2-, β3-adrenoceptor and angiotensin II type 2 receptor expression were up-regulated in β3-adrenoceptor agonist treat mice (P<0.05, P<0.01). These results suggest that chronic β3-adrenoceptor activation regulated the expression of adrenoceptors and angiontensin II receptors towards contrary direction, which indicates that there are interactions between β3-adrenoceptor and subtypes of adrenoceptor and angiotensin II receptor, and these interactions may play a protective role in pancreas and improve glucose metabolism disorders. PMID:26102566

  19. Angiotensin II and gene expression in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Klahr, S; Morrissey, J

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, has a key role in renal injury and in the progression of chronic renal disease of diverse causes. In vascular smooth muscle cells, angiotensin II modulates growth, which may lead to hypertrophy and also may inhibit mitogen-stimulated DNA synthesis. The effects of angiotensin II on responsive cells are mediated by two classes of receptors, AT-1 and AT-2. Information obtained in the last decade indicates that angiotensin II increases the production of several autocrine factors, including transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and platelet-derived growth factor A chain (PDGF). Angiotensin also increases the release of other growth factors such as endothelin, platelet-activating factor (PAF), and interleukin 6. In addition, it increases the "activity" of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and the synthesis of angiotensinogen. The emerging picture indicates that the actions of angiotensin II may be related to factors that are released or upregulated by angiotensin II, possibly through NF-kappaB activation. It appears likely that many of the effects of angiotensin II on renal disease may be mediated by TGF-beta1, TNF-alpha, and changes in the activity of NF-kappaB. The use of ACE inhibitors or antagonists of AT-1 or AT-2 receptors in experimental animals decreases the levels of angiotensin II or limits its action, thereby interfering with the production and effects of the factors described. PMID:9428470

  20. P-selectin increases angiotensin II-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis via platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GAIZHEN; LIANG, BIN; SONG, XIAOSU; BAI, RUI; QIN, WEIWEI; SUN, XU; LU, YAN; BIAN, YUNFEI; XIAO, CHUANSHI

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation is important in hypertension-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin expression significantly (P<0.05) increases when platelets are activated during hypertension. Although P-selectin recruits leukocytes to sites of inflammation, the role of P-selectin in cardiac inflammation and fibrosis remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate whether platelet-derived P-selectin promotes hypertensive cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin knockout (P-sel KO) mice and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 littermates were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) at 1,500 ng/kg/min for 7 days and then cross-transplanted with platelets originating from either WT or P-sel KO mice. P-selectin expression was increased in the myocardium and plasma of hypertensive mice, and the P-sel KO mice exhibited significantly (P<0.05) reduced cardiac fibrosis. The fibrotic areas were markedly smaller in the hearts of P-sel KO mice compared with WT mice, as assessed by Masson's trichrome staining. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression levels were decreased in the P-sel KO mice, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Following platelet transplantation into P-sel KO mice, the number of Mac-2 (galectin-3)- and TGF-β1-positive cells was increased in mice that received WT platelets compared with those that received P-sel KO platelets, and the mRNA expression levels of collagen I and TGF-β1 were also increased. The results from the present study suggest that activated platelets secrete P-selectin to promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in Ang II-induced hypertension. PMID:27121797

  1. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  2. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Takezako, Takanobu; Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Node, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109(TM3), Phe182(ECL2), Gln257(TM6), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108(TM3), Ser109(TM3), Ala163(TM4), Phe182(ECL2), Lys199(TM5), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R. PMID:26121982

  3. The conformation and activity relationship of benzofuran type of angiotensin II receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S E; Kim, S K; Lee, S H; Kim, N J; Lee, D W

    2000-09-01

    As a continuing effort to establish the structure and activity relationship in a benzofuran type of angiotensin II antagonist, we synthesized various regioisomers and performed a series of QSAR analyses. The conformational analyses of target isomers were carried out using molecular mechanics and fine-tuned using the information from the NMR NOE experiment. The conformations of compounds with a good binding activity are quite similar to that of DuP753, a prototype of AII antagonist, suggesting that these compounds also bind to the same site of AII receptor. We then studied the compounds with a varied length of the hydroxyl group bearing side chain to find out the optimum distance between the hydroxyl group and the imidazole ring. The CoMFA with these compounds gave acceptable statistical measures (cross-validated r2 and conventional r2 to be 0.881 and 0.974, respectively) and the map was well consistent with the previously proposed pharmacophore. PMID:11026543

  4. Platelet-activating factor mediates angiotensin II-induced proteinuria in isolated perfused rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Perico, N; Lapinski, R; Konopka, K; Aiello, S; Noris, M; Remuzzi, G

    1997-09-01

    Isolated kidney preparations (IPK) from male Sprague Dawley rats perfused at constant pressure were used to evaluate the effect of angiotensin II (AII) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) on renal function and urinary protein excretion. Compared with basal, intrarenal infusion of AII at 8 ng/min caused a progressive increase in protein excretion (11 +/- 6 versus 73 +/- 21 micrograms/min) in parallel with a decline in renal perfusate flow (RPF) (29 +/- 3 versus 18 +/- 3 ml/min). Addition to the perfusate of PAF at 50 nM final concentration also induced proteinuria (9 +/- 4 versus 55 +/- 14 micrograms/min) but did not change RPF (29 +/- 3 versus 30 +/- 3 ml/min). Preexposure of isolated kidneys to the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2086 prevented the increase in urinary protein excretion induced by AII infusion (basal: 13 +/- 6; post-AII: 12 +/- 7 micrograms/min) but failed to prevent the vasoactive effect of AII (RPF, basal: 30 +/- 2; post-AII: 21 +/- 3 ml/min). In additional experiments, dexamethasone reduced the proteinuric effect of PAF remarkably. These results indicate that in isolated kidney preparation: (1) AII infusion induced proteinuria and decreased RPF; and (2) the effect of AII in enhancing urinary protein excretion was completely prevented by a specific PAF receptor antagonist, which, however, did not influence the AII-induced fall in RPF. It is suggested that PAF plays a major role in AII-induced changes in the permselective function of the glomerular capillary barrier. PMID:9294830

  5. Diminazene aceturate, an angiotensin-converting enzyme II activator, prevents gastric mucosal damage in mice: Role of the angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Luan Kelves M; Nicolau, Lucas A D; Sousa, Nayara A; Araújo, Thiago S L; Sousa, Francisca Beatriz M; Costa, Douglas S; Souza, Fabiana M; Pacífico, Dvison M; Martins, Conceição S; Silva, Renan O; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Cerqueira, Gilberto S; Medeiros, Jand Venes R

    2016-07-15

    The angiotensin (Ang) II converting enzyme (ACE II) pathway has recently been shown to be associated with several beneficial effects in various organisms, including gastroprotection. ACE II is responsible for converting Ang II into an active peptide, Ang-(1-7), which in turn binds the Mas receptor. Recent studies have shown that diminazene aceturate (Dize) a trypanocidal used in animals, activates ACE II. Thus, in this study, we aimed to evaluate the gastroprotective effects of Dize via the ACE II/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway against gastric lesions induced by ethanol and acetic acid in mice. The results showed that Dize could promote gastric protection via several mechanisms, including increased levels of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory factors (e.g., decreasing tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 expression and reducing myeloperoxidase activity), maturation of collagen fibers, and promotion of re-epithelialization and regeneration of gastric tissue in different injury models. Thus, Dize represents a novel potential gastroprotective agent. PMID:27241079

  6. Aldosterone response to angiotensin II during hypoxemia

    SciTech Connect

    Colice, G.L.; Ramirez, G.

    1986-07-01

    Exercise stimulates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). However, increases in plasma aldosterone concentrations (PAC) are suppressed when exercise is performed at high altitude or under hypoxemic conditions. As the angiotensin-II response to high-altitude exercise is normal, it is speculated that an inhibitor, discharged during hypoxemia, acted to suppress angiotensin-II-mediated aldosterone release. A study was conducted to test this hypothesis, taking into account the measurement of the aldosterone response to exogenous angiotensin II during normoxemia and hypoxemia. It was found that the dose-response curve of PAC to angiotensin II was not significantly inhibited by the considered model of hypoxemia. The hypoxemia-mediated release of an angiotensin II inhibitor does, therefore, not explain the previous observations of PAC suppression during hypoxemic exercise. 28 references.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum and oxidant stress mediate nuclear factor-κB activation in the subfornical organ during angiotensin II hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Young, Colin N.; Li, Anfei; Dong, Frederick N.; Horwath, Julie A.; Clark, Catharine G.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the brain circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO) mediate the central hypertensive actions of Angiotensin II (ANG II). However, the downstream signaling events remain unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1aR), ER stress, and ROS induce activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) during ANG II-dependent hypertension. To spatiotemporally track NF-κB activity in the SFO throughout the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension, we used SFO-targeted adenoviral delivery and longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in mice. During low-dose infusion of ANG II, bioluminescence imaging revealed a prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO at a time point prior to a significant rise in arterial blood pressure. SFO-targeted ablation of AT1aR, inhibition of ER stress, or adenoviral scavenging of ROS in the SFO prevented the ANG II-induced increase in SFO NF-κB. These findings highlight the utility of bioluminescence imaging to longitudinally track transcription factor activation during the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension and reveal an AT1aR-, ER stress-, and ROS-dependent prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO. Furthermore, the increase in NF-κB activity before a rise in arterial blood pressure suggests a causal role for SFO NF-κB in the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension. PMID:25980014

  8. Region-specific changes in sympathetic nerve activity in angiotensin II-salt hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Osborn, John W; Fink, Gregory D

    2010-01-01

    It is now well accepted that many forms of experimental hypertension and human essential hypertension are caused by increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. However, the role of region-specific changes in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in the pathogenesis of hypertension has been difficult to determine because methods for chronic measurement of SNA in conscious animals have not been available. We have recently combined indirect, and continuous and chronic direct, assessment of region-specific SNA to characterize hypertension produced by administration of angiotensin II (Ang II) to rats consuming a high-salt diet (Ang II-salt hypertension). Angiotensin II increases whole-body noradrenaline (NA) spillover and depressor responses to ganglionic blockade in rats consuming a high-salt diet, but not in rats on a normal-salt diet. Despite this evidence for increased 'whole-body SNA' in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats, renal SNA is decreased in this model and renal denervation does not attenuate the steady-state level of arterial pressure. In addition, neither lumbar SNA, which largely targets skeletal muscle, nor hindlimb NA spillover is changed from control levels in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats. However, surgical denervation of the splanchnic vascular bed attenuates/abolishes the increase in arterial pressure and total peripheral resistance, as well as the decrease in vascular capacitance, observed in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats. We hypothesize that the 'sympathetic signature' of Ang II-salt hypertension is characterized by increased splanchnic SNA, no change in skeletal muscle SNA and decreased renal SNA, and this sympathetic signature creates unique haemodynamic changes capable of producing sustained hypertension. PMID:19717492

  9. Anti-Plasmodium Activity of Angiotensin II and Related Synthetic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Ceres; de Oliveira Junior, Vani Xavier; Fázio, Marcos Antonio; Nacif-Pimenta, Rafael; Miranda, Antonio; Pimenta, Paulo F. P.; Capurro, Margareth Lara

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium species are the causative agents of malaria, the most devastating insect-borne parasite of human populations. Finding and developing new drugs for malaria treatment and prevention is the goal of much research. Angiotensins I and II (ang I and ang II) and six synthetic related peptides designated Vaniceres 1-6 (VC1-VC6) were assayed in vivo and in vitro for their effects on the development of the avian parasite, Plasmodium gallinaceum. Ang II and VC5 injected into the thoraces of the insects reduced mean intensities of infection in the mosquito salivary glands by 88% and 76%, respectively. Although the mechanism(s) of action is not completely understood, we have demonstrated that these peptides disrupt selectively the P.gallinaceum cell membrane. Additionally, incubation in vitro of sporozoites with VC5 reduced the infectivity of the parasites to their vertebrate host. VC5 has no observable agonist effects on vertebrates, and this makes it a promising drug for malaria prevention and chemotherapy. PMID:18820728

  10. Angiotensin II stimulates superoxide production in the thick ascending limb by activating NOX4

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Nancy J.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulates production of superoxide (O2−) by NADPH oxidase (NOX) in medullary thick ascending limbs (TALs). There are three isoforms of the catalytic subunit (NOX1, 2, and 4) known to be expressed in the kidney. We hypothesized that NOX2 mediates ANG II-induced O2− production by TALs. To test this, we measured NOX1, 2, and 4 mRNA and protein by RT-PCR and Western blot in TAL suspensions from rats and found three catalytic subunits expressed in the TAL. We measured O2− production using a lucigenin-based assay. To assess the contribution of NOX2, we measured ANG II-induced O2− production in wild-type and NOX2 knockout mice (KO). ANG II increased O2− production by 346 relative light units (RLU)/mg protein in the wild-type mice (n = 9; P < 0.0007 vs. control). In the knockout mice, ANG II increased O2− production by 290 RLU/mg protein (n = 9; P < 0.007 vs. control). This suggests that NOX2 does not contribute to ANG II-induced O2− production (P < 0.6 WT vs. KO). To test whether NOX4 mediates the effect of ANG II, we selectively decreased NOX4 expression in rats using an adenovirus that expresses NOX4 short hairpin (sh)RNA. Six to seven days after in vivo transduction of the kidney outer medulla, NOX4 mRNA was reduced by 77%, while NOX1 and NOX2 mRNA was unaffected. In control TALs, ANG II stimulated O2− production by 96%. In TALs transduced with NOX4 shRNA, ANG II-stimulated O2− production was not significantly different from the baseline. We concluded that NOX4 is the main catalytic isoform of NADPH oxidase that contributes to ANG II-stimulated O2− production by TALs. PMID:22875785

  11. Preparation and Biological Activity of the Monoclonal Antibody against the Second Extracellular Loop of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mingming; Zhao, Chengrui; Zhang, Suli; Wang, Li; Liu, Huirong; Ma, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    The current study was to prepare a mouse-derived antibody against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-mAb) based on monoclonal antibody technology, to provide a foundation for research on AT1-AA-positive diseases. Balb/C mice were actively immunized with the second extracellular loop of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R-ECII). Then, mouse spleen lymphocytes were fused with myeloma cells and monoclonal hybridomas that secreted AT1-mAb were generated and cultured, after which those in logarithmic-phase were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice to retrieve the ascites. Highly purified AT1-mAb was isolated from mouse ascites after injection with 1 × 107 hybridomas. A greater amount of AT1-mAb was purified from mouse ascites compared to the cell supernatant of hybridomas. AT1-mAb purified from mouse ascites constricted the thoracic aorta of mice and increased the beat frequency of neonatal rat myocardial cells via the AT1R, identical to the effects of AT1-AA extracted from patients' sera. Murine blood pressure increased after intravenous injection of AT1-mAb via the tail vein. High purity and good biological activity of AT1-mAb can be obtained from mouse ascites after intraperitoneal injection of monoclonal hybridomas that secrete AT1-mAb. These data provide a simple tool for studying AT1-AA-positive diseases. PMID:27057554

  12. Structure-activity relationship study of angiotensin II analogs in terms of β-arrestin-dependent signaling to aldosterone production.

    PubMed

    Valero, Thairy Reyes; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Jafferjee, Malika; Rengo, Giuseppe; Magafa, Vassiliki; Cordopatis, Paul; McDonald, Patricia; Koch, Walter J; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2016-04-01

    The known angiotensin II (AngII) physiological effect of aldosterone synthesis and secretion induction, a steroid hormone that contributes to the pathology of postmyocardial infarction (MI) heart failure (HF), is mediated by both Gq/11 proteins and β-arrestins, both of which couple to the AngII type 1 receptors (AT1Rs) of adrenocortical zona glomerulosa (AZG) cells. Over the past several years, AngII analogs with increased selectivity ("bias") toward β-arrestin-dependent signaling at the AT1R have been designed and described, starting with SII, the gold-standard β-arrestin-"biased" AngII analog. In this study, we examined the relative potencies of an extensive series of AngII peptide analogs at relative activation of G proteins versus β-arrestins by the AT1R. The major structural difference of these peptides from SII was their varied substitutions at position 5, rather than position 4 of native AngII. Three of them were found biased for β-arrestin activation and extremely potent at stimulating aldosterone secretion in AZG cells in vitro, much more potent than SII in that regard. Finally, the most potent of these three ([Sar(1), Cys(Et)(5), Leu(8)]-AngII, CORET) was further examined in post-MI rats progressing to HF and overexpressing adrenal β-arrestin1 in vivo. Consistent with the in vitro studies, CORET was found to exacerbate the post-MI hyperaldosteronism, and, consequently, cardiac function of the post-MI animals in vivo. Finally, our data suggest that increasing the size of position 5 of the AngII peptide sequence results in directly proportional increases in AT1R-dependent β-arrestin activation. These findings provide important insights for AT1R pharmacology and future AngII-targeted drug development. PMID:27069636

  13. Jak2-Independent Activation of Stat3 by Intracellular Angiotensin II in Human Mesangial Cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rekha

    2011-01-01

    Ang II is shown to mediate the stimulatory effect of high glucose on TGF-b1 and extracellular matrix proteins in glomerular mesangial cells. Also inhibition of Ang II formation in cell media (extracellular) and lysates (intracellular) blocks high-glucose effects on TGF-b1 and matrix more effectively compared to inhibition of extracellular Ang II alone. To investigate whether intracellular Ang II can stimulate TGF-b1 and matrix independent of extracellular Ang II, cultured human mesangial cells were transfected with Ang II to increase intracellular Ang II levels and its effects on TGF-b1 and matrix proteins were determined. Prior to transfection, cells were treated with candesartan to block extracellular Ang II-induced responses via cell membrane AT1 receptors. Transfection of cells with Ang II resulted in increased levels of intracellular Ang II which was accompanied by increased production of TGF-b1, collagen IV, fibronectin, and cell proliferation as well. On further examination, intracellular Ang II was found to activate Stat3 transcription factor including increased Stat3 protein expression, tyrosine 705 phosphorylation, and DNA-binding activity. Treatment with AG-490, an inhibitor of Jak2, did not block intracellular Ang II-induced Stat3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 residue indicating a Jak2-independent mechanism used by intracellular Ang II for Stat3 phosphorylation. In contrast, extracellular Ang II-induced tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of Stat3 was inhibited by AG-490 confirming the presence of a Jak2-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that intracellular Ang II increases TGF-b1 and matrix in human mesangial cells and also activates Stat3 transcription factor without involvement of the extracellular Ang II signaling pathway. PMID:21915376

  14. Binding, degradation and pressor activity of angiotensins II and III after aminopeptidase inhibition with amastatin and bestatin

    SciTech Connect

    Abhold, R.H.; Sullivan, M.J.; Wright, J.W.; Harding, J.W.

    1987-09-01

    In the metabolism of angiotensin peptides by tissue angiotensinases, aminopeptidases A, B, M and leucine aminopeptidase have been identified as being particularly effective. Because the inhibitory actions of amastatin (AM) and bestatin (BE) are relatively specific for these aminopeptidases, we have examined the effects of these inhibitors on the binding, degradation and pressor activity of angiotensin II (AII) and angiotensin III (AIII). Within 30 min at 37 degrees C, significant metabolism of /sup 125/I-AII and /sup 125/I-AIII by homogenates of a block of tissue containing hypothalamus, thalamus, septum and anteroventral third ventricle regions of the brain was observed. A majority of /sup 125/I-AIII metabolism was due to soluble peptidases, whereas that of /sup 125/I-AII primarily resulted from membrane-bound peptidases. AM, BE and reduced incubation temperatures significantly decreased the metabolism of /sup 125/I-AII and /sup 125/I-AIII. After appropriate adjustments to reflect the proportion of intact radioligand bound, temperature- or inhibitor-induced decreases in metabolism were matched by corresponding increases in specific binding. Heat-treated bovine serum albumin, as a nonspecific peptidase inhibitor, had no effect on either the metabolism or binding of the ligands used. In accordance with their actions in vitro, i.c.v. administration of AM and BE prolonged the pressor activity of subsequently applied AII and AIII. Unexpectedly, the amplitude of the pressor response to AIII was increased by BE, whereas that to AII was decreased by AM. The results of this study indicate that the metabolism of AII and AIII by aminopeptidases is relatively specific and acts to modulate the actions of these peptides.

  15. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  16. Radiation injury in rat lung: II. Angiotensin-converting enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Solliday, N.H.; Molteni, A.; Port, C.D.

    1983-11-01

    To determine the role of endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced pulmonary injury, lung angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, arterial perfusion, and ultrastructure were examined from 1 to 150 days after a single exposure of 25 Gy of /sup 60/Co gamma rays to the right hemithorax of rats. Arterial perfusion to the irradiated right lung increased during the first 2 weeks, then decreased to approximately 80% of the left lung value at 30 days postirradiation. Perfusion of the irradiated lung continued to decline, and by 90 to 150 days was only 40% of that of the shielded lung. ACE activity in the irradiated right lung did not change significantly until 30 days after exposure, when it decreased to 72% of that in the left lung. ACE activity in the right lung declined steadily from 30 to 90 days postirradiation, then reached a plateau through 150 days at less than 20% of normal. Perivascular and interstitial edema was evident at 1 day after irradiation and persisted for 30 days. Endothelial cells exhibited blebbing, fragmentation, and increased basement membrane at 30 days. Mast cells were present in the septa, but interstitial collagen was not increased at that time. From 90 to 150 days postexposure, progressive obliteration of capillaries by fibrotic reactions was observed. Thus decreased ACE activity accompanies radiation-induced hypoperfusion and endothelial ultrastructural changes in rat lung. All of these reactions precede the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  17. Angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart. Predominance of the angiotensin-converting enzyme pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, L S; Abraham, W T; Meixell, G E; Vamvakias, B N; Quaife, R A; Lowes, B D; Roden, R L; Peacock, S J; Groves, B M; Raynolds, M V

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that the contribution of myocardial tissue angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to angiotensin II (Ang II) formation in the human heart is low compared with non-ACE pathways. However, little is known about the actual in vivo contribution of these pathways to Ang II formation in the human heart. To examine angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart, we administered intracoronary 123I-labeled angiotensin I (Ang I) with and without intracoronary enalaprilat to orthotopic heart transplant recipients. The fractional conversion of Ang I to Ang II, calculated after separation of angiotensin peptides by HPLC, was 0.415 +/- 0.104 (n = 5, mean +/- SD). Enalaprilat reduced fractional conversion by 89%, to a value of 0.044 +/- 0.053 (n = 4, P = 0.002). In a separate study of explanted hearts, a newly developed in vitro Ang II-forming assay was used to examine cardiac tissue ACE activity independent of circulating components. ACE activity in solubilized left ventricular membrane preparations from failing hearts was 49.6 +/- 5.3 fmol 125I-Ang II formed per minute per milligram of protein (n = 8, +/- SE), and 35.9 +/- 4.8 fmol/min/mg from nonfailing human hearts (n = 7, P = 0.08). In the presence of 1 microM enalaprilat, ACE activity was reduced by 85%, to 7.3 +/- 1.4 fmol/min/mg in the failing group and to 4.6 +/- 1.3 fmol/min/mg in the nonfailing group (P < 0.001). We conclude that the predominant pathway for angiotensin II formation in the human heart is through ACE. Images PMID:7657820

  18. High-salt intake induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in rats in response to local angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Isis A; Pereira, Rafael C; Dopona, Ellen P B; Shimizu, Maria H M; Furukawa, Luzia N S; Oliveira, Ivone B; Heimann, Joel C

    2014-10-01

    Many studies have shown that risk factors that are independent of blood pressure (BP) can contribute to the development of cardiac hypertrophy (CH). Among these factors, high-salt (HS) intake was prominent. Although some studies have attempted to elucidate the role of salt in the development of this disease, the mechanisms by which salt acts are not yet fully understood. Thus, the aim of this study was to better understand the mechanisms of CH and interstitial fibrosis (IF) caused by HS intake. Male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups according to diet [normal salt (NS; 1.27% NaCl) or HS (8% NaCl)] and treatment [losartan (LOS) (HS+LOS group), hydralazine (HZ) (HS+HZ group), or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (HS+NAC group)], which was given in the drinking water. Tail-cuff BP, transverse diameter of the cardiomyocyte, IF, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) gene and protein expression, serum aldosterone, cardiac angiotensin II, cardiac thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, and binding of conformation-specific anti-AT1 and anti-angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2) antibodies in the 2 ventricles were measured. Based on the left ventricle transverse diameter data, the primary finding was the occurrence of significant BP-independent CH in the HS+HZ group (96% of the HS group) and a partial or total prevention of such hypertrophy via treatment with NAC or LOS (81% and 67% of the HS group, respectively). The significant total or partial prevention of IF using all 3 treatments (HS+HZ, 27%; HS+LOS, 27%; and HS+NAC, 58% of the HS group, respectively), and an increase in the AT1 gene and protein expression and activity in groups that developed CH, confirmed that CH occurred via the AT1 in this experimental model. Thus, this study unveiled some relevant previously unknown mechanisms of CH induced by chronic HS intake in Wistar rats. The link of oxidative stress with CH in our experimental model is very interesting and stimulates further evaluation for its full comprehension

  19. Activation of the retinoid X receptor modulates angiotensin II-induced smooth muscle gene expression and inflammation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Allison M B; Montford, John R; Horita, Henrick; Ostriker, Allison C; Weiser-Evans, Mary C M; Nemenoff, Raphael A; Furgeson, Seth B

    2014-11-01

    The retinoid X receptor (RXR) partners with numerous nuclear receptors, such as the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) family, liver X receptors (LXRs), and farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Although each heterodimer can be activated by specific ligands, a subset of these receptors, defined as permissive nuclear receptors, can also be activated by RXR agonists known as rexinoids. Many individual RXR heterodimers have beneficial effects in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Because rexinoids can potently activate multiple RXR pathways, we hypothesized that treating SMCs with rexinoids would more effectively reverse the pathophysiologic effects of angiotensin II than an individual heterodimer agonist. Cultured rat aortic SMCs were pretreated with either an RXR agonist (bexarotene or 9-cis retinoic acid) or vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide) for 24 hours before stimulation with angiotensin II. Compared with dimethylsulfoxide, bexarotene blocked angiotensin II-induced SM contractile gene induction (calponin and smooth muscle-α-actin) and protein synthesis ([(3)H]leucine incorporation). Bexarotene also decreased angiotensin II-mediated inflammation, as measured by decreased expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase but not extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) or protein kinase B (Akt) was also blunted by bexarotene. We compared bexarotene to five agonists of nuclear receptors (PPARα, PPARγ, PPARδ, LXR, and FXR). Bexarotene had a greater effect on calponin reduction, MCP-1 inhibition, and p38 MAP kinase inhibition than any individual agonist. PPARγ knockout cells demonstrated blunted responses to bexarotene, indicating that PPARγ is necessary for the effects of bexarotene. These data demonstrate that RXR is a potent modulator of angiotensin II-mediated responses in the vasculature, partially through inhibition of p38. PMID:25169989

  20. Proximal tubule NHE3 activity is inhibited by beta-arrestin-biased angiotensin II type 1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Carneiro de Morais, Carla P; Polidoro, Juliano Z; Ralph, Donna L; Pessoa, Thaissa D; Oliveira-Souza, Maria; Barauna, Valério G; Rebouças, Nancy A; Malnic, Gerhard; McDonough, Alicia A; Girardi, Adriana C C

    2015-10-15

    Physiological concentrations of angiotensin II (ANG II) upregulate the activity of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) in the renal proximal tubule through activation of the ANG II type I (AT1) receptor/G protein-coupled signaling. This effect is key for maintenance of extracellular fluid volume homeostasis and blood pressure. Recent findings have shown that selective activation of the beta-arrestin-biased AT1 receptor signaling pathway induces diuresis and natriuresis independent of G protein-mediated signaling. This study tested the hypothesis that activation of this AT1 receptor/beta-arrestin signaling inhibits NHE3 activity in proximal tubule. To this end, we determined the effects of the compound TRV120023, which binds to the AT1R, blocks G-protein coupling, and stimulates beta-arrestin signaling on NHE3 function in vivo and in vitro. NHE3 activity was measured in both native proximal tubules, by stationary microperfusion, and in opossum proximal tubule (OKP) cells, by Na(+)-dependent intracellular pH recovery. We found that 10(-7) M TRV120023 remarkably inhibited proximal tubule NHE3 activity both in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, stimulation of NHE3 by ANG II was completely suppressed by TRV120023 both in vivo as well as in vitro. Inhibition of NHE3 activity by TRV120023 was associated with a decrease in NHE3 surface expression in OKP cells and with a redistribution from the body to the base of the microvilli in the rat proximal tubule. These findings indicate that biased signaling of the beta-arrestin pathway through the AT1 receptor inhibits NHE3 activity in the proximal tubule at least in part due to changes in NHE3 subcellular localization. PMID:26246427

  1. Glial high-affinity binding site with specificity for angiotensin II not angiotensin III: a possible N-terminal-specific converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Printz, M.P.; Jennings, C.; Healy, D.P.; Kalter, V.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous binding properties of angiotensin II to fetal rat brain primary cultures suggested a possible contribution from contaminating glia. To investigate this possibility, cultures of C6 glioma, a clonal rat cell line, were examined for the presence of angiotensin II receptors. A specific high-affinity site for (/sup 125/I)angiotensin II was measured both by traditional methodology using whole cells and by autoradiography. This site shared properties similar to that found with the brain cells, namely low ligand internalization and markedly decreased affinity for N-terminal sarcosine or arginine-angiotensin analogs. The competition rank order was angiotensin II much greater than (Sar1,Ile8)angiotensin II greater than or equal to des(Asp1,Arg2)angiotensin II. Angiotensin III did not compete for binding to the site. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis indicated that the ligand either in the incubation or bound to the site was stable at 15 degrees C, but there was very rapid and extensive degradation by the C6 glioma cells at 37 degrees C. It is concluded that the site exhibits unusual N-terminal specificity for angiotensin with nanomolar affinity for angiotensin II. If angiotensin III is an active ligand in the brain, the site may have a converting enzyme function. Alternatively, it may form the des-Asp derivatives of angiotensin for subsequent degradation by other enzymatic pathways. Either way, it is proposed that the site may modulate the brain-angiotensin system.

  2. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  3. Unexpected binding of an octapeptide to the angiotensin II receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, R.L.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Rosenberg, E.; Hoeprich, P.; Teitelbaum, A.; Brunck, T.; Colby, C.B.; Gloff, C.

    1987-12-01

    An octapeptide, TBI-22 (Lys-Gly-Val-Tyr-Ile, His-Ala-Leu), inhibited binding of angiotensin II by a solubilized angiotensin receptor partially purified from rabbit liver. This inhibition appears to result from competition for binding to the same receptor. Radioiodinated TBI-22, like angiotensin II, bound to the solubilized receptor with an affinity such that the binding was inhibited 50% by unlabeled TBI-22 or angiotensin II at nanomolar concentrations. The binding reaction, like that for angiotensin II, required p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. TBI-22 and angiotensin II share the sequence Val-Tyr-Ile-His; this tetrapeptide alone, however, did not inhibit binding of angiotensin II. Replacement of the tyrosine residue by aspartic acid in TBI-22 greatly reduced the ability of the peptide to compete with angiotensin II for binding, suggesting an important contribution of this residue to the configuration required for recognition by the receptor.

  4. Angiotensin II during Experimentally Simulated Central Hypovolemia

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Theo Walther; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2016-01-01

    Central hypovolemia, defined as diminished blood volume in the heart and pulmonary vascular bed, is still an unresolved problem from a therapeutic point of view. The development of pharmaceutical agents targeted at specific angiotensin II receptors, such as the non-peptidergic AT2-receptor agonist compound 21, is yielding many opportunities to uncover more knowledge about angiotensin II receptor profiles and possible therapeutic use. Cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective therapeutic use of compound 21 have been suggested. However, there has not yet been a focus on the use of these agents in a hypovolemic setting. We argue that the latest debates on the effect of angiotensin II during hypovolemia might guide for future studies, investigating the effect of such agents during experimentally simulated central hypovolemia. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of angiotensin II during episodes of central hypovolemia. To examine this, we reviewed results from studies with three experimental models of simulated hypovolemia: head up tilt table test, lower body negative pressure, and hemorrhage of animals. A systemic literature search was made with the use of PubMed/MEDLINE for studies that measured variables of the renin–angiotensin system or its effect during simulated hypovolemia. Twelve articles, using one of the three models, were included and showed a possible organ-protective effect and an effect on the sympathetic system of angiotensin II during hypovolemia. The results support the possible organ-protective vasodilatory role for the AT2-receptor during hypovolemia on both the kidney and the splanchnic tissue. PMID:26973842

  5. Angiotensin II and canonical transient receptor potential-6 activation stimulate release of a signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-activating factor from mouse podocytes.

    PubMed

    Abkhezr, Mousa; Dryer, Stuart E

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) in podocytes plays an important role in progression of HIV nephropathy and in collapsing forms of glomerulonephritis. Here, we have observed that application of 100 nM angiotensin II (Ang II) to cultured podocytes for 6-24 hours causes a marked increase in the phosphorylation of STAT3 on tyrosine Y705 but has no effect on phosphorylation at serine S727. By contrast, Ang II treatment of short periods (20-60 minutes) caused a small but consistent suppression of tyrosine phosphylation of STAT3. A similar biphasic effect was seen after treatment with the diacylglycerol analog 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), an agent that causes activation of Ca(2+)-permeable canonical transient receptor potential-6 (TRPC6) channels in podocytes. The stimulatory effects of Ang II on STAT3 phosphorylation were abolished by small-interfering RNA knockdown of TRPC6 and also by inhibitors of the Ca(2+)-dependent downstream enzymes calcineurin and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. The stimulatory effects of Ang II appear to be mediated by secretion and accumulation of an unknown factor into the surrounding medium, as they are no longer detected when medium is replaced every 2 hours even if Ang II is continuously present. By contrast, the inhibitory effect of Ang II on STAT3 phosphorylation persists with frequent medium changes. Experiments with neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies suggest that the STAT3 stimulatory factor secreted from podocytes is not interleukin-6, but also suggest that this factor exerts its actions through a receptor system that requires glycoprotein 130. PMID:24850910

  6. Angiotensin II regulation of angiotensin-converting enzymes in spontaneously hypertensive rat primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Gowrisankar, Yugandhar V; Clark, Michelle A

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II plays a critical role in cardiovascular and blood pressure regulation. Ang II is produced by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and it interacts with the Ang AT1 receptor to cause much of its well-known cardiovascular effects. Ang-(1-7) is another active peptide produced by the rennin-angiotensin system. This peptide is produced from Ang I or Ang II by the catalytic activity of ACE2. Ang-(1-7) interacts with the Mas receptor to counteract many of the effects of Ang II. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis acts opposite of the ACE/Ang II/AT1 axis. In this study we investigated how Ang II regulates the key enzymes of these axes, ACE and its homolog ACE2, and determined whether they are dysregulated in the hypertensive condition. Brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes isolated from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) were used in these studies. Ang II effect on the enzymes' mRNA and protein levels was measured using quantitative PCR and western blotting techniques, respectively. Results from this study showed that Ang II up-regulated ACE protein levels, but down-regulated ACE mRNA levels in brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes in both models. Ang II also reduced ACE2 mRNA expression in SHR and Wistar astrocytes isolated from both brain regions. Ang II effects on ACE2 protein were biphasic. In SHR astrocytes, Ang II-mediated ACE2 protein initially increased then decreased at later time points. In contrast, in Wistar astrocytes, Ang II initially decreased ACE2 protein expression, but up-regulated the protein at later time points. The findings of these studies suggest that Ang II has a differential effect on ACE and ACE2 expression. Furthermore, in the SHR model there may be alteration in the ACE/ACE2 balance in a manner that favors increased Ang II generation and decreased Ang-(1-7) production contributing to the hypertensive phenotype observed in this model. The levels of angiotensin (Ang) II depend on the actions of angiotensin-converting enzyme

  7. Identification of the angiotensin II receptor in rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, J; Murray, G D; Semple, P F

    1984-01-01

    Specific binding sites of high affinity and low capacity for 125I-angiotensin II have been identified in a membrane fraction derived from arterial arcades of the rat mesentery. Heterogeneity of binding sites and extensive tracer degradation necessitated the use of nonlinear regression methods for the analysis of radioligand binding data. Forward and reverse rate constants for the high affinity sites obtained by three experimental approaches were in good agreement and gave a dissociation equilibrium constant (Kd) of 19-74 pM (95% confidence interval). Affinities for a number of angiotensin-related peptides calculated from competitive binding curves were in the order 125I-angiotensin II = angiotensin II greater than angiotensin III greater than [Sar1,Ile8]angiotensin II greater than [Sar1,Gly8]angiotensin II. Angiotensin I and biochemically unrelated peptides had virtually no effect on binding of tracer angiotensin II. The divalent cations Mn2+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ stimulated 125I-angiotensin II binding at concentrations of 2-10 mM, as did Na+ at 50-100 mM. In the presence of Na+ or Li+, K+ had a biphasic effect. The chelating agents EDTA and EGTA were inhibitory, as were the thiol reagents dithiothreitol and cysteine. This study defined angiotensin II binding sites in a vascular target tissue of sufficiently high affinity to interact rapidly with plasma angiotensin II at physiological concentrations. PMID:6095806

  8. Contractile Function During Angiotensin-II Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Prosser, Benjamin L.; Bamboye, Moradeke A.; Gondim, Antonio N.S.; Santos, Celio X.; Martin, Daniel; Ghigo, Alessandra; Perino, Alessia; Brewer, Alison C.; Ward, Christopher W.; Hirsch, Emilio; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Shah, Ajay M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Renin-angiotensin system activation is a feature of many cardiovascular conditions. Activity of myocardial reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NADPH oxidase 2 or Nox2) is enhanced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and contributes to increased hypertrophy, fibrosis, and adverse remodeling. Recent studies found that Nox2-mediated reactive oxygen species production modulates physiological cardiomyocyte function. Objectives This study sought to investigate the effects of cardiomyocyte Nox2 on contractile function during increased Ang II activation. Methods We generated a cardiomyocyte-targeted Nox2-transgenic mouse model and studied the effects of in vivo and ex vivo Ang II stimulation, as well as chronic aortic banding. Results Chronic subpressor Ang II infusion induced greater cardiac hypertrophy in transgenic than wild-type mice but unexpectedly enhanced contractile function. Acute Ang II treatment also enhanced contractile function in transgenic hearts in vivo and transgenic cardiomyocytes ex vivo. Ang II–stimulated Nox2 activity increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ uptake in transgenic mice, increased the Ca2+ transient and contractile amplitude, and accelerated cardiomyocyte contraction and relaxation. Elevated Nox2 activity increased phospholamban phosphorylation in both hearts and cardiomyocytes, related to inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 activity. In a model of aortic banding–induced chronic pressure overload, heart function was similarly depressed in transgenic and wild-type mice. Conclusions We identified a novel mechanism in which Nox2 modulates cardiomyocyte SR Ca2+ uptake and contractile function through redox-regulated changes in phospholamban phosphorylation. This mechanism can drive increased contractility in the short term in disease states characterized by enhanced renin-angiotensin system activation. PMID:26184620

  9. Baicalin attenuates angiotensin II-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiling; Zhu, Xingyu; Hu, Nan; Zhang, Xiuqin; Sun, Tianjiao; Xu, Jiyang; Bian, Xiaohong

    2015-09-11

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been shown to activate multiple downstream pathways resulting in endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Baicalin, a natural flavone, exerts anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic effects in cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we hypothesized that baicalin has beneficial effects in Ang II-induced endothelial cells injury. Here, we shown that baicalin improved endothelial fuction impaired by Ang II through promoting endothelial-dependent vasodilation and suppressing the apoptosis of HUVECs in which baicalin decreased the expression of bax and cleaved caspase-3, and increased bcl-2 expression. Additionally, baicalin significantly conversed Ang II to angiotensin-1-7 [Ang-(1-7)] by activating angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and Mas receptor mRNA expression and protein expression. Moreover, treatment with baicalin significantly reduced cell oxidative damage induced by Ang II through MDA/ROS decrease and NO/T-AOC increase. This antioxidant capacity was related to the increases of PI3K, phosphor-AKT (Ser-473) and phosphor-eNOS (Ser-1177). In conclusion, our results implicate that baicalin could protect endothelial cells from Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress via modulating the expression of bax, bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3, activating ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis and up-regulating PI3K/AKT/eNOS pathway. PMID:26239661

  10. Angiotensin II-induced Akt activation through the epidermal growth factor receptor in vascular smooth muscle cells is mediated by phospholipid metabolites derived by activation of phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Malik, Kafait U

    2005-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates cytosolic Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)), phospholipase D (PLD), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Akt in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between Akt activation by Ang II and other signaling molecules in rat VSMC. Ang II-induced Akt phosphorylation was significantly reduced by the PLD inhibitor 1-butanol, but not by its inactive analog 2-butanol, and by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of the PLD cofactor ADP-ribosylation factor, and in cells infected with retrovirus containing PLD(2) siRNA or transfected with PLD(2) antisense but not control LacZ or sense oligonucleotide. Diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor II diminished Ang II-induced and diC8-phosphatidic acid (PA)-increased Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that PLD-dependent Akt activation is mediated by PA. Ang II-induced EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by 1-butanol and PLD(2) siRNA and also by cPLA(2) siRNA. In addition, the inhibitor of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) reduced both Ang II- and AA-induced EGFR transactivation. Furthermore, ETYA, cPLA(2) antisense, and cPLA(2) siRNA attenuated Ang II-elicited PLD activation. p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 [4-(4-flurophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole] reduced PLD activity and EGFR and Akt phosphorylation elicited by Ang II. Pyrrolidine-1, a cPLA(2) inhibitor, and cPLA(2) siRNA decreased p38 MAPK activity. These data indicate that Ang II-stimulated Akt activity is mediated by cPLA(2)-dependent, p38 MAPK regulated PLD(2) activation and EGFR transactivation. We propose the following scheme of the sequence of events leading to activation of Akt in VSMC by Ang II: Ang II-->cPLA(2)-->AA-->p38 MAPK-->PLD(2)-->PA-->EGFR-->Akt. PMID:15525798

  11. Angiotensin processing activities in the venom of Thalassophryne nattereri.

    PubMed

    Tenório, Humberto de Araújo; Marques, Maria Elizabeth da Costa; Machado, Sonia Salgueiro; Pereira, Hugo Juarez Vieira

    2015-05-01

    The venom of marine animals is a rich source of compounds with remarkable functional specificity and diversity. Thalassophryne nattereri is a small venomous fish inhabiting the northern and northeastern coast of Brazil, and represents a relatively frequent cause of injuries. Its venom causes severe inflammatory response followed frequently by the necrosis of the affected area. This venom presents characterized components such as proteases (Natterins 1-4) and a lectin (Nattectin) with complex effects on the human organism. A specific inhibitor of tissue kallikrein (TKI) reduces the nociception and the edema caused by the venom in mice. Our study sought to investigate the proteolytic activities against vasopeptides Angiotensin I, Angiotensin II, Angiotensin 1-9 and Bradykinin. The venom indicated angiotensin conversion against angiotensin I, as well as kininase against bradykinin. Captopril conducted the total inhibition of the converting activity, featuring the first report of ACE activity in fish venoms. PMID:25702959

  12. Cytoplasmic translocation of HuR contributes to angiotensin II induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Danna; Ge, Lan; Gao, Yan; Lu, Xiaozhao; Wang, Haichang; Yang, Guodong

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is one of the key structural changes of the hypertrophied left ventricle in hypertensive heart disease. Increased angiotensin II was found to be important in the hypertension related fibrosis, while the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we found that angiotensin II dose-dependently increased the expression of Col1a1, Col3a1 and α-smooth muscle actin, which were blocked by ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Mechanistically, angiotensin II induced robust ROS generation, which in turn induced cytoplasmic translocation of RNA binding protein HuR. Cytoplasmic translocated HuR increased TGFβ pathway activity and subsequent collagen synthesis. In contrast, knockdown of HuR nearly blocked angiotensin II induced TGFβ activation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, we here identified that angiotensin II promotes collagen synthesis in cardiac fibroblast through ROS-HuR-TGFβ pathway. PMID:26093296

  13. Recent Updates on the Proximal Tubule Renin-Angiotensin System in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao C; Zhuo, Jia L

    2016-08-01

    It is well recognized that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists not only as circulating, paracrine (cell to cell), but also intracrine (intracellular) system. In the kidney, however, it is difficult to dissect the respective contributions of circulating RAS versus intrarenal RAS to the physiological regulation of proximal tubular Na(+) reabsorption and hypertension. Here, we review recent studies to provide an update in this research field with a focus on the proximal tubular RAS in angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. Careful analysis of available evidence supports the hypothesis that both local synthesis or formation and AT1 (AT1a) receptor- and/or megalin-mediated uptake of angiotensinogen (AGT), ANG I and ANG II contribute to high levels of ANG II in the proximal tubules of the kidney. Under physiological conditions, nearly all major components of the RAS including AGT, prorenin, renin, ANG I, and ANG II would be filtered by the glomerulus and taken up by the proximal tubules. In ANG II-dependent hypertension, the expression of AGT, prorenin, and (pro)renin receptors, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is upregulated rather than downregulated in the kidney. Furthermore, hypertension damages the glomerular filtration barrier, which augments the filtration of circulating AGT, prorenin, renin, ANG I, and ANG II and their uptake in the proximal tubules. Together, increased local ANG II formation and augmented uptake of circulating ANG II in the proximal tubules, via activation of AT1 (AT1a) receptors and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3, may provide a powerful feedforward mechanism for promoting Na(+) retention and the development of ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:27372447

  14. A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activator induces renal CYP2C23 activity and protects from angiotensin II-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Muller, Dominik N; Theuer, Juergen; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Kaergel, Eva; Honeck, Horst; Park, Joon-Keun; Markovic, Marija; Barbosa-Sicard, Eduardo; Dechend, Ralf; Wellner, Maren; Kirsch, Torsten; Fiebeler, Anette; Rothe, Michael; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2004-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites are involved in the regulation of renal vascular tone and salt excretion. The epoxygenation product 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) is anti-inflammatory and inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B activation. We tested the hypothesis that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha-activator fenofibrate (Feno) induces CYP isoforms, AA hydroxylation, and epoxygenation activity, and protects against inflammatory organ damage. Double-transgenic rats (dTGRs) overexpressing human renin and angiotensinogen genes were treated with Feno. Feno normalized blood pressure, albuminuria, reduced nuclear factor-kappa B activity, and renal leukocyte infiltration. Renal epoxygenase activity was lower in dTGRs compared to nontransgenic rats. Feno strongly induced renal CYP2C23 protein and AA-epoxygenase activity under pathological and nonpathological conditions. In both cases, CYP2C23 was the major isoform responsible for 11,12-EET formation. Moreover, we describe a novel CYP2C23-dependent pathway leading to hydroxy-EETs (HEETs), which may serve as endogenous peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activators. The capacity to produce HEETs via CYP2C23-dependent epoxygenation of 20-HETE and CYP4A-dependent hydroxylation of EETs was reduced in dTGR kidneys and induced by Feno. These results demonstrate that Feno protects against angiotensin II-induced renal damage and acts as inducer of CYP2C23-mediated epoxygenase activities. We propose that CYP-dependent EET/HEET production may serve as an anti-inflammatory control mechanism. PMID:14742258

  15. A Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α Activator Induces Renal CYP2C23 Activity and Protects from Angiotensin II-Induced Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Dominik N.; Theuer, Juergen; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Kaergel, Eva; Honeck, Horst; Park, Joon-Keun; Markovic, Marija; Barbosa-Sicard, Eduardo; Dechend, Ralf; Wellner, Maren; Kirsch, Torsten; Fiebeler, Anette; Rothe, Michael; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C.; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2004-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites are involved in the regulation of renal vascular tone and salt excretion. The epoxygenation product 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) is anti-inflammatory and inhibits nuclear factor-κB activation. We tested the hypothesis that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-activator fenofibrate (Feno) induces CYP isoforms, AA hydroxylation, and epoxygenation activity, and protects against inflammatory organ damage. Double-transgenic rats (dTGRs) overexpressing human renin and angiotensinogen genes were treated with Feno. Feno normalized blood pressure, albuminuria, reduced nuclear factor-κB activity, and renal leukocyte infiltration. Renal epoxygenase activity was lower in dTGRs compared to nontransgenic rats. Feno strongly induced renal CYP2C23 protein and AA-epoxygenase activity under pathological and nonpathological conditions. In both cases, CYP2C23 was themajor isoform responsible for 11,12-EET formation. Moreover, we describe a novel CYP2C23-dependent pathway leading to hydroxy-EETs (HEETs), which may serve as endogenous peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α activators. The capacity to produce HEETs via CYP2C23-dependent epoxygenation of 20-HETE and CYP4A-dependent hydroxylation of EETs was reduced in dTGR kidneys and induced by Feno. These results demonstrate that Feno protects against angiotensin II-induced renal damage and acts as inducer of CYP2C23-mediated epoxygenase activities. We propose that CYP-dependent EET/HEET production may serve as an anti-inflammatory control mechanism. PMID:14742258

  16. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor stimulates Na+–K+ ATPase activity through a pathway involving PKC-ζ in rat thyroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Marsigliante, S; Muscella, A; Elia, M G; Greco, S; Storelli, C

    2003-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor subtype 1, AT1, is expressed by the rat thyroid. A relationship between thyroid function and several components of the renin-angiotensin system has also been established, but the Ang II cellular effects in thyrocytes and its transduction signalling remain undefined. The aim of the present paper was to investigate the modulation of the activity of the Na+-K+ ATPase by Ang II and its intracellular transduction pathway in PC-Cl3 cells, an established epithelial cell line derived from rat thyroid. Here we have demonstrated, by RT-PCR analysis, the expression of mRNA for the Ang II AT1 receptor in PC-Cl3 cells; mRNA for the Ang II AT2 receptor was not detected. Ang II was not able to affect the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in fura-2-loaded cells, but it stimulated the translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane of atypical protein kinase C-zeta (PKC-ζ) and -iota (PKC-ι) isoforms with subsequent phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1 and 2). Translocated atypical PKCs displayed temporally different activations, the activation of PKC-ζ being the fastest. PC-Cl3 cells stimulated with increasing Ang II concentrations showed dose- and time-dependent activation of the Na+-K+ ATPase activity, which paralleled the PKC-ζ translocation time course. Na+-K+ ATPase activity modulation was dependent on PKC activation since the PKC antagonist staurosporine abolished the stimulatory effect of Ang II. The inhibition of the ERK kinases 1 and 2 (MEK1 and 2) by PD098059 (2′-amino-3′-methoxyflavone) failed to block the effect of Ang II on the Na+-K+ ATPase activity. In conclusion, our results suggest that Ang II modulates Na+-K+ ATPase activity in PC-Cl3 cells through the AT1 receptor via activation of atypical PKC-ζ while the Ang II-activated PKC-ζ appears to have other as yet unknown functions. PMID:12527732

  17. Vascular and Central Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-β Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension: Role of RGS-5.

    PubMed

    Romero, Miguel; Jiménez, Rosario; Toral, Marta; León-Gómez, Elvira; Gómez-Gúzman, Manuel; Sánchez, Manuel; Zarzuelo, María José; Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; Rath, Geraldine; Tamargo, Juan; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Dessy, Chantal; Duarte, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ) lowers blood pressure in genetic and mineralocorticoid-induced hypertension. Regulator of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling 5 (RGS5) protein, which interferes in angiotensin II (AngII) signaling, is a target gene to PPARβ The aim of the present study was to examine whether PPARβ activation in resistance arteries and brain tissues prevents the elevated blood pressure in AngII-induced hypertension and evaluate the role of RGS5 in this effect. C57BL/6J male mice were divided into five groups (control mice, PPARβ agonist [4-[[[2-[3-Fluoro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-methyl-5-thiazolyl]methyl]thio]-2-methylphenoxy]acetic acid (GW0742)-treated mice AngII-infused mice, GW0742-treated AngII-infused mice, and AngII-infused mice treated with GW0742 plus PPARβ antagonist 3-[[[2-Methoxy-4-(phenylamino)phenyl]amino]sulfonyl]-2-thiophenecarboxylic acid methyl ester (GSK0660)) and were followed for 3 weeks. GW0742 prevented the increase in both arterial blood pressure and plasma noradrenaline levels and the higher reduction of blood pressure after ganglionic blockade, whereas it reduced the mesenteric arterial remodeling and the hyper-responsiveness to vasoconstrictors (AngII and endothelin-1) in AngII-infused mice. These effects were accompanied by an inhibition of NADPH oxidase expression and activity in the brain. Gene expression profiling revealed a marked loss of brainstem and vascular RGS5 in AngII-infused mice, which was restored by GW0742. GW0742-induced effects were abolished by GSK0660. Small interfering RNA targeting RGS5 caused augmented contractile response to AngII in resistance mesenteric arteries and blunted the inhibitory effect of GW0742 on this response. In conclusion, GW0742 exerted antihypertensive effects, restoring sympathetic tone and vascular structure and function in AngII-infused mice by PPARβ activation in brain and vessels inhibiting AngII signaling as a result of RGS5

  18. Angiotensin II promotes endometrial cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Magdalena; Matysiak-Burzyńska, Zuzanna; Kowalska, Karolina; Płuciennik, Elżbieta; Domińska, Kamila; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka W

    2016-08-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common female cancers. One of the key processes involved in EC development is uncontrolled proliferation stimulated by local factors such as angiotensin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of angiotensin II (Ang II) on human EC cells. Biological assays and gene expression analysis were performed on three cell lines: ISH, MFE-296 and MFE-280. Our results indicated that at the beginning of cancerogenesis Ang II induced abnormal proliferation at lower doses. We also showed that dose-dependent induction of proliferation was connected with changes in the expression of MKI67, CCND1 and CCNE1 genes in well- and poorly differentiated cancer cells. After Ang II treatment, poorly differentiated endometrial cancer cell line acquired a mesenchymal phenotype, which was characterized by induced expression of EMT-related genes (VIM, CD44, SNAI1, ZEB1 and ZEB2). Our study revealed that Ang II influences EC cells in terms of cancer-related processes, and is responsible for increased proliferation, reduction in apoptosis, increased mobility and modulation of adhesion potential. Its effect and effectiveness appear to be highly connected with the differentiation status of the cancerous cells, as Ang II appears to play a crucial role in the early and late stages of malignant transformation. PMID:27349856

  19. Oxidative DNA Damage in Kidneys and Heart of Hypertensive Mice Is Prevented by Blocking Angiotensin II and Aldosterone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Susanne; Amann, Kerstin; Mandel, Philipp; Zimnol, Anna; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recently, we could show that angiotensin II, the reactive peptide of the blood pressure-regulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system, causes the formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in kidneys and hearts of hypertensive mice. To further investigate on the one hand the mechanism of DNA damage caused by angiotensin II, and on the other hand possible intervention strategies against end-organ damage, the effects of substances interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system on angiotensin II-induced genomic damage were studied. Methods In C57BL/6-mice, hypertension was induced by infusion of 600 ng/kg • min angiotensin II. The animals were additionally treated with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan, the mineralocorticoid receptor blocker eplerenone and the antioxidant tempol. DNA damage and the activation of transcription factors were studied by immunohistochemistry and protein expression analysis. Results Administration of angiotensin II led to a significant increase of blood pressure, decreased only by candesartan. In kidneys and hearts of angiotensin II-treated animals, significant oxidative stress could be detected (1.5-fold over control). The redox-sensitive transcription factors Nrf2 and NF-κB were activated in the kidney by angiotensin II-treatment (4- and 3-fold over control, respectively) and reduced by all interventions. In kidneys and hearts an increase of DNA damage (3- and 2-fold over control, respectively) and of DNA repair (3-fold over control) was found. These effects were ameliorated by all interventions in both organs. Consistently, candesartan and tempol were more effective than eplerenone. Conclusion Angiotensin II-induced DNA damage is caused by angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated formation of oxidative stress in vivo. The angiotensin II-mediated physiological increase of aldosterone adds to the DNA-damaging effects. Blocking angiotensin II and mineralocorticoid receptors therefore

  20. Angiotensin II induces secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and a tissue metalloprotease inhibitor-related protein from rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.A. Jr.; Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Buhi, W.C.; Raizada, M.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The present study investigates angiotensin (Ang) II effects on secretory protein synthesis in brain astrocytes cultured from neonatal and 21-day-old rats. Ang II-induced changes in the de novo synthesis of (35S)methionine-labeled secretory proteins were visualized using two-dimensional NaDodSO4/PAGE. Astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brain possess specific high-affinity receptors for Ang II. These cells express two Ang II-induced secretory proteins with Mr 55,000 (AISP-55K) and Mr 30,000 (AISP-30K), which were time- and dose-dependent (EC50, 1 nM). (Sar1, Ile8)Ang II (where Sar is sarcosine) inhibited Ang II-induced secretion of AISP-55K but not AISP-30K. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicates that AISP-55K is identical to rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, whereas AISP-30K exhibits 72-81% identity to three closely related proteins: human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases, a rat phorbol ester-induced protein, and the murine growth-responsive protein 16C8. Immunofluorescent staining with rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 antibody was induced in the majority of cells in culture after Ang II treatment of astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brains. Absence of this response to Ang II in astrocytes from neonatal rat brain provides evidence that this action of Ang II on astrocytes is developmentally regulated.

  1. Angiotensin II receptors and peritoneal dialysis-induced peritoneal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morinelli, Thomas A; Luttrell, Louis M; Strungs, Erik G; Ullian, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    The vasoactive hormone angiotensin II initiates its major hemodynamic effects through interaction with AT1 receptors, a member of the class of G protein-coupled receptors. Acting through its AT1R, angiotensin II regulates blood pressure and renal salt and water balance. Recent evidence points to additional pathological influences of activation of AT1R, in particular inflammation, fibrosis and atherosclerosis. The transcription factor nuclear factor κB, a key mediator in inflammation and atherosclerosis, can be activated by angiotensin II through a mechanism that may involve arrestin-dependent AT1 receptor internalization. Peritoneal dialysis is a therapeutic modality for treating patients with end-stage kidney disease. The effectiveness of peritoneal dialysis at removing waste from the circulation is compromised over time as a consequence of peritoneal dialysis-induced peritoneal fibrosis. The non-physiological dialysis solution used in peritoneal dialysis, i.e. highly concentrated, hyperosmotic glucose, acidic pH as well as large volumes infused into the peritoneal cavity, contributes to the development of fibrosis. Numerous trials have been conducted altering certain components of the peritoneal dialysis fluid in hopes of preventing or delaying the fibrotic response with limited success. We hypothesize that structural activation of AT1R by hyperosmotic peritoneal dialysis fluid activates the internalization process and subsequent signaling through the transcription factor nuclear factor κB, resulting in the generation of pro-fibrotic/pro-inflammatory mediators producing peritoneal fibrosis. PMID:27167177

  2. The Angiotensin Infusion Test and Peripheral Venous Renin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Silah, J. G.; Strong, C. G.; Nowaczynski, W.; Genest, J.

    1967-01-01

    Forty hypertensive patients were studied to examine the assumption that the angiotensin pressor dose reflects endogenous renin activity. Peripheral renin activity was assayed by the method of Boucher et al.4 Sensitivity to the infusion of synthetic angiotensin II was determined as suggested by Kaplan and Silah.1 Sixteen patients with essential hypertension with normal renal angiography required 3.8 ng. angiotensin/kg./min. to raise the diastolic pressure 20 mm. Hg. All but one were sensitive to angiotensin infusion of less than 5 ng./kg./min. Renin activity was normal in all except in one sensitive subject. Angiotensin infusion response and mean renin activity in 13 patients with essential hypertension with abnormal renal angiography were similar to that of the first group. The pressor dose in 11 renovascular hypertensives was 9.8 ng./kg./min. All but three had elevated plasma renin activity. Our results suggest that: (1) the angiotensin infusion test is suitable for differentiating patients with true renovascular hypertension from those with essential hypertension with or without associated renal artery disease; (2) the angiotensin pressor dose correlates with the level of peripheral venous renin activity (p < 0.01). PMID:4290836

  3. The angiotensin infusion test and peripheral venous renin activity.

    PubMed

    Silah, J G; Strong, C G; Nowaczynski, W; Genest, J

    1967-05-27

    Forty hypertensive patients were studied to examine the assumption that the angiotensin pressor dose reflects endogenous renin activity. Peripheral renin activity was assayed by the method of Boucher et al.(4) Sensitivity to the infusion of synthetic angiotensin II was determined as suggested by Kaplan and Silah.(1)Sixteen patients with essential hypertension with normal renal angiography required 3.8 ng. angiotensin/kg./min. to raise the diastolic pressure 20 mm. Hg. All but one were sensitive to angiotensin infusion of less than 5 ng./kg./min. Renin activity was normal in all except in one sensitive subject. Angiotensin infusion response and mean renin activity in 13 patients with essential hypertension with abnormal renal angiography were similar to that of the first group. The pressor dose in 11 renovascular hypertensives was 9.8 ng./kg./min. All but three had elevated plasma renin activity.OUR RESULTS SUGGEST THAT: (1) the angiotensin infusion test is suitable for differentiating patients with true renovascular hypertension from those with essential hypertension with or without associated renal artery disease; (2) the angiotensin pressor dose correlates with the level of peripheral venous renin activity (p < 0.01). PMID:4290836

  4. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) activates the angiotensin II type 1 receptor by binding to the lectin-like oxLDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Koichi; Kakino, Akemi; Takeshita, Hikari; Hayashi, Norihiro; Li, Lei; Nakano, Atsushi; Hanasaki-Yamamoto, Hiroko; Fujita, Yoshiko; Imaizumi, Yuki; Toyama-Yokoyama, Serina; Nakama, Chikako; Kawai, Tatsuo; Takeda, Masao; Hongyo, Kazuhiro; Oguro, Ryosuke; Maekawa, Yoshihiro; Itoh, Norihisa; Takami, Yoichi; Onishi, Miyuki; Takeya, Yasushi; Sugimoto, Ken; Kamide, Kei; Nakagami, Hironori; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Kurtz, Theodore W; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2015-08-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) is a 7-transmembrane domain GPCR that when activated by its ligand angiotensin II, generates signaling events promoting vascular dysfunction and the development of cardiovascular disease. Here, we show that the single-transmembrane oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) resides in proximity to AT1 on cell-surface membranes and that binding of oxLDL to LOX-1 can allosterically activate AT1-dependent signaling events. oxLDL-induced signaling events in human vascular endothelial cells were abolished by knockdown of AT1 and inhibited by AT1 blockade (ARB). oxLDL increased cytosolic G protein by 350% in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with genetically induced expression of AT1 and LOX-1, whereas little increase was observed in CHO cells expressing only LOX-1. Immunoprecipitation and in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) assays in CHO cells revealed the presence of cell-surface complexes involving LOX-1 and AT1. Chimeric analysis showed that oxLDL-induced AT1 signaling events are mediated via interactions between the intracellular domain of LOX-1 and AT1 that activate AT1. oxLDL-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation of vascular ring from mouse thoracic aorta was abolished by ARB or genetic deletion of AT1. These findings reveal a novel pathway for AT1 activation and suggest a new mechanism whereby oxLDL may be promoting risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:25877213

  5. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as low-density lipoprotein and platelet-activating factor-stimulated human monocyte chemoattractant protein-1.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Julie M; Croft, Kevin D; Puddey, Ian B; Beilin, Lawrence J

    2003-06-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a potent chemotactic agent for monocytes and other cells and is thought to be involved in atherosclerosis, recruiting monocytes to the subendothelial space or to the site of inflammation. Angiotensin II has been demonstrated, at least in animal models, to stimulate MCP-1 expression. We investigated the effect of the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists irbesartan and losartan on MCP-1 production by freshly isolated human monocytes. Irbesartan and losartan inhibited basal MCP-1 production in a dose-dependent manner. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) stimulated MCP-1 in a concentration-dependent manner, with 200 microg/ml LDL protein giving a 2-fold increase in MCP-1. Irbesartan and losartan dose dependently blocked LDL-stimulated MCP-1. An angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonist, S-(+)-1-([4-(dimethylamino)-3-methylphenyl]methyl)-5-(diphenylacetyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo(4,5-c)pyridine-6-carboxylic acid (PD123319), had no significant effect on basal MCP-1 levels or LDL-stimulated MCP-1. After noting homology between the AT1 receptor and the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor, we showed that irbesartan inhibited both [3H]PAF binding to human monocytes and carbamyl-PAF stimulation of MCP-1. However, irbesartan affinity for the PAF receptor was 700 times less than PAF, suggesting that there may be another mechanism for irbesartan inhibition of PAF-stimulated MCP-1. This is the first report showing that AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as LDL- and PAF-stimulated MCP-1 production in freshly isolated human monocytes. PMID:12626661

  6. Knocking out Angiotensin II in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Zablocki, Daniela; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2011-01-01

    Despite ongoing medical advances, cardiovascular disease continues to be a leading health concern. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in regulating cardiovascular function, and is, therefore, the subject of extensive study. Several of the drugs currently used to treat hypertension and heart failure are designed to target Ang II synthesis and function, but none have been able to completely block the effects of RAS signaling thus far. This review discusses current and emerging approaches towards inhibiting cardiac RAS function in order to further improve cardiovascular disease outcomes. PMID:21234717

  7. Angiotensin II Type-2 Receptors Modulate Inflammation Through Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription Proteins 3 Phosphorylation and TNFα Production

    PubMed Central

    Abadir, Peter M.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Carey, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin subtype-1 receptor (AT1R) influences inflammatory processes through enhancing signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins 3 (STAT3) signal transduction, resulting in increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production. Although angiotensin subtype-2 receptor (AT2R), in general, antagonizes AT1R-stimulated activity, it is not known if AT2R has any anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that AT2R activation plays an anti-inflammatory role by reducing STAT3 phosphorylation and TNF-α production. Changes in AT2R expression, TNF-α production, and STAT3 phosphorylation were quantified by Western blotting, Bio-Plex cytokine, and phosphoprotein cellular signaling assays in PC12W cells that express AT2R but not AT1R, in response to the AT2R agonist, CGP-42112 (CGP, 100 nm), or AT2R antagonist PD-123319 (PD, 1 μm). A 100% increase in AT2R expression in response to stimulation with its agonist CGP was observed. Further, AT2R activation reduced TNF-α production by 39% and STAT3 phosphorylation by 83%. In contrast, PD decreased AT2R expression by 76%, increased TNF-α production by 84%, and increased STAT3 phosphorylation by 67%. These findings suggest that increased AT2R expression may play a role in the observed decrease in inflammatory pathway activation through decreased TNF-α production and STAT3 signaling. Restoration of AT2R expression and/or its activation constitute a potentially novel therapeutic target for the management of inflammatory processes. PMID:21288138

  8. Angiotensin II receptor type 2 activation is required for cutaneous sensory hyperinnervation and hypersensitivity in a rat hind paw model of inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Anuradha; Liao, Zhaohui; Smith, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Many pain syndromes are associated with abnormal proliferation of peripheral sensory fibers. We showed previously that angiotensin II, acting through its type 2 receptor (AT2), stimulates axon outgrowth by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. In this study, we assessed whether AT2 mediates nociceptor hyperinnervation in the rodent hind paw model of inflammatory pain. Plantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), but not saline, produced marked thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity through 7 days. This was accompanied by proliferation of dermal and epidermal PGP9.5- and calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive (CGRP-ir) axons, and dermal axons immunoreactive for GFRα2 but not tyrosine hydroxylase or neurofilament H. Continuous infusion of the AT2 antagonist PD123319 beginning with CFA injection completely prevented hyperinnervation as well as hypersensitivity over a 7 day period. A single PD123319 injection 7 days after CFA also reversed thermal hypersensitivity and partially reversed mechanical hypersensitivity 3 hours later, without affecting cutaneous innervation. Angiotensin II synthesizing proteins renin and angiotensinogen were largely absent after saline but abundant in T-cells and macrophages in CFA-injected paws with or without PD123319. Thus, emigrant cells at the site of inflammation apparently establish a renin-angiotensin system, and AT2 activation elicits nociceptor sprouting and heightened thermal and mechanical sensitivity. Perspective Short-term AT2 activation is a potent contributor to thermal hypersensitivity, while long-term effects (such as hyperinnervation) also contribute to mechanical hypersensitivity. Pharmacological blockade of AT2 signaling represents a potential therapeutic strategy aimed at biological mechanisms underlying chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:23726047

  9. Angiotensin-(1-7) regulates Angiotensin II-induced VCAM-1 expression on vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ren, Jingyi; Chan, Kenneth; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We for the first time found that Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on VCAM-1 is mediated by MAS receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Ang-(1-7) is due to the suppression of NF-kappaB translocation. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) are key effector peptides in the renin-angiotensin system. Increased circulatory Ang II level is associated with the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis, whereas Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. However, whether Ang-(1-7) regulates the action of Ang II on vascular endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. We investigated the effects of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the context of atherogenesis, specifically endothelial cell VCAM-1 expression that is implicated in early plaque formation. The results show that Ang II increased VCAM-1 mRNA expression and protein displayed on EC surface, while Ang-(1-7) alone exerted no effects. However, Ang-(1-7) significantly suppressed Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Ang-(1-7) also inhibited the Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity driven by transcription factor NF-KappaB. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay and ELISA showed that Ang II facilitated the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in ECs, and this was attenuated by the presence of Ang-(1-7). The inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation were all reversed by the competitive antagonist of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor. Our results suggest that Ang-(1-7) mediates its affects on ECs through the Mas receptor, and negatively regulates Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression by attenuating nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  10. Altered activities of kininase II, an angiotensin converting enzyme, prekallikrein, and nitric oxide in Kuwaiti patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, J N; Al-Shoumer, Kas; Matar, K M; Madathil, N V; Al-Moalem, Amk

    2015-06-01

    The current investigation was conducted to examine kininase II or angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), plasma prekallikrein (PK), and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in healthy Kuwaiti subjects and newly diagnosed Kuwaiti type 2 diabetic patients before and after treatment for 6 weeks with metformin hydrochloride 500 mg twice daily after meal. With the consent of volunteers, blood and urine samples were collected after an overnight fasting. Samples were collected from the diabetic patients before and after treatment for 6 weeks. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was carried out on the aliquoted samples to measure the concentration of kininase II. NO was detected via colorimetry. Plasma Kininase II or ACE levels were significantly (P <0.01) increased by 18% in untreated diabetics when compared with healthy volunteers. However, after treatment there was a significant decrease of 20% in their ACE levels. Plasma prekallikrein levels were raised significantly (P <0.01) by 28% in diabetic patients in contrast with the control subjects and the levels were significantly reduced (P <0.0001) by 44% after treatment with metformin hydrochloride. NO levels were found to be significantly decreased in plasma by 56% and in urine by 62% in untreated diabetic patients as compared with the healthy subjects. However, when the treated diabetic patients were compared with untreated diabetics, there was an increase of 50% in plasma and 37% in urine samples. The high levels of kininase II, prekallikrein, and reduced NO may be partly responsible for the induction of renal, cardiac, and hypertensive complications associated with type 2 diabetes. Reduced NO level is an indication of endothelial dysfunction resulting in increased blood pressure. Oral anti-diabetic treatment is associated with protective effects through the reduction of kininase II (ACE), prekallikrein, and elevation of NO levels. PMID:25964383

  11. Pancreatic angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves glycemia in angiotensin II-infused mice

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H.; Xia, Huijing; Pedersen, Kim Brint; Speth, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    An overactive renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to contribute to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although ACE2 overexpression has been shown to be protective against the overactive RAS, a role for pancreatic ACE2, particularly in the islets of Langerhans, in regulating glycemia in response to elevated angiotensin II (Ang II) levels remains to be elucidated. This study examined the role of endogenous pancreatic ACE2 and the impact of elevated Ang II levels on the enzyme's ability to alleviate hyperglycemia in an Ang II infusion mouse model. Male C57bl/6J mice were infused with Ang II or saline for a period of 14 days. On the 7th day of infusion, either an adenovirus encoding human ACE2 (Ad-hACE2) or a control adenovirus (Ad-eGFP) was injected into the mouse pancreas. After an additional 7–8 days, glycemia and plasma insulin levels as well as RAS components expression and oxidative stress were assessed. Ang II-infused mice exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islets compared with control mice. This phenotype was associated with decreased ACE2 expression and activity, increased Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression, and increased oxidative stress in the mouse pancreas. Ad-hACE2 treatment restored pancreatic ACE2 expression and compensatory activity against Ang II-mediated impaired glycemia, thus improving β-cell function. Our data suggest that decreased pancreatic ACE2 is a link between overactive RAS and impaired glycemia in T2DM. Moreover, maintenance of a normal endogenous ACE2 compensatory activity in the pancreas appears critical to avoid β-cell dysfunction, supporting a therapeutic potential for ACE2 in controlling diabetes resulting from an overactive RAS. PMID:23462816

  12. Apoptosis after reperfused myocardial infarction: Role of angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Jugdutt, Bodh I

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a significant role in apoptosis after myocardial infarction (MI) and reperfused MI. Cumulative evidence suggests that Ang II is a major contributor to cardiomyocyte (CM) apoptosis and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction after acute reperfused MI and that apoptosis mediates a major portion of early LV dysfunction. Importantly, blockade of the Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) limits CM apoptosis and LV dysfunction after acute reperfused MI. Ang II type 2 receptor activation during AT1R blockade contributes to these beneficial effects. The role of Ang II and apoptosis in chronic LV remodelling, healing and post-MI heart failure is more complex and involves effects on the CMs, fibroblasts and vascular cells. The long-term effects of agents targeting apoptosis after reperfused MI, including AT1R blockade, on apoptosis in different cell types, windows of enhanced apoptosis and the appropriate timing of therapy need to be considered. PMID:19641712

  13. Inhibition of Proteasome Activity by Low-dose Bortezomib Attenuates Angiotensin II-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Apo E−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hualiang; Li, Fangda; Tian, Cui; Nie, Hao; Wang, Lei; Li, Hui-Hua; Zheng, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a leading cause of sudden death in aged people. Activation of ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays a critical role in the protein quality control and various diseases. However, the functional role of UPS in AAA formation remains unclear. In this study, we found that the proteasome activities and subunit expressions in AAA tissues from human and angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused apolipoprotein E knockout (Apo E−/−) mice were significantly increased. To investigate the effect of proteasome activation on the AAA formation, Apo E−/− mice were cotreated with bortezomib (BTZ) (a proteasome inhibitor, 50 μg/kg, 2 times per week) and Ang II (1000 ng/kg/min) up to 28 days. Ang II infusion significantly increased the incidence and severity of AAA in Apo E−/− mice, whereas BTZ treatment markedly inhibited proteasome activities and prevented AAA formation. Furthermore, BTZ treatment significantly reduced the inflammation, inhibited the metal matrix metalloprotease activity, and reversed the phenotypic SMC modulation in AAA tissue. In conclusion, these results provide a new evidence that proteasome activation plays a critical role in AAA formation through multiple mechanisms, and suggest that BTZ might be a novel therapeutic target for treatment of AAA formation. PMID:26508670

  14. Interaction between Angiotensin II and Insulin/IGF-1 Exerted a Synergistic Stimulatory Effect on ERK1/2 Activation in Adrenocortical Carcinoma H295R Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, An-li; Wang, Fen; Cui, Yun-ying; Li, Chun-yan; Li, Yu-xiu

    2016-01-01

    The cross talk between angiotensin II (Ang II) and insulin has been described mainly in cardiovascular cells, hepatocytes, adipocytes, and so forth, and to date no such cross talk was reported in adrenal. In this study, we examined the interaction between Ang II and insulin/IGF-1 in ERK and AKT signaling pathways and expression of steroidogenic enzymes in H295R cells. Compared to the control, 100 nM Ang II increased phospho-ERK1/2 approximately 3-fold. Insulin (100 nM) or IGF-1 (10 nM) alone raised phospho-ERK1/2 1.8- and 1.5-fold, respectively, while, after pretreatment with 100 nM Ang II for 30 min, insulin (100 nM) or IGF-1 (10 nM) elevated phospho-ERK1/2 level 8- and 7-fold, respectively. The synergistic effect of Ang II and insulin/IGF-1 on ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by selective AT1 receptor blocker, PKC inhibitor, and MEK1/2 inhibitor. Ang II marginally suppressed AKT activation under the basal condition, while it had no effect on phospho-AKT induced by insulin/IGF-1. Ang II significantly stimulated mRNA expression of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2, and such stimulatory effects were enhanced when cells were cotreated with insulin/IGF-1. We are led to conclude that Ang II in combination with insulin/IGF-1 had an evident synergistic stimulatory effect on ERK1/2 activation in H295R cells and the effect may be responsible for the enhanced steroid hormone production induced by Ang II plus insulin/IGF-1. PMID:27293433

  15. The heterotrimeric G q protein-coupled angiotensin II receptor activates p21 ras via the tyrosine kinase-Shc-Grb2-Sos pathway in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sadoshima, J; Izumo, S

    1996-01-01

    p21 ras plays as important role in cell proliferation, transformation and differentiation. Recently, the requirement of p21 ras has been suggested for cellular responses induced by stimulation of heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors. However, it remains to be determined how agonists for G protein-coupled receptors activate p21 ras in metazoans. We show here that stimulation of the G q protein-coupled angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor causes activation of p21 ras in cardiac myocytes. The p21 ras activation by Ang II is mediated by an increase in the guanine nucleotide exchange activity, but not by an inhibition of the GTPase-activating protein. Ang II causes rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and its association with Grb2 and mSos-1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of p21 ras. This leads to translocation of mSos-1 to the membrane fraction. Shc associates with the SH3 domain of Fyn whose tyrosine kinase activity is activated by Ang II with a similar time course as that of tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc. Ang II-induced increase in the guanine nucleotide exchange activity was inhibited by a peptide ligand specific to the SH3 domain of the Src family tyrosine kinases. These results suggest that an agonist for a pertussis toxin-insensitive G protein-coupled receptor may initiate the cross-talk with non-receptor-type tyrosine kinases, thereby activating p21 ras using a similar mechanism as receptor tyrosine kinase-induced p21 ras activation. Images PMID:8631299

  16. Intracrine angiotensin II functions originate from noncanonical pathways in the human heart.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Carlos M; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Varagic, Jasmina; Cheng, Che Ping; Groban, Leanne; Wang, Hao; Collawn, James F; Dell Italia, Louis J

    2016-08-01

    Although it is well-known that excess renin angiotensin system (RAS) activity contributes to the pathophysiology of cardiac and vascular disease, tissue-based expression of RAS genes has given rise to the possibility that intracellularly produced angiotensin II (Ang II) may be a critical contributor to disease processes. An extended form of angiotensin I (Ang I), the dodecapeptide angiotensin-(1-12) [Ang-(1-12)], that generates Ang II directly from chymase, particularly in the human heart, reinforces the possibility that an alternative noncanonical renin independent pathway for Ang II formation may be important in explaining the mechanisms by which the hormone contributes to adverse cardiac and vascular remodeling. This review summarizes the work that has been done in evaluating the functional significance of Ang-(1-12) and how this substrate generated from angiotensinogen by a yet to be identified enzyme enhances knowledge about Ang II pathological actions. PMID:27233763

  17. Angiotensin II reduces calcium uptake into bone.

    PubMed

    Schurman, Scott J; Bergstrom, William H; Shoemaker, Lawrence R; Welch, Thomas R

    2004-01-01

    Children with neonatal Bartter syndrome (NBS) have hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, and osteopenia. A complex of basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) and a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan has been identified in the serum and urine of NBS patients. This complex increases bone resorption in a bone disc bioassay system. Angiotensin II (AT II), which is increased in Bartter syndrome, increases the synthesis of b-FGF by cultured endothelial cells. Addition of 10(-8) M AT II to the bioassay, a concentration reported in Bartter syndrome patients, significantly decreased calcium uptake into bone discs [E/C 0.60 (0.04), P < 0.001 compared with buffer, normal E/C >0.90]. Adding b-FGF monoclonal antibody at 10 microg/ml [E/C 0.90 (0.06), P=NS] or indomethacin [E/C 1.00 (0.03), P=NS] to 10(-8 )M AT II neutralized this effect. In separate experiments, newborn rats were given intraperitoneal injections of AT II. Bone discs from these animals were used in the bioassay system and calcium uptake was markedly reduced compared with discs from rats injected with phosphate-buffered saline [AT II 6.6 x 10(-9), E/C 0.10 (0.04), P<0.001, AT II 3.3 x 10(-8), E/C 0.10 (0.05), P<0.001]. AT II decreases calcium uptake in the bone disc bioassay system. This effect can be abrogated by antibody to b-FGF or prostaglandin synthetase inhibition. These results support the hypothesis that in children with NBS, elevated levels of AT II stimulate local skeletal b-FGF synthesis, with a resultant increase in bone resorption via a prostaglandin-dependent pathway. PMID:14648327

  18. Inhibition of Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy and Associated Ventricular Arrhythmias by a p21 Activated Kinase 1 Bioactive Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wee K.; Zhang, Yanmin; Liu, Wei; Huang, Kai; Terrar, Derek A.; Solaro, R. John; Wang, Xin; Ke, Yunbo; Lei, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy increases the risk of morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease and thus inhibiting such hypertrophy is beneficial. In the present study, we explored the effect of a bioactive peptide (PAP) on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertrophy and associated ventricular arrhythmias in in vitro and in vivo models. PAP enhances p21 activated kinase 1 (Pak1) activity by increasing the level of phosphorylated Pak1 in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). Such PAP-induced Pak1 activation is associated with a significant reduction of Ang II-induced hypertrophy in NRVMs and C57BL/6 mice, in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Furthermore, PAP antagonizes ventricular arrhythmias associated with Ang II-induced hypertrophy in mice. Its antiarrhythmic effect is likely to be involved in multiple mechanisms to affect both substrate and trigger of ventricular arrhythmogenesis. Thus our results suggest that Pak1 activation achieved by specific bioactive peptide represents a potential novel therapeutic strategy for cardiac hypertrophy and associated ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:25014109

  19. Production of platelet-activating factor is a component of the angiotensin II-protein kinase C activation pathway in bovine adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Pelosin, J M; Keramidas, M; Chambaz, E M

    1991-08-15

    Lyso-platelet-activating factor (lyso-PAF): acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.67) enzyme activity was characterized for the first time in bovine adrenocortical tissue. It was found to be associated with the microsomal membrane fraction, in which it exhibited a specific activity of 0.4 nmol/min per mg of protein and catalytic properties similar to those described in other cell types. The adrenocortical acetyltransferase activity was increased by 2-3-fold on incubation of the preparation with purified protein kinase C (PKC) under phosphorylating condition. This activation was optimal after 5 min of incubation and paralleled an increase in PKC-catalysed 32P incorporation into microsomal proteins. Both acetyltransferase activation and protein phosphorylation were dependent on the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids, and were blocked in the presence of the potent PKC inhibitor H-7. In the intact adrenocortical cell, angiotensin II and a potent phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) were able to rapidly induce an increase in the biosynthesis of PAF, which was mostly released into the extracellular medium. These data suggest that bovine adrenocortical lyso-PAF acetyltransferase may be regulated by a PKC-dependent activation pathway, whereas no evidence for an additional adrenocorticotropin/cyclic AMP-dependent stimulation process was obtained in this cell type. Bovine adrenocortical cell membrane preparations were shown to possess high-affinity PAF-binding sites (Kd approximately 0.5 nM). Altogether, these observations suggest that PAF production and release may play a role in the autocrine or paracrine control of adrenocortical cell activation. PMID:1883337

  20. Photoreleasable ligands to study intracrine angiotensin II signalling

    PubMed Central

    Tadevosyan, Artavazd; Létourneau, Myriam; Folch, Benjamin; Doucet, Nicolas; Villeneuve, Louis R; Mamarbachi, Aida M; Pétrin, Darlaine; Hébert, Terence E; Fournier, Alain; Chatenet, David; Allen, Bruce G; Nattel, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that intracellular angiotensin II (Ang-II) contributes to the regulation of cardiac contractility, renal salt reabsorption, vascular tone and metabolism; however, work on intracrine Ang-II signalling has been limited to indirect approaches because of a lack of selective intracellularly-acting probes. Here, we aimed to synthesize and characterize cell-permeant Ang-II analogues that are inactive without uncaging, but release active Ang-II upon exposure to a flash of UV-light, and act as novel tools for use in the study of intracrine Ang-II physiology. We prepared three novel caged Ang-II analogues, [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II, Ang-II-ODMNB and [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II-ODMNB, based upon the incorporation of the photolabile moiety 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl (DMNB). Compared to Ang-II, the caged Ang-II analogues showed 2–3 orders of magnitude reduced affinity toward both angiotensin type-1 (AT1R) and type-2 (AT2R) receptors in competition binding assays, and greatly-reduced potency in contraction assays of rat thoracic aorta. After receiving UV-irradiation, all three caged Ang-II analogues released Ang-II and potently induced the contraction of rat thoracic aorta. [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II showed the most rapid photolysis upon UV-irradiation and was the focus of subsequent characterization. Whereas Ang-II and photolysed [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation (via AT1R) and cGMP production (AT2R), caged [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II did not. Cellular uptake of [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II was 4-fold greater than that of Ang-II and significantly greater than uptake driven by the positive-control HIV TAT(48–60) peptide. Intracellular photolysis of [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II induced an increase in nucleoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]n), and initiated 18S rRNA and nuclear factor kappa B mRNA synthesis in adult cardiac cells. We conclude that caged Ang-II analogues represent powerful new tools for use in the selective study of intracrine signalling via Ang-II. PMID:25433071

  1. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in the SHR brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1986-11-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate brain angiotensin II is associated with the elevation of blood pressure seen in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). These include an increased pressor response to intracerebroventricularly administered angiotensin II and a reduction of blood pressure in response to centrally administered angiotensin II receptor antagonists. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography, we have detected greater angiotensin II receptor binding in a number of discrete brain nuclei of the 6-week-old SHR when compared to age-matched Wistar-Kyoto controls. Tissue sections from various brain regions were labeled with (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II according to a previously described method. Autoradiograms were generated by apposing the labeled tissue sections to LKB Ultrofilm along with brain paste standards which contained known amounts of (/sup 125/I). Quantitation of the binding, utilizing computer-assisted microdensitometry, indicated greater (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding in several brain areas implicated in cardiovascular control including the subfornical organ, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, locus coeruleus, supraoptic nucleus and the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis. Scatchard analysis of the binding in the nucleus of the solitary tract indicated an increased receptor number (Bmax) was responsible for the change while binding in two forebrain structures, the subfornical organ and supraoptic nucleus, showed alterations in receptor number and affinity (Kd). Several other brain regions, unrelated to cardiovascular control, exhibited no change in (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding.

  2. β-Arrestin-mediated Angiotensin II Signaling Controls the Activation of ARF6 Protein and Endocytosis in Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Charles, Ricardo; Namkung, Yoon; Cotton, Mathieu; Laporte, Stéphane A; Claing, Audrey

    2016-02-19

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a vasopressive hormone but is also a potent activator of cellular migration. We have previously shown that it can promote the activation of the GTPase ARF6 in a heterologous overexpressing system. The molecular mechanisms by which receptors control the activation of this small G protein remain, however, largely unknown. Furthermore, how ARF6 coordinates the activation of complex cellular responses needs to be further elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that Ang II receptors engage β-arrestin, but not Gq, to mediate ARF6 activation in HEK 293 cells. To further confirm the key role of β-arrestin proteins, we overexpressed β-arrestin2-(1-320), a dominant negative mutant known to block receptor endocytosis. We show that expression of this truncated construct does not support the activation of the GTPase nor cell migration. Interestingly, β-arrestin2 can interact with the ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARNO, although the C-terminally lacking mutant does not. We finally examined whether receptor endocytosis controlled ARF6 activation and cell migration. Although the clathrin inhibitor PitStop2 did not impact the ability of Ang II to activate ARF6, cell migration was markedly impaired. To further show that ARF activation regulates key signaling events leading to migration, we also examined MAPK activation. We demonstrate that this signaling axis is relevant in smooth muscle cells of the vasculature. Altogether, our findings show for the first time that Ang II receptor signaling to β-arrestin regulates ARF6 activation. These proteins together control receptor endocytosis and ultimately cell migration. PMID:26703465

  3. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essentially inactive. The combination of the two compounds completely inhibited AII binding in both tissues.

  4. Early Endosomal Antigen 1 (EEA1) Is an Obligate Scaffold for Angiotensin II-induced, PKC-α-dependent Akt Activation in Endosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Nazarewicz, Rafal Robert; Salazar, Gloria; Patrushev, Nikolay; Martin, Alejandra San; Hilenski, Lula; Xiong, Shiqin; Alexander, R. Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) activation/phosphorylation by angiotensin II (Ang II) is a critical signaling event in hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Conventional wisdom asserts that Akt activation occurs mainly in plasma membrane domains. Recent evidence that Akt activation may take place within intracellular compartments challenges this dogma. The spatial identity and mechanistic features of these putative signaling domains have not been defined. Using cell fractionation and fluorescence methods, we demonstrate that the early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1)-positive endosomes are a major site of Ang II-induced Akt activation. Akt moves to and is activated in EEA1 endosomes. The expression of EEA1 is required for phosphorylation of Akt at both Thr-308 and Ser-473 as well as for phosphorylation of its downstream targets mTOR and S6 kinase, but not for Erk1/2 activation. Both Akt and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) interact with EEA1. We also found that PKC-α is required for organizing Ang II-induced, EEA1-dependent Akt phosphorylation in VSMC early endosomes. EEA1 expression enables PKC-α phosphorylation, which in turn regulates Akt upstream signaling kinases, PDK1 and p38 MAPK. Our results indicate that PKC-α is a necessary regulator of EEA1-dependent Akt signaling in early endosomes. Finally, EEA1 down-regulation or expression of a dominant negative mutant of PKC-α blunts Ang II-induced leucine incorporation in VSMCs. Thus, EEA1 serves a novel function as an obligate scaffold for Ang II-induced Akt activation in early endosomes. PMID:21097843

  5. ACE2: Angiotensin II/Angiotensin-(1-7) balance in cardiorenal injury

    PubMed Central

    Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Nagata, Sayaka; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Our current recognition of the renin-angiotensin system is more convoluted than originally thought due to the discovery of multiple novel enzymes, peptides, and receptors inherent to this interactive biochemical cascade. Over the last decade angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has emerged as a key player in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease due to its pivotal role in metabolizing vasoconstrictive/hypertrophic/proliferative angiotensin II into favorable angiotensin-(1-7). This review addresses a considerable advancement in research on the role of tissue ACE2 in development and progression of hypertension and cardiorenal injury. We also summarize the results from recent clinical and experimental studies suggesting that serum or urine soluble ACE2 may serve as a novel biomarker or independent risk factor relevant for diagnosis and prognosis of cardiorenal disease. Recent proceedings on novel therapeutic approaches to enhance ACE2/angiotensin-(1-7) axis are also reviewed. PMID:24510672

  6. [Leu]enkephalin stimulates carbohydrate metabolism in isolated hepatocytes and kidney tubule fragments by interaction with angiotensin II receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hothi, S K; Randall, D P; Titheradge, M A

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that the effects of [Leu]enkephalin in vitro on hepatic carbohydrate metabolism are mediated by interaction with angiotensin II receptors has been examined. Preincubation of hepatocytes with either the angiotensin II receptor antagonist [Sar1,Ile8]angiotensin II or 10 mM-dithiothreitol abolished the ability of both angiotensin II and [Leu]enkephalin to increase phosphorylase a in hepatocytes prepared from fed rats. Dithiothreitol had no effect on the stimulation of phosphorylase in the presence of glucagon or phenylephrine, although it also inhibited the response to vasopressin. [Leu]enkephalin displaced specifically bound 125I-labelled angiotensin II from hepatic plasma membranes over a concentration range of 10(-7)-10(-5) M. This correlated with the dose-response required to stimulate phosphorylase activity in intact hepatocytes and suggests that the effects of the opioid peptides on carbohydrate metabolism in liver are the result of cross-reactivity of the peptides with angiotensin II receptors. Addition of 10(-5) M-[Leu]enkephalin to isolated kidney tubule fragments stimulated gluconeogenesis from 5 mM-pyruvate, the magnitude of stimulation being comparable to that by either angiotensin II or adrenaline. This effect of the opioid peptide was also abolished by pretreatment of the tubules with [Sar1,Ile8]angiotensin II, suggesting that the ability of [Leu]enkephalin to interact with angiotensin II receptors is not restricted to the liver, but may occur in other tissues where both receptors occur together. PMID:2930480

  7. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Massey, Katherine J; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F; Keezer, Susan M; Mattingly, Raymond R; Yingst, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser(938) were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K · mg protein(-1) · min(-1) and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser(938) is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells. PMID:26582472

  8. Interrenal activity in the female lizard Lacerta vivipara J.: in vitro response to ACTH 1-39 and to [Sar1, Val5] angiotensin II (ANG II).

    PubMed

    Dauphin-Villemant, C; Leboulenger, F; Xavier, F; Vaudry, H

    1988-01-01

    A perifusion system technique was developed in order to determine in vitro the respective roles of ACTH and ANG II in the regulation of adrenal steroidogenesis in the lizard Lacerta vivipara. Synthetic human ACTH 1-39, administered as 20-min pulses, stimulated corticosterone (B) and aldosterone (A) release in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in corticosterone output was higher than that in aldosterone output, leading to an enhancement of the B/A ratio. Iterative stimulations with 1 nM ACTH (20-min pulses every 120 min) led to reproducible increases in corticosterone and aldosterone release. Prolonged stimulation with 1 nM ACTH (up to 240 min) caused a sustained increase in corticosteroid release, suggesting that, in the lizard, ACTH does not induce any desensitization phenomenon. The angiotensin II analogue [Sar1, Val5] ANG II also stimulated corticosterone and aldosterone release in a dose-dependent manner; the stimulatory effects of ANG II on both steroids were very similar. These results indicate that, in lizards, ACTH plays a major role in the regulation of adrenal steroidogenesis. Since ANG II stimulates the production of gluco- and mineralocorticoids, our data raise the question of the existence of two cell types synthesizing corticosterone and aldosterone, respectively, in reptiles. PMID:2838698

  9. Deletion of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor–associated protein enhances renal sodium reabsorption and exacerbates angiotensin II–mediated hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ohsawa, Masato; Tamura, Kouichi; Wakui, Hiromichi; Maeda, Akinobu; Dejima, Toru; Kanaoka, Tomohiko; Azushima, Kengo; Uneda, Kazushi; Tsurumi-Ikeya, Yuko; Kobayashi, Ryu; Matsuda, Miyuki; Uchida, Shinichi; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Yamashita, Akio; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Umemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R)–associated protein (ATRAP) promotes AT1R internalization along with suppression of pathological activation of tissue AT1R signaling. However, the functional significance of ATRAP in renal sodium handling and blood pressure regulation under pathological stimuli is not fully resolved. Here we show the blood pressure of mice with a gene-targeted disruption of ATRAP was comparable to that of wild-type mice at baseline. However, in ATRAP-knockout mice, angiotensin II–induced hypertension was exacerbated and the extent of positive sodium balance was increased by angiotensin II. Renal expression of the sodium-proton antiporter 3, a major sodium transporter in the proximal tubules, urinary pH, renal angiotensinogen production, and angiotensin II content was unaffected. Stimulation of the renal expression and activity of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), a major sodium transporter in the distal tubules, was significantly enhanced by chronic angiotensin II infusion. The circulating and urinary aldosterone levels were comparable. The blood pressure response and renal ENaC expression by aldosterone were not affected. Thus, ATRAP deficiency exacerbated angiotensin II–mediated hypertension by pathological activation of renal tubular AT1R by angiotensin II. This directly stimulates ENaC in the distal tubules and enhances sodium retention in an aldosterone-independent manner. PMID:24694992

  10. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  11. Norepinephrine metabolism in neuronal cultures is increased by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Sumners, C.; Shalit, S.L.; Kalberg, C.J.; Raizada, M.K.

    1987-06-01

    In this study the authors have examined the actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) on catecholamine metabolism in neuronal brain cell cultures prepared from the hypothalamus and brain stem. Neuronal cultures prepared from the brains of 1-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit specific neuronal uptake mechanisms for both norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA), and also monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity. Separate neuronal uptake sites for NE and DA were identified by using specific neuronal uptake inhibitors for each amine. In previous studies, they determined that ANG II (10 nM-1 ..mu..M) stimulates increased neuronal (/sup 3/H)NE uptake by acting as specific receptors. They have confirmed these results here and in addition have shown that ANG II has not significant effects on neuronal (/sup 3/H)DA uptake. These results suggest that the actions of ANG II are restricted to the NE transporter in neuronal cultures. It is possible that ANG II stimulates the intraneuronal metabolism of at least part of the NE that is taken up, because the peptide stimulates MAO activity, an effect mediated by specific ANG II receptors. ANG II had no effect on COMT activity in neuronal cultures. Therefore, the use of neuronal cultures of hypothalamus and brain stem they have determined that ANG II can specifically alter NE metabolism in these areas, while apparently not altering DA metabolism.

  12. Angiotensin II-related hypertension and eye diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marin Garcia, Pablo Jesus; Marin-Castaño, Maria Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Systemic vascular disease, especially hypertension, has been suspected as a risk factor for some eye diseases including, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Hypertension can contribute to chronic diseases by hemodynamic injury and/or cellular actions induced by hypertension-related hormones or growth factors. Among the most important is Angiotensin II (Ang II), which controls blood pressure and induces different cellular functions that may be dependent or independent of its effect on blood pressure. Importantly, as is true for heart, kidney and other organs, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is present in the eye. So, even in the absence of hypertension, local production of Ang II could be involved in eye diseases. The goal of this manuscript is to review the most relevant scientific evidence supporting the role of the RAS activation, in the development of age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, and highlight the importance of Ang II in the etiology of these diseases. PMID:25276298

  13. Distinct properties of telmisartan on agonistic activities for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ among clinically used angiotensin II receptor blockers: drug-target interaction analyses.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Hirotoshi; Kurosaki, Eiji; Niimi, Tatsuya; Gato, Katsuhiko; Kawasaki, Yuko; Suwa, Akira; Honbou, Kazuya; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Okumura, Hiroyuki; Sanagi, Masanao; Tomura, Yuichi; Orita, Masaya; Yonemoto, Takako; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    A proportion of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) improves glucose dyshomeostasis and insulin resistance in a clinical setting. Of these ARBs, telmisartan has the unique property of being a partial agonist for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). However, the detailed mechanism of how telmisartan acts on PPARγ and exerts its insulin-sensitizing effect is poorly understood. In this context, we investigated the agonistic activity of a variety of clinically available ARBs on PPARγ using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Based on physicochemical data, we then reevaluated the metabolically beneficial effects of telmisartan in cultured murine adipocytes. ITC and SPR assays demonstrated that telmisartan exhibited the highest affinity of the ARBs tested. Distribution coefficient and parallel artificial membrane permeability assays were used to assess lipophilicity and cell permeability, for which telmisartan exhibited the highest levels of both. We next examined the effect of each ARB on insulin-mediated glucose metabolism in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. To investigate the impact on adipogenesis, 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were differentiated with each ARB in addition to standard inducers of differentiation for adipogenesis. Telmisartan dose-dependently facilitated adipogenesis and markedly augmented the mRNA expression of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (aP2), accompanied by an increase in the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and protein expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). In contrast, other ARBs showed only marginal effects in these experiments. In accordance with its highest affinity of binding for PPARγ as well as the highest cell permeability, telmisartan superbly activates PPARγ among the ARBs tested, thereby providing a fresh avenue for treating hypertensive patients with metabolic derangement. PMID:24424487

  14. DIOL Triterpenes Block Profibrotic Effects of Angiotensin II and Protect from Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-López, Raquel; Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Gómez-Hurtado, Nieves; Delgado, Carmen; Visitación Bartolomé, Maria; San Román, José Alberto; Cordova, Claudia; Lahera, Vicente; Nieto, Maria Luisa; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    myofibroblasts. They inhibit the angiotensin II-induced proliferation in a PPAR-γ-dependent manner, while at high doses they activate pathways of programmed cell death that are dependent on JNK and PPAR-γ. PMID:22844495

  15. Role of angiotensin II in renal wrap hypertension.

    PubMed

    Denton, K M; Anderson, W P

    1985-01-01

    The role of angiotensin II in the development of renal wrap hypertension was studied in rabbits that underwent either bilateral renal cellophane wrap or sham operation. In half the rabbits, angiotensin II production was blocked by continuous administration of enalapril. Four weeks after renal wrapping, mean arterial pressure had risen by 48 +/- 5 mm Hg in untreated rabbits, but by only 25 +/- 4 mm Hg in enalapril-treated rabbits (p less than 0.01). Similar differences were also measured 6 weeks after wrapping. In untreated rabbits, plasma renin activity had increased fourfold 4 and 6 weeks after renal wrapping. There were no significant changes in blood pressure or plasma renin activity following sham operation. Compared with that in sham-operated rabbits, renal blood flow was reduced by 60% in the untreated rabbits 4 weeks after wrapping but by only 30% in the enalapril-treated wrapped rabbits (p less than 0.05). Renal vascular resistances were 5.5 +/- 1.7 mm Hg . ml-1 . min-1 and 1.2 +/- 0.1 mm Hg . min . ml-1 in the untreated wrapped and sham-operated rabbits respectively and 1.9 +/- 0.4 mm Hg . min . ml-1 and 0.8 +/- 1 mm Hg . min . ml-1 in the enalapril-treated wrapped and sham-operated rabbits. Renal wrapping did not alter filtration fraction in untreated rabbits, but markedly reduced it in enalapril-treated rabbits. These results suggest that angiotensin II had two major effects in rabbits after bilateral renal wrapping: it contributed substantially to the increase in blood pressure and caused renal vasoconstriction, primarily at a postglomerular site. PMID:3000937

  16. A state of reversible compensated ventricular dysfunction precedes pathological remodelling in response to cardiomyocyte-specific activity of angiotensin II type-1 receptor in mice

    PubMed Central

    Frentzou, Georgia A.; Drinkhill, Mark J.; Turner, Neil A.; Ball, Stephen G.; Ainscough, Justin F. X.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac dysfunction is commonly associated with high-blood-pressure-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, in response to aberrant renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity. Ensuing pathological remodelling promotes cardiomyocyte death and cardiac fibroblast activation, leading to cardiac fibrosis. The initiating cellular mechanisms that underlie this progressive disease are poorly understood. We previously reported a conditional mouse model in which a human angiotensin II type-I receptor transgene (HART) was expressed in differentiated cardiomyocytes after they had fully matured, but not during development. Twelve-month-old HART mice exhibited ventricular dysfunction and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy with interstitial fibrosis following full receptor stimulation, without affecting blood pressure. Here, we show that chronic HART activity in young adult mice causes ventricular dysfunction without hypertrophy, fibrosis or cardiomyocyte death. Dysfunction correlated with reduced expression of pro-hypertrophy markers and increased expression of pro-angiogenic markers in the cardiomyocytes experiencing increased receptor load. This stimulates responsive changes in closely associated non-myocyte cells, including the downregulation of pro-angiogenic genes, a dampened inflammatory response and upregulation of Tgfβ. Importantly, this state of compensated dysfunction was reversible. Furthermore, increased stimulation of the receptors on the cardiomyocytes caused a switch in the secondary response from the non-myocyte cells. Progressive cardiac remodelling was stimulated through hypertrophy and death of individual cardiomyocytes, with infiltration, proliferation and activation of fibroblast and inflammatory cells, leading to increased angiogenic and inflammatory signalling. Together, these data demonstrate that a state of pre-hypertrophic compensated dysfunction can exist in affected individuals before common markers of heart disease are detectable. The data also suggest that

  17. Angiotensin II stimulates melanogenesis via the protein kinase C pathway

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LI-HONG; FAN, XIN; XIA, ZHI-KUAN; AN, XU-XI; YANG, RONG-YA

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis is a physiological process that results in the synthesis of melanin pigments, which serve a crucial function in hyperpigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on melanogenesis and to elucidate the molecular events of Ang II-induced melanogenesis. Experiments were performed on human melanocytes to elucidate the pigmenting effect of Ang II and the underlying mechanisms. The elements involved in melanogenesis, including melanin content, tyrosinase (TYR) activity, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and TYR expression at the mRNA and protein levels were evaluated. Melanin content and TYR activity increased in response to Ang II treatment in a concentration-dependent manner. MITF and TYR mRNA and protein expression levels were increased significantly in response to Ang II in a concentration-dependent manner. The Ang II-induced increase in melanin synthesis was reduced significantly in response to co-treatment with Ro-32-0432, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, whereas co-treatment with H-89, a PKA inhibitor, did not attenuate the Ang II-induced increase in melanin levels. These results suggest that PKC is required for Ang II-induced pigmentation in human melanocytes and that the mechanism involves the PKC pathway and MITF upregulation. PMID:26622519

  18. Angiotensin II binding to cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: identification of angiotensin II receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.; Printz, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    Physiological experiments have provided evidence that angiotensin II stimulates catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland. Their laboratory and others have now shown by receptor autoradiography the presence of angiotensin II receptors (AIIR) in bovine and rat adrenal medulla. In order to extend these studies they have undertaken to define AIIR on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Cells were isolated using the method of Levitt including cell enrichment with Percoll gradient centrifugation. Primary cultures of bovine adrenal medullary cells were maintained in DME/F12 medium containing 10% FCS. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry for Met- and Leu-enkephalin, PNMT, DBH and Chromagranin A. Cultured cells bind with high affinity and specificity (/sup 125/I)-ANG II yielding a K/sub D/ of 0.74 nM and B/sub max/ of 24,350 sites/cell. After Percoll treatment values of .77 nm and 34,500 sites/cell are obtained. K/sub D/ values are in close agreement with that obtained in adrenal slices by Healy. Competition studies identify a rank order of binding by this receptor similar to that of other tissues. They conclude that cultured chromaffin cells provide a suitable model system for the investigation and characterization of the ANG II receptor and for cellular studies of its functional significance.

  19. Molecular basis and functional significance of Angiotensin II-induced increase in Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    George, Mereena; Vijayakumar, Anupama; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; James, Jackson; Shivakumar, K

    2016-01-01

    Delineation of mechanisms underlying the regulation of fibrosis-related genes in the heart is an important clinical goal as cardiac fibrosis is a major cause of myocardial dysfunction. This study probed the regulation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene expression and the regulatory links between Angiotensin II, DDR2 and collagen in Angiotensin II-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses showed that Angiotensin II enhances DDR2 mRNA and protein expression in rat cardiac fibroblasts via NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species induction. NF-κB activation, demonstrated by gel shift assay, abolition of DDR2 expression upon NF-κB inhibition, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed transcriptional control of DDR2 by NF-κB in Angiotensin II-treated cells. Inhibitors of Phospholipase C and Protein kinase C prevented Angiotensin II-dependent p38 MAPK phosphorylation that in turn blocked NF-κB activation. Angiotensin II also enhanced collagen gene expression. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of Angiotensin II on DDR2 and collagen were inter-dependent as siRNA-mediated silencing of one abolished the other. Angiotensin II promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation whose inhibition attenuated Angiotensin II-stimulation of collagen but not DDR2. Furthermore, DDR2 knockdown prevented Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that DDR2-dependent ERK1/2 activation enhances collagen expression in cells exposed to Angiotensin II. DDR2 knockdown was also associated with compromised wound healing response to Angiotensin II. To conclude, Angiotensin II promotes NF-κB activation that up-regulates DDR2 transcription. A reciprocal regulatory relationship between DDR2 and collagen, involving cross-talk between the GPCR and RTK pathways, is central to Angiotensin II-induced increase in collagen expression in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:26674152

  20. Sirtuin3 Dysfunction Is the Key Determinant of Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Macconi, Daniela; Perico, Luca; Longaretti, Lorena; Morigi, Marina; Cassis, Paola; Buelli, Simona; Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiotensin II promotes insulin resistance. The mechanism underlying this abnormality, however, is still poorly defined. In a different setting, skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signaling are regulated by Sirtuin3. Objective Here, we investigate whether angiotensin II-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is associated with Sirtuin3 dysregulation and whether pharmacological manipulation of Sirtuin3 confers protection. Study Design Parental and GLUT4-myc L6 rat skeletal muscle cells exposed to angiotensin II are used as in vitro models of insulin resistance. GLUT4 translocation, glucose uptake, intracellular molecular signals such as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, Sirtuin3 protein expression and activity, along with its downstream targets and upstream regulators, are analyzed both in the absence and presence of acetyl-L-carnitine. The role of Sirtuin3 in GLUT4 translocation and intracellular molecular signaling is also studied in Sirtuin3-silenced as well as over-expressing cells. Results Angiotensin II promotes insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells via mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in a two-fold increase in superoxide generation. In this context, reactive oxygen species open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and significantly lower Sirtuin3 levels and activity impairing the cell antioxidant defense. Angiotensin II-induced Sirtuin3 dysfunction leads to the impairment of AMP-activated protein kinase/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase signaling. Acetyl-L-carnitine, by lowering angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial superoxide formation, prevents Sirtuin3 dysfunction. This phenomenon implies the restoration of manganese superoxide dismutase antioxidant activity and AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Acetyl-L-carnitine protection is abrogated by specific Sirtuin3 siRNA. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that angiotensin II-induced insulin resistance fosters mitochondrial superoxide generation, in

  1. Synthesis, anti-hypertensive effect of a novel angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonist and its anti-tumor activity in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Da, Y-J; Yuan, W-D; Zhu, L-F; Chen, Z-L

    2012-12-01

    Since the first non-peptide Ang II receptor antagonist was originally reported, it has become the most common target in the development of new treatments for hypertension. In recent years, all components of the classical RAS have been reported in the prostate, these results suggest the possibility that ARB is a novel therapeutic class of agents for prostate cancer. In this study, a new compound 2-(4-((2-propyl-5-nitro-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-1-yl) methyl)-1H-indol-1-yl) benzoic acid was synthesized and evaluated as a novel angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonist by radioligand binding assays, anti-hypertensive assays in vivo and oral acute toxicity test. MTT assays and tests in nude mice were used to demonstrate its anti-tumor activity. This new compound showed high affinity to AT1 receptor and anti-hypertensive activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats and renal hypertensive rats. Moreover, in human prostate cancer cells and in athymic nude mice bearing human prostate cancer cells, we observed this new compound had an efficient antiproliferative activity in vitro and anti-tumor activity in vivo. The preliminary pharmacological characteristics with oral acute toxicity test suggested that this new compound can be considered as a candidate for both anti-hypertensive and anti-tumor drug. PMID:23203543

  2. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II induces over-activation of monoamine oxidase type A: implications in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Manni, Maria Elena; Zazzeri, Marina; Musilli, Claudia; Bigagli, Elisabetta; Lodovici, Maura; Raimondi, Laura

    2013-10-15

    Several evidences indicate that increased cardiac mitochondrial monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) activity associates with a failing phenotype. Till now, the mechanism underlying such relation is largely unknown. We explored the hypothesis that exposure of cardiomyocytes to AT-II caused activation of MAO-A and also of catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities, enzymes involved in degrading MAO's end products. Left ventricular cardiomyocytes were isolated from normoglycemic (N) and streptozotocin-injected (50 mg/kg) rats (D) treated or not treated with losartan (20 mg/kg/day in drinking water; DLos and NLos, respectively), a type 1 receptor (AT1) antagonist, for 3 weeks. In each group of cells, MAO, catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were measured radiochemically and spectrophotometrically. The same enzymes were also measured in HL-1 immortalized cardiomyocytes not exposed and exposed to AT-II (100 nM for 18 h) in the absence and in the presence of irbesartan (1 μM), an AT1 antagonist. MAO-A catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were found significantly higher in D, than in N cells. MAO-A positively correlated with catalase activity in D cells. MAO-A and aldehyde dehydrogenase but not catalase over-activation, were prevented in DLos cells. Similarly, MAO-A activity, but not catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase increased significantly in HL-1 cells acutely exposed to AT-II and this increase was prevented when irbesartan, an AT1 antagonist was present. Over-activation of cardiomyocyte MAO-A activity is among acute (18 h) and short-term (2-weeks of diabetes) cardiac effects of AT-II and a novel target of AT1 antagonists, first line treatments of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:24012905

  3. Angiotensin II and Oxidative Stress in the Failing Heart

    PubMed Central

    Zablocki, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite recent medical advances, cardiovascular disease and heart failure (HF) continue to be major health concerns, and related mortality remains high. As a result, investigation of the mechanisms involved in the development of HF continues to be an active field of study. Recent Advances: The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and its effector molecule, angiotensin (Ang) II, affect cardiac function through both systemic and local actions, and have been shown to play a major role in cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in the failing heart. Many of the downstream effects of AngII signaling are mediated by elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress, which have also been implicated in the pathology of HF. Critical Issues: Inhibitors of the RAS have proven beneficial in the treatment of patients at risk for and suffering from HF, but remain only partially effective. ROS can be generated from several different sources, and the oxidative state is normally tightly regulated in the heart. How AngII increases ROS levels and causes dysregulation of the cardiac oxidative state has been the subject of considerable interest in recent years. Future Directions: A better understanding of this process and the mechanisms involved should lead to the development of more effective HF therapies and improved outcomes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1095–1109. PMID:22429089

  4. Csk regulates angiotensin II-induced podocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Ren, Zhilong; Yang, Qian; Ding, Guohua

    2016-07-01

    Increasing data have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) perpetuates podocyte injury and promotes progression to end-stage kidney disease. The mechanism underlying Ang II-induced podocyte apoptosis has not been established. C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) is a cytoplasmic kinase that interacts with scaffolding proteins involved in cell growth, adhesion, and polarization, and the role of Csk in regulating cellular apoptosis has gradually attracted attention. This study evaluates the role of Csk in Ang II-induced podocyte apoptosis. In vivo, Wistar rats were randomly subjected to a normal saline or Ang II infusion. In vitro, we exposed differentiated mouse podocytes to Ang II. Ang II increased Csk expression and induced podocyte apoptosis, stimulated Csk translocation and binding to Caveolin-1, and stimulated decreased Fyn pY416, increased Fyn pY529, and nephrin dephosphorylation. Csk knockdown prevented Ang II-induced podocyte apoptosis, reduced Fyn kinase inactivation, and increased the interaction between nephrin and the activated form of Fyn, accompanied by a reduced interaction between Csk and Caveolin-1. These findings indicate that Ang II induces podocyte injury via a Csk-dependent pathway. PMID:27225249

  5. Association of the Serum Angiotensin II Level with Disease Severity in Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiamei; Li, Huiyu; Jie, Shenghua

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging infectious disease caused by a novel Bunyavirus. Recent data suggest that the physiological balance of multiple proinflammatory cytokines is substantially changed in cases of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) infection, and the inflammatory response probably plays an important role in disease progression. Angiotensin II is an important active substance of the renin-angiotensin system, and studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II is involved in key events in the inflammatory process and can regulate inflammatory cell responses. Methods In order to elucidate the role of angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of SFTS, we collected serum samples from SFTS patients in the acute or convalescent phase and tested the angiotensin II levels using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as SFTSV viral RNA with real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, we explored possible correlations between the angiotensin II levels and clinical parameters in SFTS patients. Results Our data showed that the serum level of angiotensin II was significantly increased in the acute phase compared with that seen in the convalescent phase and the healthy controls, while there were no significant differences between the convalescent cases and healthy controls (p>0.05). A correlation analysis demonstrated that the level of angiotensin II positively correlated with the SFTS viral RNA load. The angiotensin II levels were also found to be correlated with clinical parameters indicating impairments in organ functions. Moreover, we also found that the angiotensin II levels were significantly increased in the severe cases versus the non-severe cases (p<0.001). Conclusion The serum angiotensin II levels in SFTS patients may be used to stratify the disease severity and are possibly predictive of disease outcomes. PMID:27086801

  6. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers and Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-Tao; Li, Peng-Yang; Zhang, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Lei; Yi, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) are widely used drugs that are proven to reduce cardiovascular disease events; however, several recent meta-analyses yielded conflicting conclusions regarding the relationship between ARB and cancer incidence, especially when ARB are combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI). We investigated the risk of cancer associated with ARB at different background ACEI levels. Search of PubMed and EMBASE (1966 to December 17, 2015) without language restriction. Randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) had at least 12 months of follow-up data and reported cancer incidence was included. Study characteristics, quality, and risk of bias were assessed by 2 reviewers independently. Nineteen RCTs including 148,334 patients were included in this study. Random-effects model meta-analyses were used to estimate the risk ratio (RR) of cancer risk. No excessive cancer risk was observed in our analyses of ARB alone versus placebo alone without background ACEI use (risk ratio [RR] 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00–1.18, P = 0.05); ARB alone versus ACEI alone (RR 1.03, 95%CI 0.94–1.14, P = 0.50); ARB plus partial use of ACEI versus placebo plus partial use of ACEI (RR 0.97, 95%CI 0.90–1.04, P = 0.33); and ARB plus ACEI versus ACEI (RR 0.99, 95%CI 0.79–1.24, P = 0.95). Lack of long-term data, inadequate reporting of safety data, significant heterogeneity in underlying study populations, and treatment regimens. ARB have a neutral effect on cancer incidence in randomized trials. We observed no significant differences in cancer incidence when we compared ARB alone with placebo alone, ARB alone with ACEI alone, ARB plus partial use of ACEI with placebo plus partial use of ACEI, or ARB plus ACEI combination with ACEI. PMID:27149494

  7. Relationship between angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II correlates with hemodynamic changes in human liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Walkíria Wingester; Ribeiro-Oliveira Jr, Antônio; Pereira, Regina Maria; da Cunha Ribeiro, Renata; Almeida, Jerusa; Nadu, Ana Paula; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To measure circulating angiotensins at different stages of human cirrhosis and to further evaluate a possible relationship between renin angiotensin system (RAS) components and hemodynamic changes. METHODS: Patients were allocated into 4 groups: mild-to-moderate liver disease (MLD), advanced liver disease (ALD), patients undergoing liver transplantation, and healthy controls. Blood was collected to determine plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin (Ang) I, Ang II, and Ang-(1-7) levels using radioimmunoassays. During liver transplantation, hemodynamic parameters were determined and blood was simultaneously obtained from the portal vein and radial artery in order to measure RAS components. RESULTS: PRA and angiotensins were elevated in ALD when compared to MLD and controls (P < 0.05). In contrast, Ang II was significantly reduced in MLD. Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios were increased in MLD when compared to controls and ALD. During transplantation, Ang II levels were lower and Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios were higher in the splanchnic circulation than in the peripheral circulation (0.52 ± 0.08 vs 0.38 ± 0.04, P < 0.02), whereas the peripheral circulating Ang II/Ang I ratio was elevated in comparison to splanchnic levels (0.18 ± 0.02 vs 0.13 ± 0.02, P < 0.04). Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios positively correlated with cardiac output (r = 0.66) and negatively correlated with systemic vascular resistance (r = -0.70). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the relationship between Ang-(1-7) and Ang II may play a role in the hemodynamic changes of human cirrhosis. PMID:19469002

  8. Cardiac steatosis potentiates angiotensin II effects in the heart.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Denis J; Cardema, Michelle C; Ni, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Yeghiazarians, Yerem; Grapov, Dmitry; Fiehn, Oliver; Gardner, David G

    2015-02-15

    Lipid accumulation in the heart is associated with obesity and diabetes and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. The renin-angiotensin system is also thought to contribute to cardiovascular morbidity in obese and diabetic patients. We hypothesized that the presence of lipid within the myocyte might potentiate the cardiomyopathic effects of ANG II in the cardiac diacylglycerol acyl transferase 1 (DGAT1) transgenic mouse model of myocyte steatosis. Treatment with ANG II resulted in a similar increase in blood pressure in both nontransgenic and DGAT1 transgenic mice. However, ANG II in DGAT1 transgenic mice resulted in a marked increase in interstitial fibrosis and a reduction in systolic function compared with nontransgenic littermates. Lipidomic analysis revealed that >20% of lipid species were significantly altered between nontransgenic and DGAT1 transgenic animals, whereas 3% were responsive to ANG II administration. ROS were also increased by ANG II in DGAT1 transgenic hearts. ANG II treatment resulted in increased expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 and the type I TGF-β receptor as well as increased phosphorylation of Smad2 in DGAT1 transgenic hearts. Injection of neutralizing antibodies to TGF-β resulted in a reduction in fibrosis in DGAT1 transgenic hearts treated with ANG II. These results suggest that myocyte steatosis amplifies the fibrotic effects of ANG II through mechanisms that involve activation of TGF-β signaling and increased production of ROS. PMID:25485904

  9. Angiotensin II directly impairs adipogenic differentiation of human preadipose cells.

    PubMed

    Palominos, Marisol M; Dünner, Natalia H; Wabitsch, Martin; Rojas, Cecilia V

    2015-10-01

    Angiotensin II reduces adipogenic differentiation of preadipose cells present in the stroma-vascular fraction of human adipose tissue, which also includes several cell types. Because of the ability of non-adipose lineage cells in the stroma-vascular fraction to respond to angiotensin II, it is not possible to unequivocally ascribe the anti-adipogenic response to a direct effect of this hormone on preadipose cells. Therefore, we used the human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) preadipocyte cell strain to investigate the consequences of angiotensin II treatment on adipogenic differentiation under serum-free conditions, by assessing expression of typical adipocyte markers perilipin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), at the transcript and protein level. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that perilipin and FABP4 transcripts were, respectively, reduced to 0.33 ± 0.07 (P < 0.05) and 0.41 ± 0.19-fold (P < 0.05) in SGBS cells induced to adipogenic differentiation in the presence of angiotensin II. Western Blot analysis corroborated reduction of the corresponding proteins to 0.23 ± 0.21 (P < 0.01) and 0.46 ± 0.30-fold (P < 0.01) the respective controls without angiotensin II. Angiotensin II also impaired morphological changes associated with early adipogenesis. Hence, we demonstrated that angiotensin II is able to directly reduce adipogenic differentiation of SGBS preadipose cells. PMID:26112903

  10. Evidence for extracellular, but not intracellular, generation of angiotensin II in the rat adrenal zona glomerulosa

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, H.; Khosla, M.C.; Bumpus, M.; Husain, A. )

    1988-11-01

    Based on the observation that high levels of renin and angiotensin II (Ang II) are found in the adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG), it has been postulated that Ang II is formed intracellularly by the renin-converting enzyme cascade in this tissue. To test this hypothesis, the authors examined renin-angiotensin system components in subcellular fractions of the rat adrenal ZG. Renin activity and immunoreactive-Ang II (IR-Ang II) were observed in vesicular fractions but were not colocalized. In addition, angiotensinogen, angiotensin I, and converting enzyme were not observed in the renin or IR-Ang II-containing vesicular fractions. These data do not support the hypothesis that Ang II is formed intracellularly within the renin-containing vesicles of the ZG. Rather, since modulatable renin release from adrenal ZG slices was observed and renin activity was found in dense vesicular fractions (33-39% sucrose), it is likely that Ang II formation in the ZG is extracellular and initiated by the release of vesicular renin. In ZG lysomal fractions {sup 125}I-labeled Ang II was degraded to {sup 125}I-labeled des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II. Since Ang II antibodies do not recognize des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II, these finding explain why IR-Ang II in the ZG is due predominantly to Ang II and not to its C-terminal immunoreactive fragments.

  11. Hormonal stimulation of mitochondrial glutaminase. Effects of vasopressin, angiotensin II, adrenaline and glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Corvera, S; García-Sáinz, J A

    1983-01-01

    Adrenaline (through alpha 1-adrenoceptors), vasopressin and angiotensin II stimulate mitochondrial glutaminase activity. This stimulation probably contributes to the ureogenic effect of these hormones. The activity of the enzyme is sensitive to Ca2+ depletion. A role of Ca2+ in hormonal modulation of glutaminase activity is suggested. PMID:6870814

  12. Angiotensin II Stimulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy and Functional Decompensation in Osteoprotegerin-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Toshihiro; Sekita-Hatakeyama, Yoko; Hao, Yilin; Sakamoto, Sumiharu; Kurogi, Syuji; Nakamura, Midori; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Funamoto, Taro; Sekimoto, Tomohisa; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Chosa, Etsuo; Kato, Johji; Asada, Yujiro; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Circulating and myocardial expressions of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand and osteoprotegerin are activated in heart failure; however, it remains to be determined their pathophysiological roles on left ventricular structure and function in interaction with renin-angiotensin system. We conducted experiments using 8-week-old osteoprotegerin(-/-)mice and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand-transgenic mice to assess whether they affect the angiotensin II-induced left ventricular remodeling. Subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II to osteoprotegerin(-/-)mice progressed the eccentric hypertrophy, resulting in left ventricular systolic dysfunction for 28 days, and this was comparable with wild-type mice, showing concentric hypertrophy, irrespective of equivalent elevation of systolic blood pressure. The structural alteration was associated with reduced interstitial fibrosis, decreased procollagen α1 and syndecan-1 expressions, and the increased number of apoptotic cells in the left ventricle, compared with wild-type mice. In contrast, angiotensin II infusion to the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand-transgenic mice revealed the concentric hypertrophy with preserved systolic contractile function. Intraperitoneal administration of human recombinant osteoprotegerin, but not subcutaneous injection of anti-receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand antibody, to the angiotensin II-infused osteoprotegerin(-/-)mice for 28 days ameliorated the progression of heart failure without affecting systolic blood pressure. These results underscore the biological activity of osteoprotegerin in preserving myocardial structure and function during the angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, independent of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand activity. In addition, the antiapoptotic and profibrotic actions of osteoprotegerin that emerged from our data might be involved in the mechanisms. PMID:27001297

  13. Activation of the Renin-Angiotensin System Promotes Colitis Development

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yongyan; Liu, Tianjing; He, Lei; Dougherty, Urszula; Chen, Li; Adhikari, Sarbani; Alpert, Lindsay; Zhou, Guolin; Liu, Weicheng; Wang, Jiaolong; Deb, Dilip K.; Hart, John; Liu, Shu Q.; Kwon, John; Pekow, Joel; Rubin, David T.; Zhao, Qun; Bissonnette, Marc; Li, Yan Chun

    2016-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays pathogenic roles in renal and cardiovascular disorders, but whether it is involved in colitis is unclear. Here we show that RenTgMK mice that overexpress active renin from the liver developed more severe colitis than wild-type controls. More than 50% RenTgMK mice died whereas all wild-type mice recovered. RenTgMK mice exhibited more robust mucosal TH17 and TH1/TH17 responses and more profound colonic epithelial cell apoptosis compared to wild-type controls. Treatment with aliskiren (a renin inhibitor), but not hydralazine (a smooth muscle relaxant), ameliorated colitis in RenTgMK mice, although both drugs normalized blood pressure. Chronic infusion of angiotensin II into wild-type mice mimicked the severe colitic phenotype of RenTgMK mice, and treatment with losartan [an angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker (ARB)] ameliorated colitis in wild-type mice, confirming a colitogenic role for the endogenous RAS. In human biopsies, pro-inflammatory cytokines were suppressed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were on ARB therapy compared to patients not receiving ARB therapy. These observations demonstrate that activation of the RAS promotes colitis in a blood pressure independent manner. Angiotensin II appears to drive colonic mucosal inflammation by promoting intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and mucosal TH17 responses in colitis development. PMID:27271344

  14. Angiotensin II inhibitor facilitates epidermal wound regeneration in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamber, Maria; Papalazarou, Vasileios; Rouni, Georgia; Papageorgopoulou, Evagelia; Papalois, Apostolos; Kostourou, Vassiliki

    2015-01-01

    Tissue regeneration and wound healing are severely impaired in diabetes and are associated with poor circulation and dysfunctional blood vessels. Angiotensin II inhibitors are anti-hypertensive drugs used in clinical practice to regulate blood pressure and could affect tissue remodeling. We hypothesize that blocking angiotensin II, using Losartan, could facilitate tissue regeneration in diabetic mice. To this end, we established an experimental model of wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Our data demonstrated that Losartan accelerates wound repair and normalizes wound stromal responses, having a beneficial role in wounds of diabetic individuals. Our findings highlight a potential therapeutic use of Losartan in improving wound repair in diabetic conditions. PMID:26106332

  15. Immunosuppressive treatment protects against angiotensin II-induced renal damage.

    PubMed

    Muller, Dominik N; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Park, Joon-Keun; Dechend, Ralf; Mervaala, Eero; Hampich, Franziska; Fiebeler, Anette; Ju, Xinsheng; Finckenberg, Piet; Theuer, Jürgen; Viedt, Christiane; Kreuzer, Joerg; Heidecke, Harald; Haller, Hermann; Zenke, Martin; Luft, Friedrich C

    2002-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II promotes renal infiltration by immunocompetent cells in double-transgenic rats (dTGRs) harboring both human renin and angiotensinogen genes. To elucidate disease mechanisms, we investigated whether or not dexamethasone (DEXA) immunosuppression ameliorates renal damage. Untreated dTGRs developed hypertension, renal damage, and 50% mortality at 7 weeks. DEXA reduced albuminuria, renal fibrosis, vascular reactive oxygen stress, and prevented mortality, independent of blood pressure. In dTGR kidneys, p22phox immunostaining co-localized with macrophages and partially with T cells. dTGR dendritic cells expressed major histocompatibility complex II and CD86, indicating maturation. DEXA suppressed major histocompatibility complex II+, CD86+, dendritic, and T-cell infiltration. In additional experiments, we treated dTGRs with mycophenolate mofetil to inhibit T- and B-cell proliferation. Reno-protective actions of mycophenolate mofetil and its effect on dendritic and T cells were similar to those obtained with DEXA. We next investigated whether or not Ang II directly promotes dendritic cell maturation in vitro. Ang II did not alter CD80, CD83, and MHC II expression, but increased CCR7 expression and cell migration. To explore the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on dendritic cell maturation in vivo, we treated dTGRs with the soluble TNF-alpha receptor etanercept. This treatment had no effect on blood pressure, but decreased albuminuria, nuclear factor-kappaB activation, and infiltration of all immunocompetent cells. These data suggest that immunosuppression prevents dendritic cell maturation and T-cell infiltration in a nonimmune model of Ang II-induced renal damage. Ang II induces dendritic migration directly, whereas in vivo TNF-alpha is involved in dendritic cell infiltration and maturation. Thus, Ang II may initiate events leading to innate and acquired immune response. PMID:12414515

  16. Immunosuppressive Treatment Protects Against Angiotensin II-Induced Renal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Dominik N.; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Park, Joon-Keun; Dechend, Ralf; Mervaala, Eero; Hampich, Franziska; Fiebeler, Anette; Ju, Xinsheng; Finckenberg, Piet; Theuer, Jürgen; Viedt, Christiane; Kreuzer, Joerg; Heidecke, Harald; Haller, Hermann; Zenke, Martin; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2002-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II promotes renal infiltration by immunocompetent cells in double-transgenic rats (dTGRs) harboring both human renin and angiotensinogen genes. To elucidate disease mechanisms, we investigated whether or not dexamethasone (DEXA) immunosuppression ameliorates renal damage. Untreated dTGRs developed hypertension, renal damage, and 50% mortality at 7 weeks. DEXA reduced albuminuria, renal fibrosis, vascular reactive oxygen stress, and prevented mortality, independent of blood pressure. In dTGR kidneys, p22phox immunostaining co-localized with macrophages and partially with T cells. dTGR dendritic cells expressed major histocompatibility complex II and CD86, indicating maturation. DEXA suppressed major histocompatibility complex II+, CD86+, dendritic, and T-cell infiltration. In additional experiments, we treated dTGRs with mycophenolate mofetil to inhibit T- and B-cell proliferation. Reno-protective actions of mycophenolate mofetil and its effect on dendritic and T cells were similar to those obtained with DEXA. We next investigated whether or not Ang II directly promotes dendritic cell maturation in vitro. Ang II did not alter CD80, CD83, and MHC II expression, but increased CCR7 expression and cell migration. To explore the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α on dendritic cell maturation in vivo, we treated dTGRs with the soluble TNF-α receptor etanercept. This treatment had no effect on blood pressure, but decreased albuminuria, nuclear factor-κB activation, and infiltration of all immunocompetent cells. These data suggest that immunosuppression prevents dendritic cell maturation and T-cell infiltration in a nonimmune model of Ang II-induced renal damage. Ang II induces dendritic migration directly, whereas in vivo TNF-α is involved in dendritic cell infiltration and maturation. Thus, Ang II may initiate events leading to innate and acquired immune response. PMID:12414515

  17. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition does not affect the response to exogenous angiotensin II in the human forearm.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, D; Stewart, D; Webster, J; Benjamin, N

    1994-01-01

    Suppression of endogenous levels of angiotensin II by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition, may result in up-regulation of vascular AT1 receptors. We have evaluated the effects of orally administered enalapril on angiotensin II induced vasoconstriction in the human forearm. Subjects received in random order, enalapril (20 mg) or matched placebo daily for 2 weeks. Forearm blood flow response to increasing doses of angiotensin II was measured using venous occlusion plethysmography at the beginning of the study and at the end of each 2 week treatment period. Treatment with enalapril significantly reduced plasma angiotensin II levels and supine blood pressure compared with placebo. The percentage reductions in forearm blood flow in the infused arm, in response to the maximum dose of angiotensin II (50,000 fmol min-1) were 48.1 +/- 3.6% at baseline, 57.5 +/- 3.6% on placebo and 54.5 +/- 4.2% on enalapril. The differences were not significantly different. This demonstrates that suppression of plasma angiotensin II for a 14 day period does not enhance the response to exogenous intra-arterial angiotensin II in the human forearm of healthy salt replete subjects. PMID:7893582

  18. Discovery of a Series of Imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines with Dual Activity at Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Filzen, Gary F.; Flynn, Declan; Bigge, Christopher F.; Chen, Jing; Davis, Jo Ann; Dudley, Danette A.; Edmunds, Jeremy J.; Esmaeil, Nadia; Geyer, Andrew; Heemstra, Ronald J.; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F.; Ostroski, Robert; Ellis, Teresa; Schaum, Robert P.; Stoner, Chad

    2013-03-07

    Mining of an in-house collection of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to identify compounds with activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) revealed a new series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines 2 possessing activity at these two receptors. Early availability of the crystal structure of the lead compound 2a bound to the ligand binding domain of human PPAR{gamma} confirmed the mode of interaction of this scaffold to the nuclear receptor and assisted in the optimization of PPAR{gamma} activity. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-(5-(2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-2-ethyl-5-isobutyl-7-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (2l) was identified as a potent angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (IC{sub 50} = 1.6 nM) with partial PPAR{gamma} agonism (EC{sub 50} = 212 nM, 31% max) and oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of 2l was demonstrated in animal models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (ZDF rat). In the SHR, 2l was highly efficacious in lowering blood pressure, while robust lowering of glucose and triglycerides was observed in the male ZDF rat.

  19. Discovery of a series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines with dual activity at angiotensin II type 1 receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ.

    PubMed

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Filzen, Gary F; Flynn, Declan; Bigge, Christopher F; Chen, Jing; Davis, Jo Ann; Dudley, Danette A; Edmunds, Jeremy J; Esmaeil, Nadia; Geyer, Andrew; Heemstra, Ronald J; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F; Ostroski, Robert; Ellis, Teresa; Schaum, Robert P; Stoner, Chad

    2011-06-23

    Mining of an in-house collection of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to identify compounds with activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) revealed a new series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines 2 possessing activity at these two receptors. Early availability of the crystal structure of the lead compound 2a bound to the ligand binding domain of human PPARγ confirmed the mode of interaction of this scaffold to the nuclear receptor and assisted in the optimization of PPARγ activity. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-(5-(2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-2-ethyl-5-isobutyl-7-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (2l) was identified as a potent angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (IC(50) = 1.6 nM) with partial PPARγ agonism (EC(50) = 212 nM, 31% max) and oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of 2l was demonstrated in animal models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (ZDF rat). In the SHR, 2l was highly efficacious in lowering blood pressure, while robust lowering of glucose and triglycerides was observed in the male ZDF rat. PMID:21557540

  20. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan suppresses proliferation and fibrosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Mitsuyoshi; Fushida, Sachio; Harada, Shinichi; Tsukada, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Jun; Oyama, Katsunobu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Ninomiya, Itasu; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2014-12-01

    Gastric cancer with peritoneal dissemination has poor clinical prognosis because of the presence of rich stromal fibrosis and acquired drug resistance. Recently, Angiotensin II type I receptor blockers such as candesartan have attracted attention for their potential anti-fibrotic activity. We examined whether candesartan could attenuate tumor proliferation and fibrosis through the interaction between gastric cancer cell line (MKN45) cells and human peritoneal mesothelial cells. Candesartan significantly reduced TGF-β1 expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-like change, while tumor proliferation and stromal fibrosis were impaired. Targeting the Angiotensin II signaling pathway may therefore be an efficient strategy for treatment of tumor proliferation and fibrosis. PMID:25224569

  1. Conundrum of angiotensin II and TGF-β interactions in aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Lu, Hong; Rateri, Debra L; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2013-04-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) has been invoked as a principal mediator for the development and progression of both thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms. While there is consistency in experimental and clinical studies that overactivation of the renin angiotensin system promotes aortic aneurysm development, there are many unknowns regarding the mechanistic basis underlying AngII-induced aneurysms. Interactions of AngII with TGF-β in both thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms have been the focus of recent studies. While these studies have demonstrated profound effects of manipulating TGF-β activity on AngII-induced aortic aneurysms, they have also led to more questions regarding the interactions between AngII and this multifunctional cytokine. This review compiled the recent literature to provide insights into understanding the potentially complex interactions between AngII and TGF-β in the development of aortic aneurysms. PMID:23395156

  2. Angiotensin II-induced angiotensin II type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2009-02-01

    Upon activation, the angiotensin (Ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1Rs) rapidly undergoes endocytosis. After a series of intracellular processes, the internalized AT1Rs recycle back to the plasma membrane or are trafficked to proteasomes or lysosomes for degradation. We recently reported that AT1Rs degrades in proteasomes upon stimulation of the D5 dopamine receptor (D5R) in human renal proximal tubule and HEK-293 cells. This is in contrast to the degradation of AT1R in lysosomes upon binding Ang II. However, the dynamic regulation of the AT1Rs in lysosomes is not well understood. Here we investigated the AT1Rs lysosomal degradation using FRET-FLIM in HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing the human AT1R tagged with EGFP as the donor fluorophore. Compared to its basal state, the lifetime of AT1Rs decreased after a 5-minute treatment with Ang II treatment and colocalized with Rab5 but not Rab7 and LAMP1. With longer Ang II treatment (30 min), the AT1Rs lifetime decreased and co-localized with Rab5, as well as Rab7 and LAMP1. The FLIM data are corroborated with morphological and biochemical co-immunoprecipitation studies. These data demonstrate that Ang II induces the internalization of AT1Rs into early sorting endosomes prior to trafficking to late endosomes and subsequent degradation in lysosomes.

  3. 4-Diazinyl- and 4-pyridinylimidazoles: potent angiotensin II antagonists. A study of their activity and computational characterization.

    PubMed

    Harmat, N J; Giorgi, R; Bonaccorsi, F; Cerbai, G; Colombani, S M; Renzetti, A R; Cirillo, R; Subissi, A; Alagona, G; Ghio, C

    1995-07-21

    A series of N-[biphenylyl(tetrazolyl)methyl]-2-butylimidazoles containing variously substituted diazine or pyridine moieties either as their free bases or N-oxide derivatives attached to the 4-position of the imidazole ring was synthesized and tested for interaction with the AT1 receptors of rat adrenal cortex membranes (receptor binding assay). Some compounds were then chosen for further evaluation in vivo in the A II-induced pressor response in conscious normotensive rats. The most potent in the AT1 binding assay were found to be compounds in which the diazine or pyridine ring nitrogen is adjacent to the point of attachment between the two heteroaromatic rings such as 2-butyl-4-(3,6-dimethylpyrazin-2-yl)-1-[[2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-y l)-biphenyl-4- yl]methyl]-1H-imidazole (3b) or 2-butyl-4-[5-(methoxycarbonyl)pyrid-2-yl]-1-[[2'-(1H-tetrazol++ +-5- yl)biphenyl-4-yl]methyl]-1H-imidazole (6c). The binding affinities and oral activities of the pyridine N-oxide imidazoles in which a stabilizing group ortho to the pyridine ring nitrogen is present were markedly improved as in 2-butyl-4-[(3-methoxycarbonyl)-6-methyl-N-oxopyridin-2-yl]-1-[[2'- (1H- tetrazol-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yl]methyl]-1H-imidazole 31b. Molecular modeling studies were carried out to determine the molecular electrostatic potential values of related model systems and to correlate their receptor interaction energies with the observed activities of our compounds. PMID:7636853

  4. Assessment of angiotensin II receptor blockade in humans using a standardized angiotensin II receptor-binding assay.

    PubMed

    Maillard, M P; Mazzolai, L; Daven, V; Centeno, C; Nussberger, J; Brunner, H R; Burnier, M

    1999-12-01

    An in vitro angiotensin II (AngII) receptor-binding assay was developed to monitor the degree of receptor blockade in standardized conditions. This in vitro method was validated by comparing its results with those obtained in vivo with the injection of exogenous AngII and the measurement of the AngII-induced changes in systolic blood pressure. For this purpose, 12 normotensive subjects were enrolled in a double-blind, four-way cross-over study comparing the AngII receptor blockade induced by a single oral dose of losartan (50 mg), valsartan (80 mg), irbesartan (150 mg), and placebo. A significant linear relationship between the two methods was found (r = 0.723, n = 191, P<.001). However, there exists a wide scatter of the in vivo data in the absence of active AngII receptor blockade. Thus, the relationship between the two methods is markedly improved (r = 0.87, n = 47, P<.001) when only measurements done 4 h after administration of the drugs are considered (maximal antagonist activity observed in vivo) suggesting that the two methods are equally effective in assessing the degree of AT-1 receptor blockade, but with a greatly reduced variability in the in vitro assay. In addition, the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis performed with the three antagonists suggest that the AT-1 receptor-binding assay works as a bioassay that integrates the antagonistic property of all active drug components of the plasma. This standardized in vitro-binding assay represents a simple, reproducible, and precise tool to characterize the pharmacodynamic profile of AngII receptor antagonists in humans. PMID:10619583

  5. Gynura procumbens causes vasodilation by inhibiting angiotensin II and enhancing bradykinin actions.

    PubMed

    Poh, Ting-Fung; Ng, Hien-Kun; Hoe, See-Ziau; Lam, Sau-Kuen

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies showed that Gynura procumbens reduced blood pressure by blocking calcium channels and inhibiting the angiotensin-converting enzyme activity. The present experiments were to further explore the effects and mechanisms of a purer aqueous fraction (FA-I) of G. procumbens on angiotensin I (Ang I)-induced and angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced contraction of aortic rings and also on the bradykinin (BK) effect on cardiovascular system. Rat aortic rings suspended in organ chambers were used to investigate the vascular reactivity of FA-I. Effect of FA-I on BK was studied by in vitro and in vivo methods. Results show that FA-I significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the contraction evoked by Ang I and Ang II. In the presence of indomethacin (10 µM) or N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (0.1 µM), the inhibitory effect of FA-I on Ang II-induced contraction of aortic rings was reduced. Besides, FA-I potentiated the vasorelaxant effect and enhanced the blood pressure-lowering effect of BK. In conclusion, FA-I reduced the contraction evoked by Ang II probably via the endothelium-dependent pathways, which involve activation of the release of nitric oxide and prostaglandins. The inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme activity by FA-I may contribute to the potentiation of the effects of BK on cardiovascular system. PMID:23328388

  6. ACE2 Decreases Formation and Severity of Angiotensin II-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Sean E.; Zhang, Xuan; Howatt, Deborah A.; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Gurley, Susan B.; Ennis, Terri; Curci, John A.; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) cleaves angiotensin II (AngII) to form angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)), which generally opposes effects of AngII. AngII infusion into hypercholesterolemic male mice induces formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). This study tests the hypothesis that deficiency of ACE2 promotes AngII-induced AAAs, while ACE2 activation suppresses aneurysm formation. Approach and Results ACE2 protein was detectable by immunostaining in mice and human AAAs. Whole body deficiency of ACE2 significantly increased aortic lumen diameters and external diameters of suprarenal aortas from AngII-infused mice. Conversely, ACE2 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells had no effect on AngII-induced AAAs. In contrast to AngII-induced AAAs, ACE2 deficiency had no significant effect on external aortic diameters of elastase-induced AAAs. Since ACE2 deficiency promoted AAA formation in AngII-infused mice, we determined if ACE2 activation suppressed AAAs. ACE2 activation by administration of diminazine aceturate (DIZE, 30 mg/kg/day) to Ldlr−/− mice increased kidney ACE2 mRNA abundance and activity and elevated plasma Ang-(1-7) concentrations. Unexpectedly, administration of DIZE significantly reduced total sera cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol concentrations. Notably, DIZE significantly decreased aortic lumen diameters and aortic external diameters of AngII-infused mice resulting in a marked reduction in AAA incidence (from 73 to 29%). None of these effects of DIZE were observed in the Ace2−/y mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that ACE2 exerts a modulatory role in AngII-induced AAA formation, and that therapeutic stimulation of ACE2 could be a benefit to reduce AAA expansion and rupture in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system. PMID:25301841

  7. Angiotensin II (AT(1)) receptor blockade reduces vascular tissue factor in angiotensin II-induced cardiac vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Müller, D N; Mervaala, E M; Dechend, R; Fiebeler, A; Park, J K; Schmidt, F; Theuer, J; Breu, V; Mackman, N; Luther, T; Schneider, W; Gulba, D; Ganten, D; Haller, H; Luft, F C

    2000-07-01

    Tissue factor (TF), a main initiator of clotting, is up-regulated in vasculopathy. We tested the hypothesis that chronic in vivo angiotensin (ANG) II receptor AT(1) receptor blockade inhibits TF expression in a model of ANG II-induced cardiac vasculopathy. Furthermore, we explored the mechanisms by examining transcription factor activation and analyzing the TF promoter. Untreated transgenic rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGR) feature hypertension and severe left ventricular hypertrophy with focal areas of necrosis, and die at age 7 weeks. Plasma and cardiac ANG II was three- to fivefold increased compared to Sprague-Dawley rats. Chronic treatment with valsartan normalized blood pressure and coronary resistance completely, and ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy (P < 0.001). Valsartan prevented monocyte/macrophage infiltration, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, and c-fos expression in dTGR hearts. NF-kappaB subunit p65 and TF expression was increased in the endothelium and media of cardiac vessels and markedly reduced by valsartan treatment. To analyze the mechanism of TF transcription, we then transfected human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing the AT(1) receptor with plasmids containing the human TF promoter and the luciferase reporter gene. ANG II induced the full-length TF promoter in both transfected cell lines. TF transcription was abolished by AT(1) receptor blockade. Deletion of both AP-1 and NF-kappaB sites reduced ANG II-induced TF gene transcription completely, whereas the deletion of AP-1 sites reduced transcription. Thus, the present study clearly shows an aberrant TF expression in the endothelium and media in rats with ANG II-induced vasculopathy. The beneficial effects of AT(1) receptor blockade in this model are mediated via the inhibition of NF-kappaB and AP-1 activation, thereby preventing TF expression, cardiac vasculopathy, and

  8. Angiotensin II (AT1) Receptor Blockade Reduces Vascular Tissue Factor in Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiac Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Dominik N.; Mervaala, Eero M. A.; Dechend, Ralf; Fiebeler, Anette; Park, Joon-Keun; Schmidt, Folke; Theuer, Jürgen; Breu, Volker; Mackman, Nigel; Luther, Thomas; Schneider, Wolfgang; Gulba, Dietrich; Ganten, Detlev; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2000-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF), a main initiator of clotting, is up-regulated in vasculopathy. We tested the hypothesis that chronic in vivo angiotensin (ANG) II receptor AT1 receptor blockade inhibits TF expression in a model of ANG II-induced cardiac vasculopathy. Furthermore, we explored the mechanisms by examining transcription factor activation and analyzing the TF promoter. Untreated transgenic rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGR) feature hypertension and severe left ventricular hypertrophy with focal areas of necrosis, and die at age 7 weeks. Plasma and cardiac ANG II was three- to fivefold increased compared to Sprague-Dawley rats. Chronic treatment with valsartan normalized blood pressure and coronary resistance completely, and ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy (P < 0.001). Valsartan prevented monocyte/macrophage infiltration, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, and c-fos expression in dTGR hearts. NF-κB subunit p65 and TF expression was increased in the endothelium and media of cardiac vessels and markedly reduced by valsartan treatment. To analyze the mechanism of TF transcription, we then transfected human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing the AT1 receptor with plasmids containing the human TF promoter and the luciferase reporter gene. ANG II induced the full-length TF promoter in both transfected cell lines. TF transcription was abolished by AT1 receptor blockade. Deletion of both AP-1 and NF-κB sites reduced ANG II-induced TF gene transcription completely, whereas the deletion of AP-1 sites reduced transcription. Thus, the present study clearly shows an aberrant TF expression in the endothelium and media in rats with ANG II-induced vasculopathy. The beneficial effects of AT1 receptor blockade in this model are mediated via the inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 activation, thereby preventing TF expression, cardiac vasculopathy, and microinfarctions. PMID

  9. Angiotensin AT1 receptor-mediated excitation of rat carotid body chemoreceptor afferent activity.

    PubMed

    Allen, A M

    1998-08-01

    1. A high density of angiotensin II receptors was observed in the rat carotid body by in vitro autoradiography employing 125I-[Sar1, Ile8]-angiotensin II as radioligand. Displacement studies demonstrated that the receptors were of the AT1 subtype. 2. The binding pattern indicated that the AT1 receptors occurred over clumps of glomus cells, the principal chemoreceptor cell of the carotid body. Selective lesions of the sympathetic or afferent innervation of the carotid body had little effect on the density of receptor binding, demonstrating that the majority of AT1 receptors were intrinsic to the glomus cells. 3. To determine the direct effect of angiotensin II on chemoreceptor function, without the confounding effects of the vasoconstrictor action of angiotensin II, carotid sinus nerve activity was recorded from the isolated carotid body in vitro. The carotid body was superfused with Tyrode solution saturated with carbogen (95 % O2, 5 % CO2), maintained at 36 C, and multi-unit nerve activity recorded with a suction electrode. 4. Angiotensin II elicited a dose-dependent excitation of carotid sinus nerve activity (maximum increase of 36 +/- 11 % with 10 nM angiotensin II) with a threshold concentration of 1 nM. The response was blocked by the addition of an AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan (1 microM), but not by the addition of an AT2 receptor antagonist, PD123319 (1 microM). 5. In approximately 50 % of experiments the excitation was preceded by an inhibition of activity (maximum decrease of 24 +/- 8 % with 10 nM angiotensin II). This inhibitory response was markedly attenuated by losartan but not affected by PD123319. 6. These observations demonstrate that angiotensin II, acting through AT1 receptors located on glomus cells in the carotid body, can directly alter carotid chemoreceptor afferent activity. This provides a means whereby humoral information about fluid and electrolyte homeostasis might influence control of cardiorespiratory function. PMID:9660892

  10. Angiotensin AT1 receptor-mediated excitation of rat carotid body chemoreceptor afferent activity

    PubMed Central

    Allen, A M

    1998-01-01

    A high density of angiotensin II receptors was observed in the rat carotid body by in vitro autoradiography employing 125I-[Sar1,Ile8]-angiotensin II as radioligand. Displacement studies demonstrated that the receptors were of the AT1 subtype.The binding pattern indicated that the AT1 receptors occurred over clumps of glomus cells, the principal chemoreceptor cell of the carotid body. Selective lesions of the sympathetic or afferent innervation of the carotid body had little effect on the density of receptor binding, demonstrating that the majority of AT1 receptors were intrinsic to the glomus cells.To determine the direct effect of angiotensin II on chemoreceptor function, without the confounding effects of the vasoconstrictor action of angiotensin II, carotid sinus nerve activity was recorded from the isolated carotid body in vitro. The carotid body was superfused with Tyrode solution saturated with carbogen (95% O2, 5% CO2), maintained at 36 °C, and multi-unit nerve activity recorded with a suction electrode.Angiotensin II elicited a dose-dependent excitation of carotid sinus nerve activity (maximum increase of 36 ± 11% with 10 nm angiotensin II) with a threshold concentration of 1 nm. The response was blocked by the addition of an AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan (1 μm), but not by the addition of an AT2 receptor antagonist, PD123319 (1 μm).In approximately 50% of experiments the excitation was preceded by an inhibition of activity (maximum decrease of 24 ± 8% with 10 nm angiotensin II). This inhibitory response was markedly attenuated by losartan but not affected by PD123319.These observations demonstrate that angiotensin II, acting through AT1 receptors located on glomus cells in the carotid body, can directly alter carotid chemoreceptor afferent activity. This provides a means whereby humoral information about fluid and electrolyte homeostasis might influence control of cardiorespiratory function. PMID:9660892

  11. Expression of Angiotensin II Receptor-1 in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yuki; Matsuo, Kosuke; Murata, Minako; Yudoh, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Inaba, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Kato, Tomohiro; Masuko, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Besides its involvement in the cardiovascular system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAS) system has also been suggested to play an important role in inflammation. To explore the role of this system in cartilage damage in arthritis, we investigated the expression of angiotensin II receptors in chondrocytes. Methods. Articular cartilage was obtained from patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic fractures who were undergoing arthroplasty. Chondrocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro with or without interleukin (IL-1). The expression of angiotensin II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R) mRNA by the chondrocytes was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AT1R expression in cartilage tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The effect of IL-1 on AT1R/AT2R expression in the chondrocytes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry. Results. Chondrocytes from all patient types expressed AT1R/AT2R mRNA, though considerable variation was found between samples. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed AT1R expression at the protein level. Stimulation with IL-1 enhanced the expression of AT1R/AT2R mRNA in OA and RA chondrocytes. Conclusions. Human articular chondrocytes, at least partially, express angiotensin II receptors, and IL-1 stimulation induced AT1R/AT2R mRNA expression significantly. PMID:23346400

  12. Angiotensin II Induces an Increase in Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 Expression in Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells of Ascending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms Through JNK, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmao; Chang, Qian; Sun, Xiaogang; Qian, Xiangyang; Liu, Penghong; Pei, Huawei; Guo, Xiaobo; Liu, Wenzhi

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) upregulation in aneurysmal smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) derived from ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAAs). We compared MMP-2 protein levels in ascending aortic specimens using Western blot and plasma concentrations by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay between ATAA (n = 40) and coronary heart disease patients (n = 40). Additionally, the protein level of angiotensinogen (AGT) in the ascending aorta and the plasma concentration of Ang II were detected by Western blot and radioimmunoassay, respectively, in ATAA and coronary heart disease patients. In ATAA patients, Ang II and MMP-2 plasma levels were significantly increased (P < 0.05). Additionally, AGT and MMP-2 protein levels in the aorta of ATAA patients were higher (P < 0.01). Enhanced AGT suggested that the amount of Ang II in aneurysmal aorta specimens may be also increased, which was confirmed by immunofluorescent staining for Ang II. Moreover, we investigated the effect of Ang II on MMP-2 upregulation by ASMCs and determined the Ang II receptors and intracellular signaling pathways that are involved. Our results showed that treatment with Ang II significantly increased the expression of MMP-2 through the Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and activated the 3 major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), JNK, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK. In conclusion, these results indicate that Ang II can induce MMP-2 expression elevation through AT1R and MAPK pathways in ASMCs and suggest that there is therapeutic potential for angiotensin receptor blocker drugs and MAPK inhibitors in the prevention and treatment of ATAAs. PMID:25955575

  13. Angiotensin II regulates ACE and ACE2 in neurons through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Liang; Haack, Karla K. V.

    2013-01-01

    Brain ANG II plays an important role in modulating sympathetic function and homeostasis. The generation and degradation of ANG II are carried out, to a large extent, through the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2, respectively. In disease states, such as hypertension and chronic heart failure, central expression of ACE is upregulated and ACE2 is decreased in central sympathoregulatory neurons. In this study, we determined the expression of ACE and ACE2 in response to ANG II in a neuronal cell culture and the subsequent signaling mechanism(s) involved. A mouse catecholaminergic neuronal cell line (CATH.a) was treated with ANG II (30, 100, and 300 nM) for 24 h, and protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. ANG II induced a significant dose-dependent increase in ACE and decrease in ACE2 mRNA and protein expression in CATH.a neurons. This effect was abolished by pretreatment of the cells with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB-203580 (10 μM) 30 min before administration of ANG II or the ERK1/2 inhibitor U-0126 (10 μM). These data suggest that ANG II increases ACE and attenuates ACE2 expression in neurons via the ANG II type 1 receptor, p38 MAPK, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. PMID:23535237

  14. Angiotensin II inhibits insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Senthil, D; Faulkner, J L; Choudhury, G G; Abboud, H E; Kasinath, B S

    2001-01-01

    Interaction between angiotensin II, which binds a G-protein-coupled receptor, and insulin, a ligand for receptor tyrosine kinase, was examined in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. Augmented protein translation by insulin involves activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) which follows the release of the factor from a heterodimeric complex by phosphorylation of its binding protein, 4E-BP1. Angiotensin II (1 nM) or insulin (1 nM) individually stimulated 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. However, pre-incubation with angiotensin II abrogated insulin-induced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1, resulting in persistent binding to eIF4E. Although angiotensin II and insulin individually activated phosphoinositide 3-kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/-2-type mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, pre-incubation with angiotensin II abolished insulin-induced stimulation of these kinases, suggesting more proximal events in insulin signalling may be intercepted. Pretreatment with angiotensin II markedly inhibited insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin-receptor beta-chain and insulin-receptor substrate 1. Losartan prevented angiotensin II inhibition of insulin-induced ERK-1/-2-type MAP kinase activation and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, suggesting mediation of the effect of angiotensin II by its type 1 receptor. Insulin-stimulated de novo protein synthesis was also abolished by pre-incubation with angiotensin II. These data show that angiotensin II inhibits 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and stimulation of protein synthesis induced by insulin by interfering with proximal events in insulin signalling. Our data provide a mechanistic basis for insulin insensitivity induced by angiotensin II. PMID:11695995

  15. Angiotensin II modulates salty and sweet taste sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Noriatsu; Iwata, Shusuke; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Horio, Nao; Sanematsu, Keisuke; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2013-04-10

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying gustatory detection of dietary sodium is important for the prevention and treatment of hypertension. Here, we show that Angiotensin II (AngII), a major mediator of body fluid and sodium homeostasis, modulates salty and sweet taste sensitivities, and that this modulation critically influences ingestive behaviors in mice. Gustatory nerve recording demonstrated that AngII suppressed amiloride-sensitive taste responses to NaCl. Surprisingly, AngII also enhanced nerve responses to sweeteners, but had no effect on responses to KCl, sour, bitter, or umami tastants. These effects of AngII on nerve responses were blocked by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) antagonist CV11974. In behavioral tests, CV11974 treatment reduced the stimulated high licking rate to NaCl and sweeteners in water-restricted mice with elevated plasma AngII levels. In taste cells AT1 proteins were coexpressed with αENaC (epithelial sodium channel α-subunit, an amiloride-sensitive salt taste receptor) or T1r3 (a sweet taste receptor component). These results suggest that the taste organ is a peripheral target of AngII. The specific reduction of amiloride-sensitive salt taste sensitivity by AngII may contribute to increased sodium intake. Furthermore, AngII may contribute to increased energy intake by enhancing sweet responses. The linkage between salty and sweet preferences via AngII signaling may optimize sodium and calorie intakes. PMID:23575826

  16. The Novel Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Azilsartan Medoxomil Ameliorates Insulin Resistance Induced by Chronic Angiotensin II Treatment in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lastra, Guido; Santos, Fernando R.; Hooshmand, Payam; Hooshmand, Paria; Mugerfeld, Irina; Aroor, Annayya R.; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Sowers, James R.; Henriksen, Erik J.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin receptor (type 1) blockers (ARBs) can reduce both hypertension and insulin resistance induced by local and systemic activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The effectiveness of azilsartan medoxomil (AZIL-M), a novel imidazole-based ARB, to facilitate metabolic improvements in conditions of angiotensin II (Ang II)-associated insulin resistance is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of chronic AZIL-M treatment on glucose transport activity and key insulin signaling elements in red skeletal muscle of Ang II-treated rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for 8 weeks with or without Ang II (200 ng/kg/min) combined with either vehicle or AZIL-M (1 mg/kg/day). Ang II induced significant (p < 0.05) increases in blood pressure, which were completely prevented by AZIL-M. Furthermore, Ang II reduced insulin-mediated glucose transport activity in incubated soleus muscle, and AZIL-M co-treatment increased this parameter. Moreover, AZIL-M treatment of Ang II-infused animals increased the absolute phosphorylation of insulin signaling molecules, including Akt [both Ser473 (81%) and Thr308 (23%)] and AS160 Thr642 (42%), in red gastrocnemius muscle frozen in situ. Absolute AMPKα (Thr172) phosphorylation increased (98%) by AZIL-M treatment, and relative Thr389 phosphorylation of p70 S6K1, a negative regulator of insulin signaling, decreased (51%) with AZIL-M treatment. These results indicate that ARB AZIL-M improves the in vitro insulin action on glucose transport in red soleus muscle and the functionality of the Akt/AS160 axis in red gastrocnemius muscle in situ in Ang II-induced insulin-resistant rats, with the latter modification possibly associated with enhanced AMPKα and suppressed p70 S6K1 activation. PMID:23922555

  17. Prolonged Subcutaneous Administration of Oxytocin Accelerates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension and Renal Damage in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phie, James; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Newton, Patricia; Constantinoiu, Constantin; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Chilton, Lisa; Kinobe, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin and its receptor are synthesised in the heart and blood vessels but effects of chronic activation of this peripheral oxytocinergic system on cardiovascular function are not known. In acute studies, systemic administration of low dose oxytocin exerted a protective, preconditioning effect in experimental models of myocardial ischemia and infarction. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic administration of low dose oxytocin following angiotensin II-induced hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage. Angiotensin II (40 μg/Kg/h) only, oxytocin only (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h), or angiotensin II combined with oxytocin (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h) were infused subcutaneously in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 days. At day 7, oxytocin or angiotensin-II only did not change hemodynamic parameters, but animals that received a combination of oxytocin and angiotensin-II had significantly elevated systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure compared to controls (P < 0.01). Hemodynamic changes were accompanied by significant left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage at day 28 in animals treated with angiotensin II (P < 0.05) or both oxytocin and angiotensin II, compared to controls (P < 0.01). Prolonged oxytocin administration did not affect plasma concentrations of renin and atrial natriuretic peptide, but was associated with the activation of calcium-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, a canonical signalling mechanism in pressure overload-induced cardiovascular disease. These data demonstrate that oxytocin accelerated angiotensin-II induced hypertension and end-organ renal damage, suggesting caution should be exercised in the chronic use of oxytocin in individuals with hypertension. PMID:26393919

  18. CYP4A2-Induced Hypertension is 20-HETE and Angiotensin II-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Komal; Wu, Cheng-Chia; Cheng, Jennifer; Gotlinger, Katherine; Inoue, Kazuyoshi; Goli, Mohan; Falck, John R.; Abraham, Nader G.; Schwartzman, Michal L.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that increased vascular endothelial expression of CYP4A2 leads to 20-HETE-dependent hypertension. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key regulator of blood pressure. In this study, we examined possible interactions between 20-HETE and RAS. In normotensive (110±3 mmHg) Sprague Dawley rats transduced with a lentivirus expressing the CYP4A2 cDNA under the control of an endothelial-specific promoter (VECAD-4A2), systolic blood pressure increased rapidly, reaching 139±1, 145±3 and 150±2 mmHg at 3, 5 and 10 days after transduction; blood pressure remained elevated, thereafter, with maximum levels of 163±3 mmHg. Treatment with lisinopril, losartan or the 20-HETE antagonist 20-hydroxyeicosa-6(Z), 15(Z)-dienoic acid (20-HEDE) decreased blood pressure to control values, but blood pressure returned to its high levels after cessation of treatment. Endothelial-specific overexpression of CYP4A2 resulted in increased expression of vascular angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and increased levels of plasma and tissue Angiotensin II; all were attenuated by treatment with HET0016, an inhibitor of 20-HETE synthesis, or with 20-HEDE. In cultured endothelial cells, 20-HETE specifically and potently induced ACE expression without altering the expression of ACE2, angiotensinogen or angiotensin II receptors. This is the first study to demonstrate that 20-HETE, a key constrictor eicosanoid in the microcirculation, induces ACE and AT1R expression and increases Angiotensin II levels, suggesting that the mechanisms by which 20-HETE promotes hypertension include activation of RAS that is likely initiated at the level of ACE induction. PMID:20837888

  19. Local actions of angiotensin II: quantitative in vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, S.Y.; Allen, A.M.; Adam, W.R.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the local actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) we have determined the distribution of a component of the effector system for the peptide, the ANG II receptor, and that of an enzyme-catalysing ANG II formation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), by in vitro autoradiography in several target tissues. The superagonist ANG II analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1)ANG II, or the antagonist analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1,Ile8)ANG II, were used as specific radioligands for ANG II receptors. A derivative of the specific ACE inhibitor, lysinopril, called /sup 125/I-351A, was used to label ACE in tissues. In the adrenal, a high density of ANG II receptors occurs in the glomerulosa zone of the cortex and in the medulla. ACE is also localized in these two zones, indicating that local production of ANG II may occur close to its sites of action in the zona glomerulosa and adrenal medulla. In the kidney, a high density of ANG II receptors is associated with glomeruli in the cortex and also with vasa recta bundles in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. ACE is found in very high concentration in deep proximal convoluted tubules of the cortex, while much lower concentrations of the enzyme occur in the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney. In the central nervous system three classes of relationships between ANG II receptors and ACE are observed: In the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, a high concentration of both components occurs. Since these structures have a deficient blood-brain barrier, local conversion of circulating angiotensin I (ANG I) to ANG II may contribute to the action of ANG II at these sites.

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Muchir, Antoine; Wu, Wei; Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi; Worman, Howard J.

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  1. Diabetic state, high plasma insulin and angiotensin II combine to augment endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction via ETA receptors and ERK

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, T; Nogami, T; Taguchi, K; Matsumoto, T; Kamata, K

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mechanisms associated with the enhanced contractile response to endothelin-1 in hyperinsulinaemic diabetes have been examined using the rat aorta. Functions for angiotensin II, endothelin-1 receptor expression and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) have been investigated. Experimental approach: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were infused with angiotensin II or, following insulin treatment, were treated with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist. Contractions of aortic strips with or without endothelium, in response to endothelin-1 and angiotensin II, were examined in vitro. Aortic ETA receptors and ERK/MEK expression were measured by western blotting. Key results: Insulin-treated diabetic rats exhibited increases in plasma insulin, angiotensin II and endothelin-1. The systolic blood pressure and endothelin-1-induced contractile responses in aortae in vitro were enhanced in insulin-treated diabetic rats and blunted by chronic losartan administration. LY294002 (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor) and/or PD98059 (MEK inhibitor) diminished the enhanced contractile response to endothelin-1 in aortae from insulin-treated diabetic rats. ETA and ETB receptors, ERK-1/2 and MEK-1/2 protein expression and endothelin-1-stimulated ERK phosphorylation were all increased in aortae from insulin-treated diabetic rats. Such increases were blunted by chronic losartan administration. Endothelin-1-induced contraction was significantly higher in aortae from angiotensin II-infused diabetic rats. angiotensin II-infusion increased ERK phosphorylation, but the expression of endothelin receptors and ERK/MEK proteins remained unchanged. Conclusions and implications: These results suggest that the combination of high plasma angiotensin II and insulin with a diabetic state induced enhancement of endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction, ETA receptor expression and ERK expression/activity in the aorta. Losartan improved both the diabetes

  2. miR-155 functions downstream of angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 and calcineurin to regulate cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Zhou, Yong; Cao, Zheng; Tong, Xin Zhu; Xie, Hua Qiang; Luo, Tao; Hua, Xian Ping; Wang, Han Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by maladaptive tissue remodeling that may lead to heart failure or sudden death. MicroRNAs (miRs) are negative regulators of angiotensin II and the angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1), which are two components involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the present study, the interaction between angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1) signaling and miR-155 was investigated. Rat H9C2 (2–1) cardiomyocytes were transfected with miR-155 analogues or inhibitors, then stimulated with angiotensin II to induce cardiac hypertrophy. miR-155 expression was revealed to be altered following transfection with chemically-modified miR-155 analogues and inhibitors in rat cardiomyocytes. In cell cardiac hypertrophy models, the cell surface area, AGTR1, atrial natriuretic peptide and myosin heavy chain-β mRNA expression levels were revealed to be lower in cells stimulated with miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin alone (P<0.05), as determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. Furthermore, calcineurin mRNA and protein, intracellular free calcium and nuclear factor of activated T-cells-4 proteins were downregulated in miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II, as compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin II alone (P<0.05). In conclusion, the current study indicates that miR-155 may improve cardiac hypertrophy by downregulating AGTR1 and suppressing the calcium signaling pathways activated by AGTR1. PMID:27588076

  3. Endothelial metabolism of angiotensin II to angiotensin III, not angiotensin (1-7), augments the vasorelaxation response in adrenal cortical arteries.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Phillip G; Campbell, William B

    2013-12-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is linked to the development and progression of several different cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin (Ang) II increases aldosterone secretion and adrenal blood flow. Ang II peptide fragments are produced by various peptidases, and these Angs have diverse and vital physiologic roles. Due to the uncharacteristic vasorelaxation of adrenal arteries by Ang II, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II metabolism contributes to its relaxant activity in adrenal arteries. Metabolism of Angs by bovine adrenal cortical arteries and isolated bovine adrenal vascular cells was measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The primary Ang metabolites of adrenal arteries are Ang III and Ang (1-7), with Ang IV produced to a lesser extent. Bovine microvascular endothelial cells produced a similar metabolic profile to adrenal arteries, whereas bovine adrenal artery smooth muscle cells exhibited less metabolism. In preconstricted adrenal arteries, Ang II caused relaxation in picomolar concentrations and constrictions at 10nM. Ang-converting enzyme 2 inhibition augmented this relaxation response, whereas aminopeptidase inhibition did not. Ang III was equipotent to Ang II in relaxing adrenal arteries. Ang IV did not cause relaxation. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition enhanced Ang II-induced constriction of adrenal arteries. Aminopeptidase inhibition increased the concentration range for Ang II-induced constriction of adrenal arteries. Ang III and Ang IV did not change the basal tone but caused constriction of adrenal arteries with nitric oxide synthase inhibition. These data indicate that Ang II metabolism modulates the vascular effects of Ang II in the adrenal vasculature. PMID:24092640

  4. RGS4 inhibits angiotensin II signaling and macrophage localization during renal reperfusion injury independent of vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Paul; Jin, Xiaohua; Proctor, Brandon M.; Farley, Michelle; Roy, Nilay; Chin, Matthew S.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Vollmann, Elisabeth; Perro, Mario; Hoffman, Ryan J.; Chung, Joseph; Chauhan, Nikita; Mistri, Murti; Muslin, Anthony J.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Siedlecki, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is a major contributor to the severity of acute kidney injury. In the context of vasospasm-independent reperfusion injury we studied the potential anti-inflammatory role of the Gα-related RGS protein, RGS4. Transgenic RGS4 mice were resistant to 25 minute injury, although post-ischemic renal arteriolar diameter was equal to the wild type early after injury. A 10 minute unilateral injury was performed to study reperfusion without vasospasm. Eighteen hours after injury blood flow was decreased in the inner cortex of wild type mice with preservation of tubular architecture. Angiotensin II levels in the kidneys of wild type and transgenic mice were elevated in a sub-vasoconstrictive range 12 and 18 hours after injury. Angiotensin II stimulated pre-glomerular vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to secrete the macrophage chemoattractant, RANTES; a process decreased by angiotensin II R2 (AT2) inhibition. However, RANTES increased when RGS4 expression was suppressed implicating Gα protein activation in an AT2-RGS4-dependent pathway. RGS4 function, specific to VSMC, was tested in a conditional VSMC-specific RGS4 knockout showing high macrophage density by T2 MRI compared to transgenic and non-transgenic mice after the 10 minute injury. Arteriolar diameter of this knockout was unchanged at successive time points after injury. Thus, RGS4 expression, specific to renal VSMC, inhibits angiotensin II-mediated cytokine signaling and macrophage recruitment during reperfusion, distinct from vasomotor regulation. PMID:25469849

  5. Angiotensin and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism attenuates cardiac oxidative stress in angiotensin II-infused rats.

    PubMed

    Minas, Jacqueline N; Thorwald, Max A; Conte, Debra; Vázquez-Medina, Jose-Pablo; Nishiyama, Akira; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and aldosterone contribute to hypertension, oxidative stress and cardiovascular damage, but the contributions of aldosterone during Ang II-dependent hypertension are not well defined because of the difficulty to assess each independently. To test the hypothesis that during Ang II infusion, oxidative and nitrosative damage is mediated through both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1), five groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: (i) control; (ii) Ang II infused (80 ng/min × 28 days); (iii) Ang II + AT1 receptor blocker (ARB; 10 mg losartan/kg per day × 21 days); (iv) Ang II + mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist (Epl; 100 mg eplerenone/day × 21 days); and (v) Ang II + ARB + Epl (Combo; × 21 days). Both ARB and combination treatments completely alleviated the Ang II-induced hypertension, whereas eplerenone treatment only prolonged the onset of the hypertension. Eplerenone treatment exacerbated the Ang II-mediated increase in plasma and heart aldosterone 2.3- and 1.8-fold, respectively, while ARB treatment reduced both. Chronic MR blockade was sufficient to ameliorate the AT1-mediated increase in oxidative damage. All treatments normalized protein oxidation (nitrotyrosine) levels; however, only ARB and Combo treatments completely reduced lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal) to control levels. Collectively, these data suggest that receptor signalling, and not the elevated arterial blood pressure, is the principal culprit in the oxidative stress-associated cardiovascular damage in Ang II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26234762

  6. Contractile effects of angiotensin peptides in rat aorta are differentially dependent on tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Petrescu, G; Costuleanu, M; Slatineanu, S M; Costuleanu, N; Foia, L; Costuleanu, A

    2001-09-01

    It has been suggested that tyrosine kinase activity participates in the regulation of signal transduction associated with angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced pharmaco-mechanical coupling in rat aortic smooth muscle. We further tested the effects of genistein, a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, and its inactive analogue, daidzein, on angiotensin I (Ang I), angiotensin III (Ang III) and angiotensin IV (Ang IV) contractions, as compared with those on Ang II. Genistein partially inhibited Ang II- and Ang I-induced contractions. The genistein-induced inhibition was more evident on Ang III and especially important on Ang IV contractile effects. Thus, Ang IV- and Ang III-induced contractions seem to be more dependent on tyrosine kinase activity than those evoked by Ang II or Ang I. Daidzein did not significantly affect the contractile effects of any of angiotensin peptides tested. These results clearly suggest that the inhibition of the action of angiotensin peptides actions by genistein is mediated by inhibition of endogenous tyrosine kinase activity. Furthermore, our data show that the type and/or intensity of tyrosine kinase activity is differentially associated with the contractile effects of different angiotensin peptides in rat aorta. Nifedipine, a blocker of membrane L-type Ca2+ channels, strongly inhibited Ang IV-induced contractions. At the same time, it significantly inhibited Ang III contractile effects as compared with Ang II and Ang I contractions. Meanwhile, we observed a close relationship between calcium influx and tyrosine kinase phosphorylation activity under the stimulatory effects of angiotensin peptides. Furthermore, genistein did not significantly influence the phasic contractions induced by angiotensin peptides in Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution. Thus, it appears that Ca2+ influx, rather than the release of Ca2+ from IP3-sensitive stores, may play a major role in the contractile effects of angiotensin peptides in rat aorta via tyrosine kinase activation

  7. Auto-inhibitory regulation of angiotensin II functionality in hamster aorta during the early phases of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscila Cristina; Pernomian, Larissa; Côco, Hariane; Gomes, Mayara Santos; Franco, João José; Marchi, Kátia Colombo; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; Uyemura, Sergio Akira; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato; de Oliveira, Ana Maria

    2016-06-15

    Emerging data point the crosstalk between dyslipidemia and renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Advanced dyslipidemia is described to induce RAS activation in the vasculature. However, the interplay between early dyslipidemia and the RAS remains unexplored. Knowing that hamsters and humans have a similar lipid profile, we investigated the effects of early and advanced dyslipidemia on angiotensin II-induced contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves for angiotensin II (1.0pmol/l to 1.0µmol/l) were obtained in the hamster thoracic aorta. We also investigated the modulatory action of NAD(P)H oxidase on angiotensin II-induced contraction using ML171 (Nox-1 inhibitor, 0.5µmol/l) and VAS2870 (Nox-4 inhibitor, 5µmol/l). Early dyslipidemia was detected in hamsters treated with a cholesterol-rich diet for 15 days. Early dyslipidemia decreased the contraction induced by angiotensin II and the concentration of Nox-4-derived hydrogen peroxide. Advanced dyslipidemia, observed in hamsters treated with cholesterol-rich diet for 30 days, restored the contractile response induced by angiotensin II by compensatory mechanism that involves Nox-4-mediated oxidative stress. The hyporresponsiveness to angiotensin II may be an auto-inhibitory regulation of the angiotensinergic function during early dyslipidemia in an attempt to reduce the effects of the upregulation of the vascular RAS during the advanced stages of atherogenesis. The recovery of vascular angiotensin II functionality during the advanced phases of dyslipidemia is the result of the upregulation of redox-pro-inflammatory pathway that might be most likely involved in atherogenesis progression rather than in the recovery of vascular function. Taken together, our findings show the early phase of dyslipidemia may be the most favorable moment for effective atheroprotective therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063446

  8. Angiotensin-II blockage, muscle strength, and exercise capacity in physically independent older adults

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Vinícius A.; Probst, Vanessa S.; Nogari, Bruna M.; Teixeira, Denilson C.; Felcar, Josiane M.; Santos, Denis C.; Gomes, Marcus Vinícius M.; Andraus, Rodrigo A. C.; Fernandes, Karen B. P.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the exercise capacity and muscle strength in elderly people using drugs for angiotensin-II blockage. [Subjects and Methods] Four hundred and seven older adults were recruited for this study. Data about comorbidities and medication use were recorded and the individuals were divided into three groups: control group- elderly people with normal exercise capacity (n=235); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group − individuals using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (n=140); and angiotensin-II receptor blocker group- patients using angiotensin-II receptor blockers (n= 32). Exercise capacity was evaluated by a 6-minute walking test and muscle strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer. [Results] Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 99 ± 12%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 101 ± 14%) showed higher predicted values in the 6-minute walking test than the control group patients (mean: 96 ± 10%). Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 105 ± 19%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 105.1 ± 18.73%) showed higher predicted values of muscle strength than control group patients (mean: 98.15 ± 18.77%). [Conclusion] Older adults using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers have better functional exercise capacity and muscle strength. PMID:27065543

  9. Angiotensin II in inflammation, immunity and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y; Wei, W

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease that is characterized by increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, independent of the traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Although classically known for its role in the regulation of circulatory homeostasis, angiotensin II (Ang II) is recognized to act as a powerful proinflammatory mediator. Some research has showed that Ang II plays important roles in autoimmune diseases, including RA, systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Ang II blockers prove effective in reducing inflammation and autoimmunity in rheumatic diseases and their relative safety, together with their effects for reducing the cardiovascular disease risk, suggest that Ang II blockers may at least act as effective adjunctive therapy for disease control in patients with RA. The present review focuses systematically on the potential impact of Ang II and its receptors on inflammation and immunomodulation in patients with RA. PMID:25302847

  10. The link between angiotensin II-mediated anxiety and mood disorders with NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Havens, Jennifer; Yu, Qi; Wang, Gang; Davisson, Robin L.; Pickel, Virginia M.; Iadecola, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and its active peptide angiotensin II (AngII) have major involvements not only in hypertension but also in mood and anxiety disorders. Substantial evidence supports the notion that AngII acts as a neuromodulator in the brain. In this review, we provide an overview of the link between the RAS and anxiety or mood disorders, and focus on recent advances in the understanding of AngII-linked, NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress in the central nervous system, which may underlie pathogenesis of mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:22461954

  11. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Activity in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Handjani, Farhad; Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Kalafi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background. Alopecia areata (AA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the hair follicle. The exact pathogenesis of AA remains unknown, although recent studies support a T-cell mediated autoimmune process. On the other hand, some studies have proposed that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may play a role in autoimmunity. Therefore, we assessed serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a component of this system, in AA. Methods. ACE activity was measured in the sera of 19 patients with AA and 16 healthy control subjects. In addition, the relationship between severity and duration of the disease and ACE activity was evaluated. Results. Serum ACE activity was higher in the patient group (55.81 U/L) compared to the control group (46.41 U/L), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.085). Also, there was no correlation between ACE activity and severity (P = 0.13) and duration of disease (P = 0.25) in the patient group. Conclusion. The increased serum ACE activity found in this study may demonstrate local involvement of the RAAS in the pathogenesis of AA. Assessment of ACE in a study with a larger sample size as well as in tissue samples is recommended in order to further evaluate the possible role of RAAS in AA. PMID:25349723

  12. Contractile effects of intracellularly administered angiotensin II are partially dependent on membrane receptors internalization in isolated rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Petrescu, G; Costuleanu, M; Slătineanu, S M; Foia, L; Costuleanu, N; Costuleanu, A

    2001-01-01

    In the present study we used the isolated rat aorta as a model to characterize the modulation of contractile effects of extra- and intracellularly administered angiotensin II by dithiothreitol (DTT) and hyperosmotic sucrose. DTT inactivation of AT1 receptor as well as disruption of the clathrin-coated pits by hyperosmotic sucrose significantly inhibited the contraction induced by intracellularly administered AII. We suggest that these intracellular effects of angiotensin peptides are associated with AT1 receptor activation/internalization and may thus be part of the mechanism of angiotensin peptides direct contractile effects in the vascular smooth muscle. PMID:12092224

  13. PKC δ and βII regulate angiotensin II-mediated fibrosis through p38: a mechanism of RV fibrosis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chichger, Havovi; Vang, Alexander; O'Connell, Kelly A.; Zhang, Peng; Mende, Ulrike; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) eventually leads to right ventricular (RV) fibrosis and dysfunction that is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Although angiotensin II plays an important role in RV remodeling associated with hypoxic PH, the molecular mechanisms underlying RV fibrosis in PH largely remain unresolved. We hypothesized that PKC-p38 signaling is involved in RV collagen accumulation in PH and in response to angiotensin II stimulation. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 3 wk of normoxia or hypoxia (10% FiO2) as a model of PH. Hypoxic rats developed RV hypertrophy and fibrosis associated with an increase in PKC βII and δ protein expression and p38 dephosphorylation in freshly isolated RV cardiac fibroblasts. Further mechanistic studies were performed in cultured primary cardiac fibroblasts stimulated with angiotensin II, a key activator of ventricular fibrosis in PH. Angiotensin II induced a reduction in p38 phosphorylation that was attenuated following chemical inhibition of PKC βII and δ. Molecular and chemical inhibition of PKC βII and δ abrogated angiotensin II-induced cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition in vitro. The effects of PKC inhibition on proliferation and fibrosis were reversed by chemical inhibition of p38. Conversely, constitutive activation of p38 attenuated angiotensin II-induced increase of cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen accumulation. PKC βII- and δ-dependent inactivation of p38 regulates cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition in response to angiotensin II, which suggests that the PKC-p38 signaling in cardiac fibroblasts may be involved and important in the pathophysiology of RV fibrosis in PH. PMID:25659900

  14. The inhibitory effect of angiotensin II on BKCa channels in podocytes via oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gao, Na; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaochen; Yang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is an important active substance of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The present study has confirmed that abnormalities of Ang II may be related with cerebrovascular diseases, endocrine diseases, cardiovascular diseases, liver diseases, such as: cerebral hypoxia, diabetes, obesity, atrial fibrillation, and liver cirrhosis. However, understanding effects of Ang II on podocytes is not enough. This study was to investigate the effects of oxidative stress on the large conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BKCa). Results from the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that Ang II induced podocyte death in a concentration-dependent manner. The measurement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) generation demonstrated that Ang II decreased the total SOD of cellular levels. Meaningfully, pretreatment of a type of ROS scavenger formulations named N-(mercaptopropionyl)-glycine (N-MPG) could inhibit podocyte apoptosis induced by Ang II. Meanwhile, patch-clamp technique was used in this study to detect the effects of Ang II on currents of BKCa channel in podocytes. The results indicated that Ang II inhibited the current amplitude of BKCa channel and decreased the slope of I-V curve. Ang II also made the activation curves of BKCa channel shift to the left. These results may provide a theoretical basis for potential treatment of chronic glomerular disease in the future. PMID:25234195

  15. Angiotensin II prevents hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and vascular changes in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, M.; Mullen, M.; Rosenberg, H.C.; Maruyama, K.; O'Brodovich, H.; Olley, P.M. )

    1988-03-01

    Angiotensin II, a vasoconstrictor, has been previously demonstrated to produce a secondary vasodilatation due to release of prostaglandins. Because of this effect, the authors investigated whether infusion of exogenous angiotensin II via miniosmopumps in rats during a 1-wk exposure to chronic hypobaric hypoxia might prevent pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular changes. They instrumented the rats with indwelling cardiovascular catheters and compared the hemodynamic and structural response in animals given angiotensin II, indomethacin in addition to angiotensin II (to block prostaglandin production), or saline with or without indomethacin. They then determine whether angiotensin II infusion also prevents acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. They observed that exogenous angiotensin II infusion abolished the rise in pulmonary artery pressure, the right ventricular hypertrophy, and the vascular changes induced during chronic hypoxia in control saline-infused rats with or without indomethacin. The protective effects of angiotensin II was lost when indomethacin was given to block prostaglandin synthesis. During acute hypoxia, both antiotensin II and prostacyclin infusion similarly prevented the rise in pulmonary artery pressure observed in saline-infused rats and in rats given indomethacin or saralasin in addition to angiotensin II. Thus exogenous angiotensin II infusion prevents chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, associated right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular changes and blocks acute hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, and this is likely related to its ability to release vasodilator prostaglandins.

  16. Potential effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade in adipose tissue and bone.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated that dysregulation of adipocytokine functions seen in abdominal obesity may be involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Angiotensinogen, the precursor of angiotensin (Ang) II, is produced primarily in the liver, and also in adipose tissue, where it is up-regulated during the development of obesity and involved in blood pressure regulation and adipose tissue growth. Blockade of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) attenuates weight gain and adiposity by enhanced energy expenditure, and the favorable metabolic effects of telmisartan have been related to its Ang II receptor blockade and action as a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. PPARγ plays an important role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ligands for PPARγ can improve insulin sensitivity and reduce triglyceride levels. Similarly, bone metabolism is closely regulated by hormones and cytokines, which have effects on both bone resorption and deposition. It is known that the receptors of Ang II are expressed in culture osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and Ang II is postulated to be able to act upon the cells involved in bone metabolism. In in vitro system, Ang II induced the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts responsible for bone resorption. Importantly, it was demonstrated by the sub-analysis of a recent clinical study that the fracture risk was significantly reduced by the usage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. To treat the subgroups of hypertensive patients with osteoporosis RAS can be considered a novel target. PMID:23176218

  17. Angiotensin II Signaling in Human Preadipose Cells: Participation of ERK1,2-Dependent Modulation of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Dünner, Natalia; Quezada, Carolina; Berndt, F. Andrés; Cánovas, José; Rojas, Cecilia V.

    2013-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system expressed in adipose tissue has been implicated in the modulation of adipocyte formation, glucose metabolism, triglyceride accumulation, lipolysis, and the onset of the adverse metabolic consequences of obesity. As we investigated angiotensin II signal transduction mechanisms in human preadipose cells, an interplay of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1,2) and Akt/PKB became evident. Angiotensin II caused attenuation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), at serine 473; the p-Akt/Akt ratio decreased to 0.5±0.2-fold the control value without angiotensin II (p<0.001). Here we report that the reduction of phosphorylated Akt associates with ERK1,2 activities. In the absence of angiotensin II, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 or PD98059 resulted in a 2.1±0.5 (p<0.001) and 1.4±0.2-fold (p<0.05) increase in the p-Akt/Akt ratio, respectively. In addition, partial knockdown of ERK1 protein expression by the short hairpin RNA technique also raised phosphorylated Akt in these cells (the p-Akt/Akt ratio was 1.5±0.1-fold the corresponding control; p<0.05). Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 prevented the reduction of p-Akt/Akt by angiotensin II. An analogous effect was found on the phosphorylation status of Akt downstream effectors, the forkhead box (Fox) proteins O1 and O4. Altogether, these results indicate that angiotensin II signaling in human preadipose cells involves an ERK1,2-dependent attenuation of Akt activity, whose impact on the biological functions under its regulation is not fully understood. PMID:24098385

  18. A Low-Protein Diet Enhances Angiotensin II Production in the Lung of Pregnant Rats but Not Nonpregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haijun; Tanchico, Daren Tubianosa; Yallampalli, Uma; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary angiotensin II production is enhanced in pregnant rats fed a low-protein (LP) diet. Here we assessed if LP diet induces elevations in angiotensin II production in nonpregnant rats and whether Ace expression and ACE activity in lungs are increased. Nonpregnant rats were fed a normal (CT) or LP diet for 8, 12, or 17 days and timed pregnant rats fed for 17 days from Day 3 of pregnancy. Plasma angiotensin II, expressions of Ace and Ace2, and activities of these proteins in lungs, kidneys, and plasma were measured. These parameters were compared among nonpregnant rats or between nonpregnant and pregnant rats fed different diets. Major findings are as follows: (1) plasma angiotensin II levels were slightly higher in the LP than CT group on Days 8 and 12 in nonpregnant rats; (2) expression of Ace and Ace2 and abundance and activities of ACE and ACE2 in lungs, kidneys, and plasma of nonpregnant rats were unchanged by LP diet except for minor changes; (3) the abundance and activities of ACE in lungs of pregnant rats fed LP diet were greater than nonpregnant rats, while those of ACE2 were decreased. These results indicate that LP diet-induced increase in pulmonary angiotensin II production depends on pregnancy. PMID:27195150

  19. Angiotensin II Vascular Receptors: Their Avidity in Relationship to Sodium Balance, the Autonomic Nervous System, and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Hans R.; Chang, Paul; Wallach, Ronald; Sealey, Jean E.; Laragh, John H.

    1972-01-01

    During intravenous administration of varying doses of angiotensin II antibody to anesthetized rats, apparently specific vascular receptors were characterized. These receptors compete with administered antibody to bind circulating angiotensin. This competitive phenomenon was used to evaluate the affinity of these receptors for angiotensin. Apparent vascular receptor affinity was defined by the amount of antibody required to block the blood pressure response to exogenous angiotensin. It was found that this receptor affinity varies directly with sodium intake so that the amount of antibody required to block was eightfold greater in normal animals on a high sodium intake, as compared with those on a low sodium intake. Sodium dependence of receptors was also demonstrated in nephrectomized animals, in desoxycorticosterone (DOC)-treated rats, and in chronic renal hypertension. Thus the observed changes in receptor affinity were usually inversely related to measured endogenous angiotensin II levels. Ganglionic blockade increased antibody requirement eightfold. All of these changes were consistent, with no overlap observed in response of individual animals from different groups. These results may explain the variation in pressor activity of angiotensin associated with changes in salt balance and ganglionic blockade. In general, when sufficient antibody was injected to block the effect of exogenous angiotensin a blood pressure lowering effect was also observed. Two exceptions were the nephrectomized and the one-kidney renal hypertensive animals, in both of which antibody administration had no effect on blood pressure. Additional results suggest that changes in receptor affinity are involved in the pathogenesis of various types of experimental hypertensions because the amount of antibody required to block angiotensin was enhanced in renal (twofold), DOC (fourfold), and genetic (fourfold) hypertension. Accordingly, changes in the affinity of these receptors could be critically

  20. Mineralocorticoid and angiotensin II type 1 receptors in the subfornical organ mediate angiotensin II - induced hypothalamic reactive oxygen species and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Huang, Bing S; White, Roselyn A; Chen, Aidong; Ahmad, Monir; Leenen, Frans H H

    2016-08-01

    Activation of angiotensinergic pathways by central aldosterone (Aldo)-mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway plays a critical role in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension. The subfornical organ (SFO) contains both MR and angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R) and can relay the signals of circulating Ang II to downstream nuclei such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). In Wistar rats, subcutaneous (sc) infusion of Ang II at 500ng/min/kg for 1 or 2weeks increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) as measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining in a nucleus - specific pattern. Intra-SFO infusion of AAV-MR- or AT1aR-siRNA prevented the Ang II-induced increase in AT1R mRNA expression in the SFO and decreased MR mRNA. Both MR- and AT1aR-siRNA prevented increases in ROS in the PVN and RVLM. MR- but not AT1aR-siRNA in the SFO prevented the Ang II-induced ROS in the SON. Both MR- and AT1aR-siRNA in the SFO prevented most of the Ang II-induced hypertension as assessed by telemetry. These results indicate that Aldo-MR signaling in the SFO is needed for the activation of Ang II-AT1R-ROS signaling from the SFO to the PVN and RVLM. Activation of Aldo-MR signaling from the SFO to the SON may enhance AT1R dependent activation of pre-sympathetic neurons in the PVN. PMID:27163380

  1. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage.

    PubMed

    Villapol, Sonia; Balarezo, María G; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2015-11-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article.Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan's blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking and

  2. Effect of angiotensin II on proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mesodermal progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Goshima, Hazuki; Ozawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II enhanced LIF-induced DNA synthesis of mouse iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the DNA synthesis via induction of superoxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II enhanced differentiation into mesodermal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the differentiation via activation of p38 MAPK. -- Abstract: Previous studies suggest that angiotensin receptor stimulation may enhance not only proliferation but also differentiation of undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, in the present study, we determined the involvement of the angiotensin receptor in the proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased DNA synthesis in mouse iPS cells cultured in a medium with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Pretreatment of the cells with either candesartan (a selective Ang II type 1 receptor [AT{sub 1}R] antagonist) or Tempol (a cell-permeable superoxide scavenger) significantly inhibited Ang II-induced DNA synthesis. Treatment with Ang II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Pretreatment with candesartan significantly inhibited Ang II- induced JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. In contrast, induction of mouse iPS cell differentiation into Flk-1-positive mesodermal progenitor cells was performed in type IV collagen (Col IV)- coated dishes in a differentiation medium without LIF. When Col IV-exposed iPS cells were treated with Ang II for 5 days, the expression of Flk-1 was significantly increased compared with that in the cells treated with the vehicle alone. Pretreatment of the cells with both candesartan and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the Ang II- induced increase in Flk-1 expression

  3. Angiotensin II revisited: new roles in inflammation, immunology and aging

    PubMed Central

    Benigni, Ariela; Cassis, Paola; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    That the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in regulation of blood pressure, vasoconstriction, sodium intake and potassium excretion is well established. Studies in the last few years have however documented new roles for this molecule as a pro-inflammatory molecule and more recently as a possible pro-fibrotic agent that contributes to progressive deterioration of organ function in disease. Binding of Ang II to its receptors (in particular AT1) mediates intracellular free radical generation that contributes to tissue damage by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction. Blocking Ang II signalling protects against neurodegenerative processes and promotes longevity in rodents. Altogether these findings open the unanticipated perspective for exploring Ang II signalling in therapeutic interventions in inflammatory diseases and aging-related tissue injury. This review extends from the discovery of Ang II and its implications in renal and cardiovascular physiology to cover the roles of the system in inflammation, tissue injury, autoimmunity, oxidative stress and aging. PMID:20597104

  4. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) in renal and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chow, Bryna S M; Allen, Terri J

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is well-considered to be the principal effector of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which binds with strong affinity to the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1R) and type 2 (AT2R) receptor subtype. However, activation of both receptors is likely to stimulate different signalling mechanisms/pathways and produce distinct biological responses. The haemodynamic and non-haemodynamic effects of Ang II, including its ability to regulate blood pressure, maintain water-electrolyte balance and promote vasoconstriction and cellular growth are well-documented to be mediated primarily by the AT1R. However, its biological and functional effects mediated through the AT2R subtype are still poorly understood. Recent studies have emphasized that activation of the AT2R regulates tissue and organ development and provides in certain context a potential counter-regulatory mechanism against AT1R-mediated actions. Thus, this review will focus on providing insights into the biological role of the AT2R, in particular its actions within the renal and cardiovascular system. PMID:27358027

  5. Impact of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ on angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated insulin sensitivity, vascular inflammation and atherogenesis in hypercholesterolemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Becher, Ulrich M.; Camara, Bakary; Yildirimtürk, Cihan; Aksoy, Adem; Kebschull, Moritz; Werner, Nikos; Nickenig, Georg; Müller, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. A number of studies have reported that AT1R inhibition or genetic AT1R disruption and PPARγ activation inhibit vascular inflammation and improve glucose and lipid metabolism, underscoring a molecular interaction of AT1R and PPARγ. We here analyzed the hypothesis that vasculoprotective anti-inflammatory and metabolic effects of AT1R inhibition are mediated by PPARγ. Material and methods Female ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– mice were fedwith a high-fat and cholesterol-rich diet and received continuous treatment with the selective PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or vehicle at a rate of 700 ng/kg/min for 4 weeks using subcutaneously implanted osmotic mini-pumps. Additionally, one group of female ApoE–/– mice served as a control group. After treatment for 4 weeks mice were sacrificed and read-outs (plaque development, vascular inflammation and insulinsensitivity) were performed. Results Using AT1R deficient ApoE–/– mice (ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– mice) we found decreased cholesterol-induced endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis compared to ApoE–/– mice. Inhibition of PPARγ by application of the specific PPARγ antagonist GW9662 significantly abolished the anti-atherogenic effects of AT1R deficiency in ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– mice (plaque area as % of control: ApoE–/–: 39 ±5%; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–: 17 ±7%, p = 0.044 vs. ApoE–/–; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– + GW9662: 31 ±8%, p = 0.047 vs. ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–). Focusing on IL6 as a pro-inflammatory humoral marker we detected significantly increased IL-6 levels in GW9662-treated animals (IL-6 in pg/ml: ApoE–/–: 230 ±16; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–: 117 ±20, p = 0.01 vs. ApoE–/–; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– + GW9662: 199 ±20, p = 0.01 vs. ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–), while the anti-inflammatory marker IL-10 was significantly

  6. Angiotensin II centrally induces frequent detrusor contractility of the bladder by acting on brain angiotensin II type 1 receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Bunya; Shimizu, Shogo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Higashi, Youichirou; Honda, Masashi; Sejima, Takehiro; Saito, Motoaki; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II plays an important role in the brain as a neurotransmitter and is involved in psychological stress reactions, for example through activation of the sympatho-adrenomedullary system. We investigated the effects of centrally administered Ang II on the micturition reflex, which is potentially affected by the sympatho-adrenomedullary system, and brain Ang II receptors in urethane-anesthetized (1.0 g/kg, intraperitoneally) male rats. Central administration of Ang II (0.01, 0.02, and 0.07 nmol per rat, intracerebroventricularly, icv) but not vehicle rapidly and dose-dependently decreased the urinary bladder intercontraction interval, without altering the bladder detrusor pressure. Central administration of antagonists of Ang II type 1 but not type 2 receptors inhibited the Ang II-induced shortening of intercontraction intervals. Administration of the highest dose of Ang II (0.07 nmol per rat, icv) but not lower doses (0.01 and 0.02 nmol per rat, icv) elevated the plasma concentration of adrenaline. Bilateral adrenalectomy reduced Ang II-induced elevation in adrenaline, but had no effect on the Ang II-induced shortening of the intercontraction interval. These data suggest that central administration of Ang II increases urinary frequency by acting on brain Ang II type 1 receptors, independent of activation of the sympatho-adrenomedullary system. PMID:26908391

  7. Angiotensin II-Induced Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Is Mediated by p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated c-Src Through Spleen Tyrosine Kinase and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Mugabe, Benon E.; Yaghini, Fariborz A.; Song, Chi Young; Buharalioglu, Cuneyt K.; Waters, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates protein synthesis by activating spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and DNA synthesis through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). This study was conducted to determine whether Syk mediates Ang II-induced migration of aortic VSMCs using a scratch wound approach. Treatment with Ang II (200 nM) for 24 h increased VSMC migration by 1.56 ± 0.14-fold. Ang II-induced VSMC migration and Syk phosphorylation as determined by Western blot analysis were minimized by the Syk inhibitor piceatannol (10 μM) and by transfecting VSMCs with dominant-negative but not wild-type Syk plasmid. Ang II-induced VSMC migration and Syk phosphorylation were attenuated by inhibitors of c-Src [4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2)], p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) [4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole (SB202190)], and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 [1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio) butadiene (U0126)]. SB202190 attenuated p38 MAPK and c-Src but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that p38 MAPK acts upstream of c-Src and Syk. The c-Src inhibitor PP2 attenuated Syk and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting that c-Src acts upstream of Syk and ERK1/2. Ang II- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced VSMC migration and EGFR phosphorylation were inhibited by the EGFR blocker 4-(3-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline (AG1478) (2 μM). Neither the Syk inhibitor piceatannol nor the dominant-negative Syk mutant altered EGF-induced cell migration or Ang II- and EGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation. The c-Src inhibitor PP2 diminished EGF-induced VSMC migration and EGFR, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (10 μM) attenuated EGF-induced cell migration and ERK1/2 but not EGFR phosphorylation. These data suggest that Ang II stimulates VSMC migration via p38 MAPK-activated c-Src through

  8. Angiotensin II-induced migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated c-Src through spleen tyrosine kinase and epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation.

    PubMed

    Mugabe, Benon E; Yaghini, Fariborz A; Song, Chi Young; Buharalioglu, Cuneyt K; Waters, Christopher M; Malik, Kafait U

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates protein synthesis by activating spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and DNA synthesis through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). This study was conducted to determine whether Syk mediates Ang II-induced migration of aortic VSMCs using a scratch wound approach. Treatment with Ang II (200 nM) for 24 h increased VSMC migration by 1.56 +/- 0.14-fold. Ang II-induced VSMC migration and Syk phosphorylation as determined by Western blot analysis were minimized by the Syk inhibitor piceatannol (10 microM) and by transfecting VSMCs with dominant-negative but not wild-type Syk plasmid. Ang II-induced VSMC migration and Syk phosphorylation were attenuated by inhibitors of c-Src [4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2)], p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) [4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole (SB202190)], and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 [1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio) butadiene (U0126)]. SB202190 attenuated p38 MAPK and c-Src but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that p38 MAPK acts upstream of c-Src and Syk. The c-Src inhibitor PP2 attenuated Syk and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting that c-Src acts upstream of Syk and ERK1/2. Ang II- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced VSMC migration and EGFR phosphorylation were inhibited by the EGFR blocker 4-(3-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline (AG1478) (2 microM). Neither the Syk inhibitor piceatannol nor the dominant-negative Syk mutant altered EGF-induced cell migration or Ang II- and EGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation. The c-Src inhibitor PP2 diminished EGF-induced VSMC migration and EGFR, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (10 microM) attenuated EGF-induced cell migration and ERK1/2 but not EGFR phosphorylation. These data suggest that Ang II stimulates VSMC migration via p38 MAPK-activated c

  9. Plasma Renin Activity and Angiotensin Pressor Dose in Hypertension: Correlation and Diagnostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Weidmann, P.; Endres, P.; Siegenthaler, W.

    1968-01-01

    Data obtained from 65 hypertensive patients showed a clear-cut positive correlation between peripheral plasma renin activity and the pressor response to exogenous angiotensin II (r =+0.75). For the various causes of hypertension, the mean values of plasma renin concentration were found to correspond closely to the mean values of the angiotensin pressor dose. In individual cases, however, the pressor dose of angiotensin was not found to be a reliable gauge of peripheral venous renin activity. It was impossible to establish a causal diagnosis from the results of the angiotensin infusion test or the renin level in peripheral blood under normal conditions. If, however, determinations are carried out on the renal venous effluent with sodium restriction and with the patient in the upright position the renin level is very valuable both in the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension and in predicting the probable outcome of surgical treatment. PMID:4298635

  10. Differential regulation of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and nuclear factor-κB by angiotensin II receptor subtypes in type 2 diabetic kidney.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anuradha; Goru, Santosh Kumar; Kadakol, Almesh; Malek, Vajir; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acts through Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE)/Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis to promote renal failure whereas the Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R)/Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang1-7/Mas axis constitutes the protective arm of Renin Angiotensin System (RAS). Though Ang II has been known to activate the Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling pathway through different receptor subtype(s) in different tissues under various diseases, the subtype orchestrating this stimulation in type 2 diabetic kidney remains elusive. ACE2, a protective monocarboxypeptidase, responsible for conversion of Ang II to Ang1-7, opposes the deleterious effects of RAS pathway but how its expression is altered with blockade of AT1R and AT2R is not yet known. Hence, the present study was conceived to understand the regulation of NF-κB and ACE2 by using specific AT1 and AT2 receptor antagonists in non-genetic model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Our results show that the AT1R and AT2R antagonists lead to the repression and activation of NF-κB signalling pathway, respectively which suggests the role of AT1R in NF-κB activation. The blockade of AT2R led to an increase in ACE2 expression, which may be a compensatory response to the drastically increased inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in the diabetic kidney. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the differential regulation of NF-κB and ACE2 by Ang II receptor subtypes and thus this study improves our understanding regarding regulation of inflammatory cascade and ACE2 by AT1R and AT2R in type 2 diabetic kidney, which may help in designing novel strategies to combat the disease in future. PMID:26271886

  11. Localized accumulation of angiotensin II and production of angiotensin-(1-7) in rat luteal cells and effects on steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pepperell, John R; Nemeth, Gabor; Yamada, Yuji; Naftolin, Frederick; Merino, Maricruz

    2006-08-01

    These studies aim to investigate subcellular distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) in rat luteal cells, identify other bioactive angiotensin peptides, and investigate a role for angiotensin peptides in luteal steroidogenesis. Confocal microscopy showed ANG II distributed within the cytoplasm and nuclei of luteal cells. HPLC analysis showed peaks that eluted with the same retention times as ANG-(1-7), ANG II, and ANG III. Their relative concentrations were ANG II >or= ANG-(1-7) > ANG III, and accumulation was modulated by quinapril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), Z-proprolinal (ZPP), an inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), and parachloromercurylsulfonic acid (PCMS), an inhibitor of sulfhydryl protease. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor, did not affect peptide accumulation. Quinapril, ZPP, PCMS, and PMSF, as well as losartan and PD-123319, the angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonists, were used in progesterone production studies. ZPP significantly reduced luteinizing hormone (LH)-dependent progesterone production (P < 0.05). Quinapril plus ZPP had a greater inhibitory effect on LH-stimulated progesterone than either inhibitor alone, but this was not reversed by exogenous ANG II or ANG-(1-7). Both PCMS and PMSF acutely blocked LH-stimulated progesterone, and PCMS blocked LH-sensitive cAMP accumulation. Losartan inhibited progesterone production in permeabilized but not intact luteal cells and was reversed by ANG II. PD-123319 had no significant effect on luteal progesterone production in either intact or permeabilized cells. These data suggest that steroidogenesis may be modulated by angiotensin peptides that act in part through intracellular AT1 receptors. PMID:16478781

  12. A Study of Angiotensin II Pressor Response throughout Primigravid Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gant, Norman F.; Daley, Gilroy L.; Chand, Santosh; Whalley, Peggy J.; MacDonald, Paul C.

    1973-01-01

    The present study was designed to ascertain sequentially the pressor response to angiotensin II in young primigravid patients throughout pregnancy in order a) to define when in pregnancy resistance to the pressor effects of angiotensin II develops; b) to define the physiologic sequence of events leading to this resistance; and c) to ascertain whether sensitivity to infused angiotensin II could be detected before the onset of clinical signs of pregnancy-induced hypertension. With this prospective approach, two separate groups of patients were defined. The first group of patients remained normal throughout pregnancy. The second group consisted of those patients who, while clinically normotensive during the initial phase of the study, ultimately developed hypertension of pregnancy. 192 patients were studied; of these, 120 patients remained normotensive and 72 developed pregnancy-induced hypertension. In both groups, vascular resistance to infused angiotensin II (more than 8 ng/kg/min required to elicit a pressor response of 20 mm Hg in diastolic pressure) was demonstrated as early as the 10th wk of pregnancy. In the group that remained normotensive, maximum mean vascular resistance occurred at 18-30 wk of pregnancy, (mean pressor dose required being 13.5 to 14.9 ng/kg/min). In those subjects who developed pregnancy-induced hypertension, the mean maximum dose required was 12.9 ng/kg/min, which was observed at the 18th wk of pregnancy. By the 22nd wk there was a clear separation of the two groups, with the mean dose requirement of the subjects destined to develop hypertension being progressively less than that of those who remained normal. The difference between the two groups became significant (P < 0.01) by 23-26 wk of pregnancy. Among patients requiring more than 8 ng/kg/min on one or more tests done between wk 28-32, 91% remained normotensive. Conversely, during the same time period among patients requiring less than 8 ng/kg/min, on at least one occasion, 90

  13. Angiotensin II increases phosphodiesterase 5A expression in vascular smooth muscle cells: A mechanism by which angiotensin II antagonizes cGMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongsoo; Aizawa, Toru; Wei, Heng; Pi, Xinchun; Rybalkin, Sergei D.; Berk, Bradford C.; Yan, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and nitric oxide (NO)/natriuretic peptide (NP) signaling pathways mutually regulate each other. Imbalance of Ang II and NO/NP has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many vascular diseases. cGMP functions as a key mediator in the interaction between Ang II and NO/NP. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) is important in modulating cGMP signaling by hydrolyzing cGMP in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Therefore, we examined whether Ang II negatively modulates intracellular cGMP signaling in VSMC by regulating PDE5A. Ang II rapidly and transiently increased PDE5A mRNA levels in rat aortic VSMC. Upregulation of PDE5A mRNA was associated with a time-dependent increase of both PDE5 protein expression and activity. Increased PDE5A mRNA level was transcription-dependent and mediated by the Ang II type 1 receptor. Ang II-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) was essential for Ang II-induced PDE5A upregulation. Pretreatment of VSMC with Ang II inhibited C-type NP (CNP) stimulated cGMP signaling, such as cGMP dependent protein kinase (PKG)-mediated phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated-phosphoprotein (VASP). Ang II-mediated inhibition of PKG was blocked when PDE5 activity was decreased by selective PDE5 inhibitors, suggesting that upregulation of PDE5A expression is an important mechanism for Ang II to attenuate cGMP signaling. PDE5A may also play a critical role in the growth promoting effects of Ang II because inhibition of PDE5A activity significantly decreased Ang II-stimulated VSMC growth. These observations establish a new mechanism by which Ang II antagonizes cGMP signaling and stimulates VSMC growth. PMID:15623434

  14. Glycyl-histidyl-lysine interacts with the angiotensin II AT1 receptor.

    PubMed

    García-Sáinz, J A; Olivares-Reyes, J A

    1995-01-01

    Gly-His-Lys, a tripeptide isolated from human plasma that increases the growth rate of many cells, stimulated in dose-dependent fashion the activity of phosphorylase a in isolated rat hepatocytes. Such effect was associated to increases in both IP3 production and [Ca++]i. Interestingly, these effects of Gly-His-Lys were antagonized by losartan, a nonpeptide angiotensin II receptor antagonist (AT1 selective), which suggested that these receptors were involved in its effect. Binding competition experiments using the radioligand [125I][Sar1-Ile8]angiotensin II clearly indicated that Gly-His-Lys interacts with AT1 receptors. It was also observed that other histidine-containing tripeptides were also capable of interacting with these receptors. PMID:8545239

  15. [Polyamines antagonizing angiotensin II contractile effects in isolated rat aorta].

    PubMed

    Costuleanu, Natalia; Foia, Liliana; Slătineanu, Simona Mihaela; Indrei, L L; Costuleanu, M; Petrescu, Gh

    2003-01-01

    Our study showed that the administration in pre-treatment of some polyamines (especially spermine and spermidine and almost null agmatine, putrescine and cadaverine) reduced the contractile effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) in isolated rat aorta. These effects might not be associated to the interference of clathrin coated vesicles (coated pits) formation or caveolae interaction (and thus to Ang II internalization through AT1 receptors). In contrast, these effects seem to be due to the interaction with voltage-gated membrane Ca2+ channels. Therefore, the alteration of transmembrane Ca2+ fluxes does not exclude the involvement of internalization process through coated pits or caveolae, since the endocytosis mediated by these phenomena essentially needs Ca2+. In addition, the inhibitory effects are dependent on the number of positive charges of the polyamine molecules. PMID:14755941

  16. Angiotensin II Stimulates Sympathetic Neurotransmission to Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    King, Victoria L; English, Victoria L; Bharadwaj, Kalyani; Cassis, Lisa A

    2013-08-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) facilitates sympathetic neurotransmission by regulating norepinephrine (NE) synthesis, release and uptake. These effects of AngII contribute to cardiovascular control. Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated that chronic AngII infusion decreased body weight of rats. We hypothesized that AngII facilitates sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissue and may thereby decrease body weight. The effect of chronic AngII infusion on the NE uptake transporter and NE turnover was examined in metabolic (interscapular brown adipose tissue, ISBAT; epididymal fat, EF) and cardiovascular tissues (left ventricle, LV; kidney) of rats. To examine the uptake transporter saturation isotherms were performed using [(3)H]nisoxetine (NIS). At doses that lowered body weight, AngII significantly increased ISBAT [(3)H]NIS binding density. To quantify NE turnover, alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT) was injected in saline-infused, AngII-infused, or saline-infused rats that were pair-fed to food intake of AngII-infused rats. AngII significantly increased the rate of NE decline in all tissues compared to saline. The rate of NE decline in EF was increased to a similar extent by AngII and by pair-feeding. In rats administered AngII and propranolol, reductions in food and water intake and body weight were eliminated. These data support the hypothesis that AngII facilitates sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissue. Increased sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissue following AngII exposure is suggested to contribute to reductions in body weight. PMID:24224084

  17. Cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, MIAO-QIAN; SU, FEI-FEI; XU, XUAN; LIU, XIONG-TAO; WANG, HONG-TAO; ZHANG, WEI; LI, XUE; LIAN, CHENG; ZHENG, QIANG-SUN; FENG, ZHI-CHUN

    2016-01-01

    Patients with essential hypertension undergo endothelial dysfunction, particularly in the conduit arteries. Cilostazol, a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor, serves a role in the inhibition of platelet aggregation and it is widely used in the treatment of peripheral vascular diseases. Previous studies have suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial dysfunction; however, it remains unknown whether cilostazol protects the endothelial function in essential hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether, and how, cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II (angII)-induced endothelial dysfunction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to angII and treated with cilostazol. Endothelial cell apoptosis and function, nitric oxide and superoxide production, phosphorylation (p) of Akt, and caspase-3 protein expression levels were investigated. AngII exposure resulted in the apoptosis of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, cilostazol significantly suppressed the angII-induced apoptosis of HUVECs; however, this effect was reduced in the presence of LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Furthermore, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced p-Akt downregulation and cleaved caspase-3 upregulation. These effects were also alleviated by LY294002. In vivo, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced endothelial cell apoptosis and dysfunction. Cilostazol was also demonstrated to partially reduced the angII-induced increase in superoxide production. The results of the present study suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial apoptosis and dysfunction by modulating the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:26862035

  18. Chronic cyclosporin A nephrotoxicity, P-glycoprotein overexpression, and relationships with intrarenal angiotensin II deposits.

    PubMed Central

    del Moral, R. G.; Andujar, M.; Ramírez, C.; Gómez-Morales, M.; Masseroli, M.; Aguilar, M.; Olmo, A.; Arrebola, F.; Guillén, M.; García-Chicano, M. J.; Nogales, F. F.; O'Valle, F.

    1997-01-01

    as a result of ras activation in presence of angiotensin II. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9403721

  19. Angiotensin II (de)sensitization: Fluid intake studies with implications for cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and hypertension is the most common risk factor for death. Although many anti-hypertensive pharmacotherapies are approved for use in the United States, rates of hypertension have increased over the past decade. This review article summarizes a presentation given at the 2015 meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior. The presentation described work performed in our laboratory that uses angiotensin II-induced drinking as a model system to study behavioral and cardiovascular effects of the renin-angiotensin system, a key component of blood pressure regulation, and a common target of anti-hypertensives. Angiotensin II (AngII) is a potent dipsogen, but the drinking response shows a rapid desensitization after repeated injections of AngII. This desensitization appears to be dependent upon the timing of the injections, requires activation of the AngII type 1 (AT1) receptor, requires activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family members, and involves the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) region as a critical site of action. Moreover, the response does not appear to be the result of a more general suppression of behavior, a sensitized pressor response to AngII, or an aversive state generated by the treatment. More recent studies suggest that the treatment regimen used to produce desensitization in our laboratory also prevents the sensitization that occurs after daily bolus injections of AngII. Our hope is that these findings can be used to support future basic research on the topic that could lead to new developments in treatments for hypertension. PMID:26801390

  20. Purification of an angiotensin II binding protein by using antibodies to a peptide encoded by angiotensin II complementary RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, T.S.; Dion, L.D.; Bost, K.L.; Oparil, S.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    The authors have generated a monospecific antibody to a synthetic peptide encoded by an RNA complementary to the mRNA for angiotensin II (AII) and determined whether this antibody recognizes the AII receptor. They demonstrate that the antibody competes specifically with /sup 125/I-labeled AII for the same binding site on rat adrenal membranes. Furthermore, they show this antibody inhibits the secretion of aldosterone from cultured rat adrenal cells, suggesting that the antibody recognizes the biologically relevant AII receptor. Finally, they demonstrate that antibody to the complementary peptide can be used to immunoaffinity-purify a protein of M/sub r/ 66,000 that specifically binds radiolabeled AII.

  1. Identification and characterization of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was demonstrated by radioligand binding. A single class of finding sites with a K/sub D/ of 0.7 nM was characterized. The use of radioligands also allows the localization of receptors by autoradiography. Autoradiography demonstrated that approximately 50% of the isolated cells bound angiotensin II. It was of interest to see if angiotensin II bound to a cell that possessed a certain phenotype. In order to evaluate this possibility a technique was developed that combined autoradiography and immunocytochemistry. Results indicated that angiotensin II binding sites were not localized preferentially to either norepinephrine or epinephrine cells. Binding of angiotensin II was associated with the release of intracellular catecholamine stores. Cells were pre-loaded with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine and secretion was monitored by following radioactivity released into the supernatant. Alternatively, release of endogenous catecholamines was determined by fluorometric assay.

  2. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in brain and kidney: focus on cardiovascular implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative techniques of receptor autoradiography have been applied to localize (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in brain and kidney. High densities of autoradiographic grains, indicating the presence of angiotensin II receptors, have been localized to several rat brain nuclei including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, anterior pituitary, locus coeruleus and several hypothalamic nuclei. Cat thoracic spinal cord exhibited a high density of sites over the intermedio-lateral cell column. In sections of rat kidney, angiotensin II receptors were detected in the glomerulus, vasa recta and ureter. The cardiovascular implications of these results are apparent and relate angiotensin II to hypertensive mechanisms. Thus, angiotensin II represents an endocoid which is involved in control of blood pressure through its effects on peripheral organs as well as the central nervous system.

  3. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of imidazo[4,5-c]pyridin-4-one derivatives with dual activity at angiotensin II type 1 receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ.

    PubMed

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Heemstra, Ronald J; Bigge, Christopher F; Chen, Jing; Ciske, Fred A; Davis, Jo Ann; Ellis, Teresa; Esmaeil, Nadia; Flynn, Declan; Han, Seungil; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F; Powell, Noel A

    2013-02-01

    Identification of a series of imidazo[4,5-c]pyridin-4-one derivatives that act as dual angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) partial agonists is described. Starting from a known AT1 antagonist template, conformational restriction was introduced by incorporation of an indane ring that when combined with appropriate substitution at the imidazo[4,5-c]pyridin-4-one provided novel series 5 possessing the desired dual activity. The mode of interaction of this series with PPARγ was corroborated through the X-ray crystal structure of 12b bound to the human PPARγ ligand binding domain. Modulation of activity at both receptors through substitution at the pyridone nitrogen led to the identification of potent dual AT1 antagonists/PPARγ partial agonists. Among them, 21b was identified possessing potent dual pharmacology (AT1 IC(50) = 7 nM; PPARγ EC(50) = 295 nM, 27% max) and good ADME properties. PMID:23265881

  4. Metabolic Actions of Angiotensin II and Insulin: A Microvascular Endothelial Balancing Act

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Ranganath; Yavuz, Shazene

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic actions of insulin to promote glucose disposal are augmented by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent increases in microvascular blood flow to skeletal muscle. The balance between NO-dependent vasodilator actions and endothelin-1-dependent vasoconstrictor actions of insulin is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent (PI3K) - and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent signaling in vascular endothelium, respectively. Angiotensin II acting on AT2 receptor increases capillary blood flow to increase insulin-mediated glucose disposal. In contrast, AT1 receptor activation leads to reduced NO bioavailability, impaired insulin signaling, vasoconstriction, and insulin resistance. Insulin-resistant states are characterized by dysregulated local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Under insulin-resistant conditions, pathway-specific impairment in PI3K-dependent signaling may cause imbalance between production of NO and secretion of endothelin-1, leading to decreased blood flow, which worsens insulin resistance. Similarly, excess AT1 receptor activity in the microvasculature may selectively impair vasodilation while simultaneously potentiating the vasoconstrictor actions of insulin. Therapeutic interventions that target pathway-selective impairment in insulin signaling and the imbalance in AT1 and AT2 receptor signaling in microvascular endothelium may simultaneously ameliorate endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. In the present review, we discuss molecular mechanisms in the endothelium underlying microvascular and metabolic actions of insulin and Angiotensin II, the mechanistic basis for microvascular endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in RAAS dysregulated clinical states, and the rationale for therapeutic strategies that restore the balance in vasodilator and constrictor actions of insulin and Angiotensin II in the microvasculature. PMID:22684034

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-induced contraction of cultured rat mesangial cells: interaction with angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Medina, J; Baud, L; Garcia Escribano, C; Gila, J A; Rodriguez Puyol, D; Rodriguez Puyol, M

    1993-08-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha in the regulation of renal function, particularly glomerular filtration rate, has not been completely defined. This study was designed to assess the intrinsic role of this cytokine on glomerular filtration rate by analyzing its short-term effect on the degree of contraction in cultured rat mesangial cells, not only directly but also in the presence of angiotensin II. Contraction was evaluated both morphologically--by measuring planar cell surface area of cultured rat mesangial cells and glomerular cross-sectional area of isolated rat glomeruli--and biochemically--by analyzing myosin light-chain phosphorylation in cells. Tumor necrosis factor alpha significantly decreased planar cell surface area in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner, an effect completely abolished by preincubation of the cells with platelet-activating factor receptor antagonists BN 52021 and alprazolam. This effect was also observed in the presence of angiotensin II, whether tumor necrosis factor alpha was added before or after angiotensin II, increasing the reduction in planar cell surface area induced by angiotensin II in both cases. Changes in planar cell surface area were evident not only when the absolute values of this parameter were considered but also when the percentage of contracted cells (cells with a planar cell surface area reduction > 10%) was analyzed. Tumor necrosis factor alpha also induced a significant reduction of glomerular cross-sectional area in isolated rat glomeruli. The results of the morphologic studies were supported by myosin light-chain phosphorylation experiments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8340701

  6. RGS4 inhibits angiotensin II signaling and macrophage localization during renal reperfusion injury independent of vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Pang, Paul; Jin, Xiaohua; Proctor, Brandon M; Farley, Michelle; Roy, Nilay; Chin, Matthew S; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Vollmann, Elisabeth; Perro, Mario; Hoffman, Ryan J; Chung, Joseph; Chauhan, Nikita; Mistri, Murti; Muslin, Anthony J; Bonventre, Joseph V; Siedlecki, Andrew M

    2015-04-01

    Vascular inflammation is a major contributor to the severity of acute kidney injury. In the context of vasospasm-independent reperfusion injury we studied the potential anti-inflammatory role of the Gα-related RGS protein, RGS4. Transgenic RGS4 mice were resistant to 25 min injury, although post-ischemic renal arteriolar diameter was equal to the wild type early after injury. A 10 min unilateral injury was performed to study reperfusion without vasospasm. Eighteen hours after injury, blood flow was decreased in the inner cortex of wild-type mice with preservation of tubular architecture. Angiotensin II levels in the kidneys of wild-type and transgenic mice were elevated in a sub-vasoconstrictive range 12 and 18 h after injury. Angiotensin II stimulated pre-glomerular vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to secrete the macrophage chemoattractant RANTES, a process decreased by angiotensin II R2 (AT2) inhibition. However, RANTES increased when RGS4 expression was suppressed implicating Gα protein activation in an AT2-RGS4-dependent pathway. RGS4 function, specific to VSMC, was tested in a conditional VSMC-specific RGS4 knockout showing high macrophage density by T2 MRI compared with transgenic and non-transgenic mice after the 10 min injury. Arteriolar diameter of this knockout was unchanged at successive time points after injury. Thus, RGS4 expression, specific to renal VSMC, inhibits angiotensin II-mediated cytokine signaling and macrophage recruitment during reperfusion, distinct from vasomotor regulation. PMID:25469849

  7. The Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor in Brain Functions: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Marie-Odile; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the main active product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), mediating its action via two major receptors, namely, the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor and the type 2 (AT2) receptor. Recent results also implicate several other members of the renin-angiotensin system in various aspects of brain functions. The first aim of this paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the properties and signaling of the AT2 receptor, its expression in the brain, and its well-established effects. Secondly, we will highlight the potential role of the AT2 receptor in cognitive function, neurological disorders and in the regulation of appetite and the possible link with development of metabolic disorders. The potential utility of novel nonpeptide selective AT2 receptor ligands in clarifying potential roles of this receptor in physiology will also be discussed. If confirmed, these new pharmacological tools should help to improve impaired cognitive performance, not only through its action on brain microcirculation and inflammation, but also through more specific effects on neurons. However, the overall physiological relevance of the AT2 receptor in the brain must also consider the Ang IV/AT4 receptor. PMID:23320146

  8. The Cooperative Effect of Local Angiotensin-II in Liver with Adriamycin Hepatotoxicity on Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Taskin, Eylem; Guven, Celal; Sahin, Leyla; Dursun, Nurcan

    2016-01-01

    Background Adriamycin (ADR) is a drug used clinically for anticancer treatment; however, it causes adverse effects in the liver. The mechanism by which these adverse effects occur remains unclear, impeding efforts to enhance the therapeutic effects of ADR. Its hepatotoxicity might be related to increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction. The interaction between ADR and the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the liver is unclear. ADR might activate the RAS. Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) leads to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study we investigated whether ADR’s hepatotoxicity interacts with local RAS in causing oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction in the rat liver. Material/Methods Rats were divided into 5 groups: control, ADR, co-treated ADR with captopril, co-treated ADR with Aliskiren, and co-treated ADR with both captopril and Aliskiren. Mitochondria and cytosol were separated from the liver, then biochemical measurements were made from them. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels were evaluated. Results ADR remarkably decreased MMP and ATP in liver mitochondria (p<0.05). Co-administration with ADR and Aliskiren and captopril improved the dissipation of MMP (p<0.05). The decreased ATP level was restored by treatment with inhibitors of ACE and renin. Conclusions Angiotensin-II may contribute to hepatotoxicity of in the ADR via mitochondrial oxidative production, resulting in the attenuation of MMP and ATP production. PMID:27019222

  9. [Respective roles of cortisol, aldosterone and angiotensin II during pathophysiology of atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ayari, Hanène

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of angiotensin II, cortisol and aldosterone in increased cardiovascular risk is well known but their interactions within arterial wall and during atheroma formation are not established. In fact, mild cortisol excess is associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular events, increased intima media thickness, a higher frequency of atherosclerotic plaques and increased mortality. Conversely, remission from hypercortisolism is followed by improvement in cardiovascular risk markers as intima-media thickness or arterial distensibility, suggesting a strong link between cortisol excess and adverse vascular remodeling. On the other hand, implication of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in atheromatous remodeling is well documented. The RAS also includes aldosterone, a mineralocorticoid which secretion is mainly and strongly stimulated by angiotensin II, and which receptor (MR) can also be activated by cortisol given that MR affinity is similar for both aldosterone and cortisol. The role of aldosterone in arterial remodeling is still very controversial. Aldosterone treatment associated with a high salt diet induced not only hypertension but also oxidative stress, collagen synthesis and vascular inflammation. However in models without salt loading or arterial hypertension, such as the treatment with deoxycorticosterone acetate in dogs, no alterations in aortic structure were observed and moreover, the MR blockade with eplerenone did not attenuate atherosclerosis in the aorta of diabetic Apo-E KO mice. It stems that among the different effects and mechanisms described in cell experiments, it is not known which are indeed operating in situ in human vessels and thus, if local cortisol is deleterious or beneficial and, if activation of MR by aldosterone or cortisol is important in vascular remodeling and atherogenesis. RAS blocker treatment would be particularly beneficial in essential hypertensive patients with low plasma renin, to attenuate both angiotensin

  10. Angiotensin II-triggered kinase signaling cascade in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have projected the renin-angiotensin system as a central component of the physiological and pathological processes of assorted neurological disorders. Its primary effector hormone, angiotensin II (Ang II), not only mediates the physiological effects of vasoconstriction and blood pressure regulation in cardiovascular disease but is also implicated in a much wider range of neuronal activities and diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, neuronal injury, and cognitive disorders. Ang II produces different actions by acting on its two subtypes of receptors (AT1 and AT2); however, the well-known physiological actions of Ang II are mainly mediated through AT1 receptors. Moreover, recent studies also suggest the important functional role of AT2 receptor in the brain. Ang II acts on AT1 receptors and conducts its functions via MAP kinases (ERK1/2, JNK, and p38MAPK), glycogen synthase kinase, Rho/ROCK kinase, receptor tyrosine kinases (PDGF and EGFR), and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (Src, Pyk2, and JAK/STAT). AT1R-mediated NADPH oxidase activation also leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species, widely implicated in neuroinflammation. These signaling cascades lead to glutamate excitotoxicity, apoptosis, cerebral infarction, astrocyte proliferation, nociception, neuroinflammation, and progression of other neurological disorders. The present review focuses on the Ang II-triggered signal transduction pathways in central nervous system. PMID:26574890

  11. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Renita E.; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics. PMID:26808388

  12. Low-Salt Diet and Circadian Dysfunction Synergize to Induce Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pati, Paramita; Fulton, David J R; Bagi, Zsolt; Chen, Feng; Wang, Yusi; Kitchens, Julia; Cassis, Lisa A; Stepp, David W; Rudic, R Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in health. In hypertension, sleep apnea, and even shift work, this balanced rhythm is perturbed via elevations in night-time blood pressure, inflicting silent damage to the vasculature and body organs. Herein, we examined the influence of circadian dysfunction during experimental hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry to measure ambulatory blood pressure and activity, the effects of angiotensin II administration were studied in wild-type (WT) and period isoform knockout (KO) mice (Per2-KO, Per2, 3-KO, and Per1, 2, 3-KO/Per triple KO [TKO] mice). On a normal diet, administration of angiotensin II caused nondipping blood pressure and exacerbated vascular hypertrophy in the Period isoform KO mice relative to WT mice. To study the endogenous effects of angiotensin II stimulation, we then administered a low-salt diet to the mice, which does stimulate endogenous angiotensin II in addition to lowering blood pressure. A low-salt diet decreased blood pressure in wild-type mice. In contrast, Period isoform KO mice lost their circadian rhythm in blood pressure on a low-salt diet, because of an increase in resting blood pressure, which was restorable to rhythmicity by the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. Chronic administration of low salt caused vascular hypertrophy in Period isoform KO mice, which also exhibited increased renin levels and altered angiotensin 1 receptor expression. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may act to inhibit or control renin/angiotensin signaling. Moreover, circadian disorders such as sleep apnea and shift work may alter the homeostatic responses to sodium restriction to potentially influence nocturnal hypertension. PMID:26781276

  13. Renovascular remodeling and renal injury after extended angiotensin II infusion.

    PubMed

    Casare, Fernando Augusto Malavazzi; Thieme, Karina; Costa-Pessoa, Juliana Martins; Rossoni, Luciana Venturini; Couto, Gisele Kruger; Fernandes, Fernanda Barrinha; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Oliveira-Souza, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Chronic angiotensin II (ANG II) infusion for 1 or 2 wk leads to progressive hypertension and induces inward hypertrophic remodeling in preglomerular vessels, which is associated with increased renal vascular resistance (RVR) and decreased glomerular perfusion. Considering the ability of preglomerular vessels to exhibit adaptive responses, the present study was performed to evaluate glomerular perfusion and renal function after 6 wk of ANG II infusion. To address this study, male Wistar rats were submitted to sham surgery (control) or osmotic minipump insertion (ANG II 200 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1), 42 days). A group of animals was treated or cotreated with losartan (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)), an AT1 receptor antagonist, between days 28 and 42 Chronic ANG II infusion increased systolic blood pressure to 185 ± 4 compared with 108 ± 2 mmHg in control rats. Concomitantly, ANG II-induced hypertension increased intrarenal ANG II level and consequently, preglomerular and glomerular injury. Under this condition, ANG II enhanced the total renal plasma flow (RPF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urine flow and induced pressure natriuresis. These changes were accompanied by lower RVR and enlargement of the lumen of interlobular arteries and afferent arterioles, consistent with impairment of renal autoregulatory capability and outward preglomerular remodeling. The glomerular injury culminated with podocyte effacement, albuminuria, tubulointerstitial macrophage infiltration and intrarenal extracellular matrix accumulation. Losartan attenuated most of the effects of ANG II. Our findings provide new information regarding the contribution of ANG II infusion over 2 wk to renal hemodynamics and function via the AT1 receptor. PMID:26962104

  14. Mechanism of pulmonary conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II in the dog.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oparil, S.; Tregear, G. W.; Koerner, T.; Barnes, B. A.; Haber, E.

    1971-01-01

    The conversion mechanism was studied in vivo in the pulmonary circulation of the intact anesthetized dog and in vitro in plasma by using L-Leu-angiotensin I, D-Leu-angiotensin I, and des-Leu-angiotensin I which had been synthesized by the solid-phase technique. The results obtained indicate that pulmonary conversion in vivo and plasma conversion in vitro occur via a dipeptidylcarboxypeptidase and that a D-amino acid at the C-terminus prevents conversion.

  15. Angiotensin II Contributes to Diabetic Renal Dysfunction in Rodents and Humans via Notch1/Snail Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardini, Elena; Perico, Norberto; Rizzo, Paola; Buelli, Simona; Longaretti, Lorena; Perico, Luca; Tomasoni, Susanna; Zoja, Carla; Macconi, Daniela; Morigi, Marina; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2014-01-01

    In nondiabetic rat models of renal disease, angiotensin II (Ang II) perpetuates podocyte injury and promotes progression to end-stage kidney disease. Herein, we wanted to explore the role of Ang II in diabetic nephropathy by a translational approach spanning from in vitro to in vivo rat and human studies, and to dissect the intracellular pathways involved. In isolated perfused rat kidneys and in cultured human podocytes, Ang II down-regulated nephrin expression via Notch1 activation and nuclear translocation of Snail. Hairy enhancer of split-1 was a Notch1-downstream gene effector that activated Snail in cultured podocytes. In vitro changes of the Snail/nephrin axis were similar to those in renal biopsy specimens of Zucker diabetic fatty rats and patients with advanced diabetic nephropathy, and were normalized by pharmacological inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system. Collectively, the present studies provide evidence that Ang II plays a relevant role in perpetuating glomerular injury in experimental and human diabetic nephropathy via persistent activation of Notch1 and Snail signaling in podocytes, eventually resulting in down-regulation of nephrin expression, the integrity of which is crucial for the glomerular filtration barrier. PMID:23707238

  16. Angiotensin II induced release of prostaglandins from rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Campos, G A; Guerra, F A; Israel, E J

    1983-08-01

    The effect of Angiotensin II (A-II) on 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 (6-keto-PGF1 alpha) and prostaglandin F (PGF) production by the rat uterus was studied using a novel superfusion technique. The method of superfusion used allows prostaglandin synthesis in the myometrium and endometrium to be measured independently while their anatomical relationship is undisturbed. Prostaglandins were measured by radioimmunoassay. In uterine horns from castrated, estrogen treated rats, A-II (10(-6)M) stimulated the production rate of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in the myometrium nd PGF in the endometrium. Sterile horns and pregnant horns coexisting in the same animals showed different responses when superfused with culture medium containing A-II (10(-6)M). In the sterile horns A-II failed to stimulate prostaglandin synthesis whereas in the pregnant horns there was a significant increase in the production rate of both 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and PGF in the decidua (endometrium) and of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in the myometrium. Our results suggests that the effect of A-II on prostaglandin synthesis by the rat uterus appears to be dependent of the hormonal milieu of the experimental animal. Estrogen stimulated A-II induced PG synthesis. Progesterone inhibited the synthesis of PGs caused by A-II in non-decidualized uterus but stimulated the release of PG in the decidualized uterus. The apparent differential effect of A-II in stimulating prostaglandin synthesis in the whole uterus indicates that there are different pathways for prostaglandin production in both the endometrium and myometrium. PMID:6689628

  17. Angiotensin II enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition through the interaction between activated hepatic stellate cells and the stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXCR4 axis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Koichi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Sakai, Seisho; Makino, Isamu; Kinoshita, Jun; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakamura, Keishi; Oyama, Katsunobu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Fujita, Hideto; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Harada, Shinichi; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Iseki, Shoichi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2012-08-01

    We previously reported that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activated by angiotensin II (AngII) facilitate stromal fibrosis and tumor progression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). AngII has been known as a growth factor which can promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in renal epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells and peritoneal mesothelial cells. However, in the past, the relationship between AngII and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the microenvironment around cancer and the role of AngII on EMT of cancer cells has not been reported in detail. SDF-1 and its specific receptor, CXCR4, are now receiving attention as a mechanism of cell progression and metastasis. In this study, we examined whether activated HSCs promote tumor fibrogenesis, tumor progression and distant metastasis by mediating EMT via the AngII/AngII type 1 receptor (AT-1) and the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Two human ICC cell lines and a human HSC line, LI-90, express CXCR4. Significantly higher concentration of SDF-1α was released into the supernatant of LI-90 cells to which AngII had been added. SDF-1α increased the proliferative activity of HSCs and enhanced the activation of HSCs as a growth factor. Furthermore, addition of SDF-1α and AngII enhanced the increase of the migratory capability and vimentin expression, reduced E-cadherin expression, and translocated the expression of β-catenin into the nucleus and cytoplasm in ICC cells. Co-culture with HSCs also enhanced the migratory capability of ICC cells. These findings suggest that SDF-1α, released from activated HSCs and AngII, play important roles in cancer progression, tumor fibrogenesis, and migration in autocrine and paracrine fashion by mediating EMT. Our mechanistic findings may provide pivotal insights into the molecular mechanism of the AngII and SDF-1α-initiated signaling pathway that regulates fibrogenesis in cancerous stroma, tumor progression and meta-stasis of tumor cells expressing AT-1 and CXCR4

  18. [Effect of safflor yellow B on vascular endothelial cells injury induced by angiotensin-II].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Ping; Xu, Yong; Yang, Ming; Jiang, Wen-Guo; Luan, Hai-Yun

    2012-06-01

    This study is to investigate protective effect of safflor yellow B (SYB) against vascular endothelial cells (VECs) injury induced by angiotensin-II (Ang-II). VECs were cultured and divided into six groups: control group, Ang-II group, Ang-II + SYB (1 micromolL(-1)) group, Ang-II + SYB (10 micromolL(-1)) group, Ang-II + SYB (100 micromolL(-1)) group and Ang- II + verapamil (10 micromolL(-1)) group. Except control group, all of VECs in other groups were treated with Ang- II at the final concentration of 0.1 micromolL(-1). Mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) and free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were measured by laser scanning confocal microscopy, and mitochondria complex IV activity was detected by BCA method. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in VECs were analyzed by fluorescence detector and apoptosis of VECs was observed by flow cytometer. Caspase 3 was determined by Western blotting method. Comparing with control group, Ang-II was able to increase [Ca2+]i and ROS level, decrease MMP level, inhibit complex IV activity and enhance caspase 3 activity in VECs, as a result, enhance apoptosis of VECs. But SYB could significantly reduce the result induced by Ang- II relying on different dosages (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). SYB was able to eliminate the effect of Ang-II on VECs via regulating [Ca2+]i, mitochondrial structure and function and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:22919732

  19. L-type calcium channel β subunit modulates angiotensin II responses in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Moreno, Cristian; Itfinca, Mircea; Altier, Christophe; Armisén, Ricardo; Stutzin, Andres; Zamponi, Gerald W; Varela, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II regulation of L-type calcium currents in cardiac muscle is controversial and the underlying signaling events are not completely understood. Moreover, the possible role of auxiliary subunit composition of the channels in Angiotensin II modulation of L-type calcium channels has not yet been explored. In this work we study the role of Ca(v)β subunits and the intracellular signaling responsible for L-type calcium current modulation by Angiotensin II. In cardiomyocytes, Angiotensin II exposure induces rapid inhibition of L-type current with a magnitude that is correlated with the rate of current inactivation. Semi-quantitative PCR of cardiomyocytes at different days of culture reveals changes in the Ca(v)β subunits expression pattern that are correlated with the rate of current inactivation and with Angiotensin II effect. Over-expression of individual b subunits in heterologous systems reveals that the magnitude of Angiotensin II inhibition is dependent on the Ca(v)β subunit isoform, with Ca(v)β(1b) containing channels being more strongly regulated. Ca(v)β(2a) containing channels were insensitive to modulation and this effect was partially due to the N-terminal palmitoylation sites of this subunit. Moreover, PLC or diacylglycerol lipase inhibition prevents the Angiotensin II effect on L-type calcium channels, while PKC inhibition with chelerythrine does not, suggesting a role of arachidonic acid in this process. Finally, we show that in intact cardiomyocytes the magnitude of calcium transients on spontaneous beating cells is modulated by Angiotensin II in a Ca(v)β subunit-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that Ca(v)β subunits alter the magnitude of inhibition of L-type current by Angiotensin II. PMID:21525790

  20. Gender differences in response to acute and chronic angiotensin II infusion: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Toering, Tsjitske J; van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Visser, Folkert W; Buikema, Hendrik; Navis, Gerjan; Faas, Marijke M; Lely, A Titia

    2015-01-01

    Women with renal disease progress at a slower rate to end stage renal disease than men. As angiotensin II has both hemodynamic and direct renal effects, we hypothesized that the female protection may result from gender differences in responses to angiotensin II. Therefore, we studied gender differences in response to angiotensin II, during acute (human) and chronic (rats) angiotensin II administration. In young healthy men (n = 18) and women (n = 18) we studied the responses of renal hemodynamics (125I-iothalamate and 131I-Hippuran) and blood pressure to graded angiotensin II infusion (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 ng/kg/min for 1 h). Men had increased responses of diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01), mean arterial pressure (P = 0.05), and a more pronounced decrease in effective renal plasma flow (P = 0.009) than women. We measured the changes in proteinuria and blood pressure in response to chronic administration (200 ng/kg/min for 3 weeks) of angiotensin II in rats. Male rats had an increased response of proteinuria compared with females (GEE analysis, P = 0.001). Male, but not female, angiotensin II-treated rats had increased numbers of renal interstitial macrophages compared to sham-treated rats (P < 0.001). In conclusion, gender differences are present in the response to acute and chronic infusion of angiotensin II. Difference in angiotensin II sensitivity could play a role in gender differences in progression of renal disease. PMID:26149279

  1. miR-34a modulates angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy by direct inhibition of ATG9A expression and autophagic activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jionghua; Sun, Wen; Huang, He; Ye, Jing; Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; You, Xiangyu; Liu, Benrong; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by thickening myocardium and decreasing in heart chamber volume in response to mechanical or pathological stress, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be defined. This study investigated altered miRNA expression and autophagic activity in pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. A rat model of myocardial hypertrophy was used and confirmed by heart morphology, induction of cardiomyocyte autophagy, altered expression of autophagy-related ATG9A, LC3 II/I and p62 proteins, and decrease in miR-34a expression. The in vitro data showed that in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes induced by Ang II, miR-34a expression was downregulated, whereas ATG9A expression was up-regulated. Moreover, miR-34a was able to bind to ATG9A 3'-UTR, but not to the mutated 3'-UTR and inhibited ATG9A protein expression and autophagic activity. The latter was evaluated by autophagy-related LC3 II/I and p62 levels, TEM, and flow cytometry in rat cardiomyocytes. In addition, ATG9A expression induced either by treatment of rat cardiomyocytes with Ang II or ATG9A cDNA transfection upregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in both morphology and expression of hypertrophy-related genes (i.e., ANP and β-MHC), whereas knockdown of ATG9A expression downregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. However, miR-34a antagonized Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy, whereas inhibition of miR-34a expression aggravated Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy (such as cardiomyocyte hypertrophy-related ANP and β-MHC expression and cardiomyocyte morphology). This study indicates that miR-34a plays a role in regulation of Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by inhibition of ATG9A expression and autophagic activity. PMID:24728149

  2. The effect of angiotensin II receptor blockers on hyperuricemia

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Marissa L.; Cruz, Jennifer L.; Vanderman, Adam J.; Brown, Jamie N.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review was to explore the efficacy of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for the treatment of hyperuricemia in individuals diagnosed with gout or hyperuricemia defined as ⩾7 mg/dl at baseline. A literature search of MEDLINE (1946 to June 2015) and EMBASE (1947 to June 2015) was conducted. The following search terms were used: ‘uric acid’, ‘urate transporter’, ‘gout’, ‘angiotensin II receptor blockers’, ‘hyperuricemia’ and the names for individual ARBs, as well as any combinations of these terms. Studies were excluded that did not explore fractional excretion or serum uric acid as an endpoint, if patients did not have a diagnosis of gout or hyperuricemia at baseline, or if they were non-English language. A total of eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Of the eight studies identified, six explored ARB monotherapy and two studies investigated ARBs as adjunct therapy. Losartan demonstrated statistically significant reductions in serum uric acid levels or increases in fractional excretion of uric acid in all studies, whereas no other ARB reached statistical benefit. The effect of ARBs on the occurrence of gout attacks or other clinical outcomes were not represented. Four studies evaluated safety effects of these agents indicating abnormalities such as minor changes in lab values. In conclusion, losartan is the only ARB that has consistently demonstrated a significant reduction in serum uric acid levels, although the significance of impacting clinical outcomes remains unknown. Losartan appears to be a safe and efficacious agent to lower serum uric acid levels in patients with hyperuricemia. PMID:26568810

  3. Norepinephrine uptake by rat jejunum: Modulation by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Suvannapura, A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1988-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) is believed to stimulate sodium and water absorption from the small intestine by enhancing sympathetic nerve transmission. This study is designed to determine whether ANG II can enhance sympathetic neurotransmission within the small intestine by inhibition norepinephrine (NE) uptake. Intracellular NE accumulation by rat jejunum was concentration dependent and resolved into high- and low-affinity components. The high-affinity component (uptake 1) exhibited a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 1.72 {mu}M and a maximum velocity (V{sub max}) of 1.19 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. The low-affinity component (uptake 2) exhibited a K{sub m} of 111.1 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 37.1 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. Cocaine, an inhibitor of neuronal uptake, inhibited the intracellular accumulation of label by 80%. Treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine, which depletes norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals, also attenuated NE uptake by 60%. Thus accumulation within sympathetic nerves constitutes the major form of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake into rat jejunum. ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. At a dose of 1 mM, ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation by 60%. Cocaine failed to potentiate the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake produced by ANG II. Thus ANG II appears to prevent ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation within rat jejunum by inhibiting neuronal uptake.

  4. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in the brain and kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is an important component in the regulation of systemic blood pressure. Angiotensin II is the principal effector peptide of this system. Interaction of angiotensin II with specific receptors can produce in several organic systems. When administered into the brain this octa-peptide produces a variety of responses including a stimulation of drinking, increased systemic blood pressure and several neuroendocrine responses. Its effects on the kidney include alterations in arteriolar resistance, mesangial cell contraction and a feedback inhibition of the release of renin. Since this peptide produces profound effects on homeostatis by an interaction with specific receptors, the quantitative technique of in vitro autoradiography was applied to localize receptor populations for angiotensin II. Specific binding sites for a radiolabeled form of angiotensin II were localized in various brain and kidney regions. In the rat brain high densities of angiotensin II receptors were observed in the paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus, supraoptic nucleus and the posterior lobe of the pituitary, brain areas in which angiotensin II modified neuroendocrine functions.

  5. The adipose renin-angiotensin system modulates sysemic markers of insulin sensitivity activates the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suyeon; Soltani-Bejnood, Morvarid; Quignard-Boulange, Annie; Massiera, Florence; Teboul, Michele; Ailhaud, Gerard; Kim, Jung; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Voy, Brynn H

    2006-07-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing body of data provides increasing evidence that the adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to regulation of fat mass. Beyond its paracrine actions within adipose tissue, adipocyte-derived angiotensin II (Ang II) may also impact systemic functions such as blood pressure and metabolism. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a genetic approach to manipulate adipose RAS activity in mice and then study the consequences on metabolic parameters and on feedback regulation of the RAS. The models included deletion of the angiotensinogen (Agt) gene (Agt-KO), its expression solely in adipose tissue under the control of an adipocyte-specific promoter (aP2-Agt/ Agt-KO), and overexpression in adipose tissue of wild type mice (aP2-Agt). Total body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, and circulating levels of leptin, insulin and resistin were significantly decreased in Agt-KO mice, while plasma adiponectin levels were increased. Overexpression of Agt in adipose tissue resulted in increased adiposity and plasma leptin and insulin levels compared to wild type (WT) controls. Angiotensinogen and type I Ang II receptor protein levels were also markedly elevated in kidney of aP2-Agt mice, suggesting that hypertension in these animals may be in part due to stimulation of the intrarenal RAS. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, the results from this study demonstrate that alterations in adipose RAS activity significantly alter both local and systemic physiology in a way that may contribute to the detrimental health effects of obesity.

  6. Angiotensin II type I receptor blockade attenuates reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in aged but not young skin.

    PubMed

    Lang, James A; Kolb, Kelsey E

    2015-05-15

    Stimulation of angiotensin II type I receptors (AT1R) elicits vasoconstriction (VC) that may be occurring through the activation of a pathogenic vascular pathway such as Rho kinase (ROCK). We hypothesize that reflex cutaneous VC to whole body cooling (mean skin temperature = 30.5°C) in older humans relies in part on AT1R activation, which may explain greater ROCK activity attendant with aging. Two microdialysis (MD) fibers were placed in the forearm skin of 10 young (Y; 24 ± 1 yr) and 10 older (O; 70 ± 2 yr) individuals for infusion of 1) lactated Ringer's solution (switched to fasudil, a ROCK antagonist, after cooling); and 2) AT1R blockade with losartan. Laser Doppler flux (LDF) was measured over each MD site and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated (CVC = LDF/mean arterial pressure) and expressed as percent change from baseline (%ΔCVCBASELINE). In older individuals the VC response to whole body cooling was blunted (Y = -34 ± 2, O = -17 ± 3%ΔCVC) and was further attenuated at the losartan site (Y = -34 ± 3, O = -9 ± 3%ΔCVC; P < 0.05). The VC response to an exogenous 10-μM dose of angiotensin II (Y = -27 ± 3, O = -42 ± 5%ΔCVC) was completely blocked in sites pretreated with losartan or with fasudil. These data suggest that AT1R activation contributes to the reflex VC response in aged but not young skin. Furthermore, the angiotensin II component of the VC response appears to occur primarily through a ROCK-mediated mechanism. PMID:25770238

  7. Obesity augments vasoconstrictor reactivity to angiotensin II in the renal circulation of the Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Stepp, David W; Boesen, Erika I; Sullivan, Jennifer C; Mintz, James D; Hair, Clark D; Pollock, David M

    2007-10-01

    Obesity is an emerging risk factor for renal dysfunction, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Obese patients show heightened renal vasodilation to blockade of the renin-angiotensin system, suggesting deficits in vascular responses to angiotensin II (ANG II). This study tested the hypothesis that obesity augments renal vasoconstriction to ANG II. Lean (LZR), prediabetic obese (OZR), and nonobese fructose-fed Zucker rats (FF-LZR) were studied to determine the effects of obesity and insulin resistance on reactivity of blood pressure and renal blood flow to vasoconstrictors. OZR showed enlargement of the kidneys, elevated urine output, increased sodium intake, and decreased plasma renin activity (PRA) vs. LZR, and renal vasoconstriction to ANG II was augmented in OZR. Renal reactivity to norepinephrine and mesenteric vascular reactivity to ANG II were similar between LZR and OZR. Insulin-resistant FF-LZR had normal reactivity to ANG II, indicating the insulin resistance was an unlikely explanation for the changes observed in OZR. Four weeks on a low-sodium diet (0.08%) to raise PRA reduced reactivity to ANG II in OZR back to normal levels without effect on LZR. From these data, we conclude that in the prediabetic stages of obesity, a decrease in PRA is observed in Zucker rats that may lead to increased renal vascular reactivity to ANG II. This increased reactivity to ANG II may explain the elevated renal vasodilator effects observed in obese humans and provide insight into early changes in renal function that predispose to nephropathy in later stages of the disease. PMID:17693541

  8. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D.; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P < 0.05). However, during both exercise bouts, there were no differences in CVC or sweating between the treatment sites (all P > 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P < 0.05). We show angiotensin II impairs cutaneous perfusion independent of oxidative stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise. PMID:25767030

  9. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P < 0.05). However, during both exercise bouts, there were no differences in CVC or sweating between the treatment sites (all P > 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P < 0.05). We show angiotensin II impairs cutaneous perfusion independent of oxidative stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise. PMID:25767030

  10. Effects of Angiotensin II Receptor Signaling during Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Hikaru; Katagata, Yohtaro; Hozumi, Yutaka; Kondo, Shigeo

    2004-01-01

    The tissue angiotensin (Ang) system, which acts independently of the circulating renin Ang system, is supposed to play an important role in tissue repair in the heart and kidney. In the skin, the role of the system for wound healing has remained to be ascertained. Our study demonstrated that oral administration of selective AngII type-1 receptor (AT1) blocker suppressed keratinocyte re-epithelization and angiogenesis during skin wound healing in rats. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis indicated the existence of AT1 and AngII type-2 receptor (AT2) in cultured keratinocytes and myofibroblasts. In a bromodeoxyuridine incorporation study, induction of AT1 signaling enhanced the incorporation into keratinocytes and myofibroblasts. Wound healing migration assays revealed that induction of AT1 signaling accelerated keratinocyte re-epithelization and myofibroblasts recovering. In these experiments, induction of AT2 signaling acted vice versa. Taken together, our study suggests that skin wound healing is regulated by balance of opposing signals between AT1 and AT2. PMID:15509535

  11. Regulation of ERK5 by insulin and angiotensin-II in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Girish; Goalstone, Marc Lee; E-mail: Marc.Goalstone@uchsc.edu

    2007-03-23

    ERK5 is involved in proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). The proliferative actions of insulin and angiotensin-II (A-II) in VSMC are mediated in part by ERK1/2. We hypothesized that insulin and A-II also regulate ERK5 activity in VSMC. Acute treatment (<60 min) with insulin or A-II increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 at 15 min and ERK5 at 5 min. Chronic treatment ({<=}8 h) with insulin increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation by 4 h and ERK5 by 8 h. A-II-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 by 8 h and ERK5 by 4 h. The EC{sub 50} for insulin treatment effecting ERK1/2 and ERK5 phosphorylation was 1.5 and 0.1 nM, whereas the EC{sub 50} for A-II was 2 nM, each. Insulin plus A-II induced an additive effect only on ERK5 phosphorylation. Inhibition of insulin- and A-II-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK5 and ERK1/2 by PD98059 and Wortmannin exhibited differential and time-dependent effects. Taken together, these data indicate that insulin and A-II regulate the activity of ERK5, but different from that seen for ERK1/2.

  12. Nitric oxide up-regulates endothelial expression of angiotensin II type 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Medini, Sawsan; Bisha, Marion; Balz, Vera; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Bas, Murat; Kojda, Georg

    2016-07-15

    Increasing vascular NO levels following up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is considered beneficial in cardiovascular disease. Whether such beneficial effects exerted by increased NO-levels include the vascular renin-angiotensin system remains elucidated. Exposure of endothelial cells originated from porcine aorta, mouse brain and human umbilical veins to different NO-donors showed that expression of the angiotensin-II-type-2-receptor (AT2) mRNA and protein is up-regulated by activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase without changing AT2 mRNA stability. In mice, endothelial-specific overexpression of eNOS stimulated, while chronic treatment with the NOS-blocker l-nitroarginine inhibited AT2 expression. The NO-induced AT2 up-regulation was associated with a profound inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-activity. In endothelial cells this reduction of ACE-activity was reversed by either the AT2 antagonist PD 123119 or by inhibition of transcription with actinomycin D. Furthermore, in C57Bl/6 mice an acute i.v. bolus of l-nitroarginine did not change AT2-expression and ACE-activity suggesting that inhibition of ACE-activity by endogenous NO is crucially dependent on AT2 protein level. Likewise, three weeks of either voluntary or forced exercise training increased AT2 expression and reduced ACE-activity in C57Bl/6 but not in mice lacking eNOS suggesting significance of this signaling interaction for vascular physiology. Finally, aortic AT2 expression is about 5 times greater in female as compared to male C57Bl/6 and at the same time aortic ACE activity is reduced in females by more than 50%. Together these findings imply that endothelial NO regulates AT2 expression and that AT2 may regulate ACE-activity. PMID:27235748

  13. Caveolae regulate vasoconstriction of conduit arteries to angiotensin II in hindlimb unweighted rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongchao; Bai, Yungang; Yu, Jinwen; Liu, Huan; Cheng, Yaoping; Liu, Yonghong; Xie, Xiaoping; Ma, Jin; Bao, Junxiang

    2015-10-15

    Weightlessness induces the functional remodelling of arteries, but the changes to angiotensin II (Ang II)-elicited vasoconstriction and the underlying mechanism have never been reported. Caveolae are invaginations of the cell membrane crucial for the contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells, so we investigated the adaptation of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction to simulated weightlessness and the role of caveolae in it. The 4 week hindlimb unweighted (HU) rat was used to simulate the effects of weightlessness. Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction was measured by isometric force recording. The morphology of caveolae was examined by transmission electron microscope. The binding of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 ) and caveolin-1 (cav-1) was examined by coimmunoprecipitation and Western blot. We found that the maximal developing force (E(max)) of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction was decreased in abdominal aorta by 30.6%, unchanged in thoracic aorta and increased in carotid artery by 17.9% after HU, while EC50 of the response was increased in all three arteries (P < 0.05). AT1 desensitization upon activation was significantly reduced by HU in all three arteries, as was the number of caveolae (P < 0.05). Furthermore, Ang II promoted the binding of AT1 and cav-1 significantly in control but not HU arteries. Both the number of caveolae and the binding of AT1 and cav-1 in HU arteries were restored by cholesterol pretreatment which also reinstated the change in EC50 as well as the level of AT1 desensitization. These results indicate that modified caveolae in vascular smooth muscle cells could interfere with the binding of AT1 and cav-1 mediating the adaptation of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction to HU. PMID:26260249

  14. Quantitative distribution of angiotensin II binding sites in rat brain by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.; Israel, A.; Plunkett, L.M.; Kurihara, M.; Shigematsu, K.; Correa, F.M.

    1986-07-01

    Angiotensin II binding sites were localized and quantified in individual brain nuclei from single rats by incubation of tissue sections with 1 nM /sup 125/I-(Sar1)-angiotensin II, (/sup 3/H)-Ultrofilm autoradiography, computerized microdensitometry and comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. High angiotensin II binding was present in the circumventricular organs (organon vasculosum laminae terminalis, organon subfornicalis and area postrema), in selected hypothalamic nuclei (nuclei suprachiasmatis, periventricularis and paraventricularis) and in the nucleus tractus olfactorii lateralis, the nucleus preopticus medianus, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and the nucleus tractus solitarii. High affinity (KA from 0.3 to 1.5 X 10(9) M-1) angiotensin II binding sites were demonstrated in the organon subfornicalis, the nucleus tractus solitarii and the area postrema after incubation of consecutive sections from single rat brains with /sup 125/I-(Sar1)-angiotensin II in concentrations from 100 pM to 5 nM. These results demonstrate and characterize brain binding sites for angiotensin II of variable high affinity binding both inside and outside the blood-brain barrier.

  15. Angiotensin 1-7 Protects against Angiotensin II-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction via Mas Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Dharmani; Lau, Yeh Siang; Lau, Wai Chi; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Huang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin 1–7 (Ang 1–7) counter-regulates the cardiovascular actions of angiotensin II (Ang II). The present study investigated the protective effect of Ang 1–7 against Ang II-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and endothelial dysfunction. Ex vivo treatment with Ang II (0.5 μM, 24 hours) impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in mouse aortas; this harmful effect of Ang II was reversed by co-treatment with ER stress inhibitors, l4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) as well as Ang 1–7. The Mas receptor antagonist, A779, antagonized the effect of Ang 1–7. The elevated mRNA expression of CHOP, Grp78 and ATF4 or protein expression of p-eIF2α and ATF6 (ER stress markers) in Ang II-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse aortas were blunted by co-treatment with Ang 1–7 and the latter effect was reversed by A779. Furthermore, Ang II-induced reduction in both eNOS phosphorylation and NO production was inhibited by Ang 1–7. In addition, Ang 1–7 decreased the levels of ER stress markers and augmented NO production in HUVECs treated with ER stress inducer, tunicamycin. The present study provides new evidence for functional antagonism between the two arms of the renin-angiotensin system in endothelial cells by demonstrating that Ang 1–7 ameliorates Ang II-stimulated ER stress to raise NO bioavailability, and subsequently preserves endothelial function. PMID:26709511

  16. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antibodies in childhood kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bjerre, Anna; Tangeraas, Trine; Heidecke, Harald; Dragun, Duska; Dechend, Ralf; Staff, Anne Cathrine

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antibodies (AT1 RAb) have emerged as non-HLA Ab present in patients with acute AMR and risk of graft loss. Furthermore, AT1 RAb have been shown to increase angiotensin II sensitivity which may play a role in the development of CVD and hypertension. Data on AT1 RAb in stable transplant recipients are lacking. The aim of this study was to analyze the levels of AT1 RAb in a cohort of stable patients after kidney transplantation (tx) in childhood. A cross-sectional study of 30 children (median age 14, range 3-19 yr, median time since tx five yr) and 28 adults who were transplanted in childhood (median age 26, range 20-40 yr, median time since tx 18 yr) transplanted between 1993-2006 and 1983-2002, respectively, was performed. Healthy controls were 51 healthy children (5-8 yr) and 199 healthy donors (median age 56.5 yr, range 42-83 yr). Plasma AT1 RAb were analyzed by immunoassay. Median total AT1 RAb IgG concentration was significantly higher in the pediatric-tx group as compared to the adult-tx group (40.0 and 10.95 U/mL, p < 0.0001). For both groups, the tx group showed higher levels: the pediatric-tx group vs. control group (40.0 vs. 13.3 U/mL, p = 0.0006) and the adult-tx group vs. adult control group (10.95 vs. 6.5 U/mL, p < 0.0001). Age was the strongest indicator of high levels of AT1 RAb IgG (p = 0.0003). AT1 RAb total IgG levels are significantly higher in a stable pediatric-tx cohort as compared to adult-tx patients and healthy controls of comparable age groups. The relevance of our findings in relation to age, time since tx, previous or future rejection, and CVD risk merits future studies. PMID:27251358

  17. Activation of the Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in High Oxygen-Exposed Newborn Rats: Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Prevents the Developmental Programming of Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Dios, Anne; Béland-Bonenfant, Sarah; Gascon, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Megan; Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Cloutier, Anik; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2016-04-01

    Newborn rats exposed to high oxygen (O2), mimicking preterm birth-related neonatal stress, develop later in life cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, fibrosis, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Cardiac renin-angiotensin system activation in O2-exposed adult rats is characterized by an imbalance in angiotensin (Ang) receptors type 1/2 (AT1/2), with prevailing AT1 expression. To study the role of renin-angiotensin system in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction, we assessed Ang receptor expression during neonatal high O2 exposure and whether AT1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac alterations in early adulthood. Sprague-Dawley newborn rats were kept with their mother in 80% O2 or room air (control) from days 3 to 10 (P3-P10) of life. Losartan or water was administered by gavage from P8 to P10 (n=9/group). Rats were studied at P3 (before O2 exposure), P5, P10 (end of O2), and P28. Losartan treatment had no impact on growth or kidney development. AT1 and Ang type 2 receptors were upregulated in the left ventricle by high O2 exposure (P5 and P10), which was prevented by Losartan treatment at P10. Losartan prevented the cardiac AT1/2 imbalance at P28. Losartan decreased cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and improved left ventricle fraction of shortening in P28 O2-exposed rats, which was associated with decreased oxidation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, inhibition of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD3 pathway, and upregulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. In conclusion, short-term Ang II blockade during neonatal high O2 prevents the development of cardiac alterations later in life in rats. These findings highlight the key role of neonatal renin-angiotensin system activation in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction induced by deleterious neonatal conditions. PMID:26857347

  18. Novel concept in the mechanism of injury and protection of gastric mucosa: role of renin-angiotensin system and active metabolites of angiotensin.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T; Ptak-Belowska, A; Kwiecien, S; Krzysiek-Maczka, G; Strzalka, M; Drozdowicz, D; Pajdo, R; Olszanecki, R; Korbut, R; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, W W

    2012-01-01

    The term cytoprotection pioneered by Robert and colleagues has been introduced to describe the remarkable ability of endogenous and exogenous prostaglandins (PGs) to prevent acute gastric hemorrhagic lesions induced by noxious stimuli such as ethanol, bile acids, hiperosmolar solutions and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents such as aspirin. Since that time many factors were implicated to possess gastroprotective properties such as growth factors including epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming factor alpha (TGFα), vasodilatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) as well as appetite gut hormones including gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK), leptin and recently ghrelin. This protective action of gut peptides has been attributed to the release of PG but question remains whether another peptide angiotensin, the classic component of the systemic and local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) could be involved in the mechanism of gastric integrity and gastroprotection. After renin stimulation, the circulating angiotensin I is converted to angiotensin II (ANG II) by the activity of the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE). The ANG II acting via its binding to two major receptor subtypes the ANG type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) has been shown be activated during stress and to contribute to the pathogenesis of cold stress- and ischemia-reperfusion-induced gastric lesions. All bioactive angiotensin peptides can be generated not only in systemic circulation, but also locally in several tissues and organs. Recently the new functional components of RAS, such as Ang-(1-7), Ang IV, Ang-(1-12) and novel pathways ACE2 have been described suggesting the gastroprotective role for the novel ANG II metabolite, Ang-(1-7). The fact that Ang-(1-7) is produced in excessive amounts in the gastric mucosa of rodents and that pretreatment by Ang-(1-7) exhibits a potent gastroprotective activity against the gastric lesions induced by cold

  19. Mechanisms underlying angiotensin II-induced calcium oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Aurélie; Pallone, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms that underlie angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]cyt) oscillations in medullary pericytes, we expanded a prior model of ion fluxes. ANG II stimulation was simulated by doubling maximal inositol trisphosphate (IP3) production and imposing a 90% blockade of K+ channels. We investigated two configurations, one in which ryanodine receptors (RyR) and IP3 receptors (IP3R) occupy a common store and a second in which they reside on separate stores. Our results suggest that Ca2+ release from stores and import from the extracellular space are key determinants of oscillations because both raise [Ca] in subplasmalemmal spaces near RyR. When the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) threshold of RyR is exceeded, the ensuing Ca2+ release is limited by Ca2+ reuptake into stores and export across the plasmalemma. If sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pumps do not remain saturated and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores are replenished, that phase is followed by a resumption of leak from internal stores that leads either to [Ca]cyt elevation below the CICR threshold (no oscillations) or to elevation above it (oscillations). Our model predicts that oscillations are more prone to occur when IP3R and RyR stores are separate because, in that case, Ca2+ released by RyR during CICR can enhance filling of adjacent IP3 stores to favor a high subsequent leak that generates further CICR events. Moreover, the existence or absence of oscillations depends on the set points of several parameters, so that biological variation might well explain the presence or absence of oscillations in individual pericytes. PMID:18562632

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new angiotensin II receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H-l; Zhu, W-b; Wu, D; Da, Y-j; Yan, Y-J; Bian, J; Chen, Z-l

    2014-12-01

    The design, synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of (2 R,6 S)-4-({1-[2-(1 H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl]-1 H-indol-4-yl}methyl)-2,6-dimethylmorpholine, compound 1, as a novel angiotensin II receptor antagonist is outlined. Radioligand binding assays showed that 1 displayed a high affinity for the angiotensin II type 1receptor with IC50 value of 0.82 nM. It acted as a potent anti-hypertensive derivative (maximal reduction of mean arterial pressure of 47 mm Hg at 10 mg/kg po in spontaneously hypertensive rat producing a dose-dependent fall in blood pressure following oral administration lasting beyond 10 h. Acute toxicity tests measured the LD50 of 1 value as 2431.7 mg/kg, which is higher than Losartan (LD50=2248 mg/kg). In addition further testing showed that 1 also demonstrated efficient anti-proliferative activity in vitro and anti-prostate cancer activity in vivo were also found. Taken together this compound could be considered as an effective and durable anti-hypertension drug candidate with additional anti-prostate cancer activity. These encouraging results are deserved of further investigation towards its use for therapeutic benefit. PMID:24573978

  1. Involvement of Spinal Angiotensin II System in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshiki; Nemoto, Wataru; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Yamagata, Ryota; Tadano, Takeshi; Tan-No, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity increases under hyperglycemic states, and is thought to be involved in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that angiotensin (Ang) II, a main bioactive component of the RAS, might act as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the transmission of nociceptive information in the spinal cord. Here, we examined whether the spinal Ang II system is responsible for diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Tactile allodynia was observed concurrently with an increase in blood glucose levels the day after mice received STZ (200 mg/kg, i.v.) injections. Tactile allodynia on day 14 was dose-dependently inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan, an Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, but not by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist. In the lumbar dorsal spinal cord, the expression of Ang II, Ang converting enzyme (ACE), and phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were all significantly increased on day 14 after STZ injection compared with vehicle-treated controls, whereas no differences were observed among AT1 receptors or angiotensinogen levels. Moreover, the increase in phospho-p38 MAPK was significantly inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan. These results indicate that the expression of spinal ACE increased in STZ-induced diabetic mice, which in turn led to an increase in Ang II levels and tactile allodynia. This increase in spinal Ang II was accompanied by the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, which was shown to be mediated by AT1 receptors. PMID:27401876

  2. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, F A; Quirion, R; Saavedra, J M; Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1984-01-01

    The 125I-labeled agonist analog [1-sarcosine]-angiotensin II ( [Sar1]AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (Ka = 2 X 10(9) M-1) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. Images PMID:6324205

  3. Chromatographic resolution of angiotensin II receptor antagonists (sartans).

    PubMed

    Tahir, Muhammad Saqlain; Adnan, Ahmad; Syed, Quratulain

    2016-08-01

    First time a simple, sensitive and unified quantification method has been developed to analyze the complete class of angiotensin II receptor antagonists which are used in the treatment of hypertension either alone or in combination with some other drugs. The most important advantage of developed method was that the eight separate drugs can be determined on a single chromatographic system without modifications in detection wavelength and mobile phase. The drugs were separated on a Purospher Star 4.6mm×25cm, 5μm, C18 column maintained at 40°C with 1mLmin(-1) flow rate using ultra violet detection at 254nm. Good separation (Rs>2.0) was achieved in a short analysis allowing simultaneous determination of all eight sartans. The effect of variation in flow rate, detection wavelength and column oven temperature was also studied. The proposed method was statistically validated in terms of precision, accuracy, linearity, specificity and robustness. The newly developed method proved to be specific, robust and accurate for the quantification of eight sartans in commercial pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:27258943

  4. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  5. Molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of angiotensin II-induced muscle wasting: potential therapeutic targets for cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Tabony, A Michael; Galvez, Sarah; Mitch, William E; Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2013-10-01

    Cachexia is a serious complication of many chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Many factors are involved in the development of cachexia, and there is increasing evidence that angiotensin II (Ang II), the main effector molecule of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), plays an important role in this process. Patients with advanced CHF or CKD often have increased Ang II levels and cachexia, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor treatment improves weight loss. In rodent models, an increase in systemic Ang II leads to weight loss through increased protein breakdown, reduced protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and decreased appetite. Ang II activates the ubiquitin-proteasome system via generation of reactive oxygen species and via inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and disrupts normal energy balance. Ang II also increases cytokines and circulating hormones such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, serum amyloid-A, glucocorticoids and myostatin, which regulate muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Ang II acts on hypothalamic neurons to regulate orexigenic/anorexigenic neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide-Y, orexin and corticotropin-releasing hormone, leading to reduced appetite. Also, Ang II may regulate skeletal muscle regenerative processes. Several clinical studies have indicated that blockade of Ang II signaling via ACE inhibitors or Ang II type 1 receptor blockers prevents weight loss and improves muscle strength. Thus the RAS is a promising target for the treatment of muscle atrophy in patients with CHF and CKD. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. PMID:23769949

  6. Effect of chronic intracerebroventricular angiotensin II infusion on vasopressin release in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, G. H.; Chee, O.; Riggs, R. V.; Keil, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the chronic infusion of angiotensin II into the lateral cerebral ventricle on the release of arginine vasopressin in rats are investigated. Rats were subjected to a continuous infusion of angiotensin at a rate of 1 microgram/h for five days, during which they were offered water, isotonic saline or hypertonic saline ad libitum or 40 ml water/day, and fluid intake, changes in body weight, plasma sodium ion concentrations and plasma and pituitary arginine vasopressin levels were measured. Angiotensin II is found to increase the fluid intake of rats given isotonic saline and decrease plasma sodium ion levels with no changes in plasma or pituitary arginine vasopressin in those given water or isotonic saline. However, in rats given hypertonic saline, plasma sodium concentrations remained at control levels while plasma vasopressin increased, and in water-restricted rats the effects of angiotensin II were intermediate. Results thus demonstrate that angiotensin II-stimulated arginine vasopressin release is reduced under conditions in which plasma sodium ion concentration becomes dilute, compatible with a central role of angiotensin in the regulation of salt and water balance.

  7. Nerve-mediated antidiuresis and antinatriuresis after air-jet stress is modulated by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Veelken, R; Hilgers, K F; Stetter, A; Siebert, H G; Schmieder, R E; Mann, J F

    1996-11-01

    A putative interaction between angiotensin II (Ang II) and the sympathetic nervous system within the kidney has been reported. We tested the hypothesis in conscious rats that endogenous Ang II modulates the renal effects of a stress-induced increase in sympathetic nerve activity. We recorded mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity, renal hemodynamics, urine volume, and urinary sodium content in conscious rats. We used the Ang II type 1 receptor blocker ZD 7155 to inhibit the effects of endogenous Ang II. Ten minutes of air-jet stress increased renal sympathetic nerve activity by 98 +/- 4% (n = 6) without changing systemic hemodynamics. Air-jet stress reduced urine volume (from 31 +/- 3 to 8 +/- 4 microL/min per gram kidney weight, P < .05, n = 12) and sodium excretion (from 4.3 +/- 0.9 to 1.2 +/- 0.3 mumol/min per gram kidney weight, P < .05, n = 12). After renal denervation, air-jet stress had no effect on either parameter. Six micrograms of the Ang II type 1 receptor inhibitor ZD 7155 blunted the decrease in urine volume and sodium excretion in response to air-jet stress, although the increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity during air-jet stress and the pressor response to exogenous Ang II were not affected. Glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow were also not affected. Higher doses of 30 and 60 micrograms ZD 7155 inhibited the pressor response to exogenous Ang II and abolished the changes in urine volume and sodium excretion in response to air-jet stress. None of the ZD 7155 doses affected urinary sodium excretion permanently. Hence, the Ang II type 1 receptor antagonist ZD 7155 impaired or abolished the renal nerve-mediated antinatriuresis and anitidiuresis in response to air-jet stress. We conclude that endogenous Ang II modulates the renal effects of centrally mediated changes of sympathetic nerve activity in conscious rats. PMID:8901830

  8. Long-term angiotensin II AT1 receptor inhibition produces adipose tissue hypotrophy accompanied by increased expression of adiponectin and PPARgamma.

    PubMed

    Zorad, Stefan; Dou, Jing-tao; Benicky, Julius; Hutanu, Daniel; Tybitanclova, Katarina; Zhou, Jin; Saavedra, Juan M

    2006-12-15

    To clarify the mechanism of the effects of angiotensin II AT(1) receptor antagonists on adipose tissue, we treated 8 week-old male Wistar Kyoto rats with the angiotensin II AT(1) receptor antagonist Candesartan cilexetil (10 mg/kg/day) for 18 weeks. Candesartan cilexetil reduced body weight gain, decreased fat tissue mass due to hypotrophy of epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue and decreased adipocyte size without changing the number of adipocytes. Candesartan cilexetil decreased serum leptin levels and epididymal leptin mRNA, increased serum adiponectin levels and epididymal adiponectin mRNA, decreased epididymal tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) mRNA, and increased fatty acid synthase mRNA. Considered free of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonist activity, Candesartan cilexetil increased epididymal expression of PPARgamma mRNA. The effects of Candesartan cilexetil on adipokine production and release may be attributable to PPARgamma activation and/or decrease in adipocyte cell size. In addition, Candesartan cilexetil treatment increased the expression of epididymal angiotensin II AT(2) receptor mRNA and protein and decreased the expression of renin receptor mRNA. These results suggest that Candesartan cilexetil influences lipid metabolism in adipose tissue by promoting adipose tissue rearrangement and modulating adipokine expression and release. These effects are probably consequences of local angiotensin II AT(1) receptor inhibition, angiotensin II AT(2) receptor stimulation, and perhaps additional angiotensin II-independent mechanisms. Our results indicate that the activity of local renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in adipose tissue metabolism. The decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFalpha and the increase in the anti-inflammatory adipokine adiponectin indicate that Candesartan cilexetil may exert significant anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:17064684

  9. Differentiation in the angiotensin II receptor 1 blocker class on autonomic function.

    PubMed

    Krum, H

    2001-09-01

    Autonomic function is disordered in cardiovascular disease states such as chronic heart failure (CHF) and hypertension. Interactions between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) may potentially occur at a number of sites. These include central sites (eg, rostral ventrolateral medulla), at the level of baroreflex control, and at the sympathetic prejunctional angiotensin II receptor 1 (AT(1)) receptor, which is facilitatory for norepinephrine release from the sympathetic nerve terminal. Therefore, drugs that block the RAAS may be expected to improve autonomic dysfunction in cardiovascular disease states. In order to test the hypothesis that RAAS inhibition directly reduces SNS activity, a pithed rat model of sympathetic stimulation has been established. In this model, an increase in frequency of stimulation results in a pressor response that is sympathetically mediated and highly reproducible. This pressor response is enhanced in the presence of angiotensin II and is reduced in the presence of nonselective AIIRAs that block both AT(1) and AT(2) receptor subtypes (eg, saralasin). AT(1)-selective antagonists have also been studied in this model, at pharmacologically relevant doses. In one such study, only the AT(1) blocker eprosartan reduced sympathetically stimulated increases in blood pressure, whereas comparable doses of losartan, valsartan, and irbesartan did not. The reason(s) for the differences between eprosartan and other agents of this class on sympathetic modulation are not clear, but may relate to the chemical structure of the drug (a non- biphenyl tetrazole structure that is chemically distinct from the structure of other AIIRAs), receptor binding characteristics (competitive), or unique effects on presynaptic AT(1) receptors. PMID:11580884

  10. Perioperative management of patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers: a quality improvement audit.

    PubMed

    Vijay, A; Grover, A; Coulson, T G; Myles, P S

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients continuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers on the day of surgery are more likely to have significant intraoperative hypotension, higher rates of postoperative acute kidney injury, and lower incidences of postoperative atrial fibrillation. However, many of these studies were prone to bias and confounding, and questions remain over the validity of these outcomes. This observational, before-and-after quality improvement audit aimed to assess the effect of withholding these medications on the morning of surgery. We recruited 323 participants, with 83 (26%) having their preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) withheld on the day of surgery. There were only very small Spearman rank-order correlations between time since last dose of these medications (rho -0.12, P=0.057) and intraoperative and recovery room intravenous fluid administration (rho -0.11, P=0.042). There was no statistically significant difference between the continued or withheld groups in vasopressor (metaraminol use 3.5 [1.5-8.3] mg versus 3.5 [1.5-8.5] mg, P=0.67) or intravenous fluid administration (1000 ml [800-1500] ml versus 1000 [800-1500] ml, P=0.096), nor rates of postoperative acute kidney injury (13% vs 18%, P=0.25) or atrial fibrillation (15% versus 18%, P=0.71). This audit found no significant differences in measured outcomes between the continued or withheld ACEi/ARB groups. This finding should be interpreted with caution due to the possibility of confounding and an insufficient sample size. However, as the finding is in contrast to many previous studies, future prospective randomised clinical trials are required to answer this important question. PMID:27246933

  11. Novel Roles for Peroxynitrite in Angiotensin II and CaMKII Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chaoming; Ramaswamy, Swarna S.; Johnson, Derrick E.; Vitturi, Dario A.; Schopfer, Franciso J.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Hudmon, Andy; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) oxidation controls excitability and viability. While hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) affects Ca2+-activated CaMKII in vitro, Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced CaMKIIδ signaling in cardiomyocytes is Ca2+ independent and requires NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide, but not its dismutation product H2O2. To better define the biological regulation of CaMKII activation and signaling by Ang II, we evaluated the potential for peroxynitrite (ONOO−) to mediate CaMKII activation and downstream Kv4.3 channel mRNA destabilization by Ang II. In vitro experiments show that ONOO− oxidizes and modestly activates pure CaMKII in the absence of Ca2+/CaM. Remarkably, this apokinase stimulation persists after mutating known oxidation targets (M281, M282, C290), suggesting a novel mechanism for increasing baseline Ca2+-independent CaMKII activity. The role of ONOO− in cardiac and neuronal responses to Ang II was then tested by scavenging ONOO− and preventing its formation by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase. Both treatments blocked Ang II effects on Kv4.3, tyrosine nitration and CaMKIIδ oxidation and activation. Together, these data show that ONOO− participates in Ang II-CaMKII signaling. The requirement for ONOO− in transducing Ang II signaling identifies ONOO−, which has been viewed as a reactive damaging byproduct of superoxide and nitric oxide, as a mediator of GPCR-CaMKII signaling. PMID:27079272

  12. Novel Roles for Peroxynitrite in Angiotensin II and CaMKII Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chaoming; Ramaswamy, Swarna S; Johnson, Derrick E; Vitturi, Dario A; Schopfer, Franciso J; Freeman, Bruce A; Hudmon, Andy; Levitan, Edwin S

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) oxidation controls excitability and viability. While hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) affects Ca(2+)-activated CaMKII in vitro, Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced CaMKIIδ signaling in cardiomyocytes is Ca(2+) independent and requires NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide, but not its dismutation product H2O2. To better define the biological regulation of CaMKII activation and signaling by Ang II, we evaluated the potential for peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) to mediate CaMKII activation and downstream Kv4.3 channel mRNA destabilization by Ang II. In vitro experiments show that ONOO(-) oxidizes and modestly activates pure CaMKII in the absence of Ca(2+)/CaM. Remarkably, this apokinase stimulation persists after mutating known oxidation targets (M281, M282, C290), suggesting a novel mechanism for increasing baseline Ca(2+)-independent CaMKII activity. The role of ONOO(-) in cardiac and neuronal responses to Ang II was then tested by scavenging ONOO(-) and preventing its formation by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase. Both treatments blocked Ang II effects on Kv4.3, tyrosine nitration and CaMKIIδ oxidation and activation. Together, these data show that ONOO(-) participates in Ang II-CaMKII signaling. The requirement for ONOO(-) in transducing Ang II signaling identifies ONOO(-), which has been viewed as a reactive damaging byproduct of superoxide and nitric oxide, as a mediator of GPCR-CaMKII signaling. PMID:27079272

  13. Angiotensin peptides attenuate platelet-activating factor-induced inflammatory activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Yokoyama, Izumi; Ebina, Keiichi

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)--a peptide that is part of the renin-angiotensin system-induces vasoconstriction and a subsequent increase in blood pressure; Ang peptides, especially AngII, can also act as potent pro-inflammatory mediators. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid mediator that is implicated in many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of Ang peptides (AngII, AngIII, and AngIV) on PAF-induced inflammatory activity. In experiments using a rat hind-paw oedema model, AngII markedly and dose-dependently attenuated the paw oedema induced by PAF. The inhibitory effects of AngIII and AngIV on PAF-induced paw oedema were lower than that of AngII. Two Ang receptors, the AT1 and AT2 receptors, did not affect the AngII-mediated attenuation of PAF-induced paw oedema. Moreover, intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence studies demonstrated that AngII, AngIII, and AngIV interact with PAF, and that their affinities were closely correlated with their inhibitory effects on PAF-induced rat paw oedema. Also, AngII interacted with metabolite/precursor of PAF (lyso-PAF), and an oxidized phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-(5'-oxo-valeroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC), which bears a marked structural resemblance to PAF. Furthermore, POVPC dose-dependently inhibited AngII-mediated attenuation of PAF-induced paw oedema. These results suggest that Ang peptides can attenuate PAF-induced inflammatory activity through binding to PAF and lyso-PAF in rats. Therefore, Ang peptides may be closely involved in the regulation of many inflammatory diseases caused by PAF. PMID:26348270

  14. Differences in cell-type-specific responses to angiotensin II explain cardiac remodeling differences in C57BL/6 mouse substrains.

    PubMed

    Cardin, Sophie; Scott-Boyer, Marie-Pier; Praktiknjo, Samantha; Jeidane, Saloua; Picard, Sylvie; Reudelhuber, Timothy L; Deschepper, Christian F

    2014-11-01

    Despite indications that hearts from the C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J mouse substrains differ in terms of their contractility and their responses to stress-induced overload, no information is available about the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms. We tested whether subacute (48 hours) and chronic (14 days) administration of angiotensin II (500 ng/kg per day) had different effects on the left ventricles of male C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mice. Despite higher blood pressure in C57BL/6J mice, chronic angiotensin II induced fibrosis and increased the left ventricular weight/body weight ratio and cardiac expression of markers of left ventricular hypertrophy to a greater extent in C57BL/6N mice. Subacute angiotensin II affected a greater number of cardiac genes in C57BL/6N than in C57BL/6J mice. Some of the most prominent differences were observed for markers of (1) macrophage activation and M2 polarization, including 2 genes (osteopontin and galectin-3) whose inactivation was reported as sufficient to prevent angiotensin II-induced myocardial fibrosis; and (2) fibroblast activation. These differences were confirmed in macrophage- and fibroblast-enriched populations of cells isolated from the hearts of experimental mice. When testing F2 animals, the amount of connective tissue present after chronic angiotensin II administration did not cosegregate with the inactivation mutation of the nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase gene from C57BL/6J mice, thus discounting its possible contribution to differences in cardiac remodeling. However, expression levels of osteopontin and galectin-3 were cosegregated in hearts from angiotensin II-treated F2 animals and may represent endophenotypes that could facilitate the identification of genetic regulators of the cardiac fibrogenic response to angiotensin II. PMID:25069667

  15. Serum levels of renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II in patients treated by surgical excision, propranolol and captopril for problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Sulzberger, L; Baillie, R; Itinteang, T; de Jong, S; Marsh, R; Leadbitter, P; Tan, S T

    2016-03-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the biology of infantile haemangioma (IH) and its accelerated involution induced by β-blockers was first proposed in 2010. This led to the first clinical trial in 2012 using low-dose captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, demonstrating a similar response in these tumours. This study aimed to compare serial serum levels of the components of the RAS in patients before and after surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment for problematic proliferating IH. Patients with problematic proliferating IH underwent measurements of serum levels of plasma renin activity (PRA), ACE and angiotensin II (ATII) before, and 1-2 and 6 months following surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment. This study included 27 patients undergoing surgical excision (n = 8), propranolol (n = 11) and captopril (n = 8) treatment. Treatment with either surgical excision or propranolol resulted in significant decrease in the mean levels of PRA. Surgical excision or captopril treatment led to significant decline in the mean levels of ATII. All three treatment modalities had no significant effect on the mean levels of ACE. This study demonstrates the effect of surgical excision, propranolol and captopril treatment in lowering the levels of PRA and ATII, but not ACE, supporting a mechanistic role for the RAS in the biology of IH. PMID:26612192

  16. p38 MAPK Inhibition Improves Synaptic Plasticity and Memory in Angiotensin II-dependent Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hai-long; Hu, Wei-yuan; Jiang, Li-hong; Li, Le; Gaung, Xue-feng; Xiao, Zhi-cheng

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hypertension-related cognitive impairment has not been sufficiently clarified, new molecular targets are needed. p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in hypertensive target organ damage. Activated p38 MAPK was seen in AD brain tissue. In this study, we found that long-term potentiation (LTP) of hippocampal CA1 was decreased, the density of the dendritic spines on the CA1 pyramidal cells was reduced, the p-p38 protein expression in hippocampus was elevated, and cognitive function was impaired in angiotensin II-dependent hypertensive C57BL/6 mice. In vivo, using a p38 heterozygous knockdown mice (p38KI/+) model, we showed that knockdown of p38 MAPK in hippocampus leads to the improvement of cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in angiotensin II-dependent p38KI/+ hypertensive mice. In vitro, LTP was improved in hippocampal slices from C57BL/6 hypertensive mice by treatment with p38MAPK inhibitor SKF86002. Our data demonstrated that p38 MAPK may be a potential therapeutic target for hypertension-related cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27283322

  17. Aldosterone and angiotensin II induce protein aggregation in renal proximal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Muhammad U; Poulsen, Ebbe T; Enghild, Jan J; Hoorn, Ewout; Fenton, Robert A; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Renal tubules are highly active transporting epithelia and are at risk of protein aggregation due to high protein turnover and/or oxidative stress. We hypothesized that the risk of aggregation was increased upon hormone stimulation and assessed the state of the intracellular protein degradation systems in the kidney from control rats and rats receiving aldosterone or angiotensin II treatment for 7 days. Control rats formed both aggresomes and autophagosomes specifically in the proximal tubules, indicating a need for these structures even under baseline conditions. Fluorescence sorted aggresomes contained various rat keratins known to be expressed in renal tubules as assessed by protein mass spectrometry. Aldosterone administration increased the abundance of the proximal tubular aggresomal protein keratin 5, the ribosomal protein RPL27, ataxin-3, and the chaperone heat shock protein 70-4 with no apparent change in the aggresome–autophagosome markers. Angiotensin II induced aggregation of RPL27 specifically in proximal tubules, again without apparent change in antiaggregating proteins or the aggresome–autophagosome markers. Albumin endocytosis was unaffected by the hormone administration. Taken together, we find that the renal proximal tubules display aggresome formation and autophagy. Despite an increase in aggregation-prone protein load in these tubules during hormone treatment, renal proximal tubules seem to have sufficient capacity for removing protein aggregates from the cells. PMID:24303148

  18. p38 MAPK Inhibition Improves Synaptic Plasticity and Memory in Angiotensin II-dependent Hypertensive Mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hai-Long; Hu, Wei-Yuan; Jiang, Li-Hong; Li, Le; Gaung, Xue-Feng; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hypertension-related cognitive impairment has not been sufficiently clarified, new molecular targets are needed. p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in hypertensive target organ damage. Activated p38 MAPK was seen in AD brain tissue. In this study, we found that long-term potentiation (LTP) of hippocampal CA1 was decreased, the density of the dendritic spines on the CA1 pyramidal cells was reduced, the p-p38 protein expression in hippocampus was elevated, and cognitive function was impaired in angiotensin II-dependent hypertensive C57BL/6 mice. In vivo, using a p38 heterozygous knockdown mice (p38(KI/+)) model, we showed that knockdown of p38 MAPK in hippocampus leads to the improvement of cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in angiotensin II-dependent p38(KI/+) hypertensive mice. In vitro, LTP was improved in hippocampal slices from C57BL/6 hypertensive mice by treatment with p38MAPK inhibitor SKF86002. Our data demonstrated that p38 MAPK may be a potential therapeutic target for hypertension-related cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27283322

  19. Angiopoietin-like protein 2 expression is suppressed by angiotensin II via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor in rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuya; Li, Ying; Miao, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Nan; Su, Guohai; Cai, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on angiopoietin-like protein 2 (Angptl2) in rat primary cardiomyocytes, and to investigate the potential association between angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and these effects. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from 3-day-old Wistar rats, and were cultured and identified. Subsequently, the expression levels of Angptl2 were detected following incubation with various concentrations of AngII for various durations using western blotting, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence. Finally, under the most appropriate conditions (100 nmol/l AngII, 24 h), the cardiomyocytes were divided into six groups: Normal, AngII, AngII + losartan, normal + losartan, AngII + PD123319 and normal + PD123319 groups, in order to investigate the possible function of AT1R in Angptl2 suppression. Losartan and PD123319 are antagonists of AT1R and angiotensin II type 2 receptor, respectively. The statistical significance of the results was analyzed using Student's t-test or one-way analysis of variance. The results demonstrated that Angptl2 expression was evidently suppressed (P<0.05) following incubation with 100 nmol/l AngII for 24 h. Conversely, the expression levels of Angptl2 were significantly increased in the AngII + losartan group compared with the AngII group (P<0.01). However, no significant difference was detected between the AngII + PD123319, normal + losartan or normal + PD123319 groups and the normal group. The present in vitro study indicated that AngII was able to suppress Angptl2 expression, whereas losartan was able to significantly reverse this decrease by inhibiting AT1R. PMID:27483989

  20. Characterization of angiotensin II binding sites in African Green monkey uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, E.P.; Wright, J.W.; Harding, J.W.

    1985-01-14

    The observation that there are significant differences in the concentration, affinity, and specificity of both central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral angiotensin receptors among several different mammalian species, including the African Green monkey, led to the detailed analysis of /sup 125/I-angiotensin II binding in the uterus of the African Green monkey. The B/sub max/ for angiotensin receptors in uterine tissue from this species is 56.6 +/- 8.7 fmole per mg protein. The K/sub d/ for angiotensin II is .601 +/- .108 mM. The specificity of the receptor is similar to that reported for the uterus of the rat and dog. These results indicate that the angiotensin II receptors, although nearly absent from the CNS of the African Green monkey, are found in the uterus and are very similar to uterine receptors previously characterized in the rat and dog and support the use of these species as appropriate models for studying the biochemistry of angiotensin binding in the uterus. 25 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  1. Direct positive chronotropic action by angiotensin II in the isolated mouse atrium.

    PubMed

    Mori, Toyoki; Hashimoto, Ayako

    2006-07-10

    We observed the direct positive chronotropic effect of angiotensin II in mouse atria and characterized its pharmacological property. C57BL/6J mice were anesthetized with pentobarbital and hearts were quickly excised. Atrial preparations including right and left atrium were isolated and suspended in the organ bath filled with Krebs-Henseleit solution gassed with 95% O2 and 5% CO2. Angiotensin II at concentrations of 10(-10) to 10(-6) M caused concentration-dependent increase in heart rate, and the maximal response was about 13% of that by isoproterenol. The effect was blocked by the selective AT1-receptor antagonist, losartan at concentrations of 10(-6) M, but not by the selective beta-blocker, nadolol at concentration of 10(-5) M. Furthermore, angiotensin I also caused concentration-dependent increase in heart rate, and the effect was blocked by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, captopril at concentrations of 10(-6) M. These results suggested that angiotensin I is converted to angiotensin II via ACE system in mice atria, and regulate heart rate through AT1-receptor stimulation, not by beta-adrenergic receptor. PMID:16564555

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1–7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1–7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2−/y) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2−/y mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1–7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what’s more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1–7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1-7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2(-/y)) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2(-/y) mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1-7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what's more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1-7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  4. Effect of boldine, secoboldine, and boldine methine on angiotensin II-induced neutrophil recruitment in vivo.

    PubMed

    Estellés, Rossana; Milian, Lara; Nabah, Yafa Naim Abu; Mateo, Teresa; Cerdá-Nicolás, Miguel; Losada, Mercedes; Ivorra, María Dolores; Issekutz, Andrew C; Cortijo, Julio; Morcillo, Esteban J; Blázquez, María Amparo; Sanz, María-Jesús

    2005-09-01

    Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) has inflammatory activity and is involved in different diseases associated with the cardiovascular system. This study has evaluated the effect of boldine (B), and two phenanthrene alkaloids semisynthesized by us, secoboldine (SB) and boldine methine (BM), on Ang-II-induced neutrophil recruitment. Intraperitoneal administration of 1 nM Ang-II induced significant neutrophil accumulation, which was maximal at 4-8 h. BM inhibited neutrophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity at 4 h and 8 h by 73% and 77%, respectively, SB at 8 h by 55%, and B had no effect on this response. Although BM inhibited the release of cytokine-inducible neutrophil chemoattractant/keratinocyte-derived chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), and platelet-activating factor (PAF) elicited by Ang-II, SB only reduced the release of MIP-2 after 4 h of its administration. Sixty-minute superfusion of the rat mesentery with 1 nM Ang-II induced a significant increase in the leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and P-selectin up-regulation, which were inhibited by 1 microM BM and SB. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in endothelial cells stimulated with Ang-II was inhibited significantly by the three alkaloids tested. BM also diminished Ang-II-induced interleukin-8 release from endothelial cells and blocked the PAF receptor on human neutrophils (concentration of the compound needed to produce 50% inhibition value: 28.2 microM). Therefore, BM is a potent inhibitor of Ang-II-induced neutrophil accumulation in vivo. This effect appears to be mediated through inhibition of CXC chemokine and PAF release, ROS scavenging activity, and blockade of the PAF receptor. Thus, it may have potential therapeutic interest for the control of neutrophil recruitment that occurs in inflammation associated with elevated levels of Ang-II. PMID:15944212

  5. The role of hydrogen peroxide in the contractile response to angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Torrecillas, G; Boyano-Adánez, M C; Medina, J; Parra, T; Griera, M; López-Ongil, S; Arilla, E; Rodríguez-Puyol, M; Rodríguez-Puyol, D

    2001-01-01

    In the last years, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed as mediators of proliferative/hypertrophic responses to angiotensin II (Ang II), both in vivo and in vitro. However, the hypothesis that the Ang II-dependent cell contraction could be mediated by ROS, particularly H2O2, has not been tested. Present experiments were devoted to test this hypothesis and to analyze the possible mechanisms involved. Catalase (CAT) prevented the increased myosin light chain phosphorylation and the decreased planar cell surface area (PCSA) induced by 1 microM Ang II in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This preventive effect of CAT was also detected when 1 microM platelet-activating factor (PAF) was used as a contractile agonist instead of Ang II. Similar results were found when using horseradish peroxidase as an H2O2 scavenger or cultured rat mesangial cells. In vascular smooth muscle cells, CAT modified neither the binding of labeled Ang II nor the Ang II-induced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) synthesis. However, it completely abolished the Ang II-dependent calcium peak, in a dose-dependent fashion. CAT-loaded cells (increased intracellular CAT concentration over 3-fold) did not show either a decreased PCSA or an increased intracellular calcium concentration after Ang II treatment. Ang II stimulated the H2O2 synthesis by cultured cells, and the presence of CAT in the extracellular compartment significantly diminished the Ang II-dependent increased intracellular H2O2 concentration. The physiological importance of these findings was tested in rat thoracic aortic rings: CAT prevented the contraction elicited by Ang II. In summary, present experiments point to H2O2 as a critical intracellular metabolite in the regulation of cell contraction. PMID:11125030

  6. The effect of HN-65021 on responses to angiotensin II in human forearm vasculature.

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, J R; Chowienczyk, P J; Brett, S E; Mant, T G; Durnin, C; Lynn, F; Stevenson, P; Ritter, J M

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effect of (2-butyl-4-chloro-1[[2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl) [1,1'-biphenyl]methyl]-1H-imadazole-5-carboxylic acid,-1-(ethoxycarbonyloxy) ethyl-ester (HN-65021), on angiotensin II induced vasoconstriction in forearm vasculature of eight healthy men. Placebo and HN-65021 (5, 10 and 100 mg) were administered orally. Forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography during rising dose brachial artery infusions of angiotensin II (0.3-1000 pmol min-1) 2 h after dosing. HN-65021 inhibited angiotensin II, causing a shift to the right of the dose-response curve. Angiotensin II (100 pmol min-1) decreased mean blood flow in the infused arm by 63.1 +/- 3.2% when infused following placebo and by 49.9 +/- 4.3%, 50.7 +/- 3.5% and 36.4 +/- 2.8% following HN-65021 doses of 5.10 and 100 mg respectively. These results demonstrate that HN-65021 antagonises angiotensin II receptor mediated vasoconstriction in human forearm resistance vessels. PMID:8703667

  7. Hydrosmotic effect of angiotensin II in the toad skin: role of cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Coviello, A; Brauckmann, E S; de Atenor, M S; Apud, J A; Causarano, J

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the hydrosmotic response of the isolated skin of the toad Bufo arenarum Hensel to angiotensin II was studied by means of an indirect pharmacological approach. Angiotensin II (2.10(-10) M), vasopressin (2.10(-13) M) and theophylline (10(-4) and 10(-3) M) in subliminal doses produced a significant increase on water permeability when added in different paired combinations. Angiotensin II (2.10(-7) M) and vasopressin (2.10(-8) M) in doses producing significant effects on water permeability increased the response to submaximal doses of epinephrine (10(-6) M) but not to higher doses (10(-5) M). Acid pH (6.4) and prostaglandin E1 (2.10(-7) M) reduced significantly the hydrosmotic response to angiotensin II, but in contrast with the toad bladder, the effect was not completely abolished. Present results support the view that the hydrosmotic effect of angiotensin II in toad skin is mediated by the adenylate cyclase - cyclic AMP system. PMID:189568

  8. Cholinergic signal activated renin angiotensin system associated with cardiovascular changes in the ovine fetus

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Chunsong; Mao, Caiping; Wu, Lei; Cheng, Yu; Liu, Rulu; Chen, Bingxin; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Lubo; Xu, Zhice

    2010-01-01

    Aim Cholinergic regulation is important in the control of cardiovascular and endocrine responses. The mechanisms behind cardiovascular responses induced by cholinergic activation are explored by studying hormonal systems, including renin-angiotensin and vasopressin (VP). Results In chronically prepared fetal sheep, intravenous infusion of the cholinergic agonist carbachol increased fetal systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure accompanied with bradycardia at near-term. Although intravenous administration of carbachol had no effect on plasma VP concentrations, this agonist increased angiotensin I and angiotensin II levels in fetal plasma. Fetal blood values, including sodium, osmolality, nitric oxide, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were unchanged by intravenous carbachol. Conclusion Cholinergic activation by carbachol controls fetal blood pressure and heart rate in utero. An over-activated fetal renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) is associated with changes in vascular pressure following intravenous administration of carbachol, indicating that the cholinergic stimulation-mediated hormonal mechanism in the fetus might play a critical role in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis. PMID:19921993

  9. Exploring new scaffolds for angiotensin II receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Kritsi, Eftichia; Matsoukas, Minos-Timotheos; Potamitis, Constantinos; Karageorgos, Vlasios; Detsi, Anastasia; Magafa, Vasilliki; Liapakis, George; Mavromoustakos, Thomas; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis

    2016-09-15

    Nowadays, AT1 receptor (AT1R) antagonists (ARBs) constitute the one of the most prevalent classes of antihypertensive drugs that modulate the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Their main uses include also treatment of diabetic nephropathy (kidney damage due to diabetes) and congestive heart failure. Towards this direction, our study has been focused on the discovery of novel agents bearing different scaffolds which may evolve as a new class of AT1 receptor antagonists. To fulfill this aim, a combination of computational approaches and biological assays were implemented. Particularly, a pharmacophore model was established and served as a 3D search query to screen the ChEMBL15 database. The reliability and accuracy of virtual screening results were improved by using molecular docking studies. In total, 4 compounds with completely diverse chemical scaffolds from potential ARBs, were picked and tested for their binding affinity to AT1 receptor. Results revealed high nanomolar to micromolar affinity (IC50) for all the compounds. Especially, compound 4 exhibited a binding affinity of 199nM. Molecular dynamics simulations were utilized in an effort to provide a molecular basis of their binding to AT1R in accordance to their biological activities. PMID:27480029

  10. In vitro inhibition of [3H]-angiotensin II binding on the human AT1 receptor by proanthocyanidins from Guazuma ulmifolia bark.

    PubMed

    Caballero-George, Catherina; Vanderheyden, Patrick M L; De Bruyne, Tess; Shahat, Abdel-Atty; Van den Heuvel, Hilde; Solis, Pablo N; Gupta, Mahabir P; Claeys, Magda; Pieters, Luc; Vauquelin, Georges; Vlietinck, Arnold J

    2002-12-01

    A bioassay-guided fractionation of the 70% acetone extract of the bark of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. on the inhibition of angiotensin II binding to the AT 1 receptor led to the isolation and identification of bioactive oligomeric and polymeric proanthocyanidins consisting mainly of (-)-epicatechin units. The displacement of [3H]-angiotensin II binding was dose-dependent and correlated with the degree of polymerization of the different fractions containing proanthocyanidins. A strong displacement was seen for the residual fraction suggesting that the most active substances corresponding to the highly polymerized proanthocyanidins. Angiotensin II AT 1 receptor binding might be considered as a potentially interesting biological activity of proanthocyanidins contributing to the very broad spectrum of biological activities of the condensed tannins. PMID:12494331